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Sample records for early byzantine pilgrimage

  1. The Nomads and Byzantine Empire in the Writings of Early Byzantine Historians of the 4th–6th centuries »

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    Olesia Zhdanovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the information of Byzantine authors (Ammianus Marcellinus, Priscus Panites, Procopius of Caesarea, Agathius Myrine, Menander Protector, this paper explores the relationship between the Byzantines and nomadic peoples of the Eurasian Steppe – the Huns, Turks, and Avars. The author illuminates the peculiarities of perception of the nomadic barbarians from the point of view of the Byzantine imperial worldview. Based on the analysis of the Byzantine sources, the author has attempted to uncover the Romans’ subjective perception of the eastern steppe civilizations. This article contains some information about the appearance, customs, traditions, and way of life of nomads, their relations with the Byzantine Empire since the advent of the hordes of Huns in its territory in the late 4th century up to diplomatic relations with the first steppe empire – the Great Turkic Khaganate as well as Avar khanate in the 6th century. Author clarified the propensity of eastern nomadic and western settled civilizations to the establishment of bilateral contacts and traced the dynamics and evolution of their mutual relationship. The author translated from ancient Greek the fragments of works of early Byzantine authors contained in this article

  2. Athumia and philanthrôpia. Social reactions to plagues in late antiquity and early Byzantine society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leven, K H

    1995-01-01

    Thucydides' description of the plague at Athens stands as a paradigm that influenced eyewitness accounts throughout Greek and Byzantine history. Christian authors in Late Antiquity use his dark picture as heathen background against which they highlight Christian virtues of charity and mercy. The descriptions of the Justinianic plague of AD 542 rely on Thucydides not only stylistically but also in substance, as the early Byzantine society reacts like the people of ancient Athens rather than early Christian communities.

  3. Early byzantine lamellar armour from Carthago Spartaria (Cartagena, Spain

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    Vizcaíno Sánchez, Jaime

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an Early Byzantine lamellar armour, retrieved in the excavations at the quarter built over the Roman Theatre of Cartagena. The armour has close parallels with contemporary known material from the central and eastern Mediterranean or other sites, and it is an important find which increases the body of archeological evidence about Byzantine presence in Spania.

    Este artículo presenta una coraza laminar protobizantina hallada en las excavaciones del barrio construido sobre el teatro romano de Cartagena. La coraza tiene estrechos paralelos con materiales contemporáneos del Mediterráneo Central y Oriental u otros lugares, y es un importante hallazgo que incrementa la nómina de evidencias arqueológicas acerca de la presencia bizantina en Spania.

  4. Pronoia in the Military Organization of the Byzantine Empire at Early Palaeologian Period (Part 2

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    Zolotovskiy Vladimir A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the author disclosed the role of pronoia in the military organization of the Byzantine Empire at early Palaeologian period. The concrete cases of the award allow recognizing the proniarety as the Byzantine military institution dealing exclusively with the military leadership. The grant of pronoia was a replacement for traditional rewards of military commanders of noble origin. However, in some cases it was identified that compulsory military service was a function of power which was granted to the proniares in addition to the tax quota. Holders of pronoia were not only the Romans military commanders but also the mercenaries. Such awards could reduce the costs of imperial treasury for direct payments. In the case of proniares-Byzantines, depending on posotis, we can talk about the conferring upon pronoia the representatives of various levels of the military leadership. The pronoias granted as a reward or the compensation for losses incurred as a result of the performance of official engagements, could be transferred to the commanders of low levels which were recruited from among stratiotes (obviously, dekarhes. Definition of the role of pronoia in military practice of the early palaeologian period which would be possible in the identification of the proportion of pronoiares and strateia contingents and the correlation of victories and defeats, won by them, is impossible in practice.

  5. Did the Early Byzantine Tectonic Paroxysm (EBTP) also affect the Adriatic area?

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    Evelpidou, Niki; Pirazzoli, Paolo Antonio

    2017-10-01

    The paper starts recalling the various stages that lead to the definition of the Early Byzantine Tectonic Paroxysm (EBTP), which was determined mainly from fossil uplifted shorelines of the Eastern Mediterranean between the middle of the 4th century and the middle of the 6th century CE. A comparison of catalogues of earthquakes may show that possibly an important event occurred in 361 CE in the northern Adriatic, i.e. near the beginning of a sequence of clustered earth movements. This event is proposed as the most likely for the coseismic subsidence of a known slightly submerged tidal notch that developed along over 200 km of the Croatian shoreline.

  6. PATARA’S LATE ROMAN–EARLY BYZANTINE CERAMICS FROM NORTH AFRICA IN THE LIGHT OF HURMALIK BATH FINDS

    OpenAIRE

    D. Sen Yildirim

    2012-01-01

    In the ancient city of Patara in Lycia, the Hurmalık Bath excavations carried out between 2005-2008. A large number of ceramic finds were recovered dated to the Late Roman-Early Byzantine Period. Among them, is noteworthy a group of North African origin. Amphorae, red slip pottery and clay lamps were found in samples of three main groups. Grouping samples were evaluated under 7 amphora’s forms, 10 red-slip fine ceramic’s forms and 2 red-slipped North African lamp’s forms. Detected ceramic art...

  7. Byzantine Neumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian

    musikeksempler med transskription til moderne linjenotation og en detaljeret bibliografi. Bogen er tænkt som en opdatering og uddybning af H.J.W. Tillyards Handbook of the Middle Byzantine Musical Notation (København 1935), en af de første udgivelser i serien Monumenta Musicae Byzantinae. Udgivelsen opsummerer...

  8. Pilgrimage = Transformation Journey

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    René Gothóni

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available During the two past decades, scholars in religious studies and social anthropology have frequently reconsidered Turner's theoretical model of pilgrimage. A pilgrimage is the outer manifestation of an inner journey, often referred to as an allegory of the soul's journey to God. Thus it is cosmologically meaningful. The height of the journey is the arrival at the pilgrimage centre and the encounter with the divine. There the pilgrim perceives the gap between what he should be (according to the religious tradition a what he really is, i.e. he suddenly realizes the discrepancy between the precept and the practice. This experience is the very essence of a pilgrimage, because what has been experienced cannot become unexperienced, what has been seen cannot become unseen, what has been realized cannot become unrealized.

  9. Physics as Pilgrimage

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    Gary E. Bowman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pilgrimage typically refers to a religious quest or journey. Can science ever be viewed as a sort of pilgrimage, even retaining some of the religious hallmarks thereof? Employing the views of Joseph Campbell, a widely-known religious thinker, and Albert Einstein, creator of the special and general theories of relativity, I so argue for the case of theoretical physics—the most basic and fundamental physical science. I then sketch the centuries-long (and still ongoing development of physical ideas of space from Newton to Einstein. These ideas, while relatively accessible to non-physicists, are of the most profound physical significance, determining the large-scale behavior of not only Earth, but the cosmos itself. I argue how their development may, in consonance with Campbell and Einstein, be viewed as a sort of pilgrimage.

  10. Medicinal use of leeches in the texts of ancient Greek, Roman and early Byzantine writers.

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    Papavramidou, N; Christopoulou-Aletra, H

    2009-09-01

    Blood-letting was a common therapeutic method in antiquity; many means were used to draw blood, including the application of leeches. In this paper, ancient Greek, Roman and Byzantine authors up to the 7th century AD were studied, a research that provided us with references that may be divided into two groups: those related to the medicinal use of leeches, and those related to cases in which leeches were swallowed and had to be removed. In the first group, detailed descriptions of the method of usage and of the diseases requiring leeching were found. In the second group, brief reference is made to the problems caused by swallowing leeches, and to the methods used to expel them from the human organism. The earliest references to the medicinal use of leeches may be found in the writings of Theocritus (3rd century BC), Nicander (2nd century BC) and Horace (1st century BC, while the phenomenon of swallowing a leech is first mentioned in one of the Epidaurian 'iamata' dating to the 4th century BC.

  11. High Altitude Pilgrimage Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Religious pilgrims have been going to high altitude pilgrimages long before trekkers and climbers sojourned in high altitude regions, but the medical literature about high altitude pilgrimage is sparse. Gosainkunda Lake (4300 m) near Kathmandu, Nepal, and Shri Amarnath Yatra (3800 m) in Sri Nagar, Kashmir, India, are the two sites in the Himalayas from where the majority of published reports of high altitude pilgrimage have originated. Almost all travels to high altitude pilgrimages are characterized by very rapid ascents by large congregations, leading to high rates of acute mountain sickness (AMS). In addition, epidemiological studies of pilgrims from Gosainkunda Lake show that some of the important risk factors for AMS in pilgrims are female sex and older age group. Studies based on the Shri Amarnath Yatra pilgrims show that coronary artery disease, complications of diabetes, and peptic ulcer disease are some of the common, important reasons for admission to hospital during the trip. In this review, the studies that have reported these and other relevant findings will be discussed and appropriate suggestions made to improve pilgrims' safety at high altitude. PMID:25330393

  12. The Concept of Justice in the History of the Early Byzantine Thought (4th–7th Centuries

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    Evgeniy V. Karchagin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to semantic transformation of the concept of ‘justice’ in leading intellectual traditions of early Byzantine period: late Neoplatonism, early Christianity, represented by the Cappadocians Fathers, and Christian Neoplatonism. The analysis of the texts of Proclus and his successors, Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa, Dionysius the Areopagite, Maximus the Confessor showed that the preservation of the former and the emergence of new meanings and connotations of the concept of ‘justice’ was due to the specificity of intellectual situation: the adaptation of Christianity to imperial pagan intellectual culture, the shift of the power pole from paganism to Christianity, the expansion and a qualitative change in the members of church communities. The ancient concept of justice as an equivalent exchange, manifested in a society primarily in “distribution by dignity”, in pagan neo-Platonism was transferred from the ethical sphere to the ontological sphere, and in the Christian intellectual tradition it was filled with theological reflections of incomprehensible divine justice, and new understanding of justice as righteousness, i.e. an unconditional fulfillment of the duties entrusted by God.

  13. Byzantine chant notation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The article focus on the complementarity of oral/aural transmission and written documents in the sustainment and development of Byzantine chant from c. 500 -c. 1500.......The article focus on the complementarity of oral/aural transmission and written documents in the sustainment and development of Byzantine chant from c. 500 -c. 1500....

  14. Dracula tourism as pilgrimage?

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    Tuomas Hovi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is about Dracula tourism in Romania and how it may be seen as pilgrimage. The author approaches this connection especially through the place myth of Transylvania and through the status Transylvania has in Western popular culture. The subject is approached purely from a ‘Western’ point of view, that is, in this article Romania, although a member of the EU and NATO, is treated not as part of the West but part of the East. This is due to the fact that in Western popular culture Romania and especially Transylvania have always been portrayed as the Other in relation to the West. Western popular culture plays a significant role in Dracula tourism.

  15. Pilgrimages: Space, Polysemy and Three Cases

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    Karel Dobbelaere; Voyé Liliane

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on a study of the existing literature and field work on sites of pilgrimages. It is structured in three parts: pilgrimage and space, the polysemy of pilgrimages and a presentation of three examples of pilgrimages. First we discuss the relationship of pilgrimages with space. Going on pilgrimage implies a “displacement” towards a “particular place”, where there is an “internal circuit” laid out for pilgrims and visitors. Finally, we point out the “territory of recruitment”...

  16. Pilgrimages: Space, Polysemy and Three Cases

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    Karel Dobbelaere

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a study of the existing literature and field work on sites of pilgrimages. It is structured in three parts: pilgrimage and space, the polysemy of pilgrimages and a presentation of three examples of pilgrimages. First we discuss the relationship of pilgrimages with space. Going on pilgrimage implies a “displacement” towards a “particular place”, where there is an “internal circuit” laid out for pilgrims and visitors. Finally, we point out the “territory of recruitment”, where the pilgrims live. In a second part we discuss the polysemy of the pilgrimages. Persons may go on pilgrimage towards historic places of a religion to “revive” its message. It may also be “an act of devotion” or a “penitential activity”. Pilgrimages were and still are an “affirmation of an identity” and finally we stress “the logic of requests”. These are analytical distinctions but pilgrimages are mostly a combination of these functions. Finally, we present three examples of pilgrimages: one to the Relic of the Holy Blood of Jesus Christ in Bruges (Belgium, another to a Marian sanctuary in Banneux (Belgium and finally the pilgrimage to St James of Compostela (Spain.

  17. An Examination of Middle Byzantine Reconstituted Churches in Cyprus

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    Pawlowski, Mark James

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis I will examine the phenomenon of middle byzantine churches being erected over the ruins of Early Christian and Early Byzantine basilicas in Cyprus. These churches were all abandoned or destroyed in the seventh century following the Arab raids of 649/653. The term that I use to describe this phenomenon is reconstitution, as the new churches are erected over earlier remains but take on different forms. Despite the reconquest of the island by the Byzantines in 965 and a subsequent...

  18. The Byzantine Office  for the Translation of Saint Nicholas to Bari (AD 1087)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The contribution includes a historical introduction, transcriptions of selections of the music and tranlations of the texts for the Byzantine office composed on the occasion of the translation of the relics of St Nicholas to Bari in AD 1087. Texts and music is interpreted in relation to the coexi...... to the coexistence of the Roman Latin and the Greek Byzantine Churches in the area, the political conditions in South Italy in the period around the arrival of the Normans, and the upcoming of Bari as a centre of Pan-European pilgrimage.......The contribution includes a historical introduction, transcriptions of selections of the music and tranlations of the texts for the Byzantine office composed on the occasion of the translation of the relics of St Nicholas to Bari in AD 1087. Texts and music is interpreted in relation...

  19. Pilgrimages: Law and Culture in Multicultural Societies

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    Maria Luisa Lo Giacco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pilgrimage is an age-old way of expressing one's religious faith through a collective religious ritual that can be found throughout the ages and among all peoples. Pilgrimage is, however, also an institution regulated by precise rules. In fact, there is a real and very ancient regulatory system whose rules have gradually been established over the centuries. The pilgrim who nowadays goes on the road to Santiago de Compostela, Rome, Jerusalem or Mecca is often unaware that he’s following in the footsteps of generations of believers who have gone this same route. This tradition has led to the creation and development of rules and legal norms, not only in the religious laws, but also in European law. Pilgrimage to Jerusalem was a duty for Jews up to 70 A.D., the year of the destruction of Solomon’s Temple. In Islamic tradition, the pilgrimage to Mecca, at least once in a lifetime, is a duty, one of the five pillars of the faith. Finally, while not an obligation, pilgrimage has been a ritual for Christians since ancient times, regulated by canon law. Every year millions of people all over the world make a pilgrimage. Aware of the cultural, but also economic, richness of pilgrimages, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO has included among the world heritage sites to be protected many shrines and pilgrimage routes and destinations. The Council of Europe considers the pilgrimage routes as European cultural routes. Pilgrimage is generally studied from either a historical or sociological perspective while this paper deals with the subject from a legal point of view, and this is a novelty. Its aim is to demonstrate that pilgrimage is not only a social but also a juridical phenomenon. Pilgrimage is different from other kinds of travel, including religious tourism, and for this reason pilgrimage is regulated by law.

