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Sample records for early dose response

  1. [Dose-response relationship of ropivacaine for epidural block in early herpes zoster guided by CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, K Y; Ma, J B; Xu, Q; Huang, B; Yao, M; Ni, H D; Deng, J J; Chen, G D

    2017-12-26

    Objective: To determine the dose-response relationship of ropivacaine for epidural block in early herpes zoster by CT guided. Methods: From January 2015 to February 2017, according to the principle of completely random digital table, 80 patients with early herpes zoster who were prepared for epidural block were divided into 4 groups(each group 20 patients): in group A the concentration of ropivacaine was 0.08%, in group B was 0.10%, in group C was 0.12% and in group D was 0.14%.Under CT guidance, epidural puncture was performed in the relevant section, mixing liquid 5.0 ml (with 10% iodohydrin)were injected into epidural gap.CT scan showed that the mixing liquid covered the relevant spinal nerve segmental.The numeric rating scale(NRS) values before treatment and at 30 minutes, the incidence of adverse reactions were recorded, and the treatment were evaluated. The response to ropivacaine for epidural block in early herpes zoster was defined as positive when the NRS values was less than or equal to one.The ED(50), ED(95) and 95% confidence interval ( CI ) of ropivacaine for epidural block in early herpes zoster guided by CT were calculated by probit analysis. Results: The NRS values before treatment were 5.00(4.00, 6.00), 5.00(4.25, 6.00), 5.50(5.00, 6.00) and 5.00(4.00, 6.00), the difference was no significant( Z =2.576, P =0.462). The NRS values at 30 minutes decreased and the effective rate of the treatment increased(χ(2)=8.371, P =0.004), following ropivacaine dose gradient increasing, they were 1.50(1.00, 2.00), 1.00(1.00, 2.00), 0.50(0.00, 1.00) and 0.00(0.00, 1.00), the difference was statistically significant ( Z =17.421, P =0.001). There was one case in group C and four cases in group D were hypoesthesia, others were no significant adverse reactions occurred. The ED(50) and ED(95) (95% CI ) of ropivacaine for epidural block in early herpes zoster guided by CT were 0.078%(0.015%-0.095%)and 0.157%(0.133%-0.271%), respectively. Conclusion: Ropivacaine for

  2. Early changes, attrition, and dose-response in low intensity psychological interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadillo, Jaime; McMillan, Dean; Lucock, Mike; Leach, Chris; Ali, Shehzad; Gilbody, Simon

    2014-03-01

    To investigate if early symptom changes in brief low intensity psychological interventions (guided self-help and psycho-education using cognitive behavioural therapy principles) are predictive of final treatment outcome. Retrospective cohort data analysis. Clinical records for 1,850 patients who screened positive for depression and/or an anxiety disorder were analysed. Reliable and clinically significant improvement (RCSI) on depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9: PHQ-9) or anxiety (generalized anxiety disorder-7: GAD-7) outcome measures after treatment was the primary outcome. Change scores ≥6 on PHQ-9 and ≥5 on GAD-7 were taken as indicative of reliable improvement (RI). The model assumed that RI in the earliest treatment sessions would be predictive of RCSI post-treatment. Predictive accuracy was assessed by calculating the area under the curve (AUC), as well as positive and negative predictive values. Diagnostic odds ratios were also estimated, adjusting for confounders such as baseline severity, use of medication, and pre-treatment symptom change. The AUC estimates for session-to-session change scores ranged between .62 and .88, indicative of modest to high predictive reliability. Predictive accuracy was higher for patients who had four or more treatment sessions, with more than 70% of patients with RCSI being accurately identified as early as sessions 1-3. Attrition rates were significantly associated with poor outcomes. Results suggest that at least four therapy sessions are necessary to achieve more than 50% RCSI rates, and the dose-response effect appears to decline in treatments longer than six sessions. Patients showing RI early in treatment were at least twice as likely to fully recover compared to those without early RI. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  3. Dose-response modeling of early molecular and cellular key events in the CAR-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geter, David R; Bhat, Virunya S; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Sura, Radhakrishna; Hester, Susan D

    2014-04-01

    Low-dose extrapolation and dose-related transitions are paramount in the ongoing debate regarding the quantification of cancer risks for nongenotoxic carcinogens. Phenobarbital (PB) is a prototypical nongenotoxic carcinogen that activates the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) resulting in rodent liver tumors. In this study, male and female CD-1 mice administered dietary PB at 0, 0.15, 1.5, 15, 75, or 150 mg/kg-day for 2 or 7 days to characterize multiple apical and molecular endpoints below, at (∼75 mg/kg-day), and above the carcinogenic dose level of PB and examine these responses using benchmark dose modeling. Linear toxicokinetics were observed for all doses. Increased liver weight, hepatocellular hypertrophy, and mitotic figures were seen at 75 and 150 mg/kg-day. CAR activation, based on Cyp2b qPCR and pentoxyresorufin dealkylase activity, occurred at doses ≥ 1.5 mg/kg-day. The no-observable transcriptional effect level for global gene expression was 15 mg/kg-day. At 2 days, several xenobiotic metabolism and cell protective pathways were activated at lower doses and to a greater degree in females. However, hepatocellular proliferation, quantified by bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry, was the most sensitive indicator of PB exposure with female mice more sensitive than males, contrary to sex-specific differences in sensitivity to hepatocarcinogenesis. Taken together, the identification of low-dose cellular and molecular transitions in the subtumorigenic dose range aids the understanding of early key events in CAR-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis.

  4. Dose-volume-response analysis in stereotactic radiotherapy for early lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suzuki, Osamu; Mitsuyoshi, Takamasa; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Teshima, Teruki; Nishiyama, Kinji; Ubbels, Jan F.; Bolt, Rene A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Widder, Joachim

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Japanese and Western approaches to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) are considerably different, particularly with respect to dose prescription and reporting, which makes comparisons of Japanese versus European or American results challenging. Using individual patient

  5. Microalbuminuria and early renal response to lethal dose Shiga toxin type 2 in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochoa F

    2012-01-01

    to the development of microalbuminuria in response to lethal doses of Stx2.Keywords: microalbuminuria, nephrin, podocytes, podocalyxin, megalin, acute renal injury

  6. Daytime Sleepiness Increases With Age in Early Adolescence: A Sleep Restriction Dose-Response Study.

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    Campbell, Ian G; Burright, Christopher S; Kraus, Amanda M; Grimm, Kevin J; Feinberg, Irwin

    2017-05-01

    Daytime sleepiness increases across adolescence. This increase is commonly attributed to insufficient sleep durations resulting from increasingly limited time in bed. We tested the effects of 3 sleep schedules on daytime sleepiness and whether these effects changed with age in early adolescence. In 77 children ranging in age from 9.9 to 14 years, objective (multiple sleep latency test [MSLT]) and subjective (Karolinska sleepiness scale [KSS]) sleepiness was measured following 4 consecutive nights of either 7, 8.5, or 10 hours in bed. All participants completed all 3 sleep schedules. The order in which they completed the schedules was not randomized but was accounted for in all statistical analyses. Time in bed restriction decreased sleep duration and increased objective and subjective daytime sleepiness. Although the sleep durations did not change with age, the likelihood of falling asleep during the MSLT increased with age. Nevertheless, sleep restriction produced a greater increase in MSLT-measured sleepiness in younger participants. Subjective sleepiness measured with the KSS increased with shorter sleep duration, but this effect did not change with age. Increasing objective daytime sleepiness in early adolescence cannot simply be attributed to reduced sleep due to restricted sleep schedules. We propose that some of the increased daytime sleepiness of adolescents is a consequence of adolescent brain reorganization driven by synaptic pruning which decreases the intensity of waking brain activity.

  7. A priming dose of protons alters the early cardiac cellular and molecular response to (56)Fe irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Samy S; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A; Boerma, Marjan

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the heart may be injured by ionizing radiation at lower doses than was previously thought. This raises concerns about the cardiovascular risks from exposure to radiation during space travel. Since space travel is associated with exposure to both protons from solar particle events and heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays, we here examined the effects of a "priming" dose of protons on the cardiac cellular and molecular response to a "challenge" dose of (56)Fe in a mouse model. Male C57BL/6 mice at 10 weeks of age were exposed to sham-irradiation, 0.1 Gy of protons (150 MeV), 0.5 Gy of (56)Fe (600 MeV/n), or 0.1 Gy of protons 24 hours prior to 0.5 Gy of (56)Fe. Hearts were obtained at 7 days post-irradiation and western-blots were used to determine protein markers of cardiac remodeling, inflammatory infiltration, and cell death. Exposure to (56)Fe caused an increase in expression of α-smooth muscle cell actin, collagen type III, the inflammatory cell markers mast cell tryptase, CD2 and CD68, the endothelial glycoprotein thrombomodulin, and cleaved caspase 3. Of all proteins investigated, protons at a dose of 0.1 Gy induced a small increase only in cleaved caspase 3 levels. On the other hand, exposure to protons 24 hours before (56)Fe prevented all of the responses to (56)Fe. This study shows that a low dose of protons may prime the heart to respond differently to a subsequent challenge dose of heavy ions. Further investigation is required to identify responses at additional time points, consequences for cardiac function, threshold dose levels, and mechanisms by which a proton priming dose may alter the response to heavy ions. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. TH-E-BRF-03: A Multivariate Interaction Model for Assessment of Hippocampal Vascular Dose-Response and Early Prediction of Radiation-Induced Neurocognitive Dysfunction

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    Farjam, R; Pramanik, P; Srinivasan, A; Chapman, C; Tsien, C; Lawrence, T; Cao, Y [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Vascular injury could be a cause of hippocampal dysfunction leading to late neurocognitive decline in patients receiving brain radiotherapy (RT). Hence, our aim was to develop a multivariate interaction model for characterization of hippocampal vascular dose-response and early prediction of radiation-induced late neurocognitive impairments. Methods: 27 patients (17 males and 10 females, age 31–80 years) were enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective longitudinal study. All patients were diagnosed with a low-grade glioma or benign tumor and treated by 3-D conformal or intensity-modulated RT with a median dose of 54 Gy (50.4–59.4 Gy in 1.8− Gy fractions). Six DCE-MRI scans were performed from pre-RT to 18 months post-RT. DCE data were fitted to the modified Toft model to obtain the transfer constant of gadolinium influx from the intravascular space into the extravascular extracellular space, Ktrans, and the fraction of blood plasma volume, Vp. The hippocampus vascular property alterations after starting RT were characterized by changes in the hippocampal mean values of, μh(Ktrans)τ and μh(Vp)τ. The dose-response, Δμh(Ktrans/Vp)pre->τ, was modeled using a multivariate linear regression considering integrations of doses with age, sex, hippocampal laterality and presence of tumor/edema near a hippocampus. Finally, the early vascular dose-response in hippocampus was correlated with neurocognitive decline 6 and 18 months post-RT. Results: The μh(Ktrans) increased significantly from pre-RT to 1 month post-RT (p<0.0004). The multivariate model showed that the dose effect on Δμh(Ktrans)pre->1M post-RT was interacted with sex (p<0.0007) and age (p<0.00004), with the dose-response more pronounced in older females. Also, the vascular dose-response in the left hippocampus of females was significantly correlated with memory function decline at 6 (r = − 0.95, p<0.0006) and 18 (r = −0.88, p<0.02) months post-RT. Conclusion: The hippocampal vascular

  9. Methotrexate Dose in Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Impacts Methotrexate Polyglutamate Pharmacokinetics, Adalimumab Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy: Pharmacokinetic and Exposure-response Analysis of the CONCERTO Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Sandra L; Klein, Cheri E; Jin, Ziyi; Locke, Charles S; Rodila, Ramona C; Kupper, Hartmut; Burmester, Gerd-Rudiger; Awni, Walid M

    2018-02-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) and adalimumab are well-recognized treatments of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the efficacy of which may be driven by intracellular polyglutamates (PGs). The aim of this analysis was to characterize MTX PG concentrations and adalimumab pharmacokinetics in the CONCERTO trial. In addition, the relationships between MTX dose/pharmacokinetics, adalimumab pharmacokinetics, and efficacy were evaluated. CONCERTO was a double-blind, parallel-arm study in patients with early RA randomized to adalimumab 40 mg SC every other week plus blinded MTX 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 mg PO once weekly, for 26 weeks. Blood samples were obtained through week 26 for the determination of concentrations of MTX PG, adalimumab, and anti-adalimumab antibody (AAA). Clinical outcomes were also assessed. A total of 395 patients were included in the analysis (MTX, 329; adalimumab, 395). The mean time to steady-state MTX PG concentration was increased with MTX dose, from 8 to >26 weeks, depending on PG chain length. Dose proportionality changed with PG chain length. As MTX dose was increased, the percentage of short-chain PGs increased less than dose proportionally, while the percentage of long-chain PGs increased more than dose proportionally. For very-long-chain PGs, dose proportionality could not be assessed due to the nonmeasurable concentrations in the 2.5- and 5-mg MTX dose groups. As MTX dose increased, mean adalimumab concentrations also increased (P < 0.001). The percentage of patients with AAA decreased with increasing MTX dose, and at week 26, AAA + status was significantly correlated with MTX dose level (P = 0.005). In general, rates of response, defined using the 28-joint count disease activity score based on C-reactive protein (DAS28[CRP]; response, <3.2), were greater in the subgroup without AAA. The likelihood of a patient achieving a DAS28(CRP) response was related to the baseline measurement (P < 0.001) and to the concentration of adalimumab (P = 0.001), but not to the MTX

  10. Early response assessment in gastrointestinal stromal tumors with FDG PET scan 24 hours after a single dose of imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinto, Ajit; Nair, Narendra; Dutt, Anil; Baghel, Nawab S

    2008-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), rare mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, are gaining the interest of researchers because of the impressive metabolic response to the targeted molecular therapeutic drug imatinib mesylate. FDG PET is now routinely used to assess treatment response in cases of GIST because this has proven to give metabolic information, which demonstrates response earlier than anatomic imaging modalities. A 50-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and the CT scan showed a large lobulated heterogeneously enhancing mass in the abdomen. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) confirmed GIST with strong immunoreactivity to C-Kit protein. A baseline FDG PET done before initiation of therapy showed intense nonhomogenous FDG uptake in the mass (standard uptake value maximum, SUVmax of 13.45). A whole body FDG PET, repeated 24 hours after a single dose of imatinib mesylate 400 mg, showed a significant reduction in FDG uptake with a SUVmax of 4.26.

  11. Tissue responses to low protracted doses of high let radiations or photons: Early and late damage relevant to radio-protective countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, E.J.; Afzal, S.M.J.; Crouse, D.A.; Hanson, W.R.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Early and late murine tissue responses to single or fractionated low doses of heavy charged particles, fission-spectrum neutrons or gamma rays are considered. Damage to the hematopoietic system is emphasized, but results on acute lethality, host response to challenge with transplanted leukemia cells and life-shortening are presented. Low dose rates per fraction were used in some neutron experiments. Split-dose lethality studies (LD 50/30) with fission neutrons indicated greater accumulation of injury during a 9 fraction course (over 17 days) than was the case for ..gamma..-radiation. When total doses of 96 or 247 cGy of neutrons or ..gamma.. rays were given as a single dose or in 9 fractions, a significant sparing effect on femur CFU-S depression was observed for both radiation qualities during the first 11 days, but there was not an earlier return to normal with dose fractionation. During the 9 fraction sequence, a significant sparing effect of low dose rate on CFU-S depression was observed in both neutron and ..gamma..-irradiated mice. CFU-S content at the end of the fractionation sequence did not correlate with measured LD 50/30. Sustained depression of femur and spleen CFU-S and a significant thrombocytopenia were observed when a total neutron dose of 240 cGy was given in 72 fractions over 24 weeks at low dose rates. The temporal aspects of CFU-S repopulation were different after a single versus fractionated neutron doses. The sustained reduction in the size of the CFU-S population was accompanied by an increase in the fraction in DNA synthesis. The proliferation characteristics and effects of age were different for radial CFU-S population closely associated with bone, compared with the axial population that can be readily aspirated from the femur. In aged irradiated animals, the CFU-S proliferation/redistribution response to typhoid vaccine showed both an age and radiation effect. 63 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Meta-Regression of a Dose-Response Relationship of Methotrexate in Mono- and Combination Therapy in Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drug-Naive Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstra, S A; Allaart, C F; Stijnen, T; Landewé, R B M

    2017-10-01

    To investigate a possible short-term dose-response relationship of initial treatment with methotrexate (MTX) in monotherapy and combination therapy in recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. A systematic literature search was performed on trials and cohorts, including early, disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)-naive RA patients treated with MTX, with data on clinical results within 6 months from treatment start. Cohen's effect sizes were calculated for the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)/C-reactive protein (CRP) level, and/or Disease Activity Score (DAS)/in 28 joints (DAS28) in 4 treatment groups: MTX monotherapy, or MTX in combination with synthetic (cs) DMARDs, biologic (b) DMARDs, or glucocorticoids. Random-effects meta-regression analyses were performed for each outcome, with treatment group as the predictor corrected for baseline HAQ or disease activity and assessment point. Thirty-one studies including 5,589 patients were included. The meta-regression did not support higher effectiveness of increasing MTX dose in monotherapy. The number of treatment groups using combination therapy with csDMARDs was too small to perform meta-regression analyses. In combination therapy with glucocorticoids, a higher MTX dose was associated with higher (worse) outcome HAQ, but not with DAS/DAS28 or ESR/CRP level. In combination therapy with bDMARDs, a higher MTX dose was associated with higher outcome HAQ and DAS/DAS28, but not with ESR/CRP level. All effect sizes were small. In DMARD-naive, early RA patients who start MTX, either as monotherapy or in combination with bDMARDs or glucocorticoids, a higher initial dose of MTX was not associated with better clinical outcomes. This finding suggests that there is little short-term gain from starting with high compared to low MTX doses. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

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    Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-06-06

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Kinetics of the early adaptive response and adaptation threshold dose; Cinetica de la respuesta adaptativa temprana y dosis umbral de adaptacion

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    Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The expression kinetics of the adaptive response (RA) in mouse leukocytes in vivo and the minimum dose of gamma radiation that induces it was determined. The mice were exposed 0.005 or 0.02 Gy of {sup 137} Cs like adaptation and 1h later to the challenge dose (1.0 Gy), another group was only exposed at 1.0 Gy and the damage is evaluated in the DNA with the rehearsal it makes. The treatment with 0. 005 Gy didn't induce RA and 0. 02 Gy causes a similar effect to the one obtained with 0.01 Gy. The RA was show from an interval of 0.5 h being obtained the maximum expression with 5.0 h. The threshold dose to induce the RA is 0.01 Gy and in 5.0 h the biggest quantity in molecules is presented presumably that are related with the protection of the DNA. (Author) =.

  15. Applied behavior analytic intervention for autism in early childhood: meta-analysis, meta-regression and dose-response meta-analysis of multiple outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virués-Ortega, Javier

    2010-06-01

    A number of clinical trials and single-subject studies have been published measuring the effectiveness of long-term, comprehensive applied behavior analytic (ABA) intervention for young children with autism. However, the overall appreciation of this literature through standardized measures has been hampered by the varying methods, designs, treatment features and quality standards of published studies. In an attempt to fill this gap in the literature, state-of-the-art meta-analytical methods were implemented, including quality assessment, sensitivity analysis, meta-regression, dose-response meta-analysis and meta-analysis of studies of different metrics. Results suggested that long-term, comprehensive ABA intervention leads to (positive) medium to large effects in terms of intellectual functioning, language development, acquisition of daily living skills and social functioning in children with autism. Although favorable effects were apparent across all outcomes, language-related outcomes (IQ, receptive and expressive language, communication) were superior to non-verbal IQ, social functioning and daily living skills, with effect sizes approaching 1.5 for receptive and expressive language and communication skills. Dose-dependant effect sizes were apparent by levels of total treatment hours for language and adaptation composite scores. Methodological issues relating ABA clinical trials for autism are discussed.

  16. Dose-response-a challenge for allelopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Regina G; Hurle, Karl; Duke, Stephen O

    2005-04-01

    The response of an organism to a chemical depends, among other things, on the dose. Nonlinear dose-response relationships occur across a broad range of research fields, and are a well established tool to describe the basic mechanisms of phytotoxicity. The responses of plants to allelochemicals as biosynthesized phytotoxins, relate as well to nonlinearity and, thus, allelopathic effects can be adequately quantified by nonlinear mathematical modeling. The current paper applies the concept of nonlinearity to assorted aspects of allelopathy within several bioassays and reveals their analysis by nonlinear regression models. Procedures for a valid comparison of effective doses between different allelopathic interactions are presented for both, inhibitory and stimulatory effects. The dose-response applications measure and compare the responses produced by pure allelochemicals [scopoletin (7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one); DIBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxaxin-3(4H)-one); BOA (benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one); MBOA (6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one)], involved in allelopathy of grain crops, to demonstrate how some general principles of dose responses also relate to allelopathy. Hereupon, dose-response applications with living donor plants demonstrate the validity of these principles for density-dependent phytotoxicity of allelochemicals produced and released by living plants (Avena sativa L., Secale cereale L., Triticum L. spp.), and reveal the use of such experiments for initial considerations about basic principles of allelopathy. Results confirm that nonlinearity applies to allelopathy, and the study of allelopathic effects in dose-response experiments allows for new and challenging insights into allelopathic interactions.

  17. Comparison of serological responses to single-dose azithromycin (2 g) versus benzathine penicillin G in the treatment of early syphilis in HIV-infected patients in an area of low prevalence of macrolide-resistant Treponema pallidum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chia-Jui; Tang, Hung-Jen; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Hsieh, Szu-Min; Lee, Kuan-Yeh; Lee, Yuan-Ti; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Yang, Shang-Ping; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2016-03-01

    Effectiveness of single-dose azithromycin (2 g) in the treatment of early syphilis among HIV-infected patients has rarely been evaluated in the era of combination ART. Consecutive HIV-infected patients with early syphilis, who received 2 g single-dose azithromycin or 2.4 MU benzathine penicillin G, between 2007 and 2014, were prospectively observed. Genotypic resistance to macrolides was determined in Treponema pallidum isolates identified from clinical specimens using PCR assays. Rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titres were determined at baseline and every 3 months after treatment. Primary outcome was a decline of RPR titre by ≥4-fold at 12 months after treatment. During the study period, 162 HIV-infected patients with early syphilis received benzathine penicillin G and 237 patients received azithromycin. At 12 months follow-up, the serological response rate for penicillin and azithromycin groups was 61.1% and 56.5% (P = 0.41), respectively; respective response rate was 61.1% and 65.9% (P = 0.49) if we only included patients infected with T. pallidum not harbouring macrolide resistance in the azithromycin group. In multivariate analysis, RPR titres ≥1:32 (OR 2.56; 95% CI 1.55-4.21) and prior syphilis (OR 0.54; 95% CI 0.35-0.81) were predictors of serological response. Most common adverse effects of azithromycin included diarrhoea (52.7%), nausea (22.4%), abdominal pain (18.6%), bloating (17.7%) and lassitude/somnolence (27.4%). In the setting of a low prevalence of macrolide-resistant T. pallidum, 2 g single-dose azithromycin achieved a similar serological response to benzathine penicillin G in HIV-infected patients with early syphilis. Major adverse effects of azithromycin were gastrointestinal symptoms and lassitude/somnolence. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Decreasing Irradiated Rat Lung Volume Changes Dose-Limiting Toxicity From Early to Late Effects

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    Veen, Sonja J. van der; Faber, Hette; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [KVI Center for Advanced Radiation Research, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijk, Peter van, E-mail: p.van.luijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Technological developments in radiation therapy result in smaller irradiated volumes of normal tissue. Because the risk of radiation therapy-induced toxicity generally depends on irradiated volume, changing volume could change the dose-limiting toxicity of a treatment. Recently, in our rat model, we found that early radiation-induced lung dysfunction (RILD) was closely related to irradiated volume dependent vascular remodeling besides inflammation. The exact relationship between early and late RILD is still unknown. Therefore, in this preclinical study we investigated the dose-volume relationship of late RILD, assessed its dependence on early and late pathologies and studied if decreasing irradiated volume changed the dose-limiting toxicity. Methods and Materials: A volume of 25%, 32%, 50%, 63%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using protons. Until 26 weeks after irradiation, respiratory rates were measured. Macrovascular remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed at 26 weeks after irradiation. For all endpoints dose-volume response curves were made. These results were compared to our previously published early lung effects. Results: Early vascular remodeling and inflammation correlated significantly with early RILD. Late RILD correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, but not with vascular remodeling. In contrast to the early effects, late vascular remodeling, inflammation and fibrosis showed a primarily dose but not volume dependence. Comparison of respiratory rate increases early and late after irradiation for the different dose-distributions indicated that with decreasing irradiated volumes, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late RILD. Conclusions: In our rat model, different pathologies underlie early and late RILD with different dose-volume dependencies. Consequently, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late dysfunction when the irradiated volume was reduced. In patients, early and late

  19. Decreasing Irradiated Rat Lung Volume Changes Dose-Limiting Toxicity From Early to Late Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Sonja J; Faber, Hette; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A; Coppes, Robert P; van Luijk, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Technological developments in radiation therapy result in smaller irradiated volumes of normal tissue. Because the risk of radiation therapy-induced toxicity generally depends on irradiated volume, changing volume could change the dose-limiting toxicity of a treatment. Recently, in our rat model, we found that early radiation-induced lung dysfunction (RILD) was closely related to irradiated volume dependent vascular remodeling besides inflammation. The exact relationship between early and late RILD is still unknown. Therefore, in this preclinical study we investigated the dose-volume relationship of late RILD, assessed its dependence on early and late pathologies and studied if decreasing irradiated volume changed the dose-limiting toxicity. A volume of 25%, 32%, 50%, 63%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using protons. Until 26 weeks after irradiation, respiratory rates were measured. Macrovascular remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed at 26 weeks after irradiation. For all endpoints dose-volume response curves were made. These results were compared to our previously published early lung effects. Early vascular remodeling and inflammation correlated significantly with early RILD. Late RILD correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, but not with vascular remodeling. In contrast to the early effects, late vascular remodeling, inflammation and fibrosis showed a primarily dose but not volume dependence. Comparison of respiratory rate increases early and late after irradiation for the different dose-distributions indicated that with decreasing irradiated volumes, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late RILD. In our rat model, different pathologies underlie early and late RILD with different dose-volume dependencies. Consequently, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late dysfunction when the irradiated volume was reduced. In patients, early and late RILD are also due to different pathologies. As such, new

  20. DW-MRI and (18) F-FLT PET for early assessment of response to radiation therapy associated with hypoxia-driven interventions. Preclinical studies using manipulation of oxygenation and/or dose escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ly-Binh-An; Bol, Anne; Labar, Daniel; Karroum, Oussama; Mignion, Lionel; Bol, Vanesa; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Grégoire, Vincent; Gallez, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Early markers of treatment response may help in the management of patients by predicting the outcome of a specific therapeutic intervention. Here, we studied the potential value of diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) and (18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT), markers of cell death and cell proliferation respectively, to predict the response to irradiation. In addition, dose escalation and/or carbogen breathing were used to modulate the response to irradiation. The studies were performed on two hypoxic rat tumor models: rhabdomyosarcoma and 9L-glioma. The rats were imaged using MRI and PET before and two days after the treatment. In both tumor models, changes in ADC (apparent diffusion coefficient) and (18)F-FLT SUV (standardized uptake value) were significantly correlated with the tumor growth delay. For both tumor models, the ADC values increased in all irradiated groups two days after the treatment while they decreased in the untreated groups. At the same time, the uptake of (18)F-FLT increased in the untreated groups and decreased in all treated groups. Yet, ADC values were not sensitive enough to predict the added value of dose escalation or carbogen breathing in either model. Change in (18)F-FLT uptake was able to predict the higher tumor response when using increased dose of irradiation, but not when using a carbogen breathing challenge. Our results also emphasize that the magnitude of change in (18)F-FLT uptake was strongly dependent on the tumor model. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Early stage cost-effectiveness analysis of a BRCA1-like test to detect triple negative breast cancers responsive to high dose alkylating chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miquel-Cases, Anna; Steuten, Lotte Maria Gertruda; Retel, Valesca P.; van Harten, Willem H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) with a BRCA1-like profile may benefit from high dose alkylating chemotherapy (HDAC). This study examines whether BRCA1-like testing to target effective HDAC in TNBC patients can be more cost-effective than treating all patients with standard

  2. Dose-response analysis using R

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Christian; Baty, Florent; Streibig, Jens Carl

    2015-01-01

    Dose-response analysis can be carried out using multi-purpose commercial statistical software, but except for a few special cases the analysis easily becomes cumbersome as relevant, non-standard output requires manual programming. The extension package drc for the statistical environment R provides...

  3. Lurasidone Dose Response in Bipolar Depression: A Population Dose-response Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapel, Sunny; Chiu, Yu-Yuan; Hsu, Jay; Cucchiaro, Josephine; Loebel, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of dose-response relationships for psychotropic agents may be difficult to determine based on results of individual clinical studies, particularly those with a flexible dose design. The goal of this pharmacometric analysis was to characterize the dose-response profile for lurasidone in patients with bipolar depression. The statistical modeling and simulation analyses reported here were derived from 2 randomized, 6-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, flexible-dose studies (20-60 mg/d or 80-120 mg/d of lurasidone as monotherapy or 20-120 mg/d adjunct to lithium or valproate) in patients with bipolar depression. Pooled data included 5245 Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) observations from 825 patients who had received lurasidone or placebo treatments, with or without lithium or valproate background medication. The time course of placebo effect on the MADRS score was adequately described by an exponential asymptotic placebo model. A linear dose-response model best described the effect of lurasidone. The net improvement in MADRS score due to lurasidone treatment (the drug effect) was significant (P related to demographic covariates. This population dose-response modeling analysis indicates that higher doses of lurasidone are likely to produce greater therapeutic effects in patients with bipolar depression. The linear dose response was consistent for both lurasidone monotherapy and adjunctive therapy in patients with bipolar depression. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT00868452, NCT00868699. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Single Dose of LSD Does Not Alter Gene Expression of the Serotonin 2A Receptor Gene (HTR2A) or Early Growth Response Genes (EGR1-3) in Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, Patrick C.; Grünblatt, Edna; Müller, Felix; Borgwardt, Stefan J.; Liechti, Matthias E.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Renewed interest has been seen in the use of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in psychiatric research and practice. The repeated use of LSD leads to tolerance that is believed to result from serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2A receptor downregulation. In rats, daily LSD administration for 4 days decreased frontal cortex 5-HT2A receptor binding. Additionally, a single dose of LSD acutely increased expression of the early growth response genes EGR1 and EGR2 in rat and mouse brains through 5-HT2A receptor stimulation. No human data on the effects of LSD on gene expression has been reported. Therefore, we investigated the effects of single-dose LSD administration on the expression of the 5-HT2A receptor gene (HTR2A) and EGR1-3 genes. Methods: mRNA expression levels were analyzed in whole blood as a peripheral biomarker in 15 healthy subjects before and 1.5 and 24 h after the administration of LSD (100 μg) and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Results: LSD did not alter the expression of the HTR2A or EGR1-3 genes 1.5 and 24 h after administration compared with placebo. Conclusion: No changes were observed in the gene expression of LSD’s primary target receptor gene or genes that are implicated in its downstream effects. Remaining unclear is whether chronic LSD administration alters gene expression in humans. PMID:28701958

  5. Bayesian Dose-Response Modeling in Sparse Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Steven B.

    This book discusses Bayesian dose-response modeling in small samples applied to two different settings. The first setting is early phase clinical trials, and the second setting is toxicology studies in cancer risk assessment. In early phase clinical trials, experimental units are humans who are actual patients. Prior to a clinical trial, opinions from multiple subject area experts are generally more informative than the opinion of a single expert, but we may face a dilemma when they have disagreeing prior opinions. In this regard, we consider compromising the disagreement and compare two different approaches for making a decision. In addition to combining multiple opinions, we also address balancing two levels of ethics in early phase clinical trials. The first level is individual-level ethics which reflects the perspective of trial participants. The second level is population-level ethics which reflects the perspective of future patients. We extensively compare two existing statistical methods which focus on each perspective and propose a new method which balances the two conflicting perspectives. In toxicology studies, experimental units are living animals. Here we focus on a potential non-monotonic dose-response relationship which is known as hormesis. Briefly, hormesis is a phenomenon which can be characterized by a beneficial effect at low doses and a harmful effect at high doses. In cancer risk assessments, the estimation of a parameter, which is known as a benchmark dose, can be highly sensitive to a class of assumptions, monotonicity or hormesis. In this regard, we propose a robust approach which considers both monotonicity and hormesis as a possibility. In addition, We discuss statistical hypothesis testing for hormesis and consider various experimental designs for detecting hormesis based on Bayesian decision theory. Past experiments have not been optimally designed for testing for hormesis, and some Bayesian optimal designs may not be optimal under a

  6. Exposure- and Dose-response Analyses in Dose Selection and Labeling of FDA-approved Biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Ken; Breder, Christopher D; Lin, Dora H; Alexander, G Caleb

    2018-01-01

    Biological drug products, or products derived from living cells, represent an increasingly important part of the pharmaceutical market. Despite this, little is known about how sponsors determine the dose to be studied in registrational trials or to be proposed in labeling for biologics. We examined how exposure-response and dose-response analyses were used to determine dosing in pivotal trials or the labeling for all biologics approved by the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) between 2003 and 2016. We extracted relevant characteristics of each biologic from its review package by FDA. We used descriptive statistics to characterize the rationale for the selected dose(s) in registration trials, with a particular focus on the role of exposure-response/dose-response analyses. We also examined how exposure-response/dose-response analyses were used to support the labeling dose and the basis for postmarketing requirements or commitments related to dose optimization. A total of 79 biologics license applications were examined. Dose selection in registrational trials was more often attributed to clinical efficacy (73% of applications) than to clinical safety (42%). The dosing of products whose dose was apparently selected based on clinical efficacy was often (72%) determined by the dose-response relationship. In support of doses that were described in labeling, exposure-response analyses for efficacy were performed more commonly (53%) than dose-response analyses (21%). This trend was apparent after 2012. This is the first study to summarize the justification of dose selection and the labeled dose of biologics approved by the FDA. Dose-response analyses have been often used as the rationale for dose selection of registrational studies, although exposure-response analyses are becoming more prevalent in support of the dosing guidelines in labeling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Single Dose of LSD Does Not Alter Gene Expression of the Serotonin 2A Receptor Gene (HTR2A or Early Growth Response Genes (EGR1-3 in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Dolder

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Renewed interest has been seen in the use of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD in psychiatric research and practice. The repeated use of LSD leads to tolerance that is believed to result from serotonin (5-HT 5-HT2A receptor downregulation. In rats, daily LSD administration for 4 days decreased frontal cortex 5-HT2A receptor binding. Additionally, a single dose of LSD acutely increased expression of the early growth response genes EGR1 and EGR2 in rat and mouse brains through 5-HT2A receptor stimulation. No human data on the effects of LSD on gene expression has been reported. Therefore, we investigated the effects of single-dose LSD administration on the expression of the 5-HT2A receptor gene (HTR2A and EGR1-3 genes.Methods: mRNA expression levels were analyzed in whole blood as a peripheral biomarker in 15 healthy subjects before and 1.5 and 24 h after the administration of LSD (100 μg and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study.Results: LSD did not alter the expression of the HTR2A or EGR1-3 genes 1.5 and 24 h after administration compared with placebo.Conclusion: No changes were observed in the gene expression of LSD’s primary target receptor gene or genes that are implicated in its downstream effects. Remaining unclear is whether chronic LSD administration alters gene expression in humans.

  8. Fewer Doses of HPV Vaccine Result in Immune Response Similar to Three-Dose Regimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Press Releases NCI News Note Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three- ... report that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum ...

  9. Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanser, Steven E.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Leu, Matthias; Nielsen, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    The Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS is a tool that extends the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS 10 Desktop application to aid with the visualization of relationships between two raster GIS datasets. A dose-response curve is a line graph commonly used in medical research to examine the effects of different dosage rates of a drug or chemical (for example, carcinogen) on an outcome of interest (for example, cell mutations) (Russell and others, 1982). Dose-response curves have recently been used in ecological studies to examine the influence of an explanatory dose variable (for example, percentage of habitat cover, distance to disturbance) on a predicted response (for example, survival, probability of occurrence, abundance) (Aldridge and others, 2008). These dose curves have been created by calculating the predicted response value from a statistical model at different levels of the explanatory dose variable while holding values of other explanatory variables constant. Curves (plots) developed using the Dose-Response Calculator overcome the need to hold variables constant by using values extracted from the predicted response surface of a spatially explicit statistical model fit in a GIS, which include the variation of all explanatory variables, to visualize the univariate response to the dose variable. Application of the Dose-Response Calculator can be extended beyond the assessment of statistical model predictions and may be used to visualize the relationship between any two raster GIS datasets (see example in tool instructions). This tool generates tabular data for use in further exploration of dose-response relationships and a graph of the dose-response curve.

  10. Model Averaging Software for Dichotomous Dose Response Risk Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Wheeler

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Model averaging has been shown to be a useful method for incorporating model uncertainty in quantitative risk estimation. In certain circumstances this technique is computationally complex, requiring sophisticated software to carry out the computation. We introduce software that implements model averaging for risk assessment based upon dichotomous dose-response data. This software, which we call Model Averaging for Dichotomous Response Benchmark Dose (MADr-BMD, fits the quantal response models, which are also used in the US Environmental Protection Agency benchmark dose software suite, and generates a model-averaged dose response model to generate benchmark dose and benchmark dose lower bound estimates. The software fulfills a need for risk assessors, allowing them to go beyond one single model in their risk assessments based on quantal data by focusing on a set of models that describes the experimental data.

  11. Analysis of Transcriptomic Dose Response Data in the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slide presentation at the HESI-HEALTH Canada-McGill Workshop on Transcriptomic Dose Response Data in the Context of Chemical Risk Assessment Slide presentation at the HESI-HEALTH Canada-McGill Workshop on Transcriptomic Dose Response Data in the Context of Chemical Risk Assessment

  12. Dose Effects of Ion Beam Exposure on Deinococcus Radiodurans: Survival and Dose Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dao-jun; Wu, Li-fang; Wu, Li-jun; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2001-02-01

    To explore the survival and dose response of organism for different radiation sources is of great importance in the research of radiobiology. In this study, the survival-dose response of Deinococcus radiodurans (E.coli, as the control) for ultra-violet (UV), γ-rays radiation and ion beam exposure was investigated. The shoulder type of survival curves were found for both UV and γ-ray ionizing radiation, but the saddle type of survival curves were shown for H+, N+(20keV and 30keV) and Ar+ beam exposure. This dose effect of the survival initially decreased with the increase in dose and then increased in the high dose range and finally decreased again in the higher dose range. Our experimental results suggest that D. radiodurans, which is considerably radio-resistant to UV and x-ray and γ-ray ionizing radiation, do not resist ion beam exposure.

  13. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute {gamma}-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  14. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Richard P. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute γ-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  15. Review of dose-response curves for acute antimigraine drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dose-response curves for efficacy and tolerability are the important determinants for the choice of doses of acute migraine drugs. Areas covered: Dose-response curves for the efficacy of seven triptans (5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists), a 5-HT1F receptor agonist (lasmiditan) and four or......, there are many unmet needs. Although upcoming drugs may not be superior to triptans, migraine patients will potentially benefit greatly from these, especially patients who are triptan non-responders and patients with cardiovascular disease.......INTRODUCTION: Dose-response curves for efficacy and tolerability are the important determinants for the choice of doses of acute migraine drugs. Areas covered: Dose-response curves for the efficacy of seven triptans (5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists), a 5-HT1F receptor agonist (lasmiditan) and four oral......, whereas AEs often increase with increasing doses. The two other groups of drugs also have flat dose-response curves for efficacy. Overall, the triptans still have the most favorable efficacy-tolerability profile. Current acute antimigraine drugs do not fulfill the expectations of the patients, and thus...

  16. Repeated low-dose intradermal allergen injection suppresses allergen-induced cutaneous late responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotiroti, Giuseppina; Shamji, Mohamed; Durham, Stephen R; Till, Stephen J

    2012-10-01

    Subcutaneous immunotherapy with high-dose grass pollen was first described more than 100 years ago. This treatment suppresses allergen-induced cutaneous late responses, with lesser effects on early responses. In contrast, low-dose subcutaneous immunotherapy has not shown clinical benefit. Uncontrolled reports from the early 20th century describe low-dose allergen inoculation directly into the dermis, an immunologically active area containing abundant dendritic cells and lymphatics. We sought to investigate the effect of low-dose intradermal grass pollen administration on cutaneous reactivity to allergen. Thirty adults sensitized to grass and tree pollens were randomized to receive (1) 6 repeat intradermal injections at 2-week intervals of grass pollen extract (estimated 7 ng of the major grass allergen Phl p 5 per injection), (2) 2 intradermal injections separated by 10 weeks, or (3) a single intradermal injection at 10 weeks. At the end of the study, cutaneous early and late responses were measured after double-blind intradermal injection with grass and birch pollen. Participants who received 6 fortnightly intradermal grass pollen injections had markedly smaller cutaneous late responses to grass pollen than control subjects who received 2 injections separated by 10 weeks (P pollen-specific IgG antibodies. Suppression was observed whether late responses were measured on the arms or the back. However, early responses were equivalent in all groups. Low-dose intradermal allergen, like conventional subcutaneous high-dose immmunotherapy, suppresses allergen-induced cutaneous late responses in a manner that is allergen specific, systemic, and associated with induction of IgG antibodies. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Irradiation of rainbow trout at early life stages results in a proteomic legacy in adult gills. Part B; the effect of a second radiation dose, after one year, on the proteomic responses in the irradiated and non-irradiated bystander fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard W; Moccia, Richard D; Mothersill, Carmel E; Seymour, Colin B

    2018-02-09

    This study extends the investigation of the legacy effects of exposure to a single radiation dose at one of four early life stages, in adult rainbow trout (Part A), by examining the effects of a second identical dose after one year; i.e. egg 48 h after fertilisation (48 h egg) + 1 year, eyed egg + 1 year, yolk sac larvae (YSL) + 1 year and first feeder + 1 year. This included the induction of a bystander effect in non-irradiated trout which had swam with the irradiated fish. The second radiation dose negated any beneficial proteomic responses following early life stage irradiation only, particularly irradiation of 48 h eggs and eyed eggs (Part A). Instead the responses after early life stage + 1 year irradiation are consistently associated with tumorigenesis, cancer progression, or are otherwise damaging: upregulation of alpha-globin 1 (YSL + 1 year and first feeders + 1 year) and downregulation of histone H1, type II keratin, malate dehydrogenase 2-2, Na/K ATPase alpha subunit isoform 1b, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (48 h egg + 1 year), electron transfer flavoprotein subunit alpha (eyed egg + 1 year), 60 S ribosomal protein L30 (YSL + 1 year) and haemoglobin subunit beta-4 (first feeder + 1 year). Most significantly the second radiation dose also negated the overwhelmingly beneficial bystander effect proteomic responses induced by trout irradiated at an early life stage only (Part A). Instead the bystander effect proteomic changes induced by trout irradiated at an early life stage and again at 1 year have been associated with uncertain, with respect to tumorigenesis, or detrimental effects; upregulation of alpha-globin 1 (YSL + 1 year and first feeder + 1 year) and downregulation of malate dehydrogenase 2-2, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (48 h egg + 1 year), transferrin precursor (eyed egg + 1 year), 60 S ribosomal protein L30 (YSL + 1 year) and serine / threonine-protein phosphatase 2 A 65 kDa (first feeder + 1 year). This difference between

  18. Assembled cross-species perchlorate dose-response data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data set contains dose-response data for perchlorate exposure in multiple species. These data were assembled from peer-reviewed studies. Species included in...

  19. Dose-response plasma appearance of coffee chlorogenic and phenolic acids in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Mathieu; Marmet, Cynthia; Giuffrida, Francesca; Lepage, Mélissa; Barron, Denis; Beaumont, Maurice; Williamson, Gary; Dionisi, Fabiola

    2014-02-01

    Coffee contains phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acids (CGAs). Even though coffee intake has been associated with some health benefits in epidemiological studies, the bioavailability of coffee phenolics is not fully understood. We performed a dose-response study measuring plasma bioavailability of phenolics after drinking three increasing, but still nutritionally relevant doses of instant pure soluble coffee. The study design was a one treatment (coffee) three-dose randomized cross-over design, with a washout period of 2 wks between visits. CGAs, phenolic acids, and late-appearing metabolites all increased with increasing ingested dose. Hence, the sum of area under the curve was significantly higher for the medium to low dose, and high to medium dose, by 2.23- and 2.38-fold, respectively. CGAs were not well absorbed in their intact form, regardless of the dose. CGA and phenolic acids appeared rapidly in plasma, indicating an early absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Late-appearing metabolites were the most abundant, regardless of the dose. This study confirmed previous findings about coffee bioavailability but also showed that coffee phenolics appear in a positive dose-response manner in plasma when drank at nutritionally relevant doses. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Observational-Interventional Priors for Dose-Response Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, R.

    2016-01-01

    Controlled interventions provide the most direct source of information for learning causal effects. In particular, a dose-response curve can be learned by varying the treatment level and observing the corresponding outcomes. However, interventions can be expensive and time-consuming. Observational data, where the treatment is not controlled by a known mechanism, is sometimes available. Under some strong assumptions, observational data allows for the estimation of dose-response curves. Estimat...

  1. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-07-05

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of

  2. Confidence bounds for nonlinear dose-response relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baayen, C; Hougaard, P

    2015-01-01

    An important aim of drug trials is to characterize the dose-response relationship of a new compound. Such a relationship can often be described by a parametric (nonlinear) function that is monotone in dose. If such a model is fitted, it is useful to know the uncertainty of the fitted curve...... intervals for the dose-response curve. These confidence bounds have better coverage than Wald intervals and are more precise and generally faster than bootstrap methods. Moreover, if monotonicity is assumed, the profile likelihood approach takes this automatically into account. The approach is illustrated...

  3. Response of mouse oral mucosa to repeated doses of bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, W; Hönig, M

    1994-09-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) applied at systemically tolerable doses induces denudation of tongue mucosa in the C3H-Neuherberg mouse strain. The dose-incidence curve after single injections has a sigmoid shape with an ED50 of 17.5 mg/kg. In contrast, the dose-response curves to repeated (two, five and 10) drug injections follow triphasic shapes and show dose-effect inversions. The effect initially increases with dose to a maximum of 70-100% at 2 x 7, 5 x 2, and 10 x 0.9 mg/kg. A marked decrease in response is observed at higher doses with a nadir of 10-30% after 2 x 11 mg/kg, 5 x 4 to 5 x 5 mg/kg and 10 x 2 mg/kg, followed by a second rise when dose is further increased. These clinical results were confirmed in a histological study. Variation of the time interval between two drug injections caused marked fluctuations in the treatment efficacy. A clear increase in drug response was induced by splitting total drug doses of 6, 14 or 22 mg/kg, the maximum effect (100%) was seen at intervals of 2 h, 0.5-1 h and 0.25 h between two injections of 3, 7 or 11 mg/kg, respectively. At longer intervals of up to 6 h, a dose-dependent decrease in drug efficacy resulted in an inverse dose-effect. Original tissue tolerance to BLM was restored only in the 2 x 3 mg/kg arm but was still elevated in the other arms after 96 h. The results can be plausibly explained by the dose-dependent induction of detoxifying processes.

  4. The Model Averaging for Dichotomous Response Benchmark Dose (MADr-BMD) Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Providing quantal response models, which are also used in the U.S. EPA benchmark dose software suite, and generates a model-averaged dose response model to generate benchmark dose and benchmark dose lower bound estimates.

  5. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O Stram

    Full Text Available Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.

  6. Shared dosimetry error in epidemiological dose-response analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stram, Daniel O; Preston, Dale L; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takes up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope β is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of β) is biased for β≠0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the Mayak Worker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.

  7. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, You, E-mail: you.song@niva.no [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway); Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Rosseland, Bjørn Olav [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Tollefsen, Knut Erik [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • First study on early stress responses in salmon exposed to low-dose gamma radiation. • Dramatic dose-dependent transcriptional responses characterized. • Multiple modes of action proposed for gamma radiation. - Abstract: Due to the production of free radicals, gamma radiation may pose a hazard to living organisms. The high-dose radiation effects have been extensively studied, whereas the ecotoxicity data on low-dose gamma radiation is still limited. The present study was therefore performed using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to characterize effects of low-dose (15, 70 and 280 mGy) gamma radiation after short-term (48 h) exposure. Global transcriptional changes were studied using a combination of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs; in this article the phrase gene expression is taken as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression can also be regulated, e.g., at protein stability and translational level) were determined and linked to their biological meanings predicted using both Gene Ontology (GO) and mammalian ortholog-based functional analyses. The plasma glucose level was also measured as a general stress biomarker at the organism level. Results from the microarray analysis revealed a dose-dependent pattern of global transcriptional responses, with 222, 495 and 909 DEGs regulated by 15, 70 and 280 mGy gamma radiation, respectively. Among these DEGs, only 34 were commonly regulated by all radiation doses, whereas the majority of differences were dose-specific. No GO functions were identified at low or medium doses, but repression of DEGs associated with GO functions such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed after 280 mGy gamma exposure. Ortholog-based toxicity pathway analysis further showed that 15 mGy radiation

  8. Analytical modelling of regional radiotherapy dose response of lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangkyu; Stroian, Gabriela; Kopek, Neil; AlBahhar, Mahmood; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of the dose-response of radiation-induced lung disease (RILD) is necessary for optimization of radiotherapy (RT) treatment plans involving thoracic cavity irradiation. This study models the time-dependent relationship between local radiation dose and post-treatment lung tissue damage measured by computed tomography (CT) imaging. Fifty-eight follow-up diagnostic CT scans from 21 non-small-cell lung cancer patients were examined. The extent of RILD was segmented on the follow-up CT images based on the increase of physical density relative to the pre-treatment CT image. The segmented RILD was locally correlated with dose distribution calculated by analytical anisotropic algorithm and the Monte Carlo method to generate the corresponding dose-response curves. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model was fit to the dose-response curves at six post-RT time periods, and temporal change in the LKB parameters was recorded. In this study, we observed significant correlation between the probability of lung tissue damage and the local dose for 96% of the follow-up studies. Dose-injury correlation at the first three months after RT was significantly different from later follow-up periods in terms of steepness and threshold dose as estimated from the LKB model. Dependence of dose response on superior-inferior tumour position was also observed. The time-dependent analytical modelling of RILD might provide better understanding of the long-term behaviour of the disease and could potentially be applied to improve inverse treatment planning optimization.

  9. Curious cases: Altered dose-response relationships in addiction genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, George R; Drgonova, Jana; Hall, F Scott

    2014-03-01

    Dose-response relationships for most addictive substances are "inverted U"-shaped. Addictive substances produce both positive features that include reward, euphoria, anxiolysis, withdrawal-relief, and negative features that include aversion, dysphoria, anxiety and withdrawal symptoms. A simple model differentially associates ascending and descending limbs of dose-response curves with rewarding and aversive influences, respectively. However, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) diagnoses of substance dependence fail to incorporate dose-response criteria and don't directly consider balances between euphoric and dysphoric drug effects. Classical genetic studies document substantial heritable influences on DSM substance dependence. Linkage and genome-wide association studies identify modest-sized effects at any locus. Nevertheless, clusters of SNPs within selected genes display 10(-2)>p>10(-8) associations with dependence in many independent samples. For several of these genes, evidence for cis-regulatory, level-of-expression differences supports the validity of mouse models in which levels of expression are also altered. This review documents surprising, recently defined cases in which convergent evidence from humans and mouse models supports central influences of altered dose-response relationships in mediating the impact of relevant genomic variation on addiction phenotypes. For variation at loci for the α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, cadherin 13, receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase Δ and neuronal cell adhesion molecule genes, changed dose-response relationships conferred by gene knockouts in mice are accompanied by supporting human data. These observations emphasize desirability of carefully elucidating dose-response relationships for both rewarding and aversive features of abused substances wherever possible. They motivate consideration of individual differences in dose-response relationships in addiction nosology and therapeutics. © 2013.

  10. Dose convolution filter: Incorporating spatial dose information into tissue response modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yimei; Joiner, Michael; Zhao Bo; Liao Yixiang; Burmeister, Jay [Karmanos Cancer Center, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: A model is introduced to integrate biological factors such as cell migration and bystander effects into physical dose distributions, and to incorporate spatial dose information in plan analysis and optimization. Methods: The model consists of a dose convolution filter (DCF) with single parameter {sigma}. Tissue response is calculated by an existing NTCP model with DCF-applied dose distribution as input. The authors determined {sigma} of rat spinal cord from published data. The authors also simulated the GRID technique, in which an open field is collimated into many pencil beams. Results: After applying the DCF, the NTCP model successfully fits the rat spinal cord data with a predicted value of {sigma}=2.6{+-}0.5 mm, consistent with 2 mm migration distances of remyelinating cells. Moreover, it enables the appropriate prediction of a high relative seriality for spinal cord. The model also predicts the sparing of normal tissues by the GRID technique when the size of each pencil beam becomes comparable to {sigma}. Conclusions: The DCF model incorporates spatial dose information and offers an improved way to estimate tissue response from complex radiotherapy dose distributions. It does not alter the prediction of tissue response in large homogenous fields, but successfully predicts increased tissue tolerance in small or highly nonuniform fields.

  11. DOE program--developing a scientific basis for responses to low-dose exposures: impact on dose-response relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Antone L; Couch, Lezlie

    2006-09-23

    The DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program focuses on biological mechanisms involved in response to low doses of both low and high-LET radiation (merger enables observation of radiation-induced cellular and molecular changes previously undetectable. These low-dose responses define mechanisms of interaction of radiation with living systems, and characterize the shape of dose-response. The research from this program suggests radiation paradigms regarding the involvement of radiation in the carcinogenic process. New biological phenomena observed at low doses include initial radiation-induced DNA damage and repair, changes in gene expression, adaptive responses and bystander effects. However, information from this cellular-molecular level cannot be directly extrapolated to risks in human populations. Links must be carefully developed between dose-response relationships at the cell and tissue levels and risk to human populations. The challenge and the ultimate goal of the Program is to determine if basic scientific data can be combined with more traditional epidemiological methods to improve the estimation of radiation risk from low level radiation exposures.

  12. Response of cellulose nitrate track detectors to electron doses

    CERN Document Server

    Segovia, N; Moreno, A; Vazquez-Polo, G; Santamaría, T; Aranda, P; Hernández, A

    1999-01-01

    In order to study alternative dose determination methods, the bulk etching velocity and the latent track annealing of LR 115 track detectors was studied during electron irradiation runs from a Pelletron accelerator. For this purpose alpha irradiated and blank detectors were exposed to increasing electron doses from 10.5 to 317.5 kGy. After the irradiation with electrons the detectors were etched under routine conditions, except for the etching time, that was varied for each electron dose in order to reach a fixed residual thickness. The variation of the bulk etching velocity as a function of each one of the electron doses supplied, was interpolated in order to obtain dosimetric response curves. The observed annealing effect on the latent tracks is discussed as a function of the total electron doses supplied and the temperature.

  13. Dose-response meta-analysis of differences in means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Crippa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meta-analytical methods are frequently used to combine dose-response findings expressed in terms of relative risks. However, no methodology has been established when results are summarized in terms of differences in means of quantitative outcomes. Methods We proposed a two-stage approach. A flexible dose-response model is estimated within each study (first stage taking into account the covariance of the data points (mean differences, standardized mean differences. Parameters describing the study-specific curves are then combined using a multivariate random-effects model (second stage to address heterogeneity across studies. Results The method is fairly general and can accommodate a variety of parametric functions. Compared to traditional non-linear models (e.g. E max, logistic, spline models do not assume any pre-specified dose-response curve. Spline models allow inclusion of studies with a small number of dose levels, and almost any shape, even non monotonic ones, can be estimated using only two parameters. We illustrated the method using dose-response data arising from five clinical trials on an antipsychotic drug, aripiprazole, and improvement in symptoms in shizoaffective patients. Using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, pooled results indicated a non-linear association with the maximum change in mean PANSS score equal to 10.40 (95 % confidence interval 7.48, 13.30 observed for 19.32 mg/day of aripiprazole. No substantial change in PANSS score was observed above this value. An estimated dose of 10.43 mg/day was found to produce 80 % of the maximum predicted response. Conclusion The described approach should be adopted to combine correlated differences in means of quantitative outcomes arising from multiple studies. Sensitivity analysis can be a useful tool to assess the robustness of the overall dose-response curve to different modelling strategies. A user-friendly R package has been developed to facilitate

  14. Controlled Optimal Design Program for the Logit Dose Response Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqiao Hu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of dose-response is an integral component of the drug development process. Parallel dose-response studies are conducted, customarily, in preclinical and phase 1, 2 clinical trials for this purpose. Practical constraints on dose range, dose levels and dose proportions are intrinsic issues in the design of dose response studies because of drug toxicity, efficacy, FDA regulations, protocol requirements, clinical trial logistics, and marketing issues. We provide a free on-line software package called Controlled Optimal Design 2.0 for generating controlled optimal designs that can incorporate prior information and multiple objectives, and meet multiple practical constraints at the same time. Researchers can either run the web-based design program or download its stand-alone version to construct the desired multiple-objective controlled Bayesian optimal designs. Because researchers often adopt ad-hoc design schemes such as the equal allocation rules without knowing how efficient such designs would be for the design problem, the program also evaluates the efficiency of user-supplied designs.

  15. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    CERN Document Server

    Simpkins, A A

    2002-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response models estimate dose for inhalation and ground shine pathways. A methodology has been developed to incorporate ingestion doses into the emergency response models. The methodology follows a two-phase approach. The first phase estimates site-specific derived response levels (DRLs) which can be compared with predicted ground-level concentrations to determine if intervention is needed to protect the public. This phase uses accepted methods with little deviation from recommended guidance. The second phase uses site-specific data to estimate a 'best estimate' dose to offsite individuals from ingestion of foodstuffs. While this method deviates from recommended guidance, it is technically defensibly and more realistic. As guidance is updated, these methods also will need to be updated.

  16. Single Dose Versus 3 Doses of Intramuscular Benzathine Penicillin for Early Syphilis in HIV: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Roberto; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Yasukawa, Kosuke; Villarreal, Erick; Ross, Michael; Serpa, Jose A

    2017-03-15

    Patients coinfected with syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may have a slower decrease in rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titers. Currently a single dose of 2.4 million units of intramuscular benzathine penicillin G (BPG) is recommended for the treatment of early syphilis. Some observational studies have suggested that this regimen may lead to high failure rates in coinfected patients. We conducted an open-label randomized clinical trial to compare the efficacy of single-dose and 3-dose regimens of BPG for the treatment of early syphilis in HIV-infected individuals. RPR titers were monitored every 3 months. Treatment success was defined as a decrease in RPR titers of ≥2 dilutions (4-fold) during a 12-month follow-up period. Sixty-four patients were included. In the intention-to-treat analysis, treatment success rates were 80% (28 of 35 subjects) and 93% (27 of 29 subjects) in the single-dose and 3-dose regimens, respectively (absolute difference, 13% [95% confidence interval {CI}, -5% to 30%; P = .17). In the per-protocol analysis, success rates were 93% (27 of 29) and 100% in the single-dose and 3-dose regimens, respectively (absolute difference, 7% [95% CI, -7% to 22%]; P = .49). CD4 T-cell count, RPR titer and syphilis stage did not affect treatment results. When compared with a single dose of BPG, a 3-dose regimen did not improve syphilis serological outcomes. Our results support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation of a single dose of BPG in HIV-infected patients with early syphilis. NCT02611765.

  17. Redefining radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer with single dose ablative treatment: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charaghvandi, R K; van Asselen, B; Philippens, M E P; Verkooijen, H M; van Gils, C H; van Diest, P J; Pijnappel, R M; Hobbelink, M G G; Witkamp, A J; van Dalen, T; van der Wall, E; van Heijst, T C; Koelemij, R; van Vulpen, M; van den Bongard, H J G D

    2017-03-09

    A shift towards less burdening and more patient friendly treatments for breast cancer is currently ongoing. In low-risk patients with early-stage disease, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an alternative for whole breast irradiation following breast-conserving surgery. MRI-guided single dose ablative APBI has the potential to offer a minimally burdening, non-invasive treatment that could replace current breast-conserving therapy. The ABLATIVE study is a prospective, single arm, multicenter study evaluating preoperative, single dose, ablative radiation treatment in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Patients with core biopsy proven non-lobular invasive breast cancer, (estrogen receptor positive, Her2 negative, maximum tumor size 3.0 cm on diagnostic MRI) and a negative sentinel node biopsy are eligible. Radiotherapy (RT) planning will be performed using a contrast enhanced (CE) planning CT-scan, co-registered with a CE-MRI, both in supine RT position. A total of twenty-five consecutive patients will be treated with a single ablative RT dose of 20 Gy to the tumor and 15 Gy to the tumorbed. Follow-up MRIs are scheduled within 1 week, 2, 4 and 6 months after single-dose RT. Breast-conserving surgery is scheduled at six months following RT. Primary study endpoint is pathological complete response. Secondary study endpoints are the radiological response and toxicity. Furthermore, patients will fill out questionnaires on quality of life and functional status. Cosmetic outcome will be evaluated by the treating radiation oncologist, patient and 'Breast Cancer Conservation Treatment cosmetic results' software. Recurrence and survival rates will be assessed. The patients will be followed up to 10 years after diagnosis. If patients give additional informed consent, a biopsy and a part of the irradiated specimen will be stored at the local Biobank and used for future research on radiotherapy response associated genotyping. The ABLATIVE study evaluates

  18. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Polly Y. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Cucinotta, Francis A. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences; Bjornstad, Kathleen A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Bakke, James [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Rosen, Chris J. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Du, Nicholas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Fairchild, David G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Cacao, Eliedonna [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences; Blakely, Eleanor A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    2016-04-19

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ~70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ~100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  19. Low-Dose Consolidation Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Unfavorable Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torok, Jordan A., E-mail: jordan.torok@dm.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Wu, Yuan [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Kim, Grace J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Beaven, Anne W.; Diehl, Louis F. [Division of Hematologic Malignancy and Cellular Therapy, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) trial HD11 established 4 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) and 30 Gy of radiation therapy (RT) as a standard for early stage (I, II), unfavorable Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Additional cycles of ABVD may allow for a reduction in RT dose and improved toxicity profile. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with combined modality therapy at the Duke Cancer Institute for early stage, unfavorable HL by GHSG criteria from 1994 to 2012 were included. Patients who did not undergo post-chemotherapy functional imaging (positron emission tomography or gallium imaging) or who failed to achieve a complete response were excluded. Clinical outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Late effects were also evaluated. Results: A total of 90 patients met inclusion criteria for analysis. Median follow-up was 5 years. Chemotherapy consisted primarily of ABVD (88%) with a median number of 6 cycles. The median dose of consolidation RT was 23.4 Gy. Four patients had relapses, 2 of which were in-field. Ten-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 93% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.82-0.97) and 98% (95% CI: 0.92-0.99), respectively. For the subset of patients (n=46) who received 5 to 6 cycles of chemotherapy and ≤24 Gy, the 10-year PFS and OS values were 88% (95% CI: 70%-96%) and 98% (95% CI: 85% - 99%), respectively. The most common late effect was hypothyroidism (20%) with no cardiac complications. Seven secondary malignancies were diagnosed, with only 1 arising within the RT field. Conclusions: Lower doses of RT may be sufficient when combined with more than 4 cycles of ABVD for early stage, unfavorable HL and may result in a more favorable toxicity profile than 4 cycles of ABVD and 30 Gy of RT.

