WorldWideScience

Sample records for early career award

  1. LHCb Early Career Scientist Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrick Koppenburg for the LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    On 15 September 2016, the LHCb collaboration awarded the first set of prizes for outstanding contributions of early career scientists.   From left to right: Guy Wilkinson (LHCb spokesperson), Sascha Stahl, Kevin Dungs, Tim Head, Roel Aaij, Conor Fitzpatrick, Claire Prouvé, Patrick Koppenburg (chair of committee) and Sean Benson. Twenty-five nominations were submitted and considered by the committee, and 5 prizes were awarded to teams or individuals for works that had a significant impact within the last year. The awardees are: Roel Aaij, Sean Benson, Conor Fitzpatrick, Rosen Matev and Sascha Stahl for having implemented and commissioned the revolutionary changes to the LHC Run-2 high-level-trigger, including the first widespread deployment of real-time analysis techniques in High Energy Physics;   Kevin Dungs and Tim Head for having launched the Starterkit initiative, a new style of software tutorials based on modern programming methods. “Starterkit is a group of ph...

  2. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Tania Lombrozo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    APA's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize psychologists who have demonstrated excellence early in their careers. One of the 2016 award winners is Tania Lombrozo, whose "groundbreaking studies have shown just how, and why, explanations are so important to people." Lombrozo's award citation, biography, and bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Katie A. McLaughlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    APA's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize psychologists who have demonstrated excellence early in their careers. One of the 2016 award winners is Katie A. McLaughlin, who has "has articulated important distinctions among the effects of early neglect and abuse and has uncovered specific processes that are disrupted by early adverse environmental experiences." McLaughlin's award citation, biography, and bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Kathryn Paige Harden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize psychologists who have demonstrated excellence early in their careers and have held a doctoral degree for no more than 9 years. One of the 2017 award winners is Kathryn Paige Harden, for demonstrating "how to integrate genetic knowledge with the classical clinical and developmental insights into human behavior." Harden's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Fabian A. Soto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    APA's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize psychologists who have demonstrated excellence early in their careers. One of the 2016 award winners is Fabian A. Soto, whose work "has shed fresh light on a broad range of fundamental psychological issues, including basic associative conditioning, causal judgment, categorization, visual object recognition, and face processing." Soto's award citation, biography, and selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Kate Sweeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    APA's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize psychologists who have demonstrated excellence early in their careers. One of the 2016 award winners is Kate Sweeny, whose formulation of "crisis decision theory, the bad news response model, the uncertainty navigation model," and other theories and models demonstrate her capacity to provide "order and sense to unfocused and confusing research domains." Sweeny's award citation, biography, and bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Adriana Galván.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    APA's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize psychologists who have demonstrated excellence early in their careers and have held a doctoral degree for no more than 9 years. One of the 2016 award winners is Adriana Galván, whose "scientific discoveries have delineated neurobiological determinants of adolescent behavior that promote the transition from dependence on caregivers to autonomy." Galván's award citation, biography, and bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Nathan M. Holmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The American Psychological Association's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize psychologists who have demonstrated excellence early in their careers. One of the 2016 award winners is Nathan M. Holmes, whose work "has helped to elucidate the role of error-correction mechanisms in extinction, how extinguished and counter-conditioned fear responses are regulated by context and time, and how motivational states (such as fear) alter the content and neural substrates of associative formation." Holmes's award citation, biography, and selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Greg Hajcak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    APA's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize psychologists who have demonstrated excellence early in their careers. One of the 2016 award winners is Greg Hajcak, whose "groundbreaking contributions applying psychophysiological methods to the affective neuroscience of anxiety, depression, psychosis, and related traits" and whose work "has identified promising risk biomarkers and intervention targets and has illuminated the development of, and mechanisms associated with, these disorders." Hajcak's award citation, biography, and bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. J. David Creswell: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    APA's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize excellent young psychologists who have not held a doctoral degree for more than nine years. One of the 2014 award winners is J. David Creswell, for "outstanding and innovative research on mechanisms linking stress management strategies to disease." Creswell's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Robert E. Ployhart

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Robert E. Ployhart, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for innovative work in examining reactions to staffing practices and efforts to enhance the acceptability of recruitment and staffing practices; for exemplary use of applied statistical models in examining multilevel effects…

  12. Friederike Range: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Friederike Range for outstanding contributions to the understanding of the complex social minds of nonhuman animals. Through ingenious experimental approaches,…

  13. Laurie R. Santos: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Laurie R. Santos for creative and insightful investigations of cognition across a broad range of species and psychological domains, illuminating cognitive…

  14. Angela J. Grippo: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Angela J. Grippo for her creative contributions in investigating the association between depression and cardiovascular disease in preclinical animal models.…

  15. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Ahmad R. Hariri

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Ahmad R. Hariri, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for pioneering contributions to understanding the neurobiological mechanisms driving individual differences in complex behavior traits. Hariri has integrated molecular genetics, neuropharmacology, neuroimaging, and psychology in…

  16. Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest: Anneliese A. Singh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest recognize persons who have advanced psychology as a science and/or profession by a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of outstanding contributions in the public interest. The 2016 corecipient of the Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest is Anneliese A. Singh. Dr. Singh's scholarship "has promoted major advancements in LBGT studies and intersectionality of multiple identities." Singh's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest: Mark L. Hatzenbuehler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest recognize persons who have advanced psychology as a science and/or profession by a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of outstanding contributions in the public interest. The 2016 corecipient of the Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest is Mark L. Hatzenbuehler. The Award recognizes Dr. Hatzenbuehler's advancements in understanding stigma, particularly "the stigma experience of being gay or bisexual at the psychological level in terms of rumination, secret keeping, and the like; at the social level in terms of stigma-imbued social interactions; and at the structural level in terms of policies such as the presence or absence of anti-bullying interventions in schools or gay marriage prohibitions at the level of states." Hatzenbuehler's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Laurie R. Santos: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Laurie R. Santos for creative and insightful investigations of cognition across a broad range of species and psychological domains, illuminating cognitive development and cognitive evolution. Laurie R. Santos links many branches of psychological inquiry in her research, including animal behavior, comparative psychology, developmental psychology, judgment and decision making, and social psychology. In particular, her studies of biases, irrationalities, and errors- where rational decision making fails, rather than succeeds-are providing remarkable insights into how cognitive biases evolved and how decision making operates at a fundamental level. Her accomplishments beautifully illustrate the power of comparative studies of animal learning and behavior to help us understand the human mind. Santos' Award citation and a selected bibliography are also presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Adam M. Grant: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Presents Adam M. Grant, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. "For extensive, elegant, and programmatic research on the power of relational job design in enhancing employee motivation, productivity, and satisfaction; for creative and rigorous studies documenting the profound and surprising effects of connecting employees to their impact on others; for highlighting prosocial motivation, not only extrinsic and intrinsic motivations, as a key force behind employee behavior; and for demonstrating by example the feasibility and benefits of conducting field experiments, yielding studies rich in internal validity, external validity, and practical impact. In addition to his accomplishments, Adam M. Grant is known for his generosity as a scholar, teacher, and colleague." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  20. 2011 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers: the PECASE Awards Ceremony

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poneman, Daniel [DOE Deputy Secretary

    2012-08-01

    The winners for 2011 of the DOE PECASE Awards were recognized in a ceremony held August 01, 2012. Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of the Office of Science introduced the main speaker, DOE Deputy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman. Leaders from across the Department and the fields of energy research and technology presented the 2011 winners. They are: Dr. Stanley Atcitty (SNL); Dr. Jeffrey W. Banks (LLNL); Dr. Amy J. Clarke (LANL); Derek R. Gaston (INL); Dr. Christopher Hirata (California Institute of Technology); Dr. Heileen Hsu-Kim (Duke University); Dr. Thomas Francisco (Jaramillo Stanford University); Dr.Pablo Jarillo-Herrero (MIT); Dr. Peter Mueller (ANL); Dr. Daniel B. Sinars (SNL); Dr. Jesse Thaler (MIT); and Dr. Heather Whitley (LLNL).

  1. Final report for the DOE Early Career Award #DE-SC0003912

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraman, Arthi [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2016-01-20

    This DoE supported early career project was aimed at developing computational models, theory and simulation methods that would be then be used to predict assembly and morphology in polymer nanocomposites. In particular, the focus was on composites in active layers of devices, containing conducting polymers that act as electron donors and nanoscale additives that act as electron acceptors. During the course this work, we developed the first of its kind molecular models to represent conducting polymers enabling simulations at the experimentally relevant length and time scales. By comparison with experimentally observed morphologies we validated these models. Furthermore, using these models and molecular dynamics simulations on graphical processing units (GPUs) we predicted the molecular level design features in polymers and additive that lead to morphologies with optimal features for charge carrier behavior in solar cells. Additionally, we also predicted computationally new design rules for better dispersion of additives in polymers that have been confirmed through experiments. Achieving dispersion in polymer nanocomposites is valuable to achieve controlled macroscopic properties of the composite. The results obtained during the course of this DOE funded project enables optimal design of higher efficiency organic electronic and photovoltaic devices and improve every day life with engineering of these higher efficiency devices.

  2. Mitchell Receives 2013 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan L.

    2014-07-01

    I am honored to receive this award in memory of Ron Greeley. Although I did not have the opportunity to know him, I had the pleasure of getting to know his wife, Cynthia, at a luncheon prior to the special awards session at the AGU Fall Meeting. Cynthia is an intelligent and elegant southern woman with a confident gaze. She spoke fondly of Ron and of her sincere respect for his work ethic and dedication to planetary science. What most impressed me, though, was the respect Ron showed to her and the kids by always "giving them the evenings"; no matter how busy things got, Ron always kept his evenings open for Cynthia. This clearly meant the world to her. As a family man, I can only hope that my wife and kids will speak so kindly of me many years from now. I would like to dedicate this award to them in gratitude for their seemingly unconditional love and support.

  3. Department of Energy DE-FG02-05ER25686 Early Career Principal Investigator Award Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek, Chiou [The University of Texas at Austin

    2013-05-11

    This project is researching FAST, a methodology to build very fast, cycleaccurate full system computer simulators and building the first set of such simulators and the first set of tools to help construct those simulators. The methodology relies on a functional model that is a fast, full-system but not cycle-accurate simulator coupled with a timing model that is models the micro-architectural structure and arbitration of a computer system, but not its functionality. The way FAST simulators differ from other simulators partitioned in the same way is that the interface between the functional and timing model is optimized to minimize the need for round-trip communication. The optimized communication enables FAST timing models to be implemented in an FPGA and the functional model in software while still achieving extremely high performance. Our general strategy is to design a methodology and then prototype an example using that methodology to ensure the methodology is sound before committing to it. This strategy ensures that the selected methodology has been tested and provides an early example of the output of that methodology.

  4. Helping early career research scientists ascend the professional ladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laina

    2013-08-01

    The Keystone Symposia Early Career Investigator Travel Award initiative is a unique successful research mentoring program tailored for 'end of the pipeline' life and biomedical scientists from academia and industry. Using targeted educational, mentoring, and networking activities, the program benefits early career scientists in solving a specific laboratory-based research question that is limiting their evolving research and could increase their ability to obtain new grants and improve their career progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Undergraduate Breakfast, Career Workshop, and Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate students can enjoy a hearty breakfast and learn about how to prepare for a wide variety of careers in physics outside of academia. Topics of this interactive workshop will include planning and self-assessment, inventorying transferable skills, finding out more about career opportunities, and successfully applying for jobs. Immediately following the workshop, top presenters from the Undergraduate Research/SPS sessions will be recognized. All presenters in the undergraduate sessions will receive certificates acknowledging their scientific accomplishments.

  6. NASA Early Career Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Early Career Fellowship program was established in 2005 to facilitate the integration of outstanding early career planetary science researchers into established research funding programs by providing tools and experience useful to maintain a successful research program. Executing a successful research program requires a few key elements such as: successful proposal writing; adequate (paid) research time; management of a laboratory; collaboration and networking; frequent and high-quality publications; and adequate start-up equipment funds. These elements may be particularly critical for early career researchers searching for a tenure- track or equivalent position. The Early Career Fellowship program recognizes the importance of these skills and provides extra funding and resources to begin a successful research program. For consideration into The Early Career Fellowship program, the candidate needs to be the P. I. or Science P.I. of a funded research proposal from one of the participating R&A program areas, be within 7 years of earning a PhD, hold a non-tenure track position, and indicate the early career candidacy when submitting the research proposal. If the research proposal is funded and the discipline scientist nominates the candidate as an early career fellow, the candidate is then considered a Fellow and eligible to propose for Step 2. Upon obtaining a tenure-track equivalent position the Fellow submits a Step 2 proposal for up to one hundred thousand dollars in start-up funds. Start-up funds may be used for salary; undergraduate and/or graduate research assistants; supplies and instrument upgrades; travel to conferences, meetings, and advisory groups; time and travel for learning new skills; publication page charges; books and journal subscriptions; computer time and/or specialized software; and other justified research-specific needs. The early career fellowship program provides resources that a more established scientist would have acquired allowing

  7. Preparing Scientists for Scientific Careers: Broader Impacts from an NSF CAREER Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Alfred

    2008-03-01

    The scientific focus of my NSF CAREER Award is the impact of patterns, topographical and surface chemical in design, on the adhesion of soft polymer interfaces. Although this topic has provided a strong foundation for the mentoring and training of graduate students, the primary broader impacts of my award have focused on the development of ``soft'' skills in graduate and post-doctoral researchers in STEM disciplines. I have developed a course on ``Scientific and Engineering Management,'' which provides an open forum for students to explore the skills that, in many ways, define successful careers for many scientists. Topics include: leadership, proposal writing, group management, communication in diverse environments, and ethics. In this presentation, I highlight the primary phases of this program, how it meshes with scientific goals, and general statements about the mission of education outreach within STEM disciplines.

  8. Typical career dilemmas of academic staff during the early career ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Job satisfaction is of great importance for any organization, including higher education insti- tutions, as it impacts ... support regarding research and teaching; discrimination; and certain management matters. Introduction. It is well .... typical career dilemmas of academic staff in the early career phase within a changing South.

  9. Rodney K. Goodyear: Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology is given in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. The 2015 recipient of this award is Rodney K. Goodyear "for his substantive, sustained, and enduring contributions to research and practice in the training and supervision of students and educators in professional psychology, and for his leadership in helping to establish competency standards in the area of clinical supervision both in the United States and internationally. Goodyear's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Julio J. Ramirez: Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology is given in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. The 2014 recipient of this award is Julio J. Ramirez, for "creating a national infrastructure to support education and training in behavioral neuroscience and biological psychology, for playing a seminal role in creating an undergraduate neuroscience education journal, and for creating a nationally recognized mentoring program for junior faculty in the neurosciences, particularly with underrepresented groups." Ramirez's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. 13 CFR 305.11 - Contract awards; early construction start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contract awards; early construction start. 305.11 Section 305.11 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION... § 305.11 Contract awards; early construction start. EDA must determine that the award of all contracts...

  12. Career Incentive Awards for Students with Visual Impairments: A Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russello, Susan; D'Allura, Tana

    2000-01-01

    A study interviewed 25 individuals with visual impairments who received Career Incentive Awards between 1986 and 1995. Results found the participants were a diverse group in terms of personal and educational backgrounds, career goals, and age, yet all demonstrated a common drive to succeed and were highly educated. (Contains references.) (CR)

  13. Enhancing international collaboration among early career researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jennifer K; Albada, Akke; Farahani, Mansoureh; Lithner, Maria; Neumann, Melanie; Sandhu, Harbinder; Shepherd, Heather L

    2010-09-01

    The European Association of Communication in Healthcare (EACH) Early Career Researchers Network (ECRN) aims are to (1) promote international collaboration among young investigators and (2) provide a support network for future innovative communication research projects. In October 2009, Miami, USA at a workshop facilitated by the ECRN at the International Conference on Communication in Healthcare (ICCH) hosted by the American Academy of Communication in Healthcare we explored common facilitators and challenges faced by early career researchers in health communication research. Attendees introduced themselves, their research area(s) of interest, and listed one facilitator and one barrier for their career development. EACH ECRN members then led a discussion of facilitators and challenges encountered in communication research projects and career development. We discussed potential collaboration opportunities, future goals, and activities. Having supportive collegial relationships, institutional support, job security, and funding are critical facilitators for early career investigators. Key challenges include difficulty with time management and prioritizing, limited resources, and contacts. International collaboration among early career researchers is a feasible and effective means to address important challenges, by increasing opportunities for professional support and networking, problem-solving, discussion of data, and ultimately publishing. Future AACH-EACH Early Career Researcher Networks should continue to build collaborations by developing shared research projects, papers, and other scholarly products. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Research Funding Opportunities for Early Career Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Richard

    2009-10-01

    This talk will describe opportunities for early career faculty members in the physical sciences to obtain funding for scientific research and educational projects. I will discuss programs offered by Research Corporation for Science Advancement, a private nonprofit foundation, which include opportunities for scientists at primarily undergraduate institutions and at research universities. I will emphasize strategies for successful grant writing. The target audience is early career academic scientists in Astronomy, Physics, and related fields, as well as graduate students and postdoctoral researchers considering careers in these academic disciplines.

  15. Recognizing Business Issues in Professional Psychology for Clinical PsyD Trainees and Early Career Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The largest number of licensed psychologists are centralized in California. More PsyD than PhD degrees in clinical psychology are now awarded, and California houses 16 of the 59 APA-accredited programs. Post-millennia Early Career Psychologists (ECPs) typically accumulate over $120,000 in education debt, and may be concerned with the cost-benefit…

  16. Michael E. Lamb: Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest recognize persons who have advanced psychology as a science and/or profession by a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of outstanding contributions in the public interest. The 2015 co-recipient of the Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest is Michael E. Lamb. Lamb was selected because his "work profoundly shaped the fields of developmental psychology, social welfare, child and family policy, and law." Lamb's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Early Career Psychologists: Untapped Talent and Savvy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The findings from the Smith et al. (2012) survey of early career psychologists (ECPs) who are members of the Society of Counseling Psychology (SCP) provide a snapshot of the current state of affairs for ECPs in the SCP as well as recommendations about how the SCP can better meet the professional needs of ECPs. Ideally, the implementation of these…

  18. Impact Factor: Early Career Research & Digital Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Laura A.; Wakefield, Jenny S.; Roman, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly vital to publish and share research as well as get citations for the purpose of researcher visibility. The publishing options available for research distribution seem endless. It really is an academic jungle out there! This article reviews why early career researchers and graduate scholars should consider their research…

  19. 78 FR 38304 - Applications for New Awards; Native Hawaiian Career and Technical Education Program (NHCTEP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Native Hawaiian Career and Technical Education Program (NHCTEP); Correction... Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: On June 14, 2013, the Office of...

  20. 78 FR 15008 - Applications for New Awards; Native American Career and Technical Education Program (NACTEP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Native American Career and Technical Education Program (NACTEP); Correction AGENCY: Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice; correction. Catalog of...

  1. [Early career of Michael Sendivogius].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinke, Rafał T

    2012-01-01

    One of the most influential alchemical authors of the early modern period was Michael Sendivogius whose early life is shrouded in mystery. He may be labelled the most famous Polish scientific writer between Copernicus and Marie Skłodowska-Curie, but because of the difficulties involved in researching the biography of any alchemist, there has been relatively little interest in him among Polish historians. The early work of Roman Bugaj (author of the still fundamental monograph) and Włodzimierz Hubicki (who made his research available to the international community) has been continued only by the English-born Zbigniew Szydło and the author of this article. The roots of many legends about Sendivogius were three mid-17th century short biographies, none of which is trustworthy, so it is crucial to verify the received myth and the version constructed in the 1960's and 1970's with primary sources and evidence from the recent "new historiography of alchemy". The present article examines them in the light of newly discovered sources and reinterpretation of the old ones. The genealogy of the Sedzimir family is discussed at length to show that Sendivogius most probably was not its member but only a pretender in order to assume (or prove) the status of a nobleman. Several possible hypotheses about his origins are presented. He is known to have studied at three universities (Leipzig, Vienna and Altdorf) but authors of early panegyrics dedicated to Sendivogius list more universities which he may have attended. The most interesting is that of Cambridge, listed as the first one, because practically no Poles or Czechs went there at the time. Finally, his marriage to Veronica Stiebar, a wealthy widow of a Franconian knightly family, and her interesting family relationships (links to Erasmus, Camerarius, Paracelsus and the original Doctor Faustus) are discussed. The period covered is that before Sendivogius moved to Prague in about 1597, having already been a courtier of Rudolf II

  2. Obstacles to early career psychiatrists practicing psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Norman A; Plakun, Eric M; Lazar, Susan G; Mellman, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    Though psychiatric residents are expected to be competent psychotherapists on graduation, further growth in skill and versatility requires continued experience in their ongoing career. Maturity as a psychotherapist is essential because a psychiatrist is the only mental health provider who, as a physician, can assume full responsibility for biopsychosocial patient care and roles as supervisor, consultant, and team leader. Graduating residents face an environment in which surveys show a steady and alarming decline in practice of psychotherapy by psychiatrists, along with a decline in job satisfaction. High educational debts, practice structures, intrusive management, and reimbursement policies that devalue psychotherapy discourage early career psychiatrists from a practice style that enables providing it. For the early-career psychiatrist there is thus the serious risk of being unable to develop a critical mass of experience or a secure identity as a psychiatric psychotherapist. Implementation of parity laws and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will affect the situation in unpredictable ways that call for vigilance and active response. Additional service and administrative demands may result from the ACA, creating ethical dilemmas about meeting urgent patient needs versus biopsychosocial standards of care. The authors recommend 1) vigorous advocacy for better payment levels for psychotherapy and freedom from disruptive management; 2) aggressive action against violations of the parity act, 3) active preparation of psychiatric residents for dealing with career choices and the environment for providing psychotherapy in their practice, and 4) post-graduate training in psychotherapy through supervision/consultation, continuing education courses, computer instruction, and distance learning.

  3. The Early Career Gender Wage Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Sami Napari

    2006-01-01

    In Finland the gender wage gap increases significantly during the first 10 years after labor market entry accounting most of the life-time increase in the gender wage gap. This paper focuses on the early career gender wage differences among university graduates and considers several explanations for the gender wage gap based on the human capital theory, job mobility and labor market segregation. Gender differences in the accumulation of experience and in the type of education explain about 16...

  4. A National Survey on the Effect of the Geriatric Academic Career Award in Advancing Academic Geriatric Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kevin T; Luz, Clare C; Hanson, Katherine V; Hao, Yuning; Ray, Elisia M

    2017-05-01

    A workforce that understands principles of geriatric medicine is critical to addressing the care needs of the growing elderly population. This will be impossible without a substantial increase in academicians engaged in education and aging research. Limited support of early-career clinician-educators is a major barrier to attaining this goal. The Geriatric Academic Career Award (GACA) was a vital resource that benefitted 222 junior faculty members. GACA availability was interrupted in 2006, followed by permanent discontinuation after the Geriatrics Workforce Education Program (GWEP) subsumed it in 2015, leaving aspiring clinician-educators with no similar alternatives. GACA recipients were surveyed in this cross-sectional, multimethod study to assess the effect of the award on career development, creation and dissemination of educational products, funding discontinuation consequences, and implications of program closure for the future of geriatric health care. Uninterrupted funding resulted in fulfillment of GACA goals (94%) and overall career success (96%). Collectively, awardees reached more than 40,700 learners. Funding interruption led to 55% working additional hours over and above an increased clinical workload to continue their GACA-related research and scholarship. Others terminated GACA projects (36%) or abandoned academic medicine altogether. Of respondents currently at GWEP sites (43%), only 13% report a GWEP budget including GACA-like support. Those with GWEP roles attributed their current standing to experience gained through GACA funding. These consequences are alarming and represent a major setback to academic geriatrics. GACA's singular contribution to the mission of geriatric medicine must prompt vigorous efforts to restore it as a distinct funding opportunity. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Gary B. Melton: Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest recognize persons who have advanced psychology as a science and/or profession by a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of outstanding contributions in the public interest. The 2014 recipient of the Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest is Gary B. Melton. Melton was selected for his "influential scholarship on critical topics in psychology in the public interest, especially child and family law and policy, forensic mental health services, child advocacy, rural psychology, research ethics, and child abuse and neglect." Melton's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. A 10-Year Analysis of American Society for Radiation Oncology Junior Faculty Career Development Awards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimple, Randall J., E-mail: rkimple@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Kao, Gary D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Between 2000 and 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) awarded 22 Junior Faculty Career Development Awards (JFA) totaling $4.4 million. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these awards on the grantees' career development, including current position, publications, and subsequent independent grant funding. Methods: Each awardee was requested via email and telephone to provide an updated curriculum vitae, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biosketch, and information regarding current position of employment. Twenty-one of the 22 JFA recipients complied. Reported grant funding was extracted from each candidate's CV, and the amounts of NIH grants obtained were confirmed via NIH REPORTER. Reported publications were confirmed via PubMed. Results: All survey respondents (21 of 21) have remained in academic positions. Subsequent aggregate grant funding totaled more than $25 million (range, $0-$4.1 million), 5.9 times the initial investment. NIH grant funding totaled almost $15 million, 3 times the initial investment. Awardees have published an average of 34.6 publications (range, 0-123) for an overall rate of 4.5 papers/year (range, 1-11). Conclusions: ASTRO JFAs over the past decade have been strongly associated with grantees remaining in academic positions, success in attracting private and NIH grants, and publication productivity. In an era of dwindling federal research funding, the support provided by the ASTRO JFA may be especially helpful to support the research careers of promising junior faculty members.

  7. Impacts of a CAREER Award on Advancing 3D Visualization in Geology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billen, M. I.

    2011-12-01

    CAREER awards provide a unique opportunity to develop educational activities as an integrated part of one's research activities. This CAREER award focused on developing interactive 3D visualization tools to aid geology students in improving their 3D visualization skills. Not only is this a key skill for field geologists who need to visualize unseen subsurface structures, but it is also an important aspect of geodynamic research into the processes, such as faulting and viscous flow, that occur during subduction. Working with an undergraduate student researcher and using the KeckCAVES developed volume visualization code 3DVisualizer, we have developed interactive visualization laboratory exercises (e.g., Discovering the Rule of Vs) and a suite of mini-exercises using illustrative 3D geologic structures (e.g., syncline, thrust fault) that students can explore (e.g., rotate, slice, cut-away) to understand how exposure of these structures at the surface can provide insight into the subsurface structure. These exercises have been integrated into the structural geology curriculum and made available on the web through the KeckCAVES Education website as both data-and-code downloads and pre-made movies. One of the main challenges of implementing research and education activities through the award is that progress must be made on both throughout the award period. Therefore, while our original intent was to use subduction model output as the structures in the educational models, delays in the research results required that we develop these models using other simpler input data sets. These delays occurred because one of the other goals of the CAREER grant is to allow the faculty to take their research in a new direction, which may certainly lead to transformative science, but can also lead to more false-starts as the challenges of doing the new science are overcome. However, having created the infrastructure for the educational components, use of the model results in future

  8. Early career choices and successful career progression in surgery in the UK: prospective cohort studies

    OpenAIRE

    Richards Jennifer MJ; Harrison Ewen M; Laxton Louise; Goldacre Michael J; Lambert Trevor W; Parks Rowan W

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Changes to the structure of medical training worldwide require doctors to decide on their career specialty at an increasingly early stage after graduation. We studied trends in career choices for surgery, and the eventual career destinations, of UK graduates who declared an early preference for surgery. Methods Postal questionnaires were sent, at regular time intervals after qualification, to all medical qualifiers from all UK medical schools in selected qualification year...

  9. Early Career Experiences of Physical Education Teachers in Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, Sara B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the early career experiences of three physical education (PE) teachers who taught in urban charter schools. Using cultural relevance theory, three early career PE teachers were observed and interviewed for approximately six weeks each. Data were analyzed using constant comparison. Two major themes emerged…

  10. Professional Socialization Experiences of Early Career Urban Physical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, Sara Barnard

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine how three physical education (PE) teachers' professional socialization programmes influenced their early careers in urban schools in the US. Using cultural relevance theory and occupational socialization theory, three early career PE teachers were observed and interviewed for a period of six weeks each.…

  11. What Is Career Success for Academic Hospitalists? A Qualitative Analysis of Early-Career Faculty Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbler, Ethan; Yirdaw, Essey; Kneeland, Patrick; Pierce, Read; Rendon, Patrick; Herzke, Carrie; Jones, Christine D

    2018-01-19

    Understanding the concept of career success is critical for hospital medicine groups seeking to create sustainably rewarding faculty positions. Conceptual models of career success describe both extrinsic (compensation and advancement) and intrinsic (career satisfaction and job satisfaction) domains. How hospitalists define career success for themselves is not well understood. In this study, we qualitatively explore perspectives on how early-career clinician-educators define career success. We developed a semistructured interview tool of open-ended questions validated by using cognitive interviewing. Transcribed interviews were conducted with 17 early-career academic hospitalists from 3 medical centers to thematic saturation. A mixed deductiveinductive, qualitative, analytic approach was used to code and map themes to the theoretical framework. The single most dominant theme participants described was "excitement about daily work," which mapped to the job satisfaction organizing theme. Participants frequently expressed the importance of "being respected and recognized" and "dissemination of work," which were within the career satisfaction organizing theme. The extrinsic organizing themes of advancement and compensation were described as less important contributors to an individual's sense of career success. Ambivalence toward the "academic value of clinical work," "scholarship," and especially "promotion" represented unexpected themes. The future of academic hospital medicine is predicated upon faculty finding career success. Clinician-educator hospitalists view some traditional markers of career advancement as relevant to success. However, early-career faculty question the importance of some traditional external markers to their personal definitions of success. This work suggests that the selfconcept of career success is complex and may not be captured by traditional academic metrics and milestones.

  12. Association of Polar Early Career Scientists: a model for experiential learning in professional development for students and early career researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, A. C.; Hindshaw, R. S.; Fugmann, G.; Mariash, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists was established by early career researchers during the 2007-2008 International Polar Year as an organization for early career researchers in the polar and cryospheric sciences. APECS works to promote early career researchers through soft-skills training in both research and outreach activities, through advocating for including early career researchers in all levels of the scientific process and scientific management, and through supporting a world-wide network of researchers in varied fields. APECS is lead by early career researchers; this self-driven model has proved to be an effective means for developing the leadership, management, and communication skills that are essential in the sciences, and has shown to be sustainable even in a community where frequent turn-over is inherent to the members. Since its inception, APECS has reached over 5,500 members in more than 80 countries, and we have placed more than 50 early career researchers on working groups and steering committees with organizations around the world in the last two years alone. The close partnerships that APECS has with national and international organizations exposes members to both academic and alternative career paths, including those at the science-policy interface. This paper describes APECS's approach to experiential learning in professional development and the best practices identified over our nearly ten years as an organization.

  13. Early Career Researcher Challenges: Substantive and Methods-Based Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Lynn; Amundsen, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Navigating academic work as well as career possibilities during and post-Ph.D. is challenging. To better understand these challenges, since 2010, we have investigated the experiences of early career scientists longitudinally using a range of qualitative data collection formats. For this study, we examined the experiences of four students and four…

  14. Redefining "Early Career" in Academia: A Collective Narrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosanquet, Agnes; Mailey, Alana; Matthews, Kelly E.; Lodge, Jason M.

    2017-01-01

    "Early career" in academia is typically defined in terms of research capability in the five years following PhD completion, with career progression from post-doctoral appointment to tenure, promotion and beyond. This ideal path assumes steady employment and continuous research development. With academic work increasingly casualised,…

  15. Early career mentoring for translational researchers: mentee perspectives on challenges and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Thomas E; Collier, Peter J; Blakeslee, Jennifer E; Logan, Kay; McCracken, Karen; Morris, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    The education and training of early career biomedical translational researchers often involves formal mentoring by more experienced colleagues. This study investigated the nature of these mentoring relationships from the perspective of mentees. The objective was to understand the challenges and issues encountered by mentees in forming and maintaining productive mentoring relationships. Three focus groups (n=14) were conducted with early career researchers who had mentored career development awards. Thematic analysis identified, categorized, and illustrated the challenges and issues reported by mentees. The range of mentee challenges was reflected in five major categories: (a) network--finding appropriate mentors to meet various needs; (b) access--structuring schedules and opportunities to receive mentoring; (c) expectations--negotiating the mechanics of the mentoring relationship and its purpose; (d) alignment--managing mentor-mentee mismatches regarding interests, priorities, and goals; and (e) skills and supports--developing the institutional supports to be successful. Mentoring relationships created for academic training and career development contend with tasks common to many other relationships, namely, recognizing compatibility, finding time, establishing patterns, agreeing to goals, and achieving aims. Identifying challenges faced by mentees can facilitate the development of appropriate trainings and supports to foster mentoring relationships in academic and career settings.

  16. Early Career Mentoring for Translational Researchers: Mentee Perspectives on Challenges and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Thomas E.; Collier, Peter J.; Blakeslee, Jennifer E.; Logan, Kay; McCracken, Karen; Morris, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Background and purposes The education and training of early career biomedical translational researchers often involves formal mentoring by more experienced colleagues. This study investigated the nature of these mentoring relationships from the perspective of mentees. The objective was to understand the challenges and issues encountered by mentees in forming and maintaining productive mentoring relationships. Method Three focus groups (n=14) were conducted with early career researchers who had mentored career development awards. Thematic analysis identified, categorized, and illustrated the challenges and issues reported by mentees. Results The range of mentee challenges was reflected in five major categories: 1) network—finding appropriate mentors to meet various needs; 2) access—structuring schedules and opportunities to receive mentoring; 3) expectations—negotiating the mechanics of the mentoring relationship and its purpose; 4) alignment—managing mentor-mentee mismatches regarding interests, priorities, and goals; and 5) skills and supports—developing the institutional supports to be successful. Conclusions Mentoring relationships created for academic training and career development contend with tasks common to many other relationships, namely recognizing compatibility, finding time, establishing patterns, agreeing to goals, and achieving aims. Identifying challenges faced by mentees can facilitate the development of appropriate trainings and supports to foster mentoring relationships in academic and career settings. PMID:25010230

  17. The National Science Foundation CAREER Award: A Unique Solution to the Challenges of the Tenure Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouch, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    There is a dichotomy inherent in the tenure process at most research-strong universities. Most institutions require strong performance in research production and grant acquisition, while at the same time very good to excellent teaching performance. However, in the first several years of the tenure process, many new faculty spend most of their time preparing lectures for new classes and writing grant proposals, leaving little time to forge new directions and define their individual paths in their research, which, somewhat ironically, is the primary factor by which tenure is either granted or denied. The CAREER grant is a unique solution to this problem, as it enables beginning faculty members to directly thread their research into their teaching, and vice versa. My CAREER award, the first granted by the (at the time) fledgling EarthScope Science program at NSF, enabled me to bring EarthScope data and science directly into the classroom. One cadre of efforts was a focus on software development, which is a critical roadblock in geophysics for students who do not have extensive experience with Unix-based coding. For example, Kevin Eagar developed the MATLAB-based FuncLab software system that enables one to quickly and efficiently analyze receiver functions, allowing one to image layers within Earth's interior, such as the crust-mantle boundary. This system is now publically available at http://geophysics.asu.edu/funclab. At Arizona State University, 5 undergraduate students and 2 graduate students have already used this software package to produce publishable scientific results over the past 2 years, enabling them to experience research firsthand and learn a range of key research skills for their future endeavors. The CAREER award also provided ample opportunities for my research group and me to forge into new research directions given the broad scope of the proposed work. Ultimately, this freedom has led to a number of new and exciting results regarding the nature of

  18. Stayers and Leavers: Early-Career Teacher Effectiveness and Attrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gary T. Henry; Kevin C. Bastian; C. Kevin Fortner

    2011-01-01

    Research on teacher development reports significant early-career increases in teacher effectiveness, but the extent to which this is attributable to the development of teachers who persist or to the...

  19. Comments on Neil Dorans's NCME Career Award Address: The Contestant Perspective on Taking Tests--Emanations from the Statue within

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislevy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's observations on Neil Dorans's NCME Career Award Address: "The Contestant Perspective on Taking Tests: Emanations from the Statue within." He calls attention to some points that Dr. Dorans made in his address, and offers his thoughts in response.

  20. Association of Polar Early Career Scientists Promotes Professional Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Allen; Fugmann, Gerlis; Kruse, Frigga

    2014-06-01

    As a partner organization of AGU, the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS; http://www.apecs.is) fully supports the views expressed in Wendy Gordon's Forum article "Developing Scientists' `Soft' Skills" (Eos, 95(6), 55, doi:10.1002/2014EO060003). Her recognition that beyond research skills, people skills and professional training are crucial to the success of any early-career scientist is encouraging.

  1. Early career choices and successful career progression in surgery in the UK: prospective cohort studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Jennifer MJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes to the structure of medical training worldwide require doctors to decide on their career specialty at an increasingly early stage after graduation. We studied trends in career choices for surgery, and the eventual career destinations, of UK graduates who declared an early preference for surgery. Methods Postal questionnaires were sent, at regular time intervals after qualification, to all medical qualifiers from all UK medical schools in selected qualification years between 1974 and 2005. They were sent in the first year after qualification, at year three and five years after qualification, and at longer time intervals thereafter. Results Responses were received from 27 749 of 38 280 doctors (73% at year one, 23 468 of 33151 (71% at year three, and 17 689 of 24 870 (71% at year five. Early career preferences showed that surgery has become more popular over the past two decades. Looking forward from early career choice, 60% of respondents (64% of men, 48% of women with a first preference for a surgical specialty at year one eventually worked in surgery (p Conclusions Surgery is a popular specialty choice in the UK. The great majority of doctors who progressed in a surgical career made an early and definitive decision to do so.

  2. Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest: José Toro-Alfonso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest recognize persons who have advanced psychology as a science and/or profession by a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of outstanding contributions in the public interest. The 2016 corecipient of the Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest is José Toro-Alfonso, who was posthumously given this award for his commitment to "issues of inequity, diversity, and to the alleviation of human suffering particularly among Latino/Latina and LGBTQ communities." He "pioneered HIV/AIDS-related services for youth, women, gay, and transgender populations," and Toro-Alfonso's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Mentor Perspectives on the Place of Undergraduate Research Mentoring in Academic Identity and Career Development: An Analysis of Award Winning Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric E.; Walkington, Helen; Shanahan, Jenny Olin; Ackley, Elizabeth; Stewart, Kearsley A.

    2018-01-01

    This study examines how Undergraduate Research (UR) mentoring fits into the career profile of award-winning UR mentors and the factors that motivate engagement as UR mentors. Twenty-four award-winning UR mentors in four countries were interviewed about their mentoring practices. Six themes emerged: (1) Academic Identity and Motivations; (2)…

  4. Expectations and Integration of Early Career Academics into the Teaching Career: Empirical Evidence from Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, Goski; Abdulai, Munkaila

    2016-01-01

    The preparation and induction of Early Career Academics (ECAs) in Ghana has been investigated using a qualitative study that employed an enumerative-ethnographic approach. The study combined reviews of policy documents, interviews of 50 Deans and Heads of Departments and surveys of ECAs in five purposively selected universities in Ghana to capture…

  5. Twelve tips for early career medical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Sayra; Varpio, Lara

    2016-01-01

    The first 10 years of career development pose unique challenges for MD- and PhD-trained faculty members working in medical education. These may include publishing peer-reviewed articles, winning grant funding, teaching, maintaining a clinical practice, and supporting professional communities both within and external to their institution. As the inaugural and current leaders of the ECME group in Canada, we have actively sought to better understand the challenges ECME faculty members face. We developed this understanding by surveying and tracking the qualitative reports of our ECME members, reviewing the (limited) literature available on ECME faculty members' experiences, and learning from our own experiences as ECME faculty and the advice shared by our own mentors. In this paper, we consolidate this knowledge into 12 tips for ECME faculty members. We suggest these tips will benefit both MD- and PhD-trained ECME faculty members as they strive for professional success.

  6. Early Career Academics Learning the Game in Whackademia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Loraine; Monk, Sue

    2017-01-01

    The initial years as an early career academic (ECA) are challenging times as those new to the academy attempt to balance the three aspects of their role: teaching, research and service, while also coming to terms with both overt and hidden expectations. Formal mentoring arrangements for ECAs are threatened by competing demands on time.…

  7. Questioning the Research on Early Career Teacher Attrition and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Lee; Long, Julie S.; Clandinin, D. Jean

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider scholarly work on early career teacher attrition, and retention, from 1999 to 2010. Much of the literature has framed attrition as either a problem associated with individual factors (e.g., burnout), or a problem associated with contextual factors (e.g., support and salary). Some recent conceptualizations consider early…

  8. The Early Careers of Non-College-Bound Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogger, Jeff

    Data drawn from the Sophomore Cohort of the High School and Beyond study, also known as the Class of 1982 data, were studied to provide baseline data on the early careers of noncollege-bound (NCB) men. The analysis used data primarily from two post-high school interviews in 1984 and 1986. This report also focuses on restaurant employment, an…

  9. The Future of Our Organizations: Students and Early Career Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushko, Oksana; Wang, Sherry C.; Warrior, Anitra M.