  20. Exhibiting coins as economic artefacts: Curating historical interpretation in Faith and Fortune: visualizing the divine on Byzantine and early Islamic coinage (Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham, November 2013-January 2015

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    Rebecca Darley

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Faith and Fortune: visualizing the divine on Byzantine and early Islamic coins was an exhibition at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts (October 2013-January 2015. It reflected on ways in which the rise of Islam in the seventh century shaped global political and economic systems, and how the early Islamic government and the Christian Byzantine Empire expressed the religious loyalties of their states visually. The exhibition, however, attempted to move away from traditional approaches to presenting coins, focusing almost exclusively on them as images and political documents. Instead, this exhibition sought to convey a sense of coins as economic artefacts, tightly woven into the day-to-day fabric of ordinary lives, in a period of extraordinary change. This article examines how the spatial, textual and temporal intersected in historical theory and exhibition design and suggests that exhibition represents an alternative method both of presenting (and teaching but also of undertaking research.

  1. The Influence of Byzantine Law on Serbian Mediaeval Law

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    Srđan Šarkić

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Serbian law had being developed from the early 13th century under the direct influence of Byzantine law. Serbian lawyers adopted the Byzantine law in the form of translation of Byzantine legal compilations. The first of them was Nomokanon of Saint Sava of 1219 which contained ecclesiastical rules together with canonist’s glosses, a translation of part of Justinian’s Novels and the whole of the Procheiron of Basil I. In 1349-1354 Serbian lawyers created a special Codex Tripartitus, codifying both Serbian and Byzantine law. The Russian scholar T. Florinsky noticed this in 1888, pointing out that in the oldest manuscripts Dušan’s Code is always accompanied by two other compilations of Byzantine law: the abbreviated Syntagma of Matheas Blastar and the so-called Justinian’s Law. Beside the translations of Byzantine legal miscellanies, Serbian lawyers adopted a great number of the institutes of Roman law. However, Serbian lawyers were not educated in Bologna, so that Roman law was adopted in an indirect way, i.e. through Greek (Byzantine translations, not from original Latin texts. Dušan’s Code as the most important legal source of mediaeval Serbian law borrowed about 60 articles directly from the Basilica: articles 171 and 172 are the most important of them.

  2. Abstracting out Byzantine Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Druschel, Peter; Haeberlen, Andreas; Kouznetsov, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Many distributed systems are designed to tolerate the presence of emph{Byzantine} failures: an individual process may arbitrarily deviate from the algorithm assigned to it. Depending on the application requirements, systems enjoy various levels of fault-tolerance. Systems based on state machine replication are able to emph{mask} failures so that their effect is not visible by the application. In contrast, cooperative peer-to-peer systems can tolerate bounded deviant behavior to some exten...

  3. Gender, nation and religion in European pilgrimage

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    Jansen, W.H.M.; Notermans, C.D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the forces of secularization in Europe, old pilgrimage routes are attracting huge numbers of people and given new meanings in the process. In pilgrimage, religious or spiritual meanings are interwoven with social, cultural and politico-strategic concerns. This book explores three such

  4. Notes on byzantine Panagiaria

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    Drpić Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article offers some new insights into the significance and function of Byzantine panagiaria, small-scale containers for the bread sanctified in honor of the Virgin in a rite known as the Elevation of the Panagia. This rite, it is argued, was not limited to monastic and courtly contexts or to routine liturgical observance, as is often assumed, but could be performed by the laity as well. Proposing that the use of panagiaria as personal devotional instruments was fairly common in Byzantium, the article explores the interplay between the design, materiality, epigraphic enhancement, and ritual and devotional use of these objects.

  5. Pilgrimage as post-secular therapy

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    Lisbeth Mikaelsson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the institutionalized pilgrim role and then turns to the therapeutic discourse which is so prominent in the modern pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. Both the role and the discourse can be related to the concept of post-secularity, demonstrating that complex cultural fields such as religion and therapy, become intertwined in new ways through modern pilgrimage. This article also shows that churches cooperating in this type of pilgrimage are adapting to the post-secular age, finding a new sort of raison d’être in a multi-religious, international world. Here the author refers to the Church of Norway and its role in Norwegian pilgrimage. The latter is modelled upon the Santiago example.

  6. Paul of Aegina (c. 625-690 AD), the Origins of the Early Correction of Pediatric Strabismus in Byzantine Empire.

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    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Sgantzos, Markos

    2016-09-01

    The eminent Greek physician Paul of Aegina, native of the Saronic island Aegina and pupil of the Alexandrian School, understood both exotropia and endotropia, his designation for esotropia and proposed therapeutic measures for their treatment during baby or toddler age. He had introduced an innovative method for the newborns to have a straight vision, "the congenital strabismus of the newborns must be treated with the placement of a facial mask (with 2 open holes in the middle axes of the eyes), so that the babies could only see in a straight line", combined with a small oil lamp to assure a direct eye alignment. Although not even a diagram of the masks was saved until nowadays, Paul was the first to suggest the early correction of the eyes deviation, and considered to be the father of orthoptics.

  7. The Origins of Byzantine Music

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    Murariu Marius Constantin

    2014-01-01

    The concept of “Byzantine Music” was identified in various ways by being given several definitions, according to the sense of musicologists that had taken charge of describing the phenomenon. A more conclusive definition points out the fact that byzantine music is the art of song in the Orthodox Church, which maintains a significant popular composition, resulting from the interaction of several ancient musical cultures and which appeared, developed and was disseminated under various forms of ...

  8. Paphlagonia Bölgesi’nde Geç Antik ve Erken Bizans Yerleşimi: Sora / Late Antique and Early Byzantine Settlement in Paphlagonia Region: Sora

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    Durmuş Gür

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The late antique, early Byzantine settlement area locates at 12 km. distance to southwest of Karabuk Central District, on a sloping land with an altitude of 700 meters piedmont of Keltepe mountain. This settlement area, called as Zora, Zara, Zopran, Sora, Sopran or some other similar names by the researchers, locates within the boundaries of Akören (Kaleköy and Zopran today. This area is one of the five central eparchies bounded to Paphlagonia district of Gangra (Çankırı. Various column headers, inscriptions, sculptures, Hellenistic sepulchres and architectural ruins belonging to Roman age are identified there. The settlement area called as Sora since the 4th century is observed by Doublet (1889, Mendel (1901, Gökoğlu (1952, Marek (1993, 2003, Belke (1996 and Umar (2007, and they found out that it used to be called Zobran in the records of 16th century Ottoman archive. Within the scope of this research, Sora is observed in details for the periods of Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman. The life of St. Autonomous, who had came there in the 4th century to proselytize Christianity and became a martyre, their sepulchre constructions, the bishops of the city, architectural plastic works and scriptures are all researched. Moreover, the problem of naming the area which was confusing for many years is tried to be solved by this research beside documenting the present condition of the architectural ruin on their original places. Öz Karabük’ün 12 km. güneybatısında bulunan geç Antik-erken Bizans dönemi yerleşim alanı Sora (günümüzde Zopran ve Akören, Keltepe Dağı’nın eteklerinde ortalama 700 m. rakımda eğimli bir arazi üzerinde yer almaktadır. Araştırmacılar tarafından Zora, Zara, Zopran, Sora, Sopran gibi çeşitli isimlerle adlandırılan yerleşim, günümüzde Akören (Kaleköy ve Zopran sınırlarında kalmaktadır. Sora, Paphlagonia bölgesinde Gangra (Çankırı Metropolitliğine bağlı beş Piskoposluk

  9. Comprehensive Chemical Characterisation of Byzantine Glass Weights.

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    Schibille, Nadine; Meek, Andrew; Tobias, Bendeguz; Entwistle, Chris; Avisseau-Broustet, Mathilde; Da Mota, Henrique; Gratuze, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the glass trade in the first millennium CE relies on the characterisation of well-dated compositional groups and the identification of their primary production sites. 275 Byzantine glass weights from the British Museum and the Bibliothèque nationale de France dating to the sixth and seventh century were analysed by LA-ICP-MS. Multivariate statistical and graphical data analysis discriminated between six main primary glass types. Primary glass sources were differentiated based on multi-dimensional comparison of silica-derived elements (MgO, Al2O3, CaO, TiO2, Fe2O3, ZrO2) and components associated with the alkali source (Li2O, B2O3). Along with Egyptian and Levantine origins of the glassmaking sands, variations in the natron source possibly point to the exploitation of two different natron deposits. Differences in strontium to calcium ratios revealed variations in the carbonate fractions in the sand. At least two cobalt sources were employed as colouring agents, one of which shows strong correlations with nickel, indicating a specific post-Roman cobalt source. Typological evidence identified chronological developments in the use of the different glass groups. Throughout the sixth century, Byzantine glass weights were predominately produced from two glasses that are probably of an Egyptian origin (Foy-2 and Foy-2 high Fe). Towards the second half of the sixth century a new but related plant-ash glass type emerged (Magby). Levantine I was likewise found among the late sixth- to early seventh-century samples. The use of different dies for the same batch testifies to large-scale, centralised production of the weights, while the same die used for different primary production groups demonstrates the co-existence of alternative sources of supply. Given the comprehensive design of our study, these results can be extrapolated to the wider early Byzantine glass industry and its changes at large.

  10. A Page of Romanian Pilgrimage History

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    Claudiu Cotan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pilgrimage has been one of the dimensions of the Christian life ever since ancient times. The desire to go to the places related to the activity of Jesus Christ, our Saviour, or to the life of the best-known saints of Christianity has always been present in the hearts of the faithful. Mount Athos and Jerusalem have become the most desired destinations of the Orthodox faithful. It is to these places that the Romanian pilgrims went to. This study presents the best-known pilgrimages of the Romanian Orthodox pilgrims and their travel impressions which they published for everybody to known about them.

  11. Byzantine Oecumene in the Iconoclast Controversy

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    Lev Lukhovitskiy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In 754 emperor Constantine V sought to defame the iconophile opposition by labeling John Damascene an agent of Arab influence. The fathers of Nicaenum II in 787 made a case for justifying external interference in the religious life of the Byzantine Empire. This stance was nuanced in polemical writings of the early 9th century. The author of the Life of St. Stephen the Younger presented external political pressure as internal by making the saint deliver a sermon on the geography of the iconoclast world in which political borders and ecclesiastical jurisdictions were deliberately tempered with. In late 810ies Theodore Studite and Patriarch Nicephorus launched a diplomatic enterprise aiming to increase the political pressure exercised from abroad over the recently reestablished iconoclast regime of Leo V. A close reading of Theodore’s letters and Nicephorus’ writings from exile sheds light on the underlying ideological basis of this trend. Michael II in his turn appropriated his opponents’ stratagem and tried to win over to his side an expanding external power -- the Carolingian empire -- and use it to suppress the iconophile opposition. In spite of the fact that the iconophile diplomatic efforts had negative rebound effects during the reign of Michael II, they were allotted a proper place in Byzantine cultural memory.

  12. La Spécificité roumaine dans le chant ecclésiastique de type byzantin / The Romanian Specificity in Byzantine Ecclesial Chant

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    Nechifor (Nicolae Horia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the earliest times, music has always been present at all peoples, as each people tried to embellish its cult and the expression of its religious feeling by means of the most significant and deepest treasures it had collected over time. The Orthodox Church has resorted, in its worship, to Byzantine music. The current Byzantine psaltic chant is the result of the historical evolution of the ancient musical art of the Eastern Orthodox Church with its capital at Byzantium. This is, therefore, a final stage of development, wearing new spiritual clothes, purified by the Christian doctrine, developed and crystallized in the Byzantine Empire and holding its own forms and features. The Romanian people, of Latin origin, on the one hand, and of Byzantine spiritual formation, on the other, and a Christian people since its birth, has fully benefited from the universal treasure of Byzantine chant. The Christian missionaries were the first to bring Byzantine and pre-Byzantine chant in these territories (in the early fourth century already, Saint Sabbas of Buzău is attested to “chant psalms in the church”. Many Romanian musicologists have dealt with the existence and the continuity of a genuine Romanian tradition in the field of the sacred chant. Here, on the territory of our country, the Byzantine chant developed new directions, especially due to the institutionalisation of its teaching and practicing, once the first modern schools of psaltic chant were established, such as the music school of Putna. Afterwards, the whole eighteenth century was characterized by an overt struggle between the Greek and the Romanian chant. However, in spite of the different impediments, the chant in Romanian will gradually come to the fore.

  13. Byzantine Failure Detection for Dynamic Distributed Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Santos De Lima, Murilo; Greve, Fabiola; Arantes, Luciana; Sens, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Byzantine failure detectors provide an elegant abstraction for implementing Byzantine fault tolerance. However, as far as we know, there is no general solution for this problem in a dynamic distributed system over wireless networks with unknown membership. This paper presents thus a first Byzantine failure detector for this context. The protocol has the interesting feature to be time-free, that is, it does not rely on timers to detect omission failures. This characteristic favors its scalabil...

  14. Transcription of Byzantine Chant - Problems, Possibilities, Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Discusses the problems and possibilities for transsription of Byzantine chant on the basis of medieval musical manuscripts. A relatively 'neutral' style of transcription is suggested for musicological purposes.......Discusses the problems and possibilities for transsription of Byzantine chant on the basis of medieval musical manuscripts. A relatively 'neutral' style of transcription is suggested for musicological purposes....

  15. The economic impact of pilgrimage: An economic impact analysis of pilgrimage expenditures in Galicia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graave, Elisabeth J.E.; Klijs, J.; Heijman, W.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we calculate the economic impact of pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela in the NUTS 2 region Galicia (Spain) in 2010. This economic impact is relevant to policymakers and other stakeholders dealing with religious tourism in Galicia. The analysis is based on the Input-Output model.

  16. Patriotic pilgrimages during the Italian liberal period: sites and terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Bagnaresi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to analyze the phenomenon of "laic pilgrimage": the trips that during the first fifty years of Italian unity, saw the places of memory as the protagonists of the Risorgimento. Specifically will be analyzed the trips to ossuaries, battlefields, monuments and tombs of the fathers of the Nation. The text try to create a map - on a national scale - of the places of pilgrimage divided according to the "users". To different destinations, in fact, correspond different types of pilgrimage, mirrors of Italian political situation of this period.

  17. Further solar alignments of Greek Byzantine churches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liritzis, I.; Vasiliou, H.