  20. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  1. Dose-response relationship for breast cancer induction at radiotherapy dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Günther

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Cancer induction after radiation therapy is known as a severe side effect. It is therefore of interest to predict the probability of second cancer appearance for the patient to be treated including breast cancer. Materials and methods In this work a dose-response relationship for breast cancer is derived based on (i the analysis of breast cancer induction after Hodgkin's disease, (ii a cancer risk model developed for high doses including fractionation based on the linear quadratic model, and (iii the reconstruction of treatment plans for Hodgkin's patients treated with radiotherapy, (iv the breast cancer induction of the A-bomb survivor data. Results The fitted model parameters for an α/β = 3 Gy were α = 0.067Gy-1 and R = 0.62. The risk for breast cancer is according to this model for small doses consistent with the finding of the A-bomb survivors, has a maximum at doses of around 20 Gy and drops off only slightly at larger doses. The predicted EAR for breast cancer after radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease is 11.7/10000PY which can be compared to the findings of several epidemiological studies where EAR for breast cancer varies between 10.5 and 29.4/10000PY. The model was used to predict the impact of the reduction of radiation volume on breast cancer risk. It was estimated that mantle field irradiation is associated with a 3.2-fold increased risk compared with mediastinal irradiation alone, which is in agreement with a published value of 2.7. It was also shown that the modelled age dependency of breast cancer risk is in satisfying agreement with published data. Conclusions The dose-response relationship obtained in this report can be used for the prediction of radiation induced secondary breast cancer of radiotherapy patients.

  2. Dose-response relationship for breast cancer induction at radiotherapy dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cancer induction after radiation therapy is known as a severe side effect. It is therefore of interest to predict the probability of second cancer appearance for the patient to be treated including breast cancer. Materials and methods In this work a dose-response relationship for breast cancer is derived based on (i) the analysis of breast cancer induction after Hodgkin's disease, (ii) a cancer risk model developed for high doses including fractionation based on the linear quadratic model, and (iii) the reconstruction of treatment plans for Hodgkin's patients treated with radiotherapy, (iv) the breast cancer induction of the A-bomb survivor data. Results The fitted model parameters for an α/β = 3 Gy were α = 0.067Gy-1 and R = 0.62. The risk for breast cancer is according to this model for small doses consistent with the finding of the A-bomb survivors, has a maximum at doses of around 20 Gy and drops off only slightly at larger doses. The predicted EAR for breast cancer after radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease is 11.7/10000PY which can be compared to the findings of several epidemiological studies where EAR for breast cancer varies between 10.5 and 29.4/10000PY. The model was used to predict the impact of the reduction of radiation volume on breast cancer risk. It was estimated that mantle field irradiation is associated with a 3.2-fold increased risk compared with mediastinal irradiation alone, which is in agreement with a published value of 2.7. It was also shown that the modelled age dependency of breast cancer risk is in satisfying agreement with published data. Conclusions The dose-response relationship obtained in this report can be used for the prediction of radiation induced secondary breast cancer of radiotherapy patients. PMID:21651799

  3. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J. M.; Custidiano, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  4. Time, Dose, and Volume Responses in a Mouse Pulmonary Injury Model Following Ablative Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Lee, Chang Geol; Shim, Hyo Sup; Lee, Eun Jung; Song, Kwang Hyun; Choi, Byoung Wook; Cho, Jaeho; Story, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to determine the time, dose, and volume responses in a mouse pulmonary injury model following ablative dose focal irradiation (ADFIR) in order to better understand normal lung injury. ADFIR was administered to the left lung of mice using a small animal micro-irradiator. Histopathological evaluation and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses were performed at 1, 2, 6, and 12 weeks after irradiation. Dose responses were tested at doses of 0-90 Gy in C57BL/6 and C3H/HeJCr mice at 6 weeks after irradiation. The volume effect was evaluated with 1-, 3-, and 5-mm diameter collimators at 1-4 weeks after 90-Gy irradiation. ADFIR caused gross local lung injury of the inflated lung in just 1 week, with extensive hyaline material visible in the irradiated area. The fibrosing process was initiated as early as 2 weeks after irradiation. C3H and C57 mice did not show significant differences in dose response. Six weeks after irradiation, the radiation dose-response curve had a sigmoidal shape, where the lag, log, and stationary phases occurred at 80 Gy, respectively. ADFIR induced substantial volume-dependent structural and functional damage to the lungs, and the volume changes of lung consolidation on micro-CT correlated inversely with lung fibrosis over time. We determined the time, dose, and volume responses in our established small animal model, and found that lung injury was substantially accelerated and phenotypically different from that of prior studies using non-ablative hemi-thorax and complete thorax irradiation schemes.

  5. Characterization of statin dose response in electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W-Q; Feng, Q; Jiang, L; Waitara, M S; Iwuchukwu, O F; Roden, D M; Jiang, M; Xu, H; Krauss, R M; Rotter, J I; Nickerson, D A; Davis, R L; Berg, R L; Peissig, P L; McCarty, C A; Wilke, R A; Denny, J C

    2014-03-01

    Efforts to define the genetic architecture underlying variable statin response have met with limited success, possibly because previous studies were limited to effect based on a single dose. We leveraged electronic medical records (EMRs) to extract potency (ED50) and efficacy (Emax) of statin dose-response curves and tested them for association with 144 preselected variants. Two large biobanks were used to construct dose-response curves for 2,026 and 2,252 subjects on simvastatin and atorvastatin, respectively. Atorvastatin was more efficacious, was more potent, and demonstrated less interindividual variability than simvastatin. A pharmacodynamic variant emerging from randomized trials (PRDM16) was associated with Emax for both. For atorvastatin, Emax was 51.7 mg/dl in subjects homozygous for the minor allele vs. 75.0 mg/dl for those homozygous for the major allele. We also identified several loci associated with ED50. The extraction of rigorously defined traits from EMRs for pharmacogenetic studies represents a promising approach to further understand the genetic factors contributing to drug response.

  6. Dose-dependent response of FGF-2 for lymphangiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lynn K; Garcia-Cardeña, Guillermo; Farnebo, Filip; Fannon, Michael; Chen, Emy J; Butterfield, Catherine; Moses, Marsha A; Mulligan, Richard C; Folkman, Judah; Kaipainen, Arja

    2004-08-10

    Spatio-temporal studies on the growth of capillary blood vessels and capillary lymphatic vessels in tissue remodeling have suggested that lymphangiogenesis is angiogenesis-dependent. We revisited this concept by using fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) (80 ng) to stimulate the growth of both vessel types in the mouse cornea. When we lowered the dose of FGF-2 in the cornea 6.4-fold (12.5 ng), the primary response was lymphangiogenic. Further investigation revealed that vascular endothelial growth factor-C and -D are required for this apparent lymphangiogenic property of FGF-2, and when the small amount of accompanying angiogenesis was completely suppressed, lymphangiogenesis remained unaffected. Our findings demonstrate that there is a dose-dependent response of FGF-2 for lymphangiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis can occur in the absence of a preexisting or developing vascular bed, i.e., in the absence of angiogenesis, in the mouse cornea.

  7. Hormesis: changing view of the dose-response, a personal account of the history and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2002-07-01

    This paper provides a personal account of the history of the hormesis concept, and of the role of the dose response in toxicology and pharmacology. A careful evaluation of the toxicology and pharmacology literatures suggests that the biphasic dose response that characterizes hormesis may be much more widespread than is commonly recognized, and may come to rival our currently favored ideas about toxicological dose responses confined to the linear and threshold representations used in risk assessment. Although hormesis-like biphasic dose responses were already well-established in chemical and radiation toxicology by the early decades of the 20th century, they were all but expunged from mainstream toxicology in the 1930s. The reasons may be found in a complex set of unrelated problems of which difficulties in replication of low-dose stimulatory responses resulting from poor study designs, greater societal interest in high-dose effects, linking of the concept of hormesis to the practice of homeopathy, and perhaps most crucially a complete lack of strong leadership to advocate its acceptance in the right circles. I believe that if hormesis achieves widespread recognition as a valid and valuable interpretation of dose-response results, we would expect an increase in the breadth of evaluations of the dose-response relationship which could be of great value in hazard and risk assessment as well as in future approaches to drug development and/or chemotherapeutics.

  8. The Response of Rats to Cutaneous Dosing with Trichothecene Mycotoxins,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    trichothecene absorption by human skin is unknown. We have found no synergism between T-2 and DAS, but to test all aspects of synergism and of solvent...This study does not suggest an approach to the therapy of trichothecene intoxication of skin. On the contrary it suggests that as with sulphur mustard...AD Al39 548 THE RESPONSE OF RATS TO CUTANEOUS DOSING WITH TRICHOTHECENE MYCOTOXINSIU) MATERIALS RESEARCH LABS ASCOT VALE IAUSTRALIA) H 0 CRONE OCT 83

  9. Dose-response relationship of autonomic nervous system responses to individualized training impulse in marathon runners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vincenzo Manzi; Carlo Castagna; Elvira Padua; Mauro Lombardo; Stefano D'Ottavio; Michele Massaro; Maurizio Volterrani; Ferdinando Iellamo

    2009-01-01

    .... We tested the hypothesis that in long-distance athletes, changes in ANS parameters are dose-response related to individual volume/intensity training load and could predict athletic performance...

  10. Low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses for endocrine active chemicals: Science to practice workshop: Workshop summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beausoleil, Claire; Ormsby, Jean-Nicolas; Gies, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A workshop was held in Berlin September 12–14th 2012 to assess the state of the science of the data supporting low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses (“low dose hypothesis”) for chemicals with endocrine activity (endocrine disrupting chemicals or EDCs). This workshop consisted...

  11. Study protocol: A multi-centre, double blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel group, phase II trial (RIDD to determine the efficacy of intra-nodular injection of anti-TNF to control disease progression in early Dupuytren’s disease, with an embedded dose response study. [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdeep Nanchahal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dupuytren’s disease is a common fibrotic condition of the hand affecting 4% of the population and causes the fingers to curl irreversibly into the palm. It has a strong familial tendency, there is no approved treatment for early stage disease, and patients with established digital contractures are most commonly treated by surgery. This is associated with prolonged recovery, and less invasive techniques have high recurrence rates. The myofibroblasts, the cells responsible for the excessive matrix deposition and contraction, are aggregated in nodules. Using excised diseased and control human tissue, we found that immune cells interspersed amongst the myofibroblasts secrete cytokines. Of these, only tumour necrosis factor (TNF promoted the development of myofibroblasts. The clinically approved anti-TNF agents led to inhibition of the myofibroblast phenotype in vitro. This clinical trial is designed to assess the efficacy of the anti-TNF agent adalimumab on participants with early disease. The first part is a dose-ranging study where nodules of participants already scheduled for surgery will be injected with either placebo (saline or varying doses of adalimumab. The excised tissue will then be analysed for markers of myofibroblast activity. The second part of the study will recruit participants with early stage disease. They will be randomised 1: 1 to receive either adalimumab or placebo at 3 month intervals over 1 year and will then be followed for a further 6 months. Outcome measures will include nodule hardness, size and disease progression. The trial will also determine the cost-effectiveness of adalimumb treatment for this group of participants.

  12. Dose response relationship in anti-stress gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available To maintain a stable intracellular environment, cells utilize complex and specialized defense systems against a variety of external perturbations, such as electrophilic stress, heat shock, and hypoxia, etc. Irrespective of the type of stress, many adaptive mechanisms contributing to cellular homeostasis appear to operate through gene regulatory networks that are organized into negative feedback loops. In general, the degree of deviation of the controlled variables, such as electrophiles, misfolded proteins, and O2, is first detected by specialized sensor molecules, then the signal is transduced to specific transcription factors. Transcription factors can regulate the expression of a suite of anti-stress genes, many of which encode enzymes functioning to counteract the perturbed variables. The objective of this study was to explore, using control theory and computational approaches, the theoretical basis that underlies the steady-state dose response relationship between cellular stressors and intracellular biochemical species (controlled variables, transcription factors, and gene products in these gene regulatory networks. Our work indicated that the shape of dose response curves (linear, superlinear, or sublinear depends on changes in the specific values of local response coefficients (gains distributed in the feedback loop. Multimerization of anti-stress enzymes and transcription factors into homodimers, homotrimers, or even higher-order multimers, play a significant role in maintaining robust homeostasis. Moreover, our simulation noted that dose response curves for the controlled variables can transition sequentially through four distinct phases as stressor level increases: initial superlinear with lesser control, superlinear more highly controlled, linear uncontrolled, and sublinear catastrophic. Each phase relies on specific gain-changing events that come into play as stressor level increases. The low-dose region is intrinsically nonlinear

  13. Treatment of early AIDS dementia in intravenous drug users : High versus low dose peptide T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosten, TR; Rosen, MI; McMahon, TL; Bridge, TP; OMalley, SS; Pearsall, R; OConnor, PG

    1997-01-01

    This placebo-controlled, double blind, cross-over study tested the efficacy of two different doses of Peptide T in the treatment of nine intravenous drug users with early AIDS dementia who were also receiving methadone and AZT. Subjects received Peptide T doses of either 15 or 1.5 mg daily for four

  14. Dose-response model of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) for human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrakar, Sushil B; Haas, Charles N

    2011-10-01

    Rickettsia rickettsii is the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) and is the prototype bacterium in the spotted fever group of rickettsiae, which is found in North, Central, and South America. The bacterium is gram negative and an obligate intracellular pathogen. The disease is transmitted to humans and vertebrate host through tick bites; however, some cases of aerosol transmission also have been reported. The disease can be difficult to diagnose in the early stages, and without prompt and appropriate treatment, it can be fatal. This article develops dose-response models of different routes of exposure for RMSF in primates and humans. The beta-Poisson model provided the best fit to the dose-response data of aerosol-exposed rhesus monkeys, and intradermally inoculated humans (morbidity as end point of response). The average 50% infectious dose among (ID₅₀) exposed human population, N₅₀, is 23 organisms with 95% confidence limits of 1 to 89 organisms. Similarly, ID₁₀ and ID₂₀ are 2.2 and 5.0, respectively. Moreover, the data of aerosol-exposed rhesus monkeys and intradermally inoculated humans could be pooled. This indicates that the dose-response models fitted to different data sets are not significantly different and can be described by the same relationship. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  15. Is There a Dose-Response Relationship for Heart Disease With Low-Dose Radiation Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eugene [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Corbett, James R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Marsh, Robin B.; Feng, Mary; Jagsi, Reshma; Kessler, Marc L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ficaro, Edward C. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pierce, Lori J., E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify cardiac radiation therapy (RT) exposure using sensitive measures of cardiac dysfunction; and to correlate dysfunction with heart doses, in the setting of adjuvant RT for left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: On a randomized trial, 32 women with node-positive left-sided breast cancer underwent pre-RT stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT) myocardial perfusion scans. Patients received RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes to doses of 50 to 52.2 Gy. Repeat SPECT-CT scans were performed 1 year after RT. Perfusion defects (PD), summed stress defects scores (SSS), and ejection fractions (EF) were evaluated. Doses to the heart and coronary arteries were quantified. Results: The mean difference in pre- and post-RT PD was −0.38% ± 3.20% (P=.68), with no clinically significant defects. To assess for subclinical effects, PD were also examined using a 1.5-SD below the normal mean threshold, with a mean difference of 2.53% ± 12.57% (P=.38). The mean differences in SSS and EF before and after RT were 0.78% ± 2.50% (P=.08) and 1.75% ± 7.29% (P=.39), respectively. The average heart Dmean and D95 were 2.82 Gy (range, 1.11-6.06 Gy) and 0.90 Gy (range, 0.13-2.17 Gy), respectively. The average Dmean and D95 to the left anterior descending artery were 7.22 Gy (range, 2.58-18.05 Gy) and 3.22 Gy (range, 1.23-6.86 Gy), respectively. No correlations were found between cardiac doses and changes in PD, SSS, and EF. Conclusions: Using sensitive measures of cardiac function, no clinically significant defects were found after RT, with the average heart Dmean <5 Gy. Although a dose response may exist for measures of cardiac dysfunction at higher doses, no correlation was found in the present study for low doses delivered to cardiac structures and perfusion, SSS, or EF.

  16. Characterization of a developmental toxicity dose-response model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faustman, E.M.; Wellington, D.G.; Smith, W.P.; Kimmel, C.A.

    1989-02-01

    The Rai and Van Ryzin dose-response model proposed for teratology experiments has been characterized for its appropriateness and applicability in modeling the dichotomous response data from developmental toxicity studies. Modifications were made in the initial probability statements to reflect more accurately biological events underlying developmental toxicity. Data sets used for the evaluation were obtained from the National Toxicology Program and U.S. EPA laboratories. The studies included developmental evaluations of ethylene glycol, diethylhexyl phthalate, di- and triethylene glycol dimethyl ethers, and nitrofen in rats, mice, or rabbits. Graphic examination and statistical evaluation demonstrate that this model is sensitive to the data when compared to directly measured experimental outcomes. The model was used to interpolate to low-risk dose levels, and comparisons were made between the values obtained and the no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) divided by an uncertainty factor. Our investigation suggests that the Rai and Van Ryzin model is sensitive to the developmental toxicity end points, prenatal deaths, and malformations, and appears to model closely their relationship to dose.

  17. Dose-time-response association between occupational asbestos exposure and pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourt, Aude; Lévêque, Emilie; Guichard, Elie; Gilg Soit Ilg, Anabelle; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Leffondré, Karen

    2017-09-01

    Early occupational exposure to asbestos has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of pleural mesothelioma (PM), which suggests that the timing of exposure might play a role in the dose-response relationship. However, none studies has evaluated the relative impact of increasing the annual intensity of occupational exposure to asbestos at each time of the whole exposure history. Yet such evaluation would allow the comparison of the risks of PM associated with different longitudinal profiles of occupational exposure to asbestos. Our objective was to estimate the time-dependent relative impact of asbestos exposure intensity over the whole occupational history and to compare the resulting estimated risks of PM associated with different profiles of exposure, using data from a large French case-control study. This study included 1196 male cases recruited in 1987-2006 and 2369 matched controls on birth year. Occupational exposure to asbestos was assessed using a job exposure matrix and represented in logistic regression models using a flexible weighted cumulative index of exposure. Due to much stronger weights of early doses of asbestos exposure, subjects who accumulated 20 fibres/mL over their entire job history with high doses during the first years and low doses thereafter were at higher risk of PM than those who accumulated most of the doses later (OR=2.37 (95% CI 2.01 to 2.87)). This study provides new insights on the dose-time-response relationship between occupational asbestos and PM and illustrates the importance of considering timing of exposure in its association with cancer risk. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. The determination of effective antiviral doses using a computer program for sigmoid dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J L; O'Brien, W J; Goldman, A I

    1984-05-01

    A computer program was designed to construct best fit sigmoid dose-response curves for determination of the dose required to reduce the yield of virus by 50%, effective antiviral dose (ED50). A single antiviral agent, 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine, was examined for effectiveness against four strains of herpes simplex virus type 1. The resulting ED50 values were compared with those obtained by probit analysis. The statistical parameters obtained from sigmoid curve fit program were utilized to evaluate statistical differences between ED50 values for resistant and sensitive virus strains and to evaluate the goodness-of-fit of the regression line to the data. In addition, using this analytical method, it was shown that a change in one experimental variable, i.e., multiplicity of infection, in the yield reduction assay significantly affected the apparent ED50 value. The computer program was easily utilized for analysis of data obtained from both plaque reduction and yield reduction assays and generated the parameters necessary for statistical comparison of relative antiviral activity of any antiviral agent.

  19. Bronchoscopic phototherapy at comparable dose rates: Early results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pass, H.I.; Delaney, T.; Smith, P.D.; Bonner, R.; Russo, A.

    1989-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a recently introduced treatment for surface malignancies. Since January 1987, 10 patients with endobronchial neoplasms have had bronchoscopic photodynamic therapy at similar dose rates (400 mW/cm) for total atelectasis (2), carinal narrowing with respiratory insufficiency (2), or partial obstruction without collapse (4). Two patients underwent photodynamic therapy as a preliminary to immunotherapy. Histologies included endobronchial metastases (colon, ovary, melanoma, and sarcoma, 1 each; and renal cell, 3) and primary lung cancer (3). The 2 patients with total atelectasis had complete reexpansion after photodynamic therapy, which permitted eventual sleeve lobectomy in 1. Carinal narrowing was ameliorated in the 2 patients seen with inspiratory stridor, thereby permitting hospital discharge. Endoscopically resected fragments after photodynamic therapy exhibited avascular necrosis. These data support further controlled studies of photodynamic therapy by thoracic surgical oncologists to define its limitations as well as to improve and expand its efficacy as a palliative or surgical adjuvant.

  20. Effects of low dose gamma radiation on the early growth of red pepper and the resistance to subsquent high dose of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Baek, M. H.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, Y. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. B. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    Red pepper (capsicum annuum L. cv. Jokwang and cv. Johong) seeds were irradiated with the dose of 0{approx}50 Gy to investigated the effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation. The effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequenct high dose of radiation were enhanced in Johong cultivar but not in Jokwang cultivar. Germination rate and early growth of Johong cultivar were noticeably increased at 4 Gy-, 8 Gy- and 20 Gy irradiation group. Resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at almost all of the low dose irradiation group. Especially it was highest at 4 Gy irradiation group. The carotenoid contents and enzyme activity on the resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at the 4 Gy and 8 Gy irradiation group.

  1. Bulgarian Emergency Response System (BERS) in case of nuclear accident with exposure doses estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrakov, D.; Prodanova, M.; Slavov, K.; Veleva, B.

    2015-07-01

    A PC-oriented Emergency Response System in case of nuclear accident (BERS) is developed and works operationally in the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology (NIMH). The creation and development of BERS was highly stimulated by the ETEX (European Tracer Experiment) project. BERS comprises two main parts - the operational and the accidental ones. The operational part, run automatically every 12 hours, prepares the input meteorological file used by both trajectory and dispersion models, runs the trajectory models, visualizes the results and uploads the maps of trajectories to a dedicated web-site. The accidental part is activated manually when a real radioactive releases occur or during emergency exercises. Its core is the Bulgarian dispersion models EMAP. Outputs are concentration, accumulated deposition and selected doses fields. In the paper, the BERS overall structure is described and examples of its products are presented. Key words: nuclear accident, emergency response, early warning system, air dispersion models, radioactive exposure dose. (Author)

  2. Hormone-Balancing Effect of Pre-Gelatinized Organic Maca (Lepidium peruvianum Chacon): (II) Physiological and Symptomatic Responses of Early-Postmenopausal Women to Standardized doses of Maca in Double Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Multi-Centre Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, H O; Mscisz, A; Reich-Bilinska, H; Kapczynski, W; Mrozikiewicz, P; Bobkiewicz-Kozlowska, T; Kedzia, B; Lowicka, A; Barchia, I

    2006-12-01

    This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-corrected, outpatient, multi-centre (five sites) clinical study, in which a total of 168 Caucasian early-postmenopausal women volunteers (age>49 years) participated after fulfilling the criteria: follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) >30 IU/ml and estrogen (E2) Maca (Maca-GO) treatment, according to different monthly treatment sequences scheduled for each site. Two 500 mg vegetable hard gel capsules with Maca-GO or Placebo powder were self-administered twice daily with meals (total 2 g/day) during three (Trial I; n=102) or four (Trial II; n=66) months study periods. At the baseline and follow- up monthly intervals, blood levels of FSH, E2, progesterone (PRG) and lutinizing hormone (LH), as well as serum cholesterol (CHOL), triglycerides (TRG), high- and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) were measured. Menopausal symptoms were assessed according to Greene's Score (GMS) and Kupperman's Index (KMI). Data were analyzed using multivariate technique on blocs of monthly results in one model and Maca versus Placebo contrast in another model. A total of 124 women concluded the study. Maca-GO significantly stimulated production of E2 (PMaca-GO significantly reduced both frequency and severity of individual menopausal symptoms (hot flushes and night sweating in particular) resulting in significant (P<0.001) alleviation of KMI (from 22 to 10), thus, offering an attractive non-hormonal addition to the choices available to early-postmenopausal women in the form of a natural plant alternative to Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) - hence, reducing dependence on hormone therapy programs.

  3. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Zhi-Hua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs and thromboxane A2 (TXA2. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2 after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187 induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells.

  4. Dose-response in direct comparisons of different doses of aspirin, ibuprofen and paracetamol (acetaminophen) in analgesic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2007-03-01

    Establishing the dose-response relationship for clinically useful doses of aspirin, ibuprofen and paracetamol has been difficult. Indirect comparison from meta-analysis is compromised by too little information at some doses. A systematic review of randomized, double-blind trials in acute pain comparing different doses of aspirin, ibuprofen and paracetamol was therefore undertaken. Fifty trials were found. Numerical superiority of higher over lower dose was found by the original authors in 37/50 trials (74%) and statistical superiority in 11/50 (22%). Twenty-eight trials had design, quality and data reporting characteristics to allow pooling of common doses; in 3/28 (11%) of the individual trials our calculations showed statistical superiority of higher over lower dose. Pooled comparison of 1000/1200 mg aspirin over 500/600 mg was statistically superior, with a number-needed-to-treat (NNT) for higher over lower dose of 16 (8 to > 100). Pooled comparison of 400 mg ibuprofen over 200 mg was statistically superior, with an NNT for higher over lower dose of 10 (6-23). Pooled comparison of 1000 mg paracetamol over 500 mg was statistically superior, with an NNT for higher over lower dose of 9 (6-20). Use of trials making direct comparison of two different doses of target drugs revealed the underlying dose-response curve for clinical analgesia.

  5. Estimating Adolescent Sleep Need Using Dose-Response Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Michelle A; Weber, Nathan; Reynolds, Chelsea; Coussens, Scott; Carskadon, Mary A

    2018-01-06

    This study will, (a) estimate the nightly sleep need of human adolescents, (b) determine the time course and severity of sleep-related deficits when sleep is reduced below this optimal quantity, and (c) determine whether sleep restriction perturbs the circadian system as well as the sleep homeostat. Thirty-four adolescents aged 15 to 17 years spent 10 days and 9 nights in the sleep laboratory. Between two baseline nights and two recovery nights with 10-hours' time in bed (TIB) per night, participants experienced either severe sleep restriction (5-hr TIB), moderate sleep restriction (7.5-hr TIB), or no sleep restriction (10-hr TIB) for 5 nights. A 10-minute psychomotor vigilance task (PVT; lapse = response after 500 ms) and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale were administered every 3 hours during wake. Salivary dim light melatonin onset was calculated at baseline and after 4 nights of each sleep dose to estimate circadian phase. Dose-dependent deficits to sleep duration, circadian phase timing, lapses of attention and subjective sleepiness occurred. Less TIB resulted in less sleep, more lapses of attention, greater subjective sleepiness and larger circadian phase delays. Sleep need estimated from 10-hr TIB sleep opportunities was approximately 9 hours, while modelling PVT lapse data suggested that 9.35 hr of sleep is needed to maintain optimal sustained attention performance. Sleep restriction perturbs homeostatic and circadian systems, leading to dose-dependent deficits to sustained attention and sleepiness. Adolescents require more sleep for optimal functioning than typically obtained.

  6. Dose - response relationship of bevacizumab in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzopardi, Nicolas; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Ternant, David; Fargeton, Anne-Emmanuelle; Ginon, Isabelle; Faure, Frédéric; Decullier, Evelyne; Roux, Adeline; Carette, Marie-France; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Lacombe, Pascal; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Rivière, Sophie; Corre, Romain; Bailly, Sabine; Paintaud, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), a genetic vascular disorder associated with epistaxis and hepatic shunts, is responsible for high-output cardiac failure in rare cases. Bevacizumab, which targets vascular endothelial growth factor, was shown to decrease both cardiac index (CI) and epistaxis duration in HHT patients with severe liver involvement. The relationship between its serum concentration and change in both CI and epistaxis duration was investigated to design the bevacizumab maintenance dosing regimen of future therapeutic studies. Twenty-five HHT patients with dyspnea and high CI were included in a prospective non-comparative study. They received bevacizumab at a dose of 5 mg/kg per infusion every 14 days for a total of 6 injections. The relationships between bevacizumab serum concentration and both CI and epistaxis duration were described using transit compartments and direct inhibition pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models. The performances of different maintenance regimens were evaluated using simulation. Infusions every 3, 2 and one months were predicted to maintain 41%, 45% and 50% of patients with CI <4 L/min/m(2) at 24 months, respectively. The fraction of patients with <20 min epistaxis per month was predicted to be 34%, 43% and 60%, with infusion every 3, 2 or one months, respectively. Simulations of the effects of different maintenance dosing regimens predict that monthly 5 mg/kg infusions of bevacizumab should allow sustained control of both cardiac index and epistaxis.

  7. A normal tissue dose response model of dynamic repair processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alber, Markus; Belka, Claus

    2006-01-01

    A model is presented for serial, critical element complication mechanisms for irradiated volumes from length scales of a few millimetres up to the entire organ. The central element of the model is the description of radiation complication as the failure of a dynamic repair process. The nature of the repair process is seen as reestablishing the structural organization of the tissue, rather than mere replenishment of lost cells. The interactions between the cells, such as migration, involved in the repair process are assumed to have finite ranges, which limits the repair capacity and is the defining property of a finite-sized reconstruction unit. Since the details of the repair processes are largely unknown, the development aims to make the most general assumptions about them. The model employs analogies and methods from thermodynamics and statistical physics. An explicit analytical form of the dose response of the reconstruction unit for total, partial and inhomogeneous irradiation is derived. The use of the model is demonstrated with data from animal spinal cord experiments and clinical data about heart, lung and rectum. The three-parameter model lends a new perspective to the equivalent uniform dose formalism and the established serial and parallel complication models. Its implications for dose optimization are discussed.

  8. Dose-response studies with ethylenediurea (EDU) and radish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka-Rick, R; Manning, W J

    1993-01-01

    There is some concern that the antiozonant ethylenediurea (EDU), used for crop loss assessment due to ambient ozone (O3) may per se affect plant growth and yield. In view of this, and to provide knowledge for later field experiments, dose-response studies with EDU and O3 were carried out in greenhouses in winter and spring 1989, using radish (Raphanus sativus L.) cv. 'Cherry Belle' and 'Red Prince', grown in two different substrates. EDU was applied as a single or repeated soil drench in concentrations ranging from 300 to 800 mg litre(-1) in the first, and from 100 to 400 mg litre(-1) in the second trial. In the second experiment, plants were exposed to a chronic level of O3, mimicking ambient patterns, or to filtered air after the EDU-treatment. When applied in concentrations above 300 mg litre(-1), EDU reduced growth, thereby affecting the development of the thickened hypocotyl far more than the shoot growth that was partially stimulated by lower doses of EDU. Phytotoxic symptoms on the leaves, attributable to EDU, were observed at concentrations above 200 mg litre(-1), but complete protection from visible O3-injury was provided by a single application of EDU at a concentration as low as 100 mg litre(-1). Significant interactions on growth characters measured between O3-exposure and EDU application were observed only in one of the substrates. While these results demonstrate the need for careful dose-response studies prior to field assessments, they also provide evidence of a dosage that is effective in protecting radish from O3 damage without interfering with plant growth itself.

  9. Neuromuscular dose-response studies: determining sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopman, A F; Lien, C A; Naguib, M

    2011-02-01

    Investigators planning dose-response studies of neuromuscular blockers have rarely used a priori power analysis to determine the minimal sample size their protocols require. Institutional Review Boards and peer-reviewed journals now generally ask for this information. This study outlines a proposed method for meeting these requirements. The slopes of the dose-response relationships of eight neuromuscular blocking agents were determined using regression analysis. These values were substituted for γ in the Hill equation. When this is done, the coefficient of variation (COV) around the mean value of the ED₅₀ for each drug is easily calculated. Using these values, we performed an a priori one-sample two-tailed t-test of the means to determine the required sample size when the allowable error in the ED₅₀ was varied from ±10-20%. The COV averaged 22% (range 15-27%). We used a COV value of 25% in determining the sample size. If the allowable error in finding the mean ED₅₀ is ±15%, a sample size of 24 is needed to achieve a power of 80%. Increasing 'accuracy' beyond this point requires increasing greater sample sizes (e.g. an 'n' of 37 for a ±12% error). On the basis of the results of this retrospective analysis, a total sample size of not less than 24 subjects should be adequate for determining a neuromuscular blocking drug's clinical potency with a reasonable degree of assurance.

  10. Dose-dependent changes in the locomotor responses to methamphetamine in BALB/c mice: low doses induce hypolocomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rana A K; Kosten, Therese A; Kinsey, Berma M; Shen, Xiaoyun; Lopez, Angel Y; Kosten, Thomas R; Orson, Frank M

    2012-12-01

    The overall goal of the present study was to determine the effects of different doses of (+)-methamphetamine (meth) on locomotor activity of Balb/C mice. Four experiments were designed to test a wide range of meth doses in BALB/c female mice. In Experiment 1, we examined locomotor activity induced by an acute administration of low doses of meth (0.01 and 0.03mg/kg) in a 90-min session. Experiment 2 was conducted to test higher meth doses (0.3-10mg/kg). In Experiment 3, separate sets of mice were pre-treated with various meth doses once or twice (one injection/week) prior to a locomotor challenge with a low meth dose. Finally, in Experiment 4, we tested whether locomotor activation would be affected by pretreatment with a low or moderate dose of meth one month prior to the low meth dose challenge. Results show that low doses of meth induce hypolocomotion whereas moderate to high doses induce hyperlocomotion. Prior exposure to either one moderate or high dose of meth or to two, low doses of meth attenuated the hypolocomotor effect of a low meth dose one week later. This effect was also attenuated in mice tested one month after administration of a moderate meth dose. These results show that low and high doses of meth can have opposing effects on locomotor activity. Further, prior exposure to the drug leads to tolerance, rather than sensitization, of the hypolocomotor response to low meth doses. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Early prediction of blonanserin response in Japanese patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Taro; Matsuda, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Nakao

    2014-01-01

    Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic used for the treatment of schizophrenia in Japan and Korea. The present study aimed to examine early prediction of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia. An 8-week, prospective, single-arm, flexible-dose clinical trial of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia was conducted under real-world conditions. The inclusion criteria were antipsychotic naïve, and first-episode schizophrenia patients or schizophrenia patients with no consumption of any antipsychotic medication for more than 4 weeks before enrollment in this study. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive power were calculated for the response status at week 4 to predict the subsequent response at week 8. Thirty-seven patients were recruited (56.8% of them had first-episode schizophrenia), and 28 (75.7%) completed the trial. At week 8, blonanserin was associated with a significant improvement in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score (Pblonanserin response at week 4 could predict the later response at week 8.

  12. Dose-response analysis of bromate-induced DNA damage and mutagenicity is consistent with low-dose linear, nonthreshold processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassova, Maria A; Miller, David J; Eastmond, David A; Nikolova, Nadejda S; Vulimiri, Suryanarayana V; Caldwell, Jane; Chen, Chao; White, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Mutagenic agents have long been inferred to act through low-dose linear, nonthreshold processes. However, there is debate about this assumption, with various studies interpreting datasets as showing thresholds for DNA damage and mutation. We have applied rigorous statistical analyses to investigate the shape of dose-response relationships for a series of in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity studies using potassium bromate (KBrO(3) ), a water ozonation byproduct that is bioactivated to a reactive species causing oxidative damage to DNA. We analyzed studies of KBrO(3) genotoxicity where no-effect/threshold levels were reported as well as other representative datasets. In all cases, the data were consistent with low-dose linear models. In the majority of cases, the data were fit either by a linear (straight line) model or a model which was linear at low doses and showed a saturation-like downward curvature at high doses. Other datasets with apparent upward curvature were still adequately represented by models that were linear at low dose. Sensitivity analysis of datasets showing upward curvature revealed that both low-dose linear and nonlinear models provide adequate fits. Additionally, a simple biochemical model of selected key processes in bromate-induced DNA damage was developed and illustrated a situation where response for early primary events suggested an apparent threshold while downstream events were linear. Overall, the statistical analyses of DNA damage and mutations induced by KBrO(3) are consistent with a low-dose linear response and do not provide convincing evidence for the presence of a threshold. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Biological profiling and dose-response modeling tools ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through its ToxCast project, the U.S. EPA has developed a battery of in vitro high throughput screening (HTS) assays designed to assess the potential toxicity of environmental chemicals. At present, over 1800 chemicals have been tested in up to 600 assays, yielding a large number of concentration-response data sets. Standard processing of these data sets involves finding a best fitting mathematical model and set of model parameters that specify this model. The model parameters include quantities such as the half-maximal activity concentration (or “AC50”) that have biological significance and can be used to inform the efficacy or potency of a given chemical with respect to a given assay. All of this data is processed and stored in an online-accessible database and website: http://actor.epa.gov/dashboard2. Results from these in vitro assays are used in a multitude of ways. New pathways and targets can be identified and incorporated into new or existing adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). Pharmacokinetic models such as those implemented EPA’s HTTK R package can be used to translate an in vitro concentration into an in vivo dose; i.e., one can predict the oral equivalent dose that might be expected to activate a specific biological pathway. Such predicted values can then be compared with estimated actual human exposures prioritize chemicals for further testing.Any quantitative examination should be accompanied by estimation of uncertainty. We are developing met

  14. Patch test dose-response study of p-phenylenediamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosted, Heidi; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2006-01-01

    The elicitation response in allergic contact dermatitis for the hair dye substance p-phenylenediamine (PPD) is dose dependent, but threshold concentrations have not previously been investigated. 15 PPD-sensitive patients participated in a serial dilution 48-hr patch test with PPD using 8...... concentrations of PPD ranging from 1 to 10 000 on the upper back. Petrolatum was applied as control. Three concentrations (50, 100 and 500 p.p.m. PPD) were also applied to the retroauricular area and on the lateral aspects of the upper arms. 14 of the 15 participants reacted to one or more of the test samples....... The threshold value for 10% of the tested persons (ED10) based on+or stronger reactions for PPD on the back was 38 p.p.m. (CI: 4.3-100). There were no statistically significant differences in the sensitivity of the three anatomical regions. The upper back is a suitable region for patch testing patients...

  15. Alcohol and cirrhosis: dose--response or threshold effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Grønbaek, Morten; Tolstrup, Janne

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: General population studies have shown a strong association between alcohol intake and death from alcoholic cirrhosis, but whether this is a dose-response or a threshold effect remains unknown, and the relation among alcohol misusers has not been studied. METHODS: A cohort of 6152...... alcohol misusing men and women aged 15-83 were interviewed about drinking pattern and social issues and followed for 84,257 person-years. Outcome was alcoholic cirrhosis mortality. Data was analyzed by means of Cox-regression models. RESULTS: In this large prospective cohort study of alcohol misusers...... there was a 27 fold increased mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis in men and a 35 fold increased mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis in women compared to the Danish population. Number of drinks per day was not significantly associated with death from alcoholic cirrhosis, since there was no additional risk of death...

  16. Adrenocortical responsiveness to infusions of physiological doses of ACTH is not altered in posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen D Radant

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Early studies of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD reported that abnormal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA system was associated with the disorder. However, subsequent studies attempting to identify a specific aspect of HPA dysfunction that characterizes PTSD have been marked by considerable inconsistency of results. A facet of HPA regulation that has been considered but not definitively investigated is the possibility that the responsiveness of the adrenal cortex to physiological concentrations of ACTH is diminished in PTSD. Relationships between PTSD and the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA have also been postulated. In this study we investigated the magnitude and time course of changes in concentrations of plasma cortisol and DHEA in response to bolus infusions of physiological doses of ACTH 1-24 in PTSD patients and control subjects. We found no evidence for PTSD-related alterations in cortisol or DHEA secretion in response to stimulation by low doses of ACTH and conclude that adrenocortical responsiveness is normal in PTSD. Results from this and other studies suggest that the occurrence of defects in HPA function in PTSD may be specific responses to particular combinations of trauma type, genetic susceptibility, and individual history.

  17. Fundamental investigations of natural and laboratory generated SAR dose response curves for quartz OSL in the high dose range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timar-Gabor, Alida; Constantin, Daniela; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter

    2015-01-01

    saturation much earlier. Analysis of time resolved spectra indicated similar luminescence lifetimes for both fine and coarse quartz grains, and natural and laboratory generated OSL signals seem to use the same non-dosedependent recombination pathways. The natural signals of a sample with an expected......SAR-OSL investigations on quartz from Romanian loess resulted in non concordant fine and coarse-grain ages for equivalent doses higher than ~100 Gy. The laboratory dose response for both grain sizes is well represented by a sum of two saturating exponential functions, fine and coarse grains...... equivalent dose of 2000e2500 Gy were found to be below the saturation level of the laboratory dose response curve for both grain sizes; this also applied to the luminescence signals measured after >5000 Gy given on top of natural doses. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  18. Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generoso, Jose Roberto; Latoures, Renee Elizabeth; Acar, Yahya; Miller, Dean Scott; Ciano, Mark; Sandrei, Renan; Vieira, Marlon; Luong, Sean; Hirsch, Jan; Fidler, Richard Lee

    2016-06-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER)," found on pages 255-263, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until May 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Define the purpose of the Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER) study. Review the outcome of the STEER study. DISCLOSURE

  19. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Dose of High Let Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, K.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (0.01 - 0.20 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28 ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56 ions, including doses where on average less than one direct ion traversal per cell nucleus occurs. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The responses for doses above 0.1 Gy (more than one ion traverses a cell) showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, both Si-28 ions and Fe-56 ions showed a dose independent response above background chromosome aberrations frequencies. Possible explanations for our results are non-targeted effects due to aberrant cell signaling [1], or delta-ray dose fluctuations [2] where a fraction of cells receive significant delta-ray doses due to the contributions of multiple ion tracks that do not directly traverse cell nuclei where chromosome aberrations are scored.

  20. Bounding the total-dose response of modern bipolar transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosier, S.L.; Wei, A.; Schrimpf, R.D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Combs, W.E. [Naval Surface Warfare Center-Crane, Crane, IN (United States); Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); DeLaus, M. [Analog Devices, Inc., Wilmington, MA (United States); Pease, R.L. [RLP Research, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The base current in modern bipolar transistors saturates at large total doses once a critical oxide charge is reached. The saturated value of base current is dose-rate independent. Testing implications are discussed.

  1. Ozone as U-Shaped Dose Responses Molecules (Hormetins)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez- Sánchez, G.; Pérez-Davison, G.; Re, L.; Giuliani, A.

    2010-01-01

    Redox environment involves a broad network of pro-oxidant and antioxidant components. Health benefit or damage can be induced as a consequence of an adaptive cellular stress response. A consequence of hormetic amplification is an increase in the homeodynamic space of a living system in terms of an increased defense capacity and a reduced load of damaged macromolecules. Ozone, when used at appropriate doses, promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides allows them to become late and long-lasting messengers. Healthy aging may be achieved by hormesis through mild and periodic, but not severe or chronic, physical and mental challenges, and by the use of nutritional hormesis incorporating mild stress-inducing molecules called hormetins. The paradoxical concept that ozone eventually induces an antioxidant response capable of reversing a chronic oxidative stress is common in the animal and vegetal kingdom; it is already supported by findings of an increased level of antioxidant enzymes during ozone therapy. Those facts can include ozone as a hormetin. The established scientific foundations of hormesis are ready to pave the way for new and effective approaches in redox-related disease research and intervention; ozone therapy can be a good candidate. PMID:21431076

  2. Treatment Planning for Minimizing Carotid Artery Dose in the Radiotherapy of Early Glottic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ki, Yong Kan; Kim, Won Taek; Nam, Ji Ho; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Ju Hye; Park, Dal; Kim, Dong Won [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    To examine the feasibility of the treatment planning for minimizing carotid artery dose in the radiotherapy of early glottic cancer. From 2007 to 2010, computed tomography simulation images of 31 patients treated by radiotherapy for early glottic cancer were analyzed. The virtual planning was used to compare the parallel-opposing fields (POF) with the modified oblique fields (MOF) placed at angles to exclude the ipsilateral carotid arteries. Planning target volume (PTV), irradiated volume, carotid artery, and spinal cord were analyzed at a mean dose, V{sub 35}, V{sub 40}, V{sub 50} and with a percent dose-volume. The beam angles were arranged 25 degrees anteriorly in 23 patients and 30 degrees anteriorly in 8 patients. The percent dose-volume of PTV shows no statistical difference. Conversely, the cumulative percent dose-volume of carotid artery shows the significant difference (p<0.001). The mean doses of carotid artery were 38.5 Gy for POF and 26.3 Gy for MOF and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.012). Similarly, V{sub 35}, V{sub 40}, and V{sub 50} also showed significant differences between POF and MOF. The modified oblique field was respected to prevent a carotid artery stenosis and reduce the incidence of a stroke based on these results.

  3. Human cardiovascular dose-response to supplemental oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Z; Sjöberg, F; Rousseau, A; Steinvall, I; Janerot-Sjoberg, B

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the central and peripheral cardiovascular adaptation and its coupling during increasing levels of hyperoxaemia. We hypothesized a dose-related effect of hyperoxaemia on left ventricular performance and the vascular properties of the arterial tree. Oscillometrically calibrated arterial subclavian pulse trace data were combined with echocardiographic recordings to obtain non-invasive estimates of left ventricular volumes, aortic root pressure and flow data. For complementary vascular parameters and control purposes whole-body impedance cardiography was applied. In nine (seven males) supine, resting healthy volunteers, aged 23-48 years, data was collected after 15 min of air breathing and at increasing transcutaneous oxygen tensions (20, 40 and 60 kPa), accomplished by a two group, random order and blinded hyperoxemic protocol. Left ventricular stroke volume [86 +/- 13 to 75 +/- 9 mL (mean +/- SD)] and end-diastolic area (19.3 +/- 4.4 to 16.8 +/- 4.3 cm(2)) declined (P arterial oxygen levels in a regression model. Peripheral resistance and characteristic impedance increased in a similar manner. Heart rate, left ventricular fractional area change, end-systolic area, mean arterial pressure, arterial compliance or carbon dioxide levels did not change. There is a linear dose-response relationship between arterial oxygen and cardiovascular parameters when the systemic oxygen tension increases above normal. A direct effect of supplemental oxygen on the vessels may therefore not be excluded. Proximal aortic and peripheral resistance increases from hyperoxaemia, but a decrease of venous return implies extra cardiac blood-pooling and compensatory relaxation of the capacitance vessels.

  4. Different dose rate-dependent responses of human melanoma cells and fibroblasts to low dose fast neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionet, Claude; Müller-Barthélémy, Melanie; Marceau, Geoffroy; Denis, Jean-Marc; Averbeck, Dietrich; Gueulette, John; Sapin, Vincent; Pereira, Bruno; Tchirkov, Andrei; Chautard, Emmanuel; Verrelle, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    To analyze the dose rate influence in hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) of human melanoma cells to very low doses of fast neutrons and to compare to the behaviour of normal human skin fibroblasts. We explored different neutron dose rates as well as possible implication of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), apoptosis, and energy-provider adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) levels during HRS. HRS in melanoma cells appears only at a very low dose rate (VLDR), while a high dose rate (HDR) induces an initial cell-radioresistance (ICRR). HRS does not seem to be due either to DSB or to apoptosis. Both phenomena (HRS and ICRR) appear to be related to ATP availability for triggering cell repair. Fibroblast survival after neutron irradiation is also dose rate-dependent but without HRS. Melanoma cells or fibroblasts exert their own survival behaviour at very low doses of neutrons, suggesting that in some cases there is a differential between cancer and normal cells radiation responses. Only the survival of fibroblasts at HDR fits the linear no-threshold model. This new insight into human cell responses to very low doses of neutrons, concerns natural radiations, surroundings of accelerators, proton-therapy devices, flights at high altitude. Furthermore, ATP inhibitors could increase HRS during high-linear energy transfer (high-LET) irradiation.

  5. Eosinophils in the bronchial mucosa in relation to methacholine dose-response curves in atopic asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Moller (Trude); S.E. Overbeek (Shelley); C.G. van Helden-Meeuwsen; H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); J.M. Bogaard (Jan)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAsthma is characterized by both local infiltration of eosinophils in the bronchial mucosa and bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). A detailed characterization of BHR implies analysis of a histamine or methacholine dose-response curve yielding not only the dose

  6. Comparative responses to endocrine disrupting compounds in early life stages of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Tara A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; McCormick, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) are endangered anadromous fish that may be exposed to feminizing endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) during early development, potentially altering physiological capacities, survival and fitness. To assess differential life stage sensitivity to common EDCs, we carried out short-term (four day) exposures using three doses each of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17β-estradiol (E2), and nonylphenol (NP) on four early life stages; embryos, yolk-sac larvae, feeding fry and one year old smolts. Differential response was compared using vitellogenin (Vtg, a precursor egg protein) gene transcription. Smolts were also examined for impacts on plasma Vtg, cortisol, thyroid hormones (T4/T3) and hepatosomatic index (HSI). Compound-related mortality was not observed in any life stage, but Vtg mRNA was elevated in a dose-dependent manner in yolk-sac larvae, fry and smolts but not in embyos. The estrogens EE2 and E2 were consistently stronger inducers of Vtg than NP. Embryos responded significantly to the highest concentration of EE2 only, while older life stages responded to the highest doses of all three compounds, as well as intermediate doses of EE2 and E2. Maximal transcription was greater for fry among the three earliest life stages, suggesting fry may be the most responsive life stage in early development. Smolt plasma Vtg was also significantly increased, and this response was observed at lower doses of each compound than was detected by gene transcription suggesting this is a more sensitive indicator at this life stage. HSI was increased at the highest doses of EE2 and E2 and plasma T3 decreased at the highest dose of EE2. Our results indicate that all life stages after hatching are potentially sensitive to endocrine disruption by estrogenic compounds and that physiological responses were altered over a short window of exposure, indicating the potential for these compounds to impact fish in the wild.

  7. Bayesian designs of phase II oncology trials to select maximum effective dose assuming monotonic dose-response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Beibei; Li, Yisheng

    2014-07-29

    For many molecularly targeted agents, the probability of response may be assumed to either increase or increase and then plateau in the tested dose range. Therefore, identifying the maximum effective dose, defined as the lowest dose that achieves a pre-specified target response and beyond which improvement in the response is unlikely, becomes increasingly important. Recently, a class of Bayesian designs for single-arm phase II clinical trials based on hypothesis tests and nonlocal alternative prior densities has been proposed and shown to outperform common Bayesian designs based on posterior credible intervals and common frequentist designs. We extend this and related approaches to the design of phase II oncology trials, with the goal of identifying the maximum effective dose among a small number of pre-specified doses. We propose two new Bayesian designs with continuous monitoring of response rates across doses to identify the maximum effective dose, assuming monotonicity of the response rate across doses. The first design is based on Bayesian hypothesis tests. To determine whether each dose level achieves a pre-specified target response rate and whether the response rates between doses are equal, multiple statistical hypotheses are defined using nonlocal alternative prior densities. The second design is based on Bayesian model averaging and also uses nonlocal alternative priors. We conduct simulation studies to evaluate the operating characteristics of the proposed designs, and compare them with three alternative designs. In terms of the likelihood of drawing a correct conclusion using similar between-design average sample sizes, the performance of our proposed design based on Bayesian hypothesis tests and nonlocal alternative priors is more robust than that of the other designs. Specifically, the proposed Bayesian hypothesis test-based design has the largest probability of being the best design among all designs under comparison and the smallest probability of

  8. Immune Response And Anamnestic Immune Response In Children After A 3-Dose Primary Hepatitis B Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad Faheem; Sultan, Muhammad Ashraf; Saleemi, Ahmad Imran

    2016-01-01

    Diseases caused by Hepatitis B virus (HBV) have a worldwide distribution. Pakistan adopted the recommendations of World Health Organization (WHO) for routine universal infant vaccination against hepatitis B in 2002, currently being administered at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age in a combination vaccine. This study was conducted to determine the immune response & anamnestic immune response in children, 9 months-10 years of age, after a 3dose primary Hepatitis B vaccination. This cross sectional study was conducted in the Department of Paediatrics, King Edward Medical University/Mayo Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan, from January to June, 2014. A total of 200 children of either sex between the ages of 9 months to 10 years, documented to have received 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccines according to Expanded Program of Immunization (6,10,14 weeks) schedule in infancy, were recruited by consecutive sampling. The level of serum antiHBsAb by ELIZA was measured. Children with antiHBs titers ≥10 mIU/mL were considered to be immune. Those with anti HBsAb levels <10 mIU/mL were offered a booster dose of infant recombinant hepatitis B vaccine. The second serum sample was obtained 21-28 days following the administration of the booster dose and the anamnestic immune response was measured. Data was analysed using SPSS 17 to determine the relation between time interval since last vaccination and antibody titer. Chi square test was applied. Of the 200 children, protective antibody response was found in 58%. Median serological response was 18.60 (range 2.82 - 65.15). Antibody levels were found to have a statistically significant ( pvalue 0.019) negative correlation with the time since last administration of vaccine. A booster dose of Hepatitis B vacci ne was administered to all nonresponders, with each registering a statistically significant (pvalue 0.00) anamnestic response. The vaccination schedule with short dosage interval was unable to provide protection to 42% of the study population

  9. Early prediction of blonanserin response in Japanese patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishi T

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Taro Kishi,1 Yuki Matsuda,1 Kiyoshi Fujita,2,3 Nakao Iwata1 1Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Okehazama Hospital, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan; 3The Neuroscience Research Center, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan Background: Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic used for the treatment of schizophrenia in Japan and Korea. The present study aimed to examine early prediction of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: An 8-week, prospective, single-arm, flexible-dose clinical trial of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia was conducted under real-world conditions. The inclusion criteria were antipsychotic naïve, and first-episode schizophrenia patients or schizophrenia patients with no consumption of any antipsychotic medication for more than 4 weeks before enrollment in this study. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive power were calculated for the response status at week 4 to predict the subsequent response at week 8.Results: Thirty-seven patients were recruited (56.8% of them had first-episode schizophrenia, and 28 (75.7% completed the trial. At week 8, blonanserin was associated with a significant improvement in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS total score (P<0.0001 and in positive (P<0.0001, negative (P<0.0001, and general subscale scores (P<0.0001. In terms of percentage improvement of PANSS total scores from baseline to week 8, 64.9% of patients showed a ≥20% reduction in the PANSS total score and 48.6% showed a ≥30% reduction. However, 8.1% of patients experienced at least one adverse event. Using the 20% reduction in the PANSS total score at week 4 as a definition of an early response, the negative predictive values for later responses (ie, reductions of ≥30 and ≥40 in the PANSS total scores were 88.9% and 94.1%, respectively. The specificities were 80.0% and

  10. [Oral health in asthmatic children: a dose-response study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloot, A; Vanobbergen, J; Martens, L

    2004-01-01

    In literature there is a lack of consensus regarding the relationship between dental caries risk and asthma in a child population. Despite these divergent views, all studies conclude that asthmatic children are at risk and that special preventive programs are needed. The asthmatic through either its disease status or its pharmacotherapy carries several factors for an increased caries risk. PH values of most inhalant powders are less than 5.5. A decrease of the salivary and plaque pH has been detected in asthmatic children after use of these inhalers. This low pH value associated with a reduced salivary flow rate (caused by beta-adrenergic agonists and by anti-histaminic medication) makes asthmatics more susceptible to caries and erosion. There are only a few studies that take into account that asthma is a disease with a large diversity of severity and duration. This approach could help to clarify some variability in caries risk. The aim of the present study (a dose-response study) was to examine the oral health status of asthmatic children and to compare the oral health condition and oral health habits within different groups of asthmatic children.

  11. Perioperative high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy boost for patients with early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Daya Nand; Deo, S V S; Rath, Goura Kisor; Shukla, Nootan Kumar; Thulkar, Sanjay; Madan, Renu; Julka, Pramod Kumar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical results of perioperative high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy boost treatment preceding whole breast external beam radiation therapy in patients with early breast cancer. From 2005-2010, 100 patients with early breast cancer who met the eligibility criteria were enrolled in the study. Brachytherapy implant was performed during the breast-conserving surgery procedure. The boost treatment was started on the 3rd postoperative day to deliver a dose of 15 Gy in 6 fractions over 3 days. Three weeks later, external beam radiation therapy to the whole breast was started for a prescription dose of 50 Gy. The study end points were local recurrence, acute toxicity and cosmetic outcome. Median age of the patients was 46 years, and median follow-up was 52 months. No patient developed a local recurrence but 5 patients developed distant metastases. The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival were 86% and 77%, respectively. Eleven patients had acute toxicity; 4 wound complications and 7 grade III skin toxicity. Nine of the 11 patients had breast size of more than 1500 cc. Except for the breast volume (>1500 cc), there was no statistically significant correlation between any of the patient or dosimetry-related factors and acute toxicity. Good-excellent cosmesis was observed in 87% of patients. Perioperative high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy boost followed by whole breast external beam radiation therapy provides excellent local control, acceptable acute toxicity and good-excellent breast cosmesis in patients with early breast cancer.

  12. Fertility of tall girls treated with high-dose estrogen, a dose-response relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E.J. Hendriks (Emile); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); J.S.E. Laven (Joop); A.M. Boot (Annemieke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractContext: High-dose estrogen treatment to reduce final height of tall girls increases their risk for infertility in later life. Objective: The aim was to study the effect of estrogen dose on fertility outcome of these women. Design/Setting: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of

  13. Fertility of Tall Girls Treated with High-Dose Estrogen, a Dose-Response Relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, A. E. J.; Drop, S. L. S.; Laven, J. S. E.; Boot, A. M.

    Context: High-dose estrogen treatment to reduce final height of tall girls increases their risk for infertility in later life. Objective: The aim was to study the effect of estrogen dose on fertility outcome of these women. Design/Setting: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of university

  14. The early anthropogenic hypothesis: Challenges and responses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    William F. Ruddiman

    2007-01-01

    .... Every aspect of this early anthropogenic hypothesis has been challenged: the timescale, the issue of stage 11 as a better analog, the ability of human activities to account for the gas anomalies, and the impact of the pandemics...

  15. A search for variables predicting cortisol response to low-dose corticotropin stimulation following supraphysiological doses of glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildi-Runge, Stefanie; Deladoëy, Johnny; Bélanger, Carole; Deal, Cheri L; Van Vliet, Guy; Alos, Nathalie; Huot, Céline

    2013-08-01

    To determine which biological or clinical variables may predict cortisol response to low-dose adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation following supraphysiological doses of glucocorticoids in children. This retrospective study included all patients who underwent ACTH testing (1 μg) between October 2008 and June 2010 at the Sainte-Justine University Hospital Center, Montreal, after supraphysiological doses of glucocorticoids. Data from 103 patients (median age, 8.0 years; range, 0.6-18.5 years; 57 girls) were analyzed, revealing growth deceleration in 37% and excessive weight gain in 33%. Reasons for glucocorticoid treatment included asthma (n = 30) and hematologic (n = 22), dermatologic (n = 19), rheumatologic (n = 16), and miscellaneous (n = 16) disorders. The following information was recorded: duration of glucocorticoid treatment (median, 374 days; range, 5-4226 days); duration of physiological hydrocortisone replacement (median, 118 days; range, 0-1089 days); maximum daily (median, 200 mg/m(2)/day; range, 12-3750 mg/m(2)/day) and cumulative (median, 16 728 mg/m(2); range, 82-178 209 mg/m(2)) doses, in hydrocortisone equivalents; and interval since the last dose (median, 43 days; range, 1-1584 days). Sixty-two patients (58%) exhibited a normal response (ie, peak cortisol >500 nmol/L) to ACTH stimulation. Peak cortisol level was not related to sex, prior morning cortisol level, duration of treatment, or cumulative glucocorticoid dose; 28% of the patients with normal baseline cortisol levels nevertheless demonstrated a subnormal response to ACTH. Given the absence of clinical or biological predictors of the cortisol response to ACTH after suppressive doses of glucocorticoids, physicians have only 2 options: (1) empirically advocate glucocorticoid stress coverage during 18 months after cessation of high-dose glucocorticoid treatment; or (2) perform serial ACTH testing in all such patients until a normal peak cortisol level is attained. Copyright © 2013

  16. Validation of Early Human Dose Prediction: A Key Metric for Compound Progression in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ken M

    2016-02-01

    Human dose prediction is increasingly recognized as an important parameter in Drug Discovery. Validation of a method using only in vitro and predicted parameters incorporated into a PK model was undertaken by predicting human dose and free Cmax for a number of marketed drugs and AZ Development compounds. Doses were compared to those most relevant to marketed drugs or to clinically administered doses of AZ compounds normalized either to predicted Cmin or Cmax values. Average (AFE) and absolute average (AAFE) fold-error analysis showed that best predictions were obtained using a QSAR model as the source of Vss, with Fabs set to 1 for acids and 0.5 for all other ion classes; for clearance prediction no binding correction to the well stirred model (WSM) was used for bases, while it was set to Fup/Fup(0.5) for all other ion classes. Using this combination of methods, predicted doses for 45 to 68% of the Cmin- and Cmax-normalized and marketed drug data sets were within 3-fold of the observed values, while 82 to 92% of these data sets were within 10-fold. This method for early human dose prediction is able to rank, identify, and flag risks or optimization opportunities for future development compounds within 10 days of first synthesis.

  17. A two-centre randomised trial of an additional early dose of measles vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Ane B; Nebie, Eric; Schoeps, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Background: Besides protecting against measles, measles vaccine (MV) may have beneficial non-specific effects. We tested the effect of an additional early MV on mortality and measles antibody levels. Methods: Children aged 4-7 months in two rural health and demographic surveillance sites in Burkina...... Faso and Guinea-Bissau were randomised 1:1 to an extra early standard dose of MV (Edmonston-Zagreb strain) or no extra MV 4 weeks after the third diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-hepatitis B-Haemophilus-influenzae-type-b vaccine. All children received routine MV at 9 months. We assessed mortality through......% (90/422) in Guinea-Bissau had protective measles antibody levels. By 9 months of age, no measles-unvaccinated/unexposed child had protective levels, while 92% (306/333) of early MV recipients had. At final follow-up, 98% (186/189) in the early MV group and 97% (196/202) in the control group had...