    2012-01-01

    This response focuses on the significance of ethnic minority psychology organizations and other related membership structures to early career psychologists (ECPs) and counseling psychology students. We discuss not only reasons for why students and ECPs may not be joining professional organizations, but also strategies for recruiting, supporting,…

  10. Literature Review on Induction and Mentoring Related to Early Career Teacher Attrition and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Julie S.; McKenzie-Robblee, Sue; Schaefer, Lee; Steeves, Pam; Wnuk, Sheri; Pinnegar, Eliza; Clandinin, D. Jean

    2012-01-01

    Early career teacher attrition is a matter of economic, social, and educational concern in many countries. Usually induction programs, including mentoring, are seen to alleviate the problem of early career teacher attrition. Mentoring/induction programs as a solution to what is defined as the problem of early career teacher attrition and retention…

  11. Publication Productivity of Early-Career Orthopedic Trauma Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hake, Mark E; Lee, John J; Goulet, James A

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were to: (1) define the publication productivity of early-career orthopedic trauma surgeons over time; (2) compare the early-career publication productivity of recent orthopedic trauma fellowship graduates vs their more senior colleagues; and (3) determine the proportion of fellowship graduates who meet the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) publication criteria for active membership early in their careers. Orthopedic trauma fellowship graduates from 1982 to 2007 were analyzed. A literature search was performed for each fellow's publications for the 6-year period beginning the year of fellowship graduation. Publication productivity was compared between early and recent groups of graduates, 1987 to 1991 and 2003 to 2007, respectively. Fulfillment of OTA publication criteria was determined. Seventy-nine percent of graduates contributed to 1 or more publications. The recent group produced more total publications per graduate (4.06 vs 3.29, P=.01) and more coauthor publications (2.60 vs 2.04, P=.019) than the early group. The number of first-author publications did not differ between groups (1.46 vs 1.25, P=.26). A greater percentage of the recent group met current OTA publication criteria compared with the early group (51% vs 35%, P=.04). The findings showed that recent orthopedic trauma graduates had increased publication productivity compared with their more senior colleagues, although a proportion had not qualified for active OTA membership 6 years into their career. Overall, these data are encouraging and suggest that young orthopedic trauma surgeons remain committed to sustaining a high level of academic excellence. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Risk of burnout among early career mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, U; Luciano, M; Palumbo, C; Sampogna, G; Del Vecchio, V; Fiorillo, A

    2014-01-01

    Burnout is a stress-related syndrome that often affects mental health professionals (MHPs) and may have serious consequences on personal well-being as well as on the quality of provided psychiatric care. Established literature shows a high risk to develop burnout among MHPs. Few data are available on the incidence and on the clinical implications of the burnout syndrome in the early phases of MHP professional career. We confirmed the presence of burnout among early career MHPs: early career psychiatrists showed a lower sense of personal accomplishment, while non-medical MHPs tended to have more depersonalization and suffered from higher levels of depression. Specific programmes to identify the presence of the burnout syndrome and to cope with it should be taught within mental health training curricula. Burnout is a stress-related syndrome that often affects professionals working in emotionally loaded and highly interpersonal environments. Mental health professionals (MHPs) are long known to be at high risk to develop the burnout syndrome, but this has rarely been investigated in professionals in an early phase of career. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of the burnout syndrome and of depressive symptoms among early career psychiatrists and 'non-medical' MHPs. One hundred MHPs (including 50 psychiatrists and 50 non-medical MHPs) were screened for the presence of burnout and depression, with the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory - revised, respectively. The relationships of burnout with socio-demographical and professional characteristics were also explored. We confirmed the presence of burnout among both groups of early career MHPs, but psychiatrists had a significantly higher degree of emotional exhaustion and a lower sense of personal accomplishment, while non-medical MHPs adopted more frequently depersonalization as a coping strategy and had higher scores for depression, which is associated with higher level of

  13. A Longitudinal Study of Pediatricians Early in Their Careers: PLACES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frintner, Mary Pat; Cull, William L; Byrne, Bobbi J; Freed, Gary L; Katakam, Shesha K; Leslie, Laurel K; Miller, Ashley A; Starmer, Amy J; Olson, Lynn M

    2015-08-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) launched the Pediatrician Life and Career Experience Study (PLACES), a longitudinal study that tracks the personal and professional experiences of early career pediatricians, in 2012. We used a multipronged approach to develop the study methodology and survey domains and items, including review of existing literature and qualitative research with the target population. We chose to include 2 cohorts of US pediatricians on the basis of residency graduation dates, including 1 group who were several years out of residency (2002-2004 Residency Graduates Cohort) and a second group who recently graduated from residency at study launch (2009-2011 Residency Graduates Cohort). Recruitment into PLACES was a 2-stage process: (1) random sample recruitment from the target population and completion of an initial intake survey and (2) completion of the first Annual Survey by pediatricians who responded positively to stage 1. Overall, 41.2% of pediatricians randomly selected to participate in PLACES indicated positive interest in the study by completing intake surveys; of this group, 1804 (93.7%) completed the first Annual Survey and were considered enrolled in PLACES. Participants were more likely to be female, AAP members, and graduates of US medical schools compared with the target sample; weights were calculated to adjust for these differences. We will survey PLACES pediatricians 2 times per year. PLACES data will allow the AAP to examine career and life choices and transitions experienced by early-career pediatricians. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first presentation of the newly approved Charles A. Whitten Medal for Outstanding Achievement in Research on the Form and Dynamics of the Earth and Planets was made to Charles A. Whitten at the 1985 Spring Meeting. In addition, the first presentation of the Harry H. Hess Medal for Outstanding Achievements in Research in the Constitution and Evolution of Earth and Sister Planets was made to Gerald J. Wasserburg at the 1985 Fall Meeting.A full program of honors and awards recognizes AGU members and other outstanding geophysicists who make significant contributions to geophysical knowledge and understanding. In addition to the presentation of the medals and awards listed below, a select committee annually confers the designation of Fellow on AGU members who have distinguished themselves in geophysics.

  15. A "LHC Premium" for Early Career Researchers? Perceptions from within

    CERN Document Server

    Camporesi, Tiziano; Florio, Massimo; Giffoni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    More than 36,000 students and post-docs will be involved in experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) until 2025. Do they expect that their learning experience will have an impact on their professional future? By drawing from earlier salary expectations literature, this paper proposes a framework aiming at explaining the professional expectations of early career researchers (ECR) at the LHC. Results from different ordered logistic models suggest that experiential learning at LHC positively correlates with both current and former students' salary expectations. At least two not mutually exclusive explanations underlie such a relationship. First, the training at LHC gives early career researchers valuable expertise, which in turn affects salary expectations; secondly, respondents recognise that the LHC research experience per se may act as a signal in the labour market. Respondents put a price tag on their experience at LHC, a "salary premium" ranging from 5% to 12% in terms of future salaries compared with...

  16. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Bethany A; Rodriguez, Bredny

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals' self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants' demographic information and their competency attainment. "Early career" health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, "I have demonstrated this competency." Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the "Health Sciences Information Services" competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the "Research, Analysis, and Interpretation" competency. These results contribute to the ongoing discussions regarding proposed changes to the MLA competencies. The results may also inform the development of

  17. Concept formation: a supportive process for early career nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, Tracey; West, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    Individuals come to understand abstract constructs such as that of the 'expert' through the formation of concepts. Time and repeated opportunity for observation to support the generalisation and abstraction of the developing concept are essential if the concept is to form successfully. Development of an effective concept of the 'expert nurse' is critical for early career nurses who are attempting to integrate theory, values and beliefs as they develop their clinical practice. This study explores the use of a concept development framework in a grounded theory study of the 'expert nurse'. Qualitative. Using grounded theory methods for data collection and analysis, semi-structured interviews were conducted with registered nurses. The participants were asked to describe their concept of the 'expert nurse' and to discuss their experience of developing this. Participants reported forming their concept of the 'expert nurse', after multiple opportunities to engage with nurses identified as 'expert'. This identification did not necessarily relate to the designated position of the 'expert nurse' or assigned mentors. When the early career nurse does not successfully form a concept of the 'expert nurse', difficulties in personal and professional development including skill/knowledge development may arise. To underpin development of their clinical practice effectively, early career nurses need to be provided with opportunities that facilitate the purposive formation of their own concept of the 'expert nurse'. Formation of this concept is not well supported by the common practice of assigning mentors. Early career nurses must be provided with the time and the opportunity to individually develop and refine their concept of the 'expert nurse'. To achieve this, strategies including providing opportunities to engage with expert nurses and discussion of the process of concept formation and its place in underpinning personal judgments may be of assistance. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing

  18. 10 years of Elsevier/JQSRT awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, José; Bernath, Peter F.; Mengüç, M. Pinar; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2017-10-01

    The Elsevier award program administered by the Editorial Board of the Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer (JQSRT) was conceived in June of 2006 at the 9th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia. Initially the program included three annual Elsevier/JQSRT awards for exceptional early-career scientists working in the main research fields covered by JQSRT: quantitative spectroscopy, radiative transfer, and electromagnetic scattering. In June of 2010 at the 12th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference in Helsinki, Finland, it was decided to expand the award program to include three biennial Elsevier awards intended to celebrate fundamental life-time achievements of internationally recognized leaders in the same research fields. Finally, in 2013 the Elsevier award program was augmented to include a fourth annual early-career award in the category of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing.

  19. Early Career Investigator Opportunities in Geophysics with IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, H.; Sumy, D. F.; Schutt, D.

    2016-12-01

    Early career geoscientists face many challenges as they transition from senior level graduate students into postdoctoral researchers, tenure-track faculty positions, or the vast array of employment opportunities outside of academia. However, few receive adequate mentoring or guidance on how to successfully make the leap from graduate school to a fulfilling career. In recognition of these hurdles and challenges, the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) created an early-career investigator (ECI) program in 2011 to help reduce barriers for newly minted scientists, researchers, and educators on their path to success. The core mission of the ECI program is to organize practical resources and professional development opportunities for ECIs. The initiative has encouraged and supported collaboration between ECIs and senior scientists through colloquium lectureships and visiting scientist collaborations, which aimed to increase the visibility of ECIs and their research and to promote interaction between junior and senior scientists outside of their home institutions. Additionally, ECI-centric events are held at various national meetings to showcase the range of career paths available in geophysics, openly discuss the challenges ECIs face (e.g., work-life balance, job search difficulties, teaching challenges), expose participants to the ECI program's initiatives and resources, and better inform IRIS about the needs of the community. Post-workshop evaluations reveal ECIs are eager to have exposure to a variety of workforce options and a forum in which to ask difficult questions. Of note, there is a variety of cultural knowledge and expectations assumed in both the academic and professional worlds that is often not formally disseminated. The ECI program aims to better understand and facilitate transfer of this knowledge and reduce barriers to success for ECIs from both traditional and non-traditional backgrounds. The program also features webinars focused

  20. APECS: A Network for Polar Early Career Scientist Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderlin, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Association of Polar Early Career Researchers (APECS) is an international and interdisciplinary organization for undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in the polar regions, alpine regions and the wider Cryosphere. APECS is a scientific, non-profit organization with free individual membership that aims to stimulate research collaborations and develop effective future leaders in polar research, education, and outreach. APECS grew out of the 4th International Polar Year (2007-08), which emphasized the need to stimulate and nurture the next generation of scientists in order to improve the understanding and communication of the polar regions and its global connections. The APECS organizational structure includes a Council and an elected Executive Committee that are supported by a Directorate. These positions are open to all individual members through a democratic process. The APECS Directorate is funded by the Norwegian Research Council, the University of Tromsø and the Norwegian Polar Institute and is hosted by the University of Tromsø. Early career scientists benefit from a range of activities hosted/organized by APECS. Every year, numerous activities are run with partner organizations and in conjunction with major polar conferences and meetings. In-person and online panels and workshops focus on a range of topics, from developing field skills to applying for a job after graduate school. Career development webinars are hosted each fall and topical research webinars are hosted throughout the year and archived online (http://www.apecs.is). The APECS website also contains abundant information on polar news, upcoming conferences and meetings, and job postings for early career scientists. To better respond to members' needs, APECS has national/regional committees that are linked to the international overarching organization. Many of these committees organize regional meetings or

  1. Increasing retention of early career female atmospheric scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, L. M.; Hallar, A. G.; Avallone, L. M.; Thiry, H.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric Science Collaborations and Enriching NeTworks (ASCENT) is a workshop series designed to bring together early career female scientists in the field of atmospheric science and related disciplines. ASCENT uses a multi-faceted approach to provide junior scientists with tools that will help them meet the challenges in their research and teaching career paths and will promote their retention in the field. During the workshop, senior women scientists discuss their career and life paths. They also lead seminars on tools, resources and methods that can help early career scientists to be successful and prepared to fill vacancies created by the “baby boomer” retirees. Networking is a significant aspect of ASCENT, and many opportunities for both formal and informal interactions among the participants (of both personal and professional nature) are blended in the schedule. The workshops are held in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, home of a high-altitude atmospheric science laboratory, Storm Peak Laboratory, which also allows for nearby casual outings and a pleasant environment for participants. Near the conclusion of each workshop, junior and senior scientists are matched in mentee-mentor ratios of two junior scientists per senior scientist. Post-workshop reunion events are held at national scientific meetings to maintain connectivity among each year’s participants, and for collaborating among participants of all workshops held to date. Evaluations of the two workshop cohorts thus far conclude that the workshops have been successful in achieving the goals of establishing and expanding personal and research-related networks, and that seminars have been useful in creating confidence and sharing resources for such things as preparing promotion and tenure packages, interviewing and negotiating job offers, and writing successful grant proposals.

  2. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A. Myers, MSLIS, AHIP

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals’ self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. Methods: A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants’demographic information and their competency attainment. ‘‘Early career’’ health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, ‘‘I have demonstrated this competency.’’ Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. Results: One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the ‘‘Health Sciences Information Services’’ competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the ‘‘Research, Analysis, and Interpretation’’ competency. Conclusions: These results contribute to the ongoing discussions

  3. Staying or going? Australian early career researchers' narratives of academic work, exit options and coping strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petersen, Eva Bendix

    2011-01-01

    .... To assist in developing appropriate retention strategies, this article examines the ways in which early career researcher-academics across different Australian university sites currently experience...

  4. Sense of coherence, career adaptability and burnout of early-career Black staff in the call centre environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Harry

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The call centre is recognised as being a stressful work environment that affects the general wellbeing of call centre agents.Research purpose: This study explored whether call centre agents’ sense of coherence significantly influences their career adaptability and whether their burnout levels significantly moderate the sense of coherence–career adaptability relationship. The research also investigated whether age, gender and years of service (as control variables, along with sense of coherence, predicted career adaptability.Motivation for the study: The positive psychological construct of career adaptability and its association with call centre agents’ sense of coherence, burnout, age, gender and years of service have not yet been investigated in the call centre environment.Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional quantitative survey design was used. The Orientation to Life, Career Adapt-Abilities Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory General Scale were administered to a non-probability purposive sample of 409 early-career Black staff employed in three of the largest outsourced financial call centres in Africa.Main findings: Multiple regression analyses revealed that age, gender and meaningfulness significantly predicted call centre agents’ career adaptability, but that their burnout levels do not significantly moderate the sense of coherence–career adaptability relationship.Practical/managerial implications: Enhancing call centre agents’ sense of meaningfulness will increase their levels of career adaptability and career wellbeing.Contribution/value-add: This research is the first to investigate the construct of career adaptability in the call centre environment and adds new knowledge and insights to the existing wellness and positive psychology literature.

  5. Key Decision Points in the Careers of Geoscientists: The Role of the YES Network in Facilitating Successful Career Transitions for Early Career Geoscientists (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venus, J. H.; Gonzales, L. M.; Yes Network

    2010-12-01

    The external influences on the decisions that geoscientists make pertaining to their careers are often assumed but not quantified. The YES Network is conducting an international study to determine the Key Decision points in the career pathways of early career geoscientists. The study aims to identify factors contributing to individual career decisions and to monitor these over a ten year period. The Initial phase of the study is now underway enabling preliminary conclusions to be drawn and will identify a group of individuals that will be tracked over the 10 year programme. The Survey will highlight reoccurring areas where Early Career Geoscientists are experiencing progression difficulties and, importantly, provide respondents with an opportunity to suggest solutions whilst also allowing general resource needs to be identified from the results as a whole. Early results show an overwhelming majority expressing job satisfaction most or all of the time (only 2 candidates reporting none). Respondents rate job satisfaction and respect highly, returning more responses than good salaries. A general frustration with administration, paper work and bureaucracy is particularly evident in those employed by government organisations. Early Career geoscientists express a frustration concerning a lack of involvement in decision making processes; interestingly several later career respondents also acknowledge a need to properly train, nurture and encourage new recruits to retain good graduates who may otherwise become disillusioned and leave the profession. The role of family in career choices has been highlighted both in survey and general feedback responses particularly by female geoscientists and those working in jobs with high levels of fieldwork; we aim to determine, to some extent, to what point these decisions are controlled by family as opposed to normal career progression. Flexible working conditions and agreed time away from field duty have been independently suggested

  6. 78 FR 13030 - Applications for New Awards; Native American Career and Technical Education Program (NACTEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... technical education programs through a coherent sequence of courses to ensure learning in the core academic... education, school-based enterprises, entrepreneurship, community service learning, and job shadowing that... NACTEP. (b) Under the statutory definition of ``career and technical education'', the sequence of courses...

  7. 1st International Early Research Career Enhancement School

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Valentin; Rybina, Galina

    2016-01-01

    This book presents cutting-edge research focused on current challenges towards the realization of Biologically Inspired intelligent agents, or Cognitive Architectures (BICA). The chapters are written by both world-recognized experts (including Antonio Chella, Olivier Georgeon, Oliver Kutz, Antonio Lieto, David Vernon, Paul Verschure, and others) and young researchers. Together, they constitute a good mixture of new findings with tutorial-based reviews and position papers, all presented at the First International Early Research Career Enhancement School on Biologically Inspired Cognitive Architectures (FIERCES on BICA 2016), held April 21-24 in Moscow, Russia. Most works included here cross boundaries between disciplines: from neuroscience to social science, from cognitive science to robotics, and from bioengineering to artificial intelligence. A special emphasis is given to novel solutions to urgent problems that have been resisting traditional approaches for decades. Intended for providing readers with an up...

  8. Voices of Early Career Psychologists in Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan Grant; Keller, Briana K.; Mollen, Debra; Bledsoe, Meredith L.; Buhin, Larisa; Edwards, Lisa M.; Levy, Jacob J.; Magyar-Moe, Jeana L.; Yakushko, Oksana

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of early career members of the Society of Counseling Psychology (SCP). Seventy early career psychologists completed a survey assessing the usefulness and climate of SCP, barriers to and facilitative factors for involvement in SCP, inclusiveness of SCP regarding cultural diversity and professional interests, degree…

  9. The Influences of Pre-Professional Socialization on Early Career Physical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, Sara B.; McCaughtry, Nate

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how three PE teachers' personal biographies before their formal teacher education programs influenced their early careers in urban schools. Using occupational socialization theory and cultural relevance theory, we conducted in-depth interviews and observed early career physical education teachers who did…

  10. Revisiting and Rewriting Early Career Encounters: Reconstructing One "Identity Defining" Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    There has been much research conducted into the effects of early career experiences on future practice. The research indicates that early career academics are particularly susceptible to burnout, as they are still developing their professional knowledge base, and are therefore more reliant on their theoretical knowledge or idealism to interpret…

  11. Determining discourses: Constraints and resources influencing early career science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindstaff, Kelly E.

    This study explores the thinking and practices of five early-career teachers of grades eight to ten science, in relation to their histories, schools, students, and larger cultural and political forces. All the teachers are young women, two in their fourth year of teaching, who teach together in an affluent suburb, along with one first-year teacher. The other two are first-year teachers who teach in an urban setting. All of these teachers most closely associated good science teaching with forming relationships with students. They filtered science content through a lens of relevance (mostly to everyday life) and interest for students. Thus they filtered science content through a commitment to serving students, which makes sense since I argue that the primary motivations for teaching had more to do with working with students and helping people than the disciplines of science. Thus, within the discourse of the supremacy of curriculum and the prevalence of testing, these teachers enact hybrid practices which focus on covering content -- to help ensure the success of students -- and on relevance and interest, which has more to do with teaching styles and personality than disciplines of science. Ideas of good teaching are not very focused on science, which contradicts the type of support they seek and utilize around science content. This presents a challenge to pre- and in-service education and support to question what student success means, what concern for students entails and how to connect caring and concern for students with science.

  12. Do First Impressions Matter? Predicting Early Career Teacher Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Atteberry

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As educational policy makers seek strategies to improve the teacher workforce, the early career period represents a unique opportunity to identify struggling teachers, examine the likelihood of future improvement, and make strategic pretenure investments in development or dismissals. It is also a useful time to identify particularly promising teachers for development and focus on high-needs areas. This article asks how much teachers vary in performance improvement during their first 5 years of teaching and to what extent initial job performance predicts later performance. We find that, on average, initial performance is quite predictive of future performance, far more so than typically measured teacher characteristics. This is particularly the case in math, while predictions about future English language arts (ELA performance based on initial ELA value added are less precise. Predictions are most powerful at the extremes. We use these predictions to explore the likelihood that personnel actions based on initial performance would lead to inappropriate distinctions between teachers who would be high or low performing in future years. We also examine the much less discussed costs of failure to distinguish performance when meaningful differences exist. The results point to the potential of policies that make use of teachers’ initial performance to inform personnel decisions.

  13. The Challenge of Career Exploration in Early Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Counseling and Personnel Services, Ann Arbor, MI.

    This seventh chapter in "The Challenge of Counseling in Middle Schools" presents four articles on career exploration during the middle school years. "'What Can School Do for Me?': A Guidance Play," by Natalie Wilson, presents a fantasy in which a middle school student and a superhero companion take a tour of the world of careers. The script of the…

  14. Research success and structured support: Developing early career ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Entry into a successful academic career is often an arduous process. From career preparation through to doctoral studies and beyond, the journey can be fraught with trials. Why do many academics find difficulty in completing their studies in the minimum time and publishing afterwards? As the University of the ...

  15. Professional Development Needs and Training Interests: A Survey of Early Career School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G.; Brown, Jacqueline; Harris, Bryn; Sullivan, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Early career psychologists (ECPs) are considered a distinct professional group that faces unique career challenges. Despite recent organizational efforts to increase engagement of these individuals, little is known about the professional development needs and training interests of ECPs, particularly within psychology's subfields. As such, this…

  16. The Reluctant Academic: Early-Career Academics in a Teaching-Orientated University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on research into academic identities amongst early-career academics in a UK post-1992, teaching-orientated university. Literature around academic identity suggests five major academic roles: teaching, research, management, writing and networking. However, this appears to be a picture of an established mid-career academic in a…

  17. Satisfaction among early and mid-career dentists in a metropolitan dental hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui X

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoxi Cui,1 David G Dunning,2 Na An3 1College of Dentistry, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE, USA; 2Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE, USA; 3School of Stomatology, Department of General Dentistry II, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: A growing body of research has examined career satisfaction among dentists using a standardized instrument, dentist satisfaction survey (DSS. This project examined career satisfaction of early to mid-career dentists in China, a population whose career satisfaction, heretofore, has not been studied. This is an especially critical time to examine career satisfaction because of health care reform measures being implemented in China. A culturally sensitive Chinese-language version of the DSS (CDSS was developed and electronically administered to 367 early and mid-career dentists in a tertiary dental hospital in Beijing, China. One hundred and seventy respondents completed the survey. The average total career score was 123, with a range of 82–157. Data analysis showed some significant differences in total career score and several subscales based on gender, working hours per week, and years in practice. A stepwise regression model revealed that two variables predicted total career score: working hours per week and gender. Stepwise regression also demonstrated that four subscales significantly predicted the overall professional satisfaction subscale score: respect, delivery of care, income and patient relations. Implications of these results are discussed in light of the health care delivery system and dentist career paths in China. Keywords: job satisfaction, career satisfaction, early and mid-career dentists, Chinese health care reform

  18. Final Technical Report for Years 1-4 of the Early Career Research Project "Viscosity and equation of state of hot and dense QCD matter" - ARRA portion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, Denes [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2014-04-14

    The Section below summarizes research activities and achievements during the first four years of the PI’s Early Career Research Project (ECRP). Two main areas have been advanced: i) radiative 3 ↔ 2 radiative transport, via development of a new computer code MPC/Grid that solves the Boltzmann transport equation in full 6+1D (3X+3V+time) on both single-CPU and parallel computers; ii) development of a self-consistent framework to convert viscous fluids to particles, and application of this framework to relativistic heavy-ion collisions, in particular, determination of the shear viscosity. Year 5 of the ECRP is under a separate award number, and therefore it has its own report document ’Final Technical Report for Year 5 of the Early Career Research Project “Viscosity and equation of state of hot and dense QCDmatter”’ (award DE-SC0008028). The PI’s group was also part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration, a multi-institution project that overlapped in time significantly with the ECRP. Purdue achievements as part of the JET Topical Collaboration are in a separate report “Final Technical Report summarizing Purdue research activities as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration” (award DE-SC0004077).

  19. Things I wish I'd known: desiderata for early career psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Lillian; Steane, Richard; Chacko, Emme; Scollay, Natalie

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to disseminate advice imparted to early career psychiatrists by a panel of senior colleagues at a Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists symposium, reflecting on things they wished they had known at the earlier stage in their careers. Key themes were extracted from notes taken at the symposium, where opinions were expressed by three senior psychiatrists. There are components in building a sustainable career as a psychiatrist, which include considering one's work environment and relationships with colleagues; self-care, mentorship and reflective practice; and seeking opportunities to teach and research for career progression. The mentorship and advice from senior colleagues can be highly influential. In order to sustain a career that has reward, meaning and longevity, psychiatrists would do well to pay attention to aspects of self-care, stay connected to their loved ones, seek an optimal work-life balance and take an interest in their long term career plans.

  20. Snow, Ice, & Satellites: An Early Career Researcher's Experience with Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, A.; Scambos, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    As a doctoral student, I was lucky enough to be able to experiment with a variety of communication and outreach activities (classroom visits, museum events, science festivals, blogging, social media, etc.) to build communication skills and learn how to talk about my science without writing a journal article. More importantly, the wide range of experience helped me identify what worked for me. My favorite way to share my science now? Twitter. To many, Twitter is a frivolous platform for sharing snippets 140 characters or less. To me, however, it is how I can connect directly with the elusive "wider public" and share my science. Specifically, I use satellite imagery (mostly Landsat 8) to study glaciers around the world. I look at long-term change related to climate, and I also investigate new, innovative ways to use satellite imagery to better understand glaciers and ice sheets. Luckily for me, my research is very visual. Whether fieldwork snapshots or satellite data, images make for great, shareable, accessible tweets. In this presentation, I propose to share my experience of tweeting as an early career researcher. I will include successful strategies (e.g. particular #hashtags, creating new content, using story-telling, timely tweets), as well as some not-so-successful attempts. I will also talk about how I built my Twitter network. In addition to anecdotes, I will include evaluation of my Twitter activity using available metrics and analytics (e.g. followers, favorites, re-tweets, Klout score, etc.). While misunderstood by many in the scientific community, Twitter is a platform increasingly being adopted by researchers. Used correctly, it can be a great tool for connecting directly with an interested, non-technical audience eager to learn about your research. With my experiences and evaluation, I will show how both scientists and the networks that they join and create can benefit by using Twitter as a platform for science communication.

  1. Getting Started in Academic Careers: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, R.; Ormand, C.; Manduca, C. A.; Wright-Dunbar, R.; Allen-King, R.

    2007-12-01

    The professional development program,'On the Cutting Edge', offers on-line resources and annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Pre- workshop surveys reveal that early career faculty, post-docs, and graduate students have many questions about teaching (e.g., what are effective teaching strategies, how to design a course, how to prepare a syllabus, how to teach large courses), research (e.g., initiate and fund future research, set up and manage a lab, obtain equipment), and career management (e.g., understand tenure requirements, balance all it all). The graduate students and post-docs also have questions about jobs and the job search process. Their questions show a lack of familiarity with the nature of academic positions at different kinds of educational institutions (two-year colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, and research universities). In particular, they are uncertain about what educational setting will best fit their values and career goals and how teaching loads and research expectations vary by institution. Common questions related to the job search process include where to find job listings (the most common question in recent years), when to start the job search process, how to stand out as an applicant, and how to prepare for interviews. Both groups have questions about how to develop new skills: how to develop, plan and prepare a new course (without it taking all of their time), how to expand beyond their PhD (or postdoc) research projects, how to develop a research plan, and where to apply for funding. These are important topics for advisors to discuss with all of their students and postdocs who are planning on careers in academia. On the Cutting Edge offers workshops and web resources to help current and future faculty navigate these critical stages of their careers. The four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your

  2. Transition to Independence: Characteristics and Outcomes of Mentored Career Development (KL2) Scholars at Clinical and Translational Science Award Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Carol; Schwartz, Lisa S; Toto, Robert; Merchant, Carol; Fair, Alecia S; Gabrilove, Janice L

    2017-04-01

    To describe the transition from mentored to independent research funding for clinical and translational scholars supported by institutional KL2 Mentored Career Development programs. In 2013, faculty leaders at Clinical and Translational Science Award institutions completed an online survey, reporting characteristics of scholars in their KL2 programs from 2006 to 2013. The primary outcome variable was a report that the scholar had received independent funding as a principal investigator. Data analysis included descriptive summaries and mixed-effects regression models. Respondents from 48 institutions (of 62 eligible; 77%) provided information about 914 KL2 scholars. Of those, 620 (68%) were medical doctors, 114 (12%) had other clinical training, and 177 (19%) were nonclinician PhDs. Fifty-three percent (487) were female; 12% (108/865) were members of racial or ethnic groups underrepresented in medicine (URM). After completing KL2 training, 96% (558/582) remained engaged in research. Among scholars who completed KL2 training two or more years earlier, 39% (149/374) received independent funding. Independent funding was from non-National Institutes of Health (NIH) sources (120 scholars) more often than from NIH (101 scholars). The odds of a nonclinician attaining independent funding were twice those of a clinician (odds ratio 2.05; 95% confidence interval 1.11-3.78). Female and URM scholars were as likely as male and non-URM scholars to attain independent funding. KL2 programs supported the transition to independent funding for clinical and translational scientists. Female and URM scholars were well represented. Future studies should consider non-NIH funding sources when assessing the transition to research independence.

  3. The early career, gender, and diversity actions at the LHCb Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Rademacker, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Numerous surveys of modern particle physics indicate that the discipline is still largely a male pursuit, and one in which women and other marginalised groups continue to face discriminatory practices. The fraction of female particle physicists reduces with each career stage. Early career particle physicists face precarious employment conditions with serial short term contracts, long working hours, the frequent need to relocate, and little prospect for a permanent academic position. There are indications that these employment conditions add to the gender-imbalance in the field, but clearly, this problem directly affects both male and female early career scientists. The LHCb experiment has, as the first (and so far only) LHC experiment, created a dedicated office for Early Career Gender and Diversity (ECGD) (see http://lhcb.web.cern.ch/lhcb/ECGD_Office/ECGD-intro.html ). The ECGD office’s role is to to advise the management on ECGD matters; provide a point of contact for anybody experiencing any kind discrim...

  4. The early career, gender, and diversity actions within the LHCb Collaboration (poster)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00038235; Rademacker, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Numerous surveys of modern particle physics indicate that the discipline is still largely a male pursuit, and one in which women and other marginalised groups continue to face discriminatory practices. The fraction of female particle physicists reduces with each career stage. Early career particle physicists face precarious employment conditions with serial short term contracts, long working hours, the frequent need to relocate, and little prospect for a permanent academic position. There are indications that these employment conditions add to the gender-imbalance in the field, but clearly, this problem directly affects both male and female early career scientists. The LHCb experiment has, as the first (and so far only) LHC experiment, created a dedicated office for Early Career Gender and Diversity (ECGD) The ECGD office’s role is to to advise the management on ECGD matters; provide a point of contact for anybody experiencing any kind discrimination, bullying or harassment; collate regular statistics and o...

  5. A mixed methods analysis of experiences and expectations among early-career medical oncologists in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W K Tim; Kirby, Emma; Broom, Alex; Sibbritt, David; Francis, Kay; Karapetis, Christos S; Karikios, Deme; Harrup, Rosemary; Lwin, Zarnie

    2018-01-26

    A viable and sustainable medical oncology profession is integral for meeting the increasing demand for quality cancer care. The aim of this study was to explore the workforce-related experiences, perceptions and career expectations of early-career medical oncologists in Australia. A mixed-methods design, including a survey (n  =  170) and nested qualitative semistructured interviews (n  =  14) with early-career medical oncologists. Recruitment was through the Medical Oncology Group of Australia. Qualitative data were thematically analyzed and for the survey results, logistic regression modeling was conducted. Early-career medical oncologists experienced uncertainty regarding their future employment opportunities. The competitive job market has made them cautious about securing a preferred job leading to a perceived need to improve their qualifications through higher degree training and research activities. The following themes and trends were identified from the qualitative and quantitative analyses: age, career stage and associated early-career uncertainty; locale, professional competition and training preferences; participation in research and evolving professional expectations; and workload and career development opportunities as linked to career uncertainty. Perceived diminished employment opportunities in the medical oncology profession, and shifting expectations to be "more qualified," have increased uncertainty among junior medical oncologists in terms of their future career prospects. Structural factors relating to adequate funding of medical oncology positions may facilitate or inhibit progressive change in the workforce and its sustainability. Workforce planning and strategies informed by findings from this study will be necessary in ensuring that both the needs of cancer patients and of medical oncologists are met. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Graduate entry students' early perceptions of their future nursing careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa; Brooks, Ingrid

    2017-11-16

    Graduate entry nursing programs designed for individuals with prior degrees in other disciplines are becoming increasingly popular internationally. They provide entry into nursing for people with unique skill-sets. Yet, little is known about why these individuals choose career change into nursing and what they expect from their new careers. This component of a larger study sought to explore graduate entry nursing students' short and longer term career intentions on commencement of their courses. A cross-sectional survey was used. Descriptive frequencies were used to analyse demographic data, while summative content analysis was used with the open-ended questions. Participants were drawn from eight cohorts of commencing students from enrolled in one graduate entry masters program in Australia between 2009 and 2015. Content analysis identified three main categories: professional role, work location, and work context. Longer term responses were categorised under four categories: professional role, work location, work context and personal and professional goals. Many students had clear directions about their future nursing careers. On graduation, many envisioned working in advanced roles or in clinical specialty areas, primarily in hospital settings. However, in the longer term, there was diversity among with many envisaging work outside traditional hospital settings, and some in other health disciplines. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Typical career dilemmas of academic staff during the early phase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Job satisfaction is of great importance for any organization, including higher education in stitutions, as it impacts on productivity. Higher education in stitutions need to identify, and familiarise themselves with, the career dilemmas of their employees. Then they can more effectively introduce mechanisms to support and assist ...

  8. Gender Differences in Salary in a Recent Cohort of Early-Career Physician-Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Griffith, Kent A.; Stewart, Abigail; Sambuco, Dana; DeCastro, Rochelle; Ubel, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Since prior studies have suggested that male physicians earn more than their female counterparts, the authors examined whether this disparity exists in a recently hired cohort. Method In 2010-11, the authors surveyed recent recipients of National Institutes of Health (NIH) mentored career development (i.e., K08 or K23) awards, receiving responses from 1,275 (75% response rate). For the 1,012 physicians with academic positions in clinical specialties who reported salary, they constructed linear regression models of salary considering gender, age, race, marital status, parental status, additional doctoral degree, academic rank, years on faculty, specialty, institution type, region, institution NIH funding rank, K-award type, K-award funding institute, K-award year, work hours, and research time. They evaluated the explanatory value of spousal employment status using Peters-Belson regression. Results Mean salary was $141,325 (95% confidence interval [CI] 135,607-147,043) for women and $172,164 (95% CI 167,357-176,971) for men. Male gender remained an independent, significant predictor of salary (+$10,921, P salary that was not fully explained by specialty, academic rank, work hours, or even spousal employment. Creating more equitable procedures for establishing salary at academic institutions is important. PMID:24072109

  9. Gender differences in salary in a recent cohort of early-career physician-researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Griffith, Kent A; Stewart, Abigail; Sambuco, Dana; DeCastro, Rochelle; Ubel, Peter A

    2013-11-01

    Studies have suggested that male physicians earn more than their female counterparts. The authors examined whether this disparity exists in a recently hired cohort. In 2010-2011, the authors surveyed recent recipients of National Institutes of Health (NIH) mentored career development (i.e., K08 or K23) awards, receiving responses from 1,275 (75% response rate). For the 1,012 physicians with academic positions in clinical specialties who reported salary, they constructed linear regression models of salary considering gender, age, race, marital status, parental status, additional doctoral degree, academic rank, years on faculty, specialty, institution type, region, institution NIH funding rank, K award type, K award funding institute, K award year, work hours, and research time. They evaluated the explanatory value of spousal employment status using Peters-Belson regression. Mean salary was $141,325 (95% confidence interval [CI] 135,607-147,043) for women and $172,164 (95% CI 167,357-176,971) for men. Male gender remained an independent, significant predictor of salary (+$10,921, P gender difference in salary that was not fully explained by specialty, academic rank, work hours, or even spousal employment. Creating more equitable procedures for establishing salary is important.

  10. Pathways to success for psychologists in academic health centers: from early career to emeritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kathryn A; Breland-Noble, Alfiee M; King, Cheryl A; Cubic, Barbara A

    2010-12-01

    Careers in academic health centers (AHCs) come with a unique set of challenges and rewards. Building a stable and rewarding career as a psychologist in an AHC requires the efforts of a whole team of players and coaches. This paper outlines the characteristics of AHCs and the general skills psychologists need to thrive in this type of setting. Advice specific to each stage of career development (early, mid, and late) is offered, highlighting the themes of coaching and teamwork that are critical to success in an AHC.

  11. Let's Go Toy Shopping! Exploring Early Anticipatory Socialization for Careers and Gender Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Bodie, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Courses: Gender Communication, Communication and Careers, Organizational Communication. Objectives: At the end of the activity, students will be able: to identify and analyze the socialization of gender expectations, to recognize and describe how early this type of socialization can occur, to critique the early socialization of gendered career…

  12. DIALOG: Fostering Early Career Development Across the Aquatic Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline Susan Weiler, PhD

    2004-11-14

    year increasing numbers of graduates take advantage of the opportunity to be part of this international collection, and more scientists, employers and administrators use this resource to identify recent graduates and get an overview of their work. Dissertation abstracts are submitted on line and immediately posted on the ASLO web site in a format that can be searched by year, name, and key words (www.aslo.org/phd.html). In addition to the recognition, program participants receive a compilation of abstracts, a directory, and a demographic profile of their cohort. An electronic distribution list keeps recent grads informed about job opportunities, resources, recent advances across the aquatic sciences, and-other research and professional news. Finally, the interdisciplinary symposium offers a unique opportunity for grads to get to know each other and share common experiences, and address the challenges and opportunities facing new professionals. The DIALOG Program is a long-term investment in human resources and science infrastructure. The most interesting and important questions in aquatic and other sciences are increasingly interdisciplinary and this program brings together scientists from across the full spectrum of biologically relevant aquatic science. The DIALOG database will become increasingly useful as more graduates participate. While the full impact of the program will probably not be realized for many years, there have already been many tangible results. Several interdisciplinary (including some international) research collaborations have been started; an international student exchange program has been set up at two institutions; several workshops and meeting sessions have been organized; and the entire group continues to communicate about research, education, and science policy issues via an electronic distribution list. The goal of the DIALOG symposium is to foster cross-disciplinary and international understanding and interactions at an early career stage

  13. Nothing to lose: why early career scientists make ideal entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, Jonathan N

    2014-12-01

    An entrepreneurial movement within science strives to invert the classical trajectory of academic research careers by positioning trainees at the apex of burgeoning industries. Young scientists today have nothing to lose and everything to gain by pursuing this 'third road', and academic institutes and established companies only stand to benefit from supporting this emerging movement of discovery research with economic purpose. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Insights on leadership from early career nurse academics: findings from a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Jackson, Debra; Daly, John; Gray, Joanne; Salamonson, Yenna; Andrew, Sharon; Peters, Kath

    2016-03-01

    To explore the perceptions of early career nursing academics on leadership in academia. There is growing emphasis on leadership capacity building across all domains of nursing. However, there is limited evidence on leadership capacity in early career academics. This study tested an intervention to develop leadership capacity amongst early career nursing academics in two Australian universities. A sequential mixed methods design, using online surveys and semi-structured interviews, was used to collect data. Twenty-three early career nursing academics participated. Most had experience of formal leadership roles and were aware of its importance to them as they developed their academic careers. Participants were able to discuss their own views of themselves as leaders; their perceptions of their own needs for leadership development, and ways in which they could seek to develop further as leaders. There is a need to provide initial and ongoing opportunities for leadership development amongst nurse academics. These opportunities should be contextualised and recognise factors such as gender, and the effects of structural oppression. Nurse academics are involved in the preparation of the next generation of clinical leaders and it is imperative that they are able to articulate a clear view of leadership. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Influence of Social Support and Self-Efficacy on Resilience of Early Career Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Tao, Hong; Bowers, Barbara J; Brown, Roger; Zhang, Yaqing

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among social support, self-efficacy, and resilience in early career registered nurses. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a convenience sample of 747 early career registered nurses. Data collection was performed between August and November 2015. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Among the three factors of social support, only the impact of coworker support on nurse resilience is fully mediated by self-efficacy; friend support had a significant positive direct effect on self-efficacy and an indirect effect on nurse resilience. This would suggest the importance of administrators/managers understanding how to promote coworker support, increase self-efficacy, foster a positive work climate, and develop effective mentorship programs to improve early career registered nurses resilience and mitigate factors leading to turnover.

  16. Integrating science and soft skills in training courses for early-career scientists in ACCENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuepbach, E.

    2006-12-01

    Scientists receive little training in communicating to non-scientists. Yet, both stakeholders and politicians increasingly see scientists as an important part of their world. Scientists feel, however, often uncomfortable with a socio-political role, especially, as discussion frequently moves away from the area of their expertise. The European Network of Excellence in Atmospheric Composition Change (ACCENT; www.accent- network.org) has thus started to integrate both science (disciplinary, interdisciplinary approaches) and soft skills (e.g., communicating to non-scientists) in training courses for early-career scientists. In doing so, the Training and Education Task in ACCENT attempts to respond to a need expressed by many early-career scientists in Europe. There are different ways how scientific material can be brought into the public and political arenas. This contribution will share experiences in integrated training for early-career scientists, incorporating both science and outreach to the general public and politicians.

  17. On Different Tracks? Gender, Professional Strategies, and Early Career Wage Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Grönlund

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A longstanding notion in labor market theory is that women accommodate family responsibilities in their occupational and job choices. Utilizing a survey of newly graduated highly educated men and women in five occupations in Sweden (n≈2400, the article explores whether men and women differ in their professional strategies and if such differences produce early career wage gaps. Findings based on OLS regressions show that women express dual commitment to work and family; compared with men, they value ‘family-friendly’ work-conditions higher but do not value wages and career lower. Parenthood is not related to lower levels of career focus, but neutralizes occupational differences in family focus for women. Despite the select sample, women have lower wages than men, but the wage gap is not explained by different prioritization of family/career. The findings suggest that assumptions about gendered skill investments must be empirically scrutinized and theories further developed.

  18. Studying the Effects of Early Experiences on Women's Career Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykes, M. Brinton; Stewart, Abigail J.