    Following the recent work on the solar alignment of Greek byzantine churches (Liritzis and Vassiliou 2006 a,b,c) the solar orientations of twenty one more churches are presented. The question examined is if the day of solar rise across the eastern direction of the church is related with the feast day of Patron Saint. Measurements were carried out with magnetic compass, inclinometer, portable GPS and appropriate corrections for the solar declination. The alignments towards eastern sunrise were examined for various angular altitudes of the perceptible horizon. At least for all Rhodean churches the patron's day is met when sun oblique path crosses horizon a few degrees beyond the intersection of extrapolated eastern axis of the church with horizons skyline. Therefore, taken the orientation as the glitter of first sunrays -early dawn- correlation of thirteen present churches are aligned near the autumnal equinox, three have relation with the feast of patron saint, four are related to the other important feast of Christianity and one seem orientated randomly. However accounting for a due east sun position a few degrees above horizon in early liturgy hours (6:30 - 9:30 am) all the Rhodean alignments coincides with Saint's name day.

  18. Maximum Metric Spanning Tree made Byzantine Tolerant

    OpenAIRE

    Dubois, Swan; Masuzawa, Toshimitsu; Tixeuil, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Self-stabilization is a versatile approach to fault-tolerance since it permits a distributed system to recover from any transient fault that arbitrarily corrupts the contents of all memories in the system. Byzantine tolerance is an attractive feature of distributed systems that permits to cope with arbitrary malicious behaviors. This paper focus on systems that are both self-stabilizing and Byzantine tolerant. We consider the well known problem of constructing a maximum metric tree in this co...

  19. Byzantine-resilient distributed computing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Patnaik, LM; S.Balaji

    1987-01-01

    This paper is aimed at reviewing the notion of Byzantine-resilient distributed computing systems, the relevant protocols and their possible applications as reported in the literature. The three agreement problems, namely, the consensus problem, the interactive consistency problem, and the generals problem have been discussed. Various agreement protocols for the Byzantine generals problem have been summarized in terms of their performance and level of fault-tolerance. The three classes of Byza...

  20. Selected Publications Concerning Byzantine and Neo-Byzantine Music: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Jeffrey

    This selected and annotated bibliography contains 22 references to international works on Byzantine and Neo-Byzantine music. Some of the annotations contain information about: (1) the language of the text; (2) foreign language translations; (3) included indexes and bibliographies; (4) reproductions of music and manuscripts; (5) the history of…

  1. Classicisation or representation? Mimesis in Byzantine pictorial arts as a derivative of style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grotowski Piotr Ł.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea of mimesis in art theory has been neglected by Byzantine scholars. Reasons for this may lie in the fact that the understanding of the term in Byzantium was very complex and that it changed over time. In the Early Byzantine period and the so-called Macedonian Renaissance, a tendency to use tonal modelling, which was inherited from ancient Greco-Roman art, can still be observed. Starting in the late tenth century they give way to a more linear style. Simultaneously, a change in the understanding of mimesis in theological writings can also be observed. The aim of this paper is to introduce the problem of a mimetic approach in visual arts as a phenomenon in Byzantine culture.

  2. The cities of Byzantine Italy: some items for the research agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Zanini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the literature debate concerning the Italian cities in the period from late Antiquity to the early Middle Ages the ‘Byzantine variable’ deserves a particular position. The relevant role of the proto-Byzantine Mediterranean’s permanence in the administrative, social, economic and cultural system during the transformation of many urban centres needs a new analysis and evaluation. Such a remark calls for a critical re-thinking of many traditional issues and the reappraisal of a methodology for new interpretative models which can better fit the complexity of the phenomenon which is going to be investigated.

  3. Teaching surgery in late Byzantine Alexandria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarborough, John

    2010-01-01

    When one examines Alexandrian commentaries on works of Galen and Hippocrates, disclosed are essential guides to the Art of Medicine as practiced in the late fifth, sixth, and early seventh centuries. These are outlines and contents of a 'medical curriculum' in late Byzantine Alexandria, as well as Ravenna, and thanks to the patient and skilled labors of Dickson,' Duffy,2 Irmer, Palmieri, Pritchet, Westerink, and others, following and building on the pioneering studies of Bräutigam, Meyerhoff, and Temkin, medical historians can now peruse carefully edited Greek and Latin texts and generally reliable translations of some commentaries by Agnellus of Ravenna, John of Alexandria, Palladius, and Stephanus of Athens. Deeply experienced medical practitioners became teachers of would-be medical students in Alexandria and Ravenna. Alexandria had long functioned as a city reputed to be the home of medical instruction, and by ca. 550 or slightly later, teachers began to produce commentaries on the classic texts of Greek and Roman medicine, with Galen and Hippocrates as major authorities. Underpinning what the medical professors set down in their commentaries were extended lives spent in the actual practice of medicine, sometimes as military physicians (as may have been the case of Paul of Aegina in the early seventh century), sometimes as doctors who had gained lengthy experience in Alexandria itself, and sometimes as medical professionals who had emigrated to Egypt after successful careers in another part of the Greek-speaking eastern Roman Empire. Reflecting time as a medical student and later career in Constantinople, Aetius of Amida's Tetrabiblon foreshadows editorial mechanics and techniques of textual exegesis as they emerge more clearly with the medical commentators after 550. It may well be that Stephanus, 'the Philosopher and Physician', was originally from Athens, but whether he was or not, the attribution of an Athenian background suggests that non

  4. Rusalies: The Testimony of Byzantine Tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIN Yu.Ya.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The festival of rusalies is one of the paganism relics in the medieval Byzantium. It was the subject of numerous special studies, where Byzantine traditions unfortunately recede to the background. The modern scientific summaries disregard the information on rusalies, actualizing the further study of paganism reception in the medieval Byzantium. There is an indirect connection between the rusaly and Brumaly, rituals of masquers and Slavonian Christmas carols, as well as between times of their celebration. The Byzantine tradition of rusalies deserves systematic representation from the point of view of modern historical science along with preceeding religious cults. The medieval church canons blame and forbid any pagan relics, including rusalies. They appear as the alive custom, which was observed by inhabitants of provincial settlements. Being the form of people’s religiosity, rusalies have their significance as the aspect of spiritual culture in the development of medieval Byzantine society.

  5. Motivation for pilgrimage: using theory to explore motivations

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    Ruth Blackwell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a discussion of the motivations for pilgrimage and it will draw upon theories of motivation to explore the continuing attraction of pilgrimage in contemporary times. This discussion is located within the field of Event Management. Event Management is a fast growing discipline which focuses on the design, production and management of planned events, such as festivals, celebrations, conferences, fund-raisers and so on. Clearly pilgrimages, as planned events, fit into this definition. In this context, it is essential to recognise the importance of understanding the motives and needs of event customers so that we can plan to help our customers satisfy their motives. Whilst it might seem abhorrent and commercial to talk of pilgrims as customers, pilgrimages and religious sites have become more and more commodified and increasingly are deemed to need professional management. Key theories of motivation will be compared in order to identify the prime motivating factors underpinning people’s decisions to make pilgrimages.

  6. The Royal pilgrimage of the Goddess Nanda

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    William S. Sax

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Once every twelve years, when it is thought that some calamity has taken place because of the curse of the goddess Nanda Devi, a four-horned ram is born in the fields of the former king of Garhwal, an erstwhile Central Himalayan kingdom in north India (see map of Garhwal. This four-horned ram leads a procession of priests and pilgrims on the most dangerous and spectacular pilgrimage in all of India: a three-week, barefoot journey of one-hundred and sixty-four miles, during some of the worst weather of the year, at the end of the rainy season. The procession reaches Rupkund, a small pond located at an altitude of more than 5,000 metres, which is surrounded by human­ skeletons, and from there it goes yet further, to Homkund, the ‘Lake of the Fire Sacrifice’. According to the faithful, the four-horned ram leaves the procession at that point and finds its way, unaided, to the summit of Mount Trishul. As its name suggests, the Royal Procession is closely associated with the ruler of this erstwhile Himalayan kingdom: he attends its inaugural rituals, the bones that litter the shores of Rupkund are believed to be those of one of his ancestors, and the chief sponsor of the event is a local ‘Prince’ who is thought to be descended from the first kings of Garhwal. This Prince traverses the domain of his ancestors and thereby lays claim to it in the name of the goddess Nanda, who is not only his lineage goddess but was also the royal goddess of the neighbouring kingdom of Kumaon, in pre-colonial times. Although the Royal Procession ideally fosters social integration, it was disrupted in 1987 by a quarrel between two factions of priests. The goddess’s itinerary, the culminating date of the pilgrimage, the type of sacrifice to be performed, the order of procession, the participation of previously excluded persons, and the competency of certain ritual specialists—all were subjects of heated dispute between the rival groups. What was the reason for

  7. The orientation of Byzantine Churches in eastern Macedonia and Thrace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliades, Y.

    From perhaps the mid-4th century onwards it became customary to give the sanctuary apses of churches an eastern orientation. In most churches, however, the main axis runs in a SE or NE direction and only in a few cases does it follow the rule. From the research carried out so far in the churches of Constantinople and Thessaloniki it has been found that the main axis of these buildings has a SE orientation. Particularly in the case of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople, the view has been expressed that this particular orientation is connected with the system used to control the natural lighting in its interior. No similar study has yet been carried out for the churches in Thessaloniki, except for that on the Rotunda and Panagia Kosmosoteira at Pherai (Vira). This fact, together with the fact that many churches which lie around the Thessaloniki-Constantinople axis have the same orientation, prompted us to extend our research to the churches situated in Eastern Macedonia and Thrace. The study includes churches - early Christian, Byzantine and post-Byzantine - that are built on either side of the Thessaloniki-Constantinople axis, between the latitudes of 40Ζ 43Σ N and 41Ζ 2Σ N.

  8. Study of heat exposure during Hajj (pilgrimage).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noweir, Madbuli H; Bafail, Abdullah O; Jomoah, Ibrahim M

    2008-12-01

    Heat stress presents a main problem to Muslim Hajeej (pilgrims) during Hajj (pilgrimage) season, particularly in summer. Records of the Saudi Ministry of Health show close relation between heat casualties and climatic heat load through consequent Hajj seasons. The present study was conducted to evaluate the climatic heat load in Hajj locations during summer of 1995 as well as just before and during the Hajj season of 1997. Heat measurements including: T (a), T (w), T (g), WBGT, relative humidity and air velocity were conducted through July-September 1995, and on March/April 1997, in 10 Hajj locations at morning, noon, afternoon and night. The highest WBGTs were at Haram court, Ghazzah area and Muna housing area, followed by Arafat areas and Muzdalefah, and the lowest at Azizia area. However, all the WBGTs were considerably higher than the ACGIH-TLV for safe heat exposure, particularly during daytime; meanwhile, heat exposure considerably exceeded the ASHRAE comfort zone at all locations all times. The natural climatic condition is a major contributing factor to the overall heat load; moreover, potentiated by heat dissipated from Hajj activities, including Hajeej crowds, human activities, and the vehicles' masses exhaust. This situation is further synergized by some pilgrims' misbehavior (e.g. living in open sunny areas, using vehicles without roofs) and lack of awareness of the seriousness of heat exposure among them. An outline for a control strategy has been suggested based on planting open areas of Arafat and Muna, provision of air conditioned housing and tents in Muna, segregation of pedestrians from vehicles and their provision of shaded roads and rest areas, establishing more water spatters in Arafat and Muna, checking the performance of large vehicles before issuing their permits for operation during Hajj, providing vehicles parking isolated areas away from Hajeej tents, provision of ample amounts of quality drinking water in all Hajj locations, provision of

  9. High Smog Levels Seen in Mecca During the Annual Pilgrimage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urton, James

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the Hajj drew 3.5 million Muslims to Mecca for 5 days of prayer and spiritual enlightenment. The annual pilgrimage, one of the largest annual gatherings of people in the world, also brings dangerous levels of air pollution to Islam's holiest city.

  10. An unknown letter by Joannes/Jean-Baptiste/ Thibaut, French Byzantines-musicologist 1899

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Danica

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns the letter sent from the French College in Phillipopoli/Plovdiv (Bulgaria by Pater Joannes /Jean-Baptiste/ Thibaut, the French Byzantines — musicologist, to Tihomir Ostojić, professor at the Secondary school (Gymnasium in Novi Sad, a literature historian and expert on Traditional Serbian Church Chant. At that time Thibaut was widening his research interest in Byzantine Chant and neumatic notation, to include Slavonic Chant Tradition, first Russian Chant and later that of the Balkan peoples as well. He was one of the first foreigners to show interest in the Orthodox Chant Tradition of the Southern Slavs, and perceived that, contrary of the Russians, South Slavs never adopted early Byzantine neumatic notation. Visiting monasteries in Bulgaria he tried to find reasons for this lack of Byzantine notation among the Southern Slavs. In the above letter he posed very serious questions regarding Chant in the Serbian Orthodox Church, more precisely regarding the "Karlovci Chant". Unfortunately, it is not known if Thibaut received any kind of reply from Ostojić, nor have we found the reply sent to him by the Serbian Patriarch Georgije Branković, whom he also addressed, asking for help. Answers by those experts to the Thibaut's well formulated questions would be an extremely important contribution to studies of Traditional Serbian Church Chant.

  11. Western chapels in Middle Byzantine churches: Meaning and significance

    OpenAIRE

    Sinkević Ida

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines functional and compositional relationship between the narthex and the western chapels adjacent to it in middle Byzantine churches The author examines the architectural features, archaeological evidence decorative programs and literary sources related to the western end of middle Byzantine churches and establishes that that the process of integration of the western chapels with the narthex proper, seen in a number of Palaeologan monuments, actually began in middle Byzantine...

  12. Western chapels in Middle Byzantine churches: Meaning and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinkević Ida

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines functional and compositional relationship between the narthex and the western chapels adjacent to it in middle Byzantine churches The author examines the architectural features, archaeological evidence decorative programs and literary sources related to the western end of middle Byzantine churches and establishes that that the process of integration of the western chapels with the narthex proper, seen in a number of Palaeologan monuments, actually began in middle Byzantine times.

  13. Some typological features of Byzantine spatha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksić Marko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses finds of a special type of cross-guard, closer analogies of which may be found on Byzantine visual presentations from the IX-XI centuries. The only archaeological find of a sword with such a cross-guard which includes a preserved blade, indicates the characteristics of the spatha - the type of sword that was widespread in Byzantium, in those times. Swords with this kind of cross-guard and the general characteristics of the spatha are depicted in visual presentations as the weapons of the protospatharios or some other high-ranking imperial guardsmen and, in the descriptions of Byzantine court ceremony, this weapon was also called a spatha.