  18. Chronic periodontitis and smoking. Prevalence and dose-response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahrukh; Khalid, Taimur; Awan, Kamran H

    2016-08-01

    To determine the prevalence and dose-response relationship of chronic periodontitis among smokers in Pakistan.   This is a cross-sectional study among participants seeking dental care in Karachi Medical and Dental College, Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 443 participants with a mean age of 44.3 (±6.5) participated in the study from April 2011 to December 2011. Males comprised 64.7%, and females comprised 35.2%. Participants were interviewed on social demographics and oral habits. Participants with shallow pockets (3.5-5.5 mm) and deep pockets (greater than 5.5 mm) were considered suffering from chronic periodontitis. The characteristics of participants were assessed using frequency distribution for categorical variables and mean (standard deviation) for continuous variables.  Among 443 participants, smokers were distributed as 55.1% and non-smokers as 44.9%. Smoking was found to be significantly related to young adults (p less than 0.007), male gender (p less than 0.001), and lower education level (p less than 0.01). Overall prevalence of chronic periodontitis among smokers was estimated at 81.6%. Heavy smoking was found to have significantly high prevalence (p less than 0.001) and severity (p less than 0.001) of periodontitis as compared with moderate and light smokers. The multivariate unadjusted model depicted 3.5 times higher risk of chronic periodontitis among smokers (p less than 0.001). Chronic periodontitis had a high prevalence among smokers. Heavy smoking was found to have a higher risk for having periodontitis.

  19. Swift and Strong NK Cell Responses Protect 129 Mice against High-Dose Influenza Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai; Wang, Jing; Li, An; Zhao, Wenming; Wang, Dongfang; Zhang, Wei; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George Fu; Liu, Wenjun; Fang, Min

    2016-02-15

    It is generally unclear what roles NK cells play during influenza virus infection with regard to different host genetic backgrounds. In this study, we show that in six inbred mouse strains, NK cells play an important protective role only in 129 mice during high-dose influenza A H1N1 virus infection. Swift and strong NK cell responses efficiently control early pulmonary viral replication in 129 mice, providing survival privilege. In addition, we identified that early activation of TLRs and RIG-I signaling in 129 mice resulted in quick production of type 1 IFNs and inflammatory cytokines, which are important reasons for the swift kinetics of NK cell responses post influenza virus infection. Thus, under different microenvironments, NK cells play differential roles against viral infections. The kinetics and magnitude of NK cell responses correlate with the distinct roles that NK cells play against influenza virus infections. Thus, our works further our understandings about the complex role of NK cells during influenza virus infection. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Dose-response effects in an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mintz, E. D.; Cartter, M. L.; Hadler, J. L.; Wassell, J. T.; Zingeser, J. A.; Tauxe, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of ingested Salmonella enteritidis (SE) dose on incubation period and on the severity and duration of illness were estimated in a cohort of 169 persons who developed gastroenteritis after eating hollandaise sauce made from grade-A shell eggs. The cohort was divided into three groups based on self-reported dose of sauce ingested. As dose increased, median incubation period decreased (37 h in the low exposure group v. 21 h in the medium exposure group v. 17.5 h in the high exposure ...

  1. Exposure-Response Analyses Supporting Ticagrelor Dosing Recommendation in Patients With Prior Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röshammar, Daniel; Nyberg, Joakim; Andersson, Tomas; Stanski, Donald; Storey, Robert F; Hamrén, Bengt

    2017-05-01

    The relationships between drug exposure and the composite risk of cardiovascular (CV) death, myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke as well as the risk of TIMI major bleeding were estimated following long-term treatment with ticagrelor 60 or 90 mg twice daily in 20,942 patients with prior MI. These analyses support the primary reported efficacy and safety evaluations by showing that there were clear separations from placebo early in treatment with both doses, regardless of ticagrelor exposure, for both endpoints. In addition, the exposure-response analyses provided new insight into the contribution of individual exposure levels, rather than dose, as a predictor of events and accounted for differences in the baseline risk between patients. The predicted risks of CV death/MI/stroke were similar despite an increase in the median predicted ticagrelor average steady-state concentration from 606 nmol/L with ticagrelor 60 mg to 998 nmol/L with ticagrelor 90 mg (hazard ratios vs placebo of 0.83 and 0.81, respectively). The corresponding predicted risk of TIMI major bleeding slightly increased (hazard ratios vs placebo of 2.4 and 2.6, respectively). Apart from Japanese patients, showing a lower risk of CV death/MI/stroke, the response to ticagrelor was consistent across the study population, as supported by the combination of relatively flat exposure-response relationships in the studied exposure range, similar sensitivity to ticagrelor exposure, and small exposure differences. Consequently, the present analyses support the selection of the 60-mg dose for all demographic subgroups of patients studied. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  2. Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Y. Chuang

    2006-08-31

    It has been long recognized that a significant fraction of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying enzymes may be even more prominent in the case of low-dose, low-LET irradiation, as the majority of genetic damage may be caused by secondary oxidative species. In this study we have attempted to decipher the roles of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes, which are responsible for detoxifying the superoxide anions. We used adenovirus vectors to deliver RNA interference (RNAi or siRNA) technology to down-regulate the expression levels of the SOD genes. We have also over-expressed the SOD genes by use of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Cells infected with the vectors were then subjected to low dose γ-irradiation. Total RNA were extracted from the exposed cells and the expression of 9000 genes were profiled by use of cDNA microarrays. The result showed that low dose radiation had clear effects on gene expression in HCT116 cells. Both over-expression and down-regulation of the SOD1 gene can change the expression profiles of sub-groups of genes. Close to 200 of the 9000 genes examined showed over two-fold difference in expression under various conditions. Genes with changed expression pattern belong to many categories that include: early growth response, DNA-repair, ion transport, apoptosis, and cytokine response.

  3. Half-dose immunization for diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis: response of preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernbaum, J; Daft, A; Samuelson, J; Polin, R A

    1989-04-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics currently recommends administering full-dose diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, (DTP) vaccine to preterm infants, beginning at 2 months' chronologic age. Many physicians, however, continue to administer DTP vaccine at a reduced dosage in an attempt to lessen side effects. This study was designed to quantitate the immune response of 20 preterm infants immunized with half-dose DTP vaccine and to determine the nature and extent of side effects. Control subjects were 25 preterm infants immunized with full-dose vaccine. Although 96% of infants who received a full dose were able to mount a serologic response to pertussis after a second dose of DTP, 45% of infants who received a half dose were unable to mount a similar immune response to pertussis even after a third dose of DTP and required a full-dose (fourth dose of DTP) vaccine to better ensure protection. Serologic responses to diphtheria and tetanus were similar in the two groups. The incidence of side effects in preterm infants receiving both full-dose and half-dose DTP was less than that seen in a full-term population. Thus, the physician caring for the preterm infant should adhere to the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendation for the immunization of preterm infants and offer full-dose DTP vaccine at the routine time intervals of 2, 4, 6, and 15 or 18 months' chronologic age to ensure adequate protection.

  4. Redefining radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer with single dose ablative treatment : a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Charaghvandi, R K; van Asselen, B; Philippens, M E P; Verkooijen, H M; van Gils, C H; van Diest, P J; Pijnappel, R M; Hobbelink, M G G; Witkamp, A J; van Dalen, T; van der Wall, E; van Heijst, T C; Koelemij, R; van Vulpen, M; van den Bongard, H J G D

    2017-01-01

    Background A shift towards less burdening and more patient friendly treatments for breast cancer is currently ongoing. In low-risk patients with early-stage disease, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an alternative for whole breast irradiation following breast-conserving surgery. MRI-guided single dose ablative APBI has the potential to offer a minimally burdening, non-invasive treatment that could replace current breast-conserving therapy. Methods The ABLATIVE study is a prosp...

  5. A DoseResponse Study of Magnesium Sulfate in Suppressing Cardiovascular Responses to Laryngoscopy & Endotracheal Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Montazeri

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effects of pretreatment with magnesium on cardiovascular responses associated with intubation have been studied previously. In this study we wanted to find optimal dose of magnesium that causes decreased cardiovascular responses after laryngoscopy & endotracheal intubation. Methods: In a double-blind , randomized, clinical trial ,120 ASA-1 patients with ages between 15-50 years old , who were candidates for elective surgery, were selected and classified in 6 groups (20 patients in each . The pulse rate and arterial blood pressure were measured and recorded at 5 minutes before taking any drug then, according to different groups, patients took magnesium sulfate (10, 20, 30, 40, 50mg/kg and lidocaine (1.5 mg/kg. The induction of anesthesia was same in all groups and the pulse rate and arterial blood pressure were measured and recorded just before intubation and also at 1, 3 , and 5 minutes after intubation (before surgical incision . Statistical analysis was performed by use of ANOVA, Post Hoc test (Duncan, Pearson correlation, and Chi square test. Results: there were no statistically significant differences in blood pressure, pulse rate, Train Of Four (TOF, and complications between groups who received magnesium but the significant differences in these parameters were seen between magnesium and lidocaine groups. Conclusion: We concluded that pretreatment with different doses of magnesium sulfate have a safe decreasing effect on cardiovascular responses that is more effective than pretreatment with lidocaine. Keywords: magnesium sulfate, cardiovascular responses, lidocaine.

  6. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts after Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (1-20 cGy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28- ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving greater than 2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 10 cGy were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. For Si-28- ions no dose response was observed in the 2-10 cGy dose range, suggesting a non-target effect in this range.

  7. SU-E-T-122: Dose Response Analysis of Radiochromic Films in Regions of Low Dose Using Separation Color Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, G; Nicolucci, P

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the dose response of EBT2 films in regions of low dose using the decomposition of the image's color channels (RGB, Red, Green and Blue). Doses ranging from 1 Gy to 60 Gy were used to calibrate the dose response of Gafchromic ® EBT2 films irradiated in 6MV photons beams. Segments of film with dimensions of 8.5 cm × 8.5 cm were used. Another segment of film with dimensions 8.5 cm × 20.25 cm was also irradiated with a maximum dose of 4Gy to determine the percentage depth dose (PDD). The films were digitized by a LaserJet M1132 MFP - HP ® scanner in standard resolution of 150dpi and analyzed by a routine created in MatLab to convert the image to gray levels as well as assess the desired color components from the image. The green component presented the higher sensitivity (17.8 a.u./Gy) when the separated color channels and the shades of gray analysis are compared. The red component presented the highest signal to noise ratio in the low dose range (63% at 1Gy). The blue component presented low sensitivity (0.66 a.u./Gy) in the entire dose range. A linear fitting (r=0.998) was used to the green and gray components until a dose of 4 Gy. The red component presented a non-linear behavior in the entire dose range. The useful dose range found was from 1 Gy to 15 Gy. The maximum differences between the reference PDD, measured with ionization chamber in a water phantom, and the PDDs determined with film were 6%, 9% and 14% for the green, gray and red components, respectively. This work results show that the use of radiochromic films on planning verification procedures in low dose ranges can be benefit from the analysis of the image's separated color components. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. Effects and safety of different anisodamine doses on EVLW at early stage of septic shock patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ri-Xing Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects and safety of different anisodamine doses on EVLW at early stage of septic shock patients. Method: A total of 63 patients with septic shock were enrolled in ICU, and they were randomly divided into control group (C group, 20 cases, normal anisodamine doses group (N group, 25 cases, anisodamine 20–40 mg/d, high anisodamine doses group (H group, 18 cases,anisodamine 80 mg/d. To observe the dynamic changes of temperature (T, heart rate (HR, oxygenation index (OI, cardiac index (CI, intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBVI, and extravascular lung water index (EVLWI. Results: 12 h after treatment, compared with C and N group, CI and ITBVI significantly increased in H group, EVLWI significantly decreased in H group. Meanwhile, T and HR significantly increased in H group, oxygenation index significantly decreased in H group. Some patients are unable to tolerate anisodamine treatment which leads to cessation of experiment. Compared with C group, EVLWI, CI, ITBVI, oxygenation index significantly improved in N group (P<0.05, mortality rates significantly decreased (P<0.05. Conclusions: Normal anisodamine doses would significantly decreased EVLWI and significantly improved outcomes, high anisodamine dose is not recommended on EVLWI in patients with septic shock.

  9. Dose assessment for emergency workers in early phase of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, Nahid; Ahangari, Rohollah; Kasesaz, Yaser; Noori-kalkhoran, O. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Reactor Research School

    2017-11-15

    In the case of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FNP) accident, the radioactive material was released from reactor units 1-3 and transported to short and long distances due to the atmospheric pathways-motions. Power sources for monitoring posts were lost due to earthquake and tsunami. Based on air dose rates and other data measured by monitoring cars, the amount of radioactive material released to the atmosphere from the power station was obtained. The atmospheric dispersion and the transport model used in the RASCAL code, estimate the radionuclide concentrations downwind, both in the air and on the ground due to deposition. The calculated concentrations are then used to estimate the projected doses for workers in vicinity of the accident area in the first minutes of accident time. For dose modeling, we assumed that each worker was 15 min in vicinity of FNP in accident situation, once without and once with protective clothes or respirator. According to Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) report six workers had received doses over 250 mSv (309 to 678 mSv) apparently due to inhaling Iodine-131 fume. In this paper the calculated dose results using RASCAL code shows that, if emergency workers who work in early phase of accident had not used protective equipment, for 15 min, inhalation doses from iodine in their thyroid gland up to 12 March afternoon would have been 520 mSv. A comparison between calculation results and TEPCO report shows that dose calculated virtually is nearly equal to TEPCO measurement results.

  10. Dose-response regressions for algal growth and similar continuous endpoints: Calculation of effective concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik R.; Kusk, Kresten Ole; Nyholm, Niels

    2009-01-01

    % inhibition). For illustration, data from closed, freshwater algal assays are analyzed using the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata with growth rate as the response parameter. Dose-response regressions for four test chemicals (tetraethylammonium bromide, musculamine, benzonitrile, and 4...

  11. Dose-response effects in an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, E D; Cartter, M L; Hadler, J L; Wassell, J T; Zingeser, J A; Tauxe, R V

    1994-02-01

    The effects of ingested Salmonella enteritidis (SE) dose on incubation period and on the severity and duration of illness were estimated in a cohort of 169 persons who developed gastroenteritis after eating hollandaise sauce made from grade-A shell eggs. The cohort was divided into three groups based on self-reported dose of sauce ingested. As dose increased, median incubation period decreased (37 h in the low exposure group v. 21 h in the medium exposure group v. 17.5 h in the high exposure group, P = 0.006) and greater proportions reported body aches (71 v. 85 v. 94%, P = 0.0009) and vomiting (21 v. 56 v. 57%, P = 0.002). Among 118 case-persons who completed a follow-up questionnaire, increased dose was associated with increases in median weight loss in kilograms (3.2 v. 4.5 v. 5.0, P = 0.0001), maximum daily number of stools (12.5 v. 15.0 v. 20.0, P = 0.02), subjective rating of illness severity (P = 0.0007), and the number of days of confinement to bed (3.0 v. 6.5 v. 6.5, P = 0.04). In this outbreak, ingested dose was an important determinant of the incubation period, symptoms and severity of acute salmonellosis.

  12. Non-linear dose-response of aluminium hydroxide adjuvant particles: Selective low dose neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépeaux, Guillemette; Eidi, Housam; David, Marie-Odile; Baba-Amer, Yasmine; Tzavara, Eleni; Giros, Bruno; Authier, François-Jérôme; Exley, Christopher; Shaw, Christopher A; Cadusseau, Josette; Gherardi, Romain K

    2017-01-15

    Aluminium (Al) oxyhydroxide (Alhydrogel(®)), the main adjuvant licensed for human and animal vaccines, consists of primary nanoparticles that spontaneously agglomerate. Concerns about its safety emerged following recognition of its unexpectedly long-lasting biopersistence within immune cells in some individuals, and reports of chronic fatigue syndrome, cognitive dysfunction, myalgia, dysautonomia and autoimmune/inflammatory features temporally linked to multiple Al-containing vaccine administrations. Mouse experiments have documented its capture and slow transportation by monocyte-lineage cells from the injected muscle to lymphoid organs and eventually the brain. The present study aimed at evaluating mouse brain function and Al concentration 180days after injection of various doses of Alhydrogel(®) (200, 400 and 800μg Al/kg of body weight) in the tibialis anterior muscle in adult female CD1 mice. Cognitive and motor performances were assessed by 8 validated tests, microglial activation by Iba-1 immunohistochemistry, and Al level by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. An unusual neuro-toxicological pattern limited to a low dose of Alhydrogel(®) was observed. Neurobehavioural changes, including decreased activity levels and altered anxiety-like behaviour, were observed compared to controls in animals exposed to 200μg Al/kg but not at 400 and 800μg Al/kg. Consistently, microglial number appeared increased in the ventral forebrain of the 200μg Al/kg group. Cerebral Al levels were selectively increased in animals exposed to the lowest dose, while muscle granulomas had almost completely disappeared at 6 months in these animals. We conclude that Alhydrogel(®) injected at low dose in mouse muscle may selectively induce long-term Al cerebral accumulation and neurotoxic effects. To explain this unexpected result, an avenue that could be explored in the future relates to the adjuvant size since the injected suspensions corresponding to the lowest dose

  13. A method to adjust radiation dose-response relationships for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane Lindegaard; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    Several clinical risk factors for radiation induced toxicity have been identified in the literature. Here, we present a method to quantify the effect of clinical risk factors on radiation dose-response curves and apply the method to adjust the dose-response for radiation pneumonitis for patients...

  14. Health damage of air pollution : an estimate of a dose-response relationship for The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nentjes, A; Schneider, T

    1998-01-01

    This paper estimates the dose-response relationship between air pollution and the number of work loss days for The Netherlands. The study is based on illness data (work loss days) for the Dutch labor population and average year concentrations of air pollution in 29 districts. The dose-response

  15. Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuan-Yaun

    2009-01-27

    “Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation " was started on 09/01/03 and ended on 08/31/07. The primary objective of the project was to carry out mechanistic studies of the roles of the anti-oxidant SOD genes in mammalian cellular response to low dose ionizing radiation.

  16. Dose-response relationships and threshold levels in skin and respiratory allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.H.E.; Mommers, C.; Heer, C.de

    2006-01-01

    A literature study was performed to evaluate dose-response relationships and no-effect levels for sensitization and elicitation in skin- and respiratory allergy. With respect to the skin, dose-response relationships and no-effect levels were found for both intradermal and topical induction, as well

  17. Severity of killer whale behavioral responses to ship noise: a dose-response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rob; Erbe, Christine; Ashe, Erin; Beerman, Amber; Smith, Jodi

    2014-02-15

    Critical habitats of at-risk populations of northeast Pacific "resident" killer whales can be heavily trafficked by large ships, with transits occurring on average once every hour in busy shipping lanes. We modeled behavioral responses of killer whales to ship transits during 35 "natural experiments" as a dose-response function of estimated received noise levels in both broadband and audiogram-weighted terms. Interpreting effects is contingent on a subjective and seemingly arbitrary decision about severity threshold indicating a response. Subtle responses were observed around broadband received levels of 130 dB re 1 μPa (rms); more severe responses are hypothesized to occur at received levels beyond 150 dB re 1 μPa, where our study lacked data. Avoidance responses are expected to carry minor energetic costs in terms of increased energy expenditure, but future research must assess the potential for reduced prey acquisition, and potential population consequences, under these noise levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cytogenetic dose-response in vitro for biological dosimetry after exposure to high doses of gamma-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr A; Maznyk, Nataliya A

    2013-04-01

    The dose response for dicentrics plus centric rings and total unstable chromosome-type aberrations was studied in the first mitoses of cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro to doses of ∼2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 16 and 20 Gy of acute (60)Со gamma-rays. A dose-dependent increase of aberration yield was accompanied by a tendency to the underdispersion of dicentrics and centric rings among cells distributions compared with Poisson statistics at doses ≥6 Gy. The formal fitting of the data to a linear-quadratic model resulted in an equation with the linear and quadratic coefficients ranged 0.098-0.129×cell(-1)×Gy(-1) and 0.039-0.034×cell(-1)×Gy(-2), respectively, depending on the fitting method. The actual radiation-induced aberration yield was markedly lower than expected from a calibration curve, generated earlier within a lower dose range. Interlaboratory variations in reported dicentric yields induced by medium-to-high radiation doses in vitro are discussed.

  19. Decreased heart rate variability responses during early postoperative mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jans, Øivind; Brinth, Louise; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intact orthostatic blood pressure regulation is essential for early mobilization after surgery. However, postoperative orthostatic hypotension and intolerance (OI) may delay early ambulation. The mechanisms of postoperative OI include impaired vasopressor responses relating to postope......BACKGROUND: Intact orthostatic blood pressure regulation is essential for early mobilization after surgery. However, postoperative orthostatic hypotension and intolerance (OI) may delay early ambulation. The mechanisms of postoperative OI include impaired vasopressor responses relating...... to postoperative autonomic dysfunction. Thus, based on a previous study on haemodynamic responses during mobilization before and after elective total hip arthroplasty (THA), we performed secondary analyses of heart rate variability (HRV) and aimed to identify possible abnormal postoperative autonomic responses...... in relation to postural change. METHODS: A standardized mobilization protocol before, 6 and 24 h after surgery was performed in 23 patients scheduled for elective THA. Beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure was measured by photoplethysmography and HRV was derived from pulse wave interbeat intervals and analysed...

  20. Significance testing of synergistic/antagonistic, dose level-dependent, or dose ratio-dependent effects in mixture dose-response analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, M.J.; Svendsen, C.; Bedaux, J.J.; Bongers, M.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    In ecotoxicology, the state of the art for effect assessment of chemical mixtures is through multiple dose¿response analysis of single compounds and their combinations. Investigating whether such data deviate from the reference models of concentration addition and/or independent action to identify

  1. Internal Dose from Food and Drink Ingestion in the Early Phase after the Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawai Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity concentrations in food and drink, represented by water and vegetables, have been monitored continuously since the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, with a focus on radioactive cesium. On the other hand, iodine-131 was not measured systematically in the early phase after the accident. The activity concentrations of iodine-131 in food and drink are important to estimate internal exposure due to ingestion pathway. When the internal dose from ingestion in the evacuation areas is estimated, water is considered as the main ingestion pathway. In this study, we estimated the values of activity concentrations in water in the early phase after the accident, using a compartment model as an estimation method. The model uses measurement values of activity concentration and deposition rate of iodine-131 onto the ground, which is calculated from an atmospheric dispersion simulation. The model considers how drinking water would be affected by radionuclides deposited into water. We estimated the activity concentrations of water on Kawamata town and Minamisouma city during March of 2011 and the committed effective doses were 0.08 mSv and 0.06 mSv. We calculated the transfer parameters in the model for estimating the activity concentrations in the areas with a small amount of measurement data. In addition, we estimated the committed effective doses from vegetables using atmospheric dispersion simulation and FARMLAND model in case of eating certain vegetables as option information.

  2. Internal Dose from Food and Drink Ingestion in the Early Phase after the Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Masaki; Yoshizawa, Nobuaki; Hirakawa, Sachiko; Murakami, Kana; Takizawa, Mari; Sato, Osamu; Takagi, Shunji; Miyatake, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Gen

    2017-09-01

    Activity concentrations in food and drink, represented by water and vegetables, have been monitored continuously since the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, with a focus on radioactive cesium. On the other hand, iodine-131 was not measured systematically in the early phase after the accident. The activity concentrations of iodine-131 in food and drink are important to estimate internal exposure due to ingestion pathway. When the internal dose from ingestion in the evacuation areas is estimated, water is considered as the main ingestion pathway. In this study, we estimated the values of activity concentrations in water in the early phase after the accident, using a compartment model as an estimation method. The model uses measurement values of activity concentration and deposition rate of iodine-131 onto the ground, which is calculated from an atmospheric dispersion simulation. The model considers how drinking water would be affected by radionuclides deposited into water. We estimated the activity concentrations of water on Kawamata town and Minamisouma city during March of 2011 and the committed effective doses were 0.08 mSv and 0.06 mSv. We calculated the transfer parameters in the model for estimating the activity concentrations in the areas with a small amount of measurement data. In addition, we estimated the committed effective doses from vegetables using atmospheric dispersion simulation and FARMLAND model in case of eating certain vegetables as option information.

  3. Anti-irritants I: Dose-response in acute irritation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Flemming; Hedegaard, Kathryn; Petersen, Thomas Kongstad

    2006-01-01

    , to benefit tolerability of the products and allow claims such as 'soothing' and 'healing' ingredients. Limited documentation in favour of the efficacy of AIs is published. We studied the dose-related effect of 4 alleged AIs (nifedipine, (-)-alpha-bisabolol, canola oil and glycerol) on experimentally induced...

  4. Low-dose effects of bisphenol A on early sexual development in male and female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Boberg, Julie

    2014-01-01

    the influence of BPA on early sexual development in male and female rats at dose levels covering both regulatory no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) (5 and 50 mg/kg bw per day) as well as doses in the microgram per kilogram dose range (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg bw per day). Time-mated Wistar rats (n=22) were...... gavaged during pregnancy and lactation from gestation day 7 to pup day 22 with 0, 0.025, 0.25, 5 or 50 mg/kg bw per day BPA. From 0.250 mg/kg and above, male anogenital distance (AGD) was significantly decreased, whereas decreased female AGD was seen from 0.025 mg/kg bw per day and above. Moreover......, the incidence of nipple retention in males appeared to increase dose relatedly and the increase was statistically significant at 50 mg/kg per day. No significant changes in reproductive organ weights in the 16-day-old males and females and no signs of maternal toxicity were seen. The decreased AGD at birth...

  5. Dose-dependent headache response and dilatation of limb and extracranial arteries after three doses of 5-isosorbide-mononitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Nielsen, T H; Garre, K

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of different doses of isosorbide-5-mononitrate (5-ISMN) to cause dilatation of medium sized and small arteries, and to examine the intensity and duration of any headache produced. Ten healthy volunteers each received 3 doses of 5-ISMN...... and placebo on separate days. The diameters of the radial and superficial temporal arteries were repeatedly measured with high frequency ultrasound and pain was scored using a 10 point verbal scale. A clear dose-relationship was found for plasma concentrations and headache, and for changes in the diameter...... of the temporal artery, but not for the radial artery. It is concluded that headache after 5-ISMN is caused by arterial dilatation or by mechanisms responsible for the arterial dilatation. Ultrasound monitoring of arterial diameters is an important and sensitive tool in the evaluation of nitrates and other...

  6. Evolution of Hemodynamic and Functional Human Kidney Graft Dose Response to Dopamine Using an Implantable Doppler Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Aurélien; Payen, Didier; Villiers, Stéphane; Chazalet, Jean-Jacques; Jacob, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    The relation between dopamine infusion and renal hemodynamics and function has not been studied in renal allografts during early recovery. We analyzed the dose response of dopamine infusion on renal blood flow and function in human kidney transplant recipients at reperfusion and during early graft recovery. Phasic and mean renal blood flow was measured by the pulsed Doppler technique using implantable Doppler microprobes in contact with the graft artery. Systemic and renal parameters were recorded on dopamine infusion (0, 3, 5, and 10 μg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) immediately after transplant (day 0) in 13 patients and at day 6 in 7/13 patients with early graft recovery. Results are expressed as median and interquartile range between the 25th and 75th percentiles. At day 0, 3 μg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) dopamine did not increase mean renal blood flow over baseline (580 mL/min [219-663 mL/min] vs 542 mL/min [207-686 mL/min]; P = .84). There was an absence of effect with higher dopamine doses, whereas cardiac output, heart rate, and systolic and mean arterial pressure were significantly increased. Urinary sodium excretion, creatinine clearance, and urine output increased dose dependently, with a positive correlation between the increase in urine output and mean arterial pressure (r = 0.48, P < .001). At day 6, 3 μg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ dopamine increased mean renal blood flow over baseline (318 mL/min [234-897 mL/min] vs 191 mL/min [173-706 mL/min]; P = .016), with no further increase at higher doses. Immediately after transplant, kidney grafts with ischemic-reperfusion injury are fully dilated and do not respond to dopamine. The specific renal effects observed are due to systemic hemodynamic status. Vascular responsiveness to a "renal dopamine dose" returns on graft recovery.

  7. External beam radiotherapy for palliation of painful bone metastases: pooled data bioeffect dose response analysis of dose fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveen, T.; Supe, Sanjay S.; Ganesh, K. M.; Samuel, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Bone metastases develop in up to 70% of newly diagnosed cancer patients and result in immobility, anxiety, and depression, severely diminishing the patients quality of life. Radiotherapy is a frequently used modality for bone metastasis and has been shown to be effective in reducing metastatic bone pain and in some instances, causing tumor shrinkage or growth inhibition. There is controversy surrounding the optimal fractionation schedule and total dose of external beam radiotherapy, despite many randomized trials and overviews addressing the issue. This study was undertaken to apply BED to clinical fractionation data of radiotherapeutic management of bone metastases in order to arrive at optimum BED values for acceptable level of response rate. A computerised literature search was conducted to identify all prospective clinical studies that addressed the issue of fractionation for the treatment of bone metastasis. The results of these studies were pooled together to form the database for the analysis. A total of 4111 number of patients received radiation dose ranging from 4 to 40.5 Gy in 1 to 15 fractions with dose per fraction ranging from 2 to 10 Gy. Single fraction treatments were delivered in 2013 patients and the dose varied from 4 to 10 Gy. Multifraction treatments were delivered in 2098 patients and the dose varied from 15 to 40.5 Gy. The biological effective dose (BED) was evaluated for each fractionation schedule using the linear quadratic model and an α/β value of 10 Gy. Response rate increased significantly beyond a BED value of 14.4 Gy (p fracture rate of single fraction treatments, minimum BED value of 14.4 Gy is recommended.

  8. SU-F-T-130: [18F]-FDG Uptake Dose Response in Lung Correlates Linearly with Proton Therapy Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D; Titt, U; Mirkovic, D [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Analysis of clinical outcomes in lung cancer patients treated with protons using 18F-FDG uptake in lung as a measure of dose response. Methods: A test case lung cancer patient was selected in an unbiased way. The test patient’s treatment planning and post treatment positron emission tomography (PET) were collected from picture archiving and communication system at the UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Average computerized tomography scan was registered with post PET/CT through both rigid and deformable registrations for selected region of interest (ROI) via VelocityAI imaging informatics software. For the voxels in the ROI, a system that extracts the Standard Uptake Value (SUV) from PET was developed, and the corresponding relative biological effectiveness (RBE) weighted (both variable and constant) dose was computed using the Monte Carlo (MC) methods. The treatment planning system (TPS) dose was also obtained. Using histogram analysis, the voxel average normalized SUV vs. 3 different doses was obtained and linear regression fit was performed. Results: From the registration process, there were some regions that showed significant artifacts near the diaphragm and heart region, which yielded poor r-squared values when the linear regression fit was performed on normalized SUV vs. dose. Excluding these values, TPS fit yielded mean r-squared value of 0.79 (range 0.61–0.95), constant RBE fit yielded 0.79 (range 0.52–0.94), and variable RBE fit yielded 0.80 (range 0.52–0.94). Conclusion: A system that extracts SUV from PET to correlate between normalized SUV and various dose calculations was developed. A linear relation between normalized SUV and all three different doses was found.

  9. Placental growth response to maternal insulin in early pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Tierney-Ginn, Perrie; Presley, Larraine; Myers, Stephen; Catalano, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of the placenta to maternal insulin remains controversial. Early pregnancy may be a time of increased placental sensitivity to maternal insulin because insulin receptors are abundant on the syncytiotrophoblast in the first trimester but are far fewer at term. Maternal insulin secretory response in early, but not late, pregnancy is positively associated with placental growth. This is a secondary analysis of a cohort of women (n = 40) recruited before pregnancy. An iv glucose tolerance test was administered before pregnancy and in early (12-14 weeks) and late (34-36 weeks) pregnancy. Placental volume throughout gestation (in a subset of women via 3-dimensional ultrasound) and weight at birth were recorded. Total insulin secretory response in early pregnancy was positively associated with placental volume in early pregnancy (R = 0.79, P = 0.04) and placental weight at term (R = 0.42, P = 0.007). Insulin secretory response before and in late pregnancy was not significantly associated with placental growth. Although neonatal fat mass was strongly correlated with placental weight at term (R = 0.449, P = 0.0003), maternal insulin secretory response was related to neonatal fat mass only at birth in male offspring (R = 0.59, P = 0.008). Maternal insulin secretory response in early pregnancy was strongly related to placental weight at birth. Thus, in early pregnancy, increased maternal insulin response as seen in obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus may be a key influence on placental growth, possibly due to the enhanced presence of placental insulin receptors on the maternal villous membrane early in gestation.

  10. The Inhibitory Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation in IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Mi Joo

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation has different biological effects according to dose and dose rate. In particular, the biological effect of low-dose radiation is unclear. Low-dose whole-body gamma irradiation activates immune responses in several ways. However, the effects and mechanism of low-dose radiation on allergic responses remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that low-dose ionizing radiation inhibits mediator release in IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 mast cell activation. In this study, to have any physiological relevance, we investigated whether low-dose radiation inhibits allergic responses in activated human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6 and LAD2 cells, mouse models of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the late-phase cutaneous response. High-dose radiation induced cell death, but low-dose ionizing radiation of <0.5 Gy did not induce mast cell death. Low-dose ionizing radiation that did not induce cell death significantly suppressed mediator release from human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6 and LAD2 cells that were activated by antigen-antibody reaction. To determine the inhibitory mechanism of mediator released by low-dose ionizing radiation, we examined the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules such as Lyn, Syk, phospholipase Cγ, and protein kinase C, as well as the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i. The phosphorylation of signaling molecules and [Ca2+]i following stimulation of FcεRI receptors was inhibited by low dose ionizing radiation. In agreement with its in vitro effect, ionizing radiation also significantly inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-13, and symptoms of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction and the late-phase cutaneous response in anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-sensitized mice. These results indicate that ionizing radiation inhibits both mast cell-mediated immediate- and delayed-type allergic reactions in vivo and in vitro.

  11. A decade of comparative dose planning studies for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Specht, Lena

    2014-01-01

    , especially in young patients with a long life expectancy. In this study, we review the current evidence for modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques in the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma with a focus on a reduced delivered dose, a reduced irradiated volume, and a more conformal......During the past 4 decades, the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma has changed dramatically, and combined modality treatment is now considered the standard of care for patients with early-stage disease. However, the risk of late effects has led to concerns regarding the use of radiation therapy...... the estimated risk of late effects. However, there is no such thing as a single best modern delivery technique when multiple organs at risk are considered simultaneously because of the heterogeneity in patient anatomy and disease location, and the choice of radiation therapy technique should be made...

  12. Lack-of-fit tests for assessing mean structures for continuous dose-response data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Christian; Martinussen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    We review a range of lack-of-fit tests suitable for assessing the appropriateness of the mean function in dose-response models. The review encompasses both well-known tests and new tests based on recent developments in statistics, which we have extended to the dose-response case. We argue...... that the classical methods are inadequate in certain situations, where the new tests may be applied. Power comparisons are carried out by means of extensive simulation studies, covering both designs with and without replicates at small and large sample sizes. Three datasets from dose-response applications illustrate...

  13. Radiation-induced heart disease: review of experimental data on dose response and pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz-Hector, S. (Institut fuer Strahlenbiologie, Neuherberg (Germany))

    1992-02-01

    Clinical and experimental heart irradiation can cause a variety of sequelae. A single dose of {>=} 15 Gy leads to a reversible exudative pericarditis, occurring in dogs, rabbits or rats at around 100 days. Its time-course is very similar in all species investigated, but there are considerable species and strain differences in severity and incidence. After longer, dose-dependent latency times chronic congestive myocardial failure develops. The paper reviews experimental data concerning dose response and pathogenesis. (author).

  14. Hepatitis B Seroprotection and the Response to a Challenging Dose among Vaccinated Children in Red Sea Governorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia M. Sami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess the long-term effectiveness of hepatitis B virus vaccine and the need for a booster dose among children who received three doses of vaccine during infancy in Red Sea Governorate. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed. Interviews with children (9 months to 16 years and parents were done. Blood samples to assess Hepatitis B markers were tested. Children showing no seroprotection received a booster dose to assess their anamnestic response after four weeks and one year later. RESULTS: None of the participants had evidence of chronic Hepatitis B. The seroprotection rate was 23.3% and it significantly decreased with age. Multivariate logistic analysis revealed that older age was the significant predicting variable for having no seroprotective level, while baseline anti-HBs level < 3.3 IU/L was the predicting variable for not developing early anamnestic response or loss of late anamnestic response. CONCLUSION: Long-term immunity persists among children who received complete series of hepatitis B vaccination during infancy even in absence or reduction of anti-HBs over time. Therefore, a booster dose is not necessary to maintain immunity till the age of sixteen.

  15. Characterization of early host responses in adults with dengue disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Ling

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While dengue-elicited early and transient host responses preceding defervescence could shape the disease outcome and reveal mechanisms of the disease pathogenesis, assessment of these responses are difficult as patients rarely seek healthcare during the first days of benign fever and thus data are lacking. Methods In this study, focusing on early recruitment, we performed whole-blood transcriptional profiling on denguevirus PCR positive patients sampled within 72 h of self-reported fever presentation (average 43 h, SD 18.6 h and compared the signatures with autologous samples drawn at defervescence and convalescence and to control patients with fever of other etiology. Results In the early dengue fever phase, a strong activation of the innate immune response related genes were seen that was absent at defervescence (4-7 days after fever debut, while at this second sampling genes related to biosynthesis and metabolism dominated. Transcripts relating to the adaptive immune response were over-expressed in the second sampling point with sustained activation at the third sampling. On an individual gene level, significant enrichment of transcripts early in dengue disease were chemokines CCL2 (MCP-1, CCL8 (MCP-2, CXCL10 (IP-10 and CCL3 (MIP-1α, antimicrobial peptide β-defensin 1 (DEFB1, desmosome/intermediate junction component plakoglobin (JUP and a microRNA which may negatively regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in dengue infected peripheral blood cells, mIR-147 (NMES1. Conclusions These data show that the early response in patients mimics those previously described in vitro, where early assessment of transcriptional responses has been easily obtained. Several of the early transcripts identified may be affected by or mediate the pathogenesis and deserve further assessment at this timepoint in correlation to severe disease.

  16. Dose-responsive characteristics of meperidine sedation in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, K C; Nazif, M M; Jackson, D L; Barnhart, D C; Close, J; Moore, P A

    1990-01-01

    Using double-blind conditions, 60 uncooperative and fearful preschool children (24-66 months) received intramuscular injections of meperidine 0.25, 0.50, 1.00 mg/lb or placebo prior to restorative dental treatment. Behavior was assessed by the dentist and an independent observer during five specific treatment procedures. Behavioral ratings found meperidine to be an effective sedative, with 0.50 mg/lb and 1.00 mg/lb being significantly more effective than placebo (P less than 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis). Children receiving 1.0 mg/lb of meperidine had significantly more nausea and vomiting than patients receiving lower doses of the drug (P less than 0.05, Chisquare). Physiologic monitoring demonstrated that the highest dose of meperidine was associated with transient drops in arterial oxygen saturation. Meperidine sedation was found to be more effective for older children (37-66 months) and for children initially rated as being only moderately uncooperative and fearful.

  17. Urochloa ruziziensis responses to sources and doses of urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João E. S. Lima

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of products that promote reduction of nitrogen (N losses from the urea fertilizer can contribute to increasing its use efficiency in forage grasses. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of N sources and doses on the growth of Urochloa ruziziensis. The experiment was carried out in the growing season of 2007/2008 in Santo Antônio de Goiás-GO, in a Brazilian Oxisol. A completely randomized block was used, with four replicates in a factorial scheme, corresponding to two N sources (conventional urea and urea with urease inhibitor and five N doses (0, 50, 100, 200 and 300 kg ha-1, divided into equal applications in five periods (Nov 14 to Dec 13, Dec 14 to Jan 12, Jan 13 to Feb 11 - rainy season, Mar 24 to Apr 22 and Jul 10 to Aug 08 - dry season. The effects of the treatments were evaluated for: shoot dry matter, tiller density, total N content in the leaves and relative chlorophyll content. N fertilizer sources did not affect the evaluated variables; however, N fertilization allowed linear increases in all variables with higher values during the rainy period. The relative chlorophyll content in U. ruziziensis had positive correlation with its dry matter productivity.

  18. DNA mismatch repair protein MSH2 dictates cellular survival in response to low dose radiation in endometrial carcinoma cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Lynn M

    2013-07-10

    DNA repair and G2-phase cell cycle checkpoint responses are involved in the manifestation of hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS). The low-dose radioresponse of MSH2 isogenic endometrial carcinoma cell lines was examined. Defects in cell cycle checkpoint activation and the DNA damage response in irradiated cells (0.2 Gy) were evaluated. HRS was expressed solely in MSH2+ cells and was associated with efficient activation of the early G2-phase cell cycle checkpoint. Maintenance of the arrest was associated with persistent MRE11, γH2AX, RAD51 foci at 2 h after irradiation. Persistent MRE11 and RAD51 foci were also evident 24 h after 0.2 Gy. MSH2 significantly enhances cell radiosensitivity to low dose IR.

  19. Malignant catatonia responsive to low doses of lorazepam: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fernando Moreira Matias

    Full Text Available Abstract CONTEXT: Catatonia can be divided into non-malignant or malignant. The latter is characterized by autonomic instability, exhibiting high fever, tachycardia and hypertension, and is regarded as a fulminant and rapidly progressive subtype. CASE REPORT: This article reports a case of malignant catatonia in a 43-year-old patient who had been presenting psychiatric disorders for the last three years. The patient was stable, maintaining mutism, immobility and autonomic abnormalities. Oral lorazepam (1 mg every eight hours was introduced and, in a few hours, the patient became afebrile. Two days later, the patient was already responding to verbal commands. CONCLUSIONS: Early intervention with lorazepam reduced the evolution of this patient to a fatal complication. Therefore, this case report sought to show that early diagnosis and intervention reduced the occurrence of serious and irreversible clinical outcomes.

  20. Response to low-dose herbicide selection in self-pollinated Avena fatua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Roberto; Girotto, Marcelo; Powles, Stephen B

    2016-03-01

    When applied at the correct plant stage and dose, herbicides are highly toxic to plants. At reduced, low herbicide doses (below the recommended dose) plants can survive and display continuous and quantitative variation in dose-survival responses. Recurrent (directional) selection studies can reveal whether such a phenotypic variation in plant survival response to low herbicide dose is heritable and leads to herbicide resistance. In a common experimental garden study, we have subjected a susceptible population of self-pollinated hexaploid Avena fatua to low-dose recurrent selection with the ACCase-inhibiting herbicide diclofop-methyl for three consecutive generations. Significant differences in response to low-dose diclofop-methyl selection were observed between the selected progenies and parent plants, with a twofold diclofop-methyl resistance and cross-resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides. Thus, the capacity of self-pollinated A. fatua to respond to low-dose herbicide selection is marginal, and it is much lower than in cross-pollinated L. rigidum. Lolium rigidum in the same experiment evolved 40-fold diclofop-methyl resistance by progressive enrichment of quantitative resistance-endowing traits. Cross-pollination rate, genetic variation and ploidy levels are identified as possible drivers affecting the contrasting capacity of Avena versus Lolium plants to respond to herbicide selection and the subsequent likelihood of resistance evolution at low herbicide dose usage. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Can a single dose response predict the effect of montelukast on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, Elin T. G.; Akkerman-Nijland, Anne M.; Driessen, Jean M. M.; Diamant, Zuzana; Thio, Bernard J.

    RationaleExercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) can be prevented by a single dose of montelukast (MLK). The effect is variable, similar to the variable responsiveness observed after daily treatment with MLK. We hypothesized that the effect of a single MLK-dose (5 or 10mg) on EIB could predict

  2. Dose-response analysis of testosterone replacement therapy in patients with female to male gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Aya; Watanabe, Masami; Sugimoto, Morito; Sako, Tomoko; Mahmood, Sabina; Kaku, Haruki; Nasu, Yasutomo; Ishii, Kazushi; Nagai, Atsushi; Kumon, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Gender identity disorder (GID) is a conflict between a person's actual physical gender and the one they identify him or herself with. Testosterone is the key agent in the medical treatment of female to male GID patients. We conducted a dose-response analysis of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in 138 patients to determine the onset of the therapeutic effects. The TRT consisted of intramuscular injection of testosterone enanthate and patients were divided into three groups; 250 mg every two weeks, 250 mg every three weeks and 125 mg every two weeks. The onset of deepening of voice, increase in facial hair and cessation of menses was evaluated in each group. At one month after the start of TRT, the onset of these physical changes was more prevalent in the group receiving the higher dose of testosterone, and there were dose-dependent effects observed between the three treatment groups. On the other hand, at six months after the start of TRT, most of the patients had achieved treatment responses and there were no dose-dependent effects with regard to the percentage of patients with therapeutic effects. No significant side effects were observed in any of the treatment groups. We demonstrated that the early onset of the treatment effects of TRT is dose-dependent, but within six months of starting TRT, all three doses were highly effective. Current study provides useful information to determine the initial dose of TRT and to suggest possible changes that should be made in the continuous dosage for long term TRT.

  3. A free software for the evaluation and comparison of dose response models in clinical radiotherapy (DORES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Grout, Ioannis; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Kappas, Constantin

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a user-friendly and simple tool for fast and accurate estimation of Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities (NTCP) for several radiobiological models, which can be used as a valuable complement to the clinical experience. The software which has been named DORES (Dose Response Evaluation Software) has been developed in Visual Basic, and includes three NTCP models (Lyman-Kuther-Burman (LKB), Relative Seriality and Parallel). Required input information includes the Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) for the Organs at Risk (OAR) of each treatment, the number of fractions and the total dose of therapy. NTCP values are computed, and subsequently placed in a spreadsheet file for further analysis. A Dose Response curve for every model is automatically generated. Every patient of the study population can be found on the curve since by definition their corresponding dose-response points fall exactly on the theoretical dose-response curve, when plotted on the same diagram. Distributions of absorbed dose alone do not provide information on the biological response of tissues to irradiation, so the use of this software may aid in the comparison of outcomes for different treatment plans or types of treatment, and also aid the evaluation of the sensitivity of different model predictions to uncertainties in parameter values. This was illustrated in a clinical case of breast cancer radiotherapy.

  4. Effects of fluticasone propionate on methacholine dose-response curves in nonsmoking atopic asthmatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Overbeek (Shelley); P.R. Rijnbeek (Peter); C. Vons; H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); J.M. Bogaard (Jan); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractMethacholine is frequently used to determine bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and to generate dose-response curves. These curves are characterized by a threshold (provocative concentration of methacholine producing a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second

  5. High dose antithrombin supplementation in early preeclampsia: A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Armando; Valsecchi, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Antithrombin levels are often reduced in preeclampsia and infusion of antithrombin concentrates has been reported to prolong gestation in severe preeclampsia. We aimed to evaluate efficacy and safety of high-dose antithrombin (ATIII) supplementation in patients with single pregnancies and preeclampsia occurring before 30 weeks of gestation. In November 2004 a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (code KB033) was started in 13 Italian centers. The planned sample size was of 240 patients (intention-to-treat, ITT population) to detect a 30% relative risk reduction of the primary endpoint, composite perinatal morbidity. Eligible patients were randomized to high dose AT (3000 IU/daily, ATIII Kedrion S.p.A., Italy), or placebo (1% glycine) for 7 days or less until delivery, whichever came first. The per-protocol (PP) population was restricted to patients receiving at least two days of treatment. The study was terminated by the sponsor in October 2007 after the enrolment of 38 evaluable patients - 20 randomized to high dose AT and 18 to placebo, 27 treated for 2 days or more - out of 164 screened patients. Enrolment failures were mainly represented by requirement for immediate delivery and consent refusal (91 patients). The primary endpoint occurred in 15 of 38 patients (39.5%), with a relative risk in the AT arm of 0.85 (95% CI 0.42-1.75) and 0.79 (95% CI 0.30-2.11) in the ITT and PP populations, respectively. Living neonates in the two arms had similar weight at birth, Apgar scores, and duration of hospitalization in neonatal ICU. In mothers, AT supplementation was associated with reduced blood loss at delivery and with surrogate laboratory markers (LDH, d-dimer). The results of this markedly underpowered trial, albeit suggestive of a potential maternal benefit, cannot support high-dose AT supplementation to improve fetal/neonatal outcomes in early preeclampsia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of early use of low-dose aspirin therapy on late-onset preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Patrick G; Gillin, Adrian G; Pelosi, Marilena; Tooher, Jane; Sandager, Puk; Hyett, Jon

    2018-01-24

    Low-dose aspirin (LDA) therapy has been found to be effective in preventing the development of early-onset preeclampsia. However, its effect on late-onset preeclampsia has not been described. Our study was aimed at determining if LDA therapy prescribed from early in pregnancy modified the severity of late-onset preeclampsia. A retrospective analysis of all women who were screened for early-onset preeclampsia at 11-13+6 weeks' gestation between April 2012 and October 2014 at our institution, and who subsequently developed late-onset preeclampsia. The treatment group consisted of women who were prescribed LDA therapy from early in pregnancy as a result of the screening. The control group consisted of women who did not receive LDA therapy. The aspirin group was associated with earlier delivery at 38.0 (37.5-38.5) weeks' gestation versus 39.0 (38.7-39.4) weeks' gestation for the nonaspirin group (p < .01). The aspirin group was also associated with lower absolute birth weight 2851 (2646-3055) versus 3215 (3068-3362) grams in the nonaspirin group (p < .01). However, when normalised for gestational age at delivery, the proportion of foetuses that were small for gestation age (< 10th centile) were not significantly different between the two groups [28% in aspirin group versus 23% in nonaspirin group; p = .62]. No other significant difference was noted. There was no difference in the clinical severity of late-onset preeclampsia between women screened as high risk for early-onset preeclampsia and subsequently prescribed LDA during their pregnancy, compared to women found to be at low risk and not prescribed LDA.

  7. Dose Finding of Lenvatinib in Subjects With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Based on Population Pharmacokinetic and Exposure–Response Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayato, Seiichi; Hojo, Seiichiro; Suzuki, Takuya; Okusaka, Takuji; Ikeda, Kenji; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for up to 90% of primary liver cancer occurrences worldwide. Lenvatinib, a multikinase inhibitor, was approved in radioiodine‐refractory differentiated thyroid cancer. In this phase 2 study (study 202), we aimed to identify the lenvatinib optimal dose for subjects with advanced HCC Child‐Pugh class A. Pooled data from phase 1 studies in healthy adults and in subjects with mixed tumor types, and from study 202 in subjects with HCC, were analyzed using a population pharmacokinetic approach. The relationship between treatment‐emergent adverse events leading to withdrawal or dose reduction during cycle 1 and lenvatinib exposure was explored by logistic regression analysis. A receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to investigate the best cutoff values of lenvatinib exposure and body weight to identify a high‐risk group for early dose modification. The final pharmacokinetic model included body‐weight effects on apparent clearance and volume. The relationship between the lenvatinib area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) at steady state and body weight demonstrated an increase in AUC as body weight decreased in subjects with HCC. An exposure–response relationship was observed, with higher lenvatinib AUC and lower body weight resulting in earlier drug withdrawal or dose reduction. The best cutoff values for body weight and lenvatinib AUC were 57.8 kg and 2430 ng·h/mL, respectively, to predict the group at high risk for early drug withdrawal or dose reduction. We therefore recommend 12‐mg and 8‐mg starting doses for subjects ≥60 kg and <60 kg, respectively, in subjects with HCC Child‐Pugh class A. PMID:28561918

  8. Dose Finding of Lenvatinib in Subjects With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Based on Population Pharmacokinetic and Exposure-Response Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Toshiyuki; Hayato, Seiichi; Hojo, Seiichiro; Suzuki, Takuya; Okusaka, Takuji; Ikeda, Kenji; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2017-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for up to 90% of primary liver cancer occurrences worldwide. Lenvatinib, a multikinase inhibitor, was approved in radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer. In this phase 2 study (study 202), we aimed to identify the lenvatinib optimal dose for subjects with advanced HCC Child-Pugh class A. Pooled data from phase 1 studies in healthy adults and in subjects with mixed tumor types, and from study 202 in subjects with HCC, were analyzed using a population pharmacokinetic approach. The relationship between treatment-emergent adverse events leading to withdrawal or dose reduction during cycle 1 and lenvatinib exposure was explored by logistic regression analysis. A receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to investigate the best cutoff values of lenvatinib exposure and body weight to identify a high-risk group for early dose modification. The final pharmacokinetic model included body-weight effects on apparent clearance and volume. The relationship between the lenvatinib area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) at steady state and body weight demonstrated an increase in AUC as body weight decreased in subjects with HCC. An exposure-response relationship was observed, with higher lenvatinib AUC and lower body weight resulting in earlier drug withdrawal or dose reduction. The best cutoff values for body weight and lenvatinib AUC were 57.8 kg and 2430 ng·h/mL, respectively, to predict the group at high risk for early drug withdrawal or dose reduction. We therefore recommend 12-mg and 8-mg starting doses for subjects ≥60 kg and <60 kg, respectively, in subjects with HCC Child-Pugh class A. © 2017, The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  9. Dose Response of Alanine Detectors Irradiated with Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    response model developed by J. Hansen and K. Olsen has been implemented in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA, and calculations were compared with experimental results. Results: Calculations of the relative effectiveness deviate less than 5% from the measured values for mono energetic beams. Measured depth...

  10. Low-Dose UVA Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Cultured Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongrong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the mechanism of the adaptive response induced by low-dose ultraviolet A (UVA radiation. Methods. Cultured dermal fibroblasts were irradiated by a lethal dose of UVA (86.4 J/cm2 with preirradiation of single or repetitive low dose of UVA (7.2 J/cm2. Alterations of cellular morphology were observed by light microscope and electron microscope. Cell cycle and cellular apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometer. The extent of DNA damage was determined by single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE. Results. The cultured dermal fibroblasts, with pretreatment of single or repetitive irradiation of 7.2 J/cm2 UVA relieved toxic reaction of cellular morphology and arrest of cell cycle, decreased apoptosis ratio, reduced DNA chain breakage, and accelerated DNA repair caused by subsequent 86.4 J/cm2 UVA irradiation. Compared with nonpretreatment groups, all those differences were significant (P<0.01 or P<0.05. Conclusions. The adaptation reaction might depend on the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA irradiation. Low-dose UVA radiation might induce adaptive response that may protect cultured dermal fibroblasts from the subsequent challenged dose of UVA damage. The duration and protective capability of the adaptive reaction might be related to the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA Irradiation.

  11. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects: Evidence for an Adaptive Response to Low Dose Exposures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the induction of bystander effects by low dose, low-LET ionizing radiation and discusses how they may be related to observed adaptive responses or other protective effects of low dose exposures. Bystander effects appear to be the result of a generalized stress response in tissues or cells. The signals may be produced by all exposed cells, but the response appears to require a quorum in order to be expressed. The major response involving low LET radiation exposure discussed in the existing literature is a death response. This has many characteristics of apoptosis but is p53 independent. While a death response might appear to be adverse, the position is argued in this paper that it is in fact protective and removes damaged cells from the population. Since many cell populations carry damaged cells without being exposed to radiation, so called “background damage”, it is possible that low doses exposures cause removal of cells damaged by agents other than the test dose of radiation. This mechanism would lead to the production of “U-shaped” dose response curves. In this scenario, the level of “adaptive” or beneficial response will be related to the background damage carried by the cell population. This model may be important when attempting to predict the consequences of mixed exposures involving radiation and other environmental stressors. PMID:18648593

  12. T-cell activation and early gene response in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Wei, Jerry; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    T-cells play a crucial role in canine immunoregulation and defence against invading pathogens. Proliferation is fundamental to T-cell differentiation, homeostasis and immune response. Initiation of proliferation following receptor mediated stimuli requires a temporally programmed gene response that can be identified as immediate-early, mid- and late phases. The immediate-early response genes in T-cell activation engage the cell cycle machinery and promote subsequent gene activation events. Genes involved in this immediate-early response in dogs are yet to be identified. The present study was undertaken to characterise the early T-cell gene response in dogs to improve understanding of the genetic mechanisms regulating immune function. Gene expression profiles were characterised using canine gene expression microarrays and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), and paired samples from eleven dogs. Significant functional annotation clusters were identified following stimulation with phytohemagluttinin (PHA) (5μg/ml), including the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and phosphorylation pathways. Using strict statistical criteria, 13 individual genes were found to be differentially expressed, nine of which have ontologies that relate to proliferation and cell cycle control. These included, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2/COX2), early growth response 1 (EGR1), growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene (GADD45B), phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1), V-FOS FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), early growth response 2 (EGR2), hemogen (HEMGN), polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) and polo-like kinase 3 (PLK3). Differential gene expression was re-examined using qRT-PCR, which confirmed that EGR1, EGR2, PMAIP1, PTGS2, FOS and GADD45B were significantly upregulated in stimulated cells and ALAS2 downregulated. PTGS2 and EGR1 showed the highest levels of response in these dogs. Both of these genes are involved in cell cycle

  13. T-cell activation and early gene response in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally-Anne Mortlock

    Full Text Available T-cells play a crucial role in canine immunoregulation and defence against invading pathogens. Proliferation is fundamental to T-cell differentiation, homeostasis and immune response. Initiation of proliferation following receptor mediated stimuli requires a temporally programmed gene response that can be identified as immediate-early, mid- and late phases. The immediate-early response genes in T-cell activation engage the cell cycle machinery and promote subsequent gene activation events. Genes involved in this immediate-early response in dogs are yet to be identified. The present study was undertaken to characterise the early T-cell gene response in dogs to improve understanding of the genetic mechanisms regulating immune function. Gene expression profiles were characterised using canine gene expression microarrays and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR, and paired samples from eleven dogs. Significant functional annotation clusters were identified following stimulation with phytohemagluttinin (PHA (5μg/ml, including the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and phosphorylation pathways. Using strict statistical criteria, 13 individual genes were found to be differentially expressed, nine of which have ontologies that relate to proliferation and cell cycle control. These included, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2/COX2, early growth response 1 (EGR1, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene (GADD45B, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1, V-FOS FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS, early growth response 2 (EGR2, hemogen (HEMGN, polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2 and polo-like kinase 3 (PLK3. Differential gene expression was re-examined using qRT-PCR, which confirmed that EGR1, EGR2, PMAIP1, PTGS2, FOS and GADD45B were significantly upregulated in stimulated cells and ALAS2 downregulated. PTGS2 and EGR1 showed the highest levels of response in these dogs. Both of these genes are involved in

  14. RNA splicing is responsive to MBNL1 dose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali P Jog

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy (DM1 is a highly variable, multi-system disorder resulting from the expansion of an untranslated CTG tract in DMPK. In DM1 expanded CUG repeat RNAs form hairpin secondary structures that bind and aberrantly sequester the RNA splice regulator, MBNL1. RNA splice defects resulting as a consequence of MBNL1 depletion have been shown to play a key role in the development of DM1 pathology. In patient populations, both the number and severity of DM1 symptoms increase broadly as a function of CTG tract length. However significant variability in the DM1 phenotype is observed in patients encoding similar CTG repeat numbers. Here we demonstrate that a gradual decrease in MBNL1 levels results both in the expansion of the repertoire of splice defects and an increase in the severity of the splice alterations. Thus, MBNL1 loss does not have an all or none outcome but rather shows a graded effect on the number and severity of the ensuing splice defects. Our results suggest that once a critical threshold is reached, relatively small dose variations of free MBNL1 levels, which may reflect modest changes in the size of the CUG tract or the extent of hairpin secondary structure formation, can significantly alter the number and severity of splice abnormalities and thus contribute to the phenotype variability observed in DM1 patients.

  15. PACAP38 dose-response pilot study in migraine patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollesen, Anne Luise Haulund; Guo, Song; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-01-01

    Background Intravenous infusion of 10 pmol/kg/min pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP38) induces migraine-like attacks in migraine patients without aura (MO). Here, we conducted a pilot study and investigated if lower doses of PACAP38 exert similar migraine......-inducing abilities. Methods We randomly allocated six MO patients to receive intravenous infusion of 4, 6, and 8 pmol/kg/min of PACAP38 over 20 minutes in a double-blind, three-way cross-over study. Headache and migraine characteristics were recorded during hospital (0-2 hours) and post-hospital (2-13 hours) phases....... Results PACAP38 induced migraine-like attacks in one out of six patients with 4 pmol, two out of six patients with 6 pmol and three out of six patients with 8 pmol ( p = 0.368). All patients reported head pain after 8 pmol/kg/min, whereas five of six participants reported head pain after both 4 and 6 pmol...

  16. Radiation effects on livestock: physiological effects, dose response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M C

    1985-06-01

    Farm livestock show no measurable effects from being exposed to ionizing radiation unless the level is greatly in excess of the natural background radiation. Possible sources of ionizing radiation which might affect livestock or contribute to radioactivity in the food chain to humans are reactor accidents, fuel reprocessing plant accidents and thermonuclear explosions. Most data on ionizing radiation effects on livestock are from whole body gamma doses near the LD 50/60 level. However, grazing livestock would be subjected to added beta exposure from ingested and skin retained radioactive particles. Results of attempts to simulate exposure of the Hereford cattle at Alamogardo, NM show that cattle are more sensitive to ingested fallout radiation than other species. Poultry LD 50/60 for gamma exposure is about twice the level for mammals, and swine appear to have the most efficient repair system being able to withstand the most chronic gamma exposure. Productivity of most livestock surviving an LD 50/60 exposure is temporarily reduced and longterm effects are small. Livestock are good screeners against undesirables in our diet and with the exception of radiosotopes of iodine in milk, very little fission product radioactivity would be expected to be transferred through the food chain in livestock products for humans. Feeding of stored feed or moving livestock to uncontaminated pastures would be the best protective action to follow.

  17. A dose and time response Markov model for the in-host dynamics of infection with intracellular bacteria following inhalation: with application to Francisella tularensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R M; Egan, J R; Hall, I M

    2014-06-06

    In a novel approach, the standard birth-death process is extended to incorporate a fundamental mechanism undergone by intracellular bacteria, phagocytosis. The model accounts for stochastic interaction between bacteria and cells of the immune system and heterogeneity in susceptibility to infection of individual hosts within a population. Model output is the dose-response relation and the dose-dependent distribution of time until response, where response is the onset of symptoms. The model is thereafter parametrized with respect to the highly virulent Schu S4 strain of Francisella tularensis, in the first such study to consider a biologically plausible mathematical model for early human infection with this bacterium. Results indicate a median infectious dose of about 23 organisms, which is higher than previously thought, and an average incubation period of between 3 and 7 days depending on dose. The distribution of incubation periods is right-skewed up to about 100 organisms and symmetric for larger doses. Moreover, there are some interesting parallels to the hypotheses of some of the classical dose-response models, such as independent action (single-hit model) and individual effective dose (probit model). The findings of this study support experimental evidence and postulations from other investigations that response is, in fact, influenced by both in-host and between-host variability.

  18. Dose-Response Curve of Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma-Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lusiyanti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome aberration is a biomarker to predict the level of cell damage caused by exposure to ionizing radiation on human body. Dicentric chromosome is a specific chromosome aberration caused by ionizing radiation and is used as a gold standard biodosimetry of individuals over exposed to ionizing radiation. In radiation accident the dicentric assays has been applied as biological dosimetry to estimate radiation absorbed dose and also to confirm the radiation dose received to radiation workers.The purpose of this study was to generate a dose response curve of chromosome aberration (dicentric in human lymphocyte induced by gamma radiation. Peripheral blood samples from three non smoking healthy volunteers aged between 25-48 years old with informed consent were irradiated with dose between 0.1-4.0 Gy and a control using gamma teletherapy source. The culture procedure was conducted following the IAEA standard procedures with slight modifications. Analysis of dose-response curves used was LQ model Y = a + αD + βD2. The result showed that α and β values of the curve obtained were 0.018 ± 0.006 and 0.013 ± 0.002, respectively. Dose response calibration curve for dicentric chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by gamma-radiation fitted to linear quadratic model. In order to apply the dose response curve of chromosome aberration disentric for biodosimetry, this standar curve still need to be validated.