    Virtually all psychological theories assume that early life experiences have an impact on later life choices. However, increasing doubts have been expressed about the universality and permanence of the relationship between women's work and family lives. To explore how early family experiences and early adult decisions affect women's later career…

  19. Academic and non-academic career options for marine scientists. - Support measures for early career scientists offered at MARUM - Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbeln, Dierk; Klose, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Early career scientists at MARUM cover a wide range of research topics and disciplines including geosciences, biology, chemistry, social sciences and law. Just as colourful as the disciplinary background of the people, are their ideas for their personal careers. With our services and programmes, we aim to address some important career planning needs of PhD students and early career Postdocs, both, for careers in science and for careers outside academia. For PhD students aiming to stay in science, MARUM provides funding opportunities for a research stay abroad for a duration of up to 6 months. A range of courses is offered to prepare for the first Postdoc position. These include trainings in applying for research funding, proposal writing and interview skills. Following MARUM lectures which are held once a month, early career scientists are offered the opportunity to talk to senior scientists from all over the world in an informal Meet&Greet. Mentoring and coaching programmes for women in science are offered in cooperation with the office for equal opportunities at the University of Bremen. These programmes offer an additional opportunity to train interpersonal skills and to develop personal career strategies including a focus on special challenges that especially women might (have to) face in the scientific community. Early career scientists aiming for a non-academic career find support on different levels. MARUM provides funding opportunities for placements in industry, administration, consulting or similar. We offer trainings in e.g. job hunting strategies or interview skills. For a deeper insight into jobs outside the academic world, we regularly invite professionals for informal fireside chats and career days. These events are organised in cooperation with other graduate programmes in the region to broaden the focus of both, the lecturers and the participants. A fundamental component of our career programmes is the active involvement of alumni of MARUM and our

  20. Recipients of major scientific awards: A descriptive and predictive analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, Andrew Calvin

    Recent trends demonstrate an increase of women in leadership roles, STEM fields, and participating in higher education including graduate and doctoral programs, which is a result of Title IX. This quantitative study considered major scientific awards awarded to females and examines demographic characteristics of awardees from the Nobel, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and National Science Foundation (NSF). More specifically, the following awards were examined the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, the NAS Public Welfare Medal, and the NSF National Medal of Science within the discipline of Physical Science. Also, this study focused on equality to determine if a fair playing field and equal opportunity for women in academics has improved since Title IX. A limited amount of research has explored female award recipients. Specifically, existing research, has not examined the pinnacle of academic performance in the form of national and international awards. In the present study, I posed research questions relating to demographic characteristics of award recipients from the Nobel, NAS, and NSF between 1975 and 2015. Additionally, I examined if sex and age of the awardees could predict early career award obtainment. Through the frame of Social cognitive theory (Bandura, 1986, 1997, and 2005) I considered how perceptions of gender roles are a product of influence by society and the possible connection to performance. Results indicated a limited number of females have received these scientific awards and the awardees age could predict receiving an award early in their career. Additionally, the study provided insight into the progression of Title IX within the context of athletics and academics. It addressed the incremental and systematic increase in academics for women at high school, college, career, and scientific awards. Perhaps most importantly, it identified an observed pattern for female science award recipients reaching a critical mass and a tipping point.

  1. Supporting and Inhibiting the Well-Being of Early Career Secondary School Teachers: Extending Self-Determination Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Andrew J.; Maxwell, Bronwen

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports an original examination of the well-being of early career secondary school teachers in England, which extends the evidence bases relating to early career teachers' working lives, teacher well-being, self-determination theory and performativity, respectively. Drawing on a secondary analysis of qualitative data generated for four…

  2. Early Career Mathematics Teachers' General Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills: Do Teacher Education, Teaching Experience, and Working Conditions Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Johannes; Blömeke, Sigrid; Kaiser, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We examined several facets of general pedagogical knowledge and skills of early career mathematics teachers, asking how they are associated with characteristics of teacher education, teaching experience, and working conditions. Declarative general pedagogical knowledge (GPK) was assessed via a paper-and-pencil test, while early career teachers'…

  3. Promoting Early Career Teacher Resilience: A Framework for Understanding and Acting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce; Down, Barry; Le Cornu, Rosie; Peters, Judy; Sullivan, Anna; Pearce, Jane; Hunter, Janet

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we undertake a brief review of the "conventional" research into the problems of early career teachers to create a juxtaposed position from which to launch an alternative approach based on resilience theory. We outline four reasons why a new contextualised, social theory of resilience has the potential to open up the field…

  4. Best Friends in Adolescence Show Similar Educational Careers in Early Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuru, Noona; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Nurmi, Jari-Erik; Zettergren, Peter; Andersson, Hakan; Bergman, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of best friends in educational career development from adolescence to adulthood. Participants' (N=476) reciprocal best friendships were identified at age 15, while their educational attainment was investigated in early adulthood (age 26), their intelligence (IQ) at age 13, and parental education, educational…

  5. Early-Career Academics' Perceptions of Teaching and Learning in Hong Kong: Implications for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Keith; McNaught, Carmel; Wong, Kin-Chi; Li, Yi-Ching

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses early-career academics' development at a university in Hong Kong. Reflecting the impact of local context, the paper explores cultural and structural influences that can impinge on teaching and learning strategies for new academics. Barriers such as student learning behaviour and publication pressure may discourage new…

  6. Supporting Our Junior Faculty: Assessing the Concerns and Needs of Early Career Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Jessica J.; Keeley, Jared W.; Leder, Sadie; Afful, Stephanie E.; Stiegler-Balfour, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Association and its divisions have developed various resources aimed at aiding early career psychologists (ECPs); yet, very little research has been conducted to assess the actual needs of this group. Specifically, research has not identified the needs and concerns of junior faculty engaged in classroom teaching. As…

  7. Effective Teaching Outcomes Associated with the Mentorship of Early Career Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisi, Jordan D.; Leder, Sadie; Stiegler-Balfour, Jennifer J.; Fleck, Bethany K. B.; Good, Jessica J.

    2015-01-01

    To date, research has not examined the influence of mentorship on the teaching effectiveness of Early Career Psychologists (ECPs). We sought to fill this void by conducting a national survey of 122 ECPs assessing the presence or absence of three types of ECP mentors (i.e., in their department, in another department at their university, or another…

  8. Academic success and early career outcomes : Can honors alumni be distinguished from non-honors alumni?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, A.; Mainhard, M. T.; Brekelmans, M.; van Beukelen, P.; Jaarsma, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This study compared Dutch alumni who previously participated in an honors program (n=72) to non-honors alumni who entered university as high-achieving high school students (n=72) with regard to (1) final university grade point average (GPA) and (2) early career outcomes. Final grades were drawn from

  9. Early career burnout among Dutch nurses: A process captured in a Rasch model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.A. de; Brouwers, A.; Schoot, T.; Pat-El, R.; Verboon, P.; Näring, G.W.B.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates burnout among Dutch nursing graduates as a process by testing a sequential-developmental model. A sample of 237 respondents was recruited from a population of Dutch early career nurses. Burnout was measured with the Dutch version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory Human

  10. Early career burnout among Dutch nurses : A process captured in a Rasch model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Jan Alexander; Brouwers, Andre; Schoot, Tineke; Pat-El, Ron; Verboon, Peter; Näring, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates burnout among Dutch nursing graduates as a process by testing a sequential-developmental model. A sample of 237 respondents was recruited from a population of Dutch early career nurses. Burnout was measured with the Dutch version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory Human

  11. Managing the Process: The Intradepartmental Networks of Early-Career Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifer, Meghan J.; Baker, Vicki L.

    2013-01-01

    This article relies on data from surveys and interviews to explore the networking behaviors and strategies of early-career faculty members within the contexts of their academic departments. Findings suggest that faculty members' approaches to interactions and relationships with colleagues may be conceptualized according to a continuum of…

  12. A Comprehensive Model of Career Development in Early Adulthood. Occasional Paper No. 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crites, John O.

    The paper proposes a comprehensive model of career development in early adulthood and addresses some of the theoretical and research issues central to furthering knowledge of how and why young adults enter and adjust to their jobs. The disciplines of vocational and organizational psychology, adjustment and developmental psychology, and industrial…

  13. Motivation for Teaching Career of Students from Early Childhood Education and Primary School Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Gianina-Ana

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines why teaching is chosen as a career, and considers the extent to which a range of factors identified within a sample of 173 students from kindergarten and primary school pedagogy, early childhood education and applied didactics in primary school. The study is based on the responses to a questionnaire applied to students involved…

  14. Letters from Early Career Academics: The Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy Field of Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfrey, Laura; Enright, Eimear; Rynne, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Taking our lead from Rainer Maria Rilke's (1929) "Letters to a Young Poet", our broader project aimed to create a space for dialogue and intergenerational learning between Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy (PESP) Early Career Academics (ECAs) and members of the PESP professoriate. This paper focuses specifically on the experiences of…

  15. 2013 Schroth faces of the future symposium to highlight early career professionals in Mycology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2013 Schroth Faces of the Future symposium was created to recognize early career professionals (those within 10 years of graduation) who represent the future in their field via innovative research. For this year, future faces in mycology research were recognized. Drs. Jason Slot, Erica Goss, Jam...

  16. Early Career Teachers, Mathematics and Technology: Device Conflict and Emerging Mathematical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Catherine; Orlando, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICT) are positioned in policy/syllabus documents as an essential resource in the teaching of mathematics. Given their youth and lifelong experience with technology, early career teachers (ECTs) are expected to excel in their use of ICT; however, we are not clear on the viability of these expectations and…

  17. It's Always a Pleasure: Exploring Productivity and Pleasure in a Writing Group for Early Career Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Angela; Lewis, Bridget; McDonald, Fiona; Burns, Marcelle

    2012-01-01

    The professional development needs of early career academics (ECAs) are increasingly subject to scrutiny. The literature notes writing groups can be successful in increasing research outputs and improving research track records--a core concern for ECAs. However, the pressure on ECAs to publish takes the pleasure out of writing for many. We argue…

  18. Promoting Writing amongst Peers: Establishing a Community of Writing Practice for Early Career Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Alexandra; Berry, Donna M.; Budds, Kirsty; Skipper, Yvonne; Williams, Helen L.

    2017-01-01

    In the current research-focused climate, academics are facing increasing pressure to produce research outputs. This pressure can prove particularly daunting for early career (EC) academics, who are simultaneously attempting to master new teaching and administrative demands while establishing their own independent research trajectories. Previous…

  19. Being Critical: An Account of an Early Career Academic Working within and against Neoliberalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    In 2014 I attended a symposium concerning Early Career Academics (ECAs) in the field of physical education and sport pedagogy. I was struck by the dominance of a particular theme at that symposium--that is, how to obtain a position and survive in academia. The aim of this paper is to use an inciting moment that occurred at this symposium as a…

  20. Organising, Providing and Evaluating Technical Training for Early Career Researchers: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Besouw, Rachel M.; Rogers, Katrine S.; Powles, Christopher J.; Papadopoulos, Timos; Ku, Emery M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the importance of providing technical training opportunities for Early Career Researchers (ECRs) worldwide through the case study of a MATLAB training programme, which was proposed, organised, managed and evaluated by a team of five ECRs at the University of Southampton. The effectiveness of the programme in terms of the…

  1. Target-Setting, Early-Career Academic Identities and the Measurement Culture of UK Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Early-career academics are subject to a barrage of formal measurements when they secure a first academic post in a UK university. To support this process, guidance is provided by universities on what is measured, though this can lack disciplinary nuance. This article analyses the perceptions of a sample of social scientists of the process of…

  2. Academic success and early career outcomes : Can honors alumni be distinguished from non-honors alumni?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, A.; Mainhard, M. T.; Jaarsma, A. D C; Brekelmans, M.; van Beukelen, P.

    2016-01-01

    This study compared Dutch alumni who previously participated in an honors program (n = 72) to non-honors alumni who entered university as high-achieving high school students (n = 72) with regard to (1) final university grade point average (GPA) and (2) early career outcomes. Final grades were drawn

  3. The Impact of Major-Job Mismatch on College Graduates' Early Career Earnings: Evidence from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rong

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of the mismatch between a college major and job on college graduates' early career earnings using a sample from China. On average, a major-job mismatched college graduate is found to suffer from an income loss that is much lower than the penalty documented in previous studies. The income losses are also found to be…

  4. Effectiveness of Higher Diploma Program for Early Career Academics in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebru, Demewoz Admasu

    2016-01-01

    Unprecedented expansion of the public higher education sector in Ethiopia has brought about masses of early career academics (ECAs) to take up teaching and research in the sector. In recognition of a multitude of responsibilities and challenges these ECAs would face, a higher diploma program (HDP) was introduced in 2004 both for ECAs and senior…

  5. Identifying future research directions for biodiversity, ecosystem services and sustainability : perspectives from early-career researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hossain, S.; Pogue, S.J.; Trenchard, L.; Oudenhoven, van A.P.E.; Washbourne, C-L.; Muiruri, E.W.; Tomczyk, A.M.; García-Llorente, M.; Hale, R.; Hevia, V.; Adams, T.; Tavallali, L.; De, Bell S.; Pye, M.; Resende, F.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to identify priority research questions in the field of biodiversity, ecosystem services and sustainability (BESS), based on a workshop held during the NRG BESS Conference for Early Career Researchers on BESS, and to compare these to existing horizon scanning exercises. This work highlights

  6. The Politics of Dissertation Advising: How Early Career Women Faculty Negotiate Access and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reybold, L. Earle; Brazer, S. David; Schrum, Lynne; Corda, Kirsten W.

    2012-01-01

    Dissertation committees are complex social arenas that underscore expertise, image, and peer relationships--all of which affect professional identity and advancement. This study presents a sampling of how early career women faculty members learn about and negotiate their participation on dissertation committees. Research questions focused on…

  7. Social Strategies during University Studies Predict Early Career Work Burnout and Engagement: 18-Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Tolvanen, Asko; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study spanning 18 years examined the role of social strategies in early career adaptation. The aim was to find out whether individuals' social strategies measured during their university studies had an impact on work burnout and work engagement measured 10-18 years later. A sample of 292 university students completed the SAQ…

  8. Underemployment in the early careers of college graduates following the Great Recession

    OpenAIRE

    Jaison R. Abel; Deitz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Though labor market conditions steadily improved following the Great Recession, underemployment among recent college graduates continued to climb, reaching highs not seen since the early 1990s. In this paper, we take a closer look at the jobs held by underemployed college graduates in the early stages of their careers during this period. We show that relatively few recent graduates were working in low-skilled service jobs, and that many of the underemployed worked in fairly well paid non-coll...

  9. Workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Providing resources and support for new faculty to succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. M.; Beane, R. J.; Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Allen-King, R. M.; Yuretich, R.; Richardson, R. M.; Ormand, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    A vital strategy to educate future geoscientists is to support faculty at the beginning of their careers, thus catalyzing a career-long impact on the early-career faculty and on their future students. New faculty members are at a pivotal stage in their careers as they step from being research-focused graduate students and post-doctoral scholars, under the guidance of advisors, towards launching independent careers as professors. New faculty commonly, and not unexpectedly, feel overwhelmed as they face challenges to establish themselves in a new environment, prepare new courses, begin new research, and develop a network of support. The workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career has been offered annually in the U.S. since 1999. The workshop is currently offered through the National Association of Geoscience Teachers On the Cutting Edge professional development program with support from the NSF, AGU and GSA. This five-day workshop, with associated web resources, offers guidance for incorporating evidence-based teaching practices, developing a research program, and managing professional responsibilities in balance with personal lives. The workshop design includes plenary and concurrent sessions, individual consultations, and personalized feedback from workshop participants and leaders. Since 1999, more than 850 U.S. faculty have attended the Early Career Geoscience Faculty workshop. Participants span a wide range of geoscience disciplines, and are in faculty positions at two-year colleges, four-year colleges, comprehensive universities and research universities. The percentages of women (~50%) and underrepresented participants (~8%) are higher than in the general geoscience faculty population. Multiple participants each year are starting positions after receiving all or part of their education outside the U.S. Collectively, participants report that they are better prepared to move forward with their careers as a result of

  10. Building the Next Generation of Earth Scientists: the Deep Carbon Observatory Early Career Scientist Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, K.; Fellowes, J.; Giovannelli, D.; Stagno, V.

    2016-12-01

    Building a network of collaborators and colleagues is a key professional development activity for early career scientists (ECS) dealing with a challenging job market. At large conferences, young scientists often focus on interacting with senior researchers, competing for a small number of positions in leading laboratories. However, building a strong, international network amongst their peers in related disciplines is often as valuable in the long run. The Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) began funding a series of workshops in 2014 designed to connect early career researchers within its extensive network of multidisciplinary scientists. The workshops, by design, are by and for early career scientists, thus removing any element of competition and focusing on peer-to-peer networking, collaboration, and creativity. The successful workshops, organized by committees of early career deep carbon scientists, have nucleated a lively community of like-minded individuals from around the world. Indeed, the organizers themselves often benefit greatly from the leadership experience of pulling together an international workshop on budget and on deadline. We have found that a combination of presentations from all participants in classroom sessions, professional development training such as communication and data management, and field-based relationship building and networking is a recipe for success. Small groups within the DCO ECS network have formed; publishing papers together, forging new research directions, and planning novel and ambitious field campaigns. Many DCO ECS also have come together to convene sessions at major international conferences, including the AGU Fall Meeting. Most of all, there is a broad sense of camaraderie and accessibility within the DCO ECS Community, providing the foundation for a career in the new, international, and interdisciplinary field of deep carbon science.

  11. Career Perspectives of Male Students in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anliak, Sakire; Beyazkurk, Derya Sahin

    2008-01-01

    While, in some professions, the gender balance seems to be changing in the direction of equality, the participation of males in early childhood education has not expanded because of stereotypical perceptions of this occupation, low salaries and status, and fear of being accused of sexual abuse. Males may make important contributions to the field…

  12. Assistant professor's National Science Foundation CAREER grant will help understand cell cycle model

    OpenAIRE

    Mackay, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Yang Cao, an assistant professor in the computer science department at Virginia Tech's College of Engineering, has won a $550,000 National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award to develop computer simulation methods that will better understand the complex, discrete, and stochastic cell cycle model.

  13. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discourage entrepreneurship, from approximately 3% in engineering to approximately 12% in the life sciences. Within fields, there is no difference between labs that encourage entrepreneurship and those that do not with respect to basic research activity and the number of publications. At the same time, labs that encourage entrepreneurship are significantly more likely to report invention disclosures, particularly in engineering where such labs are 41% more likely to disclose inventions. With respect to career pathways, PhDs students in labs that encourage entrepreneurship do not differ from other PhDs in their interest in academic careers, but they are 87% more likely to be interested in careers in entrepreneurship and 44% more likely to work in a startup after graduation. These results persist even when accounting for individuals’ pre-PhD interest in entrepreneurship and the encouragement of other non-academic industry careers. PMID:28178270

  14. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discourage entrepreneurship, from approximately 3% in engineering to approximately 12% in the life sciences. Within fields, there is no difference between labs that encourage entrepreneurship and those that do not with respect to basic research activity and the number of publications. At the same time, labs that encourage entrepreneurship are significantly more likely to report invention disclosures, particularly in engineering where such labs are 41% more likely to disclose inventions. With respect to career pathways, PhDs students in labs that encourage entrepreneurship do not differ from other PhDs in their interest in academic careers, but they are 87% more likely to be interested in careers in entrepreneurship and 44% more likely to work in a startup after graduation. These results persist even when accounting for individuals' pre-PhD interest in entrepreneurship and the encouragement of other non-academic industry careers.

  15. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Roach

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discourage entrepreneurship, from approximately 3% in engineering to approximately 12% in the life sciences. Within fields, there is no difference between labs that encourage entrepreneurship and those that do not with respect to basic research activity and the number of publications. At the same time, labs that encourage entrepreneurship are significantly more likely to report invention disclosures, particularly in engineering where such labs are 41% more likely to disclose inventions. With respect to career pathways, PhDs students in labs that encourage entrepreneurship do not differ from other PhDs in their interest in academic careers, but they are 87% more likely to be interested in careers in entrepreneurship and 44% more likely to work in a startup after graduation. These results persist even when accounting for individuals' pre-PhD interest in entrepreneurship and the encouragement of other non-academic industry careers.

  16. Pathways to Achievement: Career and Educational Aspirations and Expectations of Latina/o Immigrant Parents and Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavira, Gabriela; Cooper, Catherine R.; Vasquez-Salgado, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on sociocultural and related theories, 4 questions examined career and educational aspirations and expectations among 24 immigrant Latina/o early adolescents and their parents as predictors of students' grades. First, adolescents' career aspirations and expectations were correlated, and both parents and adolescents held educational…

  17. A Mentor Training Program Improves Mentoring Competency for Researchers Working with Early-Career Investigators from Underrepresented Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mallory O.; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective…

  18. A Pragmatic Approach to Getting Published: 35 Tips for Early Career Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha M. Glover

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is trite to say publish or perish, yet many early career researchers are often at a loss on how to best get one’s work published. With strong competition and many manuscripts submitted, it is difficult to convince editors and reviewers to opt for acceptance. A pragmatic approach to publishing may increase one’s odds of success. Here, we-- a group of postdocs in the field of plant science-- present specific recommendations for early career scientists on advanced levels. We cannot provide a recipe-like set of instructions with success guaranteed, but we come from a broad background in plant science, with experience publishing in a large number of different journals of varying topics and impact factors. We provide tips, tricks, and tools for collaboration, journal selection, and achieving acceptance.

  19. Positive work environments of early-career registered nurses and the correlation with physician verbal abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Carol S; Kovner, Christine T; Obeidat, Rana F; Budin, Wendy C

    2013-01-01

    Verbal abuse in the workplace is experienced by registered nurses (RNs) worldwide; physicians are one of the main sources of verbal abuse. To examine the relationship between levels of physician verbal abuse of early-career RNs and demographics, work attributes, and perceived work environment. Fourth wave of a mailed national panel survey of early career RNs begun in 2006. RNs' perception of verbal abuse by physicians was significantly associated with poor workgroup cohesion, lower supervisory and mentor support, greater quantitative workload, organizational constraints, and nurse-colleague verbal abuse, as well as RNs' lower job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and intent to stay. RNs working in unfavorable work environments experience more physician abuse and have less favorable work attitudes. Causality is unclear: do poor working conditions create an environment in which physicians are more likely to be abusive, or does verbal abuse by physicians create an unfavorable work environment? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Pragmatic Approach to Getting Published: 35 Tips for Early Career Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Natasha M; Antoniadi, Ioanna; George, Gavin M; Götzenberger, Lars; Gutzat, Ruben; Koorem, Kadri; Liancourt, Pierre; Rutowicz, Kinga; Saharan, Krishna; You, Wanhui; Mayer, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    It is trite to say "publish or perish," yet many early career researchers are often at a loss on how to best get their work published. With strong competition and many manuscripts submitted, it is difficult to convince editors and reviewers to opt for acceptance. A pragmatic approach to publishing may increase one's odds of success. Here, we - a group of postdocs in the field of plant science - present specific recommendations for early career scientists on advanced levels. We cannot provide a recipe-like set of instructions with success guaranteed, but we come from a broad background in plant science, with experience publishing in a number of journals of varying topics and impact factors. We provide tips, tricks, and tools for collaboration, journal selection, and achieving acceptance.

  1. The HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute: Training Early-Career Scientists to Conduct Research on Research Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Celia B; Yuko, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    The responsible conduct of HIV/drug abuse prevention research requires investigators with both the knowledge of and ability to generate empirical data that can enhance global ethical practices and policies. This article describes a multidisciplinary program offering early-career professionals a 2-year intensive summer curriculum along with funding to conduct a mentored research study on a wide variety of HIV/drug abuse research ethics topics. Now in its fifth year, the program has admitted 29 trainees who have to date demonstrated increased knowledge of research ethics, produced 17 peer-reviewed publications, 46 professional presentations, and submitted or been awarded five related federal grants. The institute also hosts a global information platform providing general and HIV/drug abuse relevant research ethics educational and research resources that have had more than 38,800 unique visitors from more than 150 countries. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Building an early career network through outreach projects: The "mon océan & moi" example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieux, M.; Scheurle, C.; Ardyna, M.; Harmel, T.; Ferraris, M.; Jessin, T.; Lacour, L.; Mayot, N.; Organelli, E.; Pasqueron De Fommervault, O.; Penkerc'h, C.; Poteau, A.; Uitz, J.; Ramondec, S.; Sauzède, R.; Velluci, V.; Claustre, H.

    2016-02-01

    The ocean plays an important role in the global processes of our planet, from climate change to sea level rise, uptake of carbon dioxide to fisheries stocks. In addition, its scientific importance, extraordinary beauty and public fascination provide perfect ingredients for both education and public outreach. Four years ago, after the launch of the "mon océan & moi" outreach project, an early career network (Ph.D. students and postdocs) has been formed to "promote collaborations/exchanges between the scientific and educational worlds in order to co-elaborate a teaching method for raising the awareness of school children on marine environments". Scientists are pursuing new research yielding improved knowledge and new documentation resources. However, they lack the communication skills to make the subject accessible to the general public. On the other hand, teachers must be informed of recent discoveries and of new resources for educational purposes. To fill this gap, the early career scientists developed, in collaboration with a school authority and an experienced science communicators team, both a trail education program tested directly in middle and high schools and innovative supporting material (i.e., animations, educative video clips and experiments, interactive maps and quizzes). Here we outline a set of guidelines as to how to improve science outreach across a variety of disciplines (e.g., science, technology, engineering) and how this may impact the experience of early career scientists. These tips will be useful for other early career scientists and science outreach projects, large or small, regional, national or international. Such novel outreach initiatives will help educate current and next generations about the importance of ocean environments and the relevance of ocean sciences for the society, and may serve as an example of teamwork for other young scientists.

  3. [German Research Foundation (DFG) Early Career Investigators Workshop in Health Services Research: concept - progress - feedback].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Martin; Lühmann, Dagmar; Raspe, Heiner

    2012-01-01

    In December 2010, the Institutes for Social Medicine and Cancer Epidemiology of the University of Lübeck hosted the first Workshop for Early Career Investigators in the area of Health Services Research. This workshop was funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) with the aim to promote young scientists and researchers that wish to pursue research in the field of Health Services Research in an early phase of their career. The following report addresses the background, concept and progress of the initiative. All applicants had to submit a detailed project proposal and underwent a rigorous selection process. The projects presented at the workshop covered a wide range of topics, such as, for example, access to health care, common elements of mental illnesses and psychosomatic disorders, quality assurance in medical practices (i.e., evaluation of disease management programmes) and targets in rehabilitation. A major subject was migration as a challenge to Health Services Research. The 20 best applicants out of 121 were invited to attend the programme. During five days the participants had the opportunity to present their projects and discuss current issues as well as fundamental themes in study design. At the same time, national and international leading experts gave a series of lectures on current topics of Health Services Research. In numerous discussion groups and topical workshops participants and speakers explored and sought solutions to specific research issues. Following the programme participants are expected to finalise their research proposals and apply for funding to the DFG. To foster networking among early-career researchers, an alumni meeting is scheduled after 12 months. The DFG Workshop for Early Career Investigators was the first of its kind in the field of Health Services Research in Germany. However, evidence of its sustainability will have to be obtained from the future development of the German Health Services

  4. Critical learning and tempered radicalism: An exploration of the roles and development of early career academics

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, S; Bristow, A.; Ratle, O.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on a study of 30 CMS Early Career Academics (ECAs) this paper explores how they learn to practice according to their own CMS motivations and maintain such endeavours within environments and evaluation systems which increasingly require high levels of conformity to mainstream managerialist thinking and practice. Applying a Bourdieusian lens to this issue, we focus on the tensions of co-existing between two positions (field and subfield) and explore practices which develop a habitus sui...

  5. Verbal abuse from nurse colleagues and work environment of early career registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budin, Wendy C; Brewer, Carol S; Chao, Ying-Yu; Kovner, Christine

    2013-09-01

    This study examined relationships between verbal abuse from nurse colleagues and demographic characteristics, work attributes, and work attitudes of early career registered nurses (RNs). Data are from the fourth wave of a national panel survey of early career RNs begun in 2006. The final analytic sample included 1,407 RNs. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample, analysis of variance to compare means, and chi square to compare categorical variables. RNs reporting higher levels of verbal abuse from nurse colleagues were more likely to be unmarried, work in a hospital setting, or work in a non-magnet hospital. They also had lower job satisfaction, and less organizational commitment, autonomy, and intent to stay. Lastly, they perceived their work environments unfavorably. Data support the hypothesis that early career RNs are vulnerable to the effects of verbal abuse from nurse colleagues. Although more verbal abuse is seen in environments with unfavorable working conditions, and RNs working in such environments tend to have less favorable work attitudes, one cannot assume causality. It is unclear if poor working conditions create an environment where verbal abuse is tolerated or if verbal abuse creates an unfavorable work environment. There is a need to develop and test evidence-based interventions to deal with the problems inherent with verbal abuse from nurse colleagues. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  6. Supporting early career health investigators in Kenya: A qualitative study of HIV/AIDS research capacity building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Joseph; Nduati, Ruth; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey

    2015-01-01

    Strategies to transfer international health research training programs to sub-Saharan African institutions focus on developing cadres of local investigators who will lead such programs. Using a critical leadership theory framework, we conducted a qualitative study of one program to understand how collaborative training and research can support early career investigators in Kenya toward the program transfer goal. We used purposive sampling methods and a semi-structured protocol to conduct in-depth interviews with US (N = 5) and Kenyan (N = 5) independent investigators. Transcripts were coded using a two-step process, and then compared with each other to identify major themes. A limited local research environment, funding needs and research career mentorship were identified as major influences on early career researchers. Institutional demands on Kenyan faculty to teach rather than complete research restricted investigators' ability to develop research careers. This was coupled with lack of local funding to support research. Sustainable collaborations between Kenyan, US and other international investigators were perceived to mitigate these challenges and support early career investigators who would help build a robust local research environment for training. Mutually beneficial collaborations between Kenyan and US investigators developed during training mitigate these challenges and build a supportive research environment for training. In these collaborations, early career investigators learn how to navigate the complex international research environment to build local HIV research capacity. Shared and mutually beneficial resources within international research collaborations are required to support early career investigators and plans to transfer health research training to African institutions.

  7. Launching an Academic Career: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Geoscience Graduate Students, Post-doctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.; Ormand, C. J.; MacDonald, H.; Dunbar, R. W.; Allen-King, R. M.; Manduca, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Launching an academic career presents a number of challenges. A recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education depicts academia as an “ivory sweatshop,” citing rising standards for tenure. Most graduate programs provide minimal training for life beyond graduate school. The professional development program “On the Cutting Edge” fills this gap by providing workshops and web resources on academic careers for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and early career faculty. These workshops and web resources address a wide range of topics related to teaching, research, and managing one’s career, tailored for each group. The Preparing for an Academic Career in the Geosciences workshop to help graduate students and postdoctoral fellows make the transition into an academic career has been offered annually since 2003. It provides a panel on academic careers in different institutional settings, sessions on research on learning, various teaching strategies, design of effective teaching activities, moving research forward to new settings, effective teaching and research statements, the job search process, negotiation, and presenting oneself to others. Complementary online resources (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/careerprep/index.html) focus on these topics. The workshops and web resources offer guidance for each step of the job search process, for developing and teaching one’s own courses, and for making the transition from being a research student to being in charge of a research program. Online resources also include case studies of successful dual career couples, documenting their job search strategies. A four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career, offered annually since 1999, provides sessions on teaching strategies, course design, developing a strategic plan for research, supervising student researchers, navigating departmental and institutional politics, preparing for tenure, time and

  8. Early Career Experiences of Pediatricians Pursuing or Not Pursuing Fellowship Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Bobbi J; Katakam, Shesha K; Frintner, Mary Pat; Cull, William L

    2015-10-01

    Choosing career paths can be difficult decisions for residents contemplating fellowship training. This study compares the experiences of early career pediatricians who did and did not pursue fellowships. We analyzed national, weighted data from pediatricians 8 to 10 years after residency (n = 842). Work environment, work-life balance, and satisfaction were compared for pediatricians who had pursued fellowship training (fellowship trained) and those who did not pursue fellowship training (generalist trained). Logistic and linear regression examined the independent effects of fellowship training while controlling for demographic differences. A total of 39% of the pediatricians (328/842) pursued fellowship training. The fellowship-trained group was less likely than the generalist-trained group to spend time in direct patient care and more likely to report learning opportunities in their work environment. This group was also more likely to report an income of ≥$150,000, although no difference was found when only full-time pediatricians were examined. Generalist-trained pediatricians were more likely to work work to be rewarding and were satisfied with their lives. Although residents need to consider important life and career differences when contemplating fellowship training and general care, pediatricians in both groups can achieve overall life and career satisfaction. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Promoting pedagogical content knowledge development for early career secondary teachers in science and technology using content representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John; Eames, Chris; Hume, Anne; Lockley, John

    2012-11-01

    Background: This research addressed the key area of early career teacher education and aimed to explore the use of a 'content representation' (CoRe) as a mediational tool to develop early career secondary teacher pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). This study was situated in the subject areas of science and technology, where sound teacher knowledge is particularly important to student engagement. Purpose: The study was designed to examine whether such a tool (a CoRe), co-designed by an early career secondary teacher with expert content and pedagogy specialists, can enhance the PCK of early career teachers. The research questions were: How can experts in content and pedagogy work together with early career teachers to develop one science topic CoRe and one technology topic CoRe to support the development of PCK for early career secondary teachers? How does the use of a collaboratively designed CoRe affect the planning of an early career secondary teacher in science or technology? How has engagement in the development and use of an expert-informed CoRe developed an early career teacher's PCK? Sample: The research design incorporated a unique partnership between two expert classroom teachers, two content experts, four early career teachers, and four researchers experienced in science and technology education. Design: This study employed an interpretivist-based methodology and an action research approach within a four-case study design. Data were gathered using qualitative research methods focused on semi-structured interviews, observations and document analysis. Results: The study indicated that CoRes, developed through this collaborative process, helped the early career teachers focus on the big picture of the topic, emphasize particularly relevant areas of content and consider alternative ways of planning for their teaching. Conclusions: This paper presents an analysis of the process of CoRe development by the teacher-expert partnerships and the effect that had on

  10. Locality and Transnational Mobility in the Early Stages of Academic Careers: The Importance of Family and Professional Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Toader, Alina; Dahinden, Janine; Schaer, Martine

    2016-01-01

    This paper is part of the research project entitled ‘Transnational Mobility of Academics in the Early Stages of their Careers: Transforming or Reproducing Gender Regimes?’ funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation. We present here results from an online survey we conducted in 2013 as regards the early-career academics’ experiences of international mobility within a broader social context. The paper focuses on academics’ reasons for becoming or not becoming mobile, on their professional ...

  11. Professional behaviors, sense of belonging, and professional socialization of early career clinical laboratory scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, Janna Marie

    Professional socialization is a process that individuals experience as members of a profession and consists of the knowledge, attitudes, and experiences that influence and shape their professional identity. The process of professional socialization has not been studied in the clinical laboratory science profession. Clinical laboratory science is an allied health profession that is faced by a workforce shortage that has been caused by a decrease in new graduates, decreased retention of qualified professionals, and increased retirements. Other allied health professions such as nursing, athletic training, and pharmacy have studied professional socialization as a way to identify factors that may influence the retention of early career professionals. This mixed method study, which quantitatively used Hall's Professionalism Scale (1968) in addition to qualitative focus group interviews, sought to identify the professional attitudes and behaviors, sense of belonging, and professional socialization of early career clinical laboratory scientists. Early career clinical laboratory scientists were divided into two groups based upon the amount of work experience they had; new clinical laboratory science graduates have had less than one year of work experience and novice clinical laboratory scientists had between one and three years of work experience. This study found that early career clinical laboratory scientists have established professional identities and view themselves as members of the clinical laboratory science field within four proposed stages of professional socialization consisting of pre-arrival, encounter, adaptation, and commitment. New CLS graduates and novice clinical laboratory scientists were found to be at different stages of the professional stage process. New CLS graduates, who had less than one year of work experience, were found to be in the encounter stage. Novice clinical laboratory scientists, with one to three years of work experience, were found to

  12. An investigation of the early factors which influence women's career choices in physical science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Anneliese

    The composition of the workforce has begun to undergo a change. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that women, minorities, and immigrants will constitute 80 percent of the additions to the labor force between 1987 and the year 2000 (Oakes, 1990). The National Science Foundation projects that the United States may have a shortfall of 400,000 scientists and over 250,000 engineers by the year 2006 (Argonne, 1990). Since women are among those who are significantly underrepresented among individuals preparing for a career in science, thirty women who are currently pursuing a successful career in physical science and technology were interviewed. This study determined participants' perceptions of the factors that first influenced an early interest in physical science and technology. The investigation included perceptions regarding: (1) whether certain identifiable events or experiences influenced the decision to pursue science as a career and what those events and experiences were; (2) at what age these events occurred; (3) whether an adult(s) was influential and which adult(s) it was; and (4) identification of where these events and experiences occurred. The interview technique was selected as the best research method for collecting the qualitative and demographic data needed for this study. The results represent the participants' recollections of out-of-school and in-school activities, family, friends and teacher support, self-image during the formative years, parents as the most important factor which influenced an interest in physical science, and major obstacles that had to be overcome by the participants in order to pursue successful careers in physical science and technology. Also included is participants' advice to parents and teachers who want to encourage females to pursue a career in physical science and technology.

  13. “She writes like a Woman”: Paratextual Marketing in Delarivier Manley’s Early Career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Ozment

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Delarivier Manley has long been discussed as a sensational and successful Tory political satirist of the early eighteenth century. In the late seventeenth century, however, she associated with Whigs, experimented with genres, and tested different techniques for marketing her texts. Mimicking the methods of celebrity actresses, Manley used paratextual addresses to engage public interest in a carefully curated identity, creating a commodity in her persona that she would employ throughout her career. This paper traces her developing persona in her first three publications: Letters Writen by Mrs. Manley, The Lost Lover, and The Royal Mischief. Although these texts are not explicitly political satire, they nevertheless explicate the preliminary and halting machinations of an astute businesswoman and the marketing tactics Manley would employ throughout her career. The result is a more complete and nuanced picture of Manley’s commercial authorship.

  14. A structural equation model of turnover for a longitudinal survey among early career registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Carol S; Chao, Ying-Yu; Colder, Craig R; Kovner, Christine T; Chacko, Thomas P

    2015-11-01

    Key predictors of early career nurses' turnover are job satisfaction, organizational commitment, job search, intent to stay, and shock (back injuries) based on the literature review and our previous research. Existing research has often omitted one of these key predictors. The purpose of this study in a sample of early career nurses was to compare predictors of turnover to nurses' actual turnover at two time points in their careers. A multi-state longitudinal panel survey of early career nurses was used to compare a turnover model across two time periods. The sample has been surveyed five times. The sample was selected using a two-stage sample of registered nurses nested in 51 metropolitan areas and nine non-metropolitan, rural areas in 34 states and the District of Columbia. The associations between key predictors of turnover were tested using structural equation modeling and data from the earliest and latest panels in our study. We used predictors from the respondents who replied to the Wave-1 survey in 2006 and their turnover status from Wave 2 in 2007 (N=2386). We compared these results to the remaining respondents' predictors from Wave 4 in 2011 and their turnover status in Wave 5 in 2013 (N=1073). We tested and found no effect for missingness from Wave 1-5 and little evidence of attrition bias. Strong support was found for the relationships hypothesized among job satisfaction, organizational commitment, intent to stay, and turnover, with some support for shock and search in the Wave 1-2 sample. However, for Wave 4-5 sample (n=1073), none of the paths through search were significant, nor was the path from shock to turnover. Nurses in the second analysis who had matured longer in their career did not have a significant response to search or shock (back injuries), which may indicate how easily experienced registered nurses find new jobs and/or accommodation to jobs requiring significant physicality. Nurse turnover is a major concern for healthcare organizations

  15. Outreach Opportunities for Early Career Scientists at the Phoenix ComiCon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodyskyj, L.; Walker, S. I.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Phoenix ComiCon (PCC) is a rapidly growing annual four-day pop culture event, featuring guests, costuming, exhibits, and discussion panels for popular sci-fi, fantasy, horror, and anime franchises. In 2013, PCC began experimenting with science discussion panels. The popularity of the science programming resulted in an expansion of the track for 2014, which Horodyskyj was responsible for coordinating. Thirty hours of programming were scheduled, including 25 discussion panels, NASA's FameLab, and a Mars room. Panelists included industry specialists, established scientists, STEM outreach enthusiasts, and early career scientists. The majority of the panelists were early career scientists recruited from planetary sciences and biology departments at ASU and UA. Panel topics included cosmology, biotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, astrobiology, and the cross-linkages of each with pop culture. Formats consisted of Q&A, presentations, and interactive game shows. Although most panels were aimed at the general audience, some panels were more specialized. PCC 2014 attracted 77,818 attendees. The science programming received rave reviews from the audience, the PCC management, and the panelists themselves. Many panel rooms were filled to capacity and required crowd control to limit attendance. We observed the formation of science "groupies" who sought out the science panels exclusively and requested more information on other science public events in the Phoenix area. We distributed surveys to several select sessions to evaluate audience reasons for attending the science panels and their opinion of the scientists they observed. We will present the results of these surveys. As the PCC continues to grow at an exponential rate, the science programming will continue to expand. We will discuss ideas for continued expansion of the PCC science programming both to serve the public and as a unique public outreach opportunity for early career scientists.

  16. CAREER opportunities at the Condensed Matter Physics Program, NSF/DMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity, offering prestigious awards in support of junior faculty. Awards are expected to build the careers of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research. Condensed Matter Physics Program receives between 35 and 45 CAREER proposals each year, in areas related to fundamental research of phenomena exhibited by condensed matter systems. Proposal processing, merit review process, funding levels and success rates will be discussed in the presentation. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members from CAREER-eligible organizations and encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply. NSF/DMR/CMP homepage: https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5666

  17. The early career, gender, and diversity actions within the LHCb Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Rademacker, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration has, as the first (and so far only) LHC collaboration, created a dedicated office for Early Career, Gender and Diversity (ECGD). The ECGD office’s role is to advise the management on ECGD matters; provide a point of contact for anybody experiencing any kind discrimination, bullying or harassment; collate regular statistics and other relevant information related to gender and, where appropriate, other ECGD matters; organise regular open meetings where ECGD matters are discussed. We report on the first two years of the LHCb ECGD office.