  14. [Byzantine therapeutics in the Ottoman world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, E A

    1999-01-01

    The medical literature of the greek speaking ottoman world was deeply influenced by its byzantine heritage: the major authors were copied and commented, while practical manuals containing recipes and therapies - the iatrosophia- kept being enlarged with useful information. Furthermore, during the first centuries hospitals closely followed the models of their glorious past in what concerns architecture, scientific level, means and targets. In fact, only the years after 1770 rely on occidental academic knowledge and adopt modern conceptions.

  15. FUZZY DECISION MAKING MODEL FOR BYZANTINE AGREEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. MURUGAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Byzantine fault tolerance is of high importance in the distributed computing environment where malicious attacks and software errors are common. A Byzantine process sends arbitrary messages to every other process. An effective fuzzy decision making approach is proposed to eliminate the Byzantine behaviour of the services in the distributed environment. It is proposed to derive a fuzzy decision set in which the alternatives are ranked with grade of membership and based on that an appropriate decision can be arrived on the messages sent by the different services. A balanced decision is to be taken from the messages received across the services. To accomplish this, Hurwicz criterion is used to balance the optimistic and pessimistic views of the decision makers on different services. Grades of membership for the services are assessed using the non-functional Quality of Service parameters and have been estimated using fuzzy entropy measure which logically ranks the participant services. This approach for decision making is tested by varying the number of processes, varying the number of faulty services, varying the message values sent to different services and considering the variation in the views of the decision makers about the services. The experimental result shows that the decision reached is an enhanced one and in case of conflict, the proposed approach provides a concrete result, whereas decision taken using the Lamport’s algorithm is an arbitrary one.

  16. Fatal wounding of the Byzantine Emperor Julian the Apostate (361-363 A.D.): approach to the contribution of ancient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascaratos, J; Voros, D

    2000-05-01

    Byzantine surgery flourished from the early stages of the Byzantine empire (324-1453 A.D.). The first great Byzantine physicians, among the most eminent being Oribasius from Pergamun (fourth century), not only compiled anthologies of the works of ancient Greek, Alexandrian, and Roman physicians but added their own personal practical experience and observations. The circumstances surrounding, and the treatment of, the fatal abdominal wounding of one of the most renowned emperors of Byzantium, Julian the Apostate (361-363 A.D.), is examined based on historical accounts unknown in the broader medical bibliography, namely, the histories and chronicles of Byzantine writers. From this analysis it can be concluded that the emperor's physician, Oribasius, in all probability, applied knowledge of ancient Greek and Roman surgery to save his famous patient. The techniques of "gastrorrhaphy" and pharmaceutical confrontation of the wound in that era, adopted later by the surgeons of the Medieval West, seem to constitute noteworthy roots of modern surgery.

  17. A Byzantine Fault-Tolerant Ordering Service for the Hyperledger Fabric Blockchain Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, João; Bessani, Alysson; Vukolić, Marko

    2017-01-01

    Hyperledger Fabric (HLF) is a flexible permissioned blockchain platform designed for business applications beyond the basic digital coin addressed by Bitcoin and other existing networks. A key property of HLF is its extensibility, and in particular the support for multiple ordering services for building the blockchain. Nonetheless, the version 1.0 was launched in early 2017 without an implementation of a Byzantine fault-tolerant (BFT) ordering service. To overcome this limitation, we designed...

  18. A Study on Impact of Informatization on Tourist Behavior : Analysis of Anime Pilgrimage

    OpenAIRE

    岡本, 健

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows impact of informatization on tourist behavior in Japan. This research adopts analysis of "Anime Pilgrimage" in order to accomplish the above mentioned objective. Recently, in Japan, some of anime fans make "Anime Pilgrimage" which is a kind of tourist behavior. It would appear that this behavior was affected by informatization strongly. As a result, it was found that "Anime Pilgrim" was affected by informatization not only before "Anime Pilgrimage" but also throughout "Anime ...

  19. A Study on Impact of Anime on Tourism in Japan : A Case of "Anime Pilgrimage"

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Recently, in Japan, some of anime fans make "Anime Pilgrimage" which is a kind of tourist behavior. People making an "Anime Pilgrimage" are called "Anime Pilgrims". Some cases of "Anime Pilgrimage" evolve into movement of regional development. In these cases "Anime Pilgrims" collaborate with local residents spontaneously, hold an event and make souvenir or goods. The objective of this paper is to clarify characteristics of "Anime Pilgrim" using questionnaire survey and face-to-face interviews.

  20. Pilgrimage: Intrinsic Motivation and Active Behavior in the Eldery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichberg Henning

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Can intrinsic religious motivation have relevant effects on the motor activity of older people? How are processions and pilgrimages related to the dominant imagination of old age as a period of fatigue and gray hair, suffering and loneliness, retirement and rest – and of waiting: waiting for a call from a loved one, waiting for the visit of a good companion, or, finally, expecting the end of life?

  1. GENERAL: A New Solution to Detectable Byzantine Agreement Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Meng, Luo-Ming; Zhu, Fu-Chen

    2009-12-01

    We present a new quantum protocol for solving detectable Byzantine agreement problem between three parties by employing one quantum key distribution protocol. The protocol is suggested by a special four-qubit entangled state instead of singlet states, which shows that singlet states are not necessary to achieve detectable Byzantine agreement.

  2. Unity and universe: understanding pilgrimage to Mount Athos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Gothóni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Having found the specific universal unity of pilgrimages, namely that pilgrimages are journeys of spiritual transformation, the author began to look more closely at the uniqueness of the content of beliefs embodied in pilgrimages to Mount Athos, particularly with the aim of unfolding the universe of beliefs concealed in the word proskýnima, which is the Greek word for ‘pilgrimage’. Therefore, he shifted his focus from the concept to the word ‘pilgrimage’, denoting the human phenomena of visiting holy and sacred places, persons, mountains, wells and so forth. This article illustrates how our preconceptions of the word ‘pilgrimage’ determine our conception of the concept or category of ‘pilgrimage’, which again determines our interpretation and understanding of the content of beliefs of this form of human phenomenon. As a by-product this article also displays the process of how our limited horizon of conceiving the concepts and words is extended in parallel with the process of research. The article shows how this horizon determines our leaving out fundamental elements of ‘pilgrimages’ which, in this case, are characteristic of visits to the Holy Mountain of Greece.

  3. Some typological features of Byzantine spatha

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksić Marko

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses finds of a special type of cross-guard, closer analogies of which may be found on Byzantine visual presentations from the IX-XI centuries. The only archaeological find of a sword with such a cross-guard which includes a preserved blade, indicates the characteristics of the spatha - the type of sword that was widespread in Byzantium, in those times. Swords with this kind of cross-guard and the general characteristics of the spatha are depicted in visual presentations a...

  4. Proposal for a reading of byzantine paintings inside the Cathedral of Genoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Volpera

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is dedicated to the analysis of the early Fourteenth Century byzantine cycle in the Saint Lawrence Cathedral in Genoa: in particular its purpose is to illustrate the iconographic program realized on the counter façade. The questions this article explains are: what is the relationship between painted images and spatial context, which means first the wall on which was carried out, and second the space of the Cathedral; what are the complex meanings of the iconographic themes of the Last Judgement and the Deesis, also in connection to the local devotional culture; and finally, considering the relation patron – subject of the cycle – artist, what are the connections between the Latin devotional needs of patrons and also of the public to which the cycle was intended, and the eastern compositional and expressive repertories of the Byzantine painters.

  5. Self-Representation on Byzantine Seals

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    Claudia Sode

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sigillography brings to our attention a huge number of individuals that would otherwise have remained unknown. Thousands of seals survive that bear, together with religious images, inscriptions indicating the name of their owner, a title and the office held. Based upon the corpus of published seals, the article investigates the contribution of lead seals to our understanding of identity in Byzantium. The geographic expansion of Byzantium in the tenth and eleventh centuries brought a host of populations within the empire’s frontier which for the most part were not Greek-speaking, including Armenians, Georgians, and Christian Arabs. As a consequence, oriental languages appear on Byzantine seals. The seals often show an image of the Virgin or a Saint on one side and an inscription on the other side, or they bear inscriptions on both sides. The legends can be in Arabic or Syriac, Armenian or Georgian alone or are sometimes “mixed”, for instance in Arabic and Greek or Arabic and Syriac. The seal of Andronikos Rogerios – a Westerner who, however, seems to have been fully integrated into Byzantine society – clearly shows Western influence in the choice of the seals’s image. The article discusses the function of inscriptions and images found on seals as a means of understanding ethnic, social, cultural and linguistic identities.

  6. The 'Byzantinisms' of king Stefan Radoslav

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    Maksimović Ljubomir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The life-style and politics of Stefan Radoslav bear the mark of activities that indicated his special attachment to the Byzantine world. These activities were prompted by a combination of ideological ambitions and political reality, but they were not in keeping with the modest achievements of Radoslav's reign. Moreover, most of these activities belong to the time when Radoslav was heir to the throne. There is no doubt that Stefan Nemanjić the Grand Zhupan and subsequently the first crowned king, had exclusive connections with the Byzantine dynasty of the Angeloi, especially with the emperor Alexios III (1195-1203. In that context, the donor's inscription in the basic ring of the dome in the Church of the Mother of God in Studenica (1208, in which his father Stefan Nemanja, is mentioned as (former 'veleslavni gospodin vse srbske zemlje veli(ki župan i svat cara grčkog kir Alesija', is quite indicative. This ideological construction would acquire a contour in reality by means of a political marriage with one of the female offspring of Angeloi lineage, which would represent an alternative solution to Stefan's failed marriage with Eudocia, daughter of the emperor Alexios. Instead, several years elapsed in waging war with the Latins, the Bulgarians and the State of Epiros. However, efforts to create firmer, more tangible ties with the Angeloi dynasty from Epiros were not forgotten. Therefore, the Serbian monarch brought his eldest son Radoslav into play, intending to have him act as a link with the Angeloi bloodline. As a result of all this, the final attempt to have Radoslav become the husband of a princess from the Angelos dynasty is not surprising. At the end of 1219 or the beginning of 1220, he married Anna Doukaina, the daughter of the epirotic ruler Theodore I Angelos Doukas Komnenos, which at that point represented a marriage connection of the highest possible level between two ruling houses. Stefan's insistence on Serbia acquiring a stake

  7. Pilgrimage, Past and Present. Norwegian Perspectives with emphasis on Santiago de Compostela

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    Roger Jensen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we discuss the phenomenon of pilgrimage from a Norwegian perspective, exemplified by the past and present role and significance of Santiago de Compostela as a holy site and destination for pilgrims. By taking a historical view, the transformation of meaning and role is stressed. In the Middle Ages, Santiago was an important pilgrimage destination for people living in Northern Europe. Following the subsequent Protestant Reformation and the era of confessionalization, Santiago came to exemplify all the problems and challenges related to pilgrimage and the name of the city became a derogatory word. From this background, the present-day rediscovery of pilgrimage in Norway and the role of the city of Santiago, as the foremost example of the renaissance of the pilgrimage phenomena in present day postmodern times, are discussed. It is argued that the “rehabilitation” of Santiago and the new interest in pilgrimage in Norway were made possible due to the redefinition of pilgrimage that has taken place on what can be characterized as an ideological level. It is a redefinition that reflects the postmodern renaissance of pilgrimage and which is documented in recent social scientific empirical studies on the Camino.

  8. Legendary genealogies of Byzantine Emperors and their families

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    Krsmanović Bojana T.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically, the Byzantine Emperor was, just like in the times of the Roman Empire, chosen on the basis of his personal qualities and merits — by the grace of God, of course. Practically, the factors which determined the ascension of a person to the throne were much more complex, the methods of gaining power being multifarious. In consequence, the political philosophy was confronted with the question of whether it is virtue (aretç or origin (génoz that defines an Emperor. Independently of this rather theoretical question, however, and despite the claims that the personal qualities are decisive in the choice of the Emperor, the origin of the ruler played an important role in the consciousness of the Byzantines of all epochs. This is why great attention was paid to the creation of family trees, especially in the cases when the Emperor was of low origin (homo novus or when it was for some reason necessary to strengthen his legitimacy. The choice of the genealogy was not random: since it carried a clear political message, it was of utmost importance with whom the Emperor in power would be associated and whose historical deeds or legendary personality would serve as a moral model. Also important is the fact that the search of a "good family" was as a rule triggered by the need to confirm one's own virtue. Thus, genealogies often reflect a certain system of values, usually emphasizing morality, courage in war, care for the welfare of the country, piety, etc. The choice of the archetype depended, of course, on the needs of the ruler for whom the genealogy was created. All this allows us to consider legendary genealogies as an expression of the imperial ideology. Notwithstanding their chronological diversity, the Byzantine imperial genealogies display very similar characteristics, i.e. they contain stereotypical elements, many of which had been established already in the first centuries of the Eastern Empire. In the early Byzantine period, when

  9. A Japanese media pilgrimage to a Tasmanian bakery

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    Craig Norris

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A small bakery in regional Tasmania, Australia, has been reimagined as a pop culture destination by Japanese tourists who claim it is the inspiration for a key location in the anime Kiki's Delivery Service. To understand how and why Japanese tourists have located this bakery in the imaginary world of Kiki, two processes are explored: the media pilgrimage, where fans bridge their ordinary reality and enter the special media world, and the media scaffold, where Kiki becomes a way to interpret the world around them.

  10. [Neurology in Byzantine medicine. An analysis of Alexander of Tralles' Medici libri duodecim].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Frutos-Gonzalez, Virgina; Guerrero-Peral, Ángel L

    2010-10-01

    Byzantium continued Greek and Roman habit of texts compilation, and so, preserved medical knowledge. In addition, assimilating the influence of Monastic and Arabic medicine, Byzantine physicians transmitted original contributions including references to neurological diseases. Alexander of Tralles was one of major exponents of Byzantine medicine. He received his early medical training with his father, and in extensive travels, gathered medical knowledge and experience. Medici libri duodecim is a treatise on pathology and therapeutics of internal diseases, in twelve books. It comprises views from observation of different diseases. Its influence was prolonged and it was translated and edited until Renaissance. We analyze grecolatin edition by Henricum Petrum (1556), with special interest in neurological disease citations. DEVELOPMENT. First of twelve books is dedicated to head and brain diseases. When considering headache, he classifies them, following Aretaeus of Cappadocia, in cephalalgia, cephalea and hemicrania, suggesting different pathogenic mechanisms and therapies. Headache is included among symptoms conducting, as well as memory or sleep disturbances, to delirium. Medici libri duodecim considers memory complaints among systemic diseases, mainly with cardiac involvement. Alexander distinguishes between paralysis (privation of sensibility and mobility concerning half of the body), and apoplexy (including main soul functions loss, even conducting to death). Regarding epilepsy, Medici libri duodecim considers that its origin can be outside the head, mainly in the stomach, and offers us descriptions of epileptic auras. Analysis of Alexander of Tralles' Medici libri duodecim shows how byzantine physicians understood neurological diseases. Therapeutics was based on venesection, medicinal plants and avoidance of noxious substances.