  19. Radiation dose response of N channel MOSFET submitted to filtered X-ray photon beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves Filho, Luiz C.; Monte, David S.; Barros, Fabio R.; Santos, Luiz A. P.

    2018-01-01

    MOSFET can operate as a radiation detector mainly in high-energy photon beams, which are normally used in cancer treatments. In general, such an electronic device can work as a dosimeter from threshold voltage shift measurements. The purpose of this article is to show a new way for measuring the dose-response of MOSFETs when they are under X-ray beams generated from 100kV potential range, which is normally used in diagnostic radiology. Basically, the method consists of measuring the MOSFET drain current as a function of the radiation dose. For this the type of device, it has to be biased with a high value resistor aiming to see a substantial change in the drain current after it has been irradiated with an amount of radiation dose. Two types of N channel device were used in the experiment: a signal transistor and a power transistor. The delivered dose to the device was varied and the electrical curves were plotted. Also, a sensitivity analysis of the power MOSFET response was made, by varying the tube potential of about 20%. The results show that both types of devices have responses very similar, the shift in the electrical curve is proportional to the radiation dose. Unlike the power MOSFET, the signal transistor does not provide a linear function between the dose rate and its drain current. We also have observed that the variation in the tube potential of the X-ray equipment produces a very similar dose-response.

  20. Early adversity and brain response to faces in young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieslehto, Johannes; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Mäki, Pirjo; Koivukangas, Jenni; Nordström, Tanja; Miettunen, Jouko; Barnett, Jennifer H; Jones, Peter B; Murray, Graham K; Moilanen, Irma; Paus, Tomáš; Veijola, Juha

    2017-09-01

    Early stressors play a key role in shaping interindividual differences in vulnerability to various psychopathologies, which according to the diathesis-stress model might relate to the elevated glucocorticoid secretion and impaired responsiveness to stress. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that individuals exposed to early adversity have deficits in emotion processing from faces. This study aims to explore whether early adversities associate with brain response to faces and whether this association might associate with the regional variations in mRNA expression of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1). A total of 104 individuals drawn from the Northern Finland Brith Cohort 1986 participated in a face-task functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. A large independent dataset (IMAGEN, N = 1739) was utilized for reducing fMRI data-analytical space in the NFBC 1986 dataset. Early adversities were associated with deviant brain response to fearful faces (MANCOVA, P = 0.006) and with weaker performance in fearful facial expression recognition (P = 0.01). Glucocorticoid receptor gene expression (data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas) correlated with the degree of associations between early adversities and brain response to fearful faces (R2  = 0.25, P = 0.01) across different brain regions. Our results suggest that early adversities contribute to brain response to faces and that this association is mediated in part by the glucocorticoid system. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4470-4478, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Hypertonic Saline in Conjunction with High-Dose Furosemide Improves Dose-Response Curves in Worsening Refractory Congestive Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, Salvatore; Di Gaudio, Francesca; La Rocca, Vincenzo; Balistreri, Fabio; Greco, Massimiliano; Torres, Daniele; Lupo, Umberto; Rizzo, Giuseppina; di Pasquale, Pietro; Indelicato, Sergio; Cuttitta, Francesco; Butler, Javed; Parrinello, Gaspare

    2015-10-01

    Diuretic responsiveness in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) is better assessed by urine production per unit diuretic dose than by the absolute urine output or diuretic dose. Diuretic resistance arises over time when the plateau rate of sodium and water excretion is reached prior to optimal fluid elimination and may be overcome when hypertonic saline solution (HSS) is added to high doses of furosemide. Forty-two consecutively hospitalized patients with refractory CHF were randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to furosemide doses (125 mg, 250 mg, 500 mg) so that all patients received intravenous furosemide diluted in 150 ml of normal saline (0.9%) in the first step (0-24 h) and the same furosemide dose diluted in 150 ml of HSS (1.4%) in the next step (24-48 h) as to obtain 3 groups as follows: Fourteen patients receiving 125 mg (group 1), fourteen patients receiving 250 mg (group 2), and fourteen patients receiving 500 mg (group 3) of furosemide. Urine samples of all patients were collected at 30, 60, and 90 min, and 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 24 h after infusion. Diuresis, sodium excretion, osmolality, and furosemide concentration were evaluated for each urine sample. After randomization, 40 patients completed the study. Two patients, one in group 2 and one in group 3 dropped out. Patients in group 1 (125 mg furosemide) had a mean age of 77 ± 17 years, 43% were male, 6 (43%) had heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and 64% were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV; the mean age of patients in group 2 (250 mg furosemide) was 80 ± 8.1 years, 15% were male, 5 (38%) had HFpEF, and 84% were in NYHA class IV; and the mean age of patients in group 3 (500 mg furosemide) was 73 ± 12 years, 54% were male, 6 (46%) had HFpEF, and 69% were in NYHA class IV. HSS added to furosemide increased total urine output, sodium excretion, urinary osmolality, and furosemide urine delivery in all patients and at all time points. The percentage increase was 18,14, and

  2. Improved hospital mortality with a low MET dose: the importance of a modified early warning score and communication tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullany, D V; Ziegenfuss, M; Goleby, M A; Ward, H E

    2016-11-01

    Rapid response systems have been mandated for the recognition and management of the deteriorating patient. Increasing medical emergency team (MET) dose may be associated with improved outcomes. Large numbers of MET calls may divert resources from the program providing the service unless additional personnel are provided. To describe the implementation and outcomes of a multifaceted rapid response system (RRS) in a teaching hospital, we conducted an observational study. The RRS consisted of the introduction of a MET together with 1) redesign of the ward observation chart with the vital sign variables colour-coded to identify variation from normal; 2) mandated minimum frequency of vital sign measurement; 3) three formal levels of escalation based on the degree of physiological instability as measured by a modified early warning score (MEWS); 4) COMPASS© education and e-learning package with a two-hour face-to-face small group tutorial; 5) practise in escalation and communication using the ISBAR (Identify, Situation, Background, Assessment, Response/Recommendation) communication tool. The primary outcome measures were all-cause hospital mortality rate and hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR) compared to peer hospitals calculated by the Health Round Table. There were 161,153 separations and 1,994 hospital deaths from July 2008 to December 2012. The MET call rate was 11.3 per 1000 separations in 2012. There was a decline in all-cause hospital mortality from 13.8 to 11 deaths/1000 separations. The HSMR decreased from 95.7 in 2008 to 66 in the second half of 2012 (below the three standard deviation control limit). A low MET dose may be associated with improved hospital mortality when combined with a MEWS and an intervention to improve communication.

  3. Rapid Treponema pallidum clearance from blood and ulcer samples following single dose benzathine penicillin treatment of early syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipple, Craig; Jones, Rachael; McClure, Myra; Taylor, Graham

    2015-02-01

    Currently, the efficacy of syphilis treatment is measured with anti-lipid antibody tests. These can take months to indicate cure and, as a result, syphilis treatment trials require long periods of follow-up. The causative organism, Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum), is detectable in the infectious lesions of early syphilis using DNA amplification. Bacteraemia can likewise be identified, typically in more active disease. We hypothesise that bacterial clearance from blood and ulcers will predict early the standard serology-measured treatment response and have developed a qPCR assay that could monitor this clearance directly in patients with infectious syphilis. Patients with early syphilis were given an intramuscular dose of benzathine penicillin. To investigate the appropriate sampling timeframe samples of blood and ulcer exudate were collected intensively for T. pallidum DNA (tpp047 gene) and RNA (16S rRNA) quantification. Sampling ended when two consecutive PCRs were negative. Four males were recruited. The mean peak level of T. pallidum DNA was 1626 copies/ml whole blood and the mean clearance half-life was 5.7 hours (std. dev. 0.53). The mean peak of 16S rRNA was 8879 copies/ml whole blood with a clearance half-life of 3.9 hours (std. dev. 0.84). From an ulcer, pre-treatment, 67,400 T. pallidum DNA copies and 7.08 x 107 16S rRNA copies were detected per absorbance strip and the clearance half-lives were 3.2 and 4.1 hours, respectively. Overall, T. pallidum nucleic acids were not detected in any sample collected more than 56 hours (range 20-56) after treatment. All patients achieved serologic cure. In patients with active early syphilis, measuring T. pallidum levels in blood and ulcer exudate may be a useful measure of treatment success in therapeutic trials. These laboratory findings need confirmation on a larger scale and in patients receiving different therapies.

  4. Dose-response and concentration-response relation of rocuronium infusion during propofol nitrous oxide and isoflurane nitrous oxide anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kansanaho, M; Olkkola, KT; Wierda, JMKH

    The dose-response and concentration-response relation of rocuronium infusion was studied in 20 adult surgical patients during proporfol-nitrous oxide and isoflurane (1 MAC) -nitrous oxide anaesthesia. Neuromuscular block was kept constant, initially at 90% and then at 50% with a closed-loop feedback

  5. Regulatory T Cell Responses in Participants with Type 1 Diabetes after a Single Dose of Interleukin-2: A Non-Randomised, Open Label, Adaptive Dose-Finding Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Todd

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-2 (IL-2 has an essential role in the expansion and function of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs. Tregs reduce tissue damage by limiting the immune response following infection and regulate autoreactive CD4+ effector T cells (Teffs to prevent autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D. Genetic susceptibility to T1D causes alterations in the IL-2 pathway, a finding that supports Tregs as a cellular therapeutic target. Aldesleukin (Proleukin; recombinant human IL-2, which is administered at high doses to activate the immune system in cancer immunotherapy, is now being repositioned to treat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders at lower doses by targeting Tregs.To define the aldesleukin dose response for Tregs and to find doses that increase Tregs physiologically for treatment of T1D, a statistical and systematic approach was taken by analysing the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single doses of subcutaneous aldesleukin in the Adaptive Study of IL-2 Dose on Regulatory T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes (DILT1D, a single centre, non-randomised, open label, adaptive dose-finding trial with 40 adult participants with recently diagnosed T1D. The primary endpoint was the maximum percentage increase in Tregs (defined as CD3+CD4+CD25highCD127low from the baseline frequency in each participant measured over the 7 d following treatment. There was an initial learning phase with five pairs of participants, each pair receiving one of five pre-assigned single doses from 0.04 × 106 to 1.5 × 106 IU/m2, in order to model the dose-response curve. Results from each participant were then incorporated into interim statistical modelling to target the two doses most likely to induce 10% and 20% increases in Treg frequencies. Primary analysis of the evaluable population (n = 39 found that the optimal doses of aldesleukin to induce 10% and 20% increases in Tregs were 0.101 × 106 IU/m2 (standard error [SE] = 0.078, 95% CI = -0.052, 0.254 and 0.497

  6. Two-Stage Experimental Design for Dose-Response Modeling in Toxicology Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Yang, Feng; Porter, Dale W; Wu, Nianqiang

    The efficient design of experiments (i.e., selection of experimental doses and allocation of animals) is important to establishing dose-response relationships in toxicology studies. The proposed procedure for design of experiments is distinct from those in the literature because it is able to adequately accommodate the special features of the dose-response data, which include non-normality, variance heterogeneity, possibly nonlinearity of the dose-response curve, and data scarcity. The design procedure is built in a sequential two-stage paradigm that allows for a learning process. In the first stage, preliminary experiments are performed to gain information regarding the underlying dose-response curve and variance structure. In the second stage, the prior information obtained from the previous stage is utilized to guide the second-stage experiments. An optimization algorithm is developed to search for the design of experiments that will lead to dose-response models of the highest quality. To evaluate model quality (or uncertainty), which is the basis of design optimization, a bootstrapping method is employed; unlike standard statistical methods, bootstrapping is not subject to restrictive assumptions such as normality or large sample sizes. The design procedure in this paper will help to reduce the experimental cost/time in toxicology studies and alleviate the sustainability concerns regarding the tremendous new materials and chemicals.

  7. Orthostatic intolerance and the cardiovascular response to early postoperative mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, M; Jørgensen, Christoffer Calov; Jørgensen, T B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A key element in enhanced postoperative recovery is early mobilization which, however, may be hindered by orthostatic intolerance, that is, an inability to sit or stand because of symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion as intolerable dizziness, nausea and vomiting, feeling of heat...... of orthostatic intolerance. In contrast, 8 (50%) and 2 (12%) patients were orthostatic intolerant at 6 and approximately 22 h after surgery, respectively. Before surgery, SAP, DAP, and TPR increased (P0.05) and Scv(O2) decreased (P... the preoperative evaluation (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The early postoperative postural cardiovascular response is impaired after radical prostatectomy with a risk of orthostatic intolerance, limiting early postoperative mobilization. The pathogenic mechanisms include both impaired TPR and CO responses....

  8. Inhibited early immunologic response is associated with hypertrophic scarring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butzelaar, Liselotte; Schooneman, Dennis P. M.; Soykan, Ezgi A.; Talhout, Wendy; Ulrich, Magda M. W.; van den Broek, Lenie J.; Gibbs, Susan; Beelen, Robert H. J.; van der Molen, Aebele B. Mink; Niessen, Frank B.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine changes in the inflammatory response in early hypertrophic compared to normal wound healing. The immune system is thought to be involved in hypertrophic scar formation. However, the exact mechanism and time of onset of the derailment remain unknown. In a prospective

  9. The Reasons behind Early Adolescents' Responses to Peer Victimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmore, Amy; Chen, Wei-Ting; Rischall, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Victims of school-based peer harassment face a range of risks including psycho-social, physical, and academic harm. The aim of the present study was to examine the behavioral coping responses used by early adolescents when they face peer victimization. To meet this aim, 216 sixth grade students (55% girls) from two urban middle schools and 254…

  10. Minimal dose for effective clinical outcome and predictive factors for responsiveness to carvedilol: Japanese chronic heart failure (J-CHF) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Hori, Masatsugu; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Nagai, Ryozo; Yoshikawa, Tsutomu; Fujio, Yasushi; Nonen, Shinpei; Azuma, Junichi; Izumi, Tohru; Ohashi, Yasuo; Kitabatake, Akira

    2013-04-05

    In chronic heart failure (CHF), it remains unclear whether the minimal dose of beta-blockade is related to survival benefits and which parameter predicts morbidity and mortality. We sought to determine the minimal dose related to survival benefits by comparing the efficacy and safety of three doses of carvedilol and the best predictive parameter for effective outcomes in Japanese patients with CHF. In this prospective, randomized, stratified trial, 364 patients with mild to moderate CHF were assigned to a daily carvedilol dose of 2.5, 5, or 20mg, plus optimal standard therapy. During the mean 3-year follow-up, resting heart rate (HR) and BNP were significantly reduced with dose-response relations in the early period but without dose-response relations in the late period. The LVEF and the LVDd were increased and decreased, respectively, without a dose-response relation. No significant difference was seen in the composite primary endpoint of all-cause mortality and hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases and heart failure. Multivariate analysis indicated early decreases in HR and BNP predicted long-term outcomes. However, adverse events increased dose-dependently. Among 237 polymorphisms in 87 heart failure-related genes, the osteopontin G-156 del genotype was associated with an event-free survival rate (Wilcoxon test, P=0.030). A low carvedilol dose is effective if the HR and/or plasma BNP has been reduced. Carvedilol therapy should be guided by reductions in HR and/or BNP, especially by initial HR reduction, but not only by its dose. OPN might be a surrogate genetic marker for long-term event-free survival. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Different thresholds of tissue-specific dose-responses to growth hormone in short prepubertal children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decker Ralph

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to stimulating linear growth in children, growth hormone (GH influences metabolism and body composition. These effects should be considered when individualizing GH treatment as dose-dependent changes in metabolic markers have been reported. Hypothesis: There are different dose-dependent thresholds for metabolic effects in response to GH treatment. Method A randomized, prospective, multicentre trial TRN 98-0198-003 was performed for a 2-year catch-up growth period, with two treatment regimens (a individualized GH dose including six different dose groups ranging from 17–100 μg/kg/day (n=87 and (b fixed GH dose of 43 μg/kg/day (n=41. The individualized GH dose group was used for finding dose–response effects, where the effective GH dose (ED 50% required to achieve 50% Δ effect was calculated with piecewise linear regressions. Results Different thresholds for the GH dose were found for the metabolic effects. The GH dose to achieve half of a given effect (ED 50%, with 90% confidence interval was calculated as 33(±24.4 μg/kg/day for Δ left ventricular diastolic diameter (cm, 39(±24.5 μg/kg/day for Δ alkaline phosphatase (μkat/L, 47(±43.5 μg/kg/day for Δ lean soft tissue (SDS, 48(±35.7 μg/kg/day for Δ insulin (mU/L, 51(±47.6 μg/kg/day for Δ height (SDS, and 57(±52.7 μg/kg/day for Δ insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I SDS. Even though lipolysis was seen in all subjects, there was no dose–response effect for Δ fat mass (SDS or Δ leptin ng/ml in the dose range studied. None of the metabolic effects presented here were related to the dose selection procedure in the trial. Conclusions Dose-dependent thresholds were observed for different GH effects, with cardiac tissue being the most responsive and level of IGF-I the least responsive. The level of insulin was more responsive than that of IGF-I, with the threshold effect for height in the interval between.

  12. Dose-response modelling of umeclidinium and fluticasone furoate/umeclidinium in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuying; Goyal, Navin; Beerahee, Misba; Trivedi, Roopa; Lee, Laurie; Pascoe, Steven

    2015-09-01

    In two dose-ranging crossover studies, the long-acting muscarinic antagonist umeclidinium (UMEC) was assessed as monotherapy in patients with asthma not treated with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) (NCT01641692 [study 1]) and combined with the ICS fluticasone furoate (FF) in patients with asthma symptomatic on ICS (NCT01573624 [study 2]). The present study aimed to further characterise the UMEC dose-response relationship with change from baseline trough forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (day 15). A model-based approach using non-linear mixed-effects analyses was used to assess data from studies 1 and 2. Within the Study 1 dose range, no significant dose-response was demonstrated. In study 2, the slope-intercept on log-dose model showed a mild dose-response, with a 10 % probability of a 0.075-L FEV1 improvement with FF/UMEC 100/250 mcg; period 1 data (with an absent carryover effect) indicated an 88 % probability of a 0.075-L FEV1 improvement. The model-based approach in study 2 identified FF/UMEC doses warranting further investigation.

  13. Presence of early stage cancer does not impair the early protein metabolic response to major surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Mariëlle P K J; Klimberg, V Suzanne; Allasia, Arianna; Deutz, Nicolaas Ep

    2017-06-01

    Combined bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction is a common major surgical procedure in women with breast cancer and in those with a family history of breast cancer. As this large surgical procedure induces muscle protein loss, a preserved anabolic response to nutrition is warranted for optimal recovery. It is unclear whether the presence of early stage cancer negatively affects the protein metabolic response to major surgery as this would mandate perioperative nutritional support. In nine women with early stage (Stage II) breast malignancy and nine healthy women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer undergoing the same large surgical procedure, we examined whether surgery influences the catabolic response to overnight fasting and the anabolic response to nutrition differently. Prior to and within 24 h after combined bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction surgery, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown rates were assessed after overnight fasting and after meal intake by stable isotope methodology to enable the calculation of net protein catabolism in the post-absorptive state and net protein anabolic response to a meal. Major surgery resulted in an up-regulation of post-absorptive protein synthesis and breakdown rates (P early stage breast cancer or surgery. The presence of early stage breast cancer does not enhance the normal catabolic response to major surgery or further attenuates the anabolic response to meal intake within 24 h after major surgery in patients with non-cachectic breast cancer. This indicates that the acute anabolic potential to conventional feeding is maintained in non-cachectic early stage breast cancer after major surgery. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  14. Dose response of selected solid state detectors in applied homogeneous transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, M., E-mail: michaelreynolds@ualberta.net [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Departments of Oncology and Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Rathee, S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: MR-Linac devices under development worldwide will require standard calibration, commissioning, and quality assurance. Solid state radiation detectors are often used for dose profiles and percent depth dose measurements. The dose response of selected solid state detectors is therefore evaluated in varying transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields for this purpose. Methods: The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to model irradiation of a PTW 60003 diamond detector and IBA PFD diode detector in the presence of a magnetic field. The field itself was varied in strength, and oriented both transversely and longitudinally with respect to the incident photon beam. The long axis of the detectors was oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the photon beam. The dose to the active volume of each detector in air was scored, and its ratio to dose with zero magnetic field strength was determined as the “dose response” in magnetic field. Measurements at low fields for both detectors in transverse magnetic fields were taken to evaluate the accuracy of the simulations. Additional simulations were performed in a water phantom to obtain few representative points for beam profile and percent depth dose measurements. Results: Simulations show significant dose response as a function of magnetic field in transverse field geometries. This response can be near 20% at 1.5 T, and it is highly dependent on the detectors’ relative orientation to the magnetic field, the energy of the photon beam, and detector composition. Measurements at low transverse magnetic fields verify the simulations for both detectors in their relative orientations to radiation beam. Longitudinal magnetic fields, in contrast, show little dose response, rising slowly with magnetic field, and reaching 0.5%–1% at 1.5 T regardless of detector orientation. Water tank and in air simulation results were the same within simulation uncertainty where lateral electronic equilibrium is present and expectedly

  15. Transcriptional profiling of the dose response: a more powerful approach for characterizing drug activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Ru Ji

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The dose response curve is the gold standard for measuring the effect of a drug treatment, but is rarely used in genomic scale transcriptional profiling due to perceived obstacles of cost and analysis. One barrier to examining transcriptional dose responses is that existing methods for microarray data analysis can identify patterns, but provide no quantitative pharmacological information. We developed analytical methods that identify transcripts responsive to dose, calculate classical pharmacological parameters such as the EC50, and enable an in-depth analysis of coordinated dose-dependent treatment effects. The approach was applied to a transcriptional profiling study that evaluated four kinase inhibitors (imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib and PD0325901 across a six-logarithm dose range, using 12 arrays per compound. The transcript responses proved a powerful means to characterize and compare the compounds: the distribution of EC50 values for the transcriptome was linked to specific targets, dose-dependent effects on cellular processes were identified using automated pathway analysis, and a connection was seen between EC50s in standard cellular assays and transcriptional EC50s. Our approach greatly enriches the information that can be obtained from standard transcriptional profiling technology. Moreover, these methods are automated, robust to non-optimized assays, and could be applied to other sources of quantitative data.

  16. Influence of dose history on thermoluminescence response of Ge-doped silica optical fibre dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, F.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Dermosesian, E.; Khandaker, M. U.; Ung, N. M.; Mahamd Adikan, F. R.; Amin, Y. M.

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, silica based optical fibres show enough potential to be used as TL dosimeters in different applications. Reuse of optical fibre as a practical dosimeter demands to complete removal of accumulated doses via previous irradiations. This work investigates the existence and/or effect of remnant doses in fibre dosimeter from the previous irradiations, and proposes a method to control this artifact. A single mode Ge-doped optical fibre is used as TL radiation sensor, while a well calibrated Gammacell with 60Co source is used for irradiations. The effect of irradiation history on the TL response of optical fibres is surveyed extensively for doses ranged from 1 to 1000 Gy. The results show that the absorbed dose history in a fibre affects its response in the next irradiation cycles. It is shown that a dose history of around 100 Gy can increase the response of optical fibre by a factor of 1.72. The effect of annealing at higher temperatures on stabilizing the fibre response is also examined and results revealed that another alteration in the structure of trapping states occurs in glass medium which can change the sensitivity of fibres. Preservation of the sensitivity during successive irradiation cycles can be achieved by a proper annealing procedure accompanied by a pre-dose treatment.

  17. Dose-response of acute urinary toxicity of long-course preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-course preoperative chemoradiotherapy (chemo-RT) improves outcomes for rectal cancer patients, but acute side effects during treatment may cause considerable patient discomfort and may compromise treatment compliance. We developed a dose-response model for acute urinary toxicity...... based on a large, single-institution series. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In total 345 patients were treated with (chemo-)RT for primary rectal cancer from January 2007 to May 2012. Urinary toxicity during RT was scored prospectively using the CTCAE v 3.0 cystitis score (grade 0-5). Clinical variables...... and radiation dose to the bladder were related to graded toxicity using multivariate ordinal logistic regression. Three models were optimized, each containing all available clinical variables and one of three dose metrics: Mean dose (Dmean), equivalent uniform dose (EUD), or relative volume given x Gy or above...

  18. MCz diode response as a high-dose gamma radiation dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, F. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Goncalves, J.A.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Depto. de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo-PUC/SP, Rua Marques de Paranagua no 111-01303 050 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Khoury, H.J. [Nuclear Energy Department, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco-UFPE, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire no 1000-50740 540 Recife/PE (Brazil); Napolitano, C.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Haerkoenen, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics-HIP, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Bueno, C.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Depto. de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo-PUC/SP, Rua Marques de Paranagua no 111-01303 050 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil)], E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br

    2008-02-15

    This work presents the preliminary results obtained with a high-resistivity magnetic Czochralski (MCz) silicon diode processed at the Helsinki Institute of Physics as a high-dose gamma dosimeter in radiation processing. The irradiation was performed using a {sup 60}Co source (Gammacell 220, MDS Nordion) within total doses from 100 Gy up to 3 kGy at a dose rate of 3 kGy/h. In this interval, the dosimetric response of the diode is linear with a correlation coefficient (r{sup 2}) higher than 0.993. However, without any irradiation procedure, the device showed a small sensitivity dependence on the accumulated dose. For total dose of 3 kGy, the observed decrease was about 2%. To clarify the origin of this possible radiation damage effect, some studies are under way.

  19. Replicated evolution of integrated plastic responses during early adaptive divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Kevin J; Robinson, Beren W

    2006-04-01

    Colonization of a novel environment is expected to result in adaptive divergence from the ancestral population when selection favors a new phenotypic optimum. Local adaptation in the new environment occurs through the accumulation and integration of character states that positively affect fitness. The role played by plastic traits in adaptation to a novel environment has generally been ignored, except for variable environments. We propose that if conditions in a relatively stable but novel environment induce phenotypically plastic responses in many traits, and if genetic variation exists in the form of those responses, then selection may initially favor the accumulation and integration of functionally useful plastic responses. Early divergence between ancestral and colonist forms will then occur with respect to their plastic responses across the gradient bounded by ancestral and novel environmental conditions. To test this, we compared the magnitude, integration, and pattern of plastic character responses in external body form induced by shallow versus open water conditions between two sunfish ecomorphs that coexist in four postglacial lakes. The novel sunfish ecomorph is present in the deeper open water habitat, whereas the ancestral ecomorph inhabits the shallow waters along the lake margin. Plastic responses by open water ecomorphs were more correlated than those of their local shallow water ecomorph in two of the populations, whereas equal levels of correlated plastic character responses occurred between ecomorphs in the other two populations. Small but persistent differences occurred between ecomorph pairs in the pattern of their character responses, suggesting a recent divergence. Open water ecomorphs shared some similarities in the covariance among plastic responses to rearing environment. Replication in the form of correlated plastic responses among populations of open water ecomorphs suggests that plastic character states may evolve under selection

  20. Response to intervention: implications for early childhood professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sarah; Pretti-Frontczak, Kristie; Harjusola-Webb, Sanna; Grisham-Brown, Jennifer; Romani, Jeanne M

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the importance of building strong early childhood communities of interdisciplinary practice in the application of a comprehensive curriculum framework. A curriculum framework is proposed as a means of applying and extending the principles of response to intervention (RtI) to early childhood education providers working with young children, including speech-language pathologists (SLPs). The article presents information regarding the elements of a curriculum framework and suggestions for practice. Literature related to RtI was reviewed to identify common principles of practice. The resulting principles were then aligned to early childhood education recommended practices in order to illustrate the overlapping beliefs. Rationale and support for a curriculum framework as an early childhood education RtI model was then gathered to identify appropriate practices for working with young children who are served in a variety of early childhood settings. SLPs are important members of early educational teams, particularly when applying the principles of RtI using a curriculum framework. SLPs bring the expertise needed to ensure that children achieve critical outcomes. Implementation of the curriculum framework is made possible when everyone involved in supporting young children understands how to apply the elements of a curriculum framework.

  1. Aspartame tablets-gamma dose response and usability for routine radiation processing dosimetry using spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinde, S.H. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)]. E-mail: shs_barc@yahoo.com; Mukherjee, T. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Chemistry Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2007-02-15

    Aspartame tablets were studied for gamma dose response, using spectrophotometric read-out method. The optimum concentration for ferrous ions was 2x10{sup -4}moldm{sup -3} and xylenol orange with 2.5x10{sup -1}moldm{sup -3} of sulphuric acid for the optimum acidity in FX solution. Wavelength of maximum absorbance is 548nm. Post-irradiation stability is appreciable i.e. for not less than one month. Dose response is non-linear with third order polynomial fit, in the dose range of 1000-10000Gy. This system of aspartame was further used for carrying out relative percentage dose profile measurement in Gamma Cell-220. Results obtained were inter-compared with that of a glutamine dosimeter, which showed that maximum difference between the values of aspartame and glutamine systems is within +/-10%.

  2. Study of the response reduction of LiF:Mg, Ti dosimeter for high dose dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torkzadeh, Falamarz [Nuclear Sciences and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Applications Research School; AEOI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faripour, Heidar [Nuclear Sciences and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Laser and Optics Research School; AEOI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mardashti, Forough; Manouchehri, Farhad [Nuclear Sciences and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Applications Research School

    2017-07-15

    A single crystal and 5 polycrystalline samples of LiF:Mg, Ti and their pellets were prepared and investigated so as to apply thermoluminescence high gamma dose dosimetry. Three zones of single crystal with dopant concentrations of 200 ppm of Mg and 20 ppm of Ti were also used to prepare the single crystal samples. For polycrystalline samples, dopant concentrations of 0.062 mol% Mg and Ti concentrations in the range of 0.016 and 0.046 mol% were used. All the samples were exposed to gamma doses of 1 kGy to 700 kGy and their response changes were determined by a gamma dose test of about 60 mGy. According to the results obtained, the use of response reduction by curve-fitting up to about 300 kGy can be performed reliably for high dose gamma dosimetry.

  3. EBV-Specific Immune Response: Early Research and Personal Reminiscences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, D J; Lutzky, V P

    2015-01-01

    Early research on Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) developed from serological observations that were made soon after the discovery of the virus. Indeed, the definition of the humoral response to a variety of EBV proteins dominated the early literature and was instrumental in providing the key evidence for the association of the virus with infectious mononucleosis (IM), Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Each of these disease associations involved a distinct pattern of serological reactivity to the EBV membrane antigens (MA), early antigens (EA), and the EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA). When it became generally accepted that the marked lymphocytosis , which is a hallmark of acute IM, was dominated by T cells, considerable effort was directed toward untangling the specificities that might be associated with restricting the proliferation of newly infected B cells. Early evidence was divided between support for both EBV non-specific and/or HLA non-restricted components. However, all results needed to be reassessed in light of the observation that T cells died by apoptosis within hours of separation from fresh blood from acute IM patients. The observation that EBV-infected cultures from immune (but not non-immune) individuals began to die (termed regression) about 10 days post-seeding, provided the first evidence of a specific memory response which was apparently capable of controlling the small pool of latently infected B cells which all immune individuals possess. In this early era, CD8(+) T cells were thought to be the effector population responsible for this phenomenon, but later studies suggested a role for CD4(+) cells. This historical review includes reference to key early observations in regard to both the specific humoral and cellular responses to EBV infection from the time of the discovery of the virus until 1990. As well, we have included personal recollections in regard to the events surrounding the discovery of the memory T cell response

  4. Dose Response Effects of Hypertonic Saline and Dextran on Cardiovascular Responses in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-01

    expanding PV, but use of HS >7.5% may be limited by resulting hypernatremia . INTRODUCTION The rationale behind fluid resuscitation of the hypotensive...for HSD was arbitrary and the dose of 4 mL/kg was selected as a single dose which induced only modest hypernatremia (14,19). Few studies have

  5. The alanine detector in BNCT dosimetry: Dose response in thermal and epithermal neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, T., E-mail: schmito@uni-mainz.de [Institute for nuclear chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz D-55128 (Germany); Bassler, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, Aarhus C, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Blaickner, M. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Vienna A-1220 (Austria); Ziegner, M. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Vienna A-1220, Austria and TU Wien, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna A-1020 (Austria); Hsiao, M. C. [Insitute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liu, Y. H. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Koivunoro, H. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, POB 64, FI-00014, Finland and HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FI-00029 HUS (Finland); Auterinen, I.; Serén, T.; Kotiluoto, P. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Palmans, H. [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and Medical Physics Group, EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt A-2700 (Austria); Sharpe, P. [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Langguth, P. [Department of Pharmacy and Toxicology, University of Mainz, Mainz D-55128 (Germany); Hampel, G. [Institut für Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz D-55128 (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The response of alanine solid state dosimeters to ionizing radiation strongly depends on particle type and energy. Due to nuclear interactions, neutron fields usually also consist of secondary particles such as photons and protons of diverse energies. Various experiments have been carried out in three different neutron beams to explore the alanine dose response behavior and to validate model predictions. Additionally, application in medical neutron fields for boron neutron capture therapy is discussed. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz, Germany, in five experimental conditions, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been made in the epithermal neutron beams at the research reactors FiR 1 in Helsinki, Finland, and Tsing Hua open pool reactor in HsinChu, Taiwan ROC. Readout has been performed with electron spin resonance spectrometry with reference to an absorbed dose standard in a {sup 60}Co gamma ray beam. Absorbed doses and dose components have been calculated using the Monte Carlo codes FLUKA and MCNP. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using the Hansen and Olsen alanine response model. Results: The measured dose response of the alanine detector in the different experiments has been evaluated and compared to model predictions. Therefore, a relative effectiveness has been calculated for each dose component, accounting for its dependence on particle type and energy. Agreement within 5% between model and measurement has been achieved for most irradiated detectors. Significant differences have been observed in response behavior between thermal and epithermal neutron fields, especially regarding dose composition and depth dose curves. The calculated dose components could be verified with the experimental results in the different primary and secondary particle fields. Conclusions: The

  6. Cancer dose-response modeling of epidemiological data on worker exposures to aldrin and dieldrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielken, R L; Bretzlaff, R S; Valdez-Flores, C; Stevenson, D E; de Jong, G

    1999-12-01

    The paper applies classical statistical principles to yield new tools for risk assessment and makes new use of epidemiological data for human risk assessment. An extensive clinical and epidemiological study of workers engaged in the manufacturing and formulation of aldrin and dieldrin provides occupational hygiene and biological monitoring data on individual exposures over the years of employment and provides unusually accurate measures of individual lifetime average daily doses. In the cancer dose-response modeling, each worker is treated as a separate experimental unit with his own unique dose. Maximum likelihood estimates of added cancer risk are calculated for multistage, multistage-Weibull, and proportional hazards models. Distributional characterizations of added cancer risk are based on bootstrap and relative likelihood techniques. The cancer mortality data on these male workers suggest that low-dose exposures to aldrin and dieldrin do not significantly increase human cancer risk and may even decrease the human hazard rate for all types of cancer combined at low doses (e.g., 1 microgram/kg/day). The apparent hormetic effect in the best fitting dose-response models for this data set is statistically significant. The decrease in cancer risk at low doses of aldrin and dieldrin is in sharp contrast to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's upper bound on cancer potency based on mouse liver tumors. The EPA's upper bound implies that lifetime average daily doses of 0.0000625 and 0.00625 microgram/kg body weight/day would correspond to increased cancer risks of 0.000001 and 0.0001, respectively. However, the best estimate from the Pernis epidemiological data is that there is no increase in cancer risk in these workers at these doses or even at doses as large as 2 micrograms/kg/day.

  7. Cerebral radioprotection by pentobarbital: Dose-response characteristics and association with GABA agonist activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Orr, K.; Delaney, T.; Oldfield, E.H. (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Pentobarbital reduces cerebral radiation toxicity; however, the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. As an anesthetic and depressant of cerebral metabolism, pentobarbital induces its effects on the central nervous system by stimulating the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to its receptor and by inhibiting postsynaptic excitatory amino acid activity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of these actions as well as other aspects of the radioprotective activity of pentobarbital. Fischer 344 rats were separated into multiple groups and underwent two dose-response evaluations. In one set of experiments to examine the relationship of radioprotection to pentobarbital dose, a range of pentobarbital doses (0 to 75 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally prior to a constant-level radiation dose (70 Gy). In a second series of experiments to determine the dose-response relationship of radiation protection to radiation dose, a range of radiation doses (10 to 90 Gy) were given with a single pentobarbital dose. Further groups of animals were used to evaluate the importance of the timing of pentobarbital administration, the function of the (+) and (-) isomers of pentobarbital, and the role of an alternative GABA agonist (diazepam). In addition, the potential protective effects of alternative methods of anesthesia (ketamine) and induction of cerebral hypometabolism (hypothermia) were examined. Enhancement of survival time from acute radiation injury due to high-dose single-fraction whole-brain irradiation was maximal with 60 mg/kg of pentobarbital, and occurred over the range of all doses examined between 30 to 90 Gy. Protection was seen only in animals that received the pentobarbital before irradiation. Administration of other compounds that enhance GABA binding (Saffan and diazepam) also significantly enhanced survival time.

  8. Response of mouse tongue epithelium to single doses of bleomycin and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, W; Hirler, E; Hönig, M

    1993-06-01

    Both bleomycin (BLM) and local X-irradiation (25 kV) induce denudation in the tongue epithelium of the C3H-Neuherberg mouse in a dose-dependent manner. In the present study the effect of BLM alone and of combined single doses of drug and radiation were studied using the incidence of epithelial denudation as the end-point. In 'time-line' experiments, 8 mg/kg BLM were given before or after graded doses of X-rays. BLM treatment required a reduction of the radiation dose (ED50) from 15 Gy to 5-7 Gy, independent of sequence or time interval. In contrast, the time course of the response was clearly dependent on the treatment interval. Latency decreased when the drug was injected less than 2 h before irradiation with minimum latency observed at 30 min. Isobologram analysis of experiments with varying combinations of X-rays and BLM demonstrated that small drug doses were relatively more effective than larger doses, suggesting an upward concavity of the BLM dose-effect curve in vivo, i.e. a 'negative shoulder' of the curve in the low dose region. In contrast to the response to X-rays alone, which has a constant latent time to ulcer of 10 days, the latency in combined treatment was clearly shortened with increasing drug dose and at high doses eventually approximated the epithelial turnover time of 5 days. The data suggest that BLM both as a single agent and in combination with X-rays reduced the probability of abortive divisions and through this effect shortened the latent time to epithelial denudation.

  9. Infliximab Dose Escalation as an Effective Strategy for Managing Secondary Loss of Response in Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxonera, Carlos; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; Calvo, Marta; Saro, Cristina; Bastida, Guillermo; Martín-Arranz, María D; Gisbert, Javier P; García-Sánchez, Valle; Marín-Jiménez, Ignacio; Bermejo, Fernando; Chaparro, María; Ponferrada, Ángel; Martínez-Montiel, María P; Pajares, Ramón; de Gracia, Celia; Olivares, David; Alba, Cristina; Mendoza, Juan L; Fernández-Blanco, Ignacio

    2015-10-01

    The outcomes of infliximab dose escalation in ulcerative colitis (UC) have not been well evaluated. To assess the short- and long-term outcomes of infliximab dose escalation in a cohort of patients with UC. This was a multicenter, retrospective, cohort study. All consecutive UC patients who had lost response to infliximab maintenance infusions and who underwent infliximab dose escalation were included. Post-escalation short-term clinical response and remission were evaluated. In the long term, the cumulative probabilities of infliximab failure-free survival and colectomy-free survival were calculated. Predictors of short-term response and event-free survival were estimated using logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Seventy-nine patients were included. Fifty-four patients (68.4%) achieved short-term clinical response and 41 patients (51.9%) entered in clinical remission. After a median follow-up of 15 months [interquartile range (IQR) 8-26], 33 patients (41.8%) had infliximab failure. Patients with short-term response had a significantly lower adjusted rate of infliximab failure [hazard ratio (HR) 0.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12-0.49; p infliximab during maintenance, infliximab dose escalation enabled recovery of short-term response in nearly 70% of patients. In the long term, 58% of patients maintained sustained clinical benefit, and 9 of 10 avoided colectomy. Short-term response was associated with an 86% reduction in the relative risk of colectomy.

  10. Analysis of Dose Response for Circulatory Disease After Radiotherapy for Benign Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, Mark P., E-mail: mark.little@nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Kleinerman, Ruth A. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mabuchi, Kiyohiko [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose-response for various circulatory disease endpoints, and modifiers by age and time since exposure. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by circulatory disease endpoint (ischemic heart, cerebrovascular, other circulatory disease). Results: There were significant excess risks for all circulatory disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.082 (95% CI 0.031-0.140), and ischemic heart disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.102 (95% CI 0.039-0.174) (both p = 0.01), and indications of excess risk for stroke. There were no statistically significant (p > 0.2) differences between risks by endpoint, and few indications of curvature in the dose-response. There were significant (p < 0.001) modifications of relative risk by time since exposure, the magnitude of which did not vary between endpoints (p > 0.2). Risk modifications were similar if analysis was restricted to patients receiving radiation, although the relative risks were slightly larger and the risk of stroke failed to be significant. The slopes of the dose-response were generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in occupationally and medically exposed groups. Conclusions: There were excess risks for a variety of circulatory diseases in this dataset, with significant modification of risk by time since exposure. The consistency of the dose-response slopes with those observed in radiotherapeutically treated groups at much higher dose, as well as in lower dose-exposed cohorts such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and nuclear workers, implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

  11. Dose-Response of Aerobic Exercise on Cognition: A Community-Based, Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidoni, Eric D; Johnson, David K; Morris, Jill K; Van Sciver, Angela; Greer, Colby S; Billinger, Sandra A; Donnelly, Joseph E; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest a dose-response relationship exists between physical activity and cognitive outcomes. However, no direct data from randomized trials exists to support these indirect observations. The purpose of this study was to explore the possible relationship of aerobic exercise dose on cognition. Underactive or sedentary participants without cognitive impairment were randomized to one of four groups: no-change control, 75, 150, and 225 minutes per week of moderate-intensity semi-supervised aerobic exercise for 26-weeks in a community setting. Cognitive outcomes were latent residual scores derived from a battery of 16 cognitive tests: Verbal Memory, Visuospatial Processing, Simple Attention, Set Maintenance and Shifting, and Reasoning. Other outcome measures were cardiorespiratory fitness (peak oxygen consumption) and measures of function functional health. In intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses (n = 101), cardiorespiratory fitness increased and perceived disability decreased in a dose-dependent manner across the 4 groups. No other exercise-related effects were observed in ITT analyses. Analyses restricted to individuals who exercised per-protocol (n = 77) demonstrated that Simple Attention improved equivalently across all exercise groups compared to controls and a dose-response relationship was present for Visuospatial Processing. A clear dose-response relationship exists between exercise and cardiorespiratory fitness. Cognitive benefits were apparent at low doses with possible increased benefits in visuospatial function at higher doses but only in those who adhered to the exercise protocol. An individual’s cardiorespiratory fitness response was a better predictor of cognitive gains than exercise dose (i.e., duration) and thus maximizing an individual’s cardiorespiratory fitness may be an important therapeutic target for achieving cognitive benefits. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01129115.

  12. Early-onset dropped head syndrome after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: dose constraints for neck extensor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Koji; Nakamura, Satoshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kashihara, Tairo; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Murakami, Naoya; Ito, Yoshinori; Igaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a famous but unusual late complication of multimodality treatment for head and neck carcinoma. We reported this early-onset complication and analyzed the dose to the neck extensor muscles. We examined the records of three patients with DHS after radiotherapy. The doses to the neck extensor muscles were compared between three patients with DHS and nine patients without DHS. The mean dose to the neck extensor muscles of the three patients with DHS were 58.5 Gy, 42.3 Gy and 60.9 Gy, while the dose was muscles. The proposed dose to the neck extensor muscles might be <46 Gy (or at least <50 Gy). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  13. Dose-response of pregabalin for diabetic peripheral neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lesley M; McCarberg, Bill H; Clair, Andrew G; Whalen, Ed; Thomas, Neal; Jorga, Anamaria; Pauer, Lynne; Vissing, Richard; Park, Peter W

    2017-11-01

    The pregabalin dose-response for pain, Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC), and sleep quality measures in painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN), postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), and fibromyalgia (FM) is relevant for physicians treating these patients. This analysis aimed to demonstrate the dose-response of pregabalin for each indication and describe the onset (incidence), onset/continuation (prevalence), and resolution of adverse events (AEs) occurring during treatment. Data from 14 placebo-controlled, fixed-dose pregabalin trials in pDPN, PHN, and FM were pooled within each indication. Patients had mean baseline pain scores ≥6 on an 11-point numeric rating scale. A hyperbolic Emax dose-response model examined the dose-response of pregabalin for pain, PGIC, and sleep quality. Safety assessments included onset and prevalence of common AEs each week, and resolution in the first 2 months of treatment. In all indications, the likelihood of patients experiencing pain relief and improvements in PGIC and sleep quality increased in a dose-dependent manner with increasing doses. In all indications, new incidences of dizziness and somnolence were highest after 1 week of treatment, with few subsequent new reports at a given dose. Prevalence rates decreased steadily after 1 week of treatment. In FM, new onset weight gain emerged 6-8 weeks following treatment; prevalence rates generally increased then remained steady over time. With the exception of weight gain, many AEs resolved in month 1. The dose-response of pregabalin for pain, PGIC, and sleep quality was demonstrated, highlighting the benefit of achieving the maximum recommended dose of 300 mg/day for pDPN, 300-600 mg/day for PHN, and 300-450 mg/day for FM. Common AEs are generally seen within 1 week of starting treatment, with few subsequent new reports at a given dose. New onset weight gain occurs after 6 weeks of treatment, reinforcing the need for regular monitoring of weight.

  14. Dose-response of EBT3 radiochromic films to proton and carbon ion clinical beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castriconi, Roberta; Ciocca, Mario; Mirandola, Alfredo; Sini, Carla; Broggi, Sara; Schwarz, Marco; Fracchiolla, Francesco; Martišíková, Mária; Aricò, Giulia; Mettivier, Giovanni; Russo, Paolo

    2017-01-21

    We investigated the dose-response of the external beam therapy 3 (EBT3) films for proton and carbon ion clinical beams, in comparison with conventional radiotherapy beams; we also measured the film response along the energy deposition-curve in water. We performed measurements at three hadrontherapy centres by delivering monoenergetic pencil beams (protons: 63-230 MeV; carbon ions: 115-400 MeV/u), at 0.4-20 Gy dose to water, in the plateau of the depth-dose curve. We also irradiated the films to clinical MV-photon and electron beams. We placed the EBT3 films in water along the whole depth-dose curve for 148.8 MeV protons and 398.9 MeV/u carbon ions, in comparison with measurements provided by a plane-parallel ionization chamber. For protons, the response of EBT3 in the plateau of the depth-dose curve is not different from that of photons, within experimental uncertainties. For carbon ions, we observed an energy dependent under-response of EBT3 film, from 16% to 29% with respect to photon beams. Moreover, we observed an under-response in the Bragg peak region of about 10% for 148.8 MeV protons and of about 42% for 398.9 MeV/u carbon ions. For proton and carbon ion clinical beams, an under-response occurs at the Bragg peak. For carbon ions, we also observed an under-response of the EBT3 in the plateau of the depth-dose curve. This effect is the highest at the lowest initial energy of the clinical beams, a phenomenon related to the corresponding higher LET in the film sensitive layer. This behavior should be properly modeled when using EBT3 films for accurate 3D dosimetry.

  15. Dose-response relationship in cyclophosphamide-treated B-cell lymphoma xenografts monitored with [{sup 18}F]FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brepoels, Lieselot; Saint-Hubert, Marijke de; Mortelmans, Luc [University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Stroobants, Sigrid [University Hospital Antwerpen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Edegem (Belgium); Verhoef, Gregor [University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven, Department of Hematology, Leuven (Belgium); Balzarini, Jan [KU Leuven, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Leuven (Belgium); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Although [{sup 18}F]FDG PET can measure therapy response sooner and more accurately than morphological imaging techniques, there is still some debate as to whether [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake really reflects changes in the viable cell fraction. In this study changes in [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake were investigated in a lymphoma model at several time-points after treatment and with different doses of chemotherapy. Data were analysed in terms of several parameters. SCID mice were subcutaneously inoculated with 5 x 10{sup 6} Daudi cells in the right thigh. One group was not treated (control group). The other groups received cyclophosphamide 75 mg/kg (low-dose group), 125 mg/kg (medium-dose group) and 175 mg/kg (high-dose group) on day 0. Sequential [{sup 18}F]FDG small-animal PET ({mu}PET) scans were performed on days 0, 2, 6, 9, 13 and 16 after treatment. The mean and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max}), metabolic tumour volume (Vol{sub metab}) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were calculated. A significant decrease in [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake was observed on day 2 in the medium-dose and high-dose groups and on day 6 in the low-dose group, all preceding morphological changes. SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max} formed a plateau from day 6 to day 9, corresponding to the known influx of inflammatory cells. No obvious plateau was observed with TLG which was found to be the most sensitive parameter clearly differentiating the low-dose group from the medium- and high-dose groups early after therapy. [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake was able to reflect the dose-response relationship for cyclophosphamide. TLG was the best parameter for dose-related response assessment in this tumour model. (orig.)

  16. Dose dependency and individual variability of the lipopolysaccharide-induced bovine acute phase protein response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S.; Andersen, P.H.; Tølbøll, T.

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the dose dependency and the individual variability of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute phase protein response in cattle, 8 nonlactating, nonpregnant Danish Holstein cows were challenged 3 times each by intravenous injection of increasing doses (10, 100, and 1000 ng....../kg, consecutively) of Escherichia coli LPS with 3-wk intervals. All 3 LPS doses resulted in a rapid increase in serum concentrations of haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA) and a decrease in serum concentrations of albumin in all 8 cows. Serum concentrations of acute phase proteins (APP) remained altered...... not only reflect the magnitude of LPS exposure but are also influenced by the ability of the individual cow to mount an acute phase response. The ability to produce SAA and haptoglobin may be an innate characteristic of the individual, as responses in consecutive challenges were quantitatively similar....

  17. Poster — Thur Eve — 27: Flattening Filter Free VMAT Quality Assurance: Dose Rate Considerations for Detector Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viel, Francis; Duzenli, Cheryl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia (Canada); British Columbia Cancer Agency, Department of Medical Physics, Vancouver Centre (Canada); Camborde, Marie-Laure; Strgar, Vincent; Horwood, Ron; Atwal, Parmveer; Gete, Ermias [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Department of Medical Physics, Vancouver Centre (Canada); Karan, Tania [Stronach Regional Cancer Centre, Newmarket, ON (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Introduction: Radiation detector responses can be affected by dose rate. Due to higher dose per pulse and wider range of mu rates in FFF beams, detector responses should be characterized prior to implementation of QA protocols for FFF beams. During VMAT delivery, the MU rate may also vary dramatically within a treatment fraction. This study looks at the dose per pulse variation throughout a 3D volume for typical VMAT plans and the response characteristics for a variety of detectors, and makes recommendations on the design of QA protocols for FFF VMAT QA. Materials and Methods: Linac log file data and a simplified dose calculation algorithm are used to calculate dose per pulse for a variety of clinical VMAT plans, on a voxel by voxel basis, as a function of time in a cylindrical phantom. Diode and ion chamber array responses are characterized over the relevant range of dose per pulse and dose rate. Results: Dose per pulse ranges from <0.1 mGy/pulse to 1.5 mGy/pulse in a typical VMAT treatment delivery using the 10XFFF beam. Diode detector arrays demonstrate increased sensitivity to dose (+./− 3%) with increasing dose per pulse over this range. Ion chamber arrays demonstrate decreased sensitivity to dose (+/− 1%) with increasing dose rate over this range. Conclusions: QA protocols should be designed taking into consideration inherent changes in detector sensitivity with dose rate. Neglecting to account for changes in detector response with dose per pulse can lead to skewed QA results.

  18. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  19. Bayesian penalized log-likelihood ratio approach for dose response clinical trial studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Cai, Chunyan; Sun, Liangrui; He, Jianghua

    2017-02-13

    In literature, there are a few unified approaches to test proof of concept and estimate a target dose, including the multiple comparison procedure using modeling approach, and the permutation approach proposed by Klingenberg. We discuss and compare the operating characteristics of these unified approaches and further develop an alternative approach in a Bayesian framework based on the posterior distribution of a penalized log-likelihood ratio test statistic. Our Bayesian approach is much more flexible to handle linear or nonlinear dose-response relationships and is more efficient than the permutation approach. The operating characteristics of our Bayesian approach are comparable to and sometimes better than both approaches in a wide range of dose-response relationships. It yields credible intervals as well as predictive distribution for the response rate at a specific dose level for the target dose estimation. Our Bayesian approach can be easily extended to continuous, categorical, and time-to-event responses. We illustrate the performance of our proposed method with extensive simulations and Phase II clinical trial data examples.

  20. A comparison of linaclotide and lubiprostone dosing regimens on ion transport responses in human colonic mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Bum; Marchelletta, Ronald R; Penrose, Harrison; Docherty, Michael J; McCole, Declan F

    2015-03-01

    Linaclotide, a synthetic guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) agonist, and the prostone analog, Lubiprostone, are approved to manage chronic idiopathic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Lubiprostone also protects intestinal mucosal barrier function in ischemia. GC-C signaling regulates local fluid balance and other components of intestinal mucosal homeostasis including epithelial barrier function. The aim of this study was to compare if select dosing regimens differentially affect linaclotide and lubiprostone modulation of ion transport and barrier properties of normal human colonic mucosa. Normal sigmoid colon biopsies from healthy subjects were mounted in Ussing chambers. Tissues were treated with linaclotide, lubiprostone, or vehicle to determine effects on short-circuit current (I sc). Subsequent I sc responses to the cAMP agonist, forskolin, and the calcium agonist, carbachol, were also measured to assess if either drug caused desensitization. Barrier properties were assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance. I sc responses to linaclotide and lubiprostone were significantly higher than vehicle control when administered bilaterally or to the mucosal side only. Single versus cumulative concentrations of linaclotide showed differences in efficacy while cumulative but not single dosing caused desensitization to forskolin. Lubiprostone reduced forskolin responses under all conditions. Linaclotide and lubiprostone exerted a positive effect on TER that was dependent on the dosing regimen. Linaclotide and lubiprostone increase ion transport responses across normal human colon but linaclotide displays increased sensitivity to the dosing regimen used. These findings may have implications for dosing protocols of these agents in patients with constipation.

  1. Cone-beam computed tomography in lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy: predictive parameters of early response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Rosario; Fiorentino, Alba; Ricchetti, Francesco; Giaj Levra, Niccolò; Fersino, Sergio; Di Paola, Gioacchino; Lo Casto, Antonio; Ruggieri, Ruggero; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-06-20

    To analyze lung lesion volume variations by contouring on cone-beam CT (CBCT) images to evaluate the early predictive parameters of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) treatment response. The prescribed dose of SABR was varied according to the tumour site (central or peripheral) and maximum diameter of the lesions by using a strategy of risk-adapted dose prescription with a dose range between 48 and 70 Gy in 3-10 consecutive fractions. For the purpose of the analysis, the gross tumour volume (GTV) was recontoured for each patient at first and last CBCT using two lung levels/windows: (a) -600/1000 HU and (b) -1000/250 HU. Univariate analysis was performed to evaluate a correlation between lung lesion variations on CBCT using the two levels/windows and treatment response 6 months after SABR. Independent variables were the number of fractions, time between initial and final fraction, biologically effective dose and pre-SABR GTV. Cut points of lesion volume reduction were evaluated to determine the correlation with complete response 6 months after SABR. 41 lung lesions were evaluated. 82 lung lesions were recontoured for each CBCT level/window. A lung lesion shrinkage of at least 20% was revealed to be statistically related to complete response 6 months after SABR for both the CBCT levels/windows used. The probability of complete response ranged between six and eight times higher in respect to CBCT levels/windows -600/1000 HU and -1000/250 HU, respectively, compared with patients without a lesion shrinkage of 20% at the last session of SABR. According to current findings, a lung lesion shrinkage of at least 20% at the last session of SABR could be predictable of complete response 6 months thereafter. Further investigations about this topic are needed. Prediction of the early tumour response could be useful to personalize imaging restaging after the completion of SABR or to incorporate additional therapies in case of poor responders to improve

  2. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  3. Dose response of subcutaneous GLP-1 infusion in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torekov, Signe Sørensen; Kipnes, M S; Harley, R E

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the dose-response relationship of the recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide (rGLP-1) administered by continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSCI) in subjects with type 2 diabetes, with respect to reductions in fasting, postprandial and 11-h serum glucose profiles.......To evaluate the dose-response relationship of the recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide (rGLP-1) administered by continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSCI) in subjects with type 2 diabetes, with respect to reductions in fasting, postprandial and 11-h serum glucose profiles....

  4. Dose-Response Effects of Tai Chi and Physical Therapy Exercise Interventions in Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Augustine C; Harvey, William F; Price, Lori Lyn; Han, Xingyi; Driban, Jeffrey B; Iversen, Maura D; Desai, Sima A; Knopp, Hans E; Wang, Chenchen

    2018-01-30

    Therapeutic exercise is a currently recommended non-pharmacological treatment for knee osteoarthritis (KOA). The optimal treatment dose (frequency or duration) has not been determined. To examine dose-response relationships, minimal effective dose, and baseline factors associated with the timing of response from two exercise interventions in KOA. Secondary analysis of a single-blind, randomized trial comparing 12-week Tai Chi and Physical Therapy exercise programs (Trial Registry #NCT01258985). Urban tertiary care academic hospital PARTICIPANTS: 182 participants with symptomatic KOA (mean age 61 years; BMI 32kg/m2, 70% female; 55% white). We defined dose as cumulative attendance-weeks of intervention, and treatment response as ≥20% and ≥50% improvement in pain and function. Using log-rank tests, we compared time-to-response between interventions; and used Cox regression to examine baseline factors associated with timing of response, including physical and psychosocial health, physical performance, outcome expectations, self-efficacy, and biomechanical factors. Weekly Western Ontario and McMasters Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain (0 to 500) and function (0 to 1700) scores. Both interventions had an approximately linear dose-response effect resulting in a 9 to 11-point reduction in WOMAC pain and a 32 to 41-point improvement in function per attendance-week. There was no significant difference in overall time-to-response for pain and function between treatment groups. Median time-to-response for ≥20% improvement in pain and function was 2 attendance-weeks and 4 to 5 attendance-weeks for ≥50% improvement. On multivariable models, outcome expectations were independently associated with incident function response (Hazard Ratio: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.004 to 2.14). Both interventions have approximately linear dose-dependent effects on pain and function, their minimum effective doses range from 2-5 weeks, and patient perceived benefits of exercise influence the timing of

  5. Dose-response curve to salbutamol during acute and chronic treatment with formoterol in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Piana GE

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Emanuele La Piana¹, Luciano Corda², Enrica Bertella¹, Luigi Taranto Montemurro¹, Laura Pini¹, Claudio Tantucci¹¹Cattedra di Malattie dell'Apparato Respiratorio, Università di Brescia, ²Prima Divisione di Medicina Interna, Spedali Civili, Brescia, ItalyBackground: Use of short-acting ß2-agonists in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD during treatment with long-acting ß2-agonists is recommended as needed, but its effectiveness is unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess the additional bronchodilating effect of increasing doses of salbutamol during acute and chronic treatment with formoterol in patients with COPD.Methods: Ten patients with COPD underwent a dose-response curve to salbutamol (until 800 µg of cumulative dose after a 1-week washout (baseline, 8 hours after the first administration of formoterol 12 µg (day 1, and after a 12-week and 24-week period of treatment with formoterol (12 µg twice daily by dry powder inhaler. Peak expiratory flow, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, forced vital capacity, and inspiratory capacity were measured at the different periods of treatment and at different steps of the dose-response curve.Results: Despite acute or chronic administration of formoterol, maximal values of peak expiratory flow, FEV1, and forced vital capacity after 800 µg of salbutamol were unchanged compared with baseline. The baseline FEV1 dose-response curve was steeper than that at day 1, week 12, or week 24 (P < 0.0001. Within each dose-response curve, FEV1 was different only at baseline and at day 1 (P < 0.001, when FEV1 was still greater at 800 µg than at 0 µg (P < 0.02. In contrast, the forced vital capacity dose-response curves were similar at the different periods, while within each dose-response curve, forced vital capacity was different in all instances (P < 0.001, always being higher at 800 µg than at 0 µg (P < 0.05.Conclusion: In patients with stable COPD, the maximal effect

  6. Murine neonates develop vigorous in vivo cytotoxic and Th1/Th2 responses upon exposure to low doses of NIMA-like alloantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opiela, Shannon J; Levy, Robert B; Adkins, Becky

    2008-08-15

    Early life exposure to noninherited maternal antigens (NIMAs) may occur via transplacental transfer and/or breast milk. There are indications that early life exposure to NIMAs may lead to lifelong tolerance. However, there is mounting evidence that exposure to NIMAs may also lead to immunologic priming. Understanding how these different responses arise could be critical in transplantation with donor cells expressing NIMAs. We recently reported that murine neonates that received a transplant of low doses of NIMA-like alloantigens develop vigorous memory cytotoxic responses, as assessed by in vitro assays. Here, we demonstrate that robust allospecific cytotoxicity is also manifest in vivo. Importantly, at low doses, NIMA-expressing cells induced the development of in vivo cytotoxicity during the neonatal period. NIMA-exposed neonates also developed vigorous primary and memory allospecific Th1/Th2 responses that exceeded the responses of adults. Overall, we conclude that exposure to low doses of NIMA-like alloantigens induces robust in vivo cytotoxic and Th1/Th2 responses in neonates. These findings suggest that early exposure to low levels of NIMA may lead to long-term immunologic priming of all arms of T-cell adaptive immunity, rather than tolerance.

  7. The relationship between the IC(50), toxic threshold, and the magnitude of stimulatory response in biphasic (hormetic) dose-responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascarella, Marc A; Calabrese, Edward J

    2009-08-01

    Hormesis is a dose-response relationship characterized by a biphasic (U- or inverted U-shaped) response. We present the results of a study designed to assess the relationship between toxic potency (as measured by the IC(50)) and the magnitude of the hormesis stimulation. To facilitate this, we describe a new parameter (Delta(X)), which we define as the difference between the concentration (or dose) that inhibits 50% of the growth of the organism under study (IC(50)), and the concentration (or dose) of the respective toxicological threshold (either the benchmark dose (BMD) or zero equivalent point (ZEP)). Our analysis includes a subset of data from a previously published report describing a National Cancer Institute study that exposed yeast to putative anticancer agents in a high throughput assay. The toxic threshold used in this paper was the BMD(5). Thus, the Delta(X) in this paper is defined as: Delta(X)=IC(50)-BMD(5). We have found that the Delta(X) and the magnitude of stimulation above the control response are inversely related. These findings describe the first known relationship between toxic potency and the magnitude of hormetic response and warrant further inquiry.