  18. Distinguished Lectureship Award on the Applications of Physics: Illuminating My Career - From Flash Gordon to Laser Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James

    2015-03-01

    As a child, I was fascinated by television programs about Flash Gordon. His partner in conquering the universe was Dr. Alexis Zarkov, a physicist, who had invented, among other things, a death ray gun. My personal ``death ray'' was a magnifying glass, focusing sunlight on unsuspecting insects, like crawling ants. I also practiced sneaking up on resting, flying, stinging insects and burning their wings before they could take off and attack me. So I understood something about the power of sunlight. In my senior year of high school, I had a fabulous physics teacher, Lewis E. Love, and I knew after one week that I wanted to be a physicist, not a medical doctor, which is the career my parents wanted me to pursue. It turns out that the first laser functioned on May 16, 1960, just one month before I graduated from high school, and it was inevitable that I would pursue a career working with lasers. My first job as a physicist, during the summer of 1963, was working with lasers at TRG, Inc. a small company whose guru was Gordon Gould, now recognized as the inventor of the laser. After three summers at TRG, I spent three years working on nonlinear optics for my PhD thesis, under the guidance of Prof. Nicolaas Bloembergen, who later won the Nobel Prize in Physics for codifying nonlinear optics. Following completion of my PhD research in 1969, I joined IBM Research, where I have worked ever since. Upon joining the Quantum Electronics group in the Physical Sciences Dept. of the T.J. Watson Research Center, my management told me to ``do something great'' with lasers. After working on atomic spectroscopy with dye lasers through the 1970s, I had the inspiration to acquire an excimer laser for the Laser Physics and Chemistry group. Using this laser, my colleagues and I discovered excimer laser surgery, capable of removing human and animal tissue with great precision, while leaving the underlying and adjacent tissue free of collateral damage. This discovery laid the foundation for

  19. Where to from Here? Career Choices of Pre-Service Teachers Undertaking a Dual Early Childhood/Primary Qualification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Andrea; Rouse, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Recent Australian government initiatives in the early childhood education and care sector are placing demands for an increase in the number of degree qualified early childhood teachers. Many universities are now offering courses with dual qualifications as a way to provide alternate career opportunities for pre-service teachers; however it cannot…

  20. THE IMPACT OF SEXUAL HARASSMENT ON DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS DURING THE EARLY OCCUPATIONAL CAREER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Jason N.; Staff, Jeremy; Mortimer, Jeylan T.; Uggen, Christopher; Blackstone, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Sexual harassment has been theorized as a stressor with consequences for the physical and mental health of its targets. Though social scientists have documented a negative association between sexual harassment and mental health, few longitudinal studies have investigated the association between sexual harassment and depressive symptoms. Using longitudinal survey data from the Youth Development Study, combined with in-depth interviews, this article draws on Louise Fitzgerald’s theoretical framework, stress theory, and the life course perspective to assess the impact of sexual harassment on depressive affect during the early occupational career. In support of Fitzgerald’s model, our findings confirm that sexual harassment is a stressor that is associated with increased depressive symptoms. Our quantitative results show that women and men who experience more frequent sexual harassment at work have significantly higher levels of depressed mood than non-harassed workers, even after controlling for prior harassment and depressive symptoms. Moreover, we find evidence that sexual harassment early in the career has long-term effects on depressive symptoms in adulthood. Interviews with a subset of our survey respondents point to a variety of coping strategies and reveal further links between harassment and other aspects of mental health, such as anger and self-doubt. PMID:22140650

  1. Publish or perish: strategies to help rural early career researchers increase publication output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J; Wilson, S; Rix, E; Pit, S W

    2014-01-01

    Researchers are challenged to publish or perish. A range of barriers to writing can result in sub-optimal productivity, particularly for early career researchers. Researchers in rural areas may face additional challenges of distance and limited access to colleagues. Implementing strategies to address some of these obstacles was identified as a priority for a group of early career, rural researchers. In late 2010, the Wiljo-Piri Writing Group was established, embarking on fortnightly lunch-time meetings for support, networking and the public setting of writing goals; and arranging pairing of 'writing buddies' committed to writing daily, with contact before and/or after each writing session to provide motivation and accountability. Key measures for improvement were publication output (publications per person per year (PPY)) and perceptions of effectiveness of strategies. Publication output varied between individuals and over time; overall PPY rates improved from 0.5 to 1.25. 'Buddy writing' helped facilitate adherence to routine writing sessions and was associated with perceptions of increased creativity, efficiency, confidence and ability to focus. Structured peer support can be a powerful tool to create and maintain regular writing practices and increase publication output. 'Buddy writing' is applicable to any research or academic setting, and helps maintain commitment to daily writing sessions. Furthermore, such interventions can provide peer support for those working in rural settings, helping to address issues such as geographical and professional isolation. Suggested key steps in establishing structured peer support are provided.

  2. A survey of the opinions of recent veterinary graduates and employers regarding early career business skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachynsky, E A; Dale, V H M; Kinnison, T; Gazzard, J; Baillie, S

    2013-06-08

    A questionnaire was designed to assess recent veterinary graduates' proficiency in early career business skills, from the perspectives of graduates of 2006-2008 and employers of recent graduates in the UK. Recent graduates perceived themselves to be generally more competent in financial matters than employers considered them to be. However, when specific skills were assessed, graduates felt less prepared than employers considered them to be competent. Overall, graduates and employers rated recent graduates' preparedness/competence as poor to average for all skills, which were regarded as having average to high importance. Both groups commented on the difficulties faced by new graduates in terms of client communication (generally and financially), and having the confidence to charge clients appropriately for veterinary services. The results of this study indicate that veterinary schools need to take a more active role in the teaching of basic finance skills in order to equip graduates with essential early career competencies. It is anticipated that the information reported will help inform undergraduate curriculum development and highlight the need for increased training at the continuing education level.

  3. 76 FR 34676 - Applications for New Awards; Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... improve teaching and learning; provide high-quality instruction based on rigorous college- and career... Math and English without need for remediation. 7. The percentage of current GEAR UP students and former...

  4. Growing and Supporting the Student and Early Career Pipeline in Earth and Space Sciences - A Spotlight on New AGU Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, E. R.; Williams, B. M.; Asher, P. M.; Furukawa, H.; Holm Adamec, B.; Lee, M.; Cooper, P.

    2015-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) is home to more than 60,000 scientists from 139 countries. Included in this membership are approximately 20,000 (34%) student and early career members. Many well-established programs within AGU provide a dynamic forum for Earth and Space scientists to advance research, collaborate across disciplines, and communicate the importance and impact of science to society regardless of career stage—programs such as AGU publications, scientific meetings and conferences, honors and recognition, and other educational and scientific forums. Additionally, many AGU program initiatives focusing specifically on supporting student and early career scientists and the global talent pool pipeline ones are actively underway. These include both new and long-standing programs. This presentation will describe (1) the overall demographics and needs in Earth and Space sciences, and (2) AGU's coordinated series of programs designed to help attract, retain and support student and early career scientists—with an emphasis on new programmatic activities and initiatives targeting improved diversity. Included in this presentation are a description of the AGU BrightSTaRS Program, the AGU Berkner Program for international students, a newly established AGU Student & Early Career Conference, the AGU Virtual Poster Showcase initiative, the AGU Meeting Mentor program, and GeoLEAD—an umbrella program being jointly built by a coalition of societies to help address Earth and space sciences talent pool needs.

  5. The EGU Seismology Division Early Career Scientist Representative team and its initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Laura; Ermert, Laura; Gualtieri, Lucia; Spieker, Kathrin; Van Noten, Koen; Agius, Matthew R.; Mai, P. Martin

    2017-04-01

    Since 2014, the Seismology Division (SM) of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) has its Early Career Scientist (ECS) representative to reach out to its numerous 'younger' members. In April 2016, a new team of representatives joined the Division. We are a vivid team of early career scientists, representing both (either) PhD students and post-doctoral researchers working in different seismological disciplines and different countries. The initiatives of the SM ECS-rep team have various aims: (1) to motivate the ECSs to get involved in activities and initiatives of the EGU and the Seismology Division, (2) to promote the research of ECSs, (3) to discuss issues concerning seismologists during this particular stage of their career, (4) to share ideas on how to promote equality between scientists and (5) to improve on the public dissemination of scientific knowledge. In an effort to reach out to experienced and ECS seismologists more effectively and to continuously encourage to voice their ideas by contributing and following our initiatives, a blog and social media pages dedicated to seismology and earthquake trivia are run by the team. Weekly posts are published on the blog and shared on the social media regarding scientific and social aspects of seismology. One of the major contributions recently introduced to the blog is the "Paper of the Month" series where experienced seismologists write about recent or classical - must read - seismology articles. We also aim to organise and promote social and scientific events. During the EGU General Assembly 2016 a social event was held in Vienna allowing ECS to network with peers in an informal environment. Given the success of this event, a similar event will be organized during the General Assembly 2017. Also, similar to previous years, a short course on basic seismology for non seismologists will be requested and offered to all ECSs attending the General Assembly. Finally, a workshop dedicated entirely to ECSs seismologists

  6. The European Research Agenda for career guidance and counseling - and beyond. ECADOC - Early stage researchers symposium 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie; Weber, Peter C.

    Research in CGC is an expanding field of research still it is important to attract doctoral candidates to commit themselves to participation in scholarly exchange at central conferences. IAEVG is a central conference to the research field of Career Guidance and Counseling. With this symposium we...... and counseling researcher. Thereby allowing for new and emerging research topics to be discussed in order to build capacity and facilitate the inclusion of Early stage researchers. Abstract The Early stage researchers (ESR) symposium sets out to facilitates new modes of participations by encouraging PhD students...... in career guidance and counseling by supporting the inclusion of new doctoral researchers to the field....

  7. Being relevant: Practical guidance for early career researchers interested in solving conservation problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Chapman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In a human-altered world where biodiversity is in decline and conservation problems abound, there is a dire need to ensure that the next generation of conservation scientists have the knowledge, skills, and training to address these problems. So called “early career researchers” (ECRs in conservation science have many challenges before them and it is clear that the status quo must change to bridge the knowledge–action divide. Here we identify thirteen practical strategies that ECRs can employ to become more relevant. In this context, “relevance” refers to the ability to contribute to solving conservation problems through engagement with practitioners, policy makers, and stakeholders. Conservation and career strategies outlined in this article include the following: thinking ‘big picture’ during conservation projects; embracing various forms of knowledge; maintaining positive relationships with locals familiar with the conservation issue; accepting failure as a viable (and potentially valuable outcome; daring to be creative; embracing citizen science; incorporating interdisciplinarity; promoting and practicing pro-environmental behaviours; understanding financial aspects of conservation; forming collaboration from the onset of a project; accepting the limits of technology; ongoing and effective networking; and finally, maintaining a positive outlook by focusing on and sharing conservation success stories. These strategies move beyond the generic and highlight the importance of continuing to have an open mind throughout the entire conservation process, from establishing one’s self as an asset to embracing collaboration and interdisciplinary work, and striving to push for professional and personal connections that strengthen personal career objectives.

  8. Factors associated with veterinarians’ career path choices in the early postgraduate period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinski, Murray D.; Campbell, John R.; MacGregor, Michael W.; Watts, Jon M.

    2009-01-01

    Veterinarians who graduated between 2000 and 2004, inclusive, were surveyed to determine the factors associated with career path (job) switching in the early postgraduate period. The sampling frame consisted of 348 veterinarians, 285 of whom were contacted and of these, 192 (67.4%) responded to the survey. Only 28.4% of respondents had remained with their initial employer. Three main factors were associated with employee retention: the type of practice/caseload, the workload (hours worked and number of nights on-call), and the level of mentorship and support provided by the practice. Workload and mentorship were also cited as the main reasons for leaving a place of employment. More than a third (38.0%) of respondents reported leaving a position solely because of inadequate mentorship and support. A third (33.7%) of respondents who began their careers in mixed or food animal practice were no longer in these types of practice; the main reasons for leaving were related to workload and mentorship. PMID:19949554

  9. Factors associated with veterinarians' career path choices in the early postgraduate period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinski, Murray D; Campbell, John R; MacGregor, Michael W; Watts, Jon M

    2009-09-01

    Veterinarians who graduated between 2000 and 2004, inclusive, were surveyed to determine the factors associated with career path (job) switching in the early postgraduate period. The sampling frame consisted of 348 veterinarians, 285 of whom were contacted and of these, 192 (67.4%) responded to the survey. Only 28.4% of respondents had remained with their initial employer. Three main factors were associated with employee retention: the type of practice/caseload, the workload (hours worked and number of nights on-call), and the level of mentorship and support provided by the practice. Workload and mentorship were also cited as the main reasons for leaving a place of employment. More than a third (38.0%) of respondents reported leaving a position solely because of inadequate mentorship and support. A third (33.7%) of respondents who began their careers in mixed or food animal practice were no longer in these types of practice; the main reasons for leaving were related to workload and mentorship.

  10. Streamlining Appointment, Promotion, and Tenure Procedures to Promote Early-Career Faculty Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shannon B; Hollerbach, Ann; Donato, Annemarie Sipkes; Edlund, Barbara J; Atz, Teresa; Kelechi, Teresa J

    2016-01-01

    A critical component of the progression of a successful academic career is being promoted in rank. Early-career faculty are required to have an understanding of appointment, promotion, and tenure (APT) guidelines, but many factors often impede this understanding, thwarting a smooth and planned promotion pathway for professional advancement. This article outlines the steps taken by an APT committee to improve the promotion process from instructor to assistant professor. Six sigma's DMAIC improvement model was selected as the guiding operational framework to remove variation in the promotion process. After faculty handbook revisions were made, several checklists developed, and a process review rubric was implemented; recently promoted faculty were surveyed on satisfaction with the process. Faculty opinions captured in the survey suggest increased transparency in the process and perceived support offered by the APT committee. Positive outcomes include a strengthened faculty support framework, streamlined promotion processes, and improved faculty satisfaction. Changes to the APT processes resulted in an unambiguous and standardized pathway for successful promotion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Final Technical Report for Year 5 Early Career Research Project "Viscosity and equation of state of hot and dense QCD matter"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, Denes [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2016-05-25

    The Section below summarizes research activities and achievements during the fifth (last) year of the PI’s Early Career Research Project (ECRP). Unlike the first four years of the project, the last year was not funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The ECRP advanced two main areas: i) radiative 3 ↔ 2 radiative transport, via development of a new computer code MPC/Grid that solves the Boltzmann transport equation in full 6+1D (3X+3V+time); and ii) application of relativistic hydrodynamics, via development of a self-consistent framework to convert viscous fluids to particles. In Year 5 we finalized thermalization studies with radiative gg ↔ ggg transport (Sec. 1.1.1) and used nonlinear covariant transport to assess the accuracy of fluid-to-particle conversion models (Sec. 1.1.2), calculated observables with self-consistent fluid-to-particle conversion from realistic viscous hydrodynamic evolution (Secs. 1.2.1 and 1.2.2), extended the covariant energy loss formulation to heavy quarks (Sec. 1.4.1) and studied energy loss in small systems (Sec. 1.4.2), and also investigated how much of the elliptic flow could have non-hydrodynamic origin (Sec 1.3). Years 1-4 of the ECRP were ARRA-funded and, therefore, they have their own report document ’Final Technical Report for Years 1-4 of the Early Career Research Project “Viscosity and equation of state of hot and dense QCD matter”’ (same award number DE-SC0004035). The PI’s group was also part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration, a multi-institution project that overlapped in time significantly with the ECRP. Purdue achievements as part of the JET Top- ical Collaboration are in a separate report “Final Technical Report summarizing Purdue research activities as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration” (award DE-SC0004077).

  12. Educational gaps and solutions for early-career nurse managers' education and participation in quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukic, Maja; Kovner, Christine T; Brewer, Carol S; Fatehi, Farida; Jun, Jin

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine early-career frontline nurse managers' (FLNMs') reported educational preparedness and participation in quality improvement (QI). Frontline nurse managers are vitally important for leading QI. However, it is not well known if they have adequate knowledge and skills to lead this important function. We examined cross-sectional survey data from 42 FLNMs using descriptive statistics. About 30% of FLNMs reported being very prepared across 12 measured QI skills by schools or employers and 35% reported participating in a specific clinical effort to improve patient care on their unit more than once a month. More than 50% reported having good organizational support for QI, but only about 30% reported being rewarded for their contributions to QI. Our study highlights opportunities for development in QI for FLNMs and offers some solutions for nurse executives that can bridge the educational gaps.

  13. An early career researcher's perspective on presenting flood risk research to the media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Louise

    2017-04-01

    My research lies at the intersection of three disciplines: hydrology, climatology, and geomorphology, and focusses on understanding the drivers of changing flood hazards to improve flood projections. Because flooding has major impacts on people's lives, and flood losses are projected to continue to increase in future decades, attribution studies are readily picked up by the press. As an Early Career Researcher, I will share my own experiences in communicating flood-related research results (through university press releases, Twitter, blog posts, and interviews), and what I have learnt about the types of strategies that can be followed to increase research dissemination/outreach, and the "Attention Score" of individual papers. In terms of interacting with the media, I will also share some suggestions regarding the types of questions that often arise, as well as awareness strategies to avoid potential pitfalls, misunderstandings or misinterpretations.

  14. Bridging the Generation Gap: A Rapid Early Career Hire Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieber, Richard R.; Coffee, Thomas; Dong, Shuonan; Infield, Samantha I.; Kilbride, Kendra B.; Seibert, Michael A.; Solish, Benjamin S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a training program to provide Early Career Hires (ECHs) in the aerospace industry with real, rapid, hands-on exposure to multiple phases and multiple disciplines of flight project development. Such a program has become necessary to close the Generation Gap and ensure that aerospace organizations maintain a highly skilled workforce as experienced personnel begin to retire. This paper discusses the specific motivations for and implementation of such a program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. However, the essential features are widely applicable to other NASA centers and organizations delivering large llight systems. This paper details the overall program concept, stages of participation by an ECH, oversight and mentoring, program assessment, training project selection, and facilities requirements.

  15. Early career retention of Malawian medical graduates: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandeville, Kate L; Ulaya, Godwin; Lagarde, Mylene; Gwesele, Lyson; Dzowela, Titha; Hanson, Kara; Muula, Adamson S

    2015-01-01

    There have been longstanding concerns over Malawian doctors migrating to high-income countries. Early career is a particularly vulnerable period. After significant policy changes, we examined the retention of recent medical graduates within Malawi and the public sector. We obtained data on graduates between 2006 and 2012 from the University of Malawi College of Medicine and Malawi Ministry of Health. We utilised the alumni network to triangulate official data and contacted graduates directly for missing or uncertain data. Odds ratios and chi-squared tests were employed to investigate relationships by graduation year and gender. We traced 256 graduates, with complete information for more than 90%. Nearly 80% of registered doctors were in Malawi (141/178, 79.2%), although the odds of emigration doubled with each year after graduation (odds ratio = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.54-2.56, P < 0.0001). Of the 37 graduates outside Malawi (14.5%), 23 (62.2%) were training in South Africa under a College of Medicine sandwich programme. More than 80% of graduates were working in the public sector (185/218, 82.6%), with the odds declining by 27% for each year after graduation (odds ratio = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.61-0.86, P < 0.0001). While most doctors remain in Malawi and the public sector during their early careers, the odds of leaving both increase with time. The majority of graduates outside Malawi are training in South Africa under visa restrictions, reflecting the positive impact of postgraduate training in Malawi. Concerns over attrition from the public sector are valid and require further exploratory work. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Early-Career Professional Development Training for Stakeholder-Relevant, Interdisciplinary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendahl, D. H.; Bamzai, A.; Mcpherson, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    There are many challenges to conducting inter- or multi-disciplinary research because basic research, applied research, management processes, disciplines, and even sub-disciplines have been "siloed" for so long that many research and management professionals find it difficult to communicate common interests and research needs. It is clear that the next generation of researchers must overcome these disciplinary biases and engage in more open dialogue with other disciplines and the management community in order to be better positioned to collaborate, speak a common language, and understand each other's needs. The U.S. Department of the Interior's South Central Climate Science Center recently conducted a professional development workshop for 28 early-career researchers involved in climate-related research across the South-Central U.S. The participants consisted of graduate students, postdocs, and junior faculty representing 17 different natural and social science disciplines and seven Universities/Institutions. The workshop provided the participants with guidance and instruction on how to overcome the identified challenges in conducting "actionable" research and how to better navigate multi-institutional and multi- or inter-disciplinary research. The workshop was comprised of: (1) a series of instructional presentations organized into themed sessions; (2) two keynote addresses to provide a broader perspective; (3) a real-world case study activity; (4) individual and group projects/presentations; and (5) field trips. In addition, we purposely created informal opportunities for participants to network, which met the goal of facilitating interdisciplinary interactions. An overview of the workshop experience will be provided, including a focus on those aspects leading to its ultimate success and recommendations for how to develop and implement a similar early-career workshop for your own purposes.

  17. Early-Career EBD Teacher Knowledge, Ratings of Competency Importance, and Observed Use of Instruction and Management Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lori F.; Hendrickson, Jo M.

    2007-01-01

    The empirical, conceptual, and theoretical knowledge of early-career EBD teachers was assessed two years after student teaching and compared to their ratings of the importance of specific instruction and classroom management competencies as well as to their application of those competencies. Twelve teachers, six elementary and six secondary, with…

  18. The Benefits of Publishing Systematic Quantitative Literature Reviews for PhD Candidates and Other Early-Career Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Catherine; Byrne, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Universities increasingly expect students to publish during a PhD candidature because it benefits the candidate, supervisor, institution, and wider community. Here, we describe a method successfully used by early-career researchers including PhD candidates to undertake and publish literature reviews--a challenge for researchers new to a field. Our…

  19. On Becoming Batman: An Ethnographic Examination of Hero Imagery in Early-Career Residential Life Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Danielle K.

    2016-01-01

    Emergency response is an essential function of all residential life staff, but particularly for resident assistants serving on the front line. This organizational ethnography examined the role that professional identity played for early-career residential life practitioners engaged in emergency management. The data elucidated heroism as a…

  20. Tinkering through Transition: On "Doctoring" as an Early-Career Academic in Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin; Christensen, Erin; Occhino, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses the notion of "making it" as an early-career academic in physical education and sport pedagogy. In it, we draw on the tradition of material semiotics to reflect on our shared journeys from doctoral student to beginning scholar and beyond. By attuning ourselves to the relationality, materiality and precariousness of…

  1. Digital Natives Come of Age: The Reality of Today's Early Career Teachers Using Mobile Devices to Teach Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Joanne; Attard, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Digital natives are now of age and comprise the new generation of early career teachers (ECTs). This is an important change in teacher demographics given that new technologies have been introduced into classrooms with expectations that teachers embed them effectively into the teaching of mathematics. This paper draws on the data of three separate…

  2. The Opening of Borders and Scientific Mobility: The Impact of EU Enlargement on the Movement of Early Career Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    This paper, based on extensive empirical work with Polish and Bulgarian scientists in Germany and the UK, examines the impact of the EU enlargement including the free movement of persons provisions on the mobility of scientists from Eastern to Western Europe. It focuses on early career researchers and particularly PhD candidates and begins by…

  3. The Identity Construction Experiences of Early Career English Language Teachers in Hong Kong. Great Expectations and Practical Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, John

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the results of a multiple qualitative case study which investigated the challenges that seven early career English language teachers in Hong Kong confronted as they constructed their professional and personal identities. A series of in-depth interviews with participants during the entire first year of their full-time teaching…

  4. "Swim or Sink": State of Induction in the Deployment of Early Career Academics into Teaching at Makerere University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssempebwa, Jude; Teferra, Damtew; Bakkabulindi, Fred Edward K.

    2016-01-01

    Conducted as part of a multi-country study of the teaching-related experiences and expectations of early career academics (ECAs) in Africa, this study investigated the major influences on the teaching practice of ECAs at Makerere University; the mechanisms by which these academics learn to teach; the teaching-related challenges they experience;…

  5. Teaching Health Education. A Thematic Analysis of Early Career Teachers' Experiences Following Pre-Service Health Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Karen; Rietdijk, Willeke; Byrne, Jenny; Shepherd, Jonathan; Roderick, Paul; Grace, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand early career teachers' perceptions of the impact of a pre-service health education programme on their health promotion practice in schools and the contextual factors that influence this. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 primary and secondary trainee…

  6. Early Career Teachers' Perceptions and Experiences of Leadership Development: Balancing Structure and Agency in Contrasting School Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Joan; Pedder, David

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on the findings of a three-year, longitudinal study investigating early career teachers' (ECTs) experiences and perceptions of leadership development in English secondary schools, this paper highlights, from the perspectives of ECTs, some of the factors that support and facilitate leadership development during the first few years of the…

  7. From Curriculum Guides to Classroom Enactment: Examining Early Career Elementary Teachers' Orientations toward Standards-Based Mathematics Curriculum Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujarati, Joan

    2011-01-01

    This article examines three early career elementary teachers' orientations toward standards-based mathematics curriculum implementation in New York City public schools. It is important to have a greater understanding of teachers who are responsible for enacting standards-based curriculum in authentic teaching situations in order to learn more…

  8. Early Career Academic Perceptions, Attitudes and Professional Development Activities: Questioning the Teaching and Research Gap to Further Academic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kelly E.; Lodge, Jason M.; Bosanquet, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Early career academia is a challenging time, particularly as academics are facing increasing pressures to excel across a range of areas. Boyer argued for the "true scholar" versed in the overlapping areas of scholarship in research, teaching, integration and engagement. Academic developers have an important role to play in assisting the…

  9. "Letters to an Early Career Academic": Learning from the Advice of the Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy Professoriate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Eimear; Rynne, Steven B.; Alfrey, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Taking our lead from Rilke's "Letters to a Young Poet," this project represents our attempt to stimulate dialogue between 30 physical education and sport pedagogy (PESP) early career academics (ECAs) and 11 PESP professors. First, the ECAs were invited to write a narrative around their experiences as PESP ECAs. Second, a narrative…

  10. Relationship between Early Familial Influences and Personality Traits in Relation to Career Success Outcomes of African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Keeba G.

    2010-01-01

    This study will examine the relationship between career success outcomes of African American women and early familial factors, as well as personality traits. Using a cross-sectional case-control design. the study will use participants who self-identified as African American with two African American parents. They will be randomly selected from a…

  11. Assessing the Teacher Self-Efficacy of Agriculture Instructors and Their Early Career Employment Status: A Comparison of Certification Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. Shane; Edwards, M. Craig

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive-correlational study was to assess the level of teacher self-efficacy of first-year, secondary agricultural education teachers in Oklahoma at the beginning and end of their entry-year in the profession and describe their early career retention. This study found that these first-year teachers increased their level of…

  12. Early Career Teachers' Research Literacy: What Does It Look Like and What Elements Support Its Development in Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carol

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the effectiveness of two projects: "NQT and Beyond; Developing Resilience in Learning and Teaching," and the underpinning conceptual framework (PLSP) in supporting early career teachers' (ECTs') development of their research literacy. Evidence of effective integration of research into practice is illustrated through…

  13. Making the GeoConnection: Web 2.0-based support for early-career geoscientists (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, C. M.; Gonzales, L. M.; Keane, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    The US Bureau of Labor estimates that there will be an 18% increase in geoscience jobs between 2008 and 2018 in the United States, and demand for geoscientists is expected to rise worldwide as scientists tackle global challenges related to resources, hazards and climate. At the same time, the geoscience workforce is aging, with approximately half of the current workforce reaching retirement age within the next 10-15 years. A new generation of geoscientists must be ready to take the reins. To support this new generation, AGI’s geoscience workforce outreach programs were designed to help retain geoscience students through their degree programs and into careers in the field. These resources include support for early-career professional development and career planning. AGI’s GeoConnection Network for the Geosciences provides a venue for informal dissemination of career information and professional resources. The network links Web 2.0 platforms, including a Facebook page, YouTube Channel and Twitter feed, to build a robust geoscience community of geoscientists at all stages of their careers. Early-career geoscientists can participate in GeoConnection to network with other scientists, and to receive information about professional development and job opportunities. Through GeoConnection packets, students can join professional societies which will assist their transition from school to the workplace. AGI’s member societies provide professional development course work, field trips, career services, interviewing opportunities, and community meetings. As part of the GeoConnection Network, AGI hosts informational webinars to highlight new workforce data, discuss current affairs in the geosciences, and to provide information about geoscience careers. Between December 2009 and August 2010, AGI hosted 10 webinars, with more than 300 total participants for all the webinars, and 5 additional webinars are planned for the remainder of the year. The webinars offer early-career

  14. Leaky Pipeline Myths: In Search of Gender Effects on the Job Market and Early Career Publishing in Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Hermanson, Sean

    2017-01-01

    That philosophy is an outlier in the humanities when it comes to the underrepresentation of women has been the occasion for much discussion about possible effects of subtle forms of prejudice, including implicit bias and stereotype threat. While these ideas have become familiar to the philosophical community, there has only recently been a surge of interest in acquiring field-specific data. This paper adds to quantitative findings bearing on hypotheses about the effects of unconscious prejudice on two important stages along career pathways: tenure-track hiring and early career publishing. PMID:28659843

  15. Leaky Pipeline Myths: In Search of Gender Effects on the Job Market and Early Career Publishing in Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Allen-Hermanson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available That philosophy is an outlier in the humanities when it comes to the underrepresentation of women has been the occasion for much discussion about possible effects of subtle forms of prejudice, including implicit bias and stereotype threat. While these ideas have become familiar to the philosophical community, there has only recently been a surge of interest in acquiring field-specific data. This paper adds to quantitative findings bearing on hypotheses about the effects of unconscious prejudice on two important stages along career pathways: tenure-track hiring and early career publishing.

  16. Leaky Pipeline Myths: In Search of Gender Effects on the Job Market and Early Career Publishing in Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Hermanson, Sean

    2017-01-01

    That philosophy is an outlier in the humanities when it comes to the underrepresentation of women has been the occasion for much discussion about possible effects of subtle forms of prejudice, including implicit bias and stereotype threat. While these ideas have become familiar to the philosophical community, there has only recently been a surge of interest in acquiring field-specific data. This paper adds to quantitative findings bearing on hypotheses about the effects of unconscious prejudice on two important stages along career pathways: tenure-track hiring and early career publishing.

  17. The Carbon_h-factor: predicting individuals' research impact at early stages of their career.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus-Christian Carbon

    Full Text Available Assessing an individual's research impact on the basis of a transparent algorithm is an important task for evaluation and comparison purposes. Besides simple but also inaccurate indices such as counting the mere number of publications or the accumulation of overall citations, and highly complex but also overwhelming full-range publication lists in their raw format, Hirsch (2005 introduced a single figure cleverly combining different approaches. The so-called h-index has undoubtedly become the standard in scientometrics of individuals' research impact (note: in the present paper I will always use the term "research impact" to describe the research performance as the logic of the paper is based on the h-index, which quantifies the specific "impact" of, e.g., researchers, but also because the genuine meaning of impact refers to quality as well. As the h-index reflects the number h of papers a researcher has published with at least h citations, the index is inherently positively biased towards senior level researchers. This might sometimes be problematic when predictive tools are needed for assessing young scientists' potential, especially when recruiting early career positions or equipping young scientists' labs. To be compatible with the standard h-index, the proposed index integrates the scientist's research age (Carbon_h-factor into the h-index, thus reporting the average gain of h-index per year. Comprehensive calculations of the Carbon_h-factor were made for a broad variety of four research-disciplines (economics, neuroscience, physics and psychology and for researchers performing on three high levels of research impact (substantial, outstanding and epochal with ten researchers per category. For all research areas and output levels we obtained linear developments of the h-index demonstrating the validity of predicting one's later impact in terms of research impact already at an early stage of their career with the Carbon_h-factor being approx

  18. Programs for developing the pipeline of early-career geriatric mental health researchers: outcomes and implications for other fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Stephen J; Lebowitz, Barry D; Reynolds, Charles F; Bruce, Martha L; Halpain, Maureen; Faison, Warachal E; Kirwin, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings and recommendations of an expert consensus workgroup that addressed the endangered pipeline of geriatric mental health (GMH) researchers. The workgroup was convened at the Summit on Challenges in Recruitment, Retention, and Career Development in Geriatric Mental Health Research in late 2007. Major identified challenges included attracting and developing early-career investigators into the field of GMH research; a shortfall of geriatric clinical providers and researchers; a disproportionate lack of minority researchers; inadequate mentoring and career development resources; and the loss of promising researchers during the vulnerable period of transition from research training to independent research funding. The field of GMH research has been at the forefront of developing successful programs that address these issues while spanning the spectrum of research career development. These programs serve as a model for other fields and disciplines. Core elements of these multicomponent programs include summer internships to foster early interest in GMH research (Summer Training on Aging Research Topics-Mental Health Program), research sponsorships aimed at recruitment into the field of geriatric psychiatry (Stepping Stones), research training institutes for early career development (Summer Research Institute in Geriatric Psychiatry), mentored intensive programs on developing and obtaining a first research grant (Advanced Research Institute in Geriatric Psychiatry), targeted development of minority researchers (Institute for Research Minority Training on Mental Health and Aging), and a Web-based clearinghouse of mentoring seminars and resources (MedEdMentoring.org). This report discusses implications of and principles for disseminating these programs, including examples of replications in fields besides GMH research.

  19. The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS): A Model for the Professional Development of Scientists (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeseman, J. L.; Apecs Leadership Team

    2010-12-01

    Efforts like the International Polar Year 2007-2008 (IPY) have helped to increase research efforts as well as enhancing the integration of education and outreach into research projects and developing the next generation of researchers. One of the major legacies of the IPY was the creation of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS), which was developed in 2006 by young researchers and focuses on helping each other develop the skills needed for successful careers in research by working with senior mentors. APECS is an international and interdisciplinary organization of over 2000 early career researchers and educators with interests in the Polar Regions and the wider cryosphere from 45 countries. APECS aims to stimulate interdisciplinary and international research collaborations, and develop effective future leaders in polar research, education and outreach. This is achieved by - Facilitating international and interdisciplinary networking opportunities to share ideas and experiences and to develop new research directions and collaborations, - Providing opportunities for professional career development for both academic and alternative research professions, and - Promoting education and outreach as an integral component of polar research and to stimulate future generations of polar researchers. Since its inception, APECS has strived to develop a strong network of partnerships with senior international organizations and scientific bodies to provide career development opportunities for young researchers. These partnerships have led to early-career representation on science planning bodies at an international level, the mandate of early career researchers serving as co-chairs at science conferences, the development of a mentorship program, field schools and techniques workshops, mentor panel discussions at conferences and increased funding for young researchers to attend conferences. APECS has also worked with an international teachers network to develop

  20. Exploring Perceptions of Early-Career Psychiatrists About Their Relationships With the Pharmaceutical Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Thomas Johann; Brownell, Alvin Keith; Brager, Nancy Patricia; Berg, Amanda; Balderston, Rhea; Lockyer, Jocelyn Margot

    2016-04-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has engaged physicians through medical education, patient care, and medical research. New conflict of interest policy has highlighted the challenges to these relationships. The objective of this study was to explore the perceptions that early career psychiatrists (e.g. those within 5 years of entering practice) have regarding their relationship with the pharmaceutical industry. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and were analysed using a grounded theory methodology. Interviews were conducted and analyzed in an iterative way using a constant comparison approach in which data were collected and open coded for themes and subthemes. As new interviews were conducted, the themes were applied to data along with emergent themes and previous interviews recoded until additional interviews failed to provide new themes and thematic saturation was achieved. Through axial coding, a process of relating codes (categories and concepts) to each other, the theory was generated to explain the core variable mediating perceptions participants had about the relationship with industry. The participants described increasing frequency of experiences with industry throughout training into practice. Their perceptions developed through training, physician culture, industry promotion, and their own practices. In managing the relationship with industry, participants would either avoid interactions or engage in behaviors aimed to reduce the risk of influence. Maintaining one's professional integrity was the underlying driver used to manage the relationship with industry. Psychiatrists develop perceptions about industry through experience and observation leading them to develop their own strategies to manage these relationships while maintaining their professional integrity.

  1. Changes in pathology test ordering by early career general practitioners: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Parker J; Tapley, Amanda; Morgan, Simon; Henderson, Kim; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Davey, Andrew R; Ball, Jean; Catzikiris, Nigel F; Mulquiney, Katie J; van Driel, Mieke L

    2017-07-17

    To assess the number of pathology tests ordered by general practice registrars during their first 18-24 months of clinical general practice. Longitudinal analysis of ten rounds of data collection (2010-2014) for the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) study, an ongoing, multicentre, cohort study of general practice registrars in Australia. The principal analysis employed negative binomial regression in a generalised estimating equations framework (to account for repeated measures on registrars).Setting, participants: General practice registrars in training posts with five of 17 general practice regional training providers in five Australian states. The registrar participation rate was 96.4%. Number of pathology tests requested per consultation. The time unit for analysis was the registrar training term (the 6-month full-time equivalent component of clinical training); registrars contributed data for up to four training terms. 876 registrars contributed data for 114 584 consultations. The number of pathology tests requested increased by 11% (95% CI, 8-15%; P pathology test ordering by general practice registrars increased significantly during their first 2 years of clinical practice. This causes concerns about overtesting. As established general practitioners order fewer tests than registrars, test ordering may peak during late vocational training and early career practice. Registrars need support during this difficult period in the development of their clinical practice patterns.

  2. A comparative study of voice complaints and risk factors for voice complaints in female student teachers and practicing teachers early in their career.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, G.; Kooijman, P.G.C.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Jong, F.I.C.R.S. de

    2006-01-01

    A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed to compare female student teachers (454 subjects; 1st to 4th year of training) and practicing teachers (82 female teachers; 1st to 4th year of teaching career) of primary education early in their career, with regard to risk factors perceived to be

  3. Gathering Feedback from Early-Career Faculty: Speaking with and Surveying Agricultural Faculty Members about Research Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C. Williams

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In spring 2013, the Life Sciences Data Services Librarian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign gave a data management presentation to early-career, agricultural faculty members participating in a selective program designed to help them succeed in the tenure process. After the presentation, the participants were invited to complete an online survey that included questions on how well informed and prepared they feel about funding agencies’ data requirements, what data challenges they face, and how the library can help with new or improved services in this area. The presentation discussion and survey responses suggested value in offering data training specifically for agricultural graduate students and research assistants and compiling examples of data management plans from successful grant proposals. Despite the small number of participants, the feedback provides an interesting glimpse into data management from the perspective of early-career faculty.

  4. Early community-based family practice elective positively influences medical students' career considerations--a pre-post-comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Tobias; Hönigschmid, Petra; Frese, Thomas; Sandholzer, Hagen

    2013-02-21

    Demographic change and recruitment problems in family practice are increasingly threatening an adequate primary care workforce in many countries. Thus, it is important to attract young physicians to the field. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of an early community-based 28-h family practice elective with one-to-one mentoring on medical students' consideration of family practice as a career option, their interest in working office-based, and several perceptions with regard to specific aspects of a family physician's work. First- and second-year medical students completed questionnaires before and after a short community-based family practice elective, consisting of a preparatory course and a community-based practical experience with one-to-one mentoring by trained family physicians. We found a significantly higher rate of students favoring family practice as a career option after the elective (32.7% vs. 26.0%, p = 0.039). Furthermore, the ranking of family practice among other considered career options improved (p = 0.002). Considerations to work office-based in the future did not change significantly. Perceptions regarding a family physician's job changed positively with regard to the possibility of long-term doctor-patient relationships and treatment of complex disease patterns. The majority of the students described identification with the respective family physician tutor as a professional role model and an increased interest in the specialty. Our results indicate that a short community-based family practice elective early in medical education may positively influence medical students' considerations of a career in family practice. Furthermore, perceptions regarding the specialty with significant impact on its attractiveness may be positively adjusted. Further research is needed to evaluate the influence of different components of a family practice curriculum on the de facto career decisions of young physicians after graduation.

  5. Role models and professional development in dentistry: an important resource: The views of early career stage dentists at one academic health science centre in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Osama, O; Gallagher, J E

    2017-02-08

    The importance of role models, and their differing influence in early, mid- and late careers, has been identified in the process of professional development of medical doctors. There is a paucity of evidence within dentistry on role models and their attributes. To explore the views of early career dentists on positive and negative role models across key phases of professional development, together with role models' attributes and perceived influence. This is a phenomenological study collecting qualitative data through semi-structured interviews based on a topic guide. Dentists in junior (core training) hospital posts in one academic health science centre were all invited to participate. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis. Twelve early career stage dentists, 10 of whom were female, reported having role models, mainly positive, in their undergraduate and early career phases. Participants defined role models' attributes in relation to three distinct domains: clinical attributes, personal qualities and teaching skills. Positive role models were described as "prioritising the patient's best interests", "delivering learner-centred teaching and training" and "exhibiting a positive personality", whilst negative role models demonstrated the converse. Early career dentists reported having largely positive dentist role models during- and post-dental school and report their impact on professional values and aspirations, learning outcomes and career choice. The findings suggest that these early career dentists in junior hospital posts have largely experienced and benefitted from positive role models, notably dentists, perceived as playing an important and creative influence promoting professionalism and shaping the career choices of early career stage dentists. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. 76 FR 53563 - Applications for New Awards; Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ... agenda that is focused on school readiness and ongoing academic success. They are central to this... literacy development, cognition and general knowledge (including early mathematics and early scientific... and Adult Care Food Program, and the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) may be...

  7. Burnout among U.S. medical students, residents, and early career physicians relative to the general U.S. population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrbye, Liselotte N; West, Colin P; Satele, Daniel; Boone, Sonja; Tan, Litjen; Sloan, Jeff; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2014-03-01

    To compare the prevalence of burnout and other forms of distress across career stages and the experiences of trainees and early career (EC) physicians versus those of similarly aged college graduates pursuing other careers. In 2011 and 2012, the authors conducted a national survey of medical students, residents/fellows, and EC physicians (≤ 5 years in practice) and of a probability-based sample of the general U.S. population. All surveys assessed burnout, symptoms of depression and suicidal ideation, quality of life, and fatigue. Response rates were 35.2% (4,402/12,500) for medical students, 22.5% (1,701/7,560) for residents/fellows, and 26.7% (7,288/27,276) for EC physicians. In multivariate models that controlled for relationship status, sex, age, and career stage, being a resident/fellow was associated with increased odds of burnout and being a medical student with increased odds of depressive symptoms, whereas EC physicians had the lowest odds of high fatigue. Compared with the population control samples, medical students, residents/fellows, and EC physicians were more likely to be burned out (all P students and residents/fellows were more likely to exhibit symptoms of depression than the population control samples (both P burnout, depressive symptoms, and recent suicidal ideation are relatively small. At each stage, burnout is more prevalent among physicians than among their peers in the U.S. population.