  11. Towards scalable Byzantine fault-tolerant replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbierski, Maciej

    2017-08-01

    Byzantine fault-tolerant (BFT) replication is a powerful technique, enabling distributed systems to remain available and correct even in the presence of arbitrary faults. Unfortunately, existing BFT replication protocols are mostly load-unscalable, i.e. they fail to respond with adequate performance increase whenever new computational resources are introduced into the system. This article proposes a universal architecture facilitating the creation of load-scalable distributed services based on BFT replication. The suggested approach exploits parallel request processing to fully utilize the available resources, and uses a load balancer module to dynamically adapt to the properties of the observed client workload. The article additionally provides a discussion on selected deployment scenarios, and explains how the proposed architecture could be used to increase the dependability of contemporary large-scale distributed systems.

  12. The Byzantine Chant Heritage in Sicily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfratello, Giuseppe

    The present dissertation provides a historical ethnomusicological study on the liturgical chant tradition of the Arbëreshe communities in Sicily based on oral and written sources. The musical repertoire has been cultivated by priests and faithful adhering to the Byzantine rite since the time...... of organisation. After five centuries of oral transmission, it still lives, despite, or maybe thanks to the lack of ‘original’ written sources, and it might thus be seen as a multi-layered musical tradition, featuring multiple versions and encompassing a certain degree of melodic heterogeneity....... of the Albanian diaspora in Italy in the aftermath of the Fall of Constantinople. As a matter of fact, the repertoire seems to be maintained through a delicate balance between techniques of ‘reception’, ‘safeguarding’, and ‘re-byzantinisation’ that characterize both its present oral chant administration and its...

  13. The Cosmological Potential of Byzantine Ascetic Aesthetics

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    Аndrey Tsarenok

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study explores the peculiarities of the cosmological senses, which exist in Byzantine ascetic aesthetical doctrine. Underlining the obvious strong connection between theological aesthetics, ontology and cosmology, the author of the article points out the interpretation of world’s beauty, order and harmony by representatives of ascetic culture of Byzantium (sts. Grigoriy the Theologian, Grigoriy, bishop of Niss, Ioann Chrysostom, Ioann Damaskin, Simeon the New Theologian and others. The aesthetics of the asceticism is characterized as theocentrical ontology of beauty. Its development has been influenced by theism, trinitary monotheism and theocentrism of Christian world-view tradition. The theologians speak about the existence of the Highest Absolute Beauty, Who is the cause of the beautiful things in created reality. The impressive qualities of cosmos are considered as evidence of being of their Almighty Creator. Therefore, the sensual cognition can help believer in his or her search of God. At the same time, ascetic aesthetics prevents from unreasonable enjoying of the sensual (material, somatic beauty for such enjoying is able to make the true person’s spiritual perfection impossible. Moreover, according to Christian theology, absolutization of the cosmical beauty regularly distorts the person’s belief: Byzantine ascetics point out the “aesthetical” cause of paganism appearance. Appealing to Bible, theologians differentiate two periods in history of cosmos, which can be interpreted as the pre-sin and the post-sin ones. The beginning of visible world existence was marked with being of original beauty, order and harmony, but the transgression, committed by the first people, distorted the cosmos to a great degree. Acknowledging of this sorrowful fact does not ruin quite an optimistic character of ascetic aesthetical, ontological and cosmological conceptions of Byzantium. According to them, the beauty of Universe will be completely

  14. Religious Landscape and Ecological Ethics: Pilgrimage to the Lithuanian Calvaries

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    Darius Liutikas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the ecology of pilgrimage at the Calvaries – Ways of the Cross – in Lithuania. Personal obligations to nature and respect of sacred place intermingle with devotional practices and certain rituals. Large scale arrivals at the Calvaries only occurs at certain times of year, mostly during the Indulgence Feasts. Devotional practices such as meditation on the suffering of Christ, prayers and hymns, playing musical instruments, washing one’s face at the Cedron spring are quite common during the Way. Research shows that walking the Way of the Cross doesn’t cause negative environmental, cultural and social impacts. Moreover, pilgrimage could be beneficial to local communities - providing opportunities to sell handcraft products, to meet relatives and friends. Visiting Calvaries is a religious act restrained by time: usually it takes about 3-4 hours to undertake the Stations of the Cross, about one hour to celebrate Holy Mass, and up to one hour at the market place buying religious memorabilia and other souvenirs.

  15. Diverse Legal Significance of a Document in Byzantine Private Law

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    Tamara M. Matović

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Byzantine, Graeco-Roman, law is the organic continuation of Roman law. However, the legal system itself, and many legal institutions in it, had gone through certain evolution. In this article, by researching Greek acts conserved in various monastic arhives, and confronting them with stipulations in the Byzantine law codes, we question the issues of consensuality of a contract, form of a legal deed, and acquisation of a real right in Byzantine private law. The nature of contracts in Byzantine law has not been sufficiently studied. Richful theoretical studies had been written in regards to the contract of purchase in Roman and Justinians law, however various and sometimes confronting information from the later Greek codes did not give definite answers to this question. Byzantine codices on this theme encompass already familiar stipulations and legal institutes. The attention of the lawgiver was on the notary system, on the mechanism which produced a written instrument. We believe that the issue of the παράδοσις δι̉ ἐγγράφου was not sufficiently highlighted in the field of Byzantine studies mostly due to the lack of information in the sources. However, when regarding the Athonite documents, it can be seen that the formulae describing the act of law transfer could be concidered as a relevant material to comment on this legal institute.

  16. On pilgrimage with biblical women in their land(s

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    Elaine M. Wainwright

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent sociological and anthropological studies have provided models for examining pilgrimage both in its ancient and contemporary manifestations. Such models can facilitate an examination of the phenomenon of study tours to biblical lands and the multivalence of the discourses associated with such tours. The first part of the article engaged critically with the literature in order to open up some frameworks for examining the study tour to biblical lands. Feminist critical biblical scholarship with its potential for a feminist hermeneutic of creative imagination contributes to the multivalence around the study tour. Therefore, the second part of the article engaged this scholarship in relation to an imagined tour with women of the biblical lands. The article highlighted significant issues for consideration for those planning a study tour of biblical lands, especially in terms of the consideration that ought to be paid to gender.

  17. Pilgrimage and Pilgrim Hierarchies in Vernacular Discourse: Comparative Notes from the Camino de Santiago and Glastonbury

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    Tiina Sepp

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available 0 false 18 pt 18 pt 0 0 false false false This article is based on my fieldwork conducted in two important destinations in the spiritual landscape of European vernacular religion – the Camino de Santiago (pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela in northern Spain, and Glastonbury in southwest England. In this comparison between modern expressions of pilgrimage, I look into the power relationships that exist on the pilgrimage, describe how hierarchies of pilgrims are created and maintained, and reflect on the meaning of the words pilgrim and pilgrimage. The co-existence of the different belief systems of Christianity and New Age and the conflicts and tension between them will be explored. I will also examine discourse around competing male and female energies. 

  18. Centres of international diplomacy in the medieval epoch. Byzantine diplomatic school

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    Silvia DULSCHI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Byzantine diplomacy is recognized by its ceremonial character, displaying luxury and wealth, as well as its manipulative and crafty style. All these aspects represented only the rational reactions of the Byzantines to an unfavorable strategic context. In particular, because the Byzantines could not rely on considerable military capability, they had to resort to diplomacy in order to achieve their major goals.

  19. Roman and Byzantine Ankara observed by foreign travellers

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    H. Sinan Sülüner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its strategic location and being crossroads of major roads Ankara was one of the most important cities of Anatolia throughout the ages especially during the Roman and Byzantine periods. During the Ottoman period the export of camelot to European countries played an important role in the recognition of Ankara as a trade center that urged European travellers to visit the city. They described Ankara with respect to their own point of view which contributed to our cultural heritage. In this article buildings, spolia and inscriptions belonging to the Roman and Byzantine periods are put forward within the framework of the information given by the travellers.

  20. Exact Regenerating Codes for Byzantine Fault Tolerance in Distributed Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Yunghsiang S; Mow, Wai Ho

    2011-01-01

    Due to the use of commodity software and hardware, crash-stop and Byzantine failures are likely to be more prevalent in today's large-scale distributed storage systems. Regenerating codes have been shown to be a more efficient way to disperse information across multiple nodes and recover crash-stop failures in the literature. In this paper, we present the design of regeneration codes in conjunction with integrity check that allows exact regeneration of failed nodes and data reconstruction in presence of Byzantine failures. A progressive decoding mechanism is incorporated in both procedures to leverage computation performed thus far. The fault-tolerance and security properties of the schemes are also analyzed.

  1. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-04-19

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  2. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schibille

    Full Text Available The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS. The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  3. This-worldly and other-worldly: a holocaust pilgrimage

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    Tina Hamrin-Dahl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This story is about a kind of pilgrimage, which is connected to the course of events which occurred in Częstochowa on 22 September 1942. In the morning, the German Captain Degenhardt lined up around 8,000 Jews and commanded them to step either to the left or to the right. This efficient judge from the police force in Leipzig was rapid in his decisions and he thus settled the destinies of thousands of people. After the Polish Defensive War of 1939, the town (renamed Tschenstochau had been occupied by Nazi Germany, and incorporated into the General Government. The Nazis marched into Częstochowa on Sunday, 3 September 1939, two days after they invaded Poland. The next day, which became known as Bloody Monday, approximately 150 Jews were shot deadby the Germans. On 9 April 1941, a ghetto for Jews was created. During World War II about 45,000 of the Częstochowa Jews were killed by the Germans; almost the entire Jewish community living there.The late Swedish Professor of Oncology, Jerzy Einhorn (1925–2000, lived in the borderhouse Aleja 14, and heard of the terrible horrors; a ghastliness that was elucidated and concretized by all the stories told around him. Jerzy Einhorn survived the ghetto, but was detained at the Hasag-Palcery concentration camp between June 1943 and January 1945. In June 2009, his son Stefan made a bus tour between former camps, together with Jewish men and women, who were on this pilgrimage for a variety of reasons. The trip took place on 22–28 June 2009 and was named ‘A journey in the tracks of the Holocaust’. Those on the Holocaust tour represented different ‘pilgrim-modes’. The focus in this article is on two distinct differences when it comes to creed, or conceptions of the world: ‘this-worldliness’ and ‘other- worldliness’. And for the pilgrims maybe such distinctions are over-schematic, though, since ‘sacral fulfilment’ can be seen ‘at work in all modern constructions of travel, including

  4. Contesting Conceptual Boundaries: Byzantine Literature and Its History

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    Panagiotis A. Agapitos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the problems of writing a history of Byzantine literature in the context of postmodern anxieties about canonization, authority and narrative histories of literature. An essential difficulty for such a project is the fact that Byzantine literature has been viewed as a continuation of or appendix to Ancient Greek literature, while, on the other, it has been divided into 'learned' and 'vernacular', the latter category having been defined as Modern Greek since the middle of the nineteenth century. The paper offers two sets of criteria for establishing new concepts of periodization and taxonomy. A series of examples are indicatively adduced in order to explain the scientific and ideological impasse in which Byzantine Studies have found themselves at the end of the previous century, while delineating a proposal for a different approach to content and structure of a wider synthesis. Writing a ‘new’ history of Byzantine literature is an experiment in proposing a radical paradigm shift by means of which this particular literary production in Medieval Greek can be studied within the broader context of Medieval European literatures as an integrated entity rather than as a separate and peripheral phase in the histories of Ancient or Modern Greek literature.

  5. Harald Sigurdsson and the Russo-Byzantine War of 1043

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    Oleksandr M. Fylypchuk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present article analyzes Kekaumenos’ commentary on the service of Harald Sigurdsson in the Byzantine army. Special attention is given to the composition of Consilia et Narrationes and the historiographic perception of this text. It then discusses Kekaumenos’ commentary in light of Harald’s adventures in the Haralds saga Siguðarsonar and the story about the attacks of Rus’ in the Byzantine literature. The author attempts to show that Constantine IX Monomachos tried to leave the large groups of mercenaries in Constantinople. Furthermore, the emperor’s attitude to Harald and his warriors was related to the events of Russo-Byzantine war in 1043. Constantine IX Monomachos dispersed these mercenaries into the themes. John Scylitzes wrote that the emperor put a guard over them to prevent them from inciting a rebellion. These arrests could explain Harald’s mysterious detention in the reign of Constantine IX Monomachos. It is possible to conclude that Harald’s detention was caused by the Russo-Byzantine war in 1043.

  6. L’impératrice byzantine et la cour (XIIIe-XVe siècle

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    Malamut Élisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the Byzantine empress and the court in the empire of the Lascarides and under the Palaiologoi. It studies the arrival of the Byzantine imperial princess, the ceremonial of her marriage and her coronation. All sources emphasize the prokypsis of the newly crowned bride and the role of the mother-in-law. Orthodox ceremony remains in force and the latitude granted to the early fifteenth century Latin princesses to dispense appears not to be respected. Then the author examines clothing and insignia of the Empress of the time of the Palaiologoi, then questions the role of the Empress in the march of the empire: receiving the women at the court, assistance at the counseling, at last in her presence in urban life. Finally it seems that the empresses from the West kept with them the retinue that had accompanied them from their country of origin and practiced a way of life freer than the princesses that came from the Orthodox world. The author concludes with the «noise of the Gynekeion».

  7. The Evolution of the Golden Temple of Amritsar into a Major Sikh Pilgrimage Center

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    Rajinder S. Jutla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Today the Sikh diaspora encompasses much of the world, having spread from India and Southeast Asia to the Pacific Rim, the Middle East, East Africa, Europe, and the Americas. Sikhism is a monotheistic world religion founded in the 15th century by Guru Nanak. His successors continued his teachings and provided a distinct shape to the Sikh community with a written language, a religious scripture and many institutions. The paper examines the significance of sacred place and the role of pilgrimage according to Sikh scripture. It also explores Sikh attitudes and practices towards pilgrimage through a questionnaire based survey. Finally, the paper investigates how the Golden Temple of Amritsar emerged as a sacred place for Sikhs and how it evolved into a major place of pilgrimage.