  8. Improving early diagnosis of pulmonary infections in patients with febrile neutropenia using low-dose chest computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M G Gerritsen

    Full Text Available We performed a prospective study in patients with chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia to investigate the diagnostic value of low-dose computed tomography compared to standard chest radiography. The aim was to compare both modalities for detection of pulmonary infections and to explore performance of low-dose computed tomography for early detection of invasive fungal disease. The low-dose computed tomography remained blinded during the study. A consensus diagnosis of the fever episode made by an expert panel was used as reference standard. We included 67 consecutive patients on the first day of febrile neutropenia. According to the consensus diagnosis 11 patients (16.4% had pulmonary infections. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 36%, 93%, 50% and 88% for radiography, and 73%, 91%, 62% and 94% for low-dose computed tomography, respectively. An uncorrected McNemar showed no statistical difference (p = 0.197. Mean radiation dose for low-dose computed tomography was 0.24 mSv. Four out of 5 included patients diagnosed with invasive fungal disease had radiographic abnormalities suspect for invasive fungal disease on the low-dose computed tomography scan made on day 1 of fever, compared to none of the chest radiographs. We conclude that chest radiography has little value in the initial assessment of febrile neutropenia on day 1 for detection of pulmonary abnormalities. Low-dose computed tomography improves detection of pulmonary infiltrates and seems capable of detecting invasive fungal disease at a very early stage with a low radiation dose.

  9. RadFET dose response in the CHARM mixed-field: FLUKA MC simulations

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    Marzo Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations aimed at calculating the dose response of the RadFET dosimeter, when exposed to the complex CHARM mixed-fields, at CERN. We study how the dose deposited in the gate oxide (SiO2 of the RadFET is affected by the energy threshold variation in the Monte Carlo simulations as well as the materials and sizes of scoring volumes. Also the characteristics of the input spectra will be taken into account and their impact on the final simulated dose will be studied. Dose variation as a function of the position of the RadFET in the test facility will be then examined and comparisons with experimental results will be shown. The contribution to the total dose due to all particles of the mixed-field, under different target-shielding configurations, is finally presented, aiming at a complete characterization of the RadFETs dose response in the CHARM mixed-fields.

  10. RadFET dose response in the CHARM mixed-field: FLUKA MC simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzo M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations aiming at calculating the dose response of the Rad- FET dosimeter, when exposed to the complex CHARM mixed-fields, at CERN. We study how the dose deposited in the Gate Oxide (SiO2 of the RadFET is a_ected by the energy threshold variation in the Monte Carlo simulations as well as the materials and sizes of scoring volumes. Also the characteristics of the input spectra will be taken into account and their impact on the final simulated dose will be studied. Dose variation as a function of the position of the RadFET in the test facility will be then examined and comparisons with experimental results will be shown. The contribution to the total dose due to every single particles of the mixed-field, under di_erent target-shielding configurations, will be finally presented, aiming at a complete characterization of the RadFETs dose response in the CHARM mixed-fields.

  11. Dose-response expectancies for alcohol: Validation and implications for brief interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adey, Gwen E; Moore, Simon C; Chestnutt, Ivor G

    2010-11-01

    Brief interventions for alcohol problems are informed by elements of behavioural motivation theories and behaviour change models. However, motivations across drinking occasions have yet to be explored. This paper addresses this need and presents initial validity statistics for a new construct, Dose Response Expectancies for Alcohol Metrics (DREAM) that can be used to investigate expectancies across the drinking session and thus inform novel interventions. Twenty-seven participants completed a test-retest reliability assessment. Hypothesised systematic relationships between the hypothetical number of drinks consumed across a drinking session and anticipated affective responses were assessed. The DREAM questionnaire yielded good test-retest statistics for anticipated happiness and nausea in the hours following drinking. Consistent with hypotheses, DREAM yielded a systematic relationship between anticipated alcohol dose and affective response. DREAM offers a novel means to investigate alcohol dose-response expectancies across drinking sessions and to therefore provide a theoretical platform that can be used to inform effective brief interventions for young people.[Adey GE, Moore SC, Chestnutt IG. Dose-response expectancies for alcohol: Validation and implications for brief interventions. © 2010 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  12. Arsenite Effects on Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Human and Mouse Primary Hepatocytes Follow a Nonlinear Dose Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemantkumar Chavan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenite is a known carcinogen and its exposure has been implicated in a variety of noncarcinogenic health concerns. Increased oxidative stress is thought to be the primary cause of arsenite toxicity and the toxic effect is thought to be linear with detrimental effects reported at all concentrations of arsenite. But the paradigm of linear dose response in arsenite toxicity is shifting. In the present study we demonstrate that arsenite effects on mitochondrial respiration in primary hepatocytes follow a nonlinear dose response. In vitro exposure of primary hepatocytes to an environmentally relevant, moderate level of arsenite results in increased oxidant production that appears to arise from changes in the expression and activity of respiratory Complex I of the mitochondrial proton circuit. In primary hepatocytes the excess oxidant production appears to elicit adaptive responses that promote resistance to oxidative stress and a propensity to increased proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest a nonlinear dose-response characteristic of arsenite with low-dose arsenite promoting adaptive responses in a process known as mitohormesis, with transient increase in ROS levels acting as transducers of arsenite-induced mitohormesis.

  13. Bayesian dose selection design for a binary outcome using restricted response adaptive randomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Caitlyn; Martin, Renee; Suarez, Jose I

    2017-09-08

    In phase II trials, the most efficacious dose is usually not known. Moreover, given limited resources, it is difficult to robustly identify a dose while also testing for a signal of efficacy that would support a phase III trial. Recent designs have sought to be more efficient by exploring multiple doses through the use of adaptive strategies. However, the added flexibility may potentially increase the risk of making incorrect assumptions and reduce the total amount of information available across the dose range as a function of imbalanced sample size. To balance these challenges, a novel placebo-controlled design is presented in which a restricted Bayesian response adaptive randomization (RAR) is used to allocate a majority of subjects to the optimal dose of active drug, defined as the dose with the lowest probability of poor outcome. However, the allocation between subjects who receive active drug or placebo is held constant to retain the maximum possible power for a hypothesis test of overall efficacy comparing the optimal dose to placebo. The design properties and optimization of the design are presented in the context of a phase II trial for subarachnoid hemorrhage. For a fixed total sample size, a trade-off exists between the ability to select the optimal dose and the probability of rejecting the null hypothesis. This relationship is modified by the allocation ratio between active and control subjects, the choice of RAR algorithm, and the number of subjects allocated to an initial fixed allocation period. While a responsive RAR algorithm improves the ability to select the correct dose, there is an increased risk of assigning more subjects to a worse arm as a function of ephemeral trends in the data. A subarachnoid treatment trial is used to illustrate how this design can be customized for specific objectives and available data. Bayesian adaptive designs are a flexible approach to addressing multiple questions surrounding the optimal dose for treatment efficacy

  14. Influence of Dose Rate on the Cellular Response to Low- and High-LET Radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozny, Anne-Sophie; Alphonse, Gersende; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Simonet, Stéphanie; Poncet, Delphine; Testa, Etienne; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Rancoule, Chloé; Magné, Nicolas; Beuve, Michael; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treatment failure is mostly explained by locoregional progression or intrinsic radioresistance. Radiotherapy (RT) has recently evolved with the emergence of heavy ion radiations or new fractionation schemes of photon therapy, which modify the dose rate of treatment delivery. The aim of the present study was then to evaluate the in vitro influence of a dose rate variation during conventional RT or carbon ion hadrontherapy treatment in order to improve the therapeutic care of patient. In this regard, two HNSCC cell lines were irradiated with photons or 72 MeV/n carbon ions at a dose rate of 0.5, 2, or 10 Gy/min. For both radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, the change in dose rate significantly affected cell survival in response to photon exposure. This variation of radiosensitivity was associated with the number of initial and residual DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By contrast, the dose rate change did not affect neither cell survival nor the residual DNA DSBs after carbon ion irradiation. As a result, the relative biological efficiency at 10% survival increased when the dose rate decreased. In conclusion, in the RT treatment of HNSCC, it is advised to remain very careful when modifying the classical schemes toward altered fractionation. At the opposite, as the dose rate does not seem to have any effects after carbon ion exposure, there is less need to adapt hadrontherapy treatment planning during active system irradiation.

  15. Cytogenetics dosimetry: dose-response curve for low doses of X-ray; Dosimetria citogenetica: curva dosis-respuesta para bajas dosis de rayos-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Virginia E. Noval; Pineda Bolivar, William R.; Riano, Victor M. Pabon, E-mail: venovall.15@hotmail.com, E-mail: wrpineda@misena.edu.co, E-mail: vmpabonr@udistrital.edu.co [Universidad Distrital Francisco Jose de Caldas (UD), Bogota (Colombia). Grupo de Investigacion en Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear; Ureana, Cecilia Crane, E-mail: cecicrane@yahoo.com [Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS), Bogota (Colombia). Laboratorio de Genetica

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary study for the standardization in the future, the dose-response curve for low doses of X-rays, through the analysis of in vitro cultures of peripheral blood samples of 3 men and 3 women occupationally not exposed to artificial sources of ionizing radiation, age 18-40 years, where possible nonsmokers.

  16. Effect of increased CRM₁₉₇ carrier protein dose on meningococcal C bactericidal antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lucia H; Blake, Milan S

    2012-04-01

    New multivalent CRM(197)-based conjugate vaccines are available for childhood immunization. Clinical studies were reviewed to assess meningococcal group C (MenC) antibody responses following MenC-CRM(197) coadministration with CRM(197)-based pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines. Infants receiving a total CRM(197) carrier protein dose of ∼50 μg and concomitant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP)-containing vaccine tended to have lower MenC geometric mean antibody titers and continued to have low titers after the toddler dose. Nevertheless, at least 95% of children in the reported studies achieved a MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer of ≥ 1:8 after the last infant or toddler dose. SBA was measured using an assay with a baby rabbit or human complement source. Additional studies are needed to assess long-term antibody persistence and MenC CRM(197) conjugate vaccine immunogenicity using alternative dosing schedules.

  17. The Early Endocrine Stress Response in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffer Nyberg

    Full Text Available In patients with severe illness, such as aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, a physiologic stress response is triggered. This includes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and the sympathetic nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the very early responses of these systems.A porcine animal model of aneurysmal SAH was used. In this model, blood is injected slowly to the basal cisterns above the anterior skull base until the cerebral perfusion pressure is 0 mm Hg. Sampling was done from blood and urine at -10, +15, +75 and +135 minutes from time of induction of SAH. Analyses of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, cortisol, aldosterone, catecholamines and chromogranin-A were performed.Plasma ACTH, serum cortisol and plasma aldosterone increased in the samples following induction of SAH, and started to decline after 75 minutes. Urine cortisol also increased after SAH. Urine catecholamines and their metabolites were found to increase after SAH. Many samples were however below detection level, not allowing for statistical analysis. Plasma chromogranin-A peaked at 15 minutes after SAH, and thereafter decreased.The endocrine stress response after aneurysmal SAH was found to start within 15 minutes in the HPA axis with early peak values of ACTH, cortisol and aldosterone. The fact that the concentrations of the HPA axis hormones decreased 135 minutes after SAH may suggest that a similar pattern exists in SAH patients, thus making it difficult to catch these early peak values. There were also indications of early activation of the sympathetic nervous system, but the small number of valid samples made interpretation difficult.

  18. Non-Targeted Effects and the Dose Response for Heavy Ion Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelli, Lori J.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no human epidemiology data available to estimate the heavy ion cancer risks experienced by astronauts in space. Studies of tumor induction in mice are a necessary step to estimate risks to astronauts. Previous experimental data can be better utilized to model dose response for heavy ion tumorigenesis and plan future low dose studies. DOSE RESPONSE MODELS: The Harderian Gland data of Alpen et al.[1-3] was re-analyzed [4] using non-linear least square regression. The data set measured the induction of Harderian gland tumors in mice by high-energy protons, helium, neon, iron, niobium and lanthanum with LET s ranging from 0.4 to 950 keV/micron. We were able to strengthen the individual ion models by combining data for all ions into a model that relates both radiation dose and LET for the ion to tumor prevalence. We compared models based on Targeted Effects (TE) to one motivated by Non-targeted Effects (NTE) that included a bystander term that increased tumor induction at low doses non-linearly. When comparing fitted models to the experimental data, we considered the adjusted R2, the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), and the Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC) to test for Goodness of fit.In the adjusted R2test, the model with the highest R2values provides a better fit to the available data. In the AIC and BIC tests, the model with the smaller values of the summary value provides the better fit. The non-linear NTE models fit the combined data better than the TE models that are linear at low doses. We evaluated the differences in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and found the NTE model provides a higher RBE at low dose compared to the TE model. POWER ANALYSIS: The final NTE model estimates were used to simulate example data to consider the design of new experiments to detect NTE at low dose for validation. Power and sample sizes were calculated for a variety of radiation qualities including some not considered in the Harderian Gland data

  19. On the origin of the visible light responsible for proton dose measurement using plastic optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darafsheh, Arash; Taleei, Reza; Kassaee, Alireza; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2017-03-01

    We experimentally and by means of Monte Carlo simulations investigated the origin of the visible signal responsible for proton therapy dose measurement using bare plastic optical fibers. Experimentally, the fiber optic probe, embedded in tissue-mimicking plastics, was irradiated with a proton beam produced by a proton therapy cyclotron and the luminescence spectroscopy was performed by a CCD-coupled spectrograph to analyze the emission spectrum of the fiber tip. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA Monte Carlo code to stochastically simulate radiation transport, ionizing radiation dose deposition, and optical emission of Čerenkov radiation. The spectroscopic study of proton-irradiated plastic fibers showed a continuous spectrum with shape different from that of Čerenkov radiation. The Monte Carlo simulations confirmed that the amount of the generated Čerenkov light does not follow the radiation absorbed dose in a medium. Our results show that the origin of the optical signal responsible for the proton dose measurement using bare optical fibers is not Čerenkov radiation. Our results point toward a connection between the scintillation of the plastic material of the fiber and the origin of the signal responsible for dose measurement.

  20. Concord Grape Juice Polyphenols and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Dose-Response Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Vita, Joseph A; Chen, C-Y Oliver

    2015-12-02

    Pure fruit juices provide nutritional value with evidence suggesting some of their benefits on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk may be derived from their constituent polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. However, few data from clinical trials are available on the dose-response relationship of fruit juice flavonoids to these outcomes. Utilizing the results of clinical trials testing single doses, we have analyzed data from studies of 100% Concord grape juice by placing its flavonoid content in the context of results from randomized clinical trials of other polyphenol-rich foods and beverages describing the same outcomes but covering a broader range of intake. We selected established biomarkers determined by similar methods for measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), blood pressure, platelet aggregation, and the resistance of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) to oxidation. Despite differences among the clinical trials in the treatment, subjects, and duration, correlations were observed between the dose and FMD. Inverse dose-response relationships, albeit with lower correlation coefficients, were also noted for the other outcomes. These results suggest a clear relationship between consumption of even modest serving sizes of Concord grape juice, flavonoid intake, and effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This approach to dose-response relationships may prove useful for testing other individual foods and beverages.

  1. Stomatal Blue Light Response Is Present in Early Vascular Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Michio; Kitagawa, Yuki; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Light is a major environmental factor required for stomatal opening. Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening in higher plants as a signal under the photosynthetic active radiation. The stomatal BL response is not present in the fern species of Polypodiopsida. The acquisition of a stomatal BL response might provide competitive advantages in both the uptake of CO2 and prevention of water loss with the ability to rapidly open and close stomata. We surveyed the stomatal opening in response to strong red light (RL) and weak BL under the RL with gas exchange technique in a diverse selection of plant species from euphyllophytes, including spermatophytes and monilophytes, to lycophytes. We showed the presence of RL-induced stomatal opening in most of these species and found that the BL responses operated in all euphyllophytes except Polypodiopsida. We also confirmed that the stomatal opening in lycophytes, the early vascular plants, is driven by plasma membrane proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase and K(+) accumulation in guard cells, which is the same mechanism operating in stomata of angiosperms. These results suggest that the early vascular plants respond to both RL and BL and actively regulate stomatal aperture. We also found three plant species that absolutely require BL for both stomatal opening and photosynthetic CO2 fixation, including a gymnosperm, C. revoluta, and the ferns Equisetum hyemale and Psilotum nudum. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Effects of low dose {gamma} radiation on early growth and physiological activities of radish (raphanus sativus L.) and the reduction of ultraviolet-B stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Lee, Y. K.; Lee, H. Y.; Baek, M. H.; Yoo, J. C. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    The effect of low dose {gamma} radiation on early growth and photosynthesis in radish plant was studied. The seedling height of radish was stimulated in plants grown from seeds irradiated with the low dose of 10 Gy. The O{sub 2} evolution in the 10 Gy irradiation group was 1.2 times greater than in the control. The catalase and peroxidase activity of radish leaves grown from seeds irradiated with {gamma} radiation were increased at 10 Gy irradiation group as the superoxide dismutase activity of leaves was. To investigate the effect of low dose {gamma} radiation on response to UV-B stress, UV-B was given at the intensity of 1 W{center_dot} m{sup -2} to the detached leaves. Pmax was decreased with increasing illumination time by 76% in the control, while decreased by 75% in the 10 Gy irradiation group. The photochemical yield of PSII, estimated as Fv/Fm, was decreased with increasing illumination time by 75% after 4 hours while Fv/Fm in the 10 Gy irradiation group was decreased by 69% of inhibition, indicating that the low dose {gamma} radiation retarded the deteriorative effect of UV-B on PSII. The initial fluorescence (Fo) was slightly increased with increasing illumination time, while the maximal fluorescence (Fm) was decreased. These results showed the positive effect of low dose {gamma} radiation on the seedling growth and the reduction of the deteriorative effect of UV-B stress on photosynthesis in radish plant.

  3. Linearization of dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Aldelaijan, Saad; DeBlois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan; Chan, Maria F.; Lewis, Dave [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2 (Canada); Executive Administration for Radiation Protection and Safety Medical Devices Sector, Saudi Food and Drug Authority, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 13312 (Saudi Arabia); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2 (Canada); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Basking Ridge, New Jersey 07920 (United States); Ashland Inc., Wayne, New Jersey 07470 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Despite numerous advantages of radiochromic film dosimeter (high spatial resolution, near tissue equivalence, low energy dependence) to measure a relative dose distribution with film, one needs to first measure an absolute dose (following previously established reference dosimetry protocol) and then convert measured absolute dose values into relative doses. In this work, we present result of our efforts to obtain a functional form that would linearize the inherently nonlinear dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system. Methods: Functional form [{zeta}= (-1){center_dot}netOD{sup (2/3)}/ln(netOD)] was derived from calibration curves of various previously established radiochromic film dosimetry systems. In order to test the invariance of the proposed functional form with respect to the film model used we tested it with three different GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign film models (EBT, EBT2, and EBT3) irradiated to various doses and scanned on a same scanner. For one of the film models (EBT2), we tested the invariance of the functional form to the scanner model used by scanning irradiated film pieces with three different flatbed scanner models (Epson V700, 1680, and 10000XL). To test our hypothesis that the proposed functional argument linearizes the response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system, verification tests have been performed in clinical applications: percent depth dose measurements, IMRT quality assurance (QA), and brachytherapy QA. Results: Obtained R{sup 2} values indicate that the choice of the functional form of the new argument appropriately linearizes the dose response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system we used. The linear behavior was insensitive to both film model and flatbed scanner model used. Measured PDD values using the green channel response of the GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign EBT3 film model are well within {+-}2% window of the local relative dose value when compared to the tabulated Cobalt-60 data. It was also

  4. 'Omics analysis of low dose acetaminophen intake demonstrates novel response pathways in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jetten, Marlon J.A.; Gaj, Stan [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands); Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa [RIKILT, Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen UR, PO Box 230, 6700 AE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Kok, Theo M. de [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands); Delft, Joost H.M. van, E-mail: j.vandelft@maastrichtuniversity.nl [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands); Lommen, Arjen [RIKILT, Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen UR, PO Box 230, 6700 AE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Someren, Eugene P. van [Research Group Microbiology and Systems Biology, TNO, PO Box 360 3700 AJ Zeist (Netherlands); Jennen, Danyel G.J.; Claessen, Sandra M. [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands); Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M. [RIKILT, Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen UR, PO Box 230, 6700 AE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Stierum, Rob H. [Research Group Microbiology and Systems Biology, TNO, PO Box 360 3700 AJ Zeist (Netherlands); Kleinjans, Jos C.S. [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    Acetaminophen is the primary cause of acute liver toxicity in Europe/USA, which led the FDA to reconsider recommendations concerning safe acetaminophen dosage/use. Unfortunately, the current tests for liver toxicity are no ideal predictive markers for liver injury, i.e. they only measure acetaminophen exposure after profound liver toxicity has already occurred. Furthermore, these tests do not provide mechanistic information. Here, 'omics techniques (global analysis of metabolomic/gene-expression responses) may provide additional insight. To better understand acetaminophen-induced responses at low doses, we evaluated the effects of (sub-)therapeutic acetaminophen doses on metabolite formation and global gene-expression changes (including, for the first time, full-genome human miRNA expression changes) in blood/urine samples from healthy human volunteers. Many known and several new acetaminophen-metabolites were detected, in particular in relation to hepatotoxicity-linked, oxidative metabolism of acetaminophen. Transcriptomic changes indicated immune-modulating effects (2 g dose) and oxidative stress responses (4 g dose). For the first time, effects of acetaminophen on full-genome human miRNA expression have been considered and confirmed the findings on mRNA level. 'Omics techniques outperformed clinical chemistry tests and revealed novel response pathways to acetaminophen in humans. Although no definitive conclusion about potential immunotoxic effects of acetaminophen can be drawn from this study, there are clear indications that the immune system is triggered even after intake of low doses of acetaminophen. Also, oxidative stress-related gene responses, similar to those seen after high dose acetaminophen exposure, suggest the occurrence of possible pre-toxic effects of therapeutic acetaminophen doses. Possibly, these effects are related to dose-dependent increases in levels of hepatotoxicity-related metabolites. -- Highlights: ► 'Omics techniques

  5. Linearization of dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Aldelaijan, Saad; Deblois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan; Chan, Maria F; Lewis, Dave

    2012-08-01

    Despite numerous advantages of radiochromic film dosimeter (high spatial resolution, near tissue equivalence, low energy dependence) to measure a relative dose distribution with film, one needs to first measure an absolute dose (following previously established reference dosimetry protocol) and then convert measured absolute dose values into relative doses. In this work, we present result of our efforts to obtain a functional form that would linearize the inherently nonlinear dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system. Functional form [ζ = (-1)[middle dot]netOD((2∕3))∕ln(netOD)] was derived from calibration curves of various previously established radiochromic film dosimetry systems. In order to test the invariance of the proposed functional form with respect to the film model used we tested it with three different GAFCHROMIC™ film models (EBT, EBT2, and EBT3) irradiated to various doses and scanned on a same scanner. For one of the film models (EBT2), we tested the invariance of the functional form to the scanner model used by scanning irradiated film pieces with three different flatbed scanner models (Epson V700, 1680, and 10000XL). To test our hypothesis that the proposed functional argument linearizes the response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system, verification tests have been performed in clinical applications: percent depth dose measurements, IMRT quality assurance (QA), and brachytherapy QA. Obtained R(2) values indicate that the choice of the functional form of the new argument appropriately linearizes the dose response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system we used. The linear behavior was insensitive to both film model and flatbed scanner model used. Measured PDD values using the green channel response of the GAFCHROMIC™ EBT3 film model are well within ±2% window of the local relative dose value when compared to the tabulated Cobalt-60 data. It was also found that criteria of 3%∕3 mm for an IMRT QA plan and 3%∕2

  6. Factors affecting response to national early warning score (NEWS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolic, Ivana; Crane, Smiley; McCartney, Suzanne; Perkins, Zane; Taylor, Alex

    2015-05-01

    The NEWS is a physiological score, which prescribes an appropriate response for the deteriorating patient in need of urgent medical care. However, it has been suggested that compliance with early warning scoring systems for identifying patient deterioration may vary out of hours. We aimed to (1) assess the scoring accuracy and the adequacy of the prescribed clinical responses to NEWS and (2) assess whether responses were affected by time of day, day of week and score severity. We performed a prospective observational study of 370 adult patients admitted to an acute medical ward in a London District General Hospital. Patient characteristics, NEW score, time of day, day of week and clinical response data were collected for the first 24h of admission. Patients with less than a 12h hospital stay were excluded. We analysed data with univariate and multivariate logistic regression. In 70 patients (18.9%) the NEW score was calculated incorrectly. There was a worsening of the clinical response with increasing NEW score. An appropriate clinical response to the NEWS was observed in 274 patients (74.1%). Patients admitted on the weekend were more likely to receive an inadequate response, compared to patients admitted during the week (pscore remained significantly associated with an inadequate clinical response. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a small increase in inadequate NEWS responses at night, however this was not clinically or statistically significant. The high rate of incorrectly calculated NEW scores has implications for the prescribed actions. Clinical response to NEWS score triggers is significantly worse at weekends, highlighting an important patient safety concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rapid Treponema pallidum clearance from blood and ulcer samples following single dose benzathine penicillin treatment of early syphilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Tipple

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the efficacy of syphilis treatment is measured with anti-lipid antibody tests. These can take months to indicate cure and, as a result, syphilis treatment trials require long periods of follow-up. The causative organism, Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum, is detectable in the infectious lesions of early syphilis using DNA amplification. Bacteraemia can likewise be identified, typically in more active disease. We hypothesise that bacterial clearance from blood and ulcers will predict early the standard serology-measured treatment response and have developed a qPCR assay that could monitor this clearance directly in patients with infectious syphilis. Patients with early syphilis were given an intramuscular dose of benzathine penicillin. To investigate the appropriate sampling timeframe samples of blood and ulcer exudate were collected intensively for T. pallidum DNA (tpp047 gene and RNA (16S rRNA quantification. Sampling ended when two consecutive PCRs were negative. Four males were recruited. The mean peak level of T. pallidum DNA was 1626 copies/ml whole blood and the mean clearance half-life was 5.7 hours (std. dev. 0.53. The mean peak of 16S rRNA was 8879 copies/ml whole blood with a clearance half-life of 3.9 hours (std. dev. 0.84. From an ulcer, pre-treatment, 67,400 T. pallidum DNA copies and 7.08 x 107 16S rRNA copies were detected per absorbance strip and the clearance half-lives were 3.2 and 4.1 hours, respectively. Overall, T. pallidum nucleic acids were not detected in any sample collected more than 56 hours (range 20-56 after treatment. All patients achieved serologic cure. In patients with active early syphilis, measuring T. pallidum levels in blood and ulcer exudate may be a useful measure of treatment success in therapeutic trials. These laboratory findings need confirmation on a larger scale and in patients receiving different therapies.

  8. Ultra Low-Dose Radiation: Stress Responses and Impacts Using Rice as a Grass Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Shibato

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report molecular changes in leaves of rice plants (Oryza sativa L. - reference crop plant and grass model exposed to ultra low-dose ionizing radiation, first using contaminated soil from the exclusion zone around Chernobyl reactor site. Results revealed induction of stress-related marker genes (Northern blot and secondary metabolites (LC-MS/MS in irradiated leaf segments over appropriate control. Second, employing the same in vitro model system, we replicated results of the first experiment using in-house fabricated sources of ultra low-dose gamma (g rays and selected marker genes by RT-PCR. Results suggest the usefulness of the rice model in studying ultra low-dose radiation response/s.

  9. Radiation dose-response curves: cell repair mechanisms vs. ion track overlapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Agata; Czerski, Konrad; Nasonova, Elena; Kutsalo, Polina; Krasavin, Eugen

    2017-12-01

    Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed to different doses of particle radiation: 150 MeV and spread out Bragg peak proton beams, 22 MeV/u boron beam and 199 V/u carbon beam were studied. For comparison, an experiment with 60Co γ-rays was also performed. We investigated distributions of aberration frequency and the shape of dose-response curves for the total aberration yield as well as for exchange and non-exchange aberrations, separately. Applying the linear-quadratic model, we could derive a relation between the fitted parameters and the ion track radius which could explain experimentally observed curvature of the dose-response curves. The results compared with physical expectations clearly show that the biological effects of cell repair are much more important than the ion track overlapping. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Dynamics of Systems at the Nanoscale", edited by Andrey Solov'yov and Andrei Korol.

  10. Dose-response association between leisure time physical activity and work ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Sundstrup, Emil

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Regular physical activity is important for longevity and health, but knowledge about the optimal dose of physical activity for maintaining good work ability is unknown. This study investigates the association between intensity and duration of physical activity during leisure time......, lifestyle and chronic disease showed that the duration of high-intensity physical activity during leisure was positively associated with work ability, in a dose-response fashion (p activity per week had on average 8 points higher work ability...... than those not performing such activities. The duration of low-intensity leisure-time physical activity was not associated with work ability (p = 0.5668). CONCLUSIONS: The duration of high-intensity physical activity during leisure time is associated in a dose-response fashion with work ability...

  11. Ultra Low-Dose Radiation: Stress Responses and Impacts Using Rice as a Grass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Shibato, Junko; Imanaka, Tetsuji; Fukutani, Satoshi; Tamogami, Shigeru; Endo, Satoru; Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Masuo, Yoshinori; Kimura, Shinzo

    2009-01-01

    We report molecular changes in leaves of rice plants (Oryza sativa L. - reference crop plant and grass model) exposed to ultra low-dose ionizing radiation, first using contaminated soil from the exclusion zone around Chernobyl reactor site. Results revealed induction of stress-related marker genes (Northern blot) and secondary metabolites (LC-MS/MS) in irradiated leaf segments over appropriate control. Second, employing the same in vitro model system, we replicated results of the first experiment using in-house fabricated sources of ultra low-dose gamma (γ) rays and selected marker genes by RT-PCR. Results suggest the usefulness of the rice model in studying ultra low-dose radiation response/s. PMID:19399245

  12. Salmonella fecal shedding and immune responses are dose- and serotype- dependent in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Ivanek

    Full Text Available Despite the public health importance of Salmonella infection in pigs, little is known about the associated dynamics of fecal shedding and immunity. In this study, we investigated the transitions of pigs through the states of Salmonella fecal shedding and immune response post-Salmonella inoculation as affected by the challenge dose and serotype. Continuous-time multistate Markov models were developed using published experimental data. The model for shedding had four transient states, of which two were shedding (continuous and intermittent shedding and two non-shedding (latency and intermittent non-shedding, and one absorbing state representing permanent cessation of shedding. The immune response model had two transient states representing responses below and above the seroconversion level. The effects of two doses [low (0.65×10(6 CFU/pig and high (0.65×10(9 CFU/pig] and four serotypes (Salmonella Yoruba, Salmonella Cubana, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Salmonella Derby on the models' transition intensities were evaluated using a proportional intensities model. Results indicated statistically significant effects of the challenge dose and serotype on the dynamics of shedding and immune response. The time spent in the specific states was also estimated. Continuous shedding was on average 10-26 days longer, while intermittent non-shedding was 2-4 days shorter, in pigs challenged with the high compared to low dose. Interestingly, among pigs challenged with the high dose, the continuous and intermittent shedding states were on average up to 10-17 and 3-4 days longer, respectively, in pigs infected with S. Cubana compared to the other three serotypes. Pigs challenged with the high dose of S. Typhimurium or S. Derby seroconverted on average up to 8-11 days faster compared to the low dose. These findings highlight that Salmonella fecal shedding and immune response following Salmonella challenge are dose- and serotype-dependent and that the detection of

  13. Estimation of the {beta}+ dose to the embryo resulting from {sup 18}F-FDG administration during early pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanotti-Fregonara, P.; Trebossen, R.; Maroy, R. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, SHFJ, LIME, Orsay (France); Champion, C. [Univ Paul Verlaine Metz, Inst Phys, Lab Phys Mol et Collis, Metz (France); Hindie, E. [Univ Paris 07, IUH, Ecole Doctorale B2T, Paris (France); Hindie, E. [Hop St Louis, AP-HP, Nucl Med Serv, F-75475 Paris 10 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Although {sup 18}F-FDG examinations are widely used, data are lacking on the dose to human embryo tissues in cases of exposure in early pregnancy. Although the photon component can easily be estimated from available data on the pharmacokinetics of {sup 18}F-FDG in female organs and from phantom measurements (considering the uterus as the target organ), the intensity of embryo tissue uptake, which is essential for deriving the {beta}+ dose, is not known. We report the case of a patient who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for tumor surveillance and who was later found to have been pregnant at the time of the examination(embryo age, 8 wk). Methods: The patient received 320 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG. Imaging started with an unenhanced CT scan 1 h after the injection, followed by PET acquisition. PET images were used to compute the total number of {beta}+ emissions in embryo tissues per unit of injected activity, from standardized uptake value (SUV) measurements corrected for partial-volume effects. A Monte Carlo track structure code was then used to derive the {beta}+ self-dose and the {beta}+ cross-dose from amniotic fluid. The photon and CT doses were added to obtain the final dose received by the embryo. Results: The mean SUV in embryo tissues was 2.7, after correction for the partial-volume effect. The mean corrected SUV of amniotic fluid was 1.1. Monte Carlo simulation showed that the {beta}+ dose to the embryo (self-dose plus cross-dose from amniotic fluid) was 1.8 E-2 mGy per MBq of injected {sup 18}F-FDG. Based on MIRD data for the photon dose to the uterus, the estimated photon dose to the embryo was 1.5 E-2 mGy/MBq. Thus, the specific {sup 18}F-FDG dose to the embryo was 3.3 E-2 mGy/MBq (10.6 mGy in this patient). The CT scan added a further 8.3 mGy. Conclusion: The dose to the embryo is 3.3 E-2 mGy/MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG. The {beta}+ dose contributes 55% of the total dose. This value is higher than previous estimates in late nonhuman-primate pregnancies. (authors)

  14. Radiation response of industrial materials: Dose-rate and morphology implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berejka, Anthony J.

    2007-08-01

    Industrial uses of ionizing radiation mostly rely upon high current, high dose-rate (100 kGy/s) electron beam (EB) accelerators. To a lesser extent, industry uses low dose-rate (2.8 × 10-3 kGy/s) radioactive Cobalt-60 as a gamma source, generally for some rather specific purposes, as medical device sterilization and the treatment of food and foodstuffs. There are nearly nine times as many (∼1400) high current EB units in commercial operation than gamma sources (∼160). However, gamma sources can be easily scaled-down so that much research on materials effects is conducted using gamma radiation. Likewise, laboratories are more likely to have very low beam current and consequently low dose-rate accelerators such as Van de Graaff generators and linear accelerators. With the advent of very high current EB accelerators, X-ray processing has become an industrially viable option. With X-rays from high power sources, dose-rates can be modulated based upon accelerator power and the attenuation of the X-ray by the distance of the material from the X-ray target. Dose and dose-rate dependence has been found to be of consequence in several commercial applications which can employ the use of ionizing radiation. The combination of dose and dose-rate dependence of the polymerization and crosslinking of wood impregnants and of fiber composite matrix materials can yield more economically viable results which have promising commercial potential. Monomer and oligomer structure also play an important role in attaining these desirable results. The influence of morphology is shown on the radiation response of olefin polymers, such as ethylene, propylene and isobutylene polymers and their copolymers. Both controlled morphology and controlled dose-rate have commercial consequences. These are also impacted both by the adroit selection of materials and through the possible use of X-ray processing.

  15. No priming of the immune response in newborn Brown Norway rats dosed with ovalbumin in the mouth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Pilegaard, Kirsten

    2003-01-01

    Background: Other researchers have reported that the specific immune response to subsequent antigen challenge is primed in newborn mice or rats dosed orally by gavage. We wanted to investigate if priming of a subsequent specific IgE response could be achieved by dosing newborn rats orally......E and IgG responses were decreased compared to the control groups, however, not always reaching statistical significance. A statistical significant decrease in the specific immune response was found in young adult rats dosed in the mouth as compared to by gavage. Conclusions: Dosing Brown Norway rats...... with ovalbumin in the mouth as neonates do not prime the specific immune response. The decrease in immune response found in our experiments when dosing newborn animals in the mouth in opposition to the priming seen by others when dosing by intra-gastric intubation may be explained by a dissimilar antigen...

  16. Searching for Drug Synergy in Complex Dose-Response Landscapes Using an Interaction Potency Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bhagwan; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero; Tang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Rational design of multi-targeted drug combinations is a promising strategy to tackle the drug resistance problem for many complex disorders. A drug combination is usually classified as synergistic or antagonistic, depending on the deviation of the observed combination response from the expected effect calculated based on a reference model of non-interaction. The existing reference models were proposed originally for low-throughput drug combination experiments, which make the model assumptions often incompatible with the complex drug interaction patterns across various dose pairs that are typically observed in large-scale dose-response matrix experiments. To address these limitations, we proposed a novel reference model, named zero interaction potency (ZIP), which captures the drug interaction relationships by comparing the change in the potency of the dose-response curves between individual drugs and their combinations. We utilized a delta score to quantify the deviation from the expectation of zero interaction, and proved that a delta score value of zero implies both probabilistic independence and dose additivity. Using data from a large-scale anticancer drug combination experiment, we demonstrated empirically how the ZIP scoring approach captures the experimentally confirmed drug synergy while keeping the false positive rate at a low level. Further, rather than relying on a single parameter to assess drug interaction, we proposed the use of an interaction landscape over the full dose-response matrix to identify and quantify synergistic and antagonistic dose regions. The interaction landscape offers an increased power to differentiate between various classes of drug combinations, and may therefore provide an improved means for understanding their mechanisms of action toward clinical translation.

  17. Response of Nigerian local breed of dog to graded doses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment investigated the response of Nigerian local breed of dog to different doses of Ancylostoma caninum infection. Sixteen dogs aged 6 to 7 months and assigned to 4 groups (A – D) of 4 dogs each were used. Groups A, B and C were infected with 100, 200 and 400 A. caninum infective larvae (L3) while group D ...

  18. An in vitro biofilm model for enamel demineralization and antimicrobial dose-response studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sande, F.H. van de; Azevedo, M.S.; Lund, R.G.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Cenci, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Microcosm biofilms formed in microplates have demonstrated complex community dynamics similar to natural dental biofilm. No simplified microcosm models to evaluate enamel demineralization and dose-response effect to anticariogenic therapies have yet been established, thus this study was designed to

  19. Dose response association of pregnancy cigarette smoke exposure, childhood stature, overweight and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koshy, Gibby; Delpisheh, Ali; Brabin, Bernard J.

    2011-01-01

    The combined dose response effects of pregnancy cigarette smoke exposure on childhood overweight, obesity and short stature have not been reported. A community based cross-sectional survey of 3038 children aged 5-11 years from 15 primary schools in Merseyside, UK. Self-completed parental

  20. Dose-response characteristics of ketamine effect on locomotion, cognitive function and central neuronal activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imre, G; Fokkema, DS; Den Boer, JA; Ter Horst, GJ

    2006-01-01

    The present dose-response study sought to determine the effects of subanesthetic dosages (4-16 mg/kg) of ketamine on locomotion, sensorimotor gating (PP1), working memory, as well as c-fos expression in various limbic regions implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In addition, we examined

  1. Empirical Evaluation of Meta-Analytic Approaches for Nutrient and Health Outcome Dose-Response Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Winifred W.; Schmid, Christopher H.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.; Lau, Joseph; Trikalinos, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to empirically compare alternative meta-analytic methods for combining dose-response data from epidemiological studies. We identified meta-analyses of epidemiological studies that analyzed the association between a single nutrient and a dichotomous outcome. For each topic, we performed meta-analyses of odds ratios…

  2. Concord grape juice polyphenols and cardiovascular risk factors: dose-response relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pure fruit juices provide nutritional value with evidence suggesting some of their benefits on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk may be derived from their constituent polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. However, few data from clinical trials are available on the dose-response relationship ...

  3. Accelerometer-measured dose-response for physical activity, sedentary time, and mortality in US adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Charles E; Keadle, S. K.; Troiano, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity is recommended to maintain and improve health, but the mortality benefits of light activity and risk for sedentary time remain uncertain. Objectives: Using accelerometer-based measures, we 1) described the mortality dose-response for se...

  4. Response of Nigerian local breed of dog to graded doses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aliyu.jibril

    2017-01-24

    Jan 24, 2017 ... response of the Nigerian local breed of dog to varying doses of Ancylostoma caninum infective larvae. It is hoped that information from the study will improve our understanding of the dynamics of the infection in this breed and thus aid in the clinical assessment and management of hookworm disease in the ...

  5. Adaptive response and split-dose effect of radiation on the survival ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Although the importance of radiation-induced adaptive response has been recognized in human health, risk assessment and clinical application, the phenomenon has not been understood well in terms of survival of animals. To examine this aspect Swiss albino mice were irradiated with different doses (2–10 Gy) at 0.015 ...

  6. Dose response of thin-film dosimeters irradiated with 80-120 keV electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, J.; Miller, A.; Sharpe, P.

    2005-01-01

    Thin-film dosimeters (Riso B3 and alanine films) were irradiated at 10 MeV and 80-120 keV electron accelerators, and it has been shown that the radiation response of the dosimeter materials (the radiation chemical yields) are constant at these irradiation energies. However, dose gradients within...

  7. Dose of Retroviral Infection Determines Induction of Antiviral NK Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littwitz-Salomon, Elisabeth; Schimmer, Simone; Dittmer, Ulf

    2017-11-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune system and recognize virus-infected cells as well as tumor cells. Conflicting data about the beneficial or even detrimental role of NK cells in different infectious diseases have been described previously. While the type of pathogen strongly influences NK cell functionality, less is known about how the infection dose influences the quality of a NK cell response against retroviruses. In this study, we used the well-established Friend retrovirus (FV) mouse model to investigate the impact of virus dose on the induction of antiviral NK cell functions. High-dose virus inoculation increased initial virus replication compared to that with medium- or low-dose viral challenge and significantly improved NK cell activation. Antiviral NK cell activity, including in vivo cytotoxicity toward infected target cells, was also enhanced by high-dose virus infection. NK cell activation following high-dose viral challenge was likely mediated by activated dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages and the NK cell-stimulating cytokines interleukin 15 (IL-15) and IL-18. Neutralization of these cytokines decreased NK cell functions and increased viral loads, whereas IL-15 and IL-18 therapy improved NK cell activity. Here we demonstrate that virus dose positively correlates with antiviral NK cell activity and function, which are at least partly driven by IL-15 and IL-18. Our results suggest that NK cell activity may be therapeutically enhanced by administering IL-15 and IL-18 in virus infections that inadequately activate NK cells.IMPORTANCE In infections with retroviruses, like HIV and FV infection of mice, NK cells clearly mediate antiviral activities, but they are usually not sufficient to prevent severe pathology. Here we show that the initial infection dose impacts the induction of an antiviral NK cell response during an acute retroviral infection, which had not investigated before. High-dose infection resulted in a strong NK cell

  8. Time course and dose response of alpha tocopherol on oxidative stress in haemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coombes Jeff S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality particularly in patients with end stage kidney disease. Although observational data from the general population has shown dietary antioxidant intake is associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, most clinical intervention trials have failed to support this relationship. This may be a consequence of not using an effective antioxidant dose and/or not investigating patients with elevated oxidative stress. The SPACE study, conducted in haemodialysis patients, reported that 800 IU/day of alpha tocopherol significantly reduced cardiovascular disease endpoints. A recent time course and dose response study conducted in hypercholesterolaemic patients that found 1600 IU/day of alpha tocopherol was an optimal dose. There is no such dose response data available for haemodialysis patients. Therefore the aim of this study is to investigate the effect of different doses of oral alpha tocopherol on oxidative stress in haemodialysis patients with elevated oxidative stress and the time taken to achieve this effect. Methods The study will consist of a time-course followed by a dose response study. In the time course study 20 haemodialysis patients with elevated oxidative stress will take either 1600 IU/day natural (RRR alpha tocopherol for 20 weeks or placebo. Blood will be collected every two weeks and analysed for a marker of oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and alpha tocopherol. The optimum time period to significantly decrease plasma F2-isoprostanes will be determined from this study. In the dose response study 60 patients will be randomised to receive either placebo, 100, 200, 400, 800 or 1600 IU/day of natural (RRR alpha tocopherol for a time period determined from the time course study. Blood will be collected at baseline and every two weeks and analysed for plasma F2-isoprostanes and alpha tocopherol. It is hypothesised that

  9. Proton Radiotherapy for High-Risk Pediatric Neuroblastoma: Early Outcomes and Dose Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattangadi, Jona A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Rombi, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Provincial Agency for Proton Therapy, Trento (Italy); Yock, Torunn I.; Broussard, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Friedmann, Alison M.; Huang, Mary [Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Kooy, Hanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M., E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the early outcomes for children with high-risk neuroblastoma treated with proton radiotherapy (RT) and to compare the dose distributions for intensity-modulated photon RT (IMRT), three-dimensional conformal proton RT (3D-CPT), and intensity-modulated proton RT to the postoperative tumor bed. Methods and Materials: All patients with high-risk (International Neuroblastoma Staging System Stage III or IV) neuroblastoma treated between 2005 and 2010 at our institution were included. All patients received induction chemotherapy, surgical resection of residual disease, high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue, and adjuvant 3D-CPT to the primary tumor sites. The patients were followed with clinical examinations, imaging, and laboratory testing every 6 months to monitor disease control and side effects. IMRT, 3D-CPT, and intensity-modulated proton RT plans were generated and compared for a representative case of adjuvant RT to the primary tumor bed followed by a boost. Results: Nine patients were treated with 3D-CPT. The median age at diagnosis was 2 years (range 10 months to 4 years), and all patients had Stage IV disease. All patients had unfavorable histologic characteristics (poorly differentiated histologic features in 8, N-Myc amplification in 6, and 1p/11q chromosomal abnormalities in 4). The median tumor size at diagnosis was 11.4 cm (range 7-16) in maximal dimension. At a median follow-up of 38 months (range 11-70), there were no local failures. Four patients developed distant failure, and, of these, two died of disease. Acute side effects included Grade 1 skin erythema in 5 patients and Grade 2 anorexia in 2 patients. Although comparable target coverage was achieved with all three modalities, proton therapy achieved substantial normal tissue sparing compared with IMRT. Intensity-modulated proton RT allowed additional sparing of the kidneys, lungs, and heart. Conclusions: Preliminary outcomes reveal excellent local control with proton therapy

  10. Aspirin (single dose) for perineal pain in the early postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molakatalla, Sujana; Shepherd, Emily; Grivell, Rosalie M

    2017-02-09

    Perineal trauma (due to spontaneous tears, surgical incision (episiotomy) or in association with operative vaginal birth) is common after vaginal birth, and is often associated with postpartum perineal pain. Birth over an intact perineum may also lead to perineal pain. There are adverse health consequences associated with perineal pain for the women and their babies in the short- and long-term, and the pain may interfere with newborn care and the establishment of breastfeeding. Aspirin has been used in the management of postpartum perineal pain and its effectiveness and safety should be assessed. To determine the efficacy of a single dose of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), including at different doses, in the relief of acute postpartum perineal pain. We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (30 August 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (31 May 2016) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing single dose aspirin compared with placebo, no treatment, a different dose of aspirin, or single dose paracetamol/acetaminophen for women with perineal pain in the early postpartum period. We planned to include cluster-RCTs but none were identified. Quasi-RCTs and cross-over studies were not eligible for inclusion in this review. Two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included RCTs. Data were checked for accuracy. The quality of the evidence for the main comparison (aspirin versus placebo) was assessed using the GRADE approach. We included 17 RCTs, with 16 involving 1132 women randomised to aspirin or placebo (one RCT did not report numbers of women). Two RCTs (of 16) did not contribute data to review meta-analyses. All women had perineal pain post-episiotomy, and were not breastfeeding. Studies were published between 1967 and 1997, and the risk of bias was often unclear due to poor

  11. Diethylene glycol-induced toxicities show marked threshold dose response in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Greg M., E-mail: Landry.Greg@mayo.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, & Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Dunning, Cody L., E-mail: cdunni@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, & Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Abreo, Fleurette, E-mail: fabreo@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Pathology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Latimer, Brian, E-mail: blatim@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, & Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Orchard, Elysse, E-mail: eorcha@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, & Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Division of Animal Resources, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); McMartin, Kenneth E., E-mail: kmcmar@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, & Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Diethylene glycol (DEG) exposure poses risks to human health because of widespread industrial use and accidental exposures from contaminated products. To enhance the understanding of the mechanistic role of metabolites in DEG toxicity, this study used a dose response paradigm to determine a rat model that would best mimic DEG exposure in humans. Wistar and Fischer-344 (F-344) rats were treated by oral gavage with 0, 2, 5, or 10 g/kg DEG and blood, kidney and liver tissues were collected at 48 h. Both rat strains treated with 10 g/kg DEG had equivalent degrees of metabolic acidosis, renal toxicity (increased BUN and creatinine and cortical necrosis) and liver toxicity (increased serum enzyme levels, centrilobular necrosis and severe glycogen depletion). There was no liver or kidney toxicity at the lower DEG doses (2 and 5 g/kg) regardless of strain, demonstrating a steep threshold dose response. Kidney diglycolic acid (DGA), the presumed nephrotoxic metabolite of DEG, was markedly elevated in both rat strains administered 10 g/kg DEG, but no DGA was present at 2 or 5 g/kg, asserting its necessary role in DEG-induced toxicity. These results indicate that mechanistically in order to produce toxicity, metabolism to and significant target organ accumulation of DGA are required and that both strains would be useful for DEG risk assessments. - Highlights: • DEG produces a steep threshold dose response for kidney injury in rats. • Wistar and F-344 rats do not differ in response to DEG-induced renal injury. • The dose response for renal injury closely mirrors that for renal DGA accumulation. • Results demonstrate the importance of DGA accumulation in producing kidney injury.

  12. Antipsychotic dose modulates behavioral and neural responses to feedback during reinforcement learning in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, Catherine; Reinen, Jenna; Weber, Jochen; Wager, Tor D; Jarskog, L Fredrik; Shohamy, Daphna; Smith, Edward E

    2014-03-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by an abnormal dopamine system, and dopamine blockade is the primary mechanism of antipsychotic treatment. Consistent with the known role of dopamine in reward processing, prior research has demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia exhibit impairments in reward-based learning. However, it remains unknown how treatment with antipsychotic medication impacts the behavioral and neural signatures of reinforcement learning in schizophrenia. The goal of this study was to examine whether antipsychotic medication modulates behavioral and neural responses to prediction error coding during reinforcement learning. Patients with schizophrenia completed a reinforcement learning task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. The task consisted of two separate conditions in which participants accumulated monetary gain or avoided monetary loss. Behavioral results indicated that antipsychotic medication dose was associated with altered behavioral approaches to learning, such that patients taking higher doses of medication showed increased sensitivity to negative reinforcement. Higher doses of antipsychotic medication were also associated with higher learning rates (LRs), suggesting that medication enhanced sensitivity to trial-by-trial feedback. Neuroimaging data demonstrated that antipsychotic dose was related to differences in neural signatures of feedback prediction error during the loss condition. Specifically, patients taking higher doses of medication showed attenuated prediction error responses in the striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex. These findings indicate that antipsychotic medication treatment may influence motivational processes in patients with schizophrenia.

  13. Dose responses in a normoxic polymethacrylic acid gel dosimeter using optimal CT scanning parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, K. H.; Cho, S. J.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Min, C. K.; Kim, Y. H.; Moon, S. K.; Kim, E. S.; Chang, A. R.; Kwon, S. I.

    2012-05-01

    The dosimetric characteristics of normoxic polymethacrylic acid gels are investigated using optimal CT scanning parameters and the possibility of their clinical application is also considered. The effects of CT scanning parameters (tube voltage, tube current, scan time, slick thickness, field of view, and reconstruction algorithm) are experimentally investigated to determine the optimal parameters for minimizing the amount of noise in images obtained using normoxic polymethacrylic acid gel. In addition, the dose sensitivity, dose response, accuracy, and reproducibility of the normoxic polymethacrylic acid gel are evaluated. CT images are obtained using a head phantom that is fabricated for clinical applications. In addition, IMRT treatment planning is performed using a Tomotherapy radiation treatment planning system. A program for analyzing the results is produced using Visual C. A comparison between the treatment planning and the CT images of irradiated gels is performed. The dose sensitivity is found to be 2.41±0.04 HGy-1. The accuracies of dose evaluation at doses of 2 Gy and 4 Gy are 3.0% and 2.6%, respectively, and their reproducibilities are 2.0% and 2.1%, respectively. In the comparison of gel and Tomotherpay planning, the pass rate of the γ-index, based on the reference values of a dose error of 3% and a DTA of 3 mm, is 93.7%.

  14. Is more better? Using metadata to explore dose-response relationships in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Keith R; Lang, Catherine E; Boyd, Lara A

    2014-07-01

    Neurophysiological models of rehabilitation and recovery suggest that a large volume of specific practice is required to induce the neuroplastic changes that underlie behavioral recovery. The primary objective of this meta-analysis was to explore the relationship between time scheduled for therapy and improvement in motor therapy for adults after stroke by (1) comparing high doses to low doses and (2) using metaregression to quantify the dose-response relationship further. Databases were searched to find randomized controlled trials that were not dosage matched for total time scheduled for therapy. Regression models were used to predict improvement during therapy as a function of total time scheduled for therapy and years after stroke. Overall, treatment groups receiving more therapy improved beyond control groups that received less (g=0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.26-0.45). Furthermore, increased time scheduled for therapy was a significant predictor of increased improvement by itself and when controlling for linear and quadratic effects of time after stroke. There is a positive relationship between the time scheduled for therapy and therapy outcomes. These data suggest that large doses of therapy lead to clinically meaningful improvements, controlling for time after stroke. Currently, trials report time scheduled for therapy as a measure of therapy dose. Preferable measures of dose would be active time in therapy or repetitions of an exercise. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Site-specific dose-response relationships for cancer induction from the combined Japanese A-bomb and Hodgkin cohorts for doses relevant to radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumila Marcin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose Most information on the dose-response of radiation-induced cancer is derived from data on the A-bomb survivors. Since, for radiation protection purposes, the dose span of main interest is between zero and one Gy, the analysis of the A-bomb survivors is usually focused on this range. However, estimates of cancer risk for doses larger than one Gy are becoming more important for radiotherapy patients. Therefore in this work, emphasis is placed on doses relevant for radiotherapy with respect to radiation induced solid cancer. Materials and methods For various organs and tissues the analysis of cancer induction was extended by an attempted combination of the linear-no-threshold model from the A-bomb survivors in the low dose range and the cancer risk data of patients receiving radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease in the high dose range. The data were fitted using organ equivalent dose (OED calculated for a group of different dose-response models including a linear model, a model including fractionation, a bell-shaped model and a plateau-dose-response relationship. Results The quality of the applied fits shows that the linear model fits best colon, cervix and skin. All other organs are best fitted by the model including fractionation indicating that the repopulation/repair ability of tissue is neither 0 nor 100% but somewhere in between. Bone and soft tissue sarcoma were fitted well by all the models. In the low dose range beyond 1 Gy sarcoma risk is negligible. For increasing dose, sarcoma risk increases rapidly and reaches a plateau at around 30 Gy. Conclusions In this work OED for various organs was calculated for a linear, a bell-shaped, a plateau and a mixture between a bell-shaped and plateau dose-response relationship for typical treatment plans of Hodgkin's disease patients. The model parameters (α and R were obtained by a fit of the dose-response relationships to these OED data and to the A-bomb survivors. For

  16. Site-specific dose-response relationships for cancer induction from the combined Japanese A-bomb and Hodgkin cohorts for doses relevant to radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Uwe; Sumila, Marcin; Robotka, Judith

    2011-07-26

    Most information on the dose-response of radiation-induced cancer is derived from data on the A-bomb survivors. Since, for radiation protection purposes, the dose span of main interest is between zero and one Gy, the analysis of the A-bomb survivors is usually focused on this range. However, estimates of cancer risk for doses larger than one Gy are becoming more important for radiotherapy patients. Therefore in this work, emphasis is placed on doses relevant for radiotherapy with respect to radiation induced solid cancer. For various organs and tissues the analysis of cancer induction was extended by an attempted combination of the linear-no-threshold model from the A-bomb survivors in the low dose range and the cancer risk data of patients receiving radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease in the high dose range. The data were fitted using organ equivalent dose (OED) calculated for a group of different dose-response models including a linear model, a model including fractionation, a bell-shaped model and a plateau-dose-response relationship. The quality of the applied fits shows that the linear model fits best colon, cervix and skin. All other organs are best fitted by the model including fractionation indicating that the repopulation/repair ability of tissue is neither 0 nor 100% but somewhere in between. Bone and soft tissue sarcoma were fitted well by all the models. In the low dose range beyond 1 Gy sarcoma risk is negligible. For increasing dose, sarcoma risk increases rapidly and reaches a plateau at around 30 Gy. In this work OED for various organs was calculated for a linear, a bell-shaped, a plateau and a mixture between a bell-shaped and plateau dose-response relationship for typical treatment plans of Hodgkin's disease patients. The model parameters (α and R) were obtained by a fit of the dose-response relationships to these OED data and to the A-bomb survivors. For any three-dimensional inhomogenous dose distribution, cancer risk can be compared by

  17. Early prediction of long-term response to cabergoline in patients with macroprolactinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngki; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kim, Eui-Hyun; Hong, Jae Won; Lee, Eun Jig; Kim, Sun Ho

    2014-09-01

    Cabergoline is typically effective for treating prolactinomas; however, some patients display cabergoline resistance, and the early characteristics of these patients remain unclear. We analyzed early indicators predicting long-term response to cabergoline. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 44 patients with macroprolactinomas who received cabergoline as first-line treatment; the patients were followed for a median of 16 months. The influence of various clinical parameters on outcomes was evaluated. Forty patients (90.9%) were treated medically and displayed tumor volume reduction (TVR) of 74.7%, a prolactin normalization (NP) rate of 81.8%, and a complete response (CR; TVR >50% with NP, without surgery) rate of 70.5%. Most patients (93.1%) with TVR ≥25% and NP at 3 months eventually achieved CR, whereas only 50% of patients with TVR ≥25% without NP and no patients with TVR cabergoline (β=-1.181 mg/week), and two of four patients who underwent surgery were able to discontinue cabergoline. Determining cabergoline response using TVR and NP 3 months after treatment is useful for predicting later outcomes. However, further cabergoline administration should be considered for patients with TVR >25% at 3 months without NP, particularly those with huge prolactinomas, because a delayed response may be achieved. As surgery can reduce the cabergoline dose necessary for successful disease control, it should be considered for cabergoline-resistant patients.

  18. Interrelationship between the early inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis after radiation exposure. [X radiation, rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, R.L.; Casarett, G.W.

    1977-10-01

    The mechanistic relationships between the early inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis seen after radiation exposure were studied in rats given X-ray doses of either 2000 or 5000 rad to standardized fields of the inner thigh. The animals were further subdivided into those receiving no additional treatment and those depleted of complement with cobra-venom factor. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that two mechanisms are responsible for the increases in extravasation rate and vascular injury seen after irradiation. First, direct cytocidal damage; second, chemically mediated, possibly complement-dependent, mechanisms. In addition, these data suggest that both direct and indirect damage to the vasculature play a role in influencing the subsequent late-radiation-induced fibrosis.

  19. Early Prediction of Tumor Response to Treatment: Preclinical Validation of 99mTc-Duramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvas, Filipe; Vangestel, Christel; Pak, Koon; Vermeulen, Peter; Gray, Brian; Stroobants, Sigrid; Staelens, Steven; Wyffels, Leonie

    2016-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging of cell death can provide an early indication of the efficacy of tumor treatment, aiding clinicians in distinguishing responding patients from nonresponding patients early on. (99m)Tc-duramycin is a SPECT tracer for cell death imaging. In this study, our aim was to validate the use of (99m)Tc-duramycin for imaging the early response of tumors to treatment. An in vitro binding assay was performed on COLO205 cells treated with 5-fluorouracil (3.1, 31, or 310 μM) and oxaliplatin (0.7 or 7 μM) or radiation (2 or 4.5 Gy). (99m)Tc-duramycin cell binding and the levels of cell death were evaluated after treatment. In vivo imaging was performed on 4 groups of CD1-deficient mice bearing COLO205 human colorectal cancer tumors. Each group included 6 tumors. The first group was given irinotecan (100 mg/kg), the second oxaliplatin (5 mg/kg), the third irinotecan (80 mg/kg) plus oxaliplatin (5 mg/kg), and the fourth vehicle (0.9% NaCl and 5% glucose). For radiotherapy studies, COLO205 tumors received 4.5 Gy, 2 fractions of 4.5 Gy in a 24-h interval, pretreatment with an 80 mg/kg dose of irinotecan combined with 2 fractions of 4.5 Gy in a 24-h interval, or no treatment (n = 5-6/group). Therapy response was evaluated by (99m)Tc-duramycin SPECT 24 h after the last dose of therapy. Blocking was used to confirm tracer specificity. Radiotracer uptake in the tumors was validated ex vivo using γ-counting, cleaved caspase-3, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) histology. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy increased (99m)Tc-duramycin binding to COLO205 cells in a concentration/dose- and time-dependent manner, which correlated well with cell death levels (P radioactivity in the tumors positively correlated with cleaved caspase-3 (r = 0.85, P chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It holds potential to be translated into clinical use for early assessment of treatment response. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear

  20. Low doses of gamma-irradiation induce an early bystander effect in zebrafish cells which is sufficient to radioprotect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sandrine; Malard, Véronique; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Davin, Anne-Hélène; Armengaud, Jean; Foray, Nicolas; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    The term "bystander effect" is used to describe an effect in which cells that have not been exposed to radiation are affected by irradiated cells though various intracellular signaling mechanisms. In this study we analyzed the kinetics and mechanisms of bystander effect and radioadaptation in embryonic zebrafish cells (ZF4) exposed to chronic low dose of gamma rays. ZF4 cells were irradiated for 4 hours with total doses of gamma irradiation ranging from 0.01-0.1 Gy. In two experimental conditions, the transfer of irradiated cells or culture medium from irradiated cells results in the occurrence of DNA double strand breaks in non-irradiated cells (assessed by the number of γ-H2AX foci) that are repaired at 24 hours post-irradiation whatever the dose. At low total irradiation doses the bystander effect observed does not affect DNA repair mechanisms in targeted and bystander cells. An increase in global methylation of ZF4 cells was observed in irradiated cells and bystander cells compared to control cells. We observed that pre-irradiated cells which are then irradiated for a second time with the same doses contained significantly less γ-H2AX foci than in 24 h gamma-irradiated control cells. We also showed that bystander cells that have been in contact with the pre-irradiated cells and then irradiated alone present less γ-H2AX foci compared to the control cells. This radioadaptation effect is significantly more pronounced at the highest doses. To determine the factors involved in the early events of the bystander effect, we performed an extensive comparative proteomic study of the ZF4 secretomes upon irradiation. In the experimental conditions assayed here, we showed that the early events of bystander effect are probably not due to the secretion of specific proteins neither the oxidation of these secreted proteins. These results suggest that early bystander effect may be due probably to a combination of multiple factors.