  8. Outcome of career expectancies and early professional burnout among newly qualified dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, R C; Storm, M K; te Brake, J H M; Kersten, H W; Eijkman, M A J

    2007-08-01

    To measure burnout development, outcome of expectations with regard to dental career and feelings of being unprepared for practice among newly graduated general dental practitioners. In 1997, 50 dentists were approached to fill in the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Dutch version (UBOS) and some additional variables between six months and one year after graduation at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA) (76% response). Six years later, in 2003, the same 50 dentists, plus another 60 who had graduated in the same period at ACTA, were approached (78% response). Using Repeated Measures analysis, mean scores of dentists for whom two measurements were available on the three UBOS subscales (N=24) showed no statistically significant changes over six years on Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalisation, or Personal Accomplishment. The same was true for group means of all in 1997 (N=33) compared with all in 2003 (N=82). However, according to manual criteria, varying percentages (7.2% - 24.4%) of dentists showed an unfavourable level on either one of the UBOS dimensions. Factors most frequently mentioned to be responsible for being unprepared for practice were: law and insurance matters (61.2%), practice organisation (56.6%) and staff management (55.2%). Most frequently reported factors that came out (much) worse than expected were: stressfulness of work (45.1%), and staff management (43.4%). Burnout appears no threat for the average newly qualified dentist. However, some individuals report alarmingly high burnout scores at an early professional stage. Practice management is the professional aspect about which young professionals worry most. It is recommended that dental schools pay attention to practice management skills and the stressfulness of work in the curriculum. Also, longitudinal monitoring of dental students and newly qualified dentists on burnout development is strongly advocated.

  9. The transforming power of early career acute care surgery research scholarships on academic productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzaur, Ben L; Valsangkar, Nakul; Feliciano, David F; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2016-07-01

    More than 75% of respondents to an Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma survey felt that barriers to research had increased and that acute care surgeon (ACS) academic productivity had decreased. Recent data confirm this impression and show lower academic productivity of junior ACS faculty compared with peers in other general surgical fields. The purpose of this study was to determine if early career acute care surgery research scholarships are associated with improved ACS academic productivity. Faculty data at the Top 55 National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded departments of surgery (Top 55) were obtained using SCOPUS, NIH, department, and professional society databases. Academic productivity was measured using total publications, citations, and the Hirsch index. Scholarship recipients from the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma and Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma were identified. A total of 4,101 surgical faculty (8.3% ACS) who belong to the Top 55 NIH-funded departments of surgery and 85 scholarship recipients were identified. After merging, 34 scholarship recipients (40%) were current faculty at a Top 55 NIH-funded department of surgery, and 24 of those (71%) were ACS faculty. Scholarship recipients had higher median total publications compared with nonrecipients at assistant and associate ranks but not at full professor rank. For all ranks, scholarship recipients were more likely to have NIH funding compared with nonrecipients (33% vs. 11%, p Research scholarships granted by acute care surgery professional organizations remain largely among ACS faculty in Top 55 NIH-funded departments of surgery. Among junior ACS faculty, recipients are associated with increased academic productivity and NIH funding. To fill the academic productivity gap among junior ACSs, professional organizations should consider increasing research funding scholarships for promising investigators.

  10. Early Career Researchers Demand Full-text and Rely on Google to Find Scholarly Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hayman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Nicholas, D., Boukacem-Zeghmouri, C., Rodríguez-Bravo, B., Xu, J., Watkinson, A., Abrizah, A., Herman, E., & Świgoń, M. (2017. Where and how early career researchers find scholarly information. Learned Publishing, 30(1, 19-29. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/leap.1087 Abstract Objective – To examine the attitudes and information behaviours of early career researchers (ECRs when locating scholarly information. Design – Qualitative longitudinal study. Setting – Research participants from the United Kingdom, United States of America, China, France, Malaysia, Poland, and Spain. Subjects – A total 116 participants from various disciplines, aged 35 and younger, who were holding or had previously held a research position, but not in a tenured position. All participants held a doctorate or were in the process of earning one. Methods – Using structured interviews of 60-90 minutes, researchers asked 60 questions of each participant via face-to-face, Skype, or telephone interviews. The interview format and questions were formed via focus groups. Main Results – As part of a longitudinal project, results reported are limited to the first year of the study, and focused on three primary questions identified by the authors: where do ECRs find scholarly information, whether they use their smartphones to locate and read scholarly information, and what social media do they use to find scholarly information. Researchers describe how ECRs themselves interpreted the phrase scholarly information to primarily mean journal articles, while the researchers themselves had a much expanded definition to include professional and “scholarly contacts, ideas, and data” (p. 22. This research shows that Google and Google Scholar are widely used by ECRs for locating scholarly information regardless of discipline, language, or geography. Their analysis by country points to currency and the combined breadth-and-depth search experience that Google provides as

  11. The timing of family commitments in the early work career: Work-family trajectories of young adults in Flanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Koelet

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This article examines the diverse ways in which young adults develop both their professional career and family life in the years immediately after they complete their education. Building a career and starting a family often occur simultaneously in this stage of life. By studying the simultaneous developments in these life domains, we can gain a better understanding of this complex interplay. Methods: The data consist of a sample of 1,657 young adults born in 1976 who were interviewed as part of the SONAR survey of Flanders at ages 23, 26, and 29 about their education, their entry into and early years on the labour market, and their family life. Sequence analysis is used to study the timing of union formation and having children among these young adults, as well as how these events are related to their work career. Multinomial regression analysis is applied to help us gain a better understanding of the extent to which these life course patterns are determined by education and economic status at the start of the career. Results: The results reveal a set of work-family trajectories which vary in terms of the extent of labour market participation and the type and timing of family formation. Various aspects of the trajectory are found to be determined by different dimensions of an individual's educational career (duration, level, field of study. Education is more relevant for women than for men, as a man's trajectory is more likely than a woman's to be determined by the first job. Conclusions: By using a simultaneous approach which takes into account both family and work, this life course analysis confirms that men have a head start on the labour market, and examines the factors which influence the distinct trajectories of young women and men.

  12. Early career mentoring through the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology: Lessons learned from a pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M; Black, Vandy; Meier, Emily R; Myers, Kasiani C; Pinkney, Kerice; Hastings, Caroline; Hilden, Joanne M; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick; Stork, Linda C; Johnson, Theodore S; Vaiselbuh, Sarah R

    2017-03-01

    Effective networking and mentorship are critical determinants of career satisfaction and success in academic medicine. The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) mentoring program was developed to support Early Career (EC) members. Herein, the authors report on the initial 2-year outcomes of this novel program. Mentees selected mentors with expertise in different subspecialties within the field from mentor profiles at the ASPHO Web site. Of 23 enrolled pairs, 19 mentors and 16 mentees completed electronic program feedback evaluations. The authors analyzed data collected between February 2013 and December 2014. The authors used descriptive statistics for categorical data and thematic analysis for qualitative data. The overall response rate was 76% (35/46). At the initiation of the relationship, career development and research planning were the most commonly identified goals for both mentors and mentees. Participants communicated by phone, e-mail, or met in-person at ASPHO annual meetings. Most mentor-mentee pairs were satisfied with the mentoring relationship, considered it a rewarding experience that justified their time and effort, achieved their goals in a timely manner with objective work products, and planned to continue the relationship. However, time constraints and infrequent communications remained a challenge. Participation in the ASPHO mentoring program suggests a clear benefit to a broad spectrum of ASPHO EC members with diverse personal and professional development needs. Efforts to expand the mentoring program are ongoing and focused on increasing enrollment of mentors to cover a wider diversity of career tracks/subspecialties and evaluating career and academic outcomes more objectively. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Physical activity status of academic professors during their early career transition: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Megan A; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2012-01-01

    Life-transitions (e.g. parenthood) have been linked to physical inactivity, yet the topic requires further exploration. In this study, we evaluated changes in the physical activity (PA) of adults during their early career transition using retrospective analysis and the theory of planned behavior. Recruitment from January to March 2010 yielded a random sample of 267 assistant professors, ages 25-44, employed within the last five years. Repeated measures analysis of variance (RM ANOVA) concluded that PA declined across the transition (d = 0.36-0.43) and was further attenuated by marriage, work hours, and parenthood status. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) identified specific behavioral and control correlates about PA enjoyment, limited time, inconsistent schedule, work demands, and job pressures to distinguish between those who remained active from those who did not across the transition. PA interventions administered prior to career transitions may be needed to prevent physical inactivity.

  14. 78 FR 53991 - Applications for New Awards; Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... inform families and support student progress in meeting critical educational benchmarks in the early..., and sensory screening, referral, and follow up; and the promotion of physical activity, healthy eating habits, oral health and behavioral health, and health literacy among parents; and (f) Effective data...

  15. STAR - Research Experiences at National Laboratory Facilities for Pre-Service and Early Career Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J. M.; Rebar, B.; Buxner, S.

    2012-12-01

    The STEM Teacher and Researcher (STAR) Program provides pre-service and beginning teachers the opportunity to develop identity as both teachers and researchers early in their careers. Founded and implemented by the Center for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Education (CESaME) at California Polytechnic State University on behalf of the California State University (CSU) system, STAR provides cutting edge research experiences and career development for students affiliated with the CSU system. Over the past three summers, STAR has also partnered with the NSF Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program to include Noyce Scholars from across the country. Key experiences are one to three summers of paid research experience at federal research facilities associated with the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Anchoring beginning teachers in the research community enhances participant understanding of what it means to be both researchers and effective teachers. Since its inception in 2007, the STAR Program has partnered with 15 national lab facilities to provide 290 research experiences to 230 participants. Several of the 68 STAR Fellows participating in the program during Summer 2012 have submitted abstracts to the Fall AGU Meeting. Through continued partnership with the Noyce Scholar Program and contributions from outside funding sources, the CSU is committed to sustaining the STAR Program in its efforts to significantly impact teacher preparation. Evaluation results from the program continue to indicate program effectiveness in recruiting high quality science and math majors into the teaching profession and impacting their attitudes and beliefs towards the nature of science and teaching through inquiry. Additionally, surveys and interviews are being conducted of participants who are now teaching in the classroom as

  16. Call for Early-Career Women Scientists in the Developing World ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-15

    22 août 2017 ... Nominations for excellence in research in chemistry, mathematics, and physics will be accepted until September 15, 2017. Launched in 2010 by The Elsevier Foundation, The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS) and the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD), the Awards ...

  17. 2011 and 2012 Early Careers Achievement Awards: farm and pig factors affecting welfare during the marketing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A K; Gesing, L M; Ellis, M; McGlone, J J; Berg, E; Lonergan, S M; Fitzgerald, R; Karriker, L A; Ramirez, A; Stalder, K J; Sapkota, A; Kephart, R; Selsby, J T; Sadler, L J; Ritter, M J

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the scientific literature to identify on-farm factors that contribute to market weight pig transportation losses. Transportation of market weight pigs is an essential element to the multisite pork production model used in the United States. In 2011 alone, approximately 111 million market weight pigs were transported from the finishing site to the abattoir. For pigs, the marketing process can present a combination of potentially novel, physical, and/or unfamiliar experiences that can be stressful. If the pig cannot cope with these sequential and additive stressors, then an increased rate of transportation losses could occur with a detrimental effect on pork carcass value. Current yearly estimates for transport losses are 1 million pigs (1%). A variety of market weight pig and farm factors have been reported to detrimentally affect transportation losses. By understanding how pigs interact with their environment during marketing, researchers, producers, and personnel at the abattoir may begin to identify, prioritize, and attempt to minimize or eliminate these stressors. This process will ultimately decrease transportation losses, improve pork quality, and increase profitability.

  18. Thomas H. Stix Award for Outstanding Early Career Contributions to Plasma Physics Research: MHD Stability and control in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Ian

    2017-10-01

    Highly energetic magnetised plasmas are subject to various magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, which often limit the global fusion performance, and in many cases have the potential to damage the reactor vessel. Consequently, understanding these performance limits and establishing ways to control the instabilities is vital to the success of ITER and fusion reactors which follow it. This talk will summarise understanding of the stability limits governing sawtooth instabilities, Resistive Wall Modes and Edge Localised Modes, and discuss ways to control each of these.

  19. Where are they now? - A case study of the impact of international travel support for early career Arctic researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majaneva, Sanna; Hamon, Gwénaëlle; Fugmann, Gerlis; Lisowska, Maja; Baeseman, Jenny

    2016-09-01

    Supporting and training the next generation of researchers is crucial to continuous knowledge and leadership in Arctic research. An increasing number of Arctic organizations have developed initiatives to provide travel support for Early Career Researchers (ECRs) to participate in workshops, conferences and meetings and to network with internationally renowned scientific leaders. However, there has been little evaluation of the effectiveness of these initiatives. As a contribution to the 3rd International Conference on Arctic Research Planning, a study was conducted to analyze the career paths of ECRs who received travel funding from the International Arctic Science Committee between the start of the International Polar Year (2007-2008) and 2013. Two surveys were used: one sent to ECRs who received IASC travel support and one as a specific event study to those unsuccessfully applied for IASC travel support to the IPY 2010 Conference. The results of the surveys indicate that travel support was beneficial to both the research and careers of the respondents, especially if the ECR was engaged with a task or responsibility at the event. Survey responses also included suggestions on how funds could be better used to support the next generation of Arctic researchers.

  20. A leadership primer for new librarians tools for helping today's early-career librarians become tomorrow's library leaders

    CERN Document Server

    Byke, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    This book provides strategies and practical tips for leadership development in the field of librarianship. With the increase of both new graduates entering the field and upcoming retirements, there is a foreseeable gap in library leadership. Many early-career librarians will move into roles they are not ready for and others will find themselves having to lead without being in traditional leadership roles. This book offers suggestions for librarians facing these challenging new circumstances. The book shows how to create leadership opportunities when none appear to be present, how to take charg

  1. Valued Learning Experiences of Early Career and Experienced High-Performance Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Clifford J.; Rynne, Steven B.; Billett, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: This paper attempts to move the discussion of high-performance coach development from an examination of coaches' volume of experiences towards a consideration of the contribution of the learning experiences that coaches have reported throughout their careers. Furthermore, a discussion of proximal and distal guidance in the…

  2. Cross-Lagged Relationships between Career Aspirations and Goal Orientation in Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, Peter; Tilbury, Clare; Buys, Nick; Crawford, Meegan

    2011-01-01

    We surveyed 217 students (145 girls; average age = 14.6 years) on two occasions, twelve months apart, on measures of career aspirations (job aspirations, job expectations, educational aspirations) and goal orientation (learning, performance-prove, performance-avoid), and tested the causal relationship between goal orientation and aspirations. We…

  3. Keeping Them on the Bus: Retaining Early Career Teachers in a Successful Urban School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ado, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses teacher retention in a successful, new, small urban school. As a longitudinal study, it focuses on the intersections between individual teachers' expectations about teaching, contextual factors, and experiences at the school site and teachers' future career plans. The experiences and perspectives of three representative case…

  4. Call for Early-Career Women Scientists in the Developing World ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-08-22

    Aug 22, 2017 ... In ROSSA's latest bulletin issue, find out how Africa was saved from another Ebola outbreak. View moreROSSA's newsletter - June 2017 · What we do · Funding · Resources · About IDRC. Knowledge. Innovation. Solutions. Careers · Contact Us · Site map. Sign up now for IDRC news and views sent directly ...

  5. Natural hazards Early career scientist Team (NhET), a newborn group bridging science to a broader community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Luigi; Cigala, Valeria; Rizzi, Jonathan; Craciun, Iulya; Gain, Animesh Kumar; Albano, Raffaele

    2017-04-01

    Alongside with other major EGU divisions, Natural Hazard has recently formed his Early Career Scientist (ECS) team, known as NhET. NhET was born in 2016 and its scope includes various activities for the EGU members, the international scientific community as well as for the general public. We are a group of six early career researchers, either PhDs or Post-Docs, from different fields of Natural Hazard, keen to promote knowledge exchanges and collaborations. This is done by organizing courses, training sessions and social activities, especially targeting ECSs, during the EGU General Assembly for this year and the next to come. Outside the timeframe of the EGU conference, we constantly promote EGU contents for our division. This is done through the division website (http://www.egu.eu/nh), a mailing list (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/nhet) and social media. With respect to the latter, a new Facebook page will be launched shortly and other platforms such as Twitter will be used to reach a broader audience. These platforms will foster the transmission of Natural Hazard topics to anyone who is interested. The main content will be researchers' interviews, information about open positions, trainings, open source software, conferences together with news on hazards and their anthropic and environmental impacts. We are NhET and we invite you all to follow and collaborate with us for a more dynamic, efficient and widespread scientific communication.

  6. Digital natives come of age: the reality of today's early career teachers using mobile devices to teach mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Joanne; Attard, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Digital natives are now of age and comprise the new generation of early career teachers (ECTs). This is an important change in teacher demographics given that new technologies have been introduced into classrooms with expectations that teachers embed them effectively into the teaching of mathematics. This paper draws on the data of three separate studies and reanalyses it to explore how a small group of four early career primary school teachers use information and communication technologies (ICT) in their teaching of mathematics. Two of the ECTs were observed using interactive whiteboards in their mathematics teaching, and two were observed predominantly using tablets. Two important variables developed from the research presented in this paper suggest that ECT's uses of technology to teach mathematics may not be without complications. First, the teachers appeared to experience "device conflict", in that the type of device and its particular affordances and limitations were the primary factors that influenced their mathematics. This was particularly evident in the uses of fixed and mobile devices. The interactive whiteboard (IWB) did not pose pedagogical challenges to the ECTs as their stable location facilitated the opportunity to still use these devices in traditional teaching ways. However, tablets did pose a problem because of their mobility and the need to reconfigure the organisation and to some extent the roles of teacher and student. The second finding was that the teachers' mathematical knowledge for teaching appeared to be directly related to the ways they used their technology.

  7. Satisfaction among early and mid-career dentists in a metropolitan dental hospital in China

    OpenAIRE

    Cui X.; Dunning DG; An N

    2017-01-01

    Xiaoxi Cui,1 David G Dunning,2 Na An3 1College of Dentistry, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE, USA; 2Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE, USA; 3School of Stomatology, Department of General Dentistry II, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: A growing body of research has examined career satisfaction among dentists using a standardized instr...

  8. Rescuing from oblivion: social characteristics and career destinations of early British 'sociology' graduates, 1907-39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbands, Christopher T

    2015-12-01

    Those students who were among the first sociology graduates in the UK barely feature in standard histories of the discipline, which all have an intellectual and institutional focus. This article remedies this neglect by researching the social backgrounds and later careers of sociology graduates from the London School of Economics and Political Science [LSE] and Bedford College for Women from the first such graduate in 1907 until those graduating in the 1930s. Data for this exercise were compiled from a variety of sources. The more important are: UK censuses, especially that of 1911; various civil registration records; archived student files; and, for the graduates who entered university teaching, issues of the Yearbook of the Universities of the Empire [later the Commonwealth Universities' Yearbook]. The dataset includes all identified graduates in the BSc(Econ), Special Subject Sociology, degree from 1907 to 1935 and all in the BA (Honours) in Sociology degree from 1925 to 1939. LSE sociology graduates tended to be older and to have more cosmopolitan backgrounds, with fathers more likely than for Bedford College graduates to come from commercial rather than professional backgrounds. Both institutions' graduates' careers tended to the Civil Service and local government. LSE graduates gravitated to education, especially to higher education if male, whilst those of Bedford College went into welfare work, countering a stereotype from some previous literature that especially women graduates were heavily constrained to follow careers in schoolteaching. The article also gives comparisons with the social-class profile and career destinations of several cohorts of postwar sociology graduates, noting a number of similarities. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2015.

  9. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2009 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is William Buskist. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Teaching Award at the 117th…

  10. Women in science's family and career expectations, intentions and decisions: How do they evolve over the graduate and early career years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Sarah

    A wide body of research has documented that women drop out of science at each successive stage of education and career, a phenomenon known as the leaky pipeline (Goulden, Frasch & Mason, 2009). This phenomenon is especially evident in Atmospheric Science (ATS), a group that loses women at a higher rate than other geoscience fields (NSF, 2013). One reason for this loss is the stress of education and career on family planning and vice versa (Thiry, 2011). This conflict is particularly intense for women in dual-career relationships, perhaps related to a socialized pressure to prioritize their relationships over their careers (Canetto, Trott, Thomas, & Wynstra, 2012; Larocque, 1995). One limitation of prior studies is that they are cross-sectional. No previous research has longitudinally examined the work and family choices and experiences of female ATS graduate students. This study will do so by investigating how female graduate students in ATS think about commitment to one's partner and make decisions about job location.

  11. "Supporting Early Career Women in the Geosciences through Online Peer-Mentoring: Lessons from the Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN)"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, T.; Hastings, M. G.; Barnes, R. T.; Fischer, E. V.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Rodriguez, C.; Adams, M. S.; Marin-Spiotta, E.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN) is an international peer-mentoring organization with over 2000 members, dedicated to career development and community for women across the geosciences. Since its formation in 2002, ESWN has supported the growth of a more diverse scientific community through a combination of online and in-person networking activities. Lessons learned related to online networking and community-building will be presented. ESWN serves upper-level undergraduates, graduate students, professionals in a range of environmental fields, scientists working in federal and state governments, post-doctoral researchers, and academic faculty and scientists. Membership includes women working in over 50 countries, although the majority of ESWN members work in the U.S. ESWN increases retention of women in the geosciences by enabling and supporting professional person-to-person connections. This approach has been shown to reduce feelings of isolation among our members and help build professional support systems critical to career success. In early 2013 ESWN transitioned online activities to an advanced social networking platform that supports discussion threads, group formation, and individual messaging. Prior to that, on-line activities operated through a traditional list-serve, hosted by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The new web center, http://eswnonline.org, serves as the primary forum for members to build connections, seek advice, and share resources. For example, members share job announcements, discuss issues of work-life balance, and organize events at professional conferences. ESWN provides a platform for problem-based mentoring, drawing from the wisdom of colleagues across a range of career stages.

  12. In It to Win It – From new grad to early career librarian

    OpenAIRE

    Ingram, Diane

    2017-01-01

    At the end of 2015, a new graduate emerged into a new profession, a new career, a new job and a new role. The professional qualification teaches us well – theories, frameworks, exemplars, stories and practicum opportunities to name a few, but how do you put it into practice and build on these foundational skills to create depth of knowledge.This is the story of how a very hungry new graduate, who with the primary focus of delivering excellence in customer service, used existing skills and th...

  13. An early career in the military: A developmental-contextual perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Kotze

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Young professional military officers' experience of their internal career development was studied longitudinally from a life-span, life-space approach. Significant transitions between the life roles of worker, student and leisurite, with concomitant changes in their value system, away from traditional military values towards occupationalism, were confirmed. Gender differences were found for the work and community roles as well as in the developmental patterns of the need for authority, creativity, cultural identity, physical activities, social relationships and variety. Significant differences between the career development profiles of military and civilian students with regard to life roles were revealed. Opsomming Jong militere beroepsoffisiere se belewenis van hulle interne loopbaanontwikkeling is longitudinaal uit 'n lewenspan-Iewensruimte benadering bestudeer. Beduidende oorgange tussen die werk-, studie- en ontspanningsrolle met gepaardgaande veranderinge in hulle waardestelsel, weg van tradisionele militere waardes in die rigting van 'n beroepsgeoriënteerde waardestelsel, is bevestig. Geslagsverskille is gevind wat betref die werk- en gemeenskapsrolle sowel as in die volgende ontwikkelingspatrone: 'n behoefte aan outoriteit, kreatiwiteit, kulturele identiteit, fisiese aktiwiteite, sosiale verhoudings en verskeidenheid. Beduidende verskille met betrekking tot lewensrolle het in die loopbaanontwikkelingsprofiele van militere en burgerlike studente aan die lig gekom.

  14. Men's mobility into management from blue collar and white collar jobs: race differences across the early work-career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, George; Maume, David

    2014-07-01

    Within the context of the "particularistic mobility thesis" we examine racial differences in the incidence, and determinants of, as well as timing to, mobility into management across the critical early career years at a refined level, namely, when groups share similar white collar and blue collar jobs. Findings from a Panel Study of Income Dynamics sample of men support theory and indicate that from both job levels a racial hierarchy exists: African Americans have the lowest rate of mobility, reach management through a route that is relatively formal and structured by a traditional range of stratification-based causal factors and take longest to reach management. Whites, in contrast, have the highest mobility rate, reach management through a relatively informal path that is less structured by traditional stratification-based factors, and reach management the quickest, and, across all three issues Latinos occupy an intermediate ground between African Americans and Latinos. Further, as predicted by theory, racial differences, particularly, relative to whites, are greater among those tracked from blue collar jobs than white collar jobs. Discussed are implications of the findings for understanding racial disadvantage in the American labor market across the work-career and on an inter-generational basis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. From Student of Physics to Historian of Science: T.S. Kuhn's Education and Early Career, 1940-1958

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufbauer, Karl

    2012-12-01

    I first show that Kuhn came to have doubts about physics soon after entering college but did not make up his mind to leave the discipline until 1947-1948 when a close association with Harvard's President James B. Conant convinced him of the desirability of an alternative career in the history of science. I go on to maintain that it was realistic for Kuhn to prepare for such a career in essentially autodidactic ways both because he enjoyed Conant's patronage and because he could expect that his credentials in physics would be an asset in this relatively young interdisciplinary specialty. I then suggest that it was through his work as a teacher, researcher, and journeyman gatekeeper in the history of science that Kuhn gradually came to identify with the field. Finally, I argue that his training in physics, his teaching of general-education courses, and his hopes of influencing current philosophy of science helped shape his early practice as a historian of science. By way of epilogue, I briefly consider Kuhn's path from his tenuring at Berkeley in 1958 to the appearance of The Structure of Scientific Revolutions in 1962.

  16. A mentor training program improves mentoring competency for researchers working with early-career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mallory O; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective mentors, and the few that exist have a dearth of empirical support of their impact. In 2013, we recruited 34 faculty from across the US engaged in HIV-related clinical research to participate in a 2-day Mentoring the Mentors workshop. The workshop included didactic and interactive content focused on a range of topics, such as mentor-mentee communication, leadership styles, emotional intelligence, understanding the impact of diversity (unconscious bias, microaggressions, discrimination, tokenism) for mentees, and specific tools and techniques for effective mentoring. Pre- and post-workshop online evaluations documented high rates of satisfaction with the program and statistically significant improvements in self-appraised mentoring skills (e.g. addressing diversity in mentoring, communication with mentees, aligning mentor-mentee expectations), as assessed via a validated mentoring competency tool. This is the first mentoring training program focused on enhancing mentors' abilities to nurture investigators of diversity, filling an important gap, and evaluation results offer support for its effectiveness. Results suggest a need for refinement and expansion of the program and for more comprehensive, long-term evaluation of distal mentoring outcomes for those who participate in the program.

  17. Lack of quantitative training among early-career ecologists: a survey of the problem and potential solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezard, Thomas H.G.; Jørgensen, Peter S.; Zimmerman, Naupaka; Chamberlain, Scott; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Curran, Timothy J.; Poisot, Timothée

    2014-01-01

    Proficiency in mathematics and statistics is essential to modern ecological science, yet few studies have assessed the level of quantitative training received by ecologists. To do so, we conducted an online survey. The 937 respondents were mostly early-career scientists who studied biology as undergraduates. We found a clear self-perceived lack of quantitative training: 75% were not satisfied with their understanding of mathematical models; 75% felt that the level of mathematics was “too low” in their ecology classes; 90% wanted more mathematics classes for ecologists; and 95% more statistics classes. Respondents thought that 30% of classes in ecology-related degrees should be focused on quantitative disciplines, which is likely higher than for most existing programs. The main suggestion to improve quantitative training was to relate theoretical and statistical modeling to applied ecological problems. Improving quantitative training will require dedicated, quantitative classes for ecology-related degrees that contain good mathematical and statistical practice. PMID:24688862

  18. Socialization, Indifference, and Convenience: Exploring the Uptake of Influenza Vaccine Among Medical Students and Early Career Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Rhiannon; Goodwin, Dawn; Isba, Rachel; Keegan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The Chief Medical Officer recommends that all health care workers receive an influenza vaccination annually. High vaccination coverage is believed to be the best protection against the spread of influenza within a hospital, although uptake by health care workers remains low. We conducted semistructured interviews with seven medical students and nine early career doctors, to explore the factors informing their influenza vaccination decision making. Data collection and analysis took place iteratively, until theoretical saturation was achieved, and a thematic analysis was performed. Socialization was important although its effects were attenuated by participants’ previous experiences and a lack of clarity around the risks and benefits of vaccination. Many participants did not have strong intentions regarding vaccination. There was considerable disparity between an individual’s opinion of the vaccine, their intentions, and their vaccination status. The indifference demonstrated here suggests few are strongly opposed to the vaccination—there is potential to increase vaccination coverage. PMID:28737075

  19. Lack of quantitative training among early-career ecologists: a survey of the problem and potential solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Barraquand

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Proficiency in mathematics and statistics is essential to modern ecological science, yet few studies have assessed the level of quantitative training received by ecologists. To do so, we conducted an online survey. The 937 respondents were mostly early-career scientists who studied biology as undergraduates. We found a clear self-perceived lack of quantitative training: 75% were not satisfied with their understanding of mathematical models; 75% felt that the level of mathematics was “too low” in their ecology classes; 90% wanted more mathematics classes for ecologists; and 95% more statistics classes. Respondents thought that 30% of classes in ecology-related degrees should be focused on quantitative disciplines, which is likely higher than for most existing programs. The main suggestion to improve quantitative training was to relate theoretical and statistical modeling to applied ecological problems. Improving quantitative training will require dedicated, quantitative classes for ecology-related degrees that contain good mathematical and statistical practice.

  20. ‘That women’s writing thing you do’ Reflections on Early-Career Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Fraser

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article takes its title from an experience in a liminal moment after completing a PhD but not yet finding a comfortable academic home to offer reflections based on what to contemplate when making decisions after the PhD. It considers how to find spaces to work in which there is the possibility for congruency between what we do, what we believe in and the realities of needing to earn a living. These reflections and experiences are read through the theoretical lens of work on gendered silences and the relationships of our gendered selves to knowledge and research. The article interweaves narratives of early-career decisions, gendered and feminist experiences of cultural studies with the relationships between me and my research project.

  1. Focus on early-career GPs: qualitative evaluation of a multi-faceted educational intervention to improve antibiotic prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckx, Laura; Anthierens, Sibyl; Magin, Parker J; Morgan, Simon; McArthur, Lawrie; Yardley, Lucy; Dallas, Anthea; Little, Paul; van Driel, Mieke L

    2018-01-16

    We conducted an educational intervention emphasizing rational antibiotic prescribing in early-career General Practitioners (GP) in vocational training (trainees). The intervention consisted of an online introduction module, an online communication training module, face-to-face workshops, and cases to be discussed one-on-one by the trainee-supervisor dyad during regular scheduled education sessions. To explore the participants' experiences with the intervention. A qualitative study of 14 GP trainees and supervisors. Interviews followed a semi-structured interview guide, were transcribed and analysed using concurrent thematic analysis. Overall, the intervention was well received. Resources were not often used in practice, but GP trainees used the information in communicating with patients. The intervention improved trainees' confidence and provided new communication strategies, e.g. explicitly asking about patients' expectations and talking patients through the examination to form an overall clinical picture. Trainees seemed eager to learn and adapt their practice, whereas GP supervisors rather commented that the intervention was reinforcing. None of the participants reported prescribing conflicts between trainee and supervisor. However, most participants identified conflicts within the GP practice or with specialists: other doctors who prescribe more antibiotics perpetuate patients' ideas that antibiotics will fix everything, which in turn causes conflict with the patient and undermines attempts to improve antibiotic prescribing. The educational intervention was received positively. Early-career GPs thought it influenced their prescribing behaviour and improved their confidence in non-prescribing. Interventions that target teams (e.g. entire practice) could minimize conflict, ensure consistency of messages and support overall antibiotic stewardship in primary care.

  2. Training Early Career Scientists in Flight Instrument Design Through Experiential Learning: NASA Goddard's Planetary Science Winter School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, L. V.; Lakew, B.; Bracken, J.; Brown, T.; Rivera, R.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Planetary Science Winter School (PSWS) is a Goddard Space Flight Center-sponsored training program, managed by Goddard's Solar System Exploration Division (SSED), for Goddard-based postdoctoral fellows and early career planetary scientists. Currently in its third year, the PSWS is an experiential training program for scientists interested in participating on future planetary science instrument teams. Inspired by the NASA Planetary Science Summer School, Goddard's PSWS is unique in that participants learn the flight instrument lifecycle by designing a planetary flight instrument under actual consideration by Goddard for proposal and development. They work alongside the instrument Principal Investigator (PI) and engineers in Goddard's Instrument Design Laboratory (IDL; idc.nasa.gov), to develop a science traceability matrix and design the instrument, culminating in a conceptual design and presentation to the PI, the IDL team and Goddard management. By shadowing and working alongside IDL discipline engineers, participants experience firsthand the science and cost constraints, trade-offs, and teamwork that are required for optimal instrument design. Each PSWS is collaboratively designed with representatives from SSED, IDL, and the instrument PI, to ensure value added for all stakeholders. The pilot PSWS was held in early 2015, with a second implementation in early 2016. Feedback from past participants was used to design the 2017 PSWS, which is underway as of the writing of this abstract.

  3. The Early-Career Development of Science Teachers from Initial Training Onwards: The Advantages of a Multifaceted Five-Year Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Julian; Howarth, Sue; King, Chris; Perry, John; Tas, Maarten; Twidle, John; Warhurst, Adrian; Garrett, Caro

    2014-01-01

    If a programme were to be devised for the early-career development of science teachers, what might such a programme look like? This was the focus of a meeting of science educators interested in developing such a structure, from the start of initial teacher training onwards. The contributions, modified and written up here, include a suggested…

  4. Early Career Teachers' Sense of Professional Agency in the Classroom: Associations with Turnover Intentions and Perceived Inadequacy in Teacher-Student Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikonen, Lauri; Pietarinen, Janne; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Toom, Auli; Soini, Tiina

    2017-01-01

    Teachers' capacity to learn intentionally and responsively in the classroom is particularly vulnerable during the first years in the profession. This study investigated the interrelations between early career teachers' turnover intentions, perceived inadequacy in teacher-student interaction, and sense of professional agency in the classroom. The…

  5. Can Early Careers Teachers Be Teacher Leaders? A Study of Second-Year Trainees in the Teach First Alternative Certification Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muijs, Daniel; Chapman, Chris; Armstrong, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The most recent decade has seen a major growth in interest in teacher leadership, but there is limited research on the extent to which early career teachers can take on teacher leadership roles. In this article we explore this question by looking at teachers prepared through the alternative certification programme Teach First (TF), which aims to…

  6. Early Career Teachers' Beliefs about Their Preparedness to Teach: Implications for the Professional Development of Teachers Working with Gifted and Twice-Exceptional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Leonie; Townend, Geraldine; Ewing, Bronwyn Frances

    2016-01-01

    Teachers have a major impact upon the educational achievements and psychological well-being of gifted students. Interestingly, however, relatively little is known about how well-prepared early career teachers believe themselves to be to take up this challenge. This makes the development of appropriately targeted and specifically focused…

  7. Peer Mentoring Communities of Practice for Early and Mid-Career Faculty: Broad Benefits from a Research-Oriented Female Peer Mentoring Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Amanda; Shaw, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    In light of recent interest in the limitations of early and mid-career mentoring (Driscoll et al 2009; Trowers 2011), this case study of a women's scholarly activity and goal setting Community of Practice (CoP) indicates that such groups can offer extensive peer mentoring at one teaching-oriented state university in the United States. Using a…

  8. The Professional Development Needs of Early Career Teachers, and the Extent to Which They Are Met: A Survey of Teachers in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Paul; Harrop, Susan; Thomas, Judith; Cain, Tim

    2018-01-01

    In a context in which local authority support has been largely removed from schools in England, this article examines the needs of early career teachers (ECTs) in English schools and colleges, the extent to which these needs are met through professional development activities and the nature of that professional development. Quantitative and…

  9. "Disqus" Website-Based Commenting as an e-Research Method: Engaging Doctoral and Early-Career Academic Learners in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Daniel; Earley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an adaptation of established qualitative research methods for online focus groups by using the "Disqus" website-based commenting platform as a medium for discussion among doctoral and early-career academic learners. Facilities allowing Internet users to comment on the content of web pages are increasingly popular on…

  10. CMS Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Ali Mohammad Rafiee receives the CMS Gold Award from Michel Della Negra of CMS. As part of the fifth annual CMS Awards, Iranian contractor HEPCO, located in Arak, an industrial town 200 km west of Tehran, received their Gold Award in a ceremony held on 14 June 2004 (the other award winners were reported in bulletin 13/2004). The Awards are given each year to a small number of the approximately one thousand contractors working on the CMS project. Gold Awards are given for outstanding technical achievement in work carried out for the detector. HEPCO received the Award for the excellent quality of their work in constructing two 25 tonne support tables, two 75 tonne shields (FCS) and eight supporting brackets to lower the HF into the cavern. Welds and machining obtained tolerances that were very difficult in structures of that size. Mr. A. M. Rafiee, the General Manager of the company, acknowledged the benefits of this collaboration, and thanked the efforts and skills of the many staff involved.

  11. Does early career achievement lead to earlier death? Assessment of the precocity-longevity effect in professional basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Wattie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine the precocity-longevity (P-L effect in North American professional basketball players who debuted between 1946 and 1979, and to determine whether playing position and decade of play influenced the relationship between age of career achievements and lifespan. Methods: 1852 players were evaluated from a recognized sports archive (i.e., sports-reference.com, which provided information on date of birth, death, and career debut, playing position, and indicators of achievement (i.e., All-Star team and/or All-League team selection. Athletes were categorized as above or below the median age of professional debut, and median age of selection to first All-Star team and/or All-League team. Analyses of deceased players (n = 598 were comprised of bivariate correlations between age of achievement (age of debut, age of first All-Star game and age of first All-League team selection and age of death, and t-tests to compared the average age of death of early and late achievers (p < .05. Survival analyses, using the entire sample (living and deceased players, compared the lifespans between those who debuted above and below the median age of achievement for each indicator of achievement. Results: Only the correlation between age of professional debut and age of death (r = .33, p < .001 and age of first all-star game and age of death (r = .29, p < .05 and the t-test comparing the average death age of early (66.4 y and later (69.3 y debut age groups (p =.01, reached statistical significance. However, survival analyses demonstrated a trend for lower risk of death for early achievers, with one exception (i.e., age of debut this trend was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Results did not support the P-L hypothesis, suggesting that sample characteristics (i.e., physical fitness of high performance athletes, and measurement methodologies, may influence support for the proposed hypothesis in sport. However, future research would benefit

  12. Clinical imprinting: the impact of early clinical learning on career long professional development in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Nicola

    2013-05-01

    The literature recognises a relationship between clinical experience and a successful undergraduate experience in nursing; however what constitutes an effective approach remains the subject of debate, particularly in relation to first year of learning. There is evidence from a biological standpoint that early experience impacts on the behavioural development of animals, described by Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989) as 'imprinting'. The concept of imprinting has resonance for nursing. In this article the importance of 'getting it right at the beginning' is explored and what, if anything, Lorenz's theory tells us about the impact of early clinical learning on subsequent professional development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. CERNois wins prestigious accelerator award

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference, CERN’s Rogelio Tomás García became the first Spaniard to receive the Frank Sacherer Prize for his work in particle beam optics.   Rogelio Tomás García at the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference. The Frank Sacherer Prize is awarded to physicists who have made a “significant, original contribution to the accelerator field" early on in their career. This year the prize was given to Rogelio Tomás García who, at only 35 years of age, has made important contributions to the optics design, optics measurement, and correction techniques applied at both the LHC and Brookhaven’s RHIC. “Tomás has had a vital impact on CERN’s beam optics studies and has made very impressive achievements in the field of beam optics,” says Oliver Brüning, Head of the Accelerators and Beam Physics...

  14. Careers and people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Young scientists fly high Teenagers from Poland, Slovakia and the UK won first prizes at the annual European Union (EU) Contest for Young Scientists. Magdalena Bojarska's study of Hamiltonian cycles in generalized Halin graphs, Martin Tkác's insights on tilting bulk materials in railway cargo and Elisabeth Muller's project on lunar meteorites each garnered awards worth €7000 from the EU's Science in Society programme, which aims to encourage young people to pursue scientific careers.

  15. Steltzer Receives 2013 Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Michael N.

    2014-07-01

    Heidi Steltzer, an assistant professor at Fort Lewis College, received the 2013 Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring at the 2013 Fall Meeting. This award "recognizes women in AGU who have sustained an active research career in a field related to biogeosciences, while excelling in teaching and especially in mentoring young scientists." Awardees are to serve as critical role models for the next generation of female scientists by sharing their passion for the natural world. Those who know her best agree that Heidi's passion for teaching and training the next generation of researchers truly embodies the spirit of the Sulzman award. According to one nominator, "Heidi single-handedly pushed [her] department toward a more modern and integrated view of the biological sciences, revamping curricula in both majors' and non-majors' courses to include citizen science, cross-disciplinary investigation techniques, and thought-provoking forays into real-world/real-time problems." Another nominator commented that "Heidi has made an incredibly strong impact on the careers of countless students through both compassionate and enthusiastic mentoring, as well as leadership in institutional and programmatic efforts that foster student professional development and that provide research experiences. I think it is extraordinary that at this relatively early point in her career, she has already achieved a lasting legacy."

  16. Gender, Families, and Science: Influences on Early Science Training and Career Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Sandra L.

    This research examines the effects of gender and a number of family experiences on young people's chances of going into postsecondary science training and science occupations in the years immediately following high school. Data came from the nationally representative, longitudinal High School and Beyond survey. Results show that gender plays a significant role in choices involving early science training and occupations - especially training. Amongst young men and women with comparable resources and qualifications, young women are less likely to make the science choice. The family experiences and expectations examined here are not a major factor in understanding gender differences in access to science training and occupations. Although much of the literature describes the domains of science and of family as being at odds, results from this research suggest that family experiences play a rather minimal role in predicting who will enter science training or occupations in the early post-high school years. When family variables do have an effect, they are not always negative and the nature of the effect varies by the time in the life cycle that the family variable is measured, by type of family experience (orientation vs. procreation), by outcome (science major vs. science occupation), and by gender.