  8. Forms of Pilgrimage at the Shrine of Khāled Nabi, Northeastern Iran

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    Mehdi Ebadi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pilgrimage (religious tourism is one of the fastest growing forms of tourism. Nevertheless, there is still a gap between abstract theory and empirical research about this form of tourism in the literature. This dearth of tourism studies is even more glaring in the field of Ziyārat or pilgrimage in Islam which in spite of its importance and wide extended practice have been mostly ignored in tourism and geographic literature. The present study features one such area that is (almost unknown within the community of tourism and geography researchers. In Iran, religious pilgrimage has a long tradition. Numerous sacred places with varieties of rituals and traditions, which practice among the pilgrims all around the country, indicate on its antiquity (before Islamic periods. Among the most practiced forms of religious pilgrimage are the visits to several thousands of shrines, which are known in Iran as Ziyāratgah (lit. place of visit or Imāmzādeh. One of these Ziyāratgah is the pre-Islamic shrine of Khāled Nabi (also known as Halat Nabi, which belong to a legendary Christian holy man of the 6th A.D. The shrine lies in the northeastern Iranian province of Golestan, in a region called Turkmen-Sahra. Despite its relative remote setting, every year more than 90,000 travellers do visit this shrine. This article seeks to consider varieties of pilgrimage forms at the shrine. The results of the study shows that the travelers of Khāled Nabi shrine are not homogenous and comprise of different types of visitors. In addition to secular motivations, based on the visitors’ inventives, three zones/forms of pilgrimage, namely, ‘‘religious pilgrims’’, ‘‘cultural pilgrims’’, ‘‘nostalgic pilgrims’’have been recognized.

  9. Byzantine kalophonia, illustrated by St. John Koukouzeles’ piece

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    Maria Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores some aspects of the so-called kalophonic musical style which flourished during the last centuries of Byzantium. It focuses on a masterpiece by St. John Koukouzeles, namely the epibole Φρούρησον πανένδοξε (Ο Allglorious, keep watch over the city, in honor of St. Demetrios, the protector of Thessaloniki, and is complementary to some previous musicological analysis of this piece by Stephania Meralidou. After a brief presentation of the old sticheron Ἔχει μὲν ἡ θειοτάτη σου ψυχή, whereof St. John takes his departing point for the kalophonic composition, the paper concentrates on a multi-level analysis of the epibole, firstly on the ground of the late middle-Byzantine notation, according to the ms Vlatadon 46 (A.D. 1551, and secondly by comparing the old notation to its slow exegesis in new-Byzantine notation by Chourmouzios Chartophylax (score and recording issued by the Greek Byzantine Choir, dir. L. Angelopoulos.The analysis comprises several approaches like textual, music-architectural, modal, micro-syntactical, rhetorical, macro-syntactical, generative, comparative (cf. plates 7-12, 17-20. Since this material is also suitable for didactic purposes, the different plates are given again in the appendix, in form of exercises to be filled in by interested students.The different analytical approaches reveal the highly refined melodic fabric of kalophonia with its plethora of theseis-combinations, the extensive use of music-rhetorical devices, basic norms of the complex art of musical exegesis in this style, as well as the beauty of this kind of melodies, which have been acknowledged to represent the ‘zenith’ of Byzantine music (Wellesz.

  10. Arab-Byzantine War, 629-644 AD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-14

    ecclesiastical architecture until the arrival of the Gothic style 500 years later. Inevitably, the greatest expression of their greatest art was in their...fulfillment of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE Military History by DAVID E. KUNSELMAN, LCDR , SC... ART AND SCIENCE THESIS APPROVAL PAGE Name of Candidate: David E. Kunselman Thesis Title: Arab-Byzantine War Approved by

  11. Self-Stabilization, Byzantine Containment, and Maximizable Metrics: Necessary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Dubois, Swan; Masuzawa, Toshimitsu; Tixeuil, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Self-stabilization is a versatile approach to fault-tolerance since it permits a distributed system to recover from any transient fault that arbitrarily corrupts the contents of all memories in the system. Byzantine tolerance is an attractive feature of distributed systems that permits to cope with arbitrary malicious behaviors. We consider the well known problem of constructing a maximum metric tree in this context. Combining these two properties leads to some impossibility results. In this ...

  12. Exact Regenerating Codes for Byzantine Fault Tolerance in Distributed Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Yunghsiang S.; Zheng, Rong; Mow, Wai Ho

    2011-01-01

    Due to the use of commodity software and hardware, crash-stop and Byzantine failures are likely to be more prevalent in today's large-scale distributed storage systems. Regenerating codes have been shown to be a more efficient way to disperse information across multiple nodes and recover crash-stop failures in the literature. In this paper, we present the design of regeneration codes in conjunction with integrity check that allows exact regeneration of failed nodes and data reconstruction in ...

  13. Holy Places and Pilgrimage in the Post-Socialist Bulgaria (Karamihova, 2014 [In Bulgarian

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    S. Antova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After the communist regime in Bulgaria, the interest of the people to religion was revived. Many of anthropological dimensions with religious nature are considered in Karamihova’s book (2014. Religious tourism and places of pilgrimages are described. The dynamics of this new social development is studied.

  14. Medieval Architectures for Religious Tourism and Hospitality along the Pilgrimage Routes of Northern Italy

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    Silvia Beltramo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sacred spaces are, and have always been, places of reception: hospitality is in fact a precept of God. Many biblical passages remind us of this, such as the one (Gen 18, 4-5 in which Abraham welcomes three guests, washes their feet and offers them a piece of bread and a place to rest under a tree. Saint Benedict too, in chapter 53 of the Rule, insisted on the need to honour pilgrims and travellers, who should be welcomed with a charitable service ready for devotion and stated that all guests who entered the monastery should be received as if they were Christ, washing their hands and feet. The reception of travellers, the sick, and pilgrims in religious centres in the Middle Ages has been one of the cornerstones of the life of many monastic and convent communities scattered throughout the territory. The growing number of domus hospitals and xenodochii, recorded from the early centuries of the Middle Ages until the 15th century, demonstrates the need for them and their widespread dissemination in Italy and Europe. It seems to be possible to identify some phases of this development linked to the different monastic and convent orders that dedicated themselves to relieving the suffering of travellers and the sick. An initial significant presence along the road axes was followed by a subsequent phase of settlement in the major urban centres. Each community had its rules which also influenced the choice of where the sites were positioned, the buildings in which to receive pilgrims and the architectural typologies, often clearly designed to identify the place immediately. The research findings presented here derive from research aimed at identifying religious hospitality architectures through a study of the documentary sources and an analysis of the buildings still preserved in the territory of Northern Italy. In particular, the analysis of the main cases linked to monastic hospitality, such as the Sacra di San Michele – the centre of worship of

  15. [The establishment of the hospital-system in the Byzantine Empire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józsa, László

    2011-01-01

    Byzantine hospitals developed out of Christian institutions for the poor and homeless. Philanthropy provided the initial impulse to create hospices (xenons) and to expand these institutions into specialized medical centers (iatreons or nosokomeions). However the Byzantine nosocomeions resemble more closely modern hospitals than they do any of the institutions of Greek-Roman antiquity or any of the houses of charity in the Latin West during the Middle Ages. Since the 4th century the Byzantine hospitals have stressed the central position of the nosocomeion in Byzantine society at the intersection of state, ecclesiastical and professional interest. In the great cities and in the capital, more than hundred hospitals worked in the East-Roman Empire. The Byzantine hospital rules guaranted patients private beds, required physicians to wash their hands after each examination and arranged the physical plant to keep all the sick warm. The Byzantine hospitals had separate sections (in modern terms: surgery-trauma surgery, internal medicine, ophthalmology, etc.) and at the beginning of the sixth century a separate institution for women. From the sixth century at least, bathing facilities normally adjoined Byzantine nosocomeia. By the twelfth century Byzantine hospitals also set aside a room or perhaps a separate building to treat outpatients. In addition to the main dormitories the surgery, baths and outpatient clinic, the large parts of hospitals also had separate rooms (or adjoining buildings) for library, for lecture hall, for administrative functions and record keeping for storage and for other services.

  16. Volunteers in the Late Byzantine Army: to the Question of Thelematarioi

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    Vladimir A. Zolotovskiy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the problem of a volunteer’s service at the late Byzantium military organization. The goal of the present research work is to determine the functional significance of the thelematarioi term. According to the analysis of narrative sources and act materials, the author concludes that the current state of the sources does not allow us to single out the thelematarioi as a special group of the byzantine population that had a special legal status associated with the military service. The term thelematarioi as an independent lexeme with a special functional military-technical and socio-legal content entered the science solely because of its mention of George Pachymeres in the context of describing events of particular importance to the empire. The author concludes that the thelematarioi was only one of the terms for volunteers involved in military service. Besides, as part of the problem statement, the author makes a preliminary conclusion that the volunteer service was of an organized nature supported by an independent special management system. The composition of volunteer military units that participated in the most important events of the Early Paleologian period was represented by migrant soldiers from among the Romanian’s peasants who knew warfare perhaps as stratiotes and deprived of their own lands, weapons, horses, etc. As they were forced to look for sources of income, if necessary, this part of the Byzantine population was able to attract to military service for fee, reinforcing the basic composition of the troops. Obviously, the weakness of weapons in combination with the professional skills of the soldiers predetermined their placement in the rearguard in the Battle at Apros.

  17. Illustrious personalities of ancient and Byzantine Greece with renal problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, Athanasios; Skarpelos, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    It is a traditional practice to divide history in two main categories. First, Great History, that is the important events, such as wars, revolutions, conquests, that shaped our world during the past centuries. Secondly, Minor History, that is events in the lives of important persons, gossips at the Courts, trivial coincidences, that made people wonder and discuss them. The division, although generally accepted, is not clear cut, and there is a huge overlap between the two categories. In this article, we present a particular group of data from the second category, renal problems of illustrious personalities from Ancient Greek and Byzantine eras that, in many cases, influenced the outcome of Great History.

  18. Acoustic analysis of musical intervals in modern Byzantine Chant scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delviniotis, Dimitrios; Kouroupetroglou, Georgios; Theodoridis, Sergios

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate experimentally the music intervals in modern Byzantine Chant performance and to compare the obtained results with the equal temperament scales introduced by the Patriarchal Music Committee (PMC). Current measurements resulted from pressure and electroglottographic recordings of 13 famous chanters singing scales of all the music genera. The scales' microintervals were derived after pitch detection based on autocorrelation, cepstrum, and harmonic product spectrum analysis. The microintervallic differences between the experimental values and the PMC's ones were statistically analyzed indicating large deviation of the mean values and the standard deviations. Significant interaction effects were identified among some genera and between ascending and descending scale directions.

  19. Digital hajj: the pilgrimage to Mecca in Muslim cyberspace and the issue of religious online authority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Schlosser

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to give an overview of the different representations of the pilgrimage to Mecca found in the ‘liminal space’ of the internet. For that purpose, it examines a handful of emblematic examples of how the hajj is being presented and discussed in cyberspace. Thereby, special attention shall be paid to the question of how far issues of religious authority are manifest on these websites, whether the content providers of web pages appoint themselves as authorities by scrutinizing established views of the fifth pillar of Islam, or if they upload already printed texts onto their sites in order to reiterate normative notions of the pilgrimage to Mecca, or of they make use of search engine optimisation techniques, thus heightening the very visibility of their online presence and increasing the possibility of becoming authoritative in shaping internet surfers’ perceptions of the hajj.

  20. The Byzantine Commonwealth and the international status of the Georgian political units in the first half of the 10th century

    OpenAIRE

    Papaskiri, Zurab

    2011-01-01

    Outstanding Russian Byzantine scholar Dimitri Obolensky introduced the term "Byzantine Commonwealth" as a concept in his fundamental work The Byzantine Commonwealth. Eastern Europe, 500-1453 (published in 1971). He described the Byzantine Commonwealth as a "supranational community" of sorts rooted in Orthodoxy and the idea of primacy of the Byzantine emperor. The present author demonstrates that many of the neighboring states (not only the Slavs and Rumanians as Dimitri Obolensky believed) be...

  1. Management of penile tumours during the Byzantine period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Marios; de Bree, Eelco; Trompoukis, Constantinos; Manios, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    While conventional treatment of penile cancer consists of total penile amputation and bilateral lymphadenectomy, recently a more conservative strategy comprising penile-preserving surgery and selective lymphadenectomy has been applied in order to preserve the penis and to minimize unnecessary inguinal lymphadenectomy. A thorough literature survey was performed to see what was already known of the surgical treatment of penile tumours in ancient times. In the Byzantine period, surgery appeared to have been highly developed, as one may conclude from the surgical material included mainly in the works of Oribasius of Pergamus and Paul of Aegina. Being aware of cancer, they described in their medical encyclopaedias malignant and benign tumours of the prepuce and glans penis, as well as their surgical and non-surgical management. After local excision of malignant tumours, they strongly recommended burning to prevent relapse, whereas they discouraged simultaneous removal of external and internal preputial lesions, because of the risk of perforation of the prepuce. These surprisingly detailed descriptions prove that Byzantine surgery had reached a higher level than commonly supposed. Penile-preserving treatment, which has recently become the therapeutic strategy of choice, was already accomplished in ancient times by using adjuvant thermal or chemical burning after local tumour excision.

  2. Quantum Byzantine agreement via Hardy correlations and entanglement swapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Ramij; Wieśniak, Marcin; Żukowski, Marek

    2015-10-01

    We present a device-independent quantum scheme for the Byzantine generals problem. The protocol is for three parties. Party C is to send two identical one-bit messages to parties A and B . The receivers A and B may exchange two one-bit messages informing the other party on the message received from C . A bit-flipping error in one of the transmissions does not allow the receiving parties to establish what was the message of C . Our quantum protocol is based on Hardy's argument, which uses a set of conditions impossible for classical systems, but satisfied by predictions for a unique two-qubit state. The scheme has the feature that if the messages of the Byzantine protocol are readable (that is give an unambiguous bit value for any of the receivers), then any error by C (cheating by one of the commanding generals) is impossible. A and B do not have to exchange protocol messages to be sure of this.

  3. PILGRIMAGE AND RELIGIOUS TOURISM ON THE WAY OF ST. JAMES – THE FIRST EUROPEAN CULTURAL ROUTE

    OpenAIRE

    Mróz, Franciszek; Mróz, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    Since last two decades we notice an intensive growth of the pilgrimage movement along the Way os St. James. This route connecting furthests places in Europe and ending in Santiago de Compostela is based on a medieval transportation route called The Royal Route – Via Regia. The route exists for over 1000 years and is constantly developed thanks to actions taken by the authorities of the Catholic Church, governments and non-government organizations, as well as numerous enthusiastics of the Way ...