  1. Assessment of The Dose-Response Relationship of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Two Cell Lines Exposed to High Doses of Ionizing Radiation (6 and 8 Gy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Khademi, Sara; Azimian, Hosein; Mohebbi, Shokoufeh; Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman

    2017-10-01

    The dose-response relationship of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is controversial at high dose levels. The aim of the present study is to assess RIBE at high dose levels by examination of different endpoints. This experimental study used the medium transfer technique to induce RIBE. The cells were divided into two main groups: QU-DB cells which received medium from autologous irradiated cells and MRC5 cells which received medium from irradiated QU-DB cells. Colony, MTT, and micronucleus assays were performed to quantify bystander responses. The medium was diluted and transferred to bystander cells to investigate whether medium dilution could revive the RIBE response that disappeared at a high dose. The RIBE level in QU-DB bystander cells increased in the dose range of 0.5 to 4 Gy, but decreased at 6 and 8 Gy. The Micronucleated cells per 1000 binucleated cells (MNBN) frequency of QU-DB bystander cells which received the most diluted medium from 6 and 8 Gy QU-DB irradiated cells reached the maximum level compared to the MNBN frequency of the cells that received complete medium (PMRC5 cells which received the most diluted medium from 4 Gy QU-DB irradiated cells reached the maximum level compared to MNBN frequency of cells that received complete medium (P<0.0001). Our results showed that RIBE levels decreased at doses above 4 Gy; however, RIBE increased when diluted conditioned medium was transferred to bystander cells. This finding confirmed that a negative feedback mechanism was responsible for the decrease in RIBE response at high doses. Decrease of RIBE at high doses might be used to predict that in radiosurgery, brachytherapy and grid therapy, in which high dose per fraction is applied, normal tissue damage owing to RIBE may decrease.

  2. Energy crop (Sida hermaphrodita) fertilization using digestate under marginal soil conditions: A dose-response experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabel, Moritz; Bueno Piaz Barbosa, Daniela; Horsch, David; Jablonowski, Nicolai David

    2014-05-01

    The global demand for energy security and the mitigation of climate change are the main drivers pushing energy-plant production in Germany. However, the cultivation of these plants can cause land use conflicts since agricultural soil is mostly used for plant production. A sustainable alternative to the conventional cultivation of food-based energy-crops is the cultivation of special adopted energy-plants on marginal lands. To further increase the sustainability of energy-plant cultivation systems the dependency on synthetic fertilizers needs to be reduced via closed nutrient loops. In the presented study the energy-plant Sida hermaphrodita (Malvaceae) will be used to evaluate the potential to grow this high potential energy-crop on a marginal sandy soil in combination with fertilization via digestate from biogas production. With this dose-response experiment we will further identify an optimum dose, which will be compared to equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Further, lethal doses and deficiency doses will be observed. Two weeks old Sida seedlings were transplanted to 1L pots and fertilized with six doses of digestate (equivalent to a field application of 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160t/ha) and three equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Control plants were left untreated. Sida plants will grow for 45 days under greenhouse conditions. We hypothesize that the nutrient status of the marginal soil can be increased and maintained by defined digestate applications, compared to control plants suffering of nutrient deficiency due to the low nutrient status in the marginal substrate. The dose of 40t/ha is expected to give a maximum biomass yield without causing toxicity symptoms. Results shall be used as basis for further experiments on the field scale in a field trial that was set up to investigate sustainable production systems for energy crop production under marginal soil conditions.

  3. Responses of the rat basal ganglia neurotensin systems to low doses of methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alburges, Mario E; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Cordova, Nathaniel M; Robson, Christina M; McFadden, Lisa M; Martin, Amber L; Hanson, Glen R

    2014-08-01

    Administration of high doses of methamphetamine (METH) in a manner mimicking the binging patterns associated with abuse reduces NT release and causes its accumulation and elevated NT levels in extrapyramidal structures by a D1 mechanism. The relevance of these findings to the therapeutic use of METH needs to be studied. The effect of low doses (comparable to that used for therapy) of METH on basal ganglia NT systems was examined and compared to high-dose and self-administration effects previously reported. Rats were injected four times (2-h intervals) with either saline or low doses of METH (0.25, 0.50, or 1.00 mg/kg/subcutaneously (s.c.)). For the DA antagonist studies, animals were pretreated with a D1 (SCH23390) or D2 (eticlopride) antagonist 15 min prior to METH or saline treatments. Rats were sacrificed 5-48 h after the last injection. METH at doses of 0.25 and 0.50, but not 1.00 mg/kg, rapidly and briefly decreased NTLI concentration in all basal ganglia structures studied. In the posterior dorsal striatum, the reduction in NT level after low-dose METH appeared to be caused principally by D2 stimulation, but both D2 and D1 stimulation were required for the NT responses in the other basal ganglia regions. A novel finding from the present study was that opposite to abuse-mimicking high doses of METH, the therapeutically relevant low-dose METH treatment reduced NT tissue levels likely reflecting an increase in NT release and a short-term depletion of the levels of this neuropeptide in basal ganglia structures. The possible significance is discussed.

  4. Stability and coherence of health experts' upper and lower subjective probabilities about dose-response functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallsten, T S; Forsyth, B H

    1983-06-01

    As part of a method for assessing health risks associated with primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards. T. B. Feagans and W. F. Biller (Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. EPA Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, May 1981) developed a technique for encoding experts' subjective probabilities regarding dose--response functions. The encoding technique is based on B. O. Koopman's (Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, 1940, 46, 763-764; Annals of Mathematics, 1940, 41, 269-292) probability theory, which does not require probabilities to be sharp, but rather allows lower and upper probabilities to be associated with an event. Uncertainty about a dose--response function can be expressed either in terms of the response rate expected at a given concentration or, conversely, in terms of the concentration expected to support a given response rate. Feagans and Biller (1981, cited above) derive the relation between the two conditional probabilities, which is easily extended to upper and lower conditional probabilities. These relations were treated as coherence requirements in an experiment utilizing four ozone and four lead experts as subjects, each providing judgments on two separate occasions. Four subjects strongly satisfied the coherence requirements in both conditions. and three more did no in the second session only. The eighth subject also improved in Session 2. Encoded probabilities were highly correlated between the two sessions, but changed from the first to the second in a manner that improved coherence and reflected greater attention to certain parameters of the dose--response function.

  5. Cancer risk assessment: Optimizing human health through linear dose-response models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J; Shamoun, Dima Yazji; Hanekamp, Jaap C

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes that generic cancer risk assessments be based on the integration of the Linear Non-Threshold (LNT) and hormetic dose-responses since optimal hormetic beneficial responses are estimated to occur at the dose associated with a 10(-4) risk level based on the use of a LNT model as applied to animal cancer studies. The adoption of the 10(-4) risk estimate provides a theoretical and practical integration of two competing risk assessment models whose predictions cannot be validated in human population studies or with standard chronic animal bioassay data. This model-integration reveals both substantial protection of the population from cancer effects (i.e. functional utility of the LNT model) while offering the possibility of significant reductions in cancer incidence should the hormetic dose-response model predictions be correct. The dose yielding the 10(-4) cancer risk therefore yields the optimized toxicologically based "regulatory sweet spot". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Polymer gel dosimetry--the dose response for X-ray irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Takahiro; Usui, Shuji; Hayashi, Shin-Ichiro; Yoshioka, Munenori; Haneda, Kiyofumi

    2012-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimetry has been considered a promising technique for clinical use, but this potential has not yet been fully realized in Japan. One reason may be because the commercialized gel detector, BANG gel, is expensive and it is only produced abroad. A second reason is the difficulty of controlling dose sensitivity of the gel so that it is stable under ordinary clinical conditions. In this work we introduce two types of gel detectors (MAG and PAG) which we produced in-house. First the method of fabrication of gel is presented in detail, then the dose responses of MAG and PAG for X-ray irradiation are evaluating for MRI and X-ray CT scanning. The MAG-type gel is useful in low contrast dosimetry because of the high sensitivity in its dose response (R2). The PAG-type gel is effective for dosimetry in multiple field irradiations because its dose response (CT value) has reproducibility independent of the different irradiation conditions. Finally, we summarize the potential for clinical use of polymer gel dosimetry with these gel detectors.

  7. Dose-response effects of water supplementation on cognitive performance and mood in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Caroline J; Crosbie, Laura; Fatima, Fareeha; Hussain, Maryam; Jacob, Nicole; Gardner, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Water supplementation has been found to facilitate visual attention and short-term memory, but the dose required to improve performance is not yet known. We assessed the dose response effect of water on thirst, mood and cognitive performance in both adults and children. Participants were offered either no water, 25 ml or 300 ml water to drink. Study 1 assessed 96 adults and in Study 2, data are presented from 60 children aged 7-9 years. In both studies, performance was assessed at baseline and 20 min after drinking (or no drink); on thirst and mood scales, letter cancellation and a digit span test. For both children and adults, a large drink (300 ml) was necessary to reduce thirst, while a small drink (25 ml) was sufficient to improve visual attention (letter cancellation). In adults, a large drink improved digit span, but there was no such effect in children. In children, but not adults, a small drink resulted in increased thirst ratings. Both children and adults show dose-response effects of drinking on visual attention. Visual attention is enhanced by small amounts of fluid and appears not to be contingent on thirst reduction. Memory performance may be related to thirst, but differently for children and adults. These contrasting dose-response characteristics could imply cognitive enhancement by different mechanisms for these two domains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, A. L.; Ploen, J.; Vogelius, I. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we...... estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination...... of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect...

  9. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information

  10. Gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI of the breast : Analysis of dose response and comparison with gadopentetate dimeglumine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knopp, MV; Bourne, MW; Sardanelli, F; Wasser, MN; Bonomo, L; Boetes, C; Muller-Schimpfle, M; Hall-Craggs, MA; Hamm, B; Orlacchio, A; Bartolozzi, C; Kessler, M; Fischer, U; Schneider, G; Dudkerk, M; Teh, WL; Gehl, HB; Salerio, [No Value; Pirovano, G; La Noce, A; Kirchin, MA; Spinazzi, A

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and dose response relationship of three doses of gadobenate dimeglumine for MRI of the breast and to compare the results with those obtained after a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg of body weight of gadopentetate dimeglumine. SUBJECTS

  11. Protective effect of early low-dose hydrocortisone on ventilator-associated pneumonia in the cancer patients: a propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagier, David; Platon, Laura; Lambert, Jérome; Chow-Chine, Laurent; Sannini, Antoine; Bisbal, Magali; Brun, Jean-Paul; Asehnoune, Karim; Leone, Marc; Faucher, Marion; Mokart, Djamel

    2017-10-23

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a care-related event that could be promoted by immune suppression caused by critical diseases, malignancies and cancer treatments. Low dose of hydrocortisone was proposed for modulation of immune response in the critically ill population. In this monocentric observational study, all cancer patients mechanically ventilated for more than 48 h were included. Effect of low-dose hydrocortisone administered during the first 48 h of mechanical ventilation was evaluated applying inverse probability weighting analysis after propensity score assessment. VAP impact on 1-year mortality, ICU length of stay and mechanical ventilation duration was secondarily determined. Within this cohort, 190 cancer patients were followed. VAP was confirmed in 22.1% of cases in the early hydrocortisone group and confirmed in 42.6% of cases in the no or late hydrocortisone group. Early hydrocortisone exhibited a protective effect on the risk of VAP (OR 0.23; 95% CI 0.12-0.44; P < 0.0001). VAP was associated with 1-year mortality (HR 1.60; 95% CI 1.10-2.34; P = 0.017) and increased ICU length of stay (mean extra length of stay: 4.2 days; 95% CI 0.6-7.8). Immune modulation with low-dose hydrocortisone administered in the first days of mechanical ventilation could protect from VAP occurrence in cancer patients.

  12. Dose-response relations for occupational exposure to arsenic and cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaerup, L. [Dept. of Environmental Hygiene and Inst. of Environmental Medicine, Dept. of Epidemiology, Karolinska Inst. and Dept. of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1992-12-31

    The dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and lung cancer in occupationally exposed workers and between occupational cadmium exposure and various kidney effects was studied. A cohort of 3916 Swedish smelter workers showed an increased over-all mortality as well as excess relative risks of deaths due to cancer of the lung and stomach, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, compared with the Swedish general population, When a regional reference population was used, only lung cancer mortality remained significantly elevated. A positive dose-response relation was found between cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer risk, the relative risk among the highest exposed workers being more than ten-fold (SMR=1137) (95% confidence interval=588-1986). The dose-response relation was further strengthened when smoking data was added in a nested case-referent study within the smelter cohort. The interaction between arsenic and smoking appeared to be more than additive, but less than multiplicative. Cadmium in the blood has been considered to reflect recent exposure. It was shown in a group of cadmium copper alloy workers that the decay of cadmium in blood followed a two-exponential model. Blood cadmium can thus also be regarded as an estimate of the body burden after cessation of exposure. The use of blood cadmium as a dose estimate was further explored in a group of 440 cadmium exposed battery workers. A clear dose-response relation was found between cumulative blood cadmium and tubular proteinuria. It is recognised that highly exposed workers may develop a glomerula dysfunction in addition to their tubular damage. A questionnaire including questions of the history of kidney stones was sent to the living individuals and the next of kin to the deceased workers in a cohort of 902 cadmium exposed battery workers. There was in increased incidence of renal stones among the medium and highly exposed workers.

  13. Evasion of Early Antiviral Responses by Herpes Simplex Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suazo, Paula A.; Ibañez, Francisco J.; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R.; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V.; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.; González, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency. PMID:25918478

  14. Dose-response model for Listeria monocytogenes-induced stillbirths in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Alice; Takeuchi, Kazue; Anderson, Gary; Ware, Glenn O; McClure, Harold M; Raybourne, Richard B; Mytle, Nutan; Doyle, Michael P

    2008-02-01

    A dose-response model using rhesus monkeys as a surrogate for pregnant women indicates that oral exposure to 10(7) CFU of Listeria monocytogenes results in about 50% stillbirths. Ten of 33 pregnant rhesus monkeys exposed orally to a single dose of 10(2) to 10(10) CFU of L. monocytogenes had stillbirths. A log-logistic model predicts a dose affecting 50% of animals at 10(7) CFU, comparable to an estimated 10(6) CFU based on an outbreak among pregnant women but much less than the extrapolated estimate (10(13) CFU) from the FDA-U.S. Department of Agriculture-CDC risk assessment using an exponential curve based on mouse data. Exposure and etiology of the disease are the same in humans and primates but not in mice. This information will aid in risk assessment, assist policy makers, and provide a model for mechanistic studies of L. monocytogenes-induced stillbirths.

  15. Dose-dependent acute phase response of aqueous leaf decoction of Nerium oleander in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, M H; Fatima, S; Khawar, M B; Naz, N; Mujeeb, K A; Akhtar, T; Sheikh, N

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have been carried out in order to determine the toxicity of medicinal plants. The objective of this study was to compare and analyze the hepatic response against two doses of Nerium oleander, (N. oleander) “kaner” leaf decoction. Aqueous leaf decoction was injected intramuscularly into both hind limbs of male rats (200∓10g), assigned into three categories (n=4): control group with no treatment; group I, injected with 5 ml/ kg; and group II injected with 10 ml/ kg of leaf decoction, respectively. Animals were sacrificed 6 h after administration and hepato-histological changes were then observed. The decoction induced an acute phase reaction reflected by a more significant recruitment of inflammatory cells in group II than in group I and controls, as observed by histological studies. These results indicated that both doses can induce an acute-phase condition. Hence, traditional practice of medicinal plants without preliminary dose assessment must not be administered.

  16. Hormetic Response to Low-Dose Radiation: Focus on the Immune System and Its Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuwei Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interrelationship between ionizing radiation and the immune system is complex, multifactorial, and dependent on radiation dose/quality and immune cell type. High-dose radiation usually results in immune suppression. On the contrary, low-dose radiation (LDR modulates a variety of immune responses that have exhibited the properties of immune hormesis. Although the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood yet, LDR has been used clinically for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and malignant tumors. These advancements in preclinical and clinical studies suggest that LDR-mediated immune modulation is a well-orchestrated phenomenon with clinical potential. We summarize recent developments in the understanding of LDR-mediated immune modulation, with an emphasis on its potential clinical applications.

  17. Efficient calculation of local dose distributions for response modeling in proton and heavier ion beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Hahn, Ute; Kiderlen, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We present an algorithm for fast and accurate computation of the local dose distribution in MeV beams of protons, carbon ions or other heavy charged particles. It uses compound Poisson modeling of track interaction and successive convolutions for fast computation. It can handle arbitrary complex ...... mixed particle fields over a wide range of fluences. Since the local dose distribution is the essential part of several approaches to model detector efficiency and cellular response it has potential use in ion-beam dosimetry, radiotherapy, and radiobiology.......We present an algorithm for fast and accurate computation of the local dose distribution in MeV beams of protons, carbon ions or other heavy charged particles. It uses compound Poisson modeling of track interaction and successive convolutions for fast computation. It can handle arbitrary complex...

  18. Response of Lolium perenne to repeated flame treatments with various doses of propane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Anne Merete; Andreasen, Christian; Kristoffersen, Palle

    2012-01-01

    in dry weight). Split applications generally increased the effect of the treatments, especially when the number of treatments was increased from four to six. The results are in accordance with the assumption that repeated flame treatments are necessary to kill larger plants and heat tolerant weeds......-chemical weed control methods, because of its extensive regrowth. Treatments of eight different doses and five treatment intervals were applied during two seasons from May to October. The response was measured as plant dry weight, 14 days after last treatment. All weeds were killed with doses above 80 kg......In many urban areas, use of herbicides is either unwanted or prohibited and replaced with flame weeding. The influence of dose (kg propane ha-1) and treatment interval of flame weed control was studied on Lolium perenne. Lolium perenne is a perennial grass that is very difficult to control with non...

  19. Psychophysical and Vasomotor Responses of the Oral Tissues: A Nicotine Dose-Response and Menthol Interaction Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt Nielsen, Thomas; Nielsen, Bruno Provstgaard; Wang, Kelun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Boudreau, Shellie A

    2016-05-01

    This study implemented an intra-oral test-platform to assess the sensory, psychophysical, and vasomotor responses to nicotine and menthol, alone or in combination. Two double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, cross-over studies, including healthy nonsmoking participants were performed. Study I: A dose-response relationship (N = 20) between 0, 2, and 4 mg nicotine gum. Study II: An interaction response (N = 22) to 30 mg menthol and 4 mg nicotine alone or in combination. Heart rate, blood pressure, tactile and thermosensory thresholds, intra-oral blood flow and temperature, pain/irritation intensities/locations, McGill Pain Questionnaire, and taste experience were assessed before, during or after the completion of a standardized chewing regime. A dose-response elevation in heart rate was attenuated when nicotine was combined with menthol. Blood flow, temperature, and warm-detection thresholds, as assessed on the tongue, similarly increased for all gums. Pain intensity and taste experiences were similar between nicotine doses. Nicotine attenuated the sweet, cooling, and freshening sensation of menthol. Within the first 4 minutes, menthol reduced the intensity but not the area of nicotine-induced pain and irritation. The 4-mg nicotine dose led to a continued increase in the intensity and area of irritation in the throat post-chewing. Moreover, one-half of participants responded to menthol as an irritant, and these individuals demonstrated larger areas of nicotine-induced irritation in the throat post-chewing. The intra-oral test platform provides a basis to optimize the assessment of nicotine-related taste and sensory experiences and can be used in future studies for profiling nicotine gum. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Low doses of estradiol in combination with gestodene to prevent early postmenopausal bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason, N H; Byrjalsen, I; Hassager, C; Haarbo, J; Christiansen, C

    2000-09-01

    Our purpose was to study combinations of estradiol and gestodene for prevention of bone loss in early postmenopausal women. We randomly assigned 278 healthy, early postmenopausal women to receive either 2 mg 17beta-estradiol sequentially combined with 25 microg gestodene (group 2/25s), 2 mg estradiol sequentially combined with 50 microg gestodene (group 2/50s), 1 mg estradiol sequentially combined with 25 microg gestodene (group 1/25s), 1 mg estradiol continuously combined with 25 mg gestodene (group 1/25c), or placebo. After 3 years the changes in bone mineral density of the spine were as follows (mean +/- SEM): group 2/25s, 7. 41% +/- 0.72%; group 2/50s, 8.53% +/- 0.90%; group 1.25s, 6.67% +/- 0.88%; group 1/25c, 4.44% +/- 0.59%; and placebo group, -2.03% +/- 0. 64%. The changes in bone mineral density were mirrored in the biochemical bone markers. The average responses for the urinary C-terminal telopeptide fragments of type I collagen corrected for creatinine excretion were as follows (mean of baseline +/- SEM): group 2/25s, -68.8% +/- 0.03%; group 2/50s, -72.8% +/- 0.02%; group 1/25s, -60.7% +/- 0.03%; group 1/25c, -52.28% +/- 0.04%; and placebo group, 6.5% +/- 0.09%. Beneficial lipid effects were found in all active groups. The decreases in low-density lipoprotein were as follows (mean +/- SEM): group 2/25s, -13.7% +/- 3.0%; group 2/50s, -14.6% +/- 3.2%; group 1/25s, -9.28% +/- 2.2%; group 1/25c, -9.92% +/- 2.4%; and placebo group, 1.53% +/- 1.9%. These results demonstrate that estradiol therapy with 1 mg estradiol is fully protective against early postmenopausal bone loss.

  1. Modeling and regression analysis of semiochemical dose-response curves of insect antennal reception and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, John A

    2013-08-01

    Dose-response curves of the effects of semiochemicals on neurophysiology and behavior are reported in many articles in insect chemical ecology. Most curves are shown in figures representing points connected by straight lines, in which the x-axis has order of magnitude increases in dosage vs. responses on the y-axis. The lack of regression curves indicates that the nature of the dose-response relationship is not well understood. Thus, a computer model was developed to simulate a flux of various numbers of pheromone molecules (10(3) to 5 × 10(6)) passing by 10(4) receptors distributed among 10(6) positions along an insect antenna. Each receptor was depolarized by at least one strike by a molecule, and subsequent strikes had no additional effect. The simulations showed that with an increase in pheromone release rate, the antennal response would increase in a convex fashion and not in a logarithmic relation as suggested previously. Non-linear regression showed that a family of kinetic formation functions fit the simulated data nearly perfectly (R(2) >0.999). This is reasonable because olfactory receptors have proteins that bind to the pheromone molecule and are expected to exhibit enzyme kinetics. Over 90 dose-response relationships reported in the literature of electroantennographic and behavioral bioassays in the laboratory and field were analyzed by the logarithmic and kinetic formation functions. This analysis showed that in 95% of the cases, the kinetic functions explained the relationships better than the logarithmic (mean of about 20% better). The kinetic curves become sigmoid when graphed on a log scale on the x-axis. Dose-catch relationships in the field are similar to dose-EAR (effective attraction radius, in which a spherical radius indicates the trapping effect of a lure) and the circular EARc in two dimensions used in mass trapping models. The use of kinetic formation functions for dose-response curves of attractants, and kinetic decay curves for

  2. High-Dose Borna Disease Virus Infection Induces a Nucleoprotein-Specific Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Response and Prevention of Immunopathology†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Esther; Bilzer, Thomas; Stitz, Lothar; Planz, Oliver

    2001-01-01

    Experimental Borna disease virus (BDV) infection of rats and natural infection of horses and sheep leads to severe central nervous system disease based on immunopathological pathways. The virus replicates slowly, and the cellular immune response results in immunopathology. CD8+ T cells exert effector cell functions, and their activity results in the destruction of virus-infected cells. Previously, Oldach and colleagues (D. Oldach, M. C. Zink, J. M. Pyper, S. Herzog, R. Rott, O. Narayan, and J. E. Clements, Virology 206:426–434, 1995) have reported protection against Borna disease after inoculation of high-dose cell-adapted BDV. Here we show that the outcome of the infection, i.e., immunopathology versus protection, is simply dependent on the amount of virus used for infection. High-dose BDV (106 FFU) triggers an early virus-specific reaction of the immune system, as demonstrated by strong cellular and humoral responses. In particular, the early presence and function of nucleoprotein-specific CD8+ T cells could be demonstrated in the brain. We present evidence that in a noncytolytic and usually persistent virus infection, high-dose input virus mediates early control of the pathogen due to an efficient induction of an antiviral immune mechanism. From these data, we conclude that immune reactivity, in particular the cytotoxic T-cell response, determines whether the virus is controlled with prevention of the ensuing immunopathological disease or whether a persistent infection is established. PMID:11689651

  3. Fewer Doses of HPV Vaccine Result in Immune Response Similar to Three-dose Regimen | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists report that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody levels against two of the most carcinogenic types of HPV (16 and 18), compared to a standard three dose regimen. Among women who received only one dose, antibody levels were also high and remained stable four years after vaccination. The results suggest that fewer doses of an HPV vaccine may confer necessary long-term protection against new infection and appeared Nov. 4, 2013, in Cancer Prevention Research... |

  4. Dose-dependent changes in the locomotor responses to methamphetamine in BALB/c mice: Low doses induce hypolocomotion

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Rana A.K.; Kosten, Therese A.; Berma M Kinsey; Shen, Xiaoyun; Lopez, Angel Y.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    The overall goal of the present study was to determine the effects of different doses of (+)-methamphetamine (meth) on locomotor activity of Balb/C mice. Four experiments were designed to test a wide range of meth doses in BALB/c female mice. In Experiment 1, we examined locomotor activity induced by an acute administration of low doses of meth (0.01 and 0.03 mg/kg) in a 90-min session. Experiment 2 was conducted to test higher meth doses (0.3 – 10 mg/kg). In Experiment 3, separate sets of mi...

  5. Dose/volume-response relations for rectal morbidity using planned and simulated motion-inclusive dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, Maria; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O; Karlsdóttir, Àsa; Moiseenko, Vitali; Liu, Mitchell; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2013-12-01

    Many dose-limiting normal tissues in radiotherapy (RT) display considerable internal motion between fractions over a course of treatment, potentially reducing the appropriateness of using planned dose distributions to predict morbidity. Accounting explicitly for rectal motion could improve the predictive power of modelling rectal morbidity. To test this, we simulated the effect of motion in two cohorts. The included patients (232 and 159 cases) received RT for prostate cancer to 70 and 74 Gy. Motion-inclusive dose distributions were introduced as simulations of random or systematic motion to the planned dose distributions. Six rectal morbidity endpoints were analysed. A probit model using the QUANTEC recommended parameters was also applied to the cohorts. The differences in associations using the planned over the motion-inclusive dose distributions were modest. Statistically significant associations were obtained with four of the endpoints, mainly at high doses (55-70 Gy), using both the planned and the motion-inclusive dose distributions, primarily when simulating random motion. The strongest associations were observed for GI toxicity and rectal bleeding (Rs=0.12-0.21; Rs=0.11-0.20). Applying the probit model, significant associations were found for tenesmus and rectal bleeding (Rs=0.13, p=0.02). Equally strong associations with rectal morbidity were observed at high doses (>55 Gy), for the planned and the simulated dose distributions including in particular random rectal motion. Future studies should explore patient-specific descriptions of rectal motion to achieve improved predictive power. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. An Experimental Toxoplasma gondii Dose Response Challenge Model to Study Therapeutic or Vaccine Efficacy in Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Jan B. W. J.; van der Giessen, Joke W. B.; Takumi, Katsuhisa; Teunis, Peter F. M.; Wisselink, Henk J.

    2014-01-01

    High numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in the environment are a risk factor to humans. The environmental contamination might be reduced by vaccinating the definitive host, cats. An experimental challenge model is necessary to quantitatively assess the efficacy of a vaccine or drug treatment. Previous studies have indicated that bradyzoites are highly infectious for cats. To infect cats, tissue cysts were isolated from the brains of mice infected with oocysts of T. gondii M4 strain, and bradyzoites were released by pepsin digestion. Free bradyzoites were counted and graded doses (1000, 100, 50, 10), and 250 intact tissue cysts were inoculated orally into three cats each. Oocysts shed by these five groups of cats were collected from faeces by flotation techniques, counted microscopically and estimated by real time PCR. Additionally, the number of T. gondii in heart, tongue and brains were estimated, and serology for anti T. gondii antibodies was performed. A Beta-Poisson dose-response model was used to estimate the infectivity of single bradyzoites and linear regression was used to determine the relation between inoculated dose and numbers of oocyst shed. We found that real time PCR was more sensitive than microscopic detection of oocysts, and oocysts were detected by PCR in faeces of cats fed 10 bradyzoites but by microscopic examination. Real time PCR may only detect fragments of T. gondii DNA without the presence of oocysts in low doses. Prevalence of tissue cysts of T. gondii in tongue, heart and brains, and anti T. gondii antibody concentrations were all found to depend on the inoculated bradyzoite dose. The combination of the experimental challenge model and the dose response analysis provides a suitable reference for quantifying the potential reduction in human health risk due to a treatment of domestic cats by vaccination or by therapeutic drug application. PMID:25184619

  7. Early transcriptional response of soybean contrasting accessions to root dehydration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ribamar Costa Ferreira Neto

    Full Text Available Drought is a significant constraint to yield increase in soybean. The early perception of water deprivation is critical for recruitment of genes that promote plant tolerance. DeepSuperSAGE libraries, including one control and a bulk of six stress times imposed (from 25 to 150 min of root dehydration for drought-tolerant and sensitive soybean accessions, allowed to identify new molecular targets for drought tolerance. The survey uncovered 120,770 unique transcripts expressed by the contrasting accessions. Of these, 57,610 aligned with known cDNA sequences, allowing the annotation of 32,373 unitags. A total of 1,127 unitags were up-regulated only in the tolerant accession, whereas 1,557 were up-regulated in both as compared to their controls. An expression profile concerning the most representative Gene Ontology (GO categories for the tolerant accession revealed the expression "protein binding" as the most represented for "Molecular Function", whereas CDPK and CBL were the most up-regulated protein families in this category. Furthermore, particular genes expressed different isoforms according to the accession, showing the potential to operate in the distinction of physiological behaviors. Besides, heat maps comprising GO categories related to abiotic stress response and the unitags regulation observed in the expression contrasts covering tolerant and sensitive accessions, revealed the unitags potential for plant breeding. Candidate genes related to "hormone response" (LOX, ERF1b, XET, "water response" (PUB, BMY, "salt stress response" (WRKY, MYB and "oxidative stress response" (PER figured among the most promising molecular targets. Additionally, nine transcripts (HMGR, XET, WRKY20, RAP2-4, EREBP, NAC3, PER, GPX5 and BMY validated by RT-qPCR (four different time points confirmed their differential expression and pointed that already after 25 minutes a transcriptional reorganization started in response to the new condition, with important

  8. Preoperative Single-Fraction Partial Breast Radiation Therapy: A Novel Phase 1, Dose-Escalation Protocol With Radiation Response Biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Janet K., E-mail: janet.horton@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Blitzblau, Rachel C.; Yoo, Sua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Geradts, Joseph [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chang, Zheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Baker, Jay A. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Georgiade, Gregory S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Wei [Department of Bioinformatics: Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Wang, Chunhao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Department of Biostatistics: Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Groth, Jeff [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Palta, Manisha; Dewhirst, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Barry, William T. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Duffy, Eileen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Women with biologically favorable early-stage breast cancer are increasingly treated with accelerated partial breast radiation (PBI). However, treatment-related morbidities have been linked to the large postoperative treatment volumes required for external beam PBI. Relative to external beam delivery, alternative PBI techniques require equipment that is not universally available. To address these issues, we designed a phase 1 trial utilizing widely available technology to 1) evaluate the safety of a single radiation treatment delivered preoperatively to the small-volume, intact breast tumor and 2) identify imaging and genomic markers of radiation response. Methods and Materials: Women aged ≥55 years with clinically node-negative, estrogen receptor–positive, and/or progesterone receptor–positive HER2−, T1 invasive carcinomas, or low- to intermediate-grade in situ disease ≤2 cm were enrolled (n=32). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was used to deliver 15 Gy (n=8), 18 Gy (n=8), or 21 Gy (n=16) to the tumor with a 1.5-cm margin. Lumpectomy was performed within 10 days. Paired pre- and postradiation magnetic resonance images and patient tumor samples were analyzed. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. At a median follow-up of 23 months, there have been no recurrences. Physician-rated cosmetic outcomes were good/excellent, and chronic toxicities were grade 1 to 2 (fibrosis, hyperpigmentation) in patients receiving preoperative radiation only. Evidence of dose-dependent changes in vascular permeability, cell density, and expression of genes regulating immunity and cell death were seen in response to radiation. Conclusions: Preoperative single-dose radiation therapy to intact breast tumors is well tolerated. Radiation response is marked by early indicators of cell death in this biologically favorable patient cohort. This study represents a first step toward a novel partial breast radiation approach. Preoperative radiation should

  9. Selection for early response to photostimulation in broiler breeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, N C; Gous, R M

    2011-08-01

    1. To determine if selection for early response to photostimulation could be successful, 150 male broiler breeders were photostimulated at 8 weeks of age. The first 20 to produce a semen sample and have a reddened comb with an area > 10 cm2 were selected as responders (R) and 20 birds that did not show these signs of sexual development were chosen as non-responders (NR). Once sexually mature, 8 birds from each group that consistently produced a semen sample were mated with both egg-type hybrids and broiler breeder females to observe the response to 8-week photostimulation in the as-hatched offspring. 2. The AFE of the F1 females with NR or R paternity and egg-type hybrid layer maternity (F1L) were similar, but AFE was advanced in birds from R relative to NR paternity when they had broiler breeder maternity (F1B). 3. Date following a normal distribution of AFE were extracted from the overall data set. This group included offspring from both NR and R paternity, but AFE in F1L and F1B females with R paternity was advanced compared to those with NR paternity. 4. Mean testis weights, or age at most rapid testis growth predicted using parameters from Tyler and Gous (2009), of F1 males were not significantly different in birds with NR or R paternity. A strong correlation was found between predicted age at most rapid growth and AFE of full sibs and so it is likely that an advance in AFE in female offspring would also result in an advance in age of testis development of males. 5. There was no significant difference in 21-d body weight of F1B females of NR or R paternity, but the 21-d body weights of F1L females were higher from R than from NR sires, suggesting that although fertility and meat-type traits are often negatively correlated, there was no adverse effect of selection for responsiveness to early photostimulation and broiler growth rates to 21 d. 6. These findings showed that the response to early stimulation is heritable, and should be useful to the broiler breeder

  10. Ancestry trumps experience: Transgenerational but not early life stress affects the adult physiological stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Gail L; Robbins, Travis R; Cavigelli, Sonia A; Langkilde, Tracy

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to stressors can affect an organism's physiology and behavior as well as that of its descendants (e.g. through maternal effects, epigenetics, and/or selection). We examined the relative influence of early life vs. transgenerational stress exposure on adult stress physiology in a species that has populations with and without ancestral exposure to an invasive predator. We raised offspring of eastern fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus) from sites historically invaded (high stress) or uninvaded (low stress) by predatory fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) and determined how this different transgenerational exposure to stress interacted with the effects of early life stress exposure to influence the physiological stress response in adulthood. Offspring from these high- and low-stress populations were exposed weekly to either sub-lethal attack by fire ants (an ecologically relevant stressor), topical treatment with a physiologically-appropriate dose of the stress-relevant hormone, corticosterone (CORT), or a control treatment from 2 to 43weeks of age. Several months after treatments ended, we quantified plasma CORT concentrations at baseline and following restraint, exposure to fire ants, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) injection. Exposure to fire ants or CORT during early life did not affect lizard stress physiology in adulthood. However, offspring of lizards from populations that had experienced multiple generations of fire ant-invasion exhibited more robust adult CORT responses to restraint and ACTH-injection compared to offspring from uninvaded populations. Together, these results indicate that transgenerational stress history may be at least as important, if not more important, than early life stress in affecting adult physiological stress responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Is bacterial luminescence response to low-dose radiation associated with mutagenicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhko, T V; Guseynov, O A; Guseynova, V E; Bondar, A A; Devyatlovskaya, A N; Kudryasheva, N S

    2017-10-01

    Luminous marine bacteria are widely used in bioassays with luminescence intensity being a physiological parameter tested. The purpose of the study was to determine whether bacterial genetic alteration is responsible for bioluminescence kinetics change under low-dose radiation exposure. The alpha-emitting radionuclide 241Am and beta-emitting radionuclide 3H were used as the sources of low-dose ionizing radiation. Changes of bioluminescence kinetics of Photobacterium phosphoreum in solutions of 241Am(NO3)3, 7 kBq/L, and tritiated water, 100 MBq/L, were studied; bioluminescence kinetics stages (absence of effect, activation, and inhibition) were determined. Bacterial suspension was sampled at different stages of the bioluminescent kinetics; the doses accumulated by the samples were close or a little higher than a tentative limit of a low-dose interval: 0.10 and 0.85 Gy for 241Am, or 0.11 and 0.18 Gy for 3H. Sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene did not reveal a mutagenic effect of low-dose alpha and beta radiation in the bacterial samples. Previous results on bacterial DNA exposed to low-dose gamma radiation (0.25 Gy) were analyzed and compared to those for alpha and beta irradiation. It is concluded that bioluminescence activation and/or inhibition under the applied conditions of low-dose alpha, beta and gamma radioactive exposure is not associated with DNA mutations in the gene sequences tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dose-rate and the reciprocity law: TL response of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers at therapeutic radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Rahman, A.T., E-mail: a.t.abdulrahman@surrey.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Material Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia (UiTM), Campus of Negeri Sembilan, 72000 Kuala Pilah (Malaysia); Nisbet, A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom); Departments of Medical Physics, the Royal Surrey County Hospital (RSCH) NHS Trust, Edgerton Road, Guildford GU2 7XX, Surrey (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    An investigation has been made on commercially available Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers as a novel thermoluminescence system for radiotherapy dosimetry. This dosimeter has previously been shown by the group to provide sensitive dosimetry over a wide range of electron and photon dose, suitable for the needs of radiotherapy. In addition the optical fiber offers small physical size (125 {mu}m diameter) and hence high spatial resolution. The reciprocity between thermoluminescence (TL) yield of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers and dose has been investigated for fixed radiation dose for a range of photon and electron dose rates. For electron beams of nominal energies in the range of 9-20 MeV, we have investigated the TL response of these fibers for dose rates between 100 and 1000 cGy min{sup -1}. For photon beams of nominal energies in the range of 6-15 MV, we have used dose rates of 100-600 cGy min{sup -1}. Reproducibility and fading at fixed absorbed dose (3 Gy) and dose rate for the optical fibers were also investigated. At fixed dose rates, the TL optical fibers were found to produce a flat TL yield within 4% (1{sigma}) and 3% (1{sigma}) for electron and photon beams, respectively. The optical fibers demonstrated good reproducibility ({+-}1.5%), low residual signal for a readout temperature of 300 {sup o}C and negligible fading. A weak dependence on dose-rate has been observed in the range of 3.4-3.9% for electrons (with an associated uncertainty of 4%) and 2.4-2.9% for photons (with an associated uncertainty of <4%). For electron and photon energies we note a consistent trend towards lower response in the TL yield of between 3.4-3.9% and 2.4-2.7%, respectively, at the higher dose rates in comparison with the response at lower dose rates. In addition we note an appreciable systematic energy dependence for both electron and photon beams. It is important to take such factors into account for providing precise and accurate radiotherapy dosimetry. It is also

  13. Effect of particle size in the TL response of natural quartz sensitized with high gamma dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, A B Jr; Guzzo, P L; Sullasi, H L; Khoury, H J, E-mail: alvarobcjr@yahoo.com.b

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of particle size in the thermoluminescence (TL) response of natural quartz sensitized with high gamma dose. For this, fragments of a single crystal taken from the Solonopole district (Brazil) were crushed and classified into ten size fractions ranging from 38 {mu}m to 5 mm. Aliquots of each size fraction were sensitized with 25 kGy of gamma dose of {sup 60}Co and heat-treated in a muffle furnace at 400{sup o}C. The non-sensitized samples were exposed to test doses between 50 Gy and 5 kGy and the sensitized samples were exposed to a unique test dose equal to 50 mGy. For non-sensitized samples, the TL peak near 325 {sup 0}C increases with the particle size decreasing. However, in the case of sensitized samples, the TL output near 280 {sup 0}C increases with the increasing of particle size up to mean grain size equal to 308 {mu}m. Above 308 {mu}m, an abrupt reduction in the TL intensity was noticed. These effects are discussed in relation to the specific surface area and the different interaction of high gamma doses with fine and coarse particles of quartz.

  14. Metabolomic Response of Human Skin Tissue to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zeping; Kim, Young-Mo; Sowa, Marianne B.; Robinson, Robert J.; Gao, Xiaoli; Metz, Thomas O.; Morgan, William F.; Zhang, Qibin

    2012-05-18

    Understanding how human organs respond to ionizing radiation (IR) at a systems biology level and identifying biomarkers for IR exposure at low doses can help provide a scientific basis for establishing radiation protection standards. Little is known regarding the physiological responses to low dose IR at the metabolite level, which represents the end-point of biochemical processes inside cells. Using a full thickness human skin tissue model and GC-MS-based metabolomics analysis, we examined the metabolic perturbations at three time points (3, 24 and 48 hr) after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. PLS-DA score plots revealed dose- and time-dependent clustering between sham and irradiated groups. Importantly, a comparable number of metabolites were detected to have significant change 48 hr after exposure to 3 and 10 cGy of irradiation, when compared with the high dose of 200 cGy. Biochemical pathway analysis showed perturbations to DNA/RNA damage and repair, lipid and energy metabolisms, even at low doses of IR.

  15. Maternal circulating leukocytes display early chemotactic responsiveness during late gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez-Lopez Nardhy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parturition has been widely described as an immunological response; however, it is unknown how this is triggered. We hypothesized that an early event in parturition is an increased responsiveness of peripheral leukocytes to chemotactic stimuli expressed by reproductive tissues, and this precedes expression of tissue chemotactic activity, uterine activation and the systemic progesterone/estradiol shift. Methods Tissues and blood were collected from pregnant Long-Evans rats on gestational days (GD 17, 20 and 22 (term gestation. We employed a validated Boyden chamber assay, flow cytometry, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results We found that GD20 maternal peripheral leukocytes migrated more than those from GD17 when these were tested with GD22 uterus and cervix extracts. Leukocytes on GD20 also displayed a significant increase in chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (Ccl2 gene expression and this correlated with an increase in peripheral granulocyte proportions and a decrease in B cell and monocyte proportions. Tissue chemotactic activity and specific chemokines (CCL2, chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1/CXCL1, and CXCL10 were mostly unchanged from GD17 to GD20 and increased only on GD22. CXCL10 peaked on GD20 in cervical tissues. As expected, prostaglandin F2α receptor and oxytocin receptor gene expression increased dramatically between GD20 and 22. Progesterone concentrations fell and estradiol-17β concentrations increased in peripheral serum, cervical and uterine tissue extracts between GD20 and 22. Conclusion Maternal circulating leukocytes display early chemotactic responsiveness, which leads to their infiltration into the uterus where they may participate in the process of parturition.

  16. Early Prediction of Long-Term Response to Cabergoline in Patients with Macroprolactinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngki Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCabergoline is typically effective for treating prolactinomas; however, some patients display cabergoline resistance, and the early characteristics of these patients remain unclear. We analyzed early indicators predicting long-term response to cabergoline.MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed the cases of 44 patients with macroprolactinomas who received cabergoline as first-line treatment; the patients were followed for a median of 16 months. The influence of various clinical parameters on outcomes was evaluated.ResultsForty patients (90.9% were treated medically and displayed tumor volume reduction (TVR of 74.7%, a prolactin normalization (NP rate of 81.8%, and a complete response (CR; TVR >50% with NP, without surgery rate of 70.5%. Most patients (93.1% with TVR ≥25% and NP at 3 months eventually achieved CR, whereas only 50% of patients with TVR ≥25% without NP and no patients with TVR 25% at 3 months without NP, particularly those with huge prolactinomas, because a delayed response may be achieved. As surgery can reduce the cabergoline dose necessary for successful disease control, it should be considered for cabergoline-resistant patients.

  17. Determining dose rate with a semiconductor detector - Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordenfors, C

    1999-02-01

    To determine dose rate in a gamma radiation field, based on measurements with a semiconductor detector, it is necessary to know how the detector effects the field. This work aims to describe this effect with Monte Carlo simulations and calculations, that is to identify the detector response function. This is done for a germanium gamma detector. The detector is normally used in the in-situ measurements that is carried out regularly at the department. After the response function is determined it is used to reconstruct a spectrum from an in-situ measurement, a so called unfolding. This is done to be able to calculate fluence rate and dose rate directly from a measured (and unfolded) spectrum. The Monte Carlo code used in this work is EGS4 developed mainly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is a widely used code package to simulate particle transport. The results of this work indicates that the method could be used as-is since the accuracy of this method compares to other methods already in use to measure dose rate. Bearing in mind that this method provides the nuclide specific dose it is useful, in radiation protection, since knowing what the relations between different nuclides are and how they change is very important when estimating the risks

  18. Overlapping dose responses of spermatogenic and extragonadal testosterone actions jeopardize the principle of hormonal male contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduwole, Olayiwola O; Vydra, Natalia; Wood, Nicholas E M; Samanta, Luna; Owen, Laura; Keevil, Brian; Donaldson, Mandy; Naresh, Kikkeri; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2014-06-01

    Testosterone (T), alone or in combination with progestin, provides a promising approach to hormonal male contraception. Its principle relies on enhanced negative feedback of exogenous T to suppress gonadotropins, thereby blocking the testicular T production needed for spermatogenesis, while simultaneously maintaining the extragonadal androgen actions, such as potency and libido, to avoid hypogonadism. A serious drawback of the treatment is that a significant proportion of men do not reach azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia, commensurate with contraceptive efficacy. We tested here, using hypogonadal luteinizing hormone/choriongonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) knockout (LHR(-/-)) mice, the basic principle of the T-based male contraceptive method, that a specific T dose could maintain extragonadal androgen actions without simultaneously activating spermatogenesis. LHR(-/-) mice were treated with increasing T doses, and the responses of their spermatogenesis and extragonadal androgen actions (including gonadotropin suppression and sexual behavior) were assessed. Conspicuously, all dose responses to T were practically superimposable, and no dose of T could be defined that would maintain sexual function and suppress gonadotropins without simultaneously activating spermatogenesis. This finding, never addressed in clinical contraceptive trials, is not unexpected in light of the same androgen receptor mediating androgen actions in all organs. When extrapolated to humans, our findings may jeopardize the current approach to hormonal male contraception and call for more effective means of inhibiting intratesticular T production or action, to achieve consistent spermatogenic suppression. © FASEB.

  19. Effects of measurement strategy and statistical analysis on dose-response relations between physical workload and low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.P. Jansen (Justin); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In epidemiological studies on physical workloads and back complaints, among the important features in modelling dose-response relations are the measurement strategy of the exposure and the nature of the dose-response relation that is assumed. AIM: To

  20. Dose-response relationship between periodontal inflamed surface area and HbA1c in type 2 Diabetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nesse, Willem; Linde, Annemiek; Abbas, Frank; Spijkervet, Frederik Karst Lucien; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; de Brabander, Eric Carl; Gerstenbluth, Izzy; Vissink, Arjan

    Nesse W, Linde A, Abbas F, Spijkervet FKL, Dijkstra PU, de Brabander EC, Gerstenbluth I, Vissink A. Dose-response relationship between periodontal inflamed surface area and HbA1c in type 2 diabetics. J Clin Periodontol 2009; 36: 295-300. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-051X.2009.01377.x. A dose-response

  1. Glucocorticoid treatment earlier in childhood and adolescence show dose-response associations with diurnal cortisol levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Holm, Sara K; Uldall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Heightened levels of glucocorticoids in children and adolescents have previously been linked to prolonged changes in the diurnal regulation of the stress-hormone cortisol, a glucocorticoid regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis (HPA-axis). To address this question, we examined...... the salivary cortisol awakening response (CAR) and daily cortisol output in 36 children and adolescents (25 girls/11 boys) aged 7-16 years previously treated with glucocorticoids for nephrotic syndrome or rheumatic disorder and 36 healthy controls. Patients and controls did not significantly differ in the CAR...... patients showed a positive linear relationship with the mean daily glucocorticoid doses administered during treatment. The observed dose-response associations suggest that glucocorticoid therapy during childhood and adolescence might trigger long-term changes in HPA-axis regulation, which may differ...

  2. Initial high-dose prednisolone combination therapy using COBRA and COBRA-light in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Linda A; van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Lems, Willem F; Boers, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with initial high-dose prednisolone and a combination of methotrexate (MTX) and sulfasalazine (SSZ) according to the COBRA regimen (Dutch acronym for combinatietherapie bij reumatoide artritis, 'combination therapy for rheumatoid arthritis'), has repeatedly been demonstrated to be very effective in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). COBRA combination therapy is superior to initial monotherapy of SSZ and MTX, is also associated with a good long-term outcome, is as safe as other treatment regimes, and performs as well as the combination of high-dose MTX and the tumor necrosis factor antagonist infliximab. A pilot study with an intensified version of the COBRA combination therapy showed that strict monitoring and aggressive treatment intensification based on the Disease Activity Score can result in a remission rate of 90% in patients with active early RA. Also, the first results indicate that an attenuated variation on COBRA combination therapy, called 'COBRA-light', is effective in decreasing disease activity and is generally well tolerated. Based on these results, we conclude that initial high-dose prednisolone in combination with MTX and SSZ could or should be the first choice in early active RA since it is effective and safe, and the cost price of the drugs is low. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Enhancing early child care quality and learning for toddlers at risk: the responsive early childhood program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Susan H; Zucker, Tricia A; Taylor, Heather B; Swank, Paul R; Williams, Jeffrey M; Assel, Michael; Crawford, April; Huang, Weihua; Clancy-Menchetti, Jeanine; Lonigan, Christopher J; Phillips, Beth M; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L; de Villiers, Jill; de Villiers, Peter; Barnes, Marcia; Starkey, Prentice; Klein, Alice

    2014-02-01

    Despite reports of positive effects of high-quality child care, few experimental studies have examined the process of improving low-quality center-based care for toddler-age children. In this article, we report intervention effects on child care teachers' behaviors and children's social, emotional, behavioral, early literacy, language, and math outcomes as well as the teacher-child relationship. The intervention targeted the use of a set of responsive teacher practices, derived from attachment and sociocultural theories, and a comprehensive curriculum. Sixty-five childcare classrooms serving low-income 2- and 3-year-old children were randomized into 3 conditions: business-as-usual control, Responsive Early Childhood Curriculum (RECC), and RECC plus explicit social-emotional classroom activities (RECC+). Classroom observations showed greater gains for RECC and RECC+ teachers' responsive practices including helping children manage their behavior, establishing a predictable schedule, and use of cognitively stimulating activities (e.g., shared book reading) compared with controls; however, teacher behaviors did not differ for focal areas such as sensitivity and positive discipline supports. Child assessments demonstrated that children in the interventions outperformed controls in areas of social and emotional development, although children's performance in control and intervention groups was similar for cognitive skills (language, literacy, and math). Results support the positive impact of responsive teachers and environments providing appropriate support for toddlers' social and emotional development. Possible explanations for the absence of systematic differences in children's cognitive skills are considered, including implications for practice and future research targeting low-income toddlers.

  4. Neurobehavioral Dynamics Following Chronic Sleep Restriction: Dose-Response Effects of One Night for Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Siobhan; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Maislin, Greg; Dinges, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Establish the dose-response relationship between increasing sleep durations in a single night and recovery of neurobehavioral functions following chronic sleep restriction. Design: Intent-to-treat design in which subjects were randomized to 1 of 6 recovery sleep doses (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 h TIB) for 1 night following 5 nights of sleep restriction to 4 h TIB. Setting: Twelve consecutive days in a controlled laboratory environment. Participants: N = 159 healthy adults (aged 22-45 y), median = 29 y). Interventions: Following a week of home monitoring with actigraphy and 2 baseline nights of 10 h TIB, subjects were randomized to either sleep restriction to 4 h TIB per night for 5 nights followed by randomization to 1 of 6 nocturnal acute recovery sleep conditions (N = 142), or to a control condition involving 10 h TIB on all nights (N = 17). Measurements and Results: Primary neurobehavioral outcomes included lapses on the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT), subjective sleepiness from the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), and physiological sleepiness from a modified Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT). Secondary outcomes included psychomotor and cognitive speed as measured by PVT fastest RTs and number correct on the Digit Symbol Substitution Task (DSST), respectively, and subjective fatigue from the Profile of Mood States (POMS). The dynamics of neurobehavioral outcomes following acute recovery sleep were statistically modeled across the 0 h-10 h recovery sleep doses. While TST, stage 2, REM sleep and NREM slow wave energy (SWE) increased linearly across recovery sleep doses, best-fitting neurobehavioral recovery functions were exponential across recovery sleep doses for PVT and KSS outcomes, and linear for the MWT. Analyses based on return to baseline and on estimated intersection with control condition means revealed recovery was incomplete at the 10 h TIB (8.96 h TST) for PVT performance, KSS sleepiness, and POMS fatigue. Both TST and SWE were elevated

  5. Dose of Retroviral Infection Determines Induction of Antiviral NK Cell Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Littwitz-Salomon, Elisabeth; Schimmer, Simone; Dittmer, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune system and recognize virus-infected cells as well as tumor cells. Conflicting data about the beneficial or even detrimental role of NK cells in different infectious diseases have been described previously. While the type of pathogen strongly influences NK cell functionality, less is known about how the infection dose influences the quality of a NK cell response against retroviruses. In this study, we used the well-established Fr...

  6. Early sex-dependent differences in response to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cerezales, Serafin; Ramos-Ibeas, Priscila; Rizos, Dimitrios; Lonergan, Pat; Bermejo-Alvarez, Pablo; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso

    2017-10-13

    Developmental plasticity enables the appearance of long-term effects in offspring caused by exposure to environmental stressors during embryonic and foetal life. These long-term effects can be traced to pre- and post-implantation development, and in both cases the effects are usually sex-specific. During preimplantation development, male and female embryos exhibit an extensive transcriptional dimorphism mainly driven by incomplete X-chromosome inactivation. These early developmental stages are crucial for the establishment of epigenetic marks that will be conserved throughout development, making it a particularly susceptible period for the appearance of long-term epigenetic-based phenotypes. Later in development, gonadal formation generates hormonal differences between the sexes, and male and female placentae exhibit different responses to environmental stressors. The maternal environment, including hormones and environmental insults during pregnancy, contributes to sex-specific placental development that controls genetic and epigenetic programming during foetal development, regulating sex-specific differences, including sex-specific epigenetic responses to environmental hazards, leading to long-term effects. This review summarizes several human and animal studies examining sex-specific responses to environmental stressors during both the periconception period (caused by differences in sex chromosome dosage) and placental development (caused by both sex chromosomes and hormones). The identification of relevant sex-dependent trajectories caused by sex-chromosomes and/or sex-hormones is essential to define diagnostic markers and prevention/intervention protocols.

  7. Individualisation of speed thresholds does not enhance the dose-response determination in football training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Dawn; Lovell, Ric

    2017-11-03

    This study examined the utility of a range of approaches used to develop player-dependent speed zones in time-motion analysis (TMA), in determining the dose-response (internal load) of daily football training. Daily external (10 Hz GPS) and internal load (heart rate metrics, ratings of perceived exertion [RPE], wellness ratings) measures were tracked for 22 International women's football players during a 21-day training camp. High-speed (HSR) and very high speed running (VHSR) were determined according to arbitrary speed thresholds, as well as using a range of different individualization approaches that included the velocities corresponding to the heart rate deflection point, maximal aerobic speed, YYIR1 performance, and maximal sprint speed (MSS). Within-player correlations between the TMA approaches versus internal load measures quantified the dose-response to training. Correlations between HSR and VHSR vs. RPE were large (r = 0.53-0.67), with the exception of VHSR for the MSS technique (moderate; r = 0.44). HSR was very-largely associated with heart rate indices (r = 0.72-0.78), again with the exception of MSS (large; r = 0.60-0.67). Using a range of different fitness characteristics to individualise speed thresholds did not enhance the dose-response determination to daily fluctuations in external load, and was worsened with MSS per se.

  8. Development of a mid-head radiation dose response function. [Phantom determinations of neutron and. gamma. absorbed doses in mid-brain for military applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trubey, D. K.; Knight, J. R.; Bartine, D. E.; Pace, III, J. V.

    1979-02-01

    Calculations have been made of the incident neutron and gamma-ray absorbed dose response as a function of energy in the mid-head position of a phantom model. The calculations were performed with the DOT discrete ordinates transport code in the adjoint mode using co-axial cylinders to represent the head and torso. Results, given in a coupled 37-neutron-group, 21-gamma-ray-group structure (37/21) and a 22-neutron-group, 18-gamma-ray-group structure (22/18), are compared with previously obtained results. The mid-head response is less than the conventional radiation protection fluence-to-dose factors which are based on maximum phantom values. In the case of a fission source in air the neutron dose is about a factor of 4 less, and the secondary gamma-ray dose is about a factor of 1.5 less. For a fusion source the neutron dose ratio varies from about 1.9 at close range to about 3. The gamma-ray dose ratio is about the same as for the fission source. Tables of the various response functions are presented in the Appendix A.

  9. SU-F-J-147: Magnetic Field Dose Response Considerations for a Linac Monitor Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, M; Fallone, B [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The impact of magnetic fields on the readings of a linac monitor chamber have not yet been investigated. Herein we examine the total dose response as well as any deviations in the beam parameters of flatness and symmetry when a Varian monitor chamber is irradiated within an applied magnetic field. This work has direct application to the development of Linac-MR systems worldwide. Methods: A Varian monitor chamber was modeled in the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE and irradiated in the presence of a magnetic field with a phase space generated from a model of a Linac-MR prototype system. The magnetic field strength was stepped from 0 to 3.0T in both parallel and perpendicular directions with respect to the normal surface of the phase space. Dose to each of the four regions in the monitor chamber were scored separately for every magnetic field adaptation to evaluate the effect of the magnetic field on flatness and symmetry. Results: When the magnetic field is perpendicular to the phase space normal we see a change in dose response with a maximal deviation (10–25% depending on the chamber region) near 0.75T. In the direction of electron deflection we expectedly see opposite responses in chamber regions leading to a measured asymmetry. With a magnetic field parallel to the phase space normal we see no measured asymmetries, however there is a monotonic rise in dose response leveling off at about +12% near 2.5T. Conclusion: Attention must be given to correct for the strength and direction of the magnetic field at the location of the linac monitor chamber in hybrid Linac-MR devices. Elsewise the dose sampled by these chambers may not represent the actual dose expected at isocentre; additionally there may be a need to correct for the symmetry of the beam recorded by the monitor chamber. Fallone is a co-founder and CEO of MagnetTx Oncology Solutions (under discussions to license Alberta bi-planar linac MR for commercialization).

  10. Methotrexate embryopathy after exposure to low weekly doses in early pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, María Cecilia; Barbero, Pablo; Groisman, Boris; Aguirre, Miguel Ángel; Koren, Gideon

    2014-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a potent teratogen when used in high doses for cancer or termination of tubal pregnancy. In contrast, it has been perceived as safe when used once weekly at low dose for rheumatological conditions. A prospective observational controlled study of women exposed to low dose MTX. The control group were women exposed to MTX only before conception. Among the 8 MTX-exposed pregnancies, there was a case of typical MTX embryopathy, the first to be described to date at this lower once weekly dose Schedule. This case has important implications for rheumatologists treating women of reproductive age, as the assumption of fetal safety of MTX, implied from small cohorts, is premature.

  11. Infusing Culturally Responsive Science Curriculum into Early Childhood Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jiyoon; Martin, Leisa A.

    2017-08-01

    Previous research studies in early childhood teacher education have indicated that teacher candidates are not adequately prepared to demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to teach science to all children including culturally and linguistically diverse students. To address this issue, the researchers provided 31 early childhood teacher candidates with instructions through a culturally responsive science education curriculum that integrates American and Korean science curriculum corresponding to the American and Korean standards for teacher education. The results showed a statistically significant increase in their Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PSTE). In addition, the teacher candidates were able to create a multicultural/diverse lesson in the developing and proficiency levels based on Ambrosio's lesson matrix. This study provides teacher candidates' knowledge as well as an additional resource for developing their self-efficacy and understanding the role of multicultural/diverse lesson planning for science instruction. Also, teacher candidates could be better prepared by understanding how other countries approach science education and integrating this knowledge to enrich their own science instruction.

  12. Effects of Dose Frequency of Early Communication Intervention in Young Children With and Without Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Paul J.; Woynaroski, Tiffany G.; Fey, Marc E.; Warren, Steven F.

    2014-01-01

    This study involves a re-analysis of spoken vocabulary outcomes of children with intellectual disabilities who were randomly assigned to receive Milieu Communication Teaching (MCT) at low (one 1-hour session per week) or high (five 1-hour sessions per week) dose frequency over nine months (Fey, Yoder, Warren, & Bredin-Oja, in press). Non-Down syndrome (NDS) and Down syndrome (DS) subgroups were matched on intelligence, mental age, and chronological age. A growth model including intercept, slope, and quadratic revealed that children in the NDS group had significantly more growth in spoken vocabulary than children in the DS group independent of dose frequency manipulations. Subsequent etiological subgroup analyses demonstrated that in the DS subgroup, children receiving MCT at the higher dose frequency had more spoken vocabulary growth than children receiving MCT at the lower dose frequency. Subgroup analyses also supported our previous findings that high dose frequency of MCT yielded greater vocabulary production outcomes than low dose frequency for children who played functionally with a range of objects, regardless of etiology. PMID:24450319

  13. Site-specific changes in cytokine response to septic dose of lipopolysaccharide in ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, T; Matsuzaki, T; Gereltsetseg, G; Munkhzaya, M; Tungalagsurv, A; Murakami, M; Yamasaki, M; Yamamoto, Y; Kuwahara, A; Kato, T; Yasui, T; Irahara, M

    2014-08-01

    The immune response is altered according to hormonal and metabolic status. Obesity increases the inflammatory and fever response, whereas loss of gonadal steroid decreases behavioral response to immune stress. However, the immune systems of ovariectomized animals exhibiting obesity and gonadal steroid deficiency, particularly under septic conditions, have not been fully examined. In the present study, we evaluated the ovariectomy-induced changes of central and peripheral immune responses to life-threatening septic stimulus. Ovariectomized rats showed heavier body weight and lighter uterine weight when compared with gonadally intact rats. Fever response to septic dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in ovariectomized rats was less evident when compared with that in gonadally intact rats. In addition, under LPS-injected septic conditions, hypothalamic gene levels of Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and serum protein levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in ovariectomized rats were lower than those in gonadally intact rats. On the other hand, IL-6 levels in visceral fat under septic conditions were higher in ovariectomized rats than in gonadally intact rats. These findings indicate that ovariectomy-induced site-specific changes in cytokine response under septic conditions. As hypothalamic, but not peripheral, pro-inflammatory cytokines are directly involved in the fever response, the attenuation of fever response observed in ovariectomized rats may be caused by a reduction in central cytokine responses.