  17. Attitude and knowledge of physicians about cancer pain management: young doctors of South Korea in their early career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hyun; Park, Hyeonggeun; Park, Eun Chul; Park, Keeho

    2011-06-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the attitude and knowledge about the optimal use of opioids and finding out the barriers to cancer pain management especially for young doctors in South Korea. A survey through questionnaire form was conducted on 1204 physicians. Physicians were grouped by their medical specialties and personal characteristics. Specialties were grouped into internal medicine and family medicine doctors, surgeons, anesthesiologists, pediatricians, other board holders and general physicians. Personal characteristics were grouped by their past experiences and current surroundings. Though many doctors thought that they were fairly well educated for pain management strategy, a large population of physicians showed a negative attitude and inadequate knowledge status about cancer pain management. The degree of attitude and knowledge status was different as their specialties and personal experiences. The factors that affected doctors' attitude and knowledge were: (i) medical specialty, (ii) past history of using practical pain assessment tool, (iii) self-perception of knowledge status about pain management, (iv) experience of prescribing opioids, (v) experience of education for cancer pain management. Although many physicians had a passive attitude in prescribing opioid analgesics, they are willingly open to use opioids for cancer pain management in the future. The most important perceived barriers to optimal cancer pain management were the fear for risk of tolerance, drug addiction, side effects of opioid analgesics and knowledge deficit about opioid analgesics. From this study, we found that further education and practical training will be needed for adequate cancer pain management for young physicians in their early career.

  18. The historical social positioning of nursing and medicine: implications for career choice, early socialization and interprofessional collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sheri; Doucet, Shelley; Hall, Linda McGillis

    2014-03-01

    For almost half a century, research has identified that effective teamwork is essential in order to enhance care provision and health outcomes for patients. Although the value of teamwork is well-recognized in healthcare, the historically rooted dynamics of workplace relationships create a myriad of challenges to creating collaborative teams. Understanding the history of interpersonal dynamics between health professionals can provide direction for future interprofessional education and collaboration strategies. The aim of this paper is to provide a historical overview of the social positioning of nursing and medicine in the context of interprofessional collaboration. Few professions work as closely as nursing and medicine. Despite the well-recognized benefits of interprofessional collaboration, these two professions are often socially positioned in opposition to one another and depicted as adversarial. This analysis will seek to advance our understanding of the historical roots between these two professions and their relationships with and among each other in relation to career choice, early socialization and patient care delivery. An exploration of the historical social positioning of nursing and medicine can provide an enhanced understanding of the barriers to interprofessional collaboration and inform future successes in interprofessional education and practice among all health and social care professions.

  19. Career Choice Status among Undergraduates and the Influence of Career Management Competencies and Perceived Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise; Wilton, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the influence of career management competencies and perceived employability on career choice status (CCS) among undergraduates. Making informed and appropriate career choices is positively linked with well-being, work performance and academic and career success. Early career decision-making is now critical if students wish to…

  20. The timing of family commitments in the early work career: Work-family trajectories of young adults in Flanders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelet, S.; de Valk, H.A.G.; Glorieux, I.; Laurijssen, I.; Willaert, D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This article examines the diverse ways in which young adults develop both their professional career and family life in the years immediately after they complete their education. Building a career and starting a family often occur simultaneously in this stage of life. By studying the

  1. Pedagogical Change at Times of Change in the Higher Education System: An Exploration of Early Career Mentoring, Co-publication and Teaching & Learning Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Boyd

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Universities are at a time of change. Their social, political and economic conditions are under challenge, while technological change challenges curriculum design and implementation, requiring reconsiderations of teaching and learning practices. In this context, and as part of the conference session on Higher education in 2014: threshold, watershed or business as usual?, I reviewed an approach I have been trialing to supporting early- and mid-career academics to navigate through this changing environment. This paper presents an illustrated essay on a human-scale approach to early- and mid-career mentoring through the establishment of small team-based research and writing projects. The essay provides examples of activities that, on the one hand, assist academics to develop the tools they need to navigate the new and evolving environment of higher education, while on the other hand directly addresses key pedagogical issues and provides new insight into teaching and learning in higher education.

  2. CSU Science Teacher and Researcher (STAR) Program: Developing "Teacher-Researchers" Through Paid Summer Research Experiences for Pre-Service and Early Career Science and Math Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J.; Rebar, B.; Elrod, S.

    2011-09-01

    The Science Teacher and Researcher (STAR) program aims to enhance the recruitment, preparation, and retention of science and math teachers by providing pre-service and early career science and math teachers with a "teacher-researcher" experience. With the guidance of a research mentor, STAR Fellows work on original science projects in national laboratories and other research facilities for eight to ten weeks. Weekly education workshops and an opening and closing conference provide context and opportunities for STAR Fellows to consider how the "doing of science" may be translated into the "teaching of science." This model has allowed for considerable growth over the first four years from 16 participants in its first year to 71 in the most recent year. Early indications suggest that, as a result of the program, STAR Fellows have increased interest in teaching, feel more prestige about teaching careers, and feel more included in the teacher-researcher community.

  3. Gender and medical careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riska, Elianne

    2011-03-01

    The concerns about physicians' career advancement tend to be raised in gender terms, because women presently constitute close to and will soon form a majority of the medical students in most western societies. The question is to what extent female and male medical students and residents today make similar or different career and lifestyle choices? Two major mechanisms have been referred to as the reason for gender differences in career paths for physicians. The major theoretical framework tends to be the socialization or sex-role theory and later versions of this explanatory framework. The other mechanism referred to is structural and points to the barriers or the concrete support that women and men experience in making their career decisions. Studies of medical students in the UK and US have shown that women students expected family demands to hamper career plans, while male students were less influenced by family concerns. The importance of role models and mentors in setting the career goals of medical students and residents has recently confirmed early studies of the topic. A number of studies have documented that early negative experiences or lack of encouragement in medical school deter women from choosing surgery as a career. Recent studies suggest that lifestyle choices rather than merely career advancement influence both female and male surgeons' career plans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. To Use or Not to Use: Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software Usage among Early-Career Sociologists in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Rodik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we critically analyse the usage of computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software (CAQDAS among early-career sociology researchers in Croatia. In Croatia, the CAQDAS community is very small and is dominated by problems of great expectations coming from early-career researchers. This is elaborated through a case study that addresses issues of spread and availability of CAQDAS, opportunity for its usage, reasons why early-career researchers decide to use it or not and grounds for their decisions for use of a particular software package. The perceived advantages and limitations of CAQDAS are analysed and some misconceptions about CAQDAS are contextualised and related to the dominant quantitative research framework in Croatian sociology. The broadening of the number of qualitative researchers in the sociological community in Croatia, together with more educational programmes on CAQDAS, which would highlight reflexive usage of software, open perspectives for strengthening of qualitative research in Croatia. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1501127

  5. Hero Award

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-07

    This podcast is a lecture given by William H. Foege, MD, MPH when he was honored October 7, 2009 as the 2009 CDC Foundation Hero Award Recipient.  Created: 10/7/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/22/2009.

  6. Career Development and Emerging Managerial Career Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzeda, Maurice

    1999-01-01

    Career-motivation theory provides a new framework for managerial careers in the context of contemporary career patterns. The framework includes the concepts of career resilience, career insight, and career identity. (SK)

  7. The Importance of Continuing Professional Development to Career Satisfaction and Patient Care: Meeting the Needs of Novice to Mid- to Late-Career Nurses throughout Their Career Span

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheri Price; Carol Reichert

    2017-01-01

    ... (students, early-career, mid- to late-career). A thematic analysis of the data revealed that ongoing professional development is an expressed need and expectation for nurses across the various career stages...

  8. Career adaptability and career entrenchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes; Ambiel, Rodolfo A.M.; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto

    2015-01-01

    Career adaptability constitutes a resource that can help employees to effectively manage career changes and challenges. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between the two higher-order constructs of career adaptability and career entrenchment (i.e., the perceived inability

  9. CMS AWARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Lowette

    Working under great time pressure towards a common goal in gradual steps can sometimes cause us to forget to take a step back, and celebrate what marvels have been achieved. A general need was felt within CMS to expand the recognition for our young scientists that made outstanding, well recognized and creative contributions to CMS, which served to significantly advance the performance of CMS as a complete and powerful experiment. Therefore, the Collaboration Board endorsed in March 2009 a proposal from the CB Chair and Advisory Group to award each year the newly created "CMS Achievement Award" to fourteen graduate students and postdocs that made exceptional contributions to the Tracker, ECAL, HCAL and Muon subdetectors as well as the TriDAS project, the Commissioning of CMS and the Offline Software and Computing projects. It was also agreed that there was a need to go back in time, and retroactively attribute awards for the years 2007 and 2008 when CMS went from a bare cavern to a detect...

  10. Newly established AGU awards and lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Beth; Kumar, Mohi

    2012-05-01

    The Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring (Biogeosciences section) recognizes AGU members who have sustained an active research career in a field related to biogeosciences while excelling as teachers and serving as role models for the next generation of female scientists. This new award acknowledges the importance of female mentors in enhancing gender balance in physical science career paths. The award is being endowed to honor Elizabeth Sulzman, an isotope biogeochemist and soil scientist, whose enthusiasm for teaching awed many undergraduates at Oregon State University. Current plans are to present the first Sulzman award at the 2013 Fall Meeting. Applicants must be women who are within 15 years of receiving their Ph.D., and nomination packages should include a cover letter, resumé, and three letters of recommendation. As they become available, more details will be posted on the Biogeosciences section Web site (http://www.agu.org/sections/biogeo/). The award will provide up to $1000 to one successful nominee each year, although the exact monetary amount is yet to be determined. AGU is currently accepting donations to endow this award; contact Victoria Thompson (vthompson@agu.org) to get involved.

  11. Centralized Oversight of Physician–Scientist Faculty Development at Vanderbilt: Early Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Abigail M.; Morrow, Jason D.; Limbird, Lee E.; Byrne, Daniel W.; Gabbe, Steven G.; Balser, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In 2000, faced with a national concern over the decreasing number of physician–scientists, Vanderbilt School of Medicine established the institutionally funded Vanderbilt Physician–Scientist Development (VPSD) program to provide centralized oversight and financial support for physician–scientist career development. In 2002, Vanderbilt developed the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Vanderbilt Clinical Research Scholars (VCRS) program using a similar model of centralized oversight. The authors evaluate the impact of the VPSD and VCRS programs on early career outcomes of physician–scientists. Method Physician–scientists who entered the VPSD or VCRS programs from 2000 through 2006 were compared with Vanderbilt physician–scientists who received NIH career development funding during the same period without participating in the VPSD or VCRS programs. Results Seventy-five percent of VPSD and 60% of VCRS participants achieved individual career award funding at a younger age than the comparison cohort. This shift to career development award funding at a younger age among VPSD and VCRS scholars was accompanied by a 2.6-fold increase in the number of new K awards funded and a rate of growth in K-award dollars at Vanderbilt that outpaced the national rate of growth in K-award funding. Conclusions Analysis of the early outcomes of the VPSD and VCRS programs suggests that centralized oversight can catalyze growth in the number of funded physician–scientists at an institution. Investment in this model of career development for physician–scientists may have had an additive effect on the recruitment and retention of talented trainees and junior faculty. PMID:18820531

  12. A protocol of a cross-sectional study evaluating an online tool for early career peer reviewers assessing reports of randomised controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moher, David; Altman, Doug; Schriger, David L; Alam, Sabina; Hopewell, Sally; Shanahan, Daniel R; Recchioni, Alessandro; Ravaud, Philippe; Boutron, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Systematic reviews evaluating the impact of interventions to improve the quality of peer review for biomedical publications highlighted that interventions were limited and have little impact. This study aims to compare the accuracy of early career peer reviewers who use an innovative online tool to the usual peer reviewer process in evaluating the completeness of reporting and switched primary outcomes in completed reports. Methods and analysis This is a cross-sectional study of individual two-arm parallel-group randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published in the BioMed Central series medical journals, BMJ, BMJ Open and Annals of Emergency Medicine and indexed with the publication type ‘Randomised Controlled Trial’. First, we will develop an online tool and training module based (a) on the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) 2010 checklist and the Explanation and Elaboration document that would be dedicated to junior peer reviewers for assessing the completeness of reporting of key items and (b) the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Outcome Monitoring Project process used to identify switched outcomes in completed reports of the primary results of RCTs when initially submitted. Then, we will compare the performance of early career peer reviewers who use the online tool to the usual peer review process in identifying inadequate reporting and switched outcomes in completed reports of RCTs at initial journal submission. The primary outcome will be the mean number of items accurately classified per manuscript. The secondary outcomes will be the mean number of items accurately classified per manuscript for the CONSORT items and the sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio to detect the item as adequately reported and to identify a switch in outcomes. We aim to include 120 RCTs and 120 early career peer reviewers. Ethics and dissemination The research protocol was approved by the ethics committee of the INSERM Institutional Review

  13. Gender Differences in the Influence of Early Perceived Parental Support on Student Mathematics and Science Achievement and STEM Career Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Marsha

    2014-01-01

    The lack of females entering STEM careers is well documented. Reasons for the gender gaps at all stages of the educational pipeline include both internal factors such as self-concept and external factors such as the influence of parents, media, and educators. Using latent growth curve analysis and nationally representative longitudinal survey…

  14. A Case Study of Early Career Secondary Teachers' Perceptions of Their Preparedness for Teaching: Lessons from Australia and Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Noguera, Joana; McCluskey, Kerryn

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an international comparison of Australian and Spanish secondary teachers' perceptions about the effectiveness of their pre-service education and their learning as in-service teachers. It aims to identify, firstly, the extent to which beginning teachers believe they are prepared for their careers through their teacher training…

  15. New York State Early-Career Teachers' Selection and Use of Pedagogical Approaches in Elementary General Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugos, Kristen Marie

    2011-01-01

    A mixed methods two-phase sequential explanatory design with concurrent embedded design addressed these questions: (1) (A) Which pedagogical approaches (Dalcroze, eclectic, Kodaly, Music Learning Theory, Orff) are chosen by teachers as they begin their careers? (B) Do their approaches change over time? (C) Why or why not? (2) (A) What influences…

  16. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This award is given by the Board of Educational Affairs in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. These contributions might include important research on education and training; the development of effective materials for instruction; the establishment of workshops, conferences, or networks of communication for education and training; achievement and leadership in administration that facilitates education and training; or activity in professional organizations that promote excellence. The Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in psychology recognizes a specific contribution to education and training. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. This year the Education and Training Awards Committee selected a psychologist for the Career designation. The 2017 recipients of the APA Education and Training Contributions Awards were selected by the 2016 Education and Training Awards Committee appointed by the Board of Educational Affairs (BEA). Members of the 2016 Education and Training Awards Committee were Erica Wise, PhD (Chair); Ron Rozensky, PhD; Jane D. Halonen, PhD; Sharon Berry, PhD (Chair Elect); Emil Rodolfa, PhD; and Sylvia A. Rosenfield, PhD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. On-the-job, real-time professional development for graduate students and early career scientists at the University of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; Guannel, M.; Wood-Charlson, E.; Choy, A.; Wren, J.; Chang, C.; Alegado, R.; Leon Soon, S.; Needham, H.; Wiener, C.

    2015-12-01

    Here we present an overview of inter-related programs designed to promote leadership and professional development among graduate students and early career scientists. In a very short time, these young scientists have developed into an impressive cohort of leaders. Proposal Writing. The EDventures model combines proposal-writing training with the incentive of seed money. Rather than providing training a priori, the EDventures model encourages students and post-docs to write a proposal based on guidelines provided. Training occurs during a two-stage review stage: proposers respond to panel reviews and resubmit their proposal within a single review cycle. EDventures alumni self-report statistically significant confidence gains on all questions posed. Their subsequent proposal success is envious: of the 12 proposals submitted by program alumni to NSF, 50% were funded. (Wood Charlson & Bruno, in press; cmore.soest.hawaii.edu/education/edventures.htm)Mentoring. The C-MORE Scholars and SOEST Maile Mentoring Bridgeprograms give graduate students the opportunity to serve as research mentors and non-research mentors, respectively, to undergraduates. Both programs aim to develop a "majority-minority" scientist network, where Native Hawaiians and other underrepresented students receive professional development training and personal support through one-on-one mentoring relationships (Gibson and Bruno, 2012; http://cmore.soest.hawaii.edu/scholars; http://maile.soest.hawaii.edu).Outreach & Science Communication. Ocean FEST (Families Exploring Science Together), Ocean TECH (Technology Explores Career Horizons) and the Kapiolani Community College summer bridge program provide opportunities for graduate students and post-docs to design and deliver outreach activities, lead field trips, communicate their research, and organize events (Wiener et al, 2011, Bruno & Wren, 2014; http://oceanfest.soest.hawaii.edu; http://oceantech.soest.hawaii.edu)Professional Development Course. In this

  18. Career success in a boundaryless career world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arthur, Michael B.; Khapova, S.N.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares contemporary career theory with the theory applied in recent career success research. The research makes inconsistent use of career theory, and in particular neglects the interdependence of the objective and subjective careers, and boundaryless career issues of

  19. FINAL REPORT. DOE Grant Award Number DE-SC0004062

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiesa, Luisa [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    With the support of the DOE-OFES Early Career Award and the Tufts startup support the PI has developed experimental and analytical expertise on the electromechanical characterization of Low Temperature Superconductor (LTS) and High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) for high magnetic field applications. These superconducting wires and cables are used in fusion and high-energy physics magnet applications. In a short period of time, the PI has built a laboratory and research group with unique capabilities that include both experimental and numerical modeling effort to improve the design and performance of superconducting cables and magnets. All the projects in the PI’s laboratory explore the fundamental electromechanical behavior of superconductors but the types of materials, geometries and operating conditions are chosen to be directly relevant to real machines, in particular fusion machines like ITER.

  20. 1991 Volvo Award in experimental studies. Cauda equina syndrome: neurologic recovery following immediate, early, or late decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamarter, R B; Sherman, J E; Carr, J B

    1991-09-01

    An animal model of cauda equina syndrome was developed. Neurologic recovery was analyzed following immediate, early, and delayed decompression. Five experimental groups, each containing six dogs, were studied. Compression of the cauda equina was performed in all 30 dogs following an L6-7 laminectomy. The cauda equina was constricted by 75% in each group. The first group was constricted and immediately decompressed. The remaining groups were constricted for 1 hour, 6 hours, 24 hours, and 1 week, respectively, before being decompressed. Somatosensory evoked potentials were performed before and after surgery, before and immediately after decompression, and 6 weeks following decompression. Daily neurologic exams using the Tarlov grading scale were performed. At 6 weeks postdecompression, all dogs were killed, and the neural elements analyzed histologically. Following compression, all 30 dogs had significant lower extremity weakness, tail paralysis, and urinary incontinence. All dogs recovered significant motor function 6 weeks following decompression. The dogs with immediate decompression generally recovered neurologic function within 2-5 days. The dogs receiving 1-hour and 6-hour compression recovered within 5-7 days. The dogs receiving 24-hour compression remained paraparetic 5-7 days, with bladder dysfunction for 7-10 days and tail dysfunction persisting for 4 weeks. The dogs with compression for 1 week were paraparetic (Tarlov Grade 2 or 3) and incontinent during the duration of cauda equina compression. They recovered to walking by 1 week and Tarlov Grade 5 with bladder and tail control at the time of euthanasia. Immediately after compression, all five groups demonstrated at least 50% deterioration of the posterior tibial nerve evoked potential amplitudes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Final Report, DOE Early Career Award: Predictive modeling of complex physical systems: new tools for statistical inference, uncertainty quantification, and experimental design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzouk, Youssef [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Predictive simulation of complex physical systems increasingly rests on the interplay of experimental observations with computational models. Key inputs, parameters, or structural aspects of models may be incomplete or unknown, and must be developed from indirect and limited observations. At the same time, quantified uncertainties are needed to qualify computational predictions in the support of design and decision-making. In this context, Bayesian statistics provides a foundation for inference from noisy and limited data, but at prohibitive computional expense. This project intends to make rigorous predictive modeling *feasible* in complex physical systems, via accelerated and scalable tools for uncertainty quantification, Bayesian inference, and experimental design. Specific objectives are as follows: 1. Develop adaptive posterior approximations and dimensionality reduction approaches for Bayesian inference in high-dimensional nonlinear systems. 2. Extend accelerated Bayesian methodologies to large-scale {\\em sequential} data assimilation, fully treating nonlinear models and non-Gaussian state and parameter distributions. 3. Devise efficient surrogate-based methods for Bayesian model selection and the learning of model structure. 4. Develop scalable simulation/optimization approaches to nonlinear Bayesian experimental design, for both parameter inference and model selection. 5. Demonstrate these inferential tools on chemical kinetic models in reacting flow, constructing and refining thermochemical and electrochemical models from limited data. Demonstrate Bayesian filtering on canonical stochastic PDEs and in the dynamic estimation of inhomogeneous subsurface properties and flow fields.

  2. Supporting Young Writers with Award-Winning Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Kathryn Lake; Ricks, Paul H.; Young, Terrell A.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a way to use award-winning books as mentor texts for very young writers. Books were selected as mentor texts from the winners of the Australian Early Childhood Children's Book of the Year Award and the American Theodor Seuss Geisel Award. The authors explain the value of using award-winning texts in the classroom and describe…

  3. Changes in early-career family physicians' antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infection and acute bronchitis: a multicentre longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Parker J; Morgan, Simon; Tapley, Amanda; Henderson, Kim M; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Ball, Jean; Davis, Joshua S; Dallas, Anthea; Davey, Andrew R; Spike, Neil A; McArthur, Lawrie; Stewart, Rebecca; Mulquiney, Katie J; van Driel, Mieke L

    2016-08-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic prescription and subsequent antibacterial resistance are major threats to health worldwide. We aimed to establish whether early-career 'apprenticeship-model' experience in family practice influences antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections and to also establish other associations of antibiotic prescribing changes during this early-career experience. A longitudinal analysis (2010-2014) of a cohort study of Australian GP registrars' (vocational trainees') consultations. Registrars from five regional training programs recorded data from 60 consecutive consultations, once each 6-month training Term, including the diagnoses managed and medications prescribed. The outcomes were whether an antibiotic was prescribed for the diagnoses 'upper respiratory tract infection (URTI)' and 'acute bronchitis/bronchiolitis'. Generalized linear mixed modelling was used to account for repeated measures on registrars and to include the time component: 'Term'. A total of 856 registrars recorded 108759 consultations, including 8715 'URTI' diagnoses (5.15% of diagnoses) and 2110 'acute bronchitis/bronchiolitis' diagnoses (1.25%). Antibiotics were prescribed in 16.3% [95% confidence interval (CI) 14.9-17.8] of URTI and 72.2% (95% CI 69.6-74.6) of acute bronchitis/bronchiolitis diagnoses. Moving from an earlier to later term did not significantly influence registrars' antibiotic prescribing for URTI [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.95; 95% CI 0.87, 1.04, P = 0.27] or acute bronchitis/bronchiolitis [OR 1.01 (95% CI 0.90-1.14), P = 0.86]. Significant associations of antibiotic prescribing for URTIs were the registrar being non-Australian educated, greater patient age, practices not privately billing patients, pathology being ordered, longer consultation duration and the registrar seeking in-consultation information or advice (including from their supervisor). Early-career experience/training failed to produce rational antibiotic prescribing for URTI and acute

  4. Support for a special symposium to highlight the research of early career women physical chemists at the 2011 fall ACS nationall meeting, Aug 28-Sept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Geraldine [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2012-12-19

    The symposium was well attended during the 4-day symposium. The invited speakers were primarily women in early career stage (~4-8 years) with a few senior women and men as invited speakers or session chairs. Included in each day was a Poster Session for graduate students and a lunch in which the turn out was strong and the posters presented encouraged much of dialogue with the invited speakers, guests and others attending the ACS meeting and wanted to discuss the student's research and meet with the speakers. Most all speakers and participants were very positive about the sessions and expressed that the funding to cover some expenses made it possible for them to attend the conference and the poster session luncheon. There was a total of 51 presenters, below are the speakers and their abstracts, in order presented:

  5. 76 FR 16630 - Announcement of an Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... Assistant Secretary and Inter-Departmental Liaison for Early Childhood Development announces the award of a..., Senior Policy Advisor for Early Childhood Health and Development, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary and Inter-Departmental Liaison for Early Childhood Development, 901 D Street, SW., Washington, DC...

  6. Careers: Homecoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Joetta L.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the professional career of former big-time football coach George Chaump, who is now a high school football coach whose career has come the full circle and has taught him that it is the job, not the glamour, that matters. The article discusses what high school coaching has taught him and what he can offer to high school students. (SM)

  7. Lohman Receives 2013 Geodesy Section Award: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Rowena B.

    2014-09-01

    I am very honored to be this year's recipient of the AGU Geodesy Section Award. I was fortunate to begin my academic career at a time when there was an explosion of new data types and computational resources. I have been very pleased to watch this trend continue, with the ongoing support of new InSAR missions worldwide and renewed interest in the democratization of access to this data.

  8. Deet's Place awarded prestigious Golden Cup award

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, Brandi

    2007-01-01

    Virginia Tech's premier coffee, ice cream, and pastry shop--Deet's Place--has been recognized with it's second Golden Cup award, presented by the Specialty Coffee Association of America, which recognizes excellence in brewed coffee. The award is presented each year to retailers and restaurants whose specialty coffee is properly ground and brewed. Deet's Place has submitted entries for this award twice, and has received the honor both times, with the previous win in 2000.

  9. Advancing the Illinois Early Childhood Education Workforce: A Model College and Career Pathway. IERC 2017-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernoteit, Stephanie A.; Holt, Janet K.; Kirchhoff, Amber

    2017-01-01

    The early childhood educator workforce has widely ranging credentials and degrees, qualifications and compensation, typically varying by setting. Yet, there is a national call for aligning and strengthening requirements for preparation of the early childhood workforce to ensure that young children thrive and reach their potential at each stage in…

  10. Awards for Lyn Evans and Philippe Lebrun

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Lyn Evans has received the American Physical Society’s Robert R. Wilson Prize, while Philippe Lebrun has been awarded an honorary doctorate by the Wrocław University of Technology in Poland. Lyn Evans in front of an LHC dipole magnet. Philippe Lebrun (centre) with the Dean of the Faculty of mechanical and power engineering of the Wrocław University during the ceremony (courtesy of Laurent Tavian).Numerous honours are going to the LHC and those behind it even before this exceptional machine begins operation. The LHC Project Leader, Lyn Evans, has recently been awarded the "Robert R. Wilson Prize for Achievement in the Physics of Particle Accelerators" by the American Physical Society (APS). According to the citation, the prize was awarded "for a sustained career of technical innovation and leadership in the SPS proton-antiproton collider, culminating in the construction and commissioning of the LHC&am...

  11. Teaching Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Fred; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes four different types of music education careers: elementary or secondary teacher, college/university teacher, studio/private teacher, and museum music instructor. The educational background, job availability, and advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. (AM)

  12. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology: Neil Lutsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is Neil Lutsky. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Distinguished Teaching Award…

  13. Training Early Career Space Weather Researchers and other Space Weather Professionals at the CISM Space Weather Summer School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. A.; Hughes, W.

    2011-12-01

    This talk will outline the organization of a summer school designed to introduce young professions to a sub-discipline of geophysics. Through out the 10 year life time of the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) the CISM Team has offered a two week summer school that introduces new graduate students and other interested professional to the fundamentals of space weather. The curriculum covers basic concepts in space physics, the hazards of space weather, and the utility of computer models of the space environment. Graduate students attend from both inside and outside CISM, from all the sub-disciplines involved in space weather (solar, heliosphere, geomagnetic, and aeronomy), and from across the nation and around the world. In addition, between 1/4 and 1/3 of the participants each year are professionals involved in space weather in some way, such as: forecasters from NOAA and the Air Force, Air Force satellite program directors, NASA specialists involved in astronaut radiation safety, and representatives from industries affected by space weather. The summer school has adopted modern pedagogy that has been used successfully at the undergraduate level. A typical daily schedule involves three morning lectures followed by an afternoon lab session. During the morning lectures, student interaction is encouraged using "Timeout to Think" questions and peer instruction, along with question cards for students to ask follow up questions. During the afternoon labs students, working in groups of four, answer thought provoking questions using results from simulations and observation data from a variety of source. Through the interactions with each other and the instructors, as well as social interactions during the two weeks, students network and form bonds that will last them through out their careers. We believe that this summer school can be used as a model for summer schools in a wide variety of disciplines.

  14. Recruitment of Early STEM Majors into Possible Secondary Science Teaching Careers: The Role of Science Education Summer Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    A shortage of highly qualified math and science teachers pervades the U.S. public school system. Clearly, recruitment of talented STEM educators is critical. Previous literature offers many suggestions for how STEM teacher recruitment programs and participant selection should occur. This study investigates how early STEM majors who are not already…

  15. A career roles model of career development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Hans A.

    Career development is described as the interactive progression of internal career identity formation and the growth of external career significance. Argued is the need for a content model of career development where the field is dominated by process theories. A theory is put forward of career

  16. Patient's Choice Award - a chance to say thank you.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elaine

    2016-12-14

    'Winning the Patient's Choice Award has been the highlight of my career so far. And having been nominated by a patient and then voted for by the public, it has reinforced that what I do does make a difference,' says lead bowel function clinical nurse specialist Kelly Stackhouse.

  17. Career development resource: academic career in surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfey, Hilary; Gantt, Nancy L

    2012-07-01

    Academic surgeons play an instrumental role in the training of our medical students and surgical residents. Although volunteer faculty often have an important role in the clinical development of surgeons-in-training, the tasks of curricular development, structured didactic sessions, professional advising, research sponsorship, and mentoring at all levels fall to the academic surgeon. Historically, the career advancement path for an academic physician favored grant acquisition and scholarly publication. Broader definitions of scholarship have emerged, along with corresponding modifications in academic award systems that allow advancement in faculty rank based on a surgeon's educational efforts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Perioperative careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Paul

    2012-05-01

    When I look back at how my career started, I think to myself, what if I had undertaken the BA in Business Studies which I had been accepted for, instead of the BSc in Nursing for which I was still waiting to hear the results of my interview? Well, probably I would have spent four years studying business, followed by 40 years sitting in an office somewhere; Tesco, Sainsbury's or Marks and Spencer probably. I was lucky though, my father phoned up every couple of weeks (I was only 17 and didn't really have a clue what I wanted to do) and eventually they said 'yes' and I started my nursing career. Perhaps this is the first bit of advice for anybody thinking of a career in health:

  19. The first korean doctor of medicine in ophthalmology: early career of Kong pyung woo (1907-1995) as an unusual example of medical profession in colonial Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Ho

    2013-12-01

    This article traces early career of Kong Pyung Woo, a public figure famous for being the first doctor of medicine in ophthalmology with Korean ethnicity in 1936, for founding and running the oldest and still the most successful private eye clinic in Korea since 1937, and also for his engagement in development of Korean mechanical typewriter since 1949. His case is an illustrative example of how a Korean under the Japanese colonial rule (1910-1945) could build up a career to become a medical doctor, taking full advantage of the chances available. Kong, born in 1907 in a rural province in northwestern Korea, acquired a doctor's license in 1926 by passing the qualifying examination of the Government General in Korea. The qualification test was in itself an outcome of colonial education system, in which the supply of medical doctors by only a few tertiary schools could not meet the demands. After working for a state hospital for one year, Kong volunteered to be a visiting student at Keijo Medical College, to fulfill his dream of "becoming a prominent bacteriologist like Noguchi Hideyo." He was soon officially appointed as a tutor at Department of Ophthalmology, as he had been endorsed by professor Satake Shyuichi for his diligence and earnestness. Satake also encouraged Kong to pursue a doctoral degree and recommended him to Tokumitsu Yoshitomi, a professor in the Department of Pathology at Keijo Imperial University, so that Kong could experience cutting-edge research at the imperial university. Kong reported on his experiments on the pathology of chorioretinitis centralis by 1935. He submitted the reports to Nagoya Imperial University, Japan, as a doctoral thesis, and eventually obtained the degree in 1936, which was the first Korean doctor of medicine in ophthalmology. The doctorate made Kong a public figure and he opened his own private clinic in 1937. The Kong Eye Clinic was the first private eye clinic owned and run by Korean, and soon became popular in Seoul

  20. Angelopoulos receives Scarf Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Martin

    AGU's third annual F.L. Scarf Award has been awarded to Vassilis Angelopoulos for his Ph.D. thesis, “Transport Phenomena in the Earth's Plasma Sheet,” which he completed at the University of California, Los Angeles, under the supervision of Charles Kennel. As part of the award, Angelopoulos will give an invited talk on a related topic at the upcoming AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.The award was established to honor Fred L. Scarf, a pioneer and leader in solar-planetary research. The award is given by the Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) section for outstanding dissertation research that contributes directly to solar-planetary science. The major criterion for the award is the impact or potential impact of the research on the field of solar-planetary studies. The awardee receives $1000 and is invited to deliver a paper at one of the following year's AGU meetings.

  1. The career distress scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creed, Peter; Hood, Michelle; Praskova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Career distress is a common and painful outcome of many negative career experiences, such as career indecision, career compromise, and discovering career barriers. However, there are very few scales devised to assess career distress, and the two existing scales identified have psychometric weakne...

  2. Barriers and facilitators of mentoring for trainees and early career investigators in rheumatology research: Current state, identification of needs, and roadmap to an inter-institutional adult rheumatology mentoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogdie, Alexis; Sparks, Jeffrey A; Angeles-Han, Sheila T; Bush, Kathleen; Castelino, Flavia V; Golding, Amit; Jiang, Yihui; Kahlenberg, J Michelle; Kim, Alfred H J; Lee, Yvonne C; Machireddy, Kirthi; Ombrello, Michael J; Shah, Ami A; Wallace, Zachary S; Nigrovic, Peter A; Makris, Una E

    2017-05-23

    Determine perceived barriers and facilitators to effective mentoring for early career rheumatology investigators and develop a framework for an inter-institutional mentoring program. Focus groups or interviews with rheumatology fellows, junior faculty, and mentors were conducted, audiotaped and transcribed. Content analysis was performed using NVivo software. Themes were grouped into categories (e.g., mentor-mentee relationship, barriers and facilitators of a productive relationship). Rheumatology fellows and early career investigators were also surveyed nationwide to identify specific needs to be addressed through an inter-institutional mentoring program. Twenty-five individuals participated in focus groups or interviews. Attributes of the ideal mentee-mentor relationship included communication, accessibility, regular meetings, shared interests, aligned goals, and mutual respect. The mentee should be pro-active, efficient, engaged, committed, focused, accountable, and respectful of the mentor's time. The mentor should support/promote the mentee, shape the mentee's goals and career plan, address day-to-day questions, provide critical feedback, be available, and have team leadership skills. Barriers included difficulty with career path navigation, gaining independence, internal competition, authorship, time demands, funding, and work-life balance. Facilitators of a successful relationship included having a diverse network of mentors filling different roles, mentor-mentee relationship management, and confidence. Among 187 survey respondents, the primary uses of an inter-institutional mentoring program were career development planning and oversight, goal setting, and networking. In this mixed methods study, tangible factors for optimizing the mentor-mentee relationship were identified and will inform development of an adult rheumatology inter-institutional mentoring program. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017, American College of

  3. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 53: From student to entry-level professional: Examining the technical communications practices of early career-stage US aerospace engineers and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Holloway, Karen; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    Studies indicate that communications and information-related activities take up a substantial portion of an engineer's work week; therefore, effective communications and information-use skills are one of the key engineering competencies that early career-stage aerospace engineers and scientists must possess to be successful. Feedback from industry rates communications and information-use skills high in terms of their importance to engineering practice; however, this same feedback rates the communications and information-use skills of early career-stage engineers low. To gather adequate and generalizable data about the communications and information-related activities of entry-level aerospace engineers and scientists, we surveyed 264 members of the AIAA who have no more than 1-5 years of aerospace engineering work experience. To learn more about the concomitant communications norms, we compared the results of this study with data (1,673 responses) we collected from student members of the AIAA and with data (341 responses) we collected from a study of aerospace engineering professionals. In this paper, we report selected results from these studies that focused on the communications practices and information-related activities of early career-stage U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists in the workplace.

  4. 2004 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Jeneil Biosurfactant Company, makes biobased, rhamnolipid surfactants by fermentation that are less toxic and more biodegradable than conventional surfactants.

  5. Criminal careers and "career criminals."

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blumstein, Alfred

    1986-01-01

    ... A. Visher, editors Panel on Research on Criminal Careers Committee on Research on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1986 i Copyrighttrue Please breaks inserted. are Page files. accidentally typesetting been have ma...

  6. Criminal Careers and "Career Criminals"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blumstein, Alfred; Cohen, Jacqueline; Roth, Jeffrey A; Visher, Christy A

    1986-01-01

    ..., and Christy A. Visher, editors Panel on Research on Criminal Careers Committee on Research on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education National Research Council National Academy Press Washington, D.C.1986 i Copyrighttrue Please breaks inserted. are Page files. accidentally typesetting be...

  7. Socio-chronological Starting Points for career Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela Brečko

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The author points out that, regarding efficient planning of a career, individuals as well as organisations have to take into account the laws of a bio-social life cycle and the features of a career cycle which can generally be applied to any profession. She describes the traits of a biosocial cycle based on Erikson's evolutionary theory of a personality, and the traits of a career cycle with the definitions of nine career stages. Summing up the characteristics of a career cycle at early stages of career development is less demanding; later on, such an attempt is rather risky, since specific problems and life tasks at later stages of a career strongly depend on coordinating and managing former career decisions and the career path as a whole. The author also points out that it is necessary to create materials for planning a personal career within regular curriculum from primary school to university.

  8. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  9. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    test

    Example of the letter required by IDRC: Reference: IDRC Awards competition: John Smith (Please indicate the title of the award.) a) As research supervisor of Mr. John Smith, I confirm that I approve and support the research proposal submitted by the candidate. b) Mr. Smith has successfully completed the following course(s):.

  10. “If I had to do it, then I would”: Understanding early middle school students’ perceptions of physics and physics-related careers by gender

    OpenAIRE

    Emily A. Dare; Gillian H. Roehrig

    2016-01-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Gender in Physics.] This study examined the perceptions of 6th grade middle school students regarding physics and physics-related careers. The overarching goal of this work was to understand similarities and differences between girls’ and boys’ perceptions surrounding physics and physics-related careers as part of a long-term effort to increase female interest and representation in this particular field of science. A theoretical framework based...

  11. ADVANCEMENT & CHANGE OF CAREER PATH 2001 REVIEW

    CERN Document Server

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    Advancement, exceptional advancement and exceptional performance award decisions have now been made, following the procedures published in Weekly Bulletin No. 12/2001. The decisions applied were within the guidelines fixed by the Director-General. These decisions are included, where applicable, in the salaries for the month of July 2001. The award of the annual step is communicated to staff, as in previous years, by the salary shown on the July salary slip. All other decisions are communicated by separate notification to the staff concerned, whose names may be consulted in Divisional Secretariats. It is recalled that change of career path proposals submitted to the Technical Engineers and Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) or to Human Resources Division are being examined with a view to preparing the latters' recommendations by the end of September 2001. Final decisions will be applied retroactively to 1 July 2001.

  12. Promoting sustainable excellence through diversity in research careers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Dr. Vinkenburg, Claartje; Guinot, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Excellence is a non-negotiable in science, a necessary condition for a successful careers as well as the funding of research projects. Scientific excellence is the sole criterion used by the European Research Council (ERC) to award frontier research grants. However, statistics show that there are still persistent inequalities between men and women scientists in ERC funding success as well as other career outcomes. Dr. Claartje Vinkenburg, of the VU University of Amsterdam, will illustrate two projects commissioned by the ERC Gender Balance Working Group to uncover and address this phenomenon. The first project [ERCAREER (Vinkenburg PI, 2012-2014)] is about unconventional careers and career breaks, and studies the gendered nature of career paths of ERC applicants. Findings show that “conventional careers” in science are inextricably tied to normative beliefs about the ideal academic, mobility, independence, and excellence. Allowing unconventional careers to address the issue results in ir...

  13. Pension Fund award

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Pension Fund won the Investments & Pensions Europe (IPE) 2013 Gold Award in the Medium Real-Estate Investor category. IPE is the leading European publication on the subject of pensions. The awards were judged by a panel of 22 members, which included leading European investment consultants and pension fund executives.     Théodore Economou (left), the CERN Pension Fund’s Chief Executive Officer, receives the IPE 2013 Gold Award.   The award recognised the “fresh thinking” behind the CERN Pension Fund’s updated real-estate strategy, which has brought it “focus” on “high-quality assets and diversification.” The jury also noted the Fund’s “streamlined and cost-efficient” management, and noted that CERN is “running a tight ship”. While the awards are given by a European institution, they have a worldwide scope, and winners in ot...

  14. Awards aplenty in Krakow

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    CERN will be well represented this year at the award ceremony organized by the European Physical Society (EPS) in Krakow. The Gargamelle Collaboration is being awarded the High Energy and Particle Physics prize, while Maurizio Pierini shares the Young Physicist Prize. Both Mick Storr and Andrzej Siemko will be awarded the Medal of the Polish Commission of National Education.This year’s EPS-High Energy and Particle Physics Prize is being awarded to the Gargamelle Collaboration for the discovery of the weak neutral current. Gargamelle’s large bubble chamber is now displayed in the Microcosm garden at CERN in commemoration of the discovery that led to the acceptance of the electroweak theory and the award of the Noble prize to Glashow, Salam and Weinberg in 1979. On 3 September 1973 the collaboration published two papers in the same issue of Physics Letters, one on neutral currents involving electrons, the other on neutral current interactions with hadrons (protons and neut...

  15. HEP meets ML award talk : XGBoost

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; CHEN, Tianqi

    2015-01-01

    Tianqi Chen and Tong He (team crowwork) have provided very early in the challenge to all participants XGBoost (for eXtreme Gradient Boosted). It is a parallelised software to train boost decision trees, which has been effectively used by many participants to the challenge. For this, they have won the "HEP meets ML" award which is the invitation to CERN happening today.