  4. The Ghriba pilgrimage in the island of Jerba: the semantics of otherness

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    Dora Carpenter-Latiri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the Jewish pilgrimage to the Ghriba Synagogue on the island of Jerba (or Djerba in Tunisia, with a focus on the semantics of other­ness as it is condensed in the devotion to the Ghriba, the eponym­ous local saint of the synagogue. The author explores the semantics of the pilgrimage to the Ghriba (the ‘stranger saint’ and in particular, the polysemy of the name and the ambivalence of otherness in the Tunisian context, in particular in representations through discourse in the Tunisian Arabic language as shared by Muslims and Jews. She argues that this complex and ambivalent representation is the central meaning of the ritual of the Ghriba pilgrimage, as the negative connotations of otherness are reversed and amplified into the affirmation of a positive, healing ritual, dedicated to the stranger saint as a symbolic allegory of the otherness of the Jewish community as a whole, or as an allegory of the alienated, exiled, marginalized self.

  5. Pilgrimage Experience and Consumption of Travel to the City of Makkah for Hajj Ritual

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    Razaq Raj

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In modern society which, by definition is increasingly secular and culturally motivated, the Hajj is considered the culmination of each Muslim's religious duty and aspiration. It is stated in the Holy Qur'an, that every physically and financially able Muslim should make the Hajj to the Holy City of Makkah once in his or her lifetime. This paper explores what people do during their pilgrimage, providing a brief description of the principle rites and experiences and their meaning to an individual participants travelling from the USA. The paper will draw upon previously published literature as well as an analysis of findings from a quantitative study in which steps within the pilgrimage process were explored. These findings include participants’ descriptions of the significance and value of the experience which individual pilgrims face during travel to the holy city of Makkah. The results from the quantitative study indicated that the main motivations to attend the annual pilgrimage of Hajj were to fulfil religious obligation, spiritual enhancement and to follow teachings of the Quran and the Prophet Muhammad.

  6. Air quality in Muna Valley: Some findings during pilgrimage, 1402 H (1982 G)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasralla, M.M.; Younes, A. (National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt))

    1986-12-01

    Monitoring programme was conducted in Muna Valley during muslims pilgrimage period, 1402 H (1982 G). Measurements of sulfur dioxide, ammonia and particulates were carried out at the middle of the busiest place in the valley. The rate of dustfall during pilgrimage period was 294 mg m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1} while its background rate was found to be less than 90 mg m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1}. Concentrations of sulfates and tarry matter in dustfall were more than three times higher than their concentrations in dustfall over the area after pilgrims departure. Sulfur dioxide and suspended particulate were found associated at high concentrations enough to create health problems for those who are suffering from bronchitis and other chest troubles. High concentrations of ammonia detected are possibly one of the prime causes of throat irritation during pilgrimage period. The results of the present work confirm that the atmosphere of Muna Valley favors the accumulation of pollutants to the limits causing adverse health effects for pilgrims. Control measures should be adopted and environmental planning for Muna Valley should be considered. These measures are urgently needed to avoid air pollution episodes in the valley during the occupancy of more than 2 million persons.

  7. Efficient Randomized Byzantine Fault-Tolerant Replication Based on Special Valued Coin Tossing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    NAKAMURA, Junya; ARARAGI, Tadashi; MASUYAMA, Shigeru; MASUZAWA, Toshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    .... Although most existing randomized protocols for Byzantine agreement exploit a modular approach, that is, a combination of agreement on a bit value and a reduction of request set values to the bit...

  8. A molecular portrait of maternal sepsis from Byzantine Troy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devault, Alison M; Mortimer, Tatum D; Kitchen, Andrew; Kiesewetter, Henrike; Enk, Jacob M; Golding, G Brian; Southon, John; Kuch, Melanie; Duggan, Ana T; Aylward, William; Gardner, Shea N; Allen, Jonathan E; King, Andrew M; Wright, Gerard; Kuroda, Makoto; Kato, Kengo; Briggs, Derek Eg; Fornaciari, Gino; Holmes, Edward C; Poinar, Hendrik N; Pepperell, Caitlin S

    2017-01-10

    Pregnancy complications are poorly represented in the archeological record, despite their importance in contemporary and ancient societies. While excavating a Byzantine cemetery in Troy, we discovered calcified abscesses among a woman's remains. Scanning electron microscopy of the tissue revealed 'ghost cells', resulting from dystrophic calcification, which preserved ancient maternal, fetal and bacterial DNA of a severe infection, likely chorioamnionitis. Gardnerella vaginalis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus dominated the abscesses. Phylogenomic analyses of ancient, historical, and contemporary data showed that G. vaginalis Troy fell within contemporary genetic diversity, whereas S. saprophyticus Troy belongs to a lineage that does not appear to be commonly associated with human disease today. We speculate that the ecology of S. saprophyticus infection may have differed in the ancient world as a result of close contacts between humans and domesticated animals. These results highlight the complex and dynamic interactions with our microbial milieu that underlie severe maternal infections.

  9. Iatromathematica (medical astrology) in late antiquity and the Byzantine period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanassiou, M

    1999-01-01

    Byzantium inherited the rich astrological tradition of Late Antiquity, especially that of Alexandria, where even in the 6th century A.D., astrology was taught in philosophical schools. The great number of Byzantine astrological MSS, which preserve works of famous authors and many anonymous treatises, shows the survival and continuity of astrology in Byzantium. Through medical astrology physicians can better understand the temperament of an individual man and find out about his bodily constitution and psychic faculties, his inclination to chronic and acute diseases, the possibilities of curable or incurable cases, and finally the periods of major danger for his health. They can conjecture about the evolution of a disease, choose a favorable time for an operation, or initiate a cure.

  10. Otolaryngological treatments in hagiographical Byzantine texts (324-1453 A.D.): miracles or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascaratos, J; Poulacou-Rebelacou, E; Yiotakis, J

    1998-01-01

    Hagiographical texts of the Byzantine period contain a significant number of miraculous treatments of several diseases of the ear, nose and throat. The comparison of the conservative treatments referred to as well as the often concealed surgical interventions of these texts with those known from the medical texts of the eminent Byzantine physicians, lead the writers to conclude that a series of real treatments were carried out in the churches or in the Xenones (hospitals) of Byzantium.

  11. Conrad III and the Second Crusade in the Byzantine Empire and Anatolia, 1147

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Jason T.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis aims to revise the established history of the passage of the Second Crusade through the Byzantine Empire and Anatolia in 1147. In particular, it seeks to readdress the ill-fated advance of the army nominally headed by King Conrad III Staufen of Germany towards Ikonion, the fledging Seljuk capital of Rūm. The work consists of four mutually supportive parts. Part I serves to introduce the thesis, the historiographical trends of the current scholarship, and the Byzantine noti...

  12. Les aspects matériels de la taxis byzantine The material aspects of the Byzantine taxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie‑France Auzépy

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available La taxis grecque – correspondant exact de l’ordo latin – est un aspect essentiel de la civilisation byzantine : elle organise cette société de manière à ce que celle-ci soit un reflet aussi exact que possible de la société céleste, décrite en particulier par Denys l’Aréopagite. La taxis est donc à la fois précise et contraignante et nous a été transmise dans des livres décrivant le protocole : le De Cerimoniis au Xe siècle, le Traité du pseudo-Kodinos au XIVe siècle. Au cours de cérémonies où tous les aspects matériels – l’habit, la couronne, le trône, les acclamations à la gloire de l’empereur, l’orgue qui les accompagne, les gestes accomplis par l’empereur comme par ceux qui l’entourent – ont un sens, l’Empire byzantin affirme ainsi son équilibre et sa qualité de peuple élu. Jusqu’en 1204, les autres nations ont jalousé la qualité que s’était octroyée l’Empire romain d’Orient : celle d’image de la cour céleste, qui est figurée dans le cérémonial. Cette jalousie a pris d’autres formes après 1453, et l’on s’intéressera aux souverains européens qui, tel Louis XIV, ont voulu faire figure d’héritiers de l’empire défunt et relever ses cérémonies.The Greek taxis(order– the exact equivalent of the Latin ordo – is an essential aspect of Byzantine civilization: it organized society in such a way that it would reflect the celestial society as closely as possible, as has been described by Dionysius the Areopagite. The taxis is therefore both precise and restrictive and has been passed down to us through writings describing the protocol: the De Cerimoniis in the tenth century and the treatise of Pseudo-Kodinos in the fourteenth century. Through ceremonies in which all the material aspects have a meaning – the dress, the crown, the throne, the proclaiming of the glory of the emperor, the accompanying organ, the gestures of the emperor and of those around

  13. The rhetoric of architecture in the Byzantine context: The case study of the Holy Sepulchre

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    Bogdanović Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the rhetorical capacity of architecture, and in particular, “the rhetoric of architecture” rather than the usually examined “rhetoric about architecture.” In this work, the rhetoric of architecture is understood as codified visual and architectural conventions as a series of transpositions that frame specific meanings other than and beyond visible and spatial. Here the proposed “rhetoric of architecture” is also more about its capacity as a “mnemonic tool” and about the “craft of composition” rather than about persuading others or about representation based on exact likeness. This concept is particularly significant in the creation of the sacred. By focusing on the architecture of the critical building of the Holy Sepulchre that enclosed the Tomb Shrine in Jerusalem as described by Patriarch Photios in the ninth and Abbot Daniel in the early twelfth centuries, this paper argues for the recognition of the mnemonic links that the Byzantines may have used not only for remembering the Tomb of Christ, but also for their several reconstructions of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem as well as for embedding the meaning of Jerusalem and New Jerusalem in their churches built elsewhere.

  14. Newly Found Seal of a Byzantine Strategos of Preslav

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    Nikolay Kanev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article aims at giving currency in the scholarly circles to a new Byzantine lead seal found in Pliska in 2016. This lead bulla is 2,5 mm thick, it has a diameter of 22 mm and is preserved in a very good condition. The stamp is of good quality but unfortunately, it has not been well centred and because of this part of the impression and the legend have remained outside the lead core (Fig.. However, the seal is in a sufficiently good shape and its impression is clear enough to allow to ascertain with certainty that it is a new parallel copy of an already known lead seal of a Byzantine stratēgos of which eight copies have been found and published so far. Seven of these copies come from Preslav and one has been found in the vicinity of Silistra. It is situated on the obverse of this lead bulla, an image of a blossoming doubly intersected patriarchal cross on a pedestal of two steps, inserted into a double granulated circle. The invocation “Κύριε βοήθει τῷ σῷ δούλῳ”, of which the letters R . ΗΘΙΤωCω have been preserved, is written in the form of a circle round the image. On the reverse of the lead seal, clearly enough can be seen the first four lines of the five-line written inscription. The complete deciphering of the legend is as follows: “+ Κύριε βοήθει τῷ σῷ δούλῳ Ἰωάννῃ βασιλικῷ πρωτοσπαθαρίῳ καὶ στρατηγῷ Περσκλάβας”, in translation: O, Lord, help your servant John, imperial prōtospatharios and stratēgos of Persklava (i.e. Preslav. The seal is dated back to the first quarter of the 11th century.

  15. Embracing complexity: the post-secular pilgrimage of Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt

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    Ruth Illman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the phenomenon of pilgrimage as a personal transformative process; an exploration of spiritual space rather than a journey undertaken to a physical place. The analysis focuses on the life story and authorship of the novelist and playwright Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt (b. 1960. Schmitt began his career as an academic philosopher specialised in enlightenment rationality. A mystical experience in the deserts of Sahara, however, opened his eyes to the spiritual dimensions of reality and encouraged him to redirect his professional strivings from academic writing to fiction. Today, Schmitt has reached a world-wide audience with his plays and novels on interreligious dialogue, especially the series of five short novellas called Le cycle d’Invisible. These narratives all deal with inter-religious encounters in a complex and compassionate way as Schmitt is particularly concerned with preserving the mystery of the situations he describes. The atheist conviction of his previous life has thus given way to an agnostic and mystically inspired world view focusing on diversity, divinity and inexplicability: “I am obsessed with complexity”, as he puts it himself. The presentation is based on ethnographic material, and key themes to be addressed include pilgrimage as a spiritual journey, interreligious encounters and mystical experiences.

  16. Outward Bound with Ayyappan: Work, Masculinity, and Self-Respect in a South Indian Pilgrimage Festival

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    Elizabeth (Liz Wilson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The annual pilgrimage festival dedicated to the god Ayyappan has become immensely popular in the past sixty years. As many as fifty million pilgrims participate each year. This paper draws on interviews of pilgrims conducted in South India in 2012–2013. My fieldwork suggests that the increasing popularity of the event relates to the contemporary South Indian work environment, an environment in which traditional gender roles are being reshaped by the challenges posed by migration for work opportunities. Interviews of English-speaking pilgrims show that their interpretations of the pilgrimage festival highlight the complexities of manhood in a time of rapidly changing work roles for men and women. Specifically, my fieldwork demonstrates that pilgrims perceive Ayyappan as a source of aid for those who struggle to succeed as financial providers and heads of the family unit. Pilgrims anxious about the loss of traditional models of masculinity amidst rapid change find solace in the blessings the god Ayyappan yields.

  17. Preliminary Assessment Of Surface Water Quality Of Tropical Pilgrimage Wetland Of Central Gujarat, India

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    Hiren B Soni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper highlights the preliminary investigation of physico-chemical characteristics of tropical pilgrimage wetland viz. Dakor Sacred Wetland (DSW, Anand District, Central Gujarat, India. As the existing water body is contaminated with domestic sewage influenced by anthropogenic interventions, an urgent need was felt to evaluate physico-chemical parameters such as Temperature, pH, Dissolved Oxygen (DO, Total Solids (TS, Total Suspended Solids (TSS, Total Dissolved Solids (TDS, Free CO2, Phenolphthalein Alkalinity (PA, Total Alkalinity (TA, Carbonates, Bicarbonates, Total Hardness, Calcium Hardness, Magnesium Hardness, Chloride, Salinity, Sulphate, Phosphate, Nitrate, Sodium, and Potassium. The obtained data were correlated statistically to draw a conclusion about the surface water quality of tropical pilgrimage wetland. Moreover, the results manifested the need and prime necessity to restore the physical, chemical and biological integrity with viable and rigorous restoration and management strategies in order to maintain, preserve, conserve and to avert the ecological imbalance and disturbance in hydro-geo-chemical and hydro-biological cycles, which adversely affect the food chain and food web of the significant pond ecosystem. International Journal of Environment, Volume-2, Issue-1, Sep-Nov 2013, Pages 202-223 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v2i1.9222

  18. Chants of the Byzantine Rite: the Italo-Albanian Tradition in Sicily / Canti Ecclesiastici della Tradizione Italo-Albanese in Sicilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian; Garofalo, Girolamo

    by the Albanian-speaking minority in Sicily since their ancestors arrived as refugees from the Balkans in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. The actual transcriber, Bartolomeo Di Salvo (1916–1986), was a Basilian monk and music researcher at Grottaferrata. His transcriptions in staff notation......, including an account of the few written documents that have been identified (the oldest dating from 1899); while Christian Troelsgård offers an essay on the importance of this ‘Arbëresh’ chant repertory in the broader perspective of Byzantine chant studies. This collection testifies to the continuation...