  14. Determining the Lowest Optimally Effective Methotrexate Dose for Individual RA Patients Using Their Dose Response Relation in a Tight Control Treatment Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya C Nair

    Full Text Available To determine the optimal methotrexate dose in individual patients and to explore whether this optimal dose and the level of disease activity at that dose could be predicted.Data from CAMERA II trial comparing MTX and MTX with 10 mg of prednisone both in a tight control treatment strategy in early RA was used. For each patient a curve for disease activity over time was fitted and the MTX dose after which further step-up did not result in relevant improvement in disease activity anymore was determined the 'lowest optimally effective MTX dose (LOED'. The association of demographic and clinical characteristics at baseline with this LOED and with the level of disease activity reached at LOED was studied.In 204 (100 MTX and 104 MTX with prednisone out of 236 patients LOED could be defined. 10 mg/wk was the most prevalent LOED in patients treated with MTX and prednisone and 10 mg/wk, 20 mg/wk and 30 mg/wk in the MTX strategy. Although the specific LOED could not reliably be predicted, higher baseline disease activity, height and lower weight were associated with higher LOEDs (i.e at least 15 mg/wk. A score was presented to decide on a starting dose of 10 mg/wk or (at least 15 mg/wk. The level of disease activity at LOED could not be reliably predicted.A starting dose of 10 mg/wk might be a good choice for most patients and is frequently already the optimal dose. However, a subgroup of patient can be determined who would require higher MTX doses.

  15. Dose response of saccharin in induction of urinary bladder hyperplasias in Fischer 344 rats pretreated with N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, K; Hagiwara, A; Shibata, M; Imaida, K; Tatematsu, M; Ito, N

    1980-11-01

    Studies were made on the dose response of saccharin in the induction of bladder lesions. Inbred F344 rats of both sexes were pretreated with 100 ppm N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in the drinking water for 4 weeks. Sodium saccharin was given at 50,000, 10,000, 2,000, and 400 ppm in the diet for 32 weeks after BBN administration, and surviving rats were killed at the end of week 36 of the experiment. No increase in incidence of papilloma or cancer was noted in either sex at any dose of saccharin after BBN as compared to levels induced by BBN alone. The incidences of two types of hyperplasia and average number of papillary or nodular hyperplasias per 10 cm of basement membrane were significantly increased in the group receiving 50,000 ppm saccharin as compared to the group given BBN only. None of the incidences or numbers of these lesions were significantly different in any of the other saccharin-treated groups when compared to the group treated with BBN alone except for the incidences of two types of hyperplasias in the female rats dosed with 10,000 ppm saccharin. Dose-response curves showed enhanced hyperplastic responses in both sexes given 2,000--50,000 ppm saccharin. Administration of various doses of saccharin without BBN did not cause any changes in the urinary bladders of rats of either sex. These results show that saccharin enhances the induction of early-stage bladder lesions and that the biologic response demonstrates a dose-response effect.

  16. Apoptosis is signalled early by low doses of ionising radiation in a radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlong, Hayley, E-mail: hayley.furlong@dit.ie [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Mothersill, Carmel [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Nuclear Research Building, 1280 Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Lyng, Fiona M. [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Howe, Orla [DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); School of Biological Sciences, College of Sciences and Health, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Molecular mechanisms involved in the production of a radiation induced bystander effect are not well known. ► We investigate gene expression changes in apoptotic genes in both direct and bystander responses. ► We demonstrate initiation of the apoptotic cascade in a bystander response. ► Lower doses reveal a specific but differential response related to apoptosis compared to higher doses. - Abstract: It is known that ionising radiation (IR) induces a complex signalling apoptotic cascade post-exposure to low doses ultimately to remove damaged cells from a population, specifically via the intrinsic pathway. Therefore, it was hypothesised that bystander reporter cells may initiate a similar apoptotic response if exposed to low doses of IR (0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy) and compared to directly irradiated cells. Key apoptotic genes were selected according to their role in the apoptotic cascade; tumour suppressor gene TP53, pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl2, pro-apoptotic JNK and anti-apoptotic ERK, initiator caspase 2 and 9 and effector caspase 3, 6 and 7. The data generated consolidated the role of apoptosis following direct IR exposure for all doses and time points as pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and JNK as well as initiator caspase 7 and effector caspase 3 and 9 were up-regulated. However, the gene expression profile for the bystander response was quite different and more complex in comparison to the direct response. The 0.05 Gy dose point had a more significant apoptosis gene expression profile compared to the 0.5 Gy dose point and genes were not always expressed within 1 h but were sometimes expressed 24 h later. The bystander data clearly demonstrates initiation of the apoptotic cascade by the up-regulation of TP53, Bax, Bcl-2, initiator caspase 2 and effector caspase 6. The effector caspases 3 and 7 of the bystander samples demonstrated down-regulation in their gene expression levels at 0.05 Gy and 0.5 Gy at both time points therefore not

  17. Dose-response relationship between dietary magnesium intake and cardiovascular mortality: A systematic review and dose-based meta-regression analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin; Liang, Chun; Li, Mei; Montgomery, Scott; Fall, Katja; Aaseth, Jan; Cao, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Although epidemiology studies have reported the relationship, including a dose-response relationship, between dietary magnesium intake and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the risk for CVD mortality is inconclusive and the evidence for a dose-response relationship has not been summarized. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies to summarize the evidence regarding the association of dietary magnesium intake with risk of CVD mortality and describe their dose-response relationship. We identified relevant studies by searching major scientific literature databases and grey literature resources from their inception to August 2015, and reviewed references lists of retrieved articles. We included population-based studies that reported mortality risks, i.e. relative risks (RRs), odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs) of CVD mortality or cause-specific CVD death. Linear dose-response relationships were assessed using random-effects meta-regression. Potential nonlinear associations were evaluated using restricted cubic splines. Out of 3002 articles, 9 articles from 8 independent studies met the eligibility criteria. These studies comprised 449,748 individuals and 10,313 CVD deaths. Compared with the lowest dietary magnesium consumption group in the population, the risk of CVD mortality was reduced by 16% in women and 8% in men. No significant linear dose-response relationship was found between increment in dietary magnesium intake and CVD mortality across all the studies. After adjusting for age and BMI, the risk of CVD mortality was reduced by 24-25% per 100mg/d increment in dietary magnesium intake in women of all the participants and in all the US participants. Although the combined data confirm the role of dietary magnesium intake in reducing CVD mortality, the dose-response relationship was only found among women and in US population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibody response against Trichinella spiralis in experimentally infected rats is dose dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Domestic pigs are the main representatives of the domestic cycle of Trichinella spiralis that play a role in transmission to humans. In Europe, backyard pigs of small household farms are the most important risks for humans to obtain trichinellosis. Rats might play a role in the transmission of Trichinella spiralis from domestic to sylvatic animals and vice versa. In order to be able to investigate the role of wild rats in the epidemiology of T. spiralis in The Netherlands, we studied the dynamics of antibody response after T. spiralis infections in experimental rats, using infection doses ranging from very low (10 muscle larvae, ML, per rat) to very high (16 000 ML per rat). To evaluate the feasibility of rats surviving high infection doses with T. spiralis, clinical and pathological parameters were quantified. Serological tools for detecting T. spiralis in rats were developed to quantitatively study the correlation between parasite load and immunological response. The results show that an infection dose-dependent antibody response was developed in rats after infection with as low as 10 ML up to a level of 10 000 ML. A positive correlation was found between the number of recovered ML and serum antibody levels, although specific measured antibody levels correspond to a wide range of LPG values. Serum antibodies of rats that were infected even with 10 or 25 ML could readily be detected by use of the T. spiralis western blot 2 weeks post infection. We conclude that based on these low infection doses, serologic tests are a useful tool to survey T. spiralis in wild rats. PMID:22129040

  19. The effect of low dose rate on metabolomic response to radiation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudarzi, Maryam [Georgetown University, Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Washington, DC (United States); Mak, Tytus D. [Georgetown University, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, DC (United States); Chen, Congju; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Brenner, David J. [Columbia University, Center for High-Throughput Minimally-Invasive Radiation Biodosimetry, New York, NY (United States); Fornace, Albert J. [Georgetown University, Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Washington, DC (United States); Georgetown University, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Metabolomics has been shown to have utility in assessing responses to exposure by ionizing radiation (IR) in easily accessible biofluids such as urine. Most studies to date from our laboratory and others have employed γ-irradiation at relatively high dose rates (HDR), but many environmental exposure scenarios will probably be at relatively low dose rates (LDR). There are well-documented differences in the biologic responses to LDR compared to HDR, so an important question is to assess LDR effects at the metabolomics level. Our study took advantage of a modern mass spectrometry approach in exploring the effects of dose rate on the urinary excretion levels of metabolites 2 days after IR in mice. A wide variety of statistical tools were employed to further focus on metabolites, which showed responses to LDR IR exposure (0.00309 Gy/min) distinguishable from those of HDR. From a total of 709 detected spectral features, more than 100 were determined to be statistically significant when comparing urine from mice irradiated with 1.1 or 4.45 Gy to that of sham-irradiated mice 2 days post-exposure. The results of this study show that LDR and HDR exposures perturb many of the same pathways such as TCA cycle and fatty acid metabolism, which also have been implicated in our previous IR studies. However, it is important to note that dose rate did affect the levels of particular metabolites. Differences in urinary excretion levels of such metabolites could potentially be used to assess an individual's exposure in a radiobiological event and thus would have utility for both triage and injury assessment. (orig.)

  20. Interaction of dietary protein level on dose response relationships during aflatoxicosis in young chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, K E; Nelson, L A; Hamilton, P B

    1987-06-01

    It is well known that the effect of aflatoxin is enhanced by a low protein diet, but whether this is associated with a lower apparent minimum effective dose, increased slope of response curves, or both has not been investigated previously. Aflatoxin at 12 dosages ranging from 0 to 2.34 micrograms/g of feed was fed to eight groups of 10 young chickens per treatment consuming a 10.00 or 12.75% protein diet for 3 weeks. The body weights, liver weights relative to body weights, and total lipid content of the livers were determined. Mathematical models were fitted to the data and from the appropriate equations the dose-response curves were predicted as continuous functions of aflatoxin concentration. A quadratic polynomial fit body weight data on the 12.75% protein diet whereas a plateau-linear model fit body weight data on the 10.00% protein diet. This implies that in a low protein diet aflatoxin affects only one of the factors controlling growth. Plateau-linear models fit liver relative weight and liver lipid content data on both 10.00 and 12.75% diets. For both variables the lower protein diet decreased the apparent minimum effective dose and increased the positive slope of the linear response. The apparent minimum effective doses (micrograms of aflatoxin per gram of feed) in this experimental system were calculated from the modeling approach to be 1.21 and 2.00 for body weight, 1.08 and 1.65 for liver lipids, and 1.45 and 2.34 for liver relative weight in 10.00 and 12.75% protein diets, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Low dose radiation and cancer in A-bomb survivors: latency and non-linear dose-response in the 1950–90 mortality cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dropkin Greg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analyses of Japanese A-bomb survivors' cancer mortality risks are used to establish recommended annual dose limits, currently set at 1 mSv (public and 20 mSv (occupational. Do radiation doses below 20 mSv have significant impact on cancer mortality in Japanese A-bomb survivors, and is the dose-response linear? Methods I analyse stomach, liver, lung, colon, uterus, and all-solid cancer mortality in the 0 – 20 mSv colon dose subcohort of the 1950–90 (grouped mortality cohort, by Poisson regression using a time-lagged colon dose to detect latency, while controlling for gender, attained age, and age-at-exposure. I compare linear and non-linear models, including one adapted from the cellular bystander effect for α particles. Results With a lagged linear model, Excess Relative Risk (ERR for the liver and all-solid cancers is significantly positive and several orders of magnitude above extrapolations from the Life Span Study Report 12 analysis of the full cohort. Non-linear models are strongly superior to the linear model for the stomach (latency 11.89 years, liver (36.90, lung (13.60 and all-solid (43.86 in fitting the 0 – 20 mSv data and show significant positive ERR at 0.25 mSv and 10 mSv lagged dose. The slope of the dose-response near zero is several orders of magnitude above the slope at high doses. Conclusion The standard linear model applied to the full 1950–90 cohort greatly underestimates the risks at low doses, which are significant when the 0 – 20 mSv subcohort is modelled with latency. Non-linear models give a much better fit and are compatible with a bystander effect.

  2. Th Application of Dose-Response Models to Determine the Median Effctive Adsorbent Bone Char Dose to Remove Fluoride From Drinking Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Zebarjadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In studies of the adsorption of pollutants onto diffrent adsorbents, determining the adsorbent dose of the most important characteristics must be considered. Th aim of the study was the determination and modeling of dose-response bone char floride removal from aqueous solutions and comparison of the adsorption isotherm models with dose-response models from the perspective of adsorption. Methods: In this experimental study, bone char was prepared by using an electric furnace at 450˚C in two hours. Sorting the adsorbent was conducted by standard sieve ASTM in the range of 35-18 meshes and its characteristics were determined with conventional methods. Th concentration of floride was measured according to the recommendation of manufacturer HACH( with Dr5000- of regent floride. Dose-response models were fi to the data and parameters were estimated. Based on the quality of finess indicators, the adsorption isotherm models were compared with dose-response models. Analysis of the data in this study was performed using the R softare version 3.1.2 and stats package. Results: Fit indexes AIC and R2( showed that the most appropriate model for the data in pH= 10, concentration = 10 and pH = 7, concentration = 20 was the Emax model and in pH = 7, concentration = 10 and pH = 7, concentration = 15 the quadratic model. According to these models, the median of effctive dose on bone char at removal of floride was determined 0.11 g in concentration of 10 mg/L and pH = 10. Th maximum effctive dose was determined 1.25 g in concentration of 20 mg/L and pH = 7. Th index AIC( showed that quadratic dose-response models bettr fi to adsorption data than adsorption isotherm models. Conclusions: Th median and maximum effctive doses of bone char at removal of floride were estimated by statistical models more accurately. In addition, determining the goal dose was performed using modeling method, which was more economic than repeated testing, and the performance

  3. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  4. Drug and light dose responses to focal photodynamic therapy of single blood vessels in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Mamta; Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Samkoe, Kimberley; Cramb, David; Wilson, Brian C.

    2009-11-01

    As part of an ongoing program to develop two-photon (2-γ) photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treatment of wet-form age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other vascular pathologies, we have evaluated the reciprocity of drug-light doses in focal-PDT. We targeted individual arteries in a murine window chamber model, using primarily the clinical photosensitizer Visudyne/liposomal-verteporfin. Shortly after administration of the photosensitizer, a small region including an arteriole was selected and irradiated with varying light doses. Targeted and nearby vessels were observed for a maximum of 17 to 25 h to assess vascular shutdown, tapering, and dye leakage/occlusion. For a given end-point metric, there was reciprocity between the drug and light doses, i.e., the response correlated with the drug-light product (DLP). These results provide the first quantification of photosensitizer and light dose relationships for localized irradiation of a single blood vessel and are compared to the DLP required for vessel closure between 1-γ and 2-γ activation, between focal and broad-beam irradiation, and between verteporfin and a porphyrin dimer with high 2-γ cross section. Demonstration of reciprocity over a wide range of DLP is important for further development of focal PDT treatments, such as the targeting of feeder vessels in 2-γ PDT of AMD.

  5. Monitoring aspirin therapy in children after interventional cardiac catheterization: laboratory measures, dose response, and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, Markus; Speer, Oliver; Kroiss, Sabine; Knirsch, Walter; Kretschmar, Oliver; Rand, Margaret L; Albisetti, Manuela

    2015-07-01

    Very few studies have investigated dose response of aspirin and agreement of different platelet function assays in children. One hundred five children were studied at baseline and after interventional cardiac catheterization during aspirin treatment and, in cases of aspirin resistance (AR), after dose increase. Results from arachidonate-induced aggregation (AA) were compared with aggregation induced by ADP, PFA-100 closure times (CTs), urinary 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 (urinary 11-dhTxB2) levels, and Impact-R % surface coverage. Aspirin at 2-5 mg/kg/day inhibited platelet function in a large majority. While 19 % showed bruising and mild epistaxis, no thrombotic complications were recorded. AR was detected by AA in seven children (6.7 %). After dose increase, the majority showed inhibition by aspirin. Infants had higher urinary 11-dhTxB2 baseline levels; this assay showed some correlation with AA. Both assays manifested high sensitivity and specificity for aspirin while inferior results were found for the other assays. With the PFA-100, 15.2 % of patients were found to have AR, but this corresponded to AR by AA in only one of seven children. While there was poor agreement among assays, AA and urinary 11-dhTxB2 show good specificity for the monitoring of aspirin therapy in children. Aspirin at 2-5 mg/kg inhibits platelet function; AR in children is rare and can be overcome by dose increase.

  6. The response of PAG density to dose: a model and experimental investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilts, M [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency - Vancouver Centre, Vancouver BC (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Jirasek, A [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Duzenli, C [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency - Vancouver Centre, Vancouver BC (Canada)

    2004-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a promising method of extracting three-dimensional (3D) dose information from polymer gel dosimeters. CT gel dosimetry has many practical advantages: ease of use, relatively low cost and accessibility to cancer hospitals and has been shown to have clinical potential. However, a primary disadvantage remains poor dose resolution due in part to the low sensitivity of CT contrast to dose. This CT contrast is the result of a small density change that occurs on polymerization and advanced understanding of this density change is required in order to optimize gel sensitivity to CT. This work proposes a simple model that describes the radiation induced density change in polyacrylamide gel (PAG) as a function of polymer yield and an intrinsic density change that occurs, independent of polymer yield, on polymerization. Using this model in combination with experimental CT and Raman spectroscopy work, several fundamental properties of the PAG density response to dose are discovered. The result is a valuable framework on which to focus future developments of more sensitive CT polymer gel dosimetry systems.

  7. Low dose effect of bisphosphonates on hMSCs osteogenic response to titanium surface in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.R. Alqhtani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s, titanium (Ti implants have been routinely used to replace missing teeth. This success is mainly due to the good biocompatibility of Ti and the phenomenon of osseointegration, with very early events at implant placement being important in determining good osseointegration. However, enhancing implant performance with coatings such as hydroxyapatite (HA and calcium phosphate has proved largely unsuccessful. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs are the first osteogenic cells to colonise implant surfaces and offer a target for enhancing osseointegration. We previously reported that small doses of bisphosphonate (BP may play an integral role in enhancing hMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether small doses of bisphosphonates enhance proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs on Ti surfaces, to enhance bone osseointegration and to accelerate wound healing around the implant surface. Our data suggests that treating cells with small doses of BP (100 nM & 10 nM induces significant hMSC stimulation of osteogenic markers including calcium, collagen type I and ALP compared to control group on titanium surfaces (P < 0.05. In addition, cell proliferation and migration were significantly enhanced on titanium surfaces (P < 0.05.

  8. Investigation of Dose-Related Effects of Carnosine on Anxiety with Sympathetic Skin Response and T-maze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazan Dolu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carnosine is a dipeptide formed of the amino acids β-alanine and histidine. Only a limited number of studies have examined the effects of carnosine on sympathetic nerve activation and anxiety. The present study was undertaken to determine the dose-related effects of carnosine on anxiety in the elevated T-maze test (ETM with electrodermal activity (EDA. Carnosine was injected in three groups of rats with doses of 10 (low dose, 100 (medium dose and 1000 (high dose mg/kg i.p. Physiological saline was injected in the sham group. The anxiety scores of the rats were measured with ETM 20 minutes after injection. Then, SCL was measured. The decreased number of entries into the open arm (NEOA, the percentage of time spent in the open arm (% TSOA and higher EDA [shown by skin conductance level (SCL] indicate higher anxiety. The NEOA and % TSOA were lower in the high-dose group than in the other groups. SCL was lower in the medium-dose carnosine group than in the high-dose carnosine and sham groups. SCL was higher in the high-dose group than in the medium-dose and sham groups. Our results suggest that high-dose carnosine produced anxiety-like effects as assessed in the SCL and ETM. Medium-dose carnosine acted as an anxiolytic. The anxiety-related responses of carnosine depend on its dose-related effect.

  9. The early epigenetic response to ozone: impacts on DNA ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epigenetics have been increasingly recognized as a mechanism linking environment and gene expression. Despite awareness of the role of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation as potential drivers of the response to air pollutants, very little work has been performed investigating the direct epigenetic effects following exposure to ambient air pollution. Thus the purpose of this study was to investigate the early epigenetic response to ozone in comparison to the epigenetic modifier 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) in rats. 12 week old, male Long-Evans rats (n=16) were exposed to 4 hours of whole-body 1.0 ppm ozone or air and immediately euthanized. A subset of animals were additionally treated with 5-Aza (n=16) to serve as an epigenetic control to ozone exposure. Neither 5-Aza nor ozone by itself induced changes to the global methylome or hydroxmethylome of the lung measured by ELISA. Despite this finding, ozone exposure induced a significant increase in the activity of the DNA methyltransferase enzymes in the lung which was reversed with 5-Aza treatment. Interestingly, a significant interaction between 5-Aza treatment and ozone exposure was found in a large array of data. The interaction between 5-Aza and ozone produced indicators of pulmonary edema and elevated lung damage. Along with these adverse changes, expression of major epigenetic enzymes (Tet 1-3, Dnmt3 a-b) were found to be perturbed in both the lung and hepatic tissues. While ozone exposure appears to in

  10. Radiomics analysis of pulmonary nodules in low-dose CT for early detection of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wookjin; Oh, Jung Hun; Riyahi, Sadegh; Liu, Chia-Ju; Jiang, Feng; Chen, Wengen; White, Charles; Rimner, Andreas; Mechalakos, James G; Deasy, Joseph O; Lu, Wei

    2018-02-19

    To develop a radiomics prediction model to improve pulmonary nodule (PN) classification in low-dose CT. To compare the model with the American College of Radiology (ACR) Lung CT Screening Reporting and Data System (Lung-RADS) for early detection of lung cancer. We examined a set of 72 PNs (31 benign and 41 malignant) from the Lung Image Database Consortium image collection (LIDC-IDRI). 103 CT radiomic features were extracted from each PN. Before the model building process, distinctive features were identified using a hierarchical clustering method. We then constructed a prediction model by using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier coupled with a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). A 10-fold cross-validation (CV) was repeated ten times (10×10-fold CV) to evaluate the accuracy of the SVM-LASSO model. Finally, the best model from the 10×10-fold CV was further evaluated using 20×5- and 50×2-fold CVs. The best SVM-LASSO model consisted of only two features: the bounding box anterior-posterior dimension (BB_AP) and the standard deviation of inverse difference moment (SD_IDM). The BB_AP measured the extension of a PN in the anterior-posterior direction and was highly correlated (r=0.94) with the PN size. The SD_IDM was a texture feature that measured the directional variation of the local homogeneity feature IDM. Univariate analysis showed that both features were statistically significant and discriminative (P=0.00013 and 0.000038 respectively). PNs with larger BB_AP or smaller SD_IDM were more likely malignant. The 10×10-fold CV of the best SVM model using the two features achieved an accuracy of 84.6% and 0.89 AUC. By comparison, Lung-RADS achieved an accuracy of 72.2% and 0.77 AUC using four features (size, type, calcification, and spiculation). The prediction improvement of SVM-LASSO comparing to Lung-RADS was statistically significant (McNemar's test P=0.026). Lung-RADS misclassified 19 cases because it was mainly based on PN size

  11. Inhaled corticosteroids in children with persistent asthma: dose-response effects on growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruteanu, Aniela I; Chauhan, Bhupendrasinh F; Zhang, Linjie; Prietsch, Sílvio O M; Ducharme, Francine M

    2014-12-01

    four comparisons reported growth over 12 months. Our confidence in the quality of evidence is high for this outcome, however it is low to moderate for several other outcomes, depending on the number of trials reporting these outcomes. Moreover, a few outcomes were reported only by a single trial; as these findings have not been confirmed by other trials, we downgraded the evidence for these outcomes to low quality. An insufficient number of trials have compared the effect of a larger difference in dose, for example, between a high dose and a low dose of ICS and of other popular molecules such as budesonide and beclomethasone over a year or longer of treatment. We report an evidence-based ICS dose-dependent reduction in growth velocity in prepubescent school-aged children with mild to moderate persistent asthma. The choice of ICS molecule (mometasone, ciclesonide or fluticasone) was not found to affect the level of growth velocity response over a year. The effect of corticosteroids on growth was not consistently reported: among 22 eligible trials, only four comparisons reported the effects of corticosteroids on growth over one year. In view of parents' and clinicians' concerns, lack of or incomplete reporting of growth is a matter of concern given the importance of the topic. We recommend that growth be systematically reported in all trials involving children taking ICS for three months or longer. Until further data comparing low versus high ICS dose and trials of longer duration are available, we recommend that the minimal effective ICS dose be used in all children with asthma. Copyright © 2014 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Analysis of dose-response effects on gene expression data with comparison of two microarray platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianhua; Kapoor, Mini; Zhang, Wei; Hamilton, Stanley R; Coombes, Kevin R

    2005-09-01

    The problems of analyzing dose effects on gene expression are gaining attention in biomedical research. A specific challenge is to detect genes with expression levels that change according to dose levels in a non-random manner, but nonetheless may be considered as potential biomarkers. We are among the first to formally apply a tool that uses an isotonic (monotonic) regression approach to this area of study. We introduce a test statistic to select genes with significant dose-response expression in a monotonic fashion based on a permutation procedure. We then compare the results with those achieved from the application of a likelihood ratio-based test. We apply the isotonic regression approach to a study of gene expression in the RKO colon carcinoma cell line in response to varying dosage levels of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil. A feature of both Affymetrix and printed 75mer oligomer cDNA arrays produced from the same samples provides an opportunity to compare the two microarray platforms. Statistical software S-plus Code to implement the method is available from the authors. kcoombes@mdanderson.org

  13. Mathematical modeling improves EC50 estimations from classical dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Elin; Lindgren, Isa; Lövfors, William; Lundengård, Karin; Cervin, Ida; Sjöström, Theresia Arbring; Altimiras, Jordi; Cedersund, Gunnar

    2015-03-01

    The β-adrenergic response is impaired in failing hearts. When studying β-adrenergic function in vitro, the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50 ) is an important measure of ligand response. We previously measured the in vitro contraction force response of chicken heart tissue to increasing concentrations of adrenaline, and observed a decreasing response at high concentrations. The classical interpretation of such data is to assume a maximal response before the decrease, and to fit a sigmoid curve to the remaining data to determine EC50 . Instead, we have applied a mathematical modeling approach to interpret the full dose-response curve in a new way. The developed model predicts a non-steady-state caused by a short resting time between increased concentrations of agonist, which affect the dose-response characterization. Therefore, an improved estimate of EC50 may be calculated using steady-state simulations of the model. The model-based estimation of EC50 is further refined using additional time-resolved data to decrease the uncertainty of the prediction. The resulting model-based EC50 (180-525 nm) is higher than the classically interpreted EC50 (46-191 nm). Mathematical modeling thus makes it possible to re-interpret previously obtained datasets, and to make accurate estimates of EC50 even when steady-state measurements are not experimentally feasible. The mathematical models described here have been submitted to the JWS Online Cellular Systems Modelling Database, and may be accessed at http://jjj.bio.vu.nl/database/nyman. © 2015 FEBS.

  14. Prognostic implications of immediate PSA response to early salvage radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner I I, Robert M; Yabes, Jonathan G; Woldemichael, Elen; Deutsch, Melvin M; Smith, Ryan P; Werner, Robert S; Jacobs, Bruce L; Nelson, Joel B

    2016-12-01

    Up to 25% of men with prostate cancer who undergo radical prostatectomy will recur. In this setting, salvage radiotherapy may cure patients with local recurrence, but is unable to cure those with occult metastatic disease. The objective of this study is to examine how prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to radiotherapy predicts subsequent disease progression and survival. Using a prospectively populated database of 3089 men who underwent open radical prostatectomy, 212 patients (7%) were identified who received early salvage radiotherapy for biochemical recurrence. The main outcome was time to disease progression after salvage radiotherapy. Patients were stratified by PSA response after radiotherapy: 1) PSA radiotherapy at a median PSA of 0.20 ng/mL (IQR 0.10-0.30 ng/mL). At a median follow up of 47.3 months, a total of 52 (25%) patients experienced disease progression. On multivariable analysis, both persistent PSA (HR 5.12; 95% CI 1.98-13.23) and rising PSA (HR 16.55; 95% CI 6.61-41.48) were associated with increased risk of disease progression compared to those with PSA radiotherapy PSA, Gleason score, margin status, stage, and time to radiotherapy. Only rising PSA was associated with an increased risk of cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. PSA response is associated with the risk of disease progression following salvage radiotherapy. This information can be used to counsel patients on the potential need for additional therapy and identify those at greatest risk for progression and cancer-related mortality.

  15. Genetic differences in transcript responses to low-dose ionizing radiation identify tissue functions associated with breast cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine M Snijders

    Full Text Available High dose ionizing radiation (IR is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer but the health effects after low-dose (LD, <10 cGy exposures remain highly uncertain. We explored a systems approach that compared LD-induced chromosome damage and transcriptional responses in strains of mice with genetic differences in their sensitivity to radiation-induced mammary cancer (BALB/c and C57BL/6 for the purpose of identifying mechanisms of mammary cancer susceptibility. Unirradiated mammary and blood tissues of these strains differed significantly in baseline expressions of DNA repair, tumor suppressor, and stress response genes. LD exposures of 7.5 cGy (weekly for 4 weeks did not induce detectable genomic instability in either strain. However, the mammary glands of the sensitive strain but not the resistant strain showed early transcriptional responses involving: (a diminished immune response, (b increased cellular stress, (c altered TGFβ-signaling, and (d inappropriate expression of developmental genes. One month after LD exposure, the two strains showed opposing responses in transcriptional signatures linked to proliferation, senescence, and microenvironment functions. We also discovered a pre-exposure expression signature in both blood and mammary tissues that is predictive for poor survival among human cancer patients (p = 0.0001, and a post-LD-exposure signature also predictive for poor patient survival (p<0.0001. There is concordant direction of expression in the LD-exposed sensitive mouse strain, in biomarkers of human DCIS and in biomarkers of human breast tumors. Our findings support the hypothesis that genetic mechanisms that determine susceptibility to LD radiation induced mammary cancer in mice are similar to the tissue mechanisms that determine poor-survival in breast cancer patients. We observed non-linearity of the LD responses providing molecular evidence against the LNT risk model and obtained new evidence that LD responses are

  16. In vivo99mTc-HYNIC-annexin V imaging of early tumor apoptosis in mice after single dose irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Yong-bo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis is a major mode of hematological tumor death after radiation. Early detection of apoptosis may be beneficial for cancer adaptive treatment. 99mTc-HYNIC-annexinV has been reported as a promising agent for in vivo apoptosis imaging. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of in vivo99mTc-HYNIC-annexinV imaging of radiation- induced apoptosis, and to investigate its correlation with radiosensitivity. Methods Ten days after inoculation of tumor cells in the right upper limbs, the mice were randomly divided into two groups. The imaging group (4 mice each level, 4 dose levels was injected with 4-8 MBq 99mTc-HYNIC-annexinV 24 hours after irradiation and imaged 1 hr post-injection, and the mice were sacrificed immediately after imaging for biodistribution analysis of annexin V. The observation group (4 mice each level, 2 dose levels was only observed for tumor regression post-radiation. The number of apoptotic cells in a tumor was estimated with TUNEL assay. Results The 99mTc-HYNIC-annexin V uptake in E14 lymphoma significantly increased as the radiation dose escalated from 0 to 8 Gy, and significantly correlated with the number of TUNEL-positive cells (r = 0.892, P Conclusion 99mTc-HYNIC-annexinV in vivo imaging is a feasible method to detect early radiation-induced apoptosis in different tumors, and might be predictive for radiation sensitivity.

  17. A Decade of Comparative Dose Planning Studies for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: What Can We Learn?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-12-01

    During the past 4 decades, the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma has changed dramatically, and combined modality treatment is now considered the standard of care for patients with early-stage disease. However, the risk of late effects has led to concerns regarding the use of radiation therapy, especially in young patients with a long life expectancy. In this study, we review the current evidence for modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques in the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma with a focus on a reduced delivered dose, a reduced irradiated volume, and a more conformal dose distribution. Although studies are difficult to compare because of differences in field technique, prescribed dose, target volumes, patient population, and reported dosimetric and plan evaluation parameters, modern radiation therapy significantly reduces exposure to normal tissues and thereby the estimated risk of late effects. However, there is no such thing as a single best modern delivery technique when multiple organs at risk are considered simultaneously because of the heterogeneity in patient anatomy and disease location, and the choice of radiation therapy technique should be made individually for each patient.

  18. Genetic injury in hybrid male mice exposed to low doses of /sup 60/CO. gamma. -rays or fission neutrons. 1. Response to single doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, D.; Carnes, B.A.; Farrington, B.H.; Lee, C.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1984-11-01

    Young adult male B6CF/sub 1/ mice were exposed to single whole body doses of fission neutrons or /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays. Postspermatogonial dominant lethal injury, incidence of reciprocal chromosome translocations induced in spermatogonia, incidence of abnormal epididymal sperm 4-6 weeks after exposure, and testis weight loss 3-6 weeks after exposure were all measured. Significant effects were seen at 1 and 2.5 rad of neutrons consistent with extrapolation from higher doses, with the exception of dominant lethal mutations, which occurred in significant excess of expectation. Dose-response functions were linear or linear-quadratic, depending upon end point, radiation quality, and dose range. For translocation frequencies, the D/sup 2/ term was negative for neutron and positive for ..gamma..-ray irradiations. RBE values varied with dose and end point. For testis weight loss and abnormal sperm over the full dose range, the RBEs were between 5 and 6. They were between 7 and 9 at lower doses (< 10 rad) for translocations. RBEs for postimplantation and total dominant lethal rates were 5-6 above 10 rad and 10-14 below 10 rad. The RBEs for preimplant losses were between 15 and 25 above 10 rad and possibly higher below 10 rad, although the data are statistically 'noisy'.

  19. Response to booster doses of hepatitis B vaccine among young adults who had received neonatal vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul K S Chan

    Full Text Available Newborns who have received hepatitis B immunization in 1980s are now young adults joining healthcare disciplines. The need for booster, pre- and post-booster checks becomes a practical question.The aim of this study is to refine the HBV vaccination policy for newly admitted students in the future.A prospective study on medical and nursing school entrants to evaluate hepatitis B serostatus and the response to booster doses among young adults.Among 212 students, 17-23-year-old, born after adoption of neonatal immunization, 2 (0.9% were HBsAg positive, 40 (18.9% were anti-HBs positive. At 1 month after a single-dose booster for anti-HBs-negative students, 14.5% had anti-HBs 100 mIU/mL, respectively. The anti-HBs levels were significantly higher for females than males (mean [SD]: 431 [418] vs. 246 [339] mIU/mL, P = 0.047. At 2-4 month after the third booster dose, 97.1% had anti-HBs >100 mIU/mL and 2.9% had 10-100 mIU/mL.Pre-booster check is still worthwhile to identify carriers among newly recruited healthcare workers born after adoption of neonatal immunization. A 3-dose booster, rather than a single dose, is required for the majority to achieve an anti-HBs level >100 mIU/mL, as memory immunity has declined in a substantial proportion of individuals. Cost-effectiveness of post-booster check for anti-HBs is low and should be further evaluated based on contextual specific utilization of results.

  20. Triphasic low-dose response in zebrafish embryos irradiated by microbeam protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Viann Wing Yan; Yum, Emily Hoi Wa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu; Cheng, Shuk Han; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2012-01-01

    The microbeam irradiation system (Single-Particle Irradiation System to Cell, acronym as SPICE) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan, was employed to irradiate dechorionated zebrafish embryos at the 2-cell stage at 0.75 h post fertilization (hpf) by microbeam protons. Either one or both of the cells of the embryos were irradiated with 10, 20, 40, 50, 80, 100, 160, 200, 300 and 2000 protons each with an energy of 3.37 MeV. The embryos were then returned back to the incubator until 24 hpf for analyses. The levels of apoptosis in zebrafish embryos at 25 hpf were quantified through terminal dUTP transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay, with the apoptotic signals captured by a confocal microscope. The results revealed a triphasic dose-response for zebrafish embryos with both cells irradiated at the 2-cell stage, namely, (1) increase in apoptotic signals for protons (protons (at doses of 30-60 mGy), and (3) increase in apoptotic signals again for > 600 protons (at doses > 90 mGy). The dose response for zebrafish embryos with only one cell irradiated at the 2-cell stage was also likely a triphasic one, but the apoptotic signals in the first zone (protons or < 30 mGy) did not have significant differences from those of the background. At the same time, the experimental data were in line with induction of radiation-induced bystander effect as well as rescue effect in the zebrafish embryos, particular in those embryos with unirradiated cells.

  1. Caffeine intake and atrial fibrillation incidence: dose response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Min; Hu, Zunsong; Lu, Xiangfeng; Huang, Jianfeng; Gu, Dongfeng

    2014-04-01

    The association between habitual caffeine intake with incident atrial fibrillation (AF) was unknown. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the association between chronic exposure of caffeine and the risk of AF and to evaluate the potential dose-response relation. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library up to November 2013 and references of relevant retrieved articles. Prospective cohort studies were included with relative risk (RR) or hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for AF according to coffee/caffeine intake. Six prospective cohort studies with 228,465 participants were included. In the primary meta-analysis, caffeine exposure was weakly associated with a reduced risk of AF (RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.81-1.01; P = 0.07; I(2) = 73%). In subgroup analyses, pooled results from studies with adjustment of potential confounders showed an 11% reduction for low doses (RR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.80-0.99, P = 0.032; I(2) = 30.9%, P = 0.227) and 16% for high doses (RR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.75-0.94, P = 0.002; I(2) = 24.1%, P = 0.267) of caffeine consumption in AF risk. An inverse relation was found between habitual caffeine intake and AF risk (P for overall trend = 0.015; P for nonlinearity = 0.27) in dose-response meta-analysis and the incidence of AF decreased by 6% (RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.90-0.99) for every 300 mg/d increment in habitual caffeine intake. It is unlikely that caffeine consumption causes or contributes to AF. Habitual caffeine consumption might reduce AF risk. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dose-response behavior of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri exposed to pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de García, Sheyla; García-Encina, Pedro A; Irusta-Mata, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the environment has become a real and widespread concern in recent years. Therefore, the primary goal of this study was to investigate 20 common and widely used PPCPs to assess their individual and combined effect on an important species in one trophic level, i.e., bacteria. The ecotoxicological effects of PPCPs at two different concentration ranges were determined in the bacterium Vibrio fischeri using Microtox(®) and were statistically analyzed using three models in the GraphPad Prism 6 program for Windows, v.6.03. A four-parameter model best fit the majority of the compounds. The half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of each PPCP was estimated using the best-fitting model and was compared with the results from a recent study. Comparative analysis indicated that most compounds showed the same level of toxicity. Moreover, the stimulatory effects of PPCPs at environmental concentrations (low doses) were assessed. These results indicated that certain compounds have traditional inverted U- or J-shaped dose-response curves, and 55% of them presented a stimulatory effect below the zero effect-concentration point. Effective concentrations of 0 (EC0), 5 (EC5) and 50% (EC50) were calculated for each PPCP as the ecotoxicological points. All compounds that presented narcosis as a mode of toxic action at high doses also exhibited stimulation at low concentrations. The maximum stimulatory effect of a mixture was higher than the highest stimulatory effect of each individually tested compound. Moreover, when the exposure time was increased, the hormetic effect decreased. Hormesis is being increasingly included in dose-response studies because this may have a harmful, beneficial or indifferent effect in an environment. Despite the results obtained in this research, further investigations need to be conducted to elucidate the behavior of PPCPs in aquatic environments.

  3. Exposure dose response relationships of the freshwater bivalve Hyridella australis to cadmium spiked sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasinghe Wadige, Chamani P.M., E-mail: chamani.marasinghe.wadige@canberra.edu.au; Maher, William A.; Taylor, Anne M.; Krikowa, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The exposure–dose–response approach was used to assess cadmium exposure and toxicity. • Accumulated cadmium in H. australis reflected the sediment cadmium exposure. • Spill over of cadmium into the biologically active pool was observed. • Increased cadmium resulted in measurable biological effects. • H. australis has the potential to be a cadmium biomonitor in freshwater environments. - Abstract: To understand how benthic biota may respond to the additive or antagonistic effects of metal mixtures in the environment it is first necessary to examine their responses to the individual metals. In this context, laboratory controlled single metal-spiked sediment toxicity tests are useful to assess this. The exposure–dose–response relationships of Hyridella australis to cadmium-spiked sediments were, therefore, investigated in laboratory microcosms. H. australis was exposed to individual cadmium spiked sediments (<0.05 (control), 4 ± 0.3 (low) and 15 ± 1 (high) μg/g dry mass) for 28 days. Dose was measured as cadmium accumulation in whole soft body and individual tissues at weekly intervals over the exposure period. Dose was further examined as sub-cellular localisation of cadmium in hepatopancreas tissues. The biological responses in terms of enzymatic and cellular biomarkers were measured in hepatopancreas tissues at day 28. H. australis accumulated cadmium from spiked sediments with an 8-fold (low exposure organisms) and 16-fold (high exposure organisms) increase at day 28 compared to control organisms. The accumulated tissue cadmium concentrations reflected the sediment cadmium exposure at day 28. Cadmium accumulation in high exposure organisms was inversely related to the tissue calcium concentrations. Gills of H. australis showed significantly higher cadmium accumulation than the other tissues. Accumulated cadmium in biologically active and biologically detoxified metal pools was not significantly different in cadmium exposed

  4. Relative dose intensity of chemotherapy and its impact on outcomes in patients with early breast cancer or aggressive lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildiers, Hans; Reiser, Marcel

    2011-03-01

    Early studies suggested a link between chemotherapy dosing and outcomes in breast cancer and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. To help define the impact of relative dose intensity (RDI) and the role of growth factor support, we conducted a systematic literature review. Many breast cancer patients do not achieve planned RDI. Older age, obesity and febrile neutropenia are associated with reduced RDI, which leads to worse survival in several studies, particularly those including anthracyclines. G-CSF prophylaxis improved RDI in most, but not all, studies. There may be a threshold above which increasing RDI does not further improve outcomes (∼85% for CMF and anthracycline-based regimens). For lymphoma, there is strong evidence that patients benefit from full-dose chemotherapy, with RDI reductions associated with reduced survival. The definition of "full dose" is, however, unclear. Older age and higher disease stage may be associated with reduced RDI, and G-CSF improved the chances of higher RDI in most studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Doses to head and neck normal tissues for early stage Hodgkin lymphoma after involved node radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M. V.; Brodin, N. P.; Aznar, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate dose plans for head and neck organs at risk (OARs) for classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients using involved node radiotherapy (INRT) delivered as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and intensity modulated proton therapy (PT), in comparison...

  6. Neurobehavioral dynamics following chronic sleep restriction: dose-response effects of one night for recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Siobhan; Van Dongen, Hans P A; Maislin, Greg; Dinges, David F

    2010-08-01

    Establish the dose-response relationship between increasing sleep durations in a single night and recovery of neurobehavioral functions following chronic sleep restriction. Intent-to-treat design in which subjects were randomized to 1 of 6 recovery sleep doses (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 h TIB) for 1 night following 5 nights of sleep restriction to 4 h TIB. Twelve consecutive days in a controlled laboratory environment. N = 159 healthy adults (aged 22-45 y), median = 29 y). Following a week of home monitoring with actigraphy and 2 baseline nights of 10 h TIB, subjects were randomized to either sleep restriction to 4 h TIB per night for 5 nights followed by randomization to 1 of 6 nocturnal acute recovery sleep conditions (N = 142), or to a control condition involving 10 h TIB on all nights (N = 17). Primary neurobehavioral outcomes included lapses on the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT), subjective sleepiness from the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), and physiological sleepiness from a modified Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT). Secondary outcomes included psychomotor and cognitive speed as measured by PVT fastest RTs and number correct on the Digit Symbol Substitution Task (DSST), respectively, and subjective fatigue from the Profile of Mood States (POMS). The dynamics of neurobehavioral outcomes following acute recovery sleep were statistically modeled across the 0 h-10 h recovery sleep doses. While TST, stage 2, REM sleep and NREM slow wave energy (SWE) increased linearly across recovery sleep doses, best-fitting neurobehavioral recovery functions were exponential across recovery sleep doses for PVT and KSS outcomes, and linear for the MWT. Analyses based on return to baseline and on estimated intersection with control condition means revealed recovery was incomplete at the 10 h TIB (8.96 h TST) for PVT performance, KSS sleepiness, and POMS fatigue. Both TST and SWE were elevated above baseline at the maximum recovery dose of 10 h TIB. Neurobehavioral deficits

  7. SU-E-J-51: Dose Response of Common Solid State Detectors in Homogeneous Transverse and Longitudinal Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, M; Fallone, B; Rathee, S [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Solid state radiation detectors are often used for dose profiles and percent depth dose measurements. The dose response of selected solid state detectors is evaluated in varying transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields for eventual use in MR-Linac devices. Methods: A PTW 60003 and IBA PFD detector were modeled in the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE, incorporating a magnetic field which was varied in strength and oriented both transversely and longitudinally with respect to the incident photon beam. The detectors' long axis was in turn oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the photon beam. Dose to the active volume of each detector was scored, and its ratio to dose with zero magnetic field strength (dose response) was determined. Accuracy of the simulations was evaluated by measurements using both chambers taken at low field with a small electromagnet. Simulations were also performed in a water phantom to compare to the in air results. Results: Significant dose response was found in transverse field geometries, nearing 20% at 1.5T. The response is highly dependent on relative orientations to the magnetic field and photon beam, and on detector composition. Low field measurements confirm these results. In the presence of longitudinal magnetic fields, the detectors exhibit little dose response, reaching 0.5–1% at 1.5T regardless of detector orientation. Water tank simulations compared well to the in air simulations when not at the beam periphery, where in transverse magnetic fields only, the water tank simulations differed from the in air results. Conclusion: Transverse magnetic fields can cause large deviations in dose response, and are highly position orientation dependent. Comparatively, longitudinal magnetic fields exhibit little to no dose response in each detector as a function of magnetic field strength. Water tank simulations show longitudinal fields are generally easier to work with, but each detector must be evaluated separately.

  8. Blood responses under chronic low daily dose gamma irradiation: Pt. 2; Differential preclinical responses of irradiated female dogs in progression to either aplastic anemia or myeloproliferative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.; Carnes, B.; Tolle, D.; Fritz, T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Biological and Medical Research Div.)

    1993-05-01

    Female beagle dogs were chronically exposed to low daily doses of [sup 60]Co gamma rays and responded in one of three distinct hemopathological patterns. These patterns, reflective of distinct subgroups, were characterized by (a) low radioresistance resulting in progressive hematopoietic suppression, terminal aplastic anemia (AA), and relatively short (<400 days) survival ([sup -]S-AA subgroups); (b) high radioresistance, initially coupled with strong but aberrant regenerative hematopoiesis, and later with the development of myeloproliferative disease (MPD) ([sup +]-R-MPD subgroup); and (c) high radioresistance, coupled with an early phase of strong regenerative hematopoiesis, but later with no myeloproliferative disease ([sup +]R-nonMPD subgroup). In this study, the changes in circulating blood cells levels (granulocytes, monotcytes, erythrocytes, lymphocytes and platelets) were sequentially assessed in time and fitted to a flexible, quadratic-linear-type response model previously developed. The results are consistent with our earlier observations of blood responses of chronically irradiated male dogs, in the subgroups of female dogs prone to specific radiogenic hematopathologies (i.e. AA and MPD) can be readily identified and staged in specific preclinical periods by a series of marked differential blood responses. (Author).

  9. Variability in the Responsiveness to Low-Dose Aspirin: Pharmacological and Disease-Related Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Rocca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main pharmacological aspects of pharmacodynamics (PD and pharmacokinetics (PK of aspirin as antiplatelet agent were unravelled between the late sixties and the eighties, and low-dose aspirin given once daily has been shown to be a mainstay in the current treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disorders. Nevertheless, several PD and PK aspects of aspirin in selected clinical conditions have recently emerged and deserve future clinical attention. In 1994, the term “aspirin resistance” was used for the first time, but, until now, no consensus exists on definition, standardized assay, underlying mechanisms, clinical impact, and possible efficacy of alternative therapeutic interventions. At variance with an undefined aspirin-resistant status, in the last 5 years, the concept of variability in response to aspirin due to specific pathophysiological mechanisms and based on PK and/or PD of the drug has emerged. This growing evidence highlights the existence and possible clinical relevance of an interindividual variability of pharmacological aspirin response and calls for new, large studies to test new low-dose aspirin-based regimens which may ameliorate platelet acetylation, reduce variability in drug responsiveness, and improve clinical efficacy on selected populations.

  10. Perioperative Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Keloids: Feasibility and Early Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Ping, E-mail: ping.jiang@uksh.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Baumann, René [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Geenen, Matthias [Department of Reconstructive Surgery, Lubinus Clinic Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Siebert, Frank-André [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Niehoff, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Community Clinic Köln, Köln (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Witten/Herdecke, Witten (Germany); Bertolini, Julia; Druecke, Daniel [Department of Reconstructive Surgery, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of therapy-resistant keloids and report first results, with emphasis on feasibility and early treatment outcome. Methods and Materials: From 2009 to 2014, 24 patients with 32 recurrent keloids were treated with immediate perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy; 3 patients had been previously treated with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy and presented with recurrences in the pretreated areas. Two or more different treatment modalities had been tried in all patients and had failed to achieve remission. After (re-)excision of the keloids, a single brachytherapy tube was placed subcutaneously before closing the wound. The target volume covered the scar in total length. Brachytherapy was given in 3 fractions with a single dose of 6 Gy in 5 mm tissue depth. The first fraction was given within 6 hours after surgery, the other 2 fractions on the first postoperative day. Thus, a total dose of 18 Gy in 3 fractions was administered within 36 hours after the resection. Results: The treatment was feasible in all patients. No procedure-related complications (eg, secondary infections) occurred. Nineteen patients had keloid-related symptoms before treatment like pain and pruritus; disappearance of symptoms was noticed in all patients after treatment. After a median follow-up of 29.4 months (range, 7.9-72.4 months), 2 keloid recurrences and 2 mildly hypertrophied scars were observed. The local control rate was 94%. Pigmentary abnormalities were detected in 3 patients, and an additional 6 patients had a mild delay in the wound-healing process. Conclusions: The early results of this study prove the feasibility and the efficacy of brachytherapy for the prevention of keloids. The results also suggest that brachytherapy may be advantageous in the management of high-risk keloids or as salvage treatment for failure after external beam therapy.

  11. Flow characterization and patch clamp dose responses using jet microfluidics in a tubeless microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resto, Pedro J; Bhat, Abhishek; Stava, Eric; Lor, Chong; Merriam, Elliot; Diaz-Rivera, Ruben E; Pearce, Robert; Blick, Robert; Williams, Justin C

    2017-11-01

    Surface tension passive pumping is a way to actuate flow without the need for pumps, tubing or valves by using the pressure inside small drop to move liquid via a microfluidic channel. These types of tubeless devices have typically been used in cell biology. Herein we present the use of tubeless devices as a fluid exchange platform for patch clamp electrophysiology. Inertia from high-speed droplets and jets is used to create flow and perform on-the-fly mixing of solutions. These are then flowed over GABA transfected HEK cells under patch in order to perform a dose response analysis. TIRF imaging and electrical recordings are used to study the fluid exchange properties of the microfluidic device, resulting in 0-90% fluid exchange times of hundreds of milliseconds. COMSOL is used to model flow and fluid exchange within the device. Patch-clamping experiments show the ability to use high-speed passive pumping and its derivatives for studying peak dose responses, but not for studying ion channel kinetics. Our system results in fluid exchange times slower than when using a standard 12-barrel application system and is not as stable as traditional methods, but it offers a new platform with added functionality. Surface tension passive pumping and tubeless devices can be used in a limited fashion for electrophysiology. Users may obtain peak dose responses but the system, in its current form, is not capable of fluid exchange fast enough to study the kinetics of most ion channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Coffee consumption and risk of hypertension: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, Lanfranco; La Fata, Ersilia; Galletti, Ferruccio; Scalfi, Luca; Strazzullo, Pasquale

    2017-12-08

    Recently, a large prospective study provided additional information concerning the debated possible association between habitual coffee consumption and risk of hypertension (HPT). Therefore, we updated the state of knowledge on this issue by carrying out a comprehensive new systematic review of the literature and a meta-analysis of the available relevant studies. We performed a systematic search for prospective studies on general population, published without language restrictions (1966-August 2017). A random-effects dose-response meta-analysis was conducted to combine study specific relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals. Potential non-linear relation was investigated using restricted cubic splines. Four studies (196,256 participants, 41,184 diagnosis of HPT) met the inclusion criteria. Coffee intake was assessed by dietary questionnaire. Dose-response meta-analysis showed a non-linear relationship between coffee consumption and risk of HPT (p for non-linearity < 0.001). Whereas the habitual drinking of one or two cups of coffee per day, compared with non-drinking, was not associated with risk of HPT, a significantly protective effect of coffee consumption was found starting from the consumption of three cups of coffee per day (RR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.94 to 0.99), and was confirmed for greater consumption. The results of this analysis indicate that habitual moderate coffee intake is not associated with higher risk of HPT in the general population and that in fact a non-linear inverse dose-response relationship occurs between coffee consumption and risk of HPT.

  13. Pregabalin versus gabapentin in partial epilepsy: a meta-analysis of dose-response relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Sally

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare the efficacy of pregabalin and gabapentin at comparable effective dose levels in patients with refractory partial epilepsy. Methods Eight randomized placebo controlled trials investigating the efficacy of pregabalin (4 studies and gabapentin (4 studies over 12 weeks were identified with a systematic literature search. The endpoints of interest were "responder rate" (where response was defined as at least a 50% reduction from baseline in the number of seizures and "change from baseline in seizure-free days over the last 28 days (SFD". Results of all trials were analyzed using an indirect comparison approach with placebo as the common comparator. The base-case analysis used the intention-to-treat last observation carried forward method. Two sensitivity analyses were conducted among completer and responder populations. Results The base-case analysis revealed statistically significant differences in response rate in favor of pregabalin 300 mg versus gabapentin 1200 mg (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.02, 3.25 and pregabalin 600 mg versus gabapentin 1800 mg (odds ratio, 2.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.21, 5.27. Both sensitivity analyses supported the findings of the base-case analysis, although statistical significance was not demonstrated. All dose levels of pregabalin (150 mg to 600 mg were more efficacious than corresponding dosages of gabapentin (900 mg to 2400 mg in terms of SFD over the last 28 days. Conclusion In patients with refractory partial epilepsy, pregabalin is likely to be more effective than gabapentin at comparable effective doses, based on clinical response and the number of SFD.

  14. Immune response parameters during labor and early neonatal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protonotariou, Efthimia; Chrelias, Charalampos; Kassanos, Demetrios; Kapsambeli, Helen; Trakakis, Eftihios; Sarandakou, Angeliki

    2010-01-01

    Selected cytokines, associated with Th1 and Th2 immune response and inflammation, were studied in order to evaluate the relation between their release into maternal and neonatal circulation, during labour, and after birth, in comparison with those in adults. Cytokine concentrations were determined by very sensitive immunoassays, in maternal serum (MS), umbilical cord (UC), neonatal serum, the 1st (1N) and 5th (5N) day postpartum and in adult controls. Both IL-2 and IL-4 cytokine concentrations in UC were markedly elevated, compared to adult and MS ones. IL-2 decreased significantly in 5N, while IL-4 remained unchanged. IFN-gamma UC values were significantly lower than those in adults and MS, increasing significantly in 5N. Neonatal serum sIL-2R and sIL-4R were markedly higher than those in adults and MS. IL-1beta, IL-6, sIL-6R, sTNFRI and sTNFRII concentrations in MS and all with TNF-alpha in neonatal serum were significantly higher than in adults. IFN-gamma, IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-2R, IL-4R concentrations in MS, 1N and 5N were dependent on the mode of delivery. The results of this comparative study are indicative for a meaningful role for the studied cytokines and their receptors in: i) the development of neonatal immune system, ii) the regulation of immune response during labour and early life, and iii) the initiation of the processes of labour.

  15. Dose-response relationships and time course of the response to systemic beta adrenoreceptor agonists in infants with bronchopulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, R; Birrer, P; Schöni, M H

    1988-01-01

    The lung function response to three doses of salbutamol 0.075 mg/kg given at 10 minute intervals by gastric tube was studied in 31 infants aged 2-22 months with bronchopulmonary disease (eight after the respiratory distress syndrome, 15 with wheezy bronchitis, and eight with cystic fibrosis). Lung function was measured by whole body plethysmography. Seven of 31 infants had normal lung function and 10 of the remaining 24 had an increase in thoracic gas volume (TGV), 10 an increase in airway resistance (Raw), and four an increase in both the TGV and Raw. The response of TGV and Raw to salbutamol was analysed by circular statistics, enabling analysis of coupled, directional data. Thirty minutes after administration of the first dose of salbutamol there was a reduction in TGV or Raw in 21 of the 24 infants, 11 showing a decrease in TGV ("volume responder") and 10 a fall in Raw ("flow responder"). These results indicate that in most infants with bronchopulmonary disease an improvement in lung function can be documented after systemic administration of beta agonists if both TGV and Raw are measured. PMID:3206384

  16. Genetic Background Modulates lncRNA-Coordinated Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are emerging as key regulators of diverse cell functions and processes. However, the relevance of lncRNAs in the cell and tissue response to ionizing radiation has not yet been characterized. Here we used microarray profiling to determine lncRNA and mRNA expression in mammary glands of BALB/c and SPRET/EiJ mice after low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR exposure. We found that unirradiated mammary tissues of these strains differed significantly in baseline expressions of 290 lncRNAs. LDIR exposure (10 cGy induced a significant change in the expression of many lncRNAs. The vast majority of lncRNAs identified to be differentially expressed after LDIR in either BALB/c or SPRET/EiJ had a significantly correlated expression pattern with at least one LDIR responsive mRNA. Functional analysis revealed that the response to LDIR in BALB/c mice is highly dynamic with enrichment for genes involved in tissue injury, inflammatory responses, and mammary gland development at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after LDIR, respectively. Our study demonstrates that genetic background strongly influences the expression of lncRNAs and their response to radiation and that lncRNAs may coordinate the tissue response to LDIR exposure via regulation of coding mRNAs.

  17. Dose-response of strengthening exercise for treatment of severe neck pain in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Andersen, Lars Louis; Pedersen, Mogens T

    2013-01-01

    Specific strength training is shown relieves neck pain in office workers. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of specific strength training in women with severe neck pain and to analyze the dose-response relationship between training adherence and pain reduction. 118...... untrained women with severe neck pain (>30 mm VAS pain) were included from a larger study, in which the subjects were randomized to 20-weeks specific strength training for the neck/shoulders or to a control group. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the training group experienced greater pain relief than...

  18. Inter-Individual Variability in Human Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocke, David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    In order to investigate inter-individual variability in response to low-dose ionizing radiation, we are working with three models, 1) in-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we have a realistic model, but with few subjects, all from a previous project, 2) ex-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we also have a realistic model, though with the limitations involved in keeping skin pieces alive in media, and 3) MatTek EpiDermFT skin plugs, which provides a more realistic model than cell lines, which is more controllable than human samples.

  19. Dose–response in direct comparisons of different doses of aspirin, ibuprofen and paracetamol (acetaminophen) in analgesic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Aims Establishing the dose–response relationship for clinically useful doses of aspirin, ibuprofen and paracetamol has been difficult. Indirect comparison from meta-analysis is compromised by too little information at some doses. Methods A systematic review of randomized, double-blind trials in acute pain comparing different doses of aspirin, ibuprofen and paracetamol was therefore undertaken. Results Fifty trials were found. Numerical superiority of higher over lower dose was found by the original authors in 37/50 trials (74%) and statistical superiority in 11/50 (22%). Twenty-eight trials had design, quality and data reporting characteristics to allow pooling of common doses; in 3/28 (11%) of the individual trials our calculations showed statistical superiority of higher over lower dose. Pooled comparison of 1000/1200 mg aspirin over 500/600 mg was statistically superior, with a number-needed-to-treat (NNT) for higher over lower dose of 16 (8 to ibuprofen over 200 mg was statistically superior, with an NNT for higher over lower dose of 10 (6–23). Pooled comparison of 1000 mg paracetamol over 500 mg was statistically superior, with an NNT for higher over lower dose of 9 (6–20). Conclusions Use of trials making direct comparison of two different doses of target drugs revealed the underlying dose–response curve for clinical analgesia. PMID:16869819

  20. Early assessment of therapy response in malignant lymphoma with the thymidine analogue [18F]FLT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Andreas K; Kratochwil, Clemens; Glatting, Gerhard; Juweid, Malik; Bommer, Martin; Tepsic, Djurdja; Vogg, Andreas T J; Mattfeldt, Torsten; Neumaier, Bernd; Möller, Peter; Reske, Sven N

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the thymidine analogue 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F]fluorothymidine ([(18)F]FLT) is adequate for early evaluation of the response of malignant lymphoma to antiproliferative treatment in a mouse xenotransplant model. Immunodeficient mice bearing a follicular lymphoma xenotransplant were treated with high-dose chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, n = 10), immunotherapy (CD20 mAb, ibritumomab-tiuxetan, n = 10) or radioimmunotherapy ([(90)Y]CD20 mAb, Zevalin, n = 10). Forty-eight hours after treatment, antiproliferative effects were assessed with [(18)F]FLT. Ninety minutes after i.v. injection of 5-10 MBq [(18)F]FLT, mice were sacrificed and radioactivity within the tumour and normal organs was measured using a gamma counter and calculated as % ID/g. The proliferation fraction in tissue samples derived from treated and untreated tumours was evaluated by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry, which served as the reference for proliferative activity. In untreated lymphoma, the mean proliferation fraction was 83.6%. After chemotherapy, the mean proliferation fraction decreased to 39.3% (p = 0.0001), after immunotherapy to 77.6% (p = 0.0078) and after radioimmunotherapy to 78.8% (p = 0.014). In none of the animals was a significant change in tumour size observed. In untreated lymphoma, tumoural [(18)F]FLT uptake was 5.4% ID/g, after chemotherapy it was 1.5% (p = 0.0005), after immunotherapy, 3.9% (non-significant), and after radioimmunotherapy, 5.8% (non-significant). In a lymphoma xenotransplant model, [(18)F]FLT detects early antiproliferative drug activity before changes in tumour size are visible. These findings further support the use of [(18)F]FLT-PET for imaging early response to treatment in malignant lymphoma.