  16. The Importance of Continuing Professional Development to Career Satisfaction and Patient Care: Meeting the Needs of Novice to Mid- to Late-Career Nurses throughout Their Career Span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri Price

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides insights into the role of ongoing training and education on nurses’ career satisfaction across different career stages and their ability to provide quality patient care. Eighteen focus groups were conducted over the course of five months in 2015 (January to May in eight Canadian provinces. There were a total of 185 focus group participants. Each focus group lasted approximately 1.5 h and included 8–15 participants who self-selected in one of three distinct career stages (students, early-career, mid- to late-career. A thematic analysis of the data revealed that ongoing professional development is an expressed need and expectation for nurses across the various career stages. Student and early-career nurses expected sufficient training and education to facilitate workplace transitions, as well as continuing education opportunities throughout their careers for career laddering. For mid- to late-career nurses, the importance of lifelong learning was understood within the context of maintaining competency, providing quality patient care and enhancing future career opportunities. Training and education were directly linked to nurses’ career satisfaction. Healthy work environments were identified by nurses as those that invested in continuing professional development opportunities to ensure continuous growth in their practice and provide optimal quality patient care. Training and education emerged as a cross-cutting theme across all career stages and held implications for patient care, as well as retention and recruitment.

  17. The Lennart Nilsson Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, M

    2001-01-01

    This article takes a brief look at the photography of Lennart Nilsson as well as the history of, and the formation of a foundation to raise monies for the establishment of an award in his name. Subsequently, a board and an international nominating committee evolved to select individuals to receive the award. Honorees are chosen based on the merits of their efforts in scientific imagery that, like the photography of Nilsson, reveal the unseen in the natural world. Finally, this article discusses the work of the latest two recipients of the award and invites readers to participate in the nomination process.

  18. FY11 Coc Awards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the renewal homeless assistance projects being awarded by HUD under the 2011 Continuum of Care (CoC) competitive grants process. Approximately...

  19. Great Indoors Awards 2007

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Hollandis Maastrichtis jagati 17. XI esimest korda rahvusvahelist auhinda The Great Indoors Award. Aasta sisekujundusfirmaks valiti Masamichi Katayama asutatud Wonderwall. Auhinna said veel Zaha Hadid, Heatherwick Studio, Ryui Nakamura Architects ja Item Idem

  20. CPD Allocations and Awards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The CPD Allocation and Award database provides filterable on-screen and exportable reports on select programs, such as the Community Development Block Grant Program,...

  1. Major league baseball career length in the twentieth century*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witnauer, William D.; Rogers, Richard G.; Saint Onge, Jarron M.

    2011-01-01

    Although baseball is considered “the” American pastime, little is known about the career prospects of the individuals who play the game. This study fills that void by examining the careers of baseball players over the last century. Between 1902 and 1993, 5,989 position players started their careers and played 33,272 person years of major league baseball. A rookie position player can expect to play 5.6 years; one in five position players will have only a single-year career, and at every point of a player’s career, the chance of exiting is at least 11%. Position players who start younger and begin their career in more recent decades all have longer and more stable careers; nevertheless, baseball careers are not compressed versions of normal careers, but are substantially skewed toward early exit. PMID:21976782

  2. Awarding a Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the selection and prize awarding processes for a biennial ceramics exhibition in Japan. Based on long-term fieldwork in the “art world” (Becker 1982) of contemporary Japanese ceramics, as well as on participant observation of the processes concerned, the article...... addresses and draws upon two sets of sociological writings: one concerned with prizes and awards; the other with evaluative practices....

  3. Tectonics wins AAP Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    AGU's newest journal, Tectonics, won the 1983 award for excellence in journal design and production given by the Association of American Publishers, Inc. (AAP), in the eighth annual professional and scholarly publishing awards competition. Edited by John F. Dewey, the bimonthly journal is a joint publication of AGU and the European Geophysical Society. Paul E. Tapponnier is the European editor and B.C. Burchfiel is the North American editor. The journal is now in its third year of publication.

  4. European Physical Society awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The winners of the 2004 Accelerator Prizes, awarded by the European Physical Society's Interdivisional Group on Accelerators (EPS-IGA), have been announced. Vladmir Shiltsev (Fermilab) and Igor Meshkov (JINR, Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna) will be presented with their awards during the 9th European Particle Accelerator Conference, EPAC'04, on 8 July 2004 in Lucerne. Both physicists will also give a talk about their work. More details on: http://epac.web.cern.ch/

  5. Investigation on Factors Affecting to the Career Development

    OpenAIRE

    永久, 理恵; 井田, 政則

    2013-01-01

    The factors affecting to the career development were examined in light of the problem with young workers of their job quitting and hopping at early stage. The investigation was carried out with questionnaire given to 277 business persons working in several Japanese companies. We examined how the four major factors consisting of career development, i.e.“organizational socialization”,“ psychological variables of career self-reliance”,“ behavioral variables of career self-reliance”and“ meaning o...

  6. Managing your brand career management and personal PR for librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Still, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Managing Your Brand: Career Management and Personal PR for Librarians sets out guidelines for developing career pathways, including options for career change and the exploration of community service, as an avenue that can provide new opportunities. The text allows librarians at all levels to maximize their talents, providing them with career planning strategies that will facilitate professional development and personal satisfaction. Early chapters provide advice and strategies to readers, with later chapters addressing working relationships, librarianship, scholarship, and other forms

  7. Responsible Inspiration: The Role of Arts Educators in Career Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorton, Rachel Tuggle

    2016-01-01

    The realities of a career in the performing arts can exist in shocking contrast to the sterilized glamour found in bright lights and awards shows. So how might teaching artists continue to cultivate this passion while truly preparing students for continued educational opportunities in their fields and then for the real world? Through responsible…

  8. "If I had to do it, then I would": Understanding early middle school students' perceptions of physics and physics-related careers by gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Emily A.; Roehrig, Gillian H.

    2016-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Gender in Physics.] This study examined the perceptions of 6th grade middle school students regarding physics and physics-related careers. The overarching goal of this work was to understand similarities and differences between girls' and boys' perceptions surrounding physics and physics-related careers as part of a long-term effort to increase female interest and representation in this particular field of science. A theoretical framework based on the literature of girl-friendly and integrated STEM instructional strategies guided this work to understand how instructional strategies may influence and relate to students' perceptions. This convergent parallel mixed-methods study used a survey and focus group interviews to understand similarities and differences between girls' and boys' perceptions. Our findings indicate very few differences between girls and boys, but show that boys are more interested in the physics-related career of engineering. While girls are just as interested in science class as their male counterparts, they highly value the social aspect that often accompanies hands-on group activities. These findings shed light on how K-12 science reform efforts might help to increase the number of women pursuing careers related to physics.

  9. “If I had to do it, then I would”: Understanding early middle school students’ perceptions of physics and physics-related careers by gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. Dare

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Gender in Physics.] This study examined the perceptions of 6th grade middle school students regarding physics and physics-related careers. The overarching goal of this work was to understand similarities and differences between girls’ and boys’ perceptions surrounding physics and physics-related careers as part of a long-term effort to increase female interest and representation in this particular field of science. A theoretical framework based on the literature of girl-friendly and integrated STEM instructional strategies guided this work to understand how instructional strategies may influence and relate to students’ perceptions. This convergent parallel mixed-methods study used a survey and focus group interviews to understand similarities and differences between girls’ and boys’ perceptions. Our findings indicate very few differences between girls and boys, but show that boys are more interested in the physics-related career of engineering. While girls are just as interested in science class as their male counterparts, they highly value the social aspect that often accompanies hands-on group activities. These findings shed light on how K-12 science reform efforts might help to increase the number of women pursuing careers related to physics.

  10. Career competencies for the modern career

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Marinka; Scheerens, Jaap

    2006-01-01

    Career development gains new meaning in the context of employability demands in a knowledge economy. In this context, increased mobility, a dynamic work environment, and an increased level of career support from employers are seen as characteristics of a modern career. All of these characteristics

  11. Airport Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airports. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers at airports, while the main part of the booklet outlines the following nine job categories: airport director, assistant airport director, engineers, support personnel,…

  12. Airline Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airlines. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers in the airline industry, including salaries, working conditions, job requirements, and projected job opportunities. In the main part of the booklet, the following 22 job…

  13. Career Cartography: From Stories to Science and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deleise S; Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S; Visovatti, Moira; Munro-Kramer, Michelle L; Feetham, Suzanne

    2017-05-01

    To present four case scenarios reflecting the process of research career development using career cartography. Career cartography is a novel approach that enables nurses, from all clinical and academic settings, to actively engage in a process that maximizes their clinical, teaching, research, and policy contributions that can improve patient outcomes and the health of the public. Four early-career nurse researchers applied the career cartography framework to describe their iterative process of research career development. They report the development process of each of the components of career cartography, including destination statement, career map, and policy statement. Despite diverse research interests and career mapping approaches, common experiences emerged from the four nurse researchers. Common lessons learned throughout the career cartography process include: (a) have a supportive mentorship team, (b) start early and reflect regularly, (c) be brief and to the point, (d) keep it simple and avoid jargon, (e) be open to change, (f) make time, and (g) focus on the overall career destination. These four case scenarios support the need for nurse researchers to develop their individual career cartography. Regardless of their background, career cartography can help nurse researchers articulate their meaningful contributions to science, policy, and health of the public. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. Career ladder program for registered nurses in ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Joan; Sassaman, Becky; Phillips, Alison

    2008-01-01

    RN ladder programs are designed to inspire and reward clinical excellence. Kaiser Permanente Colorado's (KPCO) career ladder program emerged as a result of a labor-management partnership. Career ladder point assignments are reflective of the organization's priorities and values. KPCO's career ladder point tool awards RNs for formal and continuing education, professional presentations, organizational experience and experience as an RN, certifications and active professional memberships, leadership activities, research and publications, and nursing-related volunteer work. Participation in the RN career ladder requires that the nurse achieve a self-determined, manager-approved, measurable goal that will improve patient care. Career ladder nurses at KPCO were significantly more involved in leadership and interdisciplinary activities, quality improvement projects, and preceptorship.

  15. Effects of Career and Marriage on Newlywed Individuals' Marital and Career Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Donna M.

    2009-01-01

    Newlywed couples face many challenges in the early years of marriage that can affect their satisfaction with the marital relationship. Research has identified the balance of career and marriage as one of the prominent stressors in newlywed couples lives. However, studies have not explored what is problematic about balancing career and marriage.…

  16. Career Pathways in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Steve; Johnson, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    The revisions to the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 require that career and technical education (CTE) programs provide students with a clear pathway from secondary to postsecondary education, and into high-wage, high-skill and high-demand careers. States nationwide are developing programs, called career pathways, to…

  17. Vocopher: The Career Collaboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Kevin W.; Savickas, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Vocopher: The Career Collaboratory is an Internet-based website (http://www.vocopher.com) that contains free career instruments and educational materials intended for practitioners, researchers, and teachers of career development. The instruments include inventories and tests designed to measure the processes that shape career development and work…

  18. Schoolteachers' Constructions of Desirable Educational Leadership: A Career-Stage Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oplatka, Izhar; Tako, Eitan

    2009-01-01

    The current study aimed at exploring desirable constructions of educational leadership among Israeli schoolteachers at three different career stages, as well as tracing the origins of these constructions. Based on semi-structured interviews with 10 teachers at early-career stage, 10 at mid-career stage and 10 at late-career stage, the study first…

  19. SALT: How two Norwegian Early Career Scientists made a living out of their passion for marine Science and Education, Outreach, and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokkan Iversen, K.; Busch, K. T.

    2011-12-01

    Many Early Career Scientists (ECS) share a heart and mind for engaging in Eduaction, Outreach, and Communication (EOC) activities. They often also experience the same frustration due to the limited resources and financial incentives available to support such important projects. The story of the knowledge-based company SALT is a tale of two Norwegian ECSs with a passion for marine science and EOC living their dream - due to the support of private and public funding sources. SALT is located in the small village Svolvær, in the Lofoten Archipelago in Northern-Norway. This small company delivers services and products within research, outreach and consultancy regarding the marine environment. Situated in the very middle of one of the most productive and unique oceanic areas in the world, SALT has a first-row perspective on blue resources, possibilities and challenges. The SALT vision is to provide marine knowledge to politicians and stakeholders, as well as the general public. EOC-projects are an important and prioritized area of this vision, and SALT has taken a broad approach to set such projects into life. SALT are building commercial projects directed towards the tourist and conference industry, as well as more idealistic projects designed to educate and engage children and youth. The total EOC-portifolio of SALT, is therefore as varied as the mixture of different sources funding them. During the first year in business, SALT has proven that it is possible to get funding for innovative EOC-projects in Norway. With the support of Innovation Norway (IN), The Norwegian Research Council (NRC), The RENATE Centre, The Norwegian Centre for Science Education, Nordland County, The Confederation of Norwegian Enterprise (NHO), and an inspiring hub of creative business partners in Lofoten, SALT has managed to realize several EOC-project within a year. SALT is especially grateful that the national structures have acknowledged the importance of innovative EOC- activities also

  20. How the terms of early life (youth) affect the selection of studies- and career choices : A case study based on interviews of siblings to people affected by disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Maria; Lovekrans, Åsa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study has been to investigate whether people with siblings that have disability have been personally affected when making choices about their studies and careers based on their upbringing with their siblings. The method chosen was qualitative data and consists of six interviews with people who are familiar with the chosen problem area. In conclusion, our results do not show a link between choices of study in relation to the sibling's disabilities. However a link was found betw...

  1. ISIAQ Academy Awards 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazaroff, William W.; Clausen, Geo; Wargocki, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    The 13th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate (Indoor Air 2014) was convened in Hong Kong during the week of 7–12 July 2014. Professor Yuguo Li served as the Conference President. One of many highlights was the presentation of awards from the ISIAQ Academy of Fellows, which...... occurred during the opening plenary session. These awards celebrate high achievements in the indoor air sciences. As described in an earlier editorial (Nazaroff, 2012a), the ISIAQ Academy of Fellows has its origins in the creation of the International Academy of Indoor Air Sciences in 1991. In 2005......, that organization was reconstituted as a part of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate (ISIAQ). The ISIAQ Academy of Fellows is an international, multidisciplinary, scientific, honorific organization established to promote scholarship in the indoor environment and building sciences. The awards...

  2. The translational science training program at NIH: Introducing early career researchers to the science and operation of translation of basic research to medical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, C Taylor; Sittampalam, G Sitta; Wang, Philip Y; Ryan, Philip E

    2017-01-02

    Translational science is an emerging field that holds great promise to accelerate the development of novel medical interventions. As the field grows, so does the demand for highly trained biomedical scientists to fill the positions that are being created. Many graduate and postdoctorate training programs do not provide their trainees with sufficient education to take advantage of this growing employment sector. To help better prepare the trainees at the National Institutes of Health for possible careers in translation, we have created the Translational Science Training Program (TSTP). The TSTP is an intensive 2- to 3-day training program that introduces NIH postdoctoral trainees and graduate students to the science and operation of turning basic research discoveries into a medical therapeutic, device or diagnostic, and also exposes them to the variety of career options in translational science. Through a combination of classroom teaching from practicing experts in the various disciplines of translation and small group interactions with pre-clinical development teams, participants in the TSTP gain knowledge that will aid them in obtaining a career in translational science and building a network to make the transition to the field. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):13-24, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  3. What impact has the NIHR Academic Clinical Fellowship (ACF) scheme had on clinical academic careers in England over the last 10 years? A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Sally; Fenton, James; Harris-Joseph, Helen; Rayton, Leesa; Magee, Caroline; Jones, David; Cotterill, Lisa Ann; Neilson, James

    2017-06-12

    The Academic Clinical Fellowship (ACF) was introduced to support the early career clinical and research training of potential future clinical academics in England. The driver for the model was concern about falling numbers of clinical academic trainees. This study examines the impact of the ACF model, over its first 10 years, in developing clinical academic careers by tracking the progression of ACF trainees. Retrospective analysis of National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) ACF career progression. This was performed using mixed methods including routine data collections of career destination, analysis of application rates to doctoral level fellowships and supplemented by survey information that captured the perceived benefits and challenges from previous ACFs and their current career activities. 1239 NIHR ACFs who completed or left their posts between 2006 and March 2015. ACFs are perceived by the candidate population as attractive posts, with high numbers of applications leading to high fill rates. Balancing clinical and academic commitments is one of the reported challenges when completing an ACF. We have found that undertaking an ACF was shown to increase the likelihood of securing an externally funded doctoral training award and the vast majority of ACFs move into academic roles, with many completing PhDs. Previous ACFs continue to show positive career progression, predominantly in translational and clinical research. The knowledge acquired during the ACF continues to be useful in subsequent roles and trainees would recommend the scheme to others. The NIHR ACF scheme is successful as part of an integrated training pathway in developing careers in academic medicine and dentistry. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. UK businesses bag innovation awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Five UK firms have received innovation awards from the Institute of Physics (IOP), which publishes Physics World. Hallmarq Veterinary Imaging, Metrasens, M Squared Lasers, Silixa and Tracerco have all won an IOP award for developing new innovative products.

  5. Understanding Career Success and Its Contributing Factors for Clinical and Translational Investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgeanna F W B; Schwartz, Lisa S; DiMeglio, Linda A; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Gabrilove, Janice L

    2016-04-01

    To understand the factors that facilitate career success for career development awardees in clinical and translational science and reconceptualize understand ing of career success for this population. In 2013-2014, the authors conducted semistructured interviews with former NIH KL2 or K12 scholars from nine Clinical and Translational Science Award-funded institutions. Participants either had or had not secured independent funding at least two years after the end of their last K award. Questions covered the factors that facilitate or hinder junior investigators' transition to independent funding. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and the transcripts were analyzed thematically. Forty individuals participated, with equal representation by men and women and by independently and not independently funded investigators. Personal factors that facilitated success included networks, persistence and resilience, initiative, autonomy, and personal and professional balance. Organizational factors included appropriate mentorship, protected research time, and institutional resources and support.Even independently funded participants described challenges regarding career direction. Five participants without independent funding modeled a broad spectrum of successful career paths, having assumed leadership positions not reliant on grant funding. Alternative definitions of career success included improving public health, enjoying work, seeing mentees succeed, and receiving external acknowledgment of successes. Awareness of the factors that facilitate or hinder career success can help junior faculty, mentors, and institutional leaders support career development in clinical and translational science. New definitions of career success are needed, as are career paths for faculty who want to engage in research in roles other than principal investigator.

  6. Awards and honours

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS

    2009-01-01

    On the occasion of the international woman day, on 7 March, Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson, was awarded “Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana” by the Italian President for her “scientific knowledge and her excellent management skills demonstrated in guiding the ATLAS project”.

  7. ATLAS Thesis Award 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on 22 February, 2018. They are pictured here with Karl Jakobs (ATLAS Spokesperson), Max Klein (ATLAS Collaboration Board Chair) and Katsuo Tokushuku (ATLAS Collaboration Board Deputy Chair).

  8. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  9. Global Cancer Humanitarian Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat Garcia-Gonzalez of the Max Foundation accepted the first annual NCI Global Cancer Medicine Humanitarian Award for her work in chronic myeloid leukemia at the NCI, Center for Global Health Symposium for Global Cancer Research, held in Boston on March 25, 2015.

  10. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    test

    Methodology. • Tentative schedule of field activities. • Ethical considerations. • Gender implications ... List of courses completed and to be completed in the program. • Confirmation that all your course work will be completed and comprehensive/oral exams passed before the award commences. • Confirmation that you have ...

  11. Research Award: Canadian Partnerships

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  12. International Humanitarian Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The International Humanitarian Award recognizes extraordinary humanitarian services and activism by psychologists, including professional and volunteer work conducted primarily in the field with underserved populations. Award recipients are psychologists who, by their extraordinary service at a difficult time, improve the lives and contribute to the well-being of people in a large or small geographic area anywhere in the world. The 2017 recipient of the APA International Humanitarian Award was selected by the 2016 Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP). The members of the 2016 CIRP were Melissa Morgan Consoli, PhD, and Arpana G. Inman, PhD (Co-chairs); Rehman Abdulrehman, PhD; Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD; Frederic Bemak, EdD; Brigitte Khoury, PhD; Susan Nolan, PhD; Nancy Sidun, PsyD; and Danny Wedding, PhD. Dr. Morgan Consoli, Dr. Inman, Dr. Nolan, and Doctor Sidun were members of the subcommittee for the 2017 award. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Research Award: Climate Change

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic ... relevance of the proposed research to local, national, and/or regional policy debates in at least one of the following regions: Africa, Asia, or Latin America and the.

  14. AFOMP Policy No 5: career progression for clinical medical physicists in AFOMP countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, W H; Stefanoyiannis, A P; Ng, K H; Rodriguez, L V; Thayalan, K; Han, Y; Tang, F; Fukuda, S; Srivastava, R; Krisanachinda, A; Shiau, A C; Deng, X

    2015-06-01

    This policy statement, which is the fifth of a series of documents being prepared by the Asia-Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics Professional Development Committee, gives guidance on how clinical medical physicists' careers should progress from their initial training to career end. It is not intended to be prescriptive as in some AFOMP countries career structures are already essentially defined by employment awards and because such matters will vary considerably from country to country depending on local culture, employment practices and legislation. It is intended to be advisory and set out options for member countries and employers of clinical medical physicists to develop suitable career structures.

  15. Antecedents of Attitudes Towards Risky Career Choices

    OpenAIRE

    Verena Jung; Schmidt, Sascha L.; Benno Torgler

    2012-01-01

    We explore the attitude towards risky career choices of young people in highly competitive environments. We empirically test which factors influence young elite athletes’ tendency towards choosing a high-risk career option over a lower risk one; looking at the attitudes, of close to 1000 soccer players in the German “Bundesliga” professional clubs’ Youth Academies, towards making real-life decisions. Generally, they face the decision early on as to whether or not they should risk quitting sch...

  16. CMS Industries awarded gold, crystal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CMS collaboration honoured 10 of its top suppliers in the seventh annual awards ceremony The representatives of the firms that recieved the CMS Gold and Crystal Awards stand with their awards after the ceremony. The seventh annual CMS Awards ceremony was held on Monday 13 March to recognize the industries that have made substantial contributions to the construction of the collaboration's detector. Nine international firms received Gold Awards, and General Tecnica of Italy received the prestigious Crystal Award. Representatives from the companies attended the ceremony during the plenary session of CMS week. 'The role of CERN, its machines and experiments, beyond particle physics is to push the development of equipment technologies related to high-energy physics,'said CMS Awards Coordinator Domenico Campi. 'All of these industries must go beyond the technologies that are currently available.' Without the involvement of good companies over the years, the construction of the CMS detector wouldn't be possible...

  17. Dentistry: Careers in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Dentistry e-mail Print Share Careers in Dentistry A dental education opens up a world of ... accredited training programs in your area . Careers in Dentistry Be a Dentist General Dentistry Dental Specialties Dental ...

  18. Goodbye Career, Hello Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisar, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Success in today's economy means throwing out the old career rules. The "noncareer" career is driven by passion for the work and has the fluidity and flexibility needed in the contemporary workplace. (JOW)

  19. CareerConnector

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — CareerConnector is USAID's premiere recruiting tool. It is powered by Monster and integrated with www.usajobs.gov. CareerConnector tracks the progression of a...

  20. Gender Differences, Career Aspirations and Career Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study therefore is to explore gender differences in adolescents' career aspirations and career development barriers among secondary school students in Kisumu municipality, Kenya. The study was conducted on 348 form four secondary school students. The major findings of this study show that there ...

  1. Career in Feet-on Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Lee, S.

    2011-12-01

    My career award was for imaging the upper mantle beneath North America. The research proposed was timely because of Earthscope and novel because of the proposed simultaneous inversion of different types of seismic data as well as the inclusion of mineral physics data on the effects of volatiles on seismic properties of the mantle. This research has been challenging and fun and is still on-going. The educational component of my career award consists of feet-on and eyes-open learning of seismology through an educational kiosk and field trips to actual seismic stations. The kiosk and field station have both been growing over the years, as has the audience. I started with the field station in-doors, so it doubled as the kiosk along with a palmtop terminal. Groups of minority elementary school children would look at the mysterious hardware of the "field" station and then jump up and down so they could awe at the peaks in the graph on the palmtop screen that they created. This has evolved into a three-screen kiosk, of which one screen is a touch screen along with a demonstration seismometer. The field station is now in a goat shed near the epicenter of an actual 2010 earthquake inIllinois, which is soon to be replaced by a TA station of Earthscope. The audience has grown to entire grades of middle-school children and activities have evolved from jumping to team-experimentation and the derivation of amplitude-distance relationships following a collaborative curriculum. Addressing the questions in the session description: 1) Education is more fun and effective when one can work in a team with an enthusiastic educator. 2) My education activities are strongly related to my field of expertise but very loosely related to the research carried out with the career award. It appears that not the research outcomes are of interest to students, but instead the simplification and accessibility of the process of research that is of interest. 3) The education component of the career

  2. TuksAthletics Club – Athletics Hall of Fame Special Awards inductees

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to document the outstanding achievements of the TuksAthletics Club Special Award recipients, and to reflect on their career performances which resulted in their induction. As this study was sport-history orientated, the historic method was applied. Preference was thus given to primary sources ...

  3. Daniel Landis: Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the co-recipients of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology. One of the 2012 winners is Daniel Landis for his unparalleled contribution to the field of intercultural research in a distinguished academic career spanning almost…

  4. 76 FR 16741 - Applications for New Awards; Erma Byrd Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... Applications for New Awards; Erma Byrd Scholarship Program AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information Erma Byrd Scholarship Program Notice inviting... Scholarship Program provides scholarships to individuals pursuing a course of study that will lead to a career...

  5. 45 CFR 680.11 - Staff involvement with NSF proposals and awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SCIENCE FOUNDATION NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RULES OF PRACTICE AND STATUTORY CONFLICT-OF-INTEREST... proposals and awards. (a)(1) Many scientists, engineers, and educators interrupt active research and teaching careers to spend a year or two at NSF and then return to research and teaching, usually at the...

  6. Akuginow and Haines-Stiles Receive 2013 Robert C. Cowen Journalism Award: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Richard

    2014-01-01

    From Cosmos to Mars and Pluto and back home, Geoffrey Haines-Stiles and Erna Akuginow have invested their careers reporting the best modern science in novel, compelling, and accessible ways through documentaries, live events, print, and new media. They are outstanding recipients of the AGU Robert C. Cowen Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism.

  7. Paul Voosen Receives 2013 David Perlman Award for Excellence in Science Journalism—News: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voosen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    It is an honor and privilege to accept the David Perlman Award. Though I have never met Dave, he is a legend, and I can only hope to have a reporting career half as distinguished and a third as long as his own.

  8. Hospital-based, Multidisciplinary, youth mentoring and medical exposure program positively influences and reinforces health care career choice: "The Reach One Each One Program early Experience".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Omar K; Lokko, Carl; Mobley, Felicia; Dansby, Montreka; Maze, Michael; Bradley, Brene'; Williams, Elizabeth; Matthews, Leslie Ray; Harrington, Emma; Mack, Lisa; Clark, Clarence; Wilson, Ken; Beech, Derrick; Heron, Sheryl; Childs, Ed

    2017-04-01

    According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, underrepresented minorities (URMs) are more likely to leave science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields at higher rates than their peers during undergraduate studies. Many institutions of higher learning have implemented pipeline programs aimed at preparing and inspiring high school and college aged students in select careers in health sciences with varying levels of success. Research has shown that a health care workforce that mirrors the community they serve is more effective in reducing health disparities and increasing positive health outcomes. We hypothesize that a hospital-based, multidisciplinary youth mentoring and medical exposure program will enhance the decision of URM high school students to choose healthcare careers. A retrospective analysis of the Reach One Each One Program (ROEO) was performed. ROEO is a hospital based, 11-week multidisciplinary youth mentoring and medical exposure program for inner-city high school students. The analysis was based on a phone survey of the twenty-six (26) seniors who completed the program and subsequently graduated from high school between May 2013 and May 2015 to assess the following: 1) College enrollment/attendance, 2) Health profession majors, and 3) Pre-med status. The study was approved by the Morehouse School of Medicine Institutional Review Board. Of the twenty-six students, 23 were female and 3 were male; 25 (96%) of the students were African American and one student was a Caucasian female. Twenty-four (92.3%) of the students were enrolled in college and 2 (7.7%) were scheduled to begin in the spring semester of 2016. Twenty-one of the 24 attending college at the time of the survey (87.5%) were enrolled in a health science degree program and 16 (66.7%) confirmed that they were enrolled in pre-medical (Pre-med) curriculum. Hospital-based, multidisciplinary medical mentoring programs can have a positive impact on the lives and

  9. Psychological career resources, career adaptability and work engagement of generational cohorts in the media industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The global skills crisis coupled with the aging workforce, rapid technological advances and changing nature of work have infringed various challenges upon organisations and employees. Media organisations in particular are affected by these trends, with retention further at risk because of the specialised and scarce skills sought and the versatility and ambiguity inherent in the nature of careers within the media industry, therefore resulting in engagement and skills retention being high on the agenda.Research purpose: The aim of the study was to explore whether employees’ age, psychological career resources and career adaptability significantly predict their work engagement and whether generational cohorts differ significantly regarding these variables.Motivation for the study: Within a retention context, it is important to gain insight into the employees’ personal career-related capabilities and dispositions as these are deemed important for driving career development and engagement levels, which, in turn, impact on the retention of talent.Research design, approach and method: A stratified random sample (N = 248 of predominantly female (63.3% and black African people (54% within their early career stages (80% < 45 years was used. A cross-sectional, quantitative research design approach was followed. Stepwise regression analyses and tests for significant mean differences were performed.Main findings: The results indicated generational cohort (age, career confidence (career adaptability and career harmonisers (psychological career resources as significant predictors of work engagement. The Generation Y individuals had higher levels of psychological career resources (career preferences, career values and career drivers, while the Generation X individuals had higher career curiosity. The Baby Boomers showed higher levels of work engagement.Practical and managerial implications: Psycho-social career meta-capacities positively

  10. The Dual Career Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtin, Lee

    1980-01-01

    The dual career couple is forced to make a series of choices and compromises that impact the realms of marriage and career. The dilemmas that confront dual career marriages can be overcome only by compromise, accommodation, and mutual understanding on the part of the individuals involved. A revamping of human resources and recruitment programs is…

  11. Awards and honours

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    President of the Italian Republic, Giorgio Napolitano, presenting Fabiola Gianotti with her award on 7 March.On the occasion of International Woman’s Day on 7 March, Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson, was awarded "Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana" by the Italian President for her "scientific knowledge and her excellent management skills demonstrated in guiding the ATLAS project". Gianotti received the honorary title also for "her contribution to the prestige of the Italian scientific community in the field of nuclear physics." Further reading (in Italian only): http://www.quirinale.it/Comunicati/Comunicato.asp?id=38192 An article about the beginning of Gianotti’s term of office as ATLAS spokesperson is available from the latest issue of the CERN Courier: http://cerncourier.com/cws/article/cern/38709

  12. CMS Thesis Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 CMS thesis award was presented to Riccardo Ranieri on 15 March for his Ph.D. thesis "Trigger Selection of WH → μ ν b bbar with CMS" where 'WH → μ ν b bbar' represents the associated production of the W boson and the Higgs boson and their subsequent decays. Riccardo received his Ph.D. from the University of Florence and was supervised by Carlo Civinini. In total nine thesis were nominated for the award, which was judged on originality, impact within the field of high energy physics, impact within CMS and clarity of writing. Gregory Snow, secretary of the awarding committee, explains why Riccardo's thesis was chosen, ‘‘The search for the Higgs boson is one of the main physics goals of CMS. Riccardo's thesis helps the experiment to formulate the strategy which will be used in that search.'' Lorenzo Foà, Chairperson of the CMS Collaboration Board, presented Riccardo with an commemorative engraved plaque. He will also receive the opportunity to...

  13. The Academy for Future Science Faculty: randomized controlled trial of theory-driven coaching to shape development and diversity of early-career scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakore, Bhoomi K; Naffziger-Hirsch, Michelle E; Richardson, Jennifer L; Williams, Simon N; McGee, Richard

    2014-08-02

    Approaches to training biomedical scientists have created a talented research community. However, they have failed to create a professional workforce that includes many racial and ethnic minorities and women in proportion to their representation in the population or in PhD training. This is particularly true at the faculty level. Explanations for the absence of diversity in faculty ranks can be found in social science theories that reveal processes by which individuals develop identities, experiences, and skills required to be seen as legitimate within the profession. Using the social science theories of Communities of Practice, Social Cognitive Career Theory, identity formation, and cultural capital, we have developed and are testing a novel coaching-based model to address some of the limitations of previous diversity approaches. This coaching intervention (The Academy for Future Science Faculty) includes annual in-person meetings of students and trained faculty Career Coaches, along with ongoing virtual coaching, group meetings and communication. The model is being tested as a randomized controlled trial with two cohorts of biomedical PhD students from across the U.S., one recruited at the start of their PhDs and one nearing completion. Stratification into the experimental and control groups, and to coaching groups within the experimental arms, achieved equal numbers of students by race, ethnicity and gender to the extent possible. A fundamental design element of the Academy is to teach and make visible the social science principles which highly influence scientific advancement, as well as acknowledging the extra challenges faced by underrepresented groups working to be seen as legitimate within the scientific communities. The strategy being tested is based upon a novel application of the well-established principles of deploying highly skilled coaches, selected and trained for their ability to develop talents of others. This coaching model is intended to be a

  14. 31 CFR 20.605 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Award. 20.605 Section 20.605 Money...-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.605 Award. Award means an award of financial... award includes: (1) A Federal grant or cooperative agreement, in the form of money or property in lieu...

  15. Outlining a typology of sports coaching careers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to extend our understanding of sports coaching careers and challenge related stage-based models by outlining and describing a typology of careers in high-performance sports coaching. A constructivist research approach is applied that intends to gain insight into the realities...... of coaches’ careers.Datawere drawn fromin-depth interviews with 10 Danish high-performance sports coaches. Results identified four classifying features that pave the way for the establishment of a typology consisting of three ideal types: (1) the elite-athlete coach; (2) the academic coach; and (3) the early......-starter coach. The findings are theorized throughWenger’s concept of paradigmatic pathways and Bourdieu’s concept of cultural capital. The study illuminates paradigmatic trajectories and conversions of cultural capital in high-performance sports coaching careers that may act as models for young athletes...

  16. 1993 architectural design awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The 10th annual architectural design awards sponsored by Contemporary Long Term Care salute nursing homes and retirement communities that combine a flair for innovative living environments with a sensitivity to the needs of aging residents. These facilities represent the very best in elderly housing that prolongs independence while enhancing efficient operation. The 1993 winners are: King Health Center, U.S. Soldiers' and Airmen's Home, Washington, DC; The Terrace of Los Gatos, Los Gatos, CA; Walker Elder Suites, Edina, MN; The Jefferson, Ballston, VA; The Forum at Rancho San Antonio, Cupertino, CA.

  17. Award for Steve Myers

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Last Thursday Steve Myers, Leader of the Accelerator and Beams Division, received one of the UK Institute of Physics awards. He is the recipient of the 2003 Duddel Medal and Prize for his contributions to the development of major charged-particle accelerator projects at CERN. As head of the commissioning group for the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider, says the citation, his contributions have had «a direct impact on the results from LEP, which have reached a precision and extent far beyond expectation and are key in defining the Standard Model of particle physics».

  18. The whole is more than the sum of its parts: Added value from a Graduate School as a structuring element within the wider field of early and pre-career support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanfland, Claudia; Sprengel, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Structured postgraduate programs are a relatively new feature at German Higher Educational Institutions, mainly fostered in the 90ies by the funding programs of the German Science Foundation (Research Training Groups) and the Max-Planck-Association (International Max Planck Research Schools). Since then, funding opportunities for postgraduate programs have equally been set up by the Helmholtz and Leibniz Associations as well as the Excellence Initiative. Today, doctoral candidates can chose from a wide range of training programs to earn a doctoral degree within a structured framework under excellent research conditions. In consequence, the percentage of PhD students in natural sciences that follow a PhD within a structured program has been continuously increasing. Graduate Schools provide a roof under which different curricula can be accommodated. They offer a comprehensive training program, foster interdisciplinary thinking and are a key instrument for quality assurance by providing rules relevant and equal to all doctoral candidates regardless of funding or affiliation. With more and more Graduate Schools becoming a permanent feature in the training of doctoral candidates, universities and research institutions are provided with a tool to create added value for the whole range of early career scientists and beyond. The Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) is currently developing a comprehensive strategy for early and pre-career support with the aim to provide a continuous support chain from high school students to Postdocs. Included are also the apprentices that get a vocational training at AWI as laboratory assistants, office clerks or qualified IT specialists. AWI aims at establishing a solid training network between these groups (apprentices, high school students, Bc and Ms students, internships, doctoral candidates, and Postdocs) across biographic borders. This network serves more than the classical transition phases from high school

  19. Predicting change over time in career planning and career exploration for high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, Peter A; Patton, Wendy; Prideaux, Lee-Ann

    2007-06-01

    This study assessed 166 high school students in Grade 8 and again in Grade 10. Four models were tested: (a) whether the T1 predictor variables (career knowledge, indecision, decision-making self efficacy, self-esteem, demographics) predicted the outcome variable (career planning/exploration) at T1; (b) whether the T1 predictor variables predicted the outcome variable at T2; (c) whether the T1 predictor variables predicted change in the outcome variable from T1-T2; and (d) whether changes in the predictor variables from T1-T2 predicted change in the outcome variable from T1-T2. Strong associations (R(2)=34%) were identified for the T1 analysis (confidence, ability and paid work experience were positively associated with career planning/exploration). T1 variables were less useful predictors of career planning/exploration at T2 (R(2)=9%; having more confidence at T1 was associated with more career planning/exploration at T2) and change in career planning/exploration from T1-T2 (R(2)=11%; less confidence and no work experience were associated with change in career planning/exploration from T1-T2). When testing effect of changes in predictor variables predicting changes in outcome variable (R(2)=22%), three important predictors, indecision, work experience and confidence, were identified. Overall, results indicated important roles for self-efficacy and early work experiences in current and future career planning/exploration of high school students.

  20. Table Summarizing Awards Supported by Fellowships and Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Liliane Castets-Poupart

    developing country university. Support is for doctoral research awards, full study degrees, post-doc fellowships, internships and sabbaticals in sub-Saharan. Africa, Asia and Latin. America and the Caribbean. Variable. Managed by various developing country institutions. Variable. Fellowships · http://www.idrc.ca/awards.

  1. NSF-CAREER outreach at the K-6 level through Project Excite, Center for Talent Development, School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, S. D.; Cockrell, K.

    2011-12-01

    Many scientists can attribute their careers to some kind of impressionable exposure to experimentation and research at an early age. However, children across the country receive varying levels of exposure to professional scientists depending upon local resources and socioeconomic composition. Outreach goals under this NSF-CAREER award are predicated on the idea that children can develop a life-long interest in science and mathematics at a very early age. The PI has focused on geoscience education to local K-6 students who might not otherwise get exposure to the field at a critical stage of their intellectual development. Working with educators at Northwestern's Center for Talent Development, the PI leads Earth science modules in Project Excite, a longitudinal program that recruits minority third-grade students from local elementary schools for a six-year program involving regular visits to the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. The primary goal is to boost minority enrollment in advanced placement courses in science and mathematics at Evanston Township High School. Hands-on demonstration modules have been developed on Mars rovers, renewable energy, as well as rock and mineral identification. Research under this CAREER award examines the role of silicate minerals in Earth's deep water cycle from atomic to geophysical scales. Under laboratory-simulated mantle conditions of 400-700 km depth, high-pressure minerals can incorporate a remarkable amount of water into their structures, resulting in modified physical properties. Experimental studies focus on determining hydration mechanisms at the atomic scale, and understanding the influence of hydration on the behavior of Earth materials at high pressures. Results will provide geophysical indicators of mantle hydration and facilitate detection of potential deep-mantle reservoirs of water remotely using seismic waves.

  2. Pierre Darriulat is awarded the André Lagarrigue Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Pierre Darriulat at the VATLY Laboratory in Hanoï. Former CERN Research Director, Pierre Darriulat, who is now Professor of Physics at VATLY in Hanoi (Vietnam), has won the 2008 André Lagarrigue Prize. This prize, instituted by the Linear Accelerator Laboratory (LAL) at Orsay under the aegis of the French Physical Society, is awarded to front-line researchers who have had responsibility for machine/detector construction and derived maximum scientific benefit from such projects, performed in a French laboratory or in close collaboration with French groups. Pierre Darriulat has received the award in recognition of his outstanding career at the CEA, at LBL (Berkeley) and at CERN from 1964 onwards. At CERN he managed the experiments at the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) before taking charge of the UA2 collaboration from 1980 to 1986, which participated in decisive discoveries at the ppbar collider. In particular, in 1982, the UA2 experiment began observing high trans...

  3. Research With Considerations of Use: Problem-Driven Research and Attempts to Improve Public Policy and Practice Huff Vollmer Award

    OpenAIRE

    Huff, CR

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Society of Criminology. The August Vollmer Award Address is intended to focus on contributions to justice and the recipient's research and policy experiences. This is a story of one person's career focusing mainly on research with "considerations of use." After receiving a formal education in psychology, social work, and sociology, as well as experience as a practitioner, the author's academic career has primarily focused on the link between research and criminal justice polic...

  4. Psychological determinants of career development in a changing labour market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this dissertation in four studies psychological factors are investigated that may affect the development of careers of employees. On the one hand, it was found that experiences of people in early childhood might affect their career. People may differ in their attachment styles with the

  5. Fundamentos Basicos de Career Education. Monografia en Career Education. [Basic Fundamentals of Career Education. Monograph in Career Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This document is the Spanish translation of ED 145 222, A Primer for Career Education. In this monograph, a view of the basic nature of the career education effort is discussed under the following topics: the basis of need for career education; the meaning and goals of career education; the difference between career education and vocational…

  6. Research Award: Governance and Justice

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    2015-08-06

    Research Award: Governance and Justice. Deadline: August 6, 2015. Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and ...

  7. Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before a grant can be awarded and accepted, several pre-award activities must happen to formalize the partnership. Ensuring compliance with federal laws, a review of costs and a negotiation of the appropriate funding level must all happen in order to rece

  8. Building careers, managing capitals

    OpenAIRE

    Flynn, Emma

    2015-01-01

    I sought to find out whether this was a tension between artistic and commercial in the career of visual artists, and if so, how this tension was managed. In attempting to uncover information which could address the research question I undertook in-depth career history interviews with artists which covered their time at art school through to their current practice. The career history method was deliberately chosen in order to address the research question at a tangent as both th...