  1. Dose-responses for mortality from cerebrovascular and heart diseases in atomic bomb survivors: 1950-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöllnberger, Helmut; Eidemüller, Markus; Cullings, Harry M; Simonetto, Cristoforo; Neff, Frauke; Kaiser, Jan Christian

    2017-12-08

    The scientific community faces important discussions on the validity of the linear no-threshold (LNT) model for radiation-associated cardiovascular diseases at low and moderate doses. In the present study, mortalities from cerebrovascular diseases (CeVD) and heart diseases from the latest data on atomic bomb survivors were analyzed. The analysis was performed with several radio-biologically motivated linear and nonlinear dose-response models. For each detrimental health outcome one set of models was identified that all fitted the data about equally well. This set was used for multi-model inference (MMI), a statistical method of superposing different models to allow risk estimates to be based on several plausible dose-response models rather than just relying on a single model of choice. MMI provides a more accurate determination of the dose response and a more comprehensive characterization of uncertainties. It was found that for CeVD, the dose-response curve from MMI is located below the linear no-threshold model at low and medium doses (0-1.4 Gy). At higher doses MMI predicts a higher risk compared to the LNT model. A sublinear dose-response was also found for heart diseases (0-3 Gy). The analyses provide no conclusive answer to the question whether there is a radiation risk below 0.75 Gy for CeVD and 2.6 Gy for heart diseases. MMI suggests that the dose-response curves for CeVD and heart diseases in the Lifespan Study are sublinear at low and moderate doses. This has relevance for radiotherapy treatment planning and for international radiation protection practices in general.

  2. Caudate neuronal recording in freely behaving animals following acute and chronic dose response methylphenidate exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-09-01

    The misuse and abuse of the psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPD) the drug of choice in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has seen a sharp uprising in recent years among both youth and adults for its cognitive enhancing effects and for recreational purposes. This uprise in illicit use has lead to many questions concerning the long-term consequences of MPD exposure. The objective of this study was to record animal behavior concomitantly with the caudate nucleus (CN) neuronal activity following acute and repetitive (chronic) dose response exposure to methylphenidate (MPD). A saline control and three MPD dose (0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg) groups were used. Behaviorally, the same MPD dose in some animals following chronic MPD exposure elicited behavioral sensitization and other animals elicited behavioral tolerance. Based on this finding, the CN neuronal population recorded from animals expressing behavioral sensitization was also evaluated separately from CN neurons recorded from animals expressing behavioral tolerance to chronic MPD exposure, respectively. Significant differences in CN neuronal population responses between the behaviorally sensitized and the behaviorally tolerant animals were observed for the 2.5 and 10.0mg/kg MPD exposed groups. For 2.5mg/kg MPD, behaviorally sensitized animals responded by decreasing their firing rates while behaviorally tolerant animals showed mainly an increase in their firing rates. The CN neuronal responses recorded from the behaviorally sensitized animals following 10.0mg/kg MPD responded by increasing their firing rates whereas the CN neuronal recordings from the behaviorally tolerant animals showed that approximately half decreased their firing rates in response to 10.0mg/kg MPD exposure. The comparison of percentage change in neuronal firing rates showed that the behaviorally tolerant animals trended to exhibit increases in their neuronal firing rates at ED1 following initial MPD exposure and

  3. The effect of elective sham dose escalation on the placebo response during an antimuscarinic trial for overactive bladder symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staskin, David R.; Michel, Martin C.; Sun, Franklin; Guan, Zhonghong; Morrow, Jon D.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of baseline symptom severity and placebo response magnitude on the decision to dose escalate in a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, flexible dose antimuscarinic trial of subjects with overactive bladder symptoms. Data from the placebo arm of the trial were used for this post

  4. Pancreatic beta cell function increases in a linear dose-response manner following exercise training in adults with prediabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malin, Steven K; Solomon, Thomas; Blaszczak, Alecia

    2013-01-01

    While some studies suggest that a linear dose-response relationship exists between exercise and insulin sensitivity, the exercise dose required to enhance pancreatic beta-cell function is unknown. Thirty-five older, obese adults with prediabetes underwent a progressive 12-week supervised exercise...

  5. Adult height in children with growth hormone deficiency: a randomized, controlled, growth hormone dose-response trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sas, T.C.J.; Ridder, M.A. de; Wit, J.M.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Oostdijk, W.; Reeser, H.M.; Otten, B.J.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of 2 growth hormone (GH) doses on adult height (AH) in GH deficiency (GHD). METHODS: A multicenter, randomized, controlled dose-response trial compared attained AH minus target height (TH) between children receiving 0.7 mg/m(2)/day biosynthetic GH (approx. 0.025

  6. Dose-response effects in immunizations with keyhole limpet haemocyanin and rabies vaccine: shift in some immunodeficiency states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver, K.; Boeschoten, E. W.; Krediet, R. T.; van Steenis, G.; Schellekens, P. T.

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the primary antibody response to the antigens keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) and rabies vaccine (RV). Eighty-one healthy volunteers were injected with nine doses of KLH (ranging from 10 to 2500 micrograms) and 66 volunteers with six doses of RV (ranging from 17 to 680 micrograms

  7. Adult Height in Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency: A Randomized, Controlled, Growth Hormone Dose-Response Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sas, T.C.J.; de Ridder, M.A.J.; Wit, J.M.; Rotteveel, J.; Oostdijk, W.; Reeser, H.M.; Otten, B.J.; Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of 2 growth hormone (GH) doses on adult height (AH) in GH deficiency (GHD). Methods: A multicenter, randomized, controlled dose-response trial compared attained AH minus target height (TH) between children receiving 0.7 mg/m

  8. European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology task force report on 'dose-response relationship in allergen-specific immunotherapy'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, M A; Larenas, D; Kleine-Tebbe, J

    2011-01-01

    For a century, allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) has proven to be an effective treatment for allergic rhinitis, asthma, and insect sting allergy. However, as allergen doses are frequently adapted to the individual patient, there are few data on dose-response relationship in SIT. Allergen prod...

  9. Response of eggplant crop fertigated with doses of nitrogen and potassium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro H. C. de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of the present study was to evaluate the response of eggplant, cv. ‘Ciça’, with respect to yield, number of fruits and dry matter (root and stem, when grown in a greenhouse and conducted under fertigation with nitrogen and potassium. The experiment was conducted in the Irrigation Technical Center of the State University of Maringá, between the months of February and August 2015. Four nitrogen doses (0.0; 6.43; 12.86 and 25.72 g of N plant-1 and four potassium doses (0.0; 5.18; 10.36 and 20.73 g of K plant-1 were tested, totaling 16 treatments in a 4 x 4 factorial scheme, arranged in a completely randomized design with four replicates, in a Red Latosol with sandy texture. The highest number of fruits per plant and yield were found in the range of 14-17 g of N plant-1 (145-177 kg N ha-1. Single doses of potassium did not statistically influence yield and root dry matter.

  10. Aldrin and dieldrin: a reevaluation of the cancer and noncancer dose-response assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Eric P; Fulcher, Keri G; Gibb, Herman J

    2014-05-01

    The dose-response analyses of cancer and noncancer health effects of aldrin and dieldrin were evaluated using current methodology, including benchmark dose analysis and the current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) guidance on body weight scaling and uncertainty factors. A literature review was performed to determine the most appropriate adverse effect endpoints. Using current methodology and information, the estimated reference dose values were 0.0001 and 0.00008 mg/kg-day for aldrin and dieldrin, respectively. The estimated cancer slope factors for aldrin and dieldrin were 3.4 and 7.0 (mg/kg-day)(-1), respectively (i.e., about 5- and 2.3-fold lower risk than the 1987 U.S. EPA assessments). Because aldrin and dieldrin are no longer used as pesticides in the United States, they are presumed to be a low priority for additional review by the U.S. EPA. However, because they are persistent and still detected in environmental samples, quantitative risk assessments based on the best available methods are required. Recent epidemiologic studies do not demonstrate a causal association between aldrin and dieldrin and human cancer risk. The proposed reevaluations suggest that these two compounds pose a lower human health risk than currently reported by the U.S. EPA. © 2013 Society for Risk Analysis.

  11. Low-dose radiation modifies skin response to acute gamma-rays and protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao Wen; Pecaut, Michael J; Cao, Jeffrey D; Moldovan, Maria; Gridley, Daila S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to obtain pilot data on the effects of protracted low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-rays on the skin, both with and without acute gamma or proton irradiation (IR). Six groups of C57BL/6 mice were examined: a) 0 Gy control, b) LDR, c) Gamma, d) LDR+Gamma, e) Proton, and f) LDR+Proton. LDR radiation was delivered to a total dose of 0.01 Gy (0.03 cGy/h), whereas the Gamma and Proton groups received 2 Gy (0.9 Gy/min and 1.0 Gy/min, respectively). Assays were performed 56 days after exposure. Skin samples from all irradiated groups had activated caspase-3, indicative of apoptosis. The significant (pGamma and Proton groups were not present when LDR pre-exposure was included. However, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay for DNA fragmentation and histological examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections revealed no significant differences among groups, regardless of radiation regimen. The data demonstrate that caspase-3 activation initially triggered by both forms of acute radiation was greatly elevated in the skin nearly two months after whole-body exposure. In addition, LDR γ-ray priming ameliorated this response.

  12. A comparison of three doses of omeprazole in the treatment of equine gastric ulcer syndrome: A blinded, randomised, dose-response clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, B W; Sykes, K M; Hallowell, G D

    2015-05-01

    A previous study demonstrated that a dose effect between 1.6 and 4.0 mg/kg bwt of omeprazole per os s.i.d. is present in the treatment of equine gastric ulceration. In the same study, healing of glandular ulceration appeared inferior to healing of squamous ulceration. However, several limitations were recognised in that study and further investigation is warranted. To further investigate the presence of a dose relationship in the treatment of gastric ulceration under conditions that may favour omeprazole efficacy such as administration prior to exercise and after a brief fast, and potential differences between the response of squamous and glandular ulceration to omeprazole therapy. A blinded, randomised, dose-response clinical trial. Sixty Thoroughbred racehorses with grade ≥2/4 squamous and/or glandular ulceration were identified by gastroscopy. Horses were randomly assigned to receive either 1.0, 2.0 or 4.0 mg/kg bwt of enteric coated omeprazole per os s.i.d. 1-4 h prior to exercise. Gastroscopy was repeated at approximately 28 days. The lower doses studied (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg bwt) were noninferior to the reference dose (4.0 mg/kg bwt) in the treatment of squamous ulceration. Healing was greater in squamous ulceration than glandular ulceration (86% vs. 14%; Pomeprazole is administered before exercise and following a brief fast, doses of omeprazole as low as 1 mg/kg bwt per os s.i.d. may be as effective as higher doses. The proportion of glandular ulceration that heals with 28 days of omeprazole therapy is less than that of squamous ulceration. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  13. Dosing study of massage for chronic neck pain: protocol for the dose response evaluation and analysis of massage [DREAM] trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Karen J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the growing popularity of massage, its effectiveness for treating neck pain remains unclear, largely because of the poor quality of research. A major deficiency of previous studies has been their use of low “doses” of massage that massage therapists consider inadequate. Unfortunately, the number of minutes per massage session, sessions per week, or weeks of treatment necessary for massage to have beneficial or optimal effects are not known. This study is designed to address these gaps in our knowledge by determining, for persons with chronic neck pain: 1 the optimal combination of number of treatments per week and length of individual treatment session, and 2 the optimal number of weeks of treatment. Methods/design In this study, 228 persons with chronic non-specific neck pain will be recruited from primary health care clinics in a large health care system in the Seattle area. Participants will be randomized to a wait list control group or 4 weeks of treatment with one of 5 different dosing combinations (2 or 3 30-min treatments per week or 1, 2, or 3 60-min treatments per week. At the end of this 4-week primary treatment period, participants initially receiving each of the 5 dosing combinations will be randomized to a secondary treatment period of either no additional treatment or 6 weekly 60-min massages. The primary outcomes, neck-related dysfunction and pain, will be assessed by blinded telephone interviewers 5, 12, and 26 weeks post-randomization. To better characterize the trajectory of treatment effects, these interview data will be supplemented with outcomes data collected by internet questionnaire at 10, 16, 20 and 39 weeks. Comparisons of outcomes for the 6 groups during the primary treatment period will identify the optimal weekly dose, while comparisons of outcomes during the secondary treatment period will determine if 10 weeks of treatment is superior to 4 weeks. Discussion A broad dosing schedule

  14. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Dose-Response Relationship of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Varigonda, Anjali L; Freemantle, Nicholas; Taylor, Matthew J; Bloch, Michael H

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies suggested that the treatment response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in major depressive disorder follows a flat response curve within the therapeutic dose range. The present study was designed to clarify the relationship between dosage and treatment response in major depressive disorder. The authors searched PubMed for randomized placebo-controlled trials examining the efficacy of SSRIs for treating adults with major depressive disorder. Trials were also required to assess improvement in depression severity at multiple time points. Additional data were collected on treatment response and all-cause and side effect-related discontinuation. All medication doses were transformed into imipramine-equivalent doses. The longitudinal data were analyzed with a mixed-regression model. Endpoint and tolerability analyses were analyzed using meta-regression and stratified subgroup analysis by predefined SSRI dose categories in order to assess the effect of SSRI dosing on the efficacy and tolerability of SSRIs for major depressive disorder. Forty studies involving 10,039 participants were included. Longitudinal modeling (dose-by-time interaction=0.0007, 95% CI=0.0001-0.0013) and endpoint analysis (meta-regression: β=0.00053, 95% CI=0.00018-0.00088, z=2.98) demonstrated a small but statistically significant positive association between SSRI dose and efficacy. Higher doses of SSRIs were associated with an increased likelihood of dropouts due to side effects (meta-regression: β=0.00207, 95% CI=0.00071-0.00342, z=2.98) and decreased likelihood of all-cause dropout (meta-regression: β=-0.00093, 95% CI=-0.00165 to -0.00021, z=-2.54). Higher doses of SSRIs appear slightly more effective in major depressive disorder. This benefit appears to plateau at around 250 mg of imipramine equivalents (50 mg of fluoxetine). The slightly increased benefits of SSRIs at higher doses are somewhat offset by decreased tolerability at high doses.

  15. An apparent threshold dose response in ferrous xylenol-orange gel dosimeters when scanned with a yellow light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Steven; Battista, Jerry; Jordan, Kevin

    2008-03-01

    Freshly prepared radiochromic ferrous xylenol-orange (FX) gels optically scanned with a light source exhibit a threshold dose response that is thermally and wavelength dependent. Correction for this threshold dose leads to accurate dose calibration and better reproducibility in multiple fraction radiation exposures. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of the threshold dose effect and to control it through improved dose calibration procedures. The results of a systematic investigation into the chemical cause revealed that impurities within the various FX gel constituents (i.e. xylenol-orange, gelatin, sulfuric acid and ferrous ammonium sulfate) were not directly responsible for the threshold dose. Rather, it was determined that the threshold dose response stems from a spectral sensitivity to different chemical complexes that are formed at different dose levels in FX gels between ferric (Fe(III)) ions and xylenol-orange (XO), i.e. Fe(III)i:XOj. A double Fe(III)2:XO1 complex preferentially absorbs at longer wavelengths (i.e. yellow), while at shorter wavelengths (i.e. green) the sensitivity is biased toward the single Fe(III)1:XO1 complex. As a result, when scanning with yellow light, freshly prepared FX gels require a minimum concentration of Fe(III) ions to shift the equilibrium concentration to favor the predominant production of the double Fe(III)2:XO1 complex at low doses. This can be accomplished via pre-irradiation of freshly prepared gels to a priming dose of ~0.5 Gy or allowing auto-oxidation to generate the startup concentration of Fe(III) ions required to negate the apparent threshold dose response.

  16. Dose-response effects of atropine and HI-6 treatment of organophosphorus poisoning in guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koplovitz, I.; Menton, R.; Matthews, C.; Shutz, M.; Nalls, C.

    1995-12-31

    H1-6 (1-2-hydrnxyiminomethyl-1 pyridino-3-(4-carbameyl- 1--pyddino)-2- oxaprnpane dichioride) has been evaluated as an oxime alternative to pralidoxime, and toxogonin in the treatment of organophosphorus (OP) poisoning. The dose response effects of atropine (ATR) and HI-6 were investigated to more fully explore the interaction of these compounds in the treatment of OP poisoning. ATR, HI-6 and various combinations of the two drugs were evaluated against lethal poisoning by soman (GD) and tabun (GA) in guinea pigs. The effect of adjunctive diazepam treatment on the efficacy of atropine and HI-6 against soman was also investigated. Animals of either sex were challenged s.c. with OP and treated i.m. 1 min later with ATR and/or HI-6. When used, diazepam was injected immediately after ATR+HI6. LD50s of each treatment were calculated from probit models based on 24-hour survival against 5 levels of nerve agent and 6 animals per challenge level. A protective index (PI) was calculated by dividing the nerve agent LD50 in the presence of treatment by the LD50 in the absence of treatment. Treatment with HI-6 alone had little effect on the toxicity of either OP. Treatment with ATR alone was more effective than HI-6 alone and was significantly more effective against soman than against tabun. When used in combination atropine and HI-6 had a strong synergistic effect against both agents. The dose of atropine used with HI-6 was critical in determining the efficacy of HI-6 against either agent. The slopes of the dose-lethality curves were minimally affected by the dose of ATR or HI-6. Adjunctive treatment with diazepam enhanced the efficacy of HI-6 and atropine against soman.

  17. What Role for Biologically Based Dose–Response Models in Estimating Low-Dose Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Kenny S.; Chen, Chao; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Louis, Thomas A.; Portier, Christopher J.; Subramaniam, Ravi P.; White, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Biologically based dose–response (BBDR) models can incorporate data on biological processes at the cellular and molecular level to link external exposure to an adverse effect. Objectives Our goal was to examine the utility of BBDR models in estimating low-dose risk. Methods We reviewed the utility of BBDR models in risk assessment. Results BBDR models have been used profitably to evaluate proposed mechanisms of toxicity and identify data gaps. However, these models have not improved the reliability of quantitative predictions of low-dose human risk. In this commentary we identify serious impediments to developing BBDR models for this purpose. BBDR models do not eliminate the need for empirical modeling of the relationship between dose and effect, but only move it from the whole organism to a lower level of biological organization. However, in doing this, BBDR models introduce significant new sources of uncertainty. Quantitative inferences are limited by inter- and intraindividual heterogeneity that cannot be eliminated with available or reasonably anticipated experimental techniques. BBDR modeling does not avoid uncertainties in the mechanisms of toxicity relevant to low-level human exposures. Although implementation of BBDR models for low-dose risk estimation have thus far been limited mainly to cancer modeled using a two-stage clonal expansion framework, these problems are expected to be present in all attempts at BBDR modeling. Conclusions The problems discussed here appear so intractable that we conclude that BBDR models are unlikely to be fruitful in reducing uncertainty in quantitative estimates of human risk from low-level exposures in the foreseeable future. Use of in vitro data from recent advances in molecular toxicology in BBDR models is not likely to remove these problems and will introduce new issues regarding extrapolation of data from in vitro systems. PMID:20056564

  18. Effect of Photon Hormesis on Dose Responses to Alpha Particles in Zebrafish Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Candy Yuen Ping; Cheng, Shuk Han; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2017-02-11

    Photon hormesis refers to the phenomenon where the biological effect of ionizing radiation with a high linear energy transfer (LET) value is diminished by photons with a low LET value. The present paper studied the effect of photon hormesis from X-rays on dose responses to alpha particles using embryos of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as the in vivo vertebrate model. The toxicity of these ionizing radiations in the zebrafish embryos was assessed using the apoptotic counts at 20, 24, or 30 h post fertilization (hpf) revealed through acridine orange (AO) staining. For alpha-particle doses ≥ 4.4 mGy, the additional X-ray dose of 10 mGy significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells at 24 hpf, which proved the presence of photon hormesis. Smaller alpha-particle doses might not have inflicted sufficient aggregate damages to trigger photon hormesis. The time gap T between the X-ray (10 mGy) and alpha-particle (4.4 mGy) exposures was also studied. Photon hormesis was present when T ≤ 30 min, but was absent when T = 60 min, at which time repair of damage induced by alpha particles would have completed to prevent their interactions with those induced by X-rays. Finally, the drop in the apoptotic counts at 24 hpf due to photon hormesis was explained by bringing the apoptotic events earlier to 20 hpf, which strongly supported the removal of aberrant cells through apoptosis as an underlying mechanism for photon hormesis.

  19. A new method for synthesizing radiation dose-response data from multiple trials applied to prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diez, Patricia; Vogelius, Ivan S; Bentzen, Søren M

    2010-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing dose-response data for biochemical control of prostate cancer according to study design (randomized vs. nonrandomized) and risk group (low vs. intermediate-high)....

  20. Influence of lung parenchymal destruction on the different indexes of the methacholine dose-response curve in COPD patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T. Verhoeven; A.F.M. Verbraak (Anton); S. Boere-van der Straat; H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); J.M. Bogaard (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractSTUDY OBJECTIVES: The interpretation of nonspecific bronchial provocation dose-response curves in COPD is still a matter of debate. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) in patients with COPD could be influenced by the destruction of the parenchyma and the

  1. Accumulative dose response of CdZnTe detectors to 14.1 MeV neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang, E-mail: chenxiang@nint.ac.cn; Han, He-tong; Li, Gang; Lu, Yi

    2017-03-01

    The accumulative dose response of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors to 14.1 MeV neutrons is discussed experimentally in this paper. The Cockcroft–Walton Accelerator is used to obtain a steady neutron beam of 14.1 MeV neutrons. A pulsed X-ray source is used to test the response parameters of the neutron-exposed CZT detectors under the pulse mode. The irradiation time (hours) is shorter relative to the time scales (years) where annealing effects occur. Time and linearity response is analyzed to evaluate the maximum dose rate of the CZT detectors and the pulse shape. The result shows that the experimental CZT detectors maintain stable response behaviors, while the maximum dose rate and the total accumulative dose are less than 10{sup 6} neutrons/(cm{sup 2}·s) and 10{sup 10} neutrons/cm{sup 2}, respectively.

  2. Dose-response relationship of the cardiovascular adaptation to endurance training in healthy adults: how much training for what benefit?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ken-ichi Iwasaki; Rong Zhang; Julie H. Zuckerman; Benjamin D. Levine

    2003-01-01

    .... Therefore, we conducted the present long-term longitudinal study to quantify the dose-response relationship between the volume and intensity of exercise training, and regulation of heart rate (HR) and BP...

  3. Health effects of low doses at low dose rates: dose-response relationship modeling in a cohort of workers of the nuclear industry; Effets sanitaires des faibles doses a faibles debits de dose: modelisation de la relation dose-reponse dans une cohorte de travailleurs du nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz-Flamant, Camille

    2011-09-19

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to a better understanding of the health effects of chronic external low doses of ionising radiation. This work is based on the French cohort of CEA-AREVA NC nuclear workers. The mains stages of this thesis were (1) conducting a review of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers, (2) completing the database and performing a descriptive analysis of the cohort, (3) quantifying risk by different statistical methods and (4) modelling the exposure-time-risk relationship. The cohort includes monitored workers employed more than one year between 1950 and 1994 at CEA or AREVA NC companies. Individual annual external exposure, history of work, vital status and causes of death were reconstructed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios using French national mortality rates as external reference were computed. Exposure-risk analysis was conducted in the cohort using the linear excess relative risk model, based on both Poisson regression and Cox model. Time dependent modifying factors were investigated by adding an interaction term in the model or by using exposure time windows. The cohort includes 36, 769 workers, followed-up until age 60 in average. During the 1968- 2004 period, 5, 443 deaths, 2, 213 cancers, 62 leukemia and 1, 314 cardiovascular diseases were recorded. Among the 57% exposed workers, the mean cumulative dose was 21.5 milli-sieverts (mSv). A strong Healthy Worker Effect is observed in the cohort. Significant elevated risks of pleura cancer and melanoma deaths were observed in the cohort but not associated with dose. No significant association was observed with solid cancers, lung cancer and cardiovascular diseases. A significant dose-response relationship was observed for leukemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia, mainly for doses received less than 15 years before and for yearly dose rates higher than 10 mSv. This PhD work contributes to the evaluation of risks associated to chronic external radiation

  4. Adaptive response of mouse thymic lymphoma with low dose gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilip, B.; Ito, Akihiro [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine

    2000-12-01

    This review describes whether there is the adaptive response in carcinogenesis of a mouse model leukemia. The response, firstly found in human lymphocytes, concerns the reducing effect of pre-irradiation on chromosome aberration rate. At the whole body level, suppression or delay of tumor development by the response is reported: In mice irradiated with 2 Gy, thymic lymphoma is observed in 46% whereas the rate is reduced to 42.5-30% in animals pre-irradiated once to 10 times with 0.1 cGy. In mice receiving the adaptive dose of 1 cGy and the transplantation of barcle 95 tumor cells derived from the above lymphoma, the tumor development in 100% of the control is reduced to 70%. The adaptive irradiation with 1 cGy is also effective in vitro to suppress neoplastic transformation of mouse fetal cells by 4.0 Gy irradiation. Repair mechanisms of DNA damage and participation of signal transduction mediated by protein kinase C are proposed at the molecular level for possibly explaining the mechanism of adaptive response, however, the problem still remains to conclude there is the response in author's carcinogenic process. (K.H.)

  5. An investigation of gene-gene interactions in dose-response studies with Bayesian nonparametrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Andrew L; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A; Doyle, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Best practice for statistical methodology in cell-based dose-response studies has yet to be established. We examine the ability of MANOVA to detect trait-associated genetic loci in the presence of gene-gene interactions. We present a novel Bayesian nonparametric method designed to detect such interactions. MANOVA and the Bayesian nonparametric approach show good ability to detect trait-associated genetic variants under various possible genetic models. It is shown through several sets of analyses that this may be due to marginal effects being present, even if the underlying genetic model does not explicitly contain them. Understanding how genetic interactions affect drug response continues to be a critical goal. MANOVA and the novel Bayesian framework present a trade-off between computational complexity and model flexibility.

  6. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audette-Stuart, M., E-mail: stuartm@aecl.ca [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada); Kim, S.B.; McMullin, D.; Festarini, A.; Yankovich, T.L.; Carr, J.; Mulpuru, S. [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: > Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. > The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. > No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. > Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  7. Radiation dose response of normal lung assessed by Cone Beam CT - a potential tool for biologically adaptive radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Søren M

    2011-01-01

    Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose.......Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose....

  8. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Agglomeration Influences Dose-Rates and Modulates Oxidative Stress Mediated Dose-Response Profiles In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-07-31

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm-1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  9. Graded-threshold parametric response maps: towards a strategy for adaptive dose painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausch, A.; Jensen, N.; Chen, J.; Lee, T. Y.; Lock, M.; Wong, E.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To modify the single-threshold parametric response map (ST-PRM) method for predicting treatment outcomes in order to facilitate its use for guidance of adaptive dose painting in intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods: Multiple graded thresholds were used to extend the ST-PRM method (Nat. Med. 2009;15(5):572-576) such that the full functional change distribution within tumours could be represented with respect to multiple confidence interval estimates for functional changes in similar healthy tissue. The ST-PRM and graded-threshold PRM (GT-PRM) methods were applied to functional imaging scans of 5 patients treated for hepatocellular carcinoma. Pre and post-radiotherapy arterial blood flow maps (ABF) were generated from CT-perfusion scans of each patient. ABF maps were rigidly registered based on aligning tumour centres of mass. ST-PRM and GT-PRM analyses were then performed on overlapping tumour regions within the registered ABF maps. Main findings: The ST-PRMs contained many disconnected clusters of voxels classified as having a significant change in function. While this may be useful to predict treatment response, it may pose challenges for identifying boost volumes or for informing dose-painting by numbers strategies. The GT-PRMs included all of the same information as ST-PRMs but also visualized the full tumour functional change distribution. Heterogeneous clusters in the ST-PRMs often became more connected in the GT-PRMs by voxels with similar functional changes. Conclusions: GT-PRMs provided additional information which helped to visualize relationships between significant functional changes identified by ST-PRMs. This may enhance ST-PRM utility for guiding adaptive dose painting.

  10. Dose-response relationship of octylphenol and radiation evaluated by tradescantia-micronucleus assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. K.; Cheon, K. J.; Lee, B. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, H. S.; Lee, J. H. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-01

    Many kinds of synthetic chemicals have been being used for various purposes. Some of them are called 'Endocrine Disruptor's because they can disturb the endocrine system of organisms. Presently no technique is established for the quantitative assessment of biological risk of the environmental hormones. The pollen mother cells (PMC) of Tradescantia are very sensitive to chemical toxicants or ionizing radiation, and thus can be used as a biological end-point assessing their effect. Micronucleus frequencies in PMC showed a good dose- and concentration-response relationship for radiation, bisphenol A and octylphenol. A parallel series of experiment using five increasing doses of gamma-ray at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 cGy was conducted. The MCN frequencies of 12.0, 25.2, 41.7, 76 and 83 MCN/100 tetrads were observed from each of the increasing gamma-ray dosage groups, respectively. Lenear regression analysis of the gamma-ray data MCN frequencies yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.95. the MCN frequencies in pollen mother cells treated with bisphenol a and octylphenol showed dose-response relationship in a concentration of 0, 1, 2, 4 {mu}M and 0, 4, 10, 20 {mu}M. the MCN frequency for the bisphenol a and octylphenol group yields 2.33, 8.06, 12.7 and 19.6 MCN/100 tetrads for the bisphenol a and 2.33, 2.33, 11.47, 17.6 MCN/100 tetrads for the octylphenol. The MCN frequency of the control was 2.33 MCN/100 tetrads. It is known from the result that Trad-MCN assay can be an excellent tool for detection of biological risk due to environmental toxicants or synthetic chemicals.

  11. Aged garlic extract reduces blood pressure in hypertensives: a dose-response trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, K; Frank, O R; Stocks, N P

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension affects about 30% of adults worldwide. Garlic has blood pressure-lowering properties and the mechanism of action is biologically plausible. Our trial assessed the effect, dose-response, tolerability and acceptability of different doses of aged garlic extract as an adjunct treatment to existing antihypertensive medication in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. A total of 79 general practice patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension participated in a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled dose-response trial of 12 weeks. Participants were allocated to one of three garlic groups with either of one, two or four capsules daily of aged garlic extract (240/480/960 mg containing 0.6/1.2/2.4 mg of S-allylcysteine) or placebo. Blood pressure was assessed at 4, 8 and 12 weeks and compared with baseline using a mixed-model approach. Tolerability was monitored throughout the trial and acceptability was assessed at 12 weeks by questionnaire. Mean systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced by 11.8±5.4 mm Hg in the garlic-2-capsule group over 12 weeks compared with placebo (P=0.006), and reached borderline significant reduction in the garlic-4-capsule group at 8 weeks (-7.4±4.1 mm Hg, P=0.07). Changes in systolic blood pressure in the garlic-1-capsule group and diastolic blood pressure were not significantly different to placebo. Tolerability, compliance and acceptability were high in all garlic groups (93%) and highest in the groups taking one or two capsules daily. Our trial suggests aged garlic extract to be an effective and tolerable treatment in uncontrolled hypertension, and may be considered as a safe adjunct treatment to conventional antihypertensive therapy.

  12. Radiobiological equivalent of low/high dose rate brachytherapy and evaluation of tumor and normal responses to the dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, S

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biological equivalent of low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in terms of the more recent linear quadratic (LQ) model, which leads to theoretical estimation of biological equivalence. One of the key features of the LQ model is that it allows a more systematic radiobiological comparison between different types of treatment because the main parameters alpha/beta and micro are tissue-specific. Such comparisons also allow assessment of the likely change in the therapeutic ratio when switching between LDR and HDR treatments. The main application of LQ methodology, which focuses on by increasing the availability of remote afterloading units, has been to design fractionated HDR treatments that can replace existing LDR techniques. In this study, with LDR treatments (39 Gy in 48 h) equivalent to 11 fractions of HDR irradiation at the experimental level, there are increasing reports of reproducible animal models that may be used to investigate the biological basis of brachytherapy and to help confirm theoretical predictions. This is a timely development owing to the nonavailability of sufficient retrospective patient data analysis. It appears that HDR brachytherapy is likely to be a viable alternative to LDR only if it is delivered without a prohibitively large number of fractions (e.g., fewer than 11). With increased scientific understanding and technological capability, the prospect of a dose equivalent to HDR brachytherapy will allow greater utilization of the concepts discussed in this article.

  13. A method for inverse bifurcation of biochemical switches: inferring parameters from dose response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Muras, Irene; Yordanov, Pencho; Stelling, Joerg

    2014-11-20

    Within cells, stimuli are transduced into cell responses by complex networks of biochemical reactions. In many cell decision processes the underlying networks behave as bistable switches, converting graded stimuli or inputs into all or none cell responses. Observing how systems respond to different perturbations, insight can be gained into the underlying molecular mechanisms by developing mathematical models. Emergent properties of systems, like bistability, can be exploited to this purpose. One of the main challenges in modeling intracellular processes, from signaling pathways to gene regulatory networks, is to deal with high structural and parametric uncertainty, due to the complexity of the systems and the difficulty to obtain experimental measurements. Formal methods that exploit structural properties of networks for parameter estimation can help to overcome these problems. We here propose a novel method to infer the kinetic parameters of bistable biochemical network models. Bistable systems typically show hysteretic dose response curves, in which the so called bifurcation points can be located experimentally. We exploit the fact that, at the bifurcation points, a condition for multistationarity derived in the context of the Chemical Reaction Network Theory must be fulfilled. Chemical Reaction Network Theory has attracted attention from the (systems) biology community since it connects the structure of biochemical reaction networks to qualitative properties of the corresponding model of ordinary differential equations. The inverse bifurcation method developed here allows determining the parameters that produce the expected behavior of the dose response curves and, in particular, the observed location of the bifurcation points given by experimental data. Our inverse bifurcation method exploits inherent structural properties of bistable switches in order to estimate kinetic parameters of bistable biochemical networks, opening a promising route for developments in

  14. Folate intake and pancreatic cancer risk: an overall and dose-response meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H L; An, Q Z; Wang, Q Z; Liu, C X

    2013-07-01

    Inconsistent findings of association between supplemental folate consumption and pancreatic cancer risk have been observed in the literature. This study aims to summarize the relationship between folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. Pertinent studies published before November 2011 were identified by searching PubMed and Embase and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved articles. The summary relative risks were estimated by the random effects model. A linear regression analysis of the natural logarithm of the relative risk (RR) was carried out to assess a possible dose-response relationship between folate intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Ten studies on dietary and supplemental folate intake and pancreatic cancer (4 case-control and 6 cohort studies) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RRs of pancreatic cancer for the highest vs lowest categories of dietary folate intake and supplemental folate intake were 0.66 (95% CI: 0.49-0.88) and 1.08 (95% CI, 0.82-1.41), respectively. The dose-response meta-analysis indicated that a 100 μg/day increment in dietary folate intake conferred a RR of 0.93 (95% CI: 0.90-0.97). These findings support the hypothesis that dietary folate may play a protective role in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dose Response Association between Physical Activity and Biological, Demographic, and Perceptions of Health Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Loprinzi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few population-based studies have examined the association between physical activity (PA and cardiovascular disease risk factors, demographic variables, and perceptions of health status, and we do not have a clear understanding of the dose-response relationship among these variables. Methods: Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to examine the dose-response relationship between objectively measured PA and metabolic syndrome (and its individual cardiovascular disease risk factors, demographic variables, and perceptions of health. After exclusions, 5,538 participants 18 years or older were included in the present study, with 2,538 participants providing fasting glucose and 2,527 providing fasting triglyceride data. PA was categorized into deciles. Results: Overall, the health benefits showed a general pattern of increase with each increasing levels of PA. Of the ten PA classifications examined, participants in the highest moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA category (at least 71 min/day had the lowest odds of developing metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: At a minimum, sedentary adults should strive to meet current PA guidelines (i.e., 150 min/week of MVPA, with additional positive benefits associated with engaging in three times this level of PA.

  16. Effect of composition interactions on the dose response of an N-isopropylacrylamide gel dosimeter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Jen Chang

    Full Text Available In this study, a two-level full factorial design was used to identify the effects of the interactions between compositions in an N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM gel dosimeter involving the following variables: (A gelatin, (B NIPAM, (C the crosslinker N, N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide (Bis, and (D the antioxidant tetrakis (hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride (THPC. The dose range was from 0 Gy to 5 Gy. Optical computed tomography was used to scan the polymer gel dosimeter. Each component was set to two levels for all four variables, including (A 4% and 6%, (B 4% and 6%, (C 2% and 4%, as well as (D 5 and 15 mM. Response surface methodology and a central composite design were adopted for the quantitative investigation of the respective interaction effects on the dose response curve of the gel. The results showed that the contributions of the interaction effects, i.e., AB (6.22%, AC (8.38%, AD (7.74%, BC (9.44%, ABC (18.24%, BCD (12.66%, and ABCD (13.4%, were greater than those of the four main effects, accounting for over 76.08% of the total variability. These results also indicated that the NIPAM gel recipe with the highest sensitivity was at 40%C (mass fraction of Bis.

  17. Response Funtions for Computing Absorbed Dose to Skeletal Tissues from Photon Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Bolch, W E [University of Florida, Gainesville; Zankl, M [Institute of Radiation Protection, GSF-National Reserach Center for Environ; Petoussi-Henss, N [Institute of Radiation Protection, GSF-National Reserach Center for Environ

    2007-01-01

    The calculation of absorbed dose in skeletal tissues at radiogenic risk has been a difficult problem because the relevant structures cannot be represented in conventional geometric terms nor can they be visualised in the tomographic image data used to define the computational models of the human body. The active marrow, the tissue of concern in leukaemia induction, is present within the spongiosa regions of trabecular bone, whereas the osteoprogenitor cells at risk for bone cancer induction are considered to be within the soft tissues adjacent to the mineral surfaces. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommends averaging the absorbed energy over the active marrow within the spongiosa and over the soft tissues within 10 mm of the mineral surface for leukaemia and bone cancer induction, respectively. In its forthcoming recommendation, it is expected that the latter guidance will be changed to include soft tissues within 50 mm of the mineral surfaces. To address the computational problems, the skeleton of the proposed ICRP reference computational phantom has been subdivided to identify those voxels associated with cortical shell, spongiosa and the medullary cavity of the long bones. It is further proposed that the Monte Carlo calculations with these phantoms compute the energy deposition in the skeletal target tissues as the product of the particle fluence in the skeletal subdivisions and applicable fluence-to-dose response functions. This paper outlines the development of such response functions for photons.

  18. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from photon irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K.F. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6480 (United States); Bolch, W.E. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Zankl, M.; Petoussi-Henss, N. [GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstaedter Landstr, 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The calculation of absorbed dose in skeletal tissues at radiogenic risk has been a difficult problem because the relevant structures cannot be represented in conventional geometric terms nor can they be visualized in the tomographic image data used to define the computational models of the human body. The active marrow, the tissue of concern in leukaemia induction, is present within the spongiosa regions of trabecular bone, whereas the osteo-progenitor cells at risk for bone cancer induction are considered to be within the soft tissues adjacent to the mineral surfaces. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommends averaging the absorbed energy over the active marrow within the spongiosa and over the soft tissues within 10 {mu}m of the mineral surface for leukaemia and bone cancer induction, respectively. In its forthcoming recommendation, it is expected that the latter guidance will be changed to include soft tissues within 50 {mu}m of the mineral surfaces. To address the computational problems, the skeleton of the proposed ICRP reference computational phantom has been subdivided to identify those voxels associated with cortical shell, spongiosa and the medullary cavity of the long bones. It is further proposed that the Monte Carlo calculations with these phantoms compute the energy deposition in the skeletal target tissues as the product of the particle fluence in the skeletal subdivisions and applicable fluence-to-dose-response functions. This paper outlines the development of such response functions for photons. (authors)

  19. Characterization of the bronchodilatory dose response to indacaterol in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using model-based approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence David

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indacaterol is a once-daily long-acting inhaled β2-agonist indicated for maintenance treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The large inter-patient and inter-study variability in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 with bronchodilators makes determination of optimal doses difficult in conventional dose-ranging studies. We considered alternative methods of analysis. Methods We utilized a novel modelling approach to provide a robust analysis of the bronchodilatory dose response to indacaterol. This involved pooled analysis of study-level data to characterize the bronchodilatory dose response, and nonlinear mixed-effects analysis of patient-level data to characterize the impact of baseline covariates. Results The study-level analysis pooled summary statistics for each steady-state visit in 11 placebo-controlled studies. These study-level summaries encompassed data from 7476 patients at indacaterol doses of 18.75-600 μg once daily, and showed that doses of 75 μg and above achieved clinically important improvements in predicted trough FEV1 response. Indacaterol 75 μg achieved 74% of the maximum effect on trough FEV1, and exceeded the midpoint of the 100-140 mL range that represents the minimal clinically important difference (MCID; ≥120 mL vs placebo, with a 90% probability that the mean improvement vs placebo exceeded the MCID. Indacaterol 150 μg achieved 85% of the model-predicted maximum effect on trough FEV1 and was numerically superior to all comparators (99.9% probability of exceeding MCID. Indacaterol 300 μg was the lowest dose that achieved the model-predicted maximum trough response. The patient-level analysis included data from 1835 patients from two dose-ranging studies of indacaterol 18.75-600 μg once daily. This analysis provided a characterization of dose response consistent with the study-level analysis, and demonstrated that disease severity, as captured by

  20. X-ray dose response of calcite—A comprehensive analysis for optimal application in TL dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalita, J.M., E-mail: jitukalita09@gmail.com; Wary, G.

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Effect of annealing temperature on TL signal of calcite has been studied. • Specific annealing treatment for optimal dose response has been evaluated. • The dose response of natural calcite has been analyzed quantitatively. - Abstract: The effect of various annealing treatments on dosimetric characteristics of orange calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) mineral has been studied in detail. Quantitative analysis on the dose response shows that the 573 K annealed sample showed sublinear dose response from 10 mGy to 1 Gy. The fading and reproducibility of this sample are also good enough for dosimetric application. However, a specific annealing treatment after irradiation shows some significant improvements in the dosimetric characteristics of the sample. The 773 K pre-annealed sample, after X-ray irradiation post-annealing at 340 K for 6 min provides linear dose response from 10 mGy to 3.60 Gy, very less fading and good reproducibility. Moreover, this sample after post-annealing at 380 K for 6 min shows linear dose response from 10 mGy to 5.40 Gy when analyzed from the ∼408 K thermoluminescence (TL) glow peak. Analysis of TL glow curves confirmed that the 1.30 eV trap center in calcite crystal is the most effective trapping site for dosimetric application.

  1. Early Biochemical Effects of an Organic Mercury Fungicide on Infants: ``Dose Makes the Poison''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotelli, Carlos A.; Astolfi, Emilio; Cox, Christopher; Cernichiari, Elsa; Clarkson, Thomas W.

    1985-02-01

    Phenylmercury absorbed through the skin from contaminated diapers affected urinary excretion in infants in Buenos Aires. The effects were reversible and quantitatively related to the concentration of urinary mercury. Excretion of γ -glutamyl transpeptidase, an enzyme in the brush borders of renal tubular cells, increased in a dose-dependent manner when mercury excretion exceeded a ``threshold'' value. Urine volume also increased but at a higher threshold with respect to mercury. The results support the threshold concept of the systemic toxicity of metals. γ -Glutamyl transpeptidase is a useful and sensitive marker for preclinical effects of toxic metals.

  2. Growth hormone (GH) dose-dependent IGF-I response relates to pubertal height gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Elena; Kriström, Berit; Jonsson, Bjorn; Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin

    2015-12-18

    Responsiveness to GH treatment can be estimated by both growth and ∆IGF-I. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate if mimicking the physiological increase during puberty in GH secretion, by using a higher GH dose could lead to pubertal IGFs in short children with low GH secretion. The secondary aim was to explore the relationship between IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and the IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio and gain in height. A multicentre, randomized, clinical trial (TRN88-177) in 104 children (90 boys), who had received GH 33 μg/kg/day during at least 1 prepubertal year. They were followed from GH start to adult height (mean, 7.5 years; range, 4.6-10.7). At onset of puberty, children were randomized into three groups, to receive 67 μg/kg/day (GH(67)) given once (GH(67x1); n = 30) or divided into two daily injection (GH(33x2); n = 36), or to remain on a single 33 μg/kg/day dose (GH(33x1); n = 38). The outcome measures were change and obtained mean on-treatment IGF-I(SDS), IGFBP3(SDS) and IGF-I/IGFBP3 ratio(SDS) during prepuberty and puberty. These variables were assessed in relation to prepubertal, pubertal and total gain in heightSDS. Mean prepubertal increases 1 year after GH start were: 2.1 IGF-I(SDS), 0.6 IGFBP3(SDS) and 1.5 IGF-I/IGFBP3ratio(SDS). A significant positive correlation was found between prepubertal ∆IGFs and both prepubertal and total gain in height(SDS). During puberty changes in IGFs were GH dose-dependent: mean pubertal level of IGF-I(SDS) was higher in GH(67) vs GH(33) (p = 0.031). First year pubertal ∆IGF-I(SDS) was significantly higher in the GH(67)vs GH(33) group (0.5 vs -0.1, respectively, p = 0.007), as well as ∆IGF-I(SDS) to the pubertal mean level (0.2 vs -0.2, p = 0.028). In multivariate analyses, the prepubertal increase in '∆IGF-I(SDS) from GH start' and the 'GH dose-dependent pubertal ∆IGF-I(SDS)' were the most important variables for explaining variation in prepubertal (21 %), pubertal (26 %) and total

  3. A novel method of estimating dose responses for polymer gels using texture analysis of scanning electron microscopy images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ting Shih

    Full Text Available Polymer gels are regarded as a potential dosimeter for independent validation of absorbed doses in clinical radiotherapy. Several imaging modalities have been used to convert radiation-induced polymerization to absorbed doses from a macro-scale viewpoint. This study developed a novel dose conversion mechanism by texture analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM images. The modified N-isopropyl-acrylamide (NIPAM gels were prepared under normoxic conditions, and were administered radiation doses from 5 to 20 Gy. After freeze drying, the gel samples were sliced for SEM scanning with 50×, 500×, and 3500× magnifications. Four texture indices were calculated based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM. The results showed that entropy and homogeneity were more suitable than contrast and energy as dose indices for higher linearity and sensitivity of the dose response curves. After parameter optimization, an R (2 value of 0.993 can be achieved for homogeneity using 500× magnified SEM images with 27 pixel offsets and no outlier exclusion. For dose verification, the percentage errors between the prescribed dose and the measured dose for 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy were -7.60%, 5.80%, 2.53%, and -0.95%, respectively. We conclude that texture analysis can be applied to the SEM images of gel dosimeters to accurately convert micro-scale structural features to absorbed doses. The proposed method may extend the feasibility of applying gel dosimeters in the fields of diagnostic radiology and radiation protection.

  4. Transcriptional Response in Mouse Thyroid Tissue after 211At Administration: Effects of Absorbed Dose, Initial Dose-Rate and Time after Administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Rudqvist

    Full Text Available 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals are potentially useful for tumor therapy. However, a limitation has been the preferential accumulation of released 211At in the thyroid gland, which is a critical organ for such therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of absorbed dose, dose-rate, and time after 211At exposure on genome-wide transcriptional expression in mouse thyroid gland.BALB/c mice were i.v. injected with 1.7, 7.5 or 100 kBq 211At. Animals injected with 1.7 kBq were killed after 1, 6, or 168 h with mean thyroid absorbed doses of 0.023, 0.32, and 1.8 Gy, respectively. Animals injected with 7.5 and 100 kBq were killed after 6 and 1 h, respectively; mean thyroid absorbed dose was 1.4 Gy. Total RNA was extracted from pooled thyroids and the Illumina RNA microarray platform was used to determine mRNA levels. Differentially expressed transcripts and enriched GO terms were determined with adjusted p-value 1.5, and p-value <0.05, respectively.In total, 1232 differentially expressed transcripts were detected after 211At administration, demonstrating a profound effect on gene regulation. The number of regulated transcripts increased with higher initial dose-rate/absorbed dose at 1 or 6 h. However, the number of regulated transcripts decreased with mean absorbed dose/time after 1.7 kBq 211At administration. Furthermore, similar regulation profiles were seen for groups administered 1.7 kBq. Interestingly, few previously proposed radiation responsive genes were detected in the present study. Regulation of immunological processes were prevalent at 1, 6, and 168 h after 1.7 kBq administration (0.023, 0.32, 1.8 Gy.

  5. Radiation dose response correlation between thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence in quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oniya, E.O. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute (C.E.T.I.), R.C. ' Athena' , Tsimiski 58, GR-67100 Xanthi (Greece); Physics and Electronics Department, Adekunle Ajasin University, PMB 01, Akungba Akoko (Nigeria); Polymeris, G.S.; Tsirliganis, N.C. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute (C.E.T.I.), R.C. ' Athena' , Tsimiski 58, GR-67100 Xanthi (Greece); Kitis, G., E-mail: gkitis@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2012-07-15

    The fast, linearly modulated optically stimulated luminescence (LM-OSL) component in quartz is the main dosimetric signal used for the dating applications of this material. Since the blue light stimulation (470 nm, 40 mW cm {sup -2}) time needed to obtain the fast LM-OSL component is less than 50 s the electron trapping levels responsible for it are still highly populated. In this way an active radiation history is created which could play an important role in the dosimetric characteristics of the fast OSL signal. In the present work the dose response behavior of the fast OSL signal is investigated in quartz samples with an annealed radiation history and quartz samples possessing an artificial radiation history. A computerized curve de-convolution analysis of the LM-OSL curves for 50 s stimulation time showed that it consists of three individual OSL components. The faster component C{sub 1} with peak maximum time around 5 s has a linear dose response in virgin samples, which turns to a slight superlinearity as a function of the artificial radiation history. On the other hand the component C{sub 2} with peak maximum time at 12 s is slightly superlinear which turns into strong superlinearity as a function of artificial radiation history. Finally, component C{sub 3} with peak maximum time at about 45 s is strongly superlinear for both virgin samples and as a function of artificial radiation history. The implications to practical application are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fast OSL component consists of three components. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The linearity of first fast component does not depend on radiation history. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The linearity of second and third components depend on radiation history. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TL between 180 and 300 Degree-Sign C is the major source of OSL.

  6. Response of CEDIA amphetamines assay after a single dose of bitter orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, DiemThuy T; Bui, Linda T; Ambrose, Peter J

    2006-04-01

    Bitter orange has recently been substituted as an ingredient in many "ephedra-free" dietary supplements used for weight loss. The primary active ingredient in bitter orange is synephrine. Previous reports have documented false-positive results from ephedrine with urine amphetamine assays. Because of the similarity in chemical structure of ephedrine and synephrine, it is hypothesized that ingestion of a bitter orange supplement may have the potential to cause false-positive results with urine amphetamine assays. The purpose of this study was to determine the response of the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay after ingestion of bitter orange. Six healthy adult male volunteers were administered a single oral dose of Nature's Way Bitter Orange, a 900-mg dietary supplement extract standardized to 6% synephrine. Urine specimens were collected at baseline and 3 and 6 hours post-administration. Additional urine specimens were collected from 1 subject at 9, 12, and 15 hours after administration. All specimens were analyzed by the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay. Urine specific gravity and pH also were measured. All urine specimens demonstrated a negative response to the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay. Urine specific gravity ranged from 1.007 to 1.028, and pH ranged from 5.0 to 7.0; thus, reducing the possibility that the negative results were caused by diluted specimens or reduced excretion of synephrine into alkaline urine. This information will be of value when health care providers or those who interpret drug screens are asked to provide consultation regarding the interference of bitter orange supplements with the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay. A single-dose of Nature's Way Bitter Orange was not found to cause a false-positive response to the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay in 6 healthy adult male volunteers.

  7. Treatment of ulcerative colitis with oral mesalamine: advances in drug formulation, efficacy expectations and dose response, compliance, and chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandborn, William J

    2006-01-01

    Sulfasalazine, olsalazine, balsalazide, delayed-release mesalamine, controlled-release mesalamine, mesalamine pellets, and Multi-Matrix System mesalamine are effective first-line therapies for the treatment of mildly to moderately active ulcerative colitis and for subsequent maintenance of remission. For induction therapy it is unclear if there is a dose response above 1.5 g, and for maintenance therapy existing data do not support a dose response above 1.5 g. Sulfasalazine has more frequent side effects than olsalazine, balsalazide, and mesalamine formulations. Once-daily dosing with multi-matrix system mesalamine 1.2 g tablets may lead to optimal compliance. Mesalamine >/= 1.2 g and sulfasalazine >/= 2 g reduce the risk of colorectal cancer in patients with ulcerative colitis. Drug formulations, efficacy expectations and dose response, toxicity expectations, compliance considerations, and chemoprevention considerations are reviewed.

  8. Laser-based irradiation apparatus and method to measure the functional dose-rate response of semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Kevin M [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-05-20

    A broad-beam laser irradiation apparatus can measure the parametric or functional response of a semiconductor device to exposure to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light. Comparisons of dose-rate response from before, during, and after accelerated aging of a device, or from periodic sampling of devices from fielded operational systems can determine if aging has affected the device's overall functionality. The dependence of these changes on equivalent dose-rate pulse intensity and/or duration can be measured with the apparatus. The synchronized introduction of external electrical transients into the device under test can be used to simulate the electrical effects of the surrounding circuitry's response to a radiation exposure while exposing the device to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light.

  9. The energy dependence of the lateral dose response functions of detectors with various densities in photon-beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looe, Hui Khee; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2017-02-07

    The lateral dose response function is a general characteristic of the volume effect of a detector used for photon dosimetry in a water phantom. It serves as the convolution kernel transforming the true absorbed dose to water profile, which would be produced within the undisturbed water phantom, into the detector-measured signal profile. The shape of the lateral dose response function characterizes (i) the volume averaging attributable to the detector's size and (ii) the disturbance of the secondary electron field associated with the deviation of the electron density of the detector material from the surrounding water. In previous work, the characteristic dependence of the shape of the lateral dose response function upon the electron density of the detector material was studied for 6 MV photons by Monte Carlo simulation of a wall-less voxel-sized detector (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-07). This study is here continued for 60Co gamma rays and 15 MV photons in comparison with 6 MV photons. It is found (1) that throughout these photon spectra the shapes of the lateral dose response functions are retaining their characteristic dependence on the detector's electron density, and (2) that their energy-dependent changes are only moderate. This appears as a practical advantage because the lateral dose response function can then be treated as practically invariant across a clinical photon beam in spite of the known changes of the photon spectrum with increasing distance from the beam axis.

  10. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Early Treatment Responses of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varigonda, Anjali L; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Taylor, Matthew J; Freemantle, Nick; Coughlin, Catherine; Bloch, Michael H

    2015-07-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the first-line pharmacological treatment for pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the following: the time-course of response to SSRIs in pediatric depression; whether higher doses of SSRIs are associated with an improved response in pediatric depression; differences in efficacy between SSRI agents; and whether the time-course and magnitude of response to SSRIs is different in pediatric and adult patients with MDD. We searched PubMed and CENTRAL for randomized controlled trials comparing SSRIs to placebo for the treatment of pediatric MDD. We extracted weekly symptom data from trials to characterize the trajectory of pharmacological response to SSRIs. Pooled estimates of treatment effect were calculated based on standardized mean differences between treatment and placebo groups. The meta-analysis included 13 pediatric MDD trials with a total of 3,004 patients. A logarithmic model indicating that the greatest benefits of SSRIs occurred early in treatment best fit the longitudinal data (log[week] = 0.10, 95% CI = 0.06-0.15, p < .0001). There were no significant differences based on maximum SSRI dose or between particular SSRI agents. SSRIs were demonstrated to have a smaller benefit in pediatric compared to adult MDD. Treatment gains in pediatric MDD are greatest early in treatment and are, on average, minimal after 4 weeks of SSRI pharmacotherapy in pediatric MDD. Further research is needed using individual patient data to examine the power of early SSRI response (e.g., 2-4 weeks) to predict outcomes in short-term pharmacological trials. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Subjective Responses to Caffeine Are Influenced by Caffeine Dose, Sex, and Pubertal Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Jennifer L; Ziegler, Amanda M; Martin, Catherine; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-12-01

    Background: Our previous work has shown that there are sex differences in subjective responses to acute caffeine administration in adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine if these sex differences are dependent on pubertal development. Materials and Methods: We examined subjective responses before and after administration of 0, 1, and 2 mg/kg of caffeine in pre- and postpubertal boys and girls (n = 112). In addition, we examined differences in subjective responses to acute caffeine in both the luteal and follicular phases of the menstrual cycle in postpubertal girls. Results: Caffeine at both doses resulted in greater changes in responses on the Addiction Research Center Inventory and the Brief Assessment of Mood States compared with placebo. Girls reported greater increases from baseline to peak in feeling different and liking the feeling than boys after 2 mg/kg of caffeine regardless of pubertal stage. Postpubertal girls also had a greater decrease from baseline in reports of feeling high and greater increases from baseline in reports of wanting more than postpubertal males. Finally, girls had greater changes (both increases and decreases) in responses on the Brief Mood Questionnaire when in the follicular phase compared with the luteal phase. This was also true for reports of feeling high and feeling different on the Drug Effects Questionnaire. None of these effects varied as a function of usual caffeine use, suggesting that differences are not the result of tolerance or sensitization. Conclusions: These results suggest that subjective responses to caffeine emerge before puberty, but sex differences may be strengthened after pubertal development.

  12. Dose response of micronuclei induced by combination radiation of α-particles and γ-rays in human lymphoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Ruiping; He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Ye, Shuang; Yuan, Dexiao [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shao, Chunlin, E-mail: clshao@shmu.edu.cn [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► α-Particle induced MN had a biphasic dose–response followed by a bystander model. ► MN dose–response of α- and γ-combination IR was similar to that of α-particle. ► α-Particles followed by γ-rays yielded a synergistic effect on MN induction. ► Low dose γ-rays triggered antagonistic and adaptive responses against α-particle. - Abstract: Combination radiation is a real situation of both nuclear accident exposure and space radiation environment, but its biological dosimetry is still not established. This study investigated the dose–response of micronuclei (MN) induction in lymphocyte by irradiating HMy2.CIR lymphoblast cells with α-particles, γ-rays, and their combinations. Results showed that the dose–response of MN induced by γ-rays was well-fitted with the linear-quadratic model. But for α-particle irradiation, the MN induction had a biphasic phenomenon containing a low dose hypersensitivity characteristic and its dose response could be well-stimulated with a state vector model where radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was involved. For the combination exposure, the dose response of MN was similar to that of α-irradiation. However, the yield of MN was closely related to the sequence of irradiations. When the cells were irradiated with α-particles at first and then γ-rays, a synergistic effect of MN induction was observed. But when the cells were irradiated with γ-rays followed by α-particles, an antagonistic effect of MN was observed in the low dose range although this combination radiation also yielded a synergistic effect at high doses. When the interval between two irradiations was extended to 4 h, a cross-adaptive response against the other irradiation was induced by a low dose of γ-rays but not α-particles.

  13. Arecoline stimulated early growth response-1 production in human buccal fibroblasts: suppression by epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Ping; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Chang, Jenny Zwei-Chieng; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Deng, Yi-Ting; Kuo, Mark Yen-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Early growth response-1 (Egr-1) protein plays an important role in many human fibrotic diseases. Areca nut chewing is the most important risk factor of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF). Egr-1 protein expression in OSF was examined using antibody to Egr-1. Arecoline-induced Egr-1 expression and its signaling pathways were assessed by Western blot analyses in human buccal mucosal fibroblasts (BMFs). Elevated Egr-1 staining was observed in epithelial cells, fibroblast, and inflammatory cells in 7 of 10 OSF cases. Arecoline, a main alkaloid found in the areca nut, stimulated Egr-1 synthesis in BMFs. Pretreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor PD98059 significantly reduced arecoline-induced Egr-1 synthesis. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) inhibited arecoline-induced Egr-1 synthesis and collagen gel contraction in a dose-responsive manner. Constitutive Egr-1 expression during areca nut chewing may play a role in the pathogenesis of OSF. EGCG could be a good candidate for prevention or treatment of OSF. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages after Plutonium Oxide Inhalation in Rats: Involvement in the Early Inflammatory Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Meeren, A.; Tourdes, F.; Gremy, O.; Grillon, G.; Abram, M.C.; Poncy, J.L.; Griffiths, N. [CEA, DSV, DRR, SRCA, Centre DAM Ile de France, F-91297 Bruyeres Le Chatel, Arpajon (France)

    2008-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play an important role in the distribution, clearance and inflammatory reactions after particle inhalation, which may influence long-term events such as fibrosis and tumorigenesis. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the early inflammatory events after plutonium oxide inhalation in rats and involvement of alveolar macrophages. Lung changes were studied from 3 days to 3 months after inhalation of PuO{sub 2} or different isotopic compositions (70% or 97% {sup 239}Pu) and initial lung deposits (range 2.1 to 43.4 kBq/rat). Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavages showed early increases in the numbers of granulocytes, lymphocytes and multi-nucleated macrophages. The activation of macrophages was evaluated ex vivo by measurement of inflammatory mediator levels in culture supernatants. TNF-alpha and chemokine MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1 production was elevated from 7 days after inhalation and remained so up to 3 months. In contrast, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 production was unchanged. At 6 weeks, pulmonary macrophage numbers and activation state were increased as observed from an immunohistochemistry study of lung sections with anti-ED1. Similarly, histological analyses of lung sections also showed evidence of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results indicate early inflammatory changes in the lungs of PuO{sub 2}-contaminated animals and the involvement of macrophages in this process. A dose-effect relationship was observed between the amount of radionuclide inhaled or retained at the time of analysis and inflammatory mediator production by alveolar macrophages 14 days after exposure. For similar initial lung deposits, the inflammatory manifestation appears higher for 97% {sup 239}Pu than for 70% {sup 239}Pu. (authors)

  15. Paradigm lost, paradigm found: The re-emergence of hormesis as a fundamental dose response model in the toxicological sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabrese, Edward J. [Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Morrill I, N344, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)]. E-mail: edwardc@schoolph.umass.edu

    2005-12-15

    This paper provides an assessment of the toxicological basis of the hormetic dose-response relationship including issues relating to its reproducibility, frequency, and generalizability across biological models, endpoints measured and chemical class/physical stressors and implications for risk assessment. The quantitative features of the hormetic dose response are described and placed within toxicological context that considers study design, temporal assessment, mechanism, and experimental model/population heterogeneity. Particular emphasis is placed on an historical evaluation of why the field of toxicology rejected hormesis in favor of dose response models such as the threshold model for assessing non-carcinogens and linear no threshold (LNT) models for assessing carcinogens. The paper argues that such decisions were principally based on complex historical factors that emerged from the intense and protracted conflict between what is now called traditional medicine and homeopathy and the overly dominating influence of regulatory agencies on the toxicological intellectual agenda. Such regulatory agency influence emphasized hazard/risk assessment goals such as the derivation of no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) and the lowest observed adverse effect levels (LOAELs) which were derived principally from high dose studies using few doses, a feature which restricted perceptions and distorted judgments of several generations of toxicologists concerning the nature of the dose-response continuum. Such historical and technical blind spots lead the field of toxicology to not only reject an established dose-response model (hormesis), but also the model that was more common and fundamental than those that the field accepted. - The quantitative features of the hormetic dose/response are described and placed within the context of toxicology.

  16. Dose Response of Retinol and Isotretinoin in the Prevention of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Recurrence