  9. Career guidance in communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie

    from a critical psychological standpoint the paper introduces a social practice theory of career guidance. The social practice theory of career guidance argues that career guidance can be seen as a collective practice in which people can join forces with career guidance practitioners to analyse...... their situation and based on these insights create new opportunities in relation to their future educational or vocational participation in society (Thomsen 2012). From this idea, the second part of the paper the paper moves on to consider the practical implications of taking the collective as the starting point...

  10. The last SPR dinner awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce

    1992-03-01

    Because the Solar-Planetary Relationships section of AGU has officially changed its name to Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA), the December 10, 1991, section dinner award ceremony at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco was the last of the series. Presumably an SPA dinner award series will be started under President-elect Andy Nagy.We have followed our tradition of recognizing the special talents of section members at the annual dinner. This year we had eight awardees. These awards are given in fun and are intended to be humorous. The selection committee defining the awards (the awards are changed regularly to keep people from trying to win one) and selecting the awardees will have to remain anonymous. (The committee is similar to Skull and Bones, but we are politically correct in that we allow women as members.)

  11. Robert Aymar awarded the Légion d’honneur

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

      On 24 May, Robert Aymar, CERN Director-General from 2004 to 2008, was awarded the Légion d’honneur by the French authorities in recognition of his outstanding scientific career. A renowned French physicist, he was Director of the superconducting tokamak Tore Supra from 1977 to 1988, Director of Material Sciences at the CEA in 1990 and Director of the ITER project in 1994. His term of office as CERN Director-General was marked in particular by the commissioning and start-up of the LHC machine, which he inaugurated on 21 October 2008.        

  12. [Career counselling and choice of speciality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillevang, G.; Ringsted, C.

    2008-01-01

    Career counselling is meant to support and ensure an early and relevant choice of specialty. Self-awareness regarding personality, life goals, wishes for family life, and lifestyle is of help in narrowing down the number of specialties to those that fit personal attitudes and preferences. The cou......Career counselling is meant to support and ensure an early and relevant choice of specialty. Self-awareness regarding personality, life goals, wishes for family life, and lifestyle is of help in narrowing down the number of specialties to those that fit personal attitudes and preferences....... The counsellor must be aware that the trainees' subjective opinions about the specialties may not be in line with the actual conditions. Hence, career counselling should provide factual knowledge about the specialties including information on the working conditions and defining characteristics of the specialties...

  13. Early Onset of Type 1 Diabetes and Educational Field at Upper Secondary and University Level: Is Own Experience an Asset for a Health Care Career?

    OpenAIRE

    Ida Lovén; Katarina Steen Carlsson

    2017-01-01

    Ill health in early life has a significant negative impact on school grades, grade repetition, educational level, and labor market outcomes. However, less is known about qualitative socio-economic consequences of a health shock in childhood or adolescence. We investigate the relationship between onset of type 1 diabetes up to age 15 and the probability of choosing and completing a health-oriented path at upper secondary and university level of education. We analyze the Swedish Childhood Diabe...

  14. Careers and people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Nanopioneer honoured Massachusetts Institute of Technology nanophysicist Mildred Dresselhaus has won the 2009 Vannevar Bush Award. The award is given each year by the US National Science Board and honours activities in science and technology that have made an outstanding "contribution toward the welfare of mankind and the nation". Dresselhaus' research on carbon nanostructures produced breakthroughs in the fields of thermoelectricity and superconductivity, and her efforts in mentoring young researchers (particularly women) have been recognized in numerous awards and 25 honorary doctorates from universities around the world.

  15. Parental Attitudes toward Preschoolers' Career Education: A Mixed-Method Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Dan, Orly

    2010-01-01

    This mixed-method study examined a neglected area in career education: parents' attitudes toward the relevance of early career development, parents' attitudes toward the implementation of career education in preschools (including preferred subjects to be included in curricula), and the contribution of gender, socioeconomic status (SES), and…

  16. Mediating effect of self-esteem on the career selfmanagement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examines the mediating effect of general selfesteem on the link between the career self-management and career resilience of a non-probability sample of 304 early-career employees in the business management field. A cross-sectional quantitative survey design was followed, collecting primary data.

  17. Testing Times: Careers Market Policies and Practices in England and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Deirdre; Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka

    2015-01-01

    Careers work is a very political business. Since the early 1990s, successive governments in England and the Netherlands have persistently challenged those working in the careers sector to demonstrate the educational, social and economic value and impact of their work. In this context, the marketisation of career guidance policies and practices has…

  18. Today's Physicians Seek Career Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Haker, Veronica R.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the role of the physician in today's society have made their career choices risky. Career specialists have an opportunity to assist those who do not normally seek career advice outside their own profession. (JOW)

  19. AID awards 3-year Guatemala contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The US Agency for International Development (USAID) has awarded a 3-year US$593,036 grant to the Los Angeles firm of Juarez and Associates, Inc. to help implement a contraceptive social marketing project in Guatemala. The firm will provide marketing assistance to the for-profit organization. Importadora de Productos Farmaceuticos (PROFA), an offshoot of the nonprofit International Planned Parenthood Federation affiliate, Asociacion Pro-Bienestar de la Familia de Guatemala (APROFAM), created specifically to conduct the social marketing project. Juarez and Associates has previous market research experience in family planning in Guatemala. Contraceptive social marketing sales are projected to begin in early 1985.

  20. Through the eyes of children: Exploring Grade 7 career aspirations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Robinson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The shift in recent years towards the lifespan concept of career development, which views career behaviour as occurring in stages beginning in childhood and continuing throughout life, has meant that it has become increasingly important to assist learners in fulfilling their career goals. There is, however, a scarcity of research on the career aspirations of primary school learners, especially those from low socio-economic backgrounds. Aim: This article describes research conducted on the career aspirations of Grade 7 learners at a community school. Setting: The study is set within an interpretivist paradigm and utilises a generic qualitative research design. Methods: The study involved a purposefully selected group of Grade 7 learners from a local community school. As part of the study, each learner completed a collage and sociogram, and took part in a group interview. Results: Themes that emerged from the data analysis were: career aspirations that seek to fulfil hopes and dreams, the role of the family in shaping career aspirations and counting the ‘cost’ of career aspirations. Conclusion: The results of the study indicated that there is a need to explore learners’ career aspirations from an early age in order to expose them to various career choices in the constantly changing world of work.

  1. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  2. Awards and Honours

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Graphene collects the Nobel prize   Nobel Prize winners Andre Geim (left) and Konstantin Novoselov (right). © Sergeom, Wikimedia Commons, and University of Manchester, UK. The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2010 has been awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, both from the University of Manchester, for their “groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene”. Graphene has exceptional properties that have made it a micro-laboratory for quantum physics. Not only is graphene the thinnest material ever made, it is also the strongest, as well as being an excellent conductor and almost completely transparent. At a time when many researchers believed that it was impossible for such thin materials to be stable, Geim and Novoselov extracted graphene from a piece of graphite using only normal adhesive tape. Novoselov, 36, first worked with Andre Geim, 51, as a PhD student in the Netherlands. He subsequentl...

  3. Real Estate Career Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Robert; Gardner, Gene

    Designed to provide basic information on the major entry-level career fields in real estate, this document can be used as a reference manual for counselors and instructors. The manual contains general information about the following real estate careers: salesperson, sales manager, broker, land developer, property manager, appraiser, mortgage loan…

  4. Health Inequality and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Structural explanations of career choice and development are well established. Socioeconomic inequality represents a powerful factor shaping career trajectories and economic outcomes achieved by individuals. However, a robust and growing body of evidence demonstrates a strong link between socioeconomic inequality and health outcomes. Work is a key…

  5. Careers in Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Mort; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A career in the broadcasting, recording, or film industries is attractive to many people, partly because of the glamour that tends to be identified with these fields. Several of the best known careers, completely behind the scenes or only partly in the spotlight but also interesting and challenging, are described. (Editor/RK)

  6. Security careers skills, compensation, and career paths

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    The third edition of Security Careers is the authoritative reference for current job descriptions and pay practices of security, compliance, ethics, environmental, health and safety occupations. The job descriptions and compensation ranges in this report are drawn from research from the Foushée Group, which has been conducting this research since 1980. Security Careers includes more than 75 job descriptions for security-related positions, which range from the entry-level security guard to the top global corporate executive. It also provides four years of compensation trend data to give a th

  7. Athletes’ careers across cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia

    This symposium will introduce a project developed under the auspices of the International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) in an effort to inspire and support the development of culturally sensitive theoretical frameworks and research methodologies in career studies and career assistance services...... in this symposium continue the initiated dialogue of the relevance of culture and cultural issues in their analyses of how social and cultural discourses shape career development and career transitions of athletes in different countries. Opening the foundations of sport psychological knowledge to culturally diverse...... and, perhaps, unfamiliar intellectual traditions, perspectives and concerns, the symposium will demonstrate how local knowledge of problems enables researchers and practitioners to better understand the dynamics of cultural diversity within the topic of athlete career development and assistance....

  8. Career Path Descriptions

    CERN Document Server

    Charkiewicz, A

    2000-01-01

    Before the Career Path system, jobs were classified according to grades with general statutory definitions, guided by the "Job Catalogue" which defined 6 evaluation criteria with example illustrations in the form of "typical" job descriptions. Career Paths were given concise statutory definitions necessitating a method of description and evaluation adapted to their new wider-band salary concept. Evaluations were derived from the same 6 criteria but the typical descriptions became unusable. In 1999, a sub-group of the Standing Concertation Committee proposed a new guide for describing Career Paths, adapted to their wider career concept by expanding the 6 evaluation criteria into 9. For each criterion several levels were established tracing the expected evolution of job level profiles and personal competencies over their longer salary ranges. While providing more transparency to supervisors and staff, the Guide's official use would be by services responsible for vacancy notices, Career Path evaluations and rela...

  9. Early Onset of Type 1 Diabetes and Educational Field at Upper Secondary and University Level: Is Own Experience an Asset for a Health Care Career?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Lovén

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ill health in early life has a significant negative impact on school grades, grade repetition, educational level, and labor market outcomes. However, less is known about qualitative socio-economic consequences of a health shock in childhood or adolescence. We investigate the relationship between onset of type 1 diabetes up to age 15 and the probability of choosing and completing a health-oriented path at upper secondary and university level of education. We analyze the Swedish Childhood Diabetes Register, the National Educational Register, and other population registers in Sweden for 2756 people with type 1 diabetes and 10,020 matched population controls. Educational decisions are modeled as unsorted series of binary choices to assess the choice of educational field as a potential mechanism linking early life health to adult outcomes. The analyses reject the hypothesis of no systematic differences in choice of educational field between people with and without type 1 diabetes at both levels. The results are robust to selection on ability proxies and across sensitivity analysis. We conclude that the observed pro health-oriented educational choices among people with type 1 diabetes in our data are consistent with disease onset in childhood and adolescence having qualitative impact on life-course choices.

  10. Early Onset of Type 1 Diabetes and Educational Field at Upper Secondary and University Level: Is Own Experience an Asset for a Health Care Career?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovén, Ida; Steen Carlsson, Katarina

    2017-06-30

    Ill health in early life has a significant negative impact on school grades, grade repetition, educational level, and labor market outcomes. However, less is known about qualitative socio-economic consequences of a health shock in childhood or adolescence. We investigate the relationship between onset of type 1 diabetes up to age 15 and the probability of choosing and completing a health-oriented path at upper secondary and university level of education. We analyze the Swedish Childhood Diabetes Register, the National Educational Register, and other population registers in Sweden for 2756 people with type 1 diabetes and 10,020 matched population controls. Educational decisions are modeled as unsorted series of binary choices to assess the choice of educational field as a potential mechanism linking early life health to adult outcomes. The analyses reject the hypothesis of no systematic differences in choice of educational field between people with and without type 1 diabetes at both levels. The results are robust to selection on ability proxies and across sensitivity analysis. We conclude that the observed pro health-oriented educational choices among people with type 1 diabetes in our data are consistent with disease onset in childhood and adolescence having qualitative impact on life-course choices.

  11. Recognizing mid-career productivity: the 2008 Retrovirology Prize, call for nomination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent analysis suggested a narrow age range for productivity of innovative work by researchers. The Retrovirology Prize seeks to recognize the research of a mid-career retrovirologist between the ages of 45 and 60. The 2007 Retrovirology Prize was awarded to Dr. Karen Beemon. Nominations are being solicited for the 2008 prize.

  12. Reflections on a career in neurosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Heimburger, Robert F.; Heimburger, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Robert Heimburger recounts his career in neurosurgery, including some of the early years of modern neurosurgery and some of the contributions he made, particularly in the areas of early repair of myelomeningocele and spinal cord tethering, high-intensity focused ultrasound for the brain, stereotactic surgery, washing hair and scalps instead of shaving for cranial surgery, and neurosurgical consultation in Asian countries. Now aged 96, he continues to have a keen mind and thorough commitment t...

  13. 32 CFR 22.610 - Award instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Award instruments. 22.610 Section 22.610 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-AWARD AND ADMINISTRATION Award § 22.610 Award instruments. (a) Each...

  14. Engineering and Scientific Training Schemes, Including Industrial Awards for Degree Courses for Those Leaving School in 1972 and 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Joan, Ed.

    This revised edition of a 1955 publication is designed to help those who have chosen careers in engineering or science, and in particular, those who wish to pursue their technical training in some association with industry on leaving school. The introduction discusses: changes in this edition; trends in sandwich training; industrial awards; how to…

  15. A Career Ladder's Effect on Teacher Career and Work Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ann Weaver

    1987-01-01

    A career ladder affecting the work structure and career opportunities of teachers was studied to determine effects on teacher attitudes. Responses of 389 elementary through high school teachers to career ladder work efforts, work of schools, peer supervision, and career growth opportunities and stability were affected by the design. (TJH)

  16. Social Cognitive Career Theory and Middle School Student Career Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickinger, Pamela H.

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of social cognitive career theory, social cognitive career variables, demographic variables, and the contextual variable, parent support, were examined to determine their predictive value for eighth-grade students' career exploration behavior. Results suggest that the social cognitive career variable, intentions/goals,…

  17. Climate Leadership Awards and Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    The seventh annual Climate Leadership Awards Dinner will be held during the 2018 Climate Leadership Conference; the event publicly recognize individuals and organizations for their outstanding leadership in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. Climate Leadership Awards Frequent Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides answers to frequently asked questions regarding the Climate Leadership Awards, sponsored by EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership with co-sponsorship from the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions and The Climate Registry.

  19. 2002 Institute of Physics awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The IOP Rutherford Medal and prize was awarded to P Dornan, W Venus and D Plane for their major contributions to the detectors and leadership of the LEP, ALEPH, OPAL and DELPHI experiments (4 paragraphs).

  20. Plascore receives awards from CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Plascore recently was awarded two honors from CERN, European High Energy Physics Lab, for its involvement in the manufacture of Thermoplastic Honeycomb panels for their large superconducting super collider (1/2 page).

  1. Institute of Physics Awards 2002

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    The IOP Physics Awards for 2002 include: Prof. M Lockwood, Univ. Southhampton and Rutherford Laboratory, Charles Chree Medal and Prize; Dr. S Myers, CERN, Duddell Medal and Prize; Dr S Langridge, Rutherford Laboratory, Charles Vernon Boys Medal and Prize.

  2. The physics of an academic career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Merry L; de Castro Brás, Lisandra E

    2017-12-01

    We adopted well-known physics equations to illustrate concepts for developing a successful academic career plan. Formulas for distance, force, momentum, and power are used to explain how to define goals and set a pace that maximizes success potential. Formulas for synergy, balance, and stress are used to highlight common obstacles encountered by both junior (untenured and early career) and established faculty and provide ways to circumvent or limit damage from setbacks. Combined, these formulas provide tips for thriving in an academic environment.

  3. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J. McPhee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013. Candidates were chosen by the Editor-in-Chief and selected editorial board members from among all the papers published in 2009.

  4. Faculty career flexibility: Why we need it and how best to achieve it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Kate

    2010-02-01

    Research conducted over the last decade provides compelling evidence that higher education institutions have a strong business case for providing flexibility for their tenure-track and tenured faculty. Flexibility constitutes an effective tool for recruiting and retaining talented faculty. Career flexibility is especially critical to retaining some of the most qualified female PhDs in academic science, engineering, and mathematics. Acquiring the best talent is essential to an institution's ability to achieve excellence and maintain its competitive advantage in a global environment. In an effort to increase the flexibility of faculty careers, the American Council on Education partnered with the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to create the Award for Faculty Career Flexibility. This presentation will address the origins of the award and share findings from the awards process. Fairly simple and cost effective strategies have been successful in accelerating the cultural change necessary to increase the flexibility of faculty careers. This presentation shares these strategies in addition to information about the types of policies and practices being adopted to support faculty work-life balance through career flexibility. )

  5. Outstanding student paper awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hydrology Section presented five outstanding student paper awards at the 1999 Spring Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, last June.Maneesha Joshi presented a poster titled “Estimation of the Extent and Duration of Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet using an Edge Detection Technique on Passive Microwave Data.” She received her B.Tech. in civil engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay in 1991, and a M.S. in environmental engineering from State University of New York, Buffalo in 1994. Maneesha expects to complete her Ph.D. in civil engineering (remote sensing) in September 1999, under the supervision of Carolyn Merry (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering & Geodetic Science), Ken Jezek, and John Bolzan (Byrd Polar Research Center) at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Her thesis focuses on estimating the extent of melt, melt season, and duration, and absorbed radiation on the Greenland ice sheet from passive microwave and SAR data. Maneesha's other interests include image processing, issues related to global climate change, and photogrammetry.

  6. CERN apprentice receives award

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Another CERN apprentice has received an award for the quality of his work. Stéphane Küng (centre), at the UIG ceremony last November, presided over by Geneva State Councillor Pierre-François Unger, Head of the Department of Economics and Health. Electronics technician Stéphane Küng was honoured in November by the Social Foundation of the Union Industrielle Genevoise (UIG) as one of Geneva’s eight best apprentices in the field of mechatronics. The 20-year-old Genevan obtained his Federal apprentice’s certificate (Certificat fédéral de capacité - CFC) in June 2007, achieving excellent marks in his written tests at the Centre d’Enseignement Professionnel Technique et Artisanal (CEPTA). Like more than 200 youngsters before him, Stéphane Küng spent part of his four-year sandwich course working at CERN, where he followed many practical training courses and gained valuable hands-on experience in various technical groups and labs. "It’ always very gr...

  7. Career Exploration among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Ghosh, Arpita; Chang, Wen-hsin; Figueiredo, Catia; Bachhuber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    College is a significant time for undergraduates to declare majors and choose career paths. For many undergraduates, choosing both a major and a career path is challenging. Research shows that many universities deliver career interventions through dedicated career decision-making courses (Mead & Korschgen, 1994). However, there has been…

  8. Exploring Writing Careers in Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincinnati Public Schools, OH.

    The career exploration program for grades 9 through 10, as part of a comprehensive K through 10 career development program, attempts to develop an awareness of and appreciation for work, extend knowledge of the variety of career opportunities, and provide experiences in career areas of individual interest. The document, a collection of materials…

  9. Michael E. Lamb: Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The APA Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology is presented to a person who, in the opinion of the Committee on Scientific Awards, has made distinguished theoretical or empirical advances leading to the understanding or amelioration of important practical problems. The 2015 recipient is Michael E. Lamb, who "has significantly advanced understanding of the developmental and contextual factors affecting the delivery and impact of child care in the early years of life; the role of parent-child relationships in development; and the cognitive, emotional, and social factors affecting the quality of children's testimony, especially in cases of sexual and physical abuse." award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Unique post-doctoral positions in Master of Arts in Teaching Earth Science program at the American Museum of Natural History: Involving early-career research scientists in Earth science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, K. E.; Nadeau, P. A.; Zirakparvar, N. A.; Grcevich, J.; Ustunisik, G. K.

    2012-12-01

    Post-doctoral positions in Earth science fields traditionally emphasize research within a university setting or research institute. Such positions may include a teaching component, but one which is often restricted to introductory undergraduate Earth science courses or upper-level courses within their own field of specialization. With such a specific focus, there may not be much inclination on the part of a post-doctoral fellow to involve themselves in broader education programs, such as public outreach or secondary schools. The American Museum of Natural History is now conducting a non-traditional post-doctoral position as part of its new Master of Arts in Teaching Earth Science (MAT). This pilot program involves forging a one-of-a-kind partnership between a world-class research museum and high-needs schools in New York City with the goal of addressing a critical shortage of qualified Earth Science teachers in New York State, particularly in high-needs schools with diverse populations. The program, which is part of the state's Race to the Top initiative, is approved by the NYS Board of Regents and will prepare a total of 50 candidates in two cohorts to earn a Board of Regents-awarded Masters of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree with a specialization in Earth Science for grades 7-12. The post-doctoral fellows of the MAT program have unique 3-year positions, with more traditional research-based work comprising 65% of the tenure and non-traditional educational roles 35%. The MAT fellows are divided into two types: those with a teaching role, who are involved in the co-design and co-teaching of graduate-level Earth science courses; and those in a research/mentoring role, who design and teach a summer-long science research practicum while also providing informal support to MAT teaching candidates throughout the school year. Over the first year of the MAT program's implementation, fellows have been exposed to a range of activities outside the realm of a traditional post

  11. Female Physicians Are Underrepresented in Recognition Awards from the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Julie K; Bhatnagar, Saurabha; Blauwet, Cheri A; Zafonte, Ross D; Mazwi, Nicole L; Slocum, Chloe S; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Tenforde, Adam S

    2017-10-01

    Medical specialty societies are important resources for physicians in advancing their careers. There is a gap in the literature regarding gender disparities within these societies. This study assesses one area where disparities may exist: recognition awards. To determine whether female physicians are underrepresented among recognition award recipients by the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (AAPM&R). Surveillance study. A published online list of national award recipients from the AAPM&R was analyzed. Forty-eight years of data were included, as the list contained all major recognition award recipients from 1968 to 2015. All awards that were given exclusively to physicians were included. There were eight award categories listed online; seven met this criterion, with a total of 264 individual awards presented. One award category was excluded because it focused on distinguished public service and included both physician and nonphysician (eg, public official) recipients. Awards that were not published online were also excluded. Total awards given to female versus male physicians from 1968 to 2015, with awards given over the past decade (2006-2015) assessed independently. Lectureships were also analyzed as a set. For awards given to groups of physician recipients, analysis included gender composition of the group (eg, male only versus female only versus mixed-gender physician groups). To assess the proportion of female versus male physiatrists over time, physician gender and specialty data from 3 sources were used: the American Medical Association (AMA), the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), and the AAPM&R. Over the past 48 years, the AAPM&R presented 264 recognition awards to physicians. Award recipients were overwhelmingly male (n = 222; 84.1%). Females received 15.9% (n = 42) of the total awards, although there was an upward trend in female physician recipients to 26.8% (n = 26) from 2006 to 2015. Lectureships were given to 8

  12. A smashing career choice

    CERN Document Server

    Battersby, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    "There's more diversity in physics careers than you might think. Stephen Battersby talks to three very different phsicists, all doing their bit to help us learn more about the world we live in." (2 pages)

  13. Insights on STEM Careers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-05

    This presentation will provide career advice for individuals seeking to go beyond just having a job to building a successful career in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Careful planning can be used to turn a job into a springboard for professional advancement and personal satisfaction. Topics to be addressed include setting priorities, understanding career ladders, making tough choices, overcoming stereotypes and assumptions by others, networking, developing a professional identify, and balancing a career with family and other personal responsibilities. Insights on the transition from individual technical work to leadership will also be provided. The author will draw upon experiences gained in academic, industrial, and government laboratory settings, as well as extensive professional service and community involvement.

  14. Part-time careers in academic internal medicine: a report from the association of specialty professors part-time careers task force on behalf of the alliance for academic internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzer, Mark; Warde, Carole; Alexander, R Wayne; Demarco, Deborah M; Haupt, Allison; Hicks, Leroi; Kutner, Jean; Mangione, Carol M; Mechaber, Hilit; Rentz, Meridith; Riley, Joanne; Schuster, Barbara; Solomon, Glen D; Volberding, Paul; Ibrahim, Tod

    2009-10-01

    To establish guidelines for more effectively incorporating part-time faculty into departments of internal medicine, a task force was convened in early 2007 by the Association of Specialty Professors. The task force used informal surveys, current literature, and consensus building among members of the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine to produce a consensus statement and a series of recommendations. The task force agreed that part-time faculty could enrich a department of medicine, enhance workforce flexibility, and provide high-quality research, patient care, and education in a cost-effective manner. The task force provided a series of detailed steps for operationalizing part-time practice; to do so, key issues were addressed, such as fixed costs, malpractice insurance, space, cross-coverage, mentoring, career development, productivity targets, and flexible scheduling. Recommendations included (1) increasing respect for work-family balance, (2) allowing flexible time as well as part-time employment, (3) directly addressing negative perceptions about part-time faculty, (4) developing policies to allow flexibility in academic advancement, (5) considering part-time faculty as candidates for leadership positions, (6) encouraging granting agencies, including the National Institutes of Health and Veterans Administration, to consider part-time faculty as eligible for research career development awards, and (7) supporting future research in "best practices" for incorporating part-time faculty into academic departments of medicine.

  15. Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, John

    2011-01-01

    Following the suggestion of Earl Marmar in 1995, I installed a compact von Hamos type x-ray spectrometer (originally built with Elisabeth Rachlew and Jan Kallne) on a tangentially viewing port on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The spectrometer views the plasma through a 2 cm diameter hole, and is tuned to H-like argon, suitable for passive measurement of the core toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler shift. It soon became evident that the rotation in Ohmic L-mode discharges, while for the most part directed counter-current, depends in a very complicated fashion on plasma parameters, notably the electron density, current and magnetic configuration. The rotation can even flip sign for almost no apparent reason! In Ohmic and ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heated H-mode plasmas the rotation is in the co-current direction and has a relatively simple dependence on plasma parameters, proportional to the stored energy normalized to the current. Rotation velocities as high as 130 km s-1 have been observed without external momentum input. In dimensionless terms this intrinsic (or spontaneous rotation) depends on the normalized plasma pressure. The association of toroidal rotation with plasma pressure in ICRF H-modes was first observed by Lars-Goran Eriksson in JET discharges. Similar results were subsequently reported for Tore Supra enhanced confinement plasmas. In the early 2000s concerns began to surface about the lack of substantial neutral beam driven rotation in ITER, and intrinsic rotation became a topic of interest in the ITPA Transport Group. Through that connection, similar observations from DIII-D, TCV and JT-60U were added to the growing list. A database of intrinsic rotation observations was assembled with the goal of extrapolating to the expected values for ITER. Both dimensional and dimensionless scalings were developed and formed the backbone of the 2007 Nuclear Fusion paper. I gratefully acknowledge the important contributions to this paper from

  16. Clinical careers film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Those interested in developing clinical academic careers might be interested in a short animated film by Health Education England (HEE) and the National Institute for Health Research. The three-minute film, a frame from which is shown below, describes the sort of opportunities that are on offer to all professionals as part of the HEE's clinical academic careers framework. You can view the film on YouTube at tinyurl.com/pelb95c.

  17. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  18. Career practitioners' conceptions of social media in career services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Jaana; Vuorinen, Raimo; Sampson, James P

    2013-06-01

    This article reports the outcomes of a study, undertaken from a phenomenographic perspective, of career practitioners' conceptions of social media usage in career services. Fifteen Finnish career practitioners - representing comprehensive, secondary and higher education as well as public employment services - were interviewed in focus groups. The analysis of the interview data revealed five distinct descriptive categories reflecting the career practitioners' conceptions of social media's use in career services. Social media in career services was conceived as (1) unnecessary, (2) dispensable, (3) a possibility, (4) desirable and (5) indispensable. The results indicated associations between career practitioners' conceptions and their practice. Moreover, the critical aspects identified in this study can be used to support the career practitioners' understanding of new technologies in career services.

  19. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology: Sue Frantz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2016 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is Sue Frantz. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the Distinguished Teaching Award at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Education and training benefiting a career as entrepreneur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheraghi, Maryam; Schøtt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ’s entrepreneurial career and widen or narrow due both to environmental forces that reconfigure the gap across career phases and to the gendering of competencies and benefits from education and training. Methodology – A representative sample of 110,689 adults around the world was surveyed in the Global...... are reduced slightly over time as women gain greater benefit from training than men. Implications for research – The cumulative effects of early gender gaps in education and training call for research on gendered learning, and recurrent gender effects across career phases call for research on gendering....... The finding that women gain greater benefit than men from training is informative for policies that foster gender equality and empower women pursuing careers. Originality/value – Conceptualising the entrepreneurial career as a sequence of several stages enables the assessment of gender gaps owing to initial...

  1. Cost-Benefit Considerations of New Careers Programs. Career Options Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Robert K.; And Others

    Since the early 1960's, new programs have been developed to prepare poor people for jobs in hospitals, schools, social agencies, and community centers offering human services. To ascertain the cost effectiveness of these programs the Career Options Research and Development (CORD) Project focused on the need for cost and benefit studies that…

  2. Use of the COPSystem in Career Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp-Lee, Lisa J.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the revision of three measures: Career Occupational Preference System Interest Inventory, the Career Orientation Placement and Evaluation Survey, and the Career Ability Placement Survey. (SK)

  3. Career phase of board-certified general surgeons: workload composition and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki, James; Fisher, John W; Tsulukidze, M Maka; Taylor, Yhenneko J; Salandy, Simone; Laditka, James N

    2011-11-01

    To examine surgeon career phase and its association with surgical workload composition and outcomes of surgery. Cross-sectional study. The study used data from calendar years 2004 through 2006 from 4 Florida general surgeon (GS) cohorts determined by years since board certification. American Board of Surgery-certified GSs regardless of subspecialty (n = 1187) performing 460 881 operations on adults 18 years or older. Workload composition based on the Clinical Classification System, complications identified by patient safety indicators, and in-hospital mortality. Poisson regression with robust error variance estimated adjusted rate ratios (RRs) for complications and mortality. Compared with late-career surgeons, the rate of complications from cardiovascular procedures was higher for surgeons in the early-career phase (RR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.06-1.44) and the late middle-career phase (1.18; 1.02-1.37). The mortality rate for cardiovascular procedures also was higher for early-career surgeons (RR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.04-1.46). For digestive procedures, early-career surgeons had lower complication rates than late-career surgeons (RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.75-0.99). Late-career GSs perform both better and worse compared with early-career GSs, relative to their workload composition and proportional surgical volume. Factors such as training and case complexity may contribute to these career-phase differences.

  4. ATLAS Award for Difficult Task

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Two Russian companies were honoured with an ATLAS Award, for supply of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure elements, last week. On 23 March the Russian company ORPE Technologiya and its subcontractor, RSP Khrunitchev, were jointly presented with an ATLAS Supplier Award. Since 1998, ORPE Technologiya has been actively involved in the development of the carbon-fibre reinforced plastic elements of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure. After three years of joint research and development, CERN and ORPE Technologiya launched the manufacturing contract. It had a tight delivery schedule and very demanding specifications in terms of mechanical tolerance and stability. The contract was successfully completed with the arrival of the last element of the structure at CERN on 8 January 2004. The delivery of this key component of the Inner Detector deserves an ATLAS Award given the difficulty of manufacturing the end-frames, which very few companies in the world would have been able to do at an ...

  5. THE ECONOMIC AND CAREER EFFECTS OF SEXUAL HARASSMENT ON WORKING WOMEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Heather; Uggen, Christopher; Blackstone, Amy

    2017-06-01

    Many working women will experience sexual harassment at some point in their careers. While some report this harassment, many leave their jobs to escape the harassing environment. This mixed-methods study examines whether sexual harassment and subsequent career disruption affect women's careers. Using in-depth interviews and longitudinal survey data from the Youth Development Study, we examine the effect of sexual harassment for women in the early career. We find that sexual harassment increases financial stress, largely by precipitating job change, and can significantly alter women's career attainment.

  6. ANNULMENT OF THE ARBITRATION AWARD

    OpenAIRE

    Roxana Maria ROBA

    2015-01-01

    The action for annulment appears to be the unique means of appealing that can be exercised against the arbitration award, similar in content and effects to the recourse against judgments, though being not a devolutive appeal. As the legal nature of this means of appeal is concerned, it is determined by the conclusive feature of the arbitration award which is not likely to be appealed and may be put into force. Since in the common law procedure, such a decision can be challenged only by recour...

  7. Molecules Best Paper Award 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J. McPhee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecules instituted some years ago a “Best Paper” award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of organic synthesis, natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published each year in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the third “Molecules Best Paper Award” for 2015. The winners were chosen by the Editor-in-Chief and selected editorial board members from among all the papers published in 2011. Reviews and research papers were evaluated separately. We are pleased to announce that the following eight papers have won the Molecules Best Paper Award for 2015:[...

  8. Toxins Best Paper Award 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon L. Tesh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to recognize outstanding papers related to biotoxins and toxinology that have been published in Toxins, the Editorial Board established an annual “Toxins Best Paper Award”. We are pleased to announce the first “Toxins Best Paper Award” for 2015. Nominations were selected by the Editorial Board members, with all papers published in 2011 eligible for consideration. Reviews and original research articles were evaluated separately. Following review and voting by the Toxins Best Paper Award Committee, the following three papers have won Toxins Best Paper Awards for 2015:[...

  9. AIP's Career Pathways Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Jose

    2014-03-01

    The American Institute of Physics (AIP) Career Pathways Project, funded by the National Science Foundation, aims to increase the number of undergraduates going into STEM careers. The main purposes of this project are to show students the professional opportunities for a STEM career, understand what departments can do to better prepare physics bachelor's degree recipients to enter the workforce, understand what students can do to better prepare themselves, and develop resources based on these findings. I was chosen by the Society of Physics Students (SPS) to be the 2013 summer intern of the AIP's Career Pathways Project. In this talk I will discuss several resources I worked on with the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics and SPS. These resources include how to write a resume and cover letter, how to perform an informational interview, common job titles for physics bachelors, how to find career information in physics and STEM, how to search and use job postings, and how to network.

  10. CoC Awards by Program Component

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CoC Awards by Program Component reports provide snapshots of award data broken down by eligible program component types for the year selected. The reports, which can...

  11. Research Award: Innovation for Inclusive Development program

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    2011-09-12

    Research Award: Innovation for Inclusive Development program. Deadline: September 12, 2011. Note that all applications must be sent electronically. IDRC offers Research Awards annually to Canadians, permanent residents of. Canada, and citizens of developing countries pursuing master's or doctoral studies.

  12. Organizational Careers: A forward theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, Ph.D., Hon. Ph.D.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In general, organizations obtain work from people by offering them some kind of career within their structures. The operation of organizations, therefore, depends on people’s assuming a career orientation toward them. To generate this orientation, organizations distribute rewards, working conditions, and prestige to their members according to career level; thus these benefits are properties of the organizational career. To advance in this career is to receive more or better of all or some of these benefits. Generally speaking, therefore, people work to advance their organizational careers. But also, generally speaking, people do not like to talk about their careers or to be asked about them in everyday conversations with many or unknown people. In this sense, a person’s own organizational career is a sensitive or “taboo topic.” Discussions with others about one’s career occur only under the most private, discreet conditions. As a result, while people may talk abstractly and generally about careers, these discussions are typically based on a combination of the little they know of their own career and much speculation. They often have very little particular or general knowledge based on actual careers. These observations apply also to a large sector or the sociological community, as indicated by a brief perusal of the table of contents of sociological monographs and readers on organizations. The topic of careers is seldom discussed and almost never concertedly focused upon.

  13. Early Career Physical Education Teacher Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Karen E.; Stuart, Moira E.

    2012-01-01

    The retention of quality teachers has become a critical issue facing the American educational system. Unfortunately, various estimates identify that 30-50% of teachers leave the profession with the first five years. To address this issue, educational researchers have focused on identifying ways of enhancing retention through examining factors that…

  14. Education and Career Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Brečko

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The author has been represented four basic domains, which we should include in the career development of new employers; individual, people/employees, organisation and work task. Each of these domains includes three subordinate or learning tasks, which are very important for balancing the educational plan of new employees. The author warns about the most important role of the work organisation. Twelve learning tasks, suggested in the system of the new employee career development bring new challenges for educational organisations but also limits. The author is also quite sure career development programs must become part of the regular school curriculum especially at the end of schooling and before entry into the work organisation.

  15. 78 FR 33078 - Applications for New Awards; Training and Information for Parents of Children With Disabilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... and responsibility of parents and ensuring that families of such children have meaningful... children meet challenging expectations established for all children, including college- and career-ready..., have successfully helped families navigate systems providing early intervention, special education...

  16. 77 FR 20802 - Applications for New Awards; Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... Families of Children with Disabilities 84.324B Special Education Research Training: Early Career July 19... Spectrum Disorders Technology for Special Education Families of Children with Disabilities 84.324A-2...

  17. Development of a Career Interest Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Hollie B.

    1974-01-01

    The educational significance of the present study lies in the potential use of the Career Interest by career educators needing to identify students with interests in particular career areas and to counselors placing students into various career courses. (BP)

  18. Career learning and career learning environment in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation,

  19. Effects of Career Choice Intervention on Components of Career Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Petri; Vinokur, Amiram D.; Vuori, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    This randomized experimental study (N = 1,034) examines both the direct and the indirect effects of the Towards Working Life intervention on 2 components of adolescents' career preparation: preparedness for career choice and attitude toward career planning. The intervention comprised a 1-week workshop program, the proximal goals of which were to…

  20. Career learning and career learning environment in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinka Kuijpers; dr. Frans Meijers

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation,

  1. Career Education and Organized Labor. Monographs on Career Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth B.; And Others

    The three papers compiled here provide educators and others involved in career education with some information regarding the relationship of career education and organized labor. The first paper, a conference speech by Peter A. Bommarito, President of the United Rubber Workers, presents an official policy statement on career education from the…

  2. Career Practitioners' Conceptions of Social Media in Career Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Jaana; Vuorinen, Raimo; Sampson, James P., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the outcomes of a study, undertaken from a phenomenographic perspective, of career practitioners' conceptions of social media usage in career services. Fifteen Finnish career practitioners--representing comprehensive, secondary and higher education as well as public employment services--were interviewed in focus groups. The…

  3. 15 CFR 296.22 - Award criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Award criteria. 296.22 Section 296.22... Competition Process § 296.22 Award criteria. NIST must determine that a proposal successfully meets all of the Award Criteria set forth in this section for the proposal to receive funding under the Program. The...

  4. 46 CFR 502.409 - Arbitration awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Arbitration awards. 502.409 Section 502.409 Shipping... Alternative Dispute Resolution § 502.409 Arbitration awards. (a)(1) The award in an arbitration proceeding... arbitration proceeding may not serve as an estoppel in any other proceeding for any issue that was resolved in...

  5. 40 CFR 36.605 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 36.605 Award. Award means an award of...: (1) A Federal grant or cooperative agreement, in the form of money or property in lieu of money. (2... include: (1) Technical assistance that provides services instead of money. (2) Loans. (3) Loan guarantees...

  6. 22 CFR 312.605 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 312.605 Award. Award means an award of financial assistance by the Peace Corps or other Federal agency...)(2) of this section, this paragraph is not applicable for the Peace Corps. ...

  7. Wind Power Career Chat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Flowers

    2011-01-01

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  8. Research Award: Information and Networks

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship ...

  9. Research Award: Think Tank Iniave

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division teams. The Think Tank Iniave is a global program that supports independent policy research organizaons – or "think tanks" – in ...

  10. Materials Best Paper Award 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Ophelia Han; Maryam Tabrizian

    2013-01-01

    Materials is instituting an annual award to recognize the outstanding papers in the area of materials science and engineering published in Materials. We are pleased to announce the first “Materials Best Paper Award” for 2013. Nominations were selected by the Section Editor-in-Chiefs and Editorial Board members of Materials from all papers published in 2009.

  11. Research Award: Foundations for Innovation

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship ...

  12. Two awards for Herwig Schopper

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Former CERN Director-General Herwig Schopper has received two prestigious awards, from UNESCO and from the American Institute of Physics. Herwig Schopper receives the UNESCO Albert Einstein Gold Medal from Koïchiro Matsuura, Director-General of UNESCO. Without any great fanfare, Herwig Schopper has just received two major awards. UNESCO awarded him the Albert Einstein Gold Medal in Paris on 15 April, while on 2 May in Denver the American Institute of Physics (AIP) presented him with the Tate Medal for International Leadership in Physics (together with a USD 10 000 prize). Both awards were in recognition of Herwig Schopper's pivotal role in the construction of international scientific cooperation. Today President of the SESAME Council - the International Centre for Synchrotron Light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (see Bulletin No. 26/2003) - Herwig Schopper was Director-General of CERN from 1981 to 1988. President of the European Physical Society from 1994 to 1996, he wa...

  13. Carter G. Woodson Book Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents the recipients of the 1999 Carter G. Woodson book awards that honor books focusing on ethnic minorities and race relations that are appropriate for elementary and secondary levels. Includes books that cover topics such as life for Japanese Americans in internment camps and lives of 12 black women. (CMK)

  14. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 8. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award. Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 12 Issue 8 August 2007 pp 5-5. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/08/0005-0005. Author Affiliations.

  15. Homeland Security Master's Degrees Awarded

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2011-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, PRESS RELEASES MONTEREY, Calif. – Twenty-nine professionals who work in the homeland security field were awarded master’s degrees March 25 at the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security. The...

  16. Impact on Learning Award Winners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Planning & Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents awardees of the School Planning & Management magazine's third annual "Impact on Learning Award" given to architectural firms whose K-12 school facilities have solved real-world problems through design, engineering, and technology solutions. Each selection presents the design challenge faced and its solution along with project details. (GR)

  17. Research Award: Donor Partnerships Division

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Deadline: August 7, 2013. Please note that all applicafions must be sent electronically. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial.

  18. Research Award: IDRC Challenge Fund

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Deadline: August 7, 2013. Please note that all applicafions must be sent electronically. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial.

  19. Research Award: Supporng Inclusive Growth

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  20. Research Award: IDRC Challenge Fund

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2014-08-06

    Aug 6, 2014 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training ...