  19. The Serbian state in the work of Byzantine historian Doucas

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    Nikolić Maja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While the first two chapters of Doucas's historical work present a meagre outline of world history - a sketch which becomes a little more detailed from 1261 on, when the narration reaches the history of the Turks and their conquests in Asia Minor - the third chapter deals with the well-known battle of Kosovo, which took place in 1389. From that point on, the Byzantine historian gives much important information on Serbia, as well as on the Ottoman advances in the Balkans, and thus embarks upon his central theme - the rise of the Turks and the decline of Byzantium. Doucas considers the battle of Kosovo a key event in the subjugation of the Balkan peoples by the Turks, and he shows that after the battle of Kosovo the Serbs were the first to suffer that fate. At the beginning, Doucas says that after the death of Orhan, the ruler (o archgos of the Turks, his son and successor Murad conquered the Thracian towns, Adrianople and the whole Thessaly, so that he mastered almost all the lands of the Byzantines, and finally reached the Triballi (Triballous. He devastated many of their towns and villages sending the enslaved population beyond Chersonesus, until Lazar, son of King Stefan of Serbia (Serbias, who ruled (kraleyōn in Serbia at that time decided to oppose him with all the might he could muster. The Serbs were often called Triballi by Byzantine authors. For the fourteenth century writers Pachymeres, Gregoras, Metochites and Kantakouzenos the Serbs were Triballi. However, Pachymeres and Gregoras refer to the rulers of the Triballi as the rulers of Serbia. Fifteenth century writers, primarily Chalcondyles and Critobulos, use only that name. It seems, nevertheless, that Doucas makes a distinction between the Triballi and the Serbs. As it is known, the conquest of the Serbian lands by the Turks began after the battle on the river Marica in 1371. By 1387. the Turks had mastered Serres(1388 Bitola and Štip (1385, Sofia (1385, Niš (1386 and several

  20. Byzantine wall paintings from Mani (Greece): microanalytical investigation of pigments and plasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Anno; Karatasios, Ioannis; Mourelatos, Dionysis

    2009-12-01

    The present case study concerns the technology of Byzantine wall paintings from the Mani Peninsula, Greece. An assemblage of 12 Byzantine churches, constructed in the tenth to fifteenth century, was included in an initial analytical survey. Two random samples of wall paintings were taken in each monument in order to study their micro stratigraphy and the composition of pigment and plaster layers. Polished sections were fabricated for examination with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, selected samples were powdered and analysed with Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The analytical results achieved in this case study provided general conclusions concerning painting techniques for wall paintings in a rather provincial area of the Byzantine Empire. The palette comprised mainly earthen pigments like ochres and carbon black but occasionally also other pigments like cinnabar, minium and ultramarine. In view of future studies, a portable X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) set-up was tested.

  1. A war psychiatry approach to warfare in the Middle Byzantine period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntafoulis, Pavlos

    2016-12-01

    Combat stress cases were traced in historical texts and military manuals on warfare from the Middle Byzantine period; they were mainly labelled as cowardice. Soldiers suffered from nostalgia or exhaustion; officers looked stunned, or could not speak during the battle. Cruel punishments were often enforced. Suicide and alcohol abuse were rarely mentioned. The Byzantines' evacuation system for battle casualties was well organized. Psychological operations were conducted and prisoners-of-war were usually part of them. The Byzantine army had 'parakletores', officers assigned to encourage soldiers before combat. The leaders dealt with combat stress by using their rhetoric skills and emphasizing religious faith in eternal life. The treatment of the 'cowards' was rather similar to modern war psychiatry principles of treatment. No description of PTSD was found. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Menander Protector. History: On the Turkish Embassy to the Persians and Byzantines in 568 A.C. (translation and commentary

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    Olesia Zhdanovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents annotated translation from ancient Greek into Russian of the book of Menander Protector. In this text Menander Protector describes first the Turkish embassy to the Persians, and then to the Byzantines. The Great Turkic Khanate was the first Steppe empire in history. The relationship between Turkic Khanate and Byzantine Empire began from the middle of 6th century, parallel to the establishment of the Steppe empire. The purpose of the first Turkish embassies to the Byzantines was conclusion of an alliance against the Persians. Since the end of the 4th century Sassanid Empire and Byzantium challenged each other for the territory of Armenia, part of Georgia and the lands of southern Arabia. At the same time the Byzantine Empire’s relationship with the barbarians in the West were problematic. In addition it was going through a difficult economical and political period inside Empire. Another side of antagonism between Persian and Byzantine Empire was silk trade. Persian Empire had a monopoly on it. Byzantine Empire was in dire need of silk and was forced to buy it overpriced. Turks had silk and proposed it to Byzantines at a bargain price. This article contains the view of the problems of relationship between European Byzantine and Asian Nomadic civilizations in terms of Byzantine author. Previously the Russian translation of Menander Protector was done in the middle of the 19th century by Spiridon Destunis. However, his translation was fragmented and unprofessional containing many imprecisions. Our versions have many rectifications and important comments to some elements of Nomadic and Byzantine style of life. This research should help to understand some part of life, customs and diplomacy of ancient Turks.

  3. The Expression of Public Office in some Roman-Byzantine Legal Sources

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    Francisco J. Andrés-Santos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the methods for understanding the notion of public service in some Byzantine legal sources between the end of the 9th and the beginning of the 10th centuries. From this, it can be ascertained that the use of the word ὀφφίκιον corresponds to a mechanic translation of the legal technical term officium in Latin (transliteration, but as the Byzantine legal sources became progressively “exhellenized” the term started to disappear and be replaced by more traditional Greek words.

  4. Experiences in adapting post-byzantine chant into foreign languages: Research and praxis

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    Olkinuora Jaakko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the current state of the research and practical methodology of the adaptation of Byzantine melodies written in the “New Method” into foreign languages, with Romanian, English and Finnish serving as examples. The adaptation of independent, “fixed” melodies as well as metrical liturgical texts (prosomoia and canons are examined. The challenges emerging in adapting Byzantine chant into Finnish are also discussed. The author also suggests some future subjects for research, which include the synthesis of examining arrangements in both “Old” and “New Method”.

  5. The depiction of the Vision of Saint Peter of Alexandria in the sanctuary of Byzantine churches

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    Koukiaris Silas, Archimandrite

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the factors that have influenced the frequent depicting of the ‘Vision of St. Peter of Alexandria’ in the sanctuaries of Byzantine churches from the beginning of the thirteenth century. It also discusses the theological messages of this scene. The preserved examples of the ‘Vision’ from the thirteenth century have been inventoried and described, after which the iconographic characteristics of depictions from the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries have been given. The examples from the sanctuaries of post-Byzantine churches have also been added to the catalogue of scenes.

  6. The schemata of the stars Byzantine astronomy from 1300 A.D.

    CERN Document Server

    Paschos, E A

    1998-01-01

    Most of the knowledge of ancient Greek science survived through Byzantine codices. A short Byzantine article, extant in three manuscripts, contains advanced astronomical ideas and pre-Copernican diagrams; it presents improvements on ancient and medieval astronomy. This important book includes the edited version and translation of the text and analyzes its content. It surveys the development of astronomical models from Ptolemy to Byzantium and compares them mathematically with several works of Arab astronomers, as well as with the heliocentric system of Copernicus and Newton.

  7. Byzantine-fault tolerant self-stabilizing protocol for distributed clock synchronization systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A rapid Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization protocol that self-stabilizes from any state, tolerates bursts of transient failures, and deterministically converges within a linear convergence time with respect to the self-stabilization period. Upon self-stabilization, all good clocks proceed synchronously. The Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization protocol does not rely on any assumptions about the initial state of the clocks. Furthermore, there is neither a central clock nor an externally generated pulse system. The protocol converges deterministically, is scalable, and self-stabilizes in a short amount of time. The convergence time is linear with respect to the self-stabilization period.

  8. The schemata of the stars. Byzantine astronomy from A.D. 1300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, E. A.; Sotiroudis, P.

    Most of the knowledge of ancient Greek science survived through Byzantine codices. A short Byzantine article, extant in three manuscripts, contains advanced astronomical ideas and pre-Copernican diagrams; it presents improvements on ancient and medieval astronomy. This important book includes the edited version and translation of the text and analyzes its content. It surveys the development of astronomical models from Ptolemy to Byzantium and compares them mathematically with several works of Arab astronomers, as well as with the heliocentric system of Copernicus and Newton.

  9. 'Pseudomonas saudiphocaensis' sp. nov., a new bacterial species isolated from currency notes collected during the Hajj pilgrimage in 2012 at Makkah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, E I; Papadioti, A; Bibi, F; Ashshi, A M; Raoult, D; Angelakis, E

    2017-01-01

    We report here the main characteristics of 'Pseudomonas saudiphocaensis' strain 20_BNT (CSUR P1224), a new species of the Pseudomonas genus that was isolated from currency notes collected during the Hajj pilgrimage in 2012 at Makkah, Saudi Arabia.

  10. From the History of Byzantine Servile Aristocracy: Chalkoutzes Family in the 10th–11th Centuries

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    Dmitriy S. Borovkov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the genus Chalkoutzes, whose representatives occupied a strong position in the Byzantine aristocracy during the 10th–11th centuries. The author, analyzing documentary, narrative and data of lead seals, presents data on more than twenty five representatives of the genus. In the early period, the second half of 10th – the beginning of the 11th centuries, members of the family served mainly in the armed forces. In particular, according to historical writings, Nikitas (10th c. and Leo (the second quarter of 11th c. was strategos. However most of currently known members of the genus were civilian officials. Information about them is contained in sphragistic sources and legal acts. Apparently, the flowering of Chalkoutzes as a civil aristocratic clan falls in the middle – the second half of the 11th century. Most members of the family were tax officials, serving in the state treasury (sakellion and performed judicial duties, both in the capital and in the provinces. Some of them held positions in institutions, which was responsible for the logistic support of the army (logothesion ton agelon, logothesion tou stratiotikou. In the last third of the 11th century Chalkoutzes were a strong “bureaucratic clan”, occupying positions in several departments at the same time. This is clearly demonstrated by the acts of the monastery of St. John the Theologian on the Patmos island by 1087 1088 years: among all the officials, mentioned in the documents, three belong to the Chalkoutzes family. However after 1088 this family disappeared for more than a century from sources. At the turn of the 12th–13th centuries Chalkoutzes were large landowners in Euboea island and Hellas and, most likely, after 1204 lost their possessions and status. Several members of the genus, known from sources of the 13th–15th centuries, were mainly representatives of the clergy of lower rank.

  11. Gout in the writings of eminent ancient Greek and Byzantine physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritzalis, Konstantinos C; Karamanou, Marianna; Androutsos, George

    2011-01-01

    Gout is a medical condition with typical recurrent attacks of acute inflammatory arthritis. The severity of this illness has been recognised from antiquity, and several ancient physicians studied it intensively. This paper presents the pathogenesis of the disease, approaches to therapy and preventive measures based on a number of original medical scripts from Hippocrates to the end of the Byzantine era.

  12. A Byzantine-Fault Tolerant Self-Stabilizing Protocol for Distributed Clock Synchronization Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2006-01-01

    Embedded distributed systems have become an integral part of safety-critical computing applications, necessitating system designs that incorporate fault tolerant clock synchronization in order to achieve ultra-reliable assurance levels. Many efficient clock synchronization protocols do not, however, address Byzantine failures, and most protocols that do tolerate Byzantine failures do not self-stabilize. Of the Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization algorithms that exist in the literature, they are based on either unjustifiably strong assumptions about initial synchrony of the nodes or on the existence of a common pulse at the nodes. The Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization protocol presented here does not rely on any assumptions about the initial state of the clocks. Furthermore, there is neither a central clock nor an externally generated pulse system. The proposed protocol converges deterministically, is scalable, and self-stabilizes in a short amount of time. The convergence time is linear with respect to the self-stabilization period. Proofs of the correctness of the protocol as well as the results of formal verification efforts are reported.

  13. From Byzantine to Persian Jerusalem: Jewish Perspectives and Jewish/Christian Polemics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagith Sivan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Several piyyutim, the Hebrew liturgical poems of late ancient date, make reference to the Persian and then Arab conquests of the Holy Land, and can shed light on Jewish responses to the Byzantine losses, losses which some Christian authors sought to blame on the Jews.

  14. A Byzantine chant collection from Sicily: a collaboration between Copenhagen and Piana degli Albanesi (Palermo)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfratello, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    on Cretan music, University of Vienna), Creative performance in the liturgy: a formulaic melodic language in the Sicilian-Albanian chant tradition (forthcoming, University of Joensuu, Finland), and several articles as chapters of his doctoral thesis. Nøgleord Byzantine chant, Oral transmission, Sicily...

  15. Western European influences on Post-Byzantine panel painting technique through binding media identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouloumpi, E. [De Montfort University -UK, National Gallery- Alexandros Soutzos Museum, Conservation Department.1 Michalacopoulou Street, 11601, Athens (Greece); Lawson, G. [Head of Research, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Hawthorn Building, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Pavlidis, B. [School of Allied Health Sciences, Hawthorn Building, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)]. e-mail: elenikouloumpi@nationalgallery.gr

    2006-07-01

    Post-Byzantine is called the period after the invasion of the Ottomans in Constantinople, the capital of Byzantium in 1453, which lasted until the establishment of the first Greek State in 1836. The Post - Byzantine era is one of the most important artistic periods of the Neo-Hellenic Pictorial Art, since, through cultural exchanges with Western Europe, it sets the fundaments for oil painting. The thematology changes from religious to civil, the technique changes from egg yolk to egg-oil emulsion in order to end up to pure oil painting and finally, it opens 'the gates' for the modern artistic movements of the world. The current research is focused on the study of the effects of western influences on the technique and pictorial characteristics of the post-Byzantine icons by the study of any changes in the pigment's binding media through scientific analyses (SEM-EDX, micro-FTIR and GC), as well as of any changes in the painting style of the icons through comparison with both Byzantine and western painting standards. Research never ends and the results of this work give rise to further analysis, in order to throw some light to this transitional period of art. (Author)

  16. A computational comparison of theory and practice of scale intonation in Byzantine chant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panteli, Maria; Purwins, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Byzantine Chant performance practice is quantitatively compared to the Chrysanthine theory. The intonation of scale degrees is quantified, based on pitch class profiles. An analysis procedure is introduced that consists of the following steps: 1) Pitch class histograms are calculated via non...

  17. Gynaecomastia and scrotal rhacosis: two aesthetic surgical operations for men in Byzantine times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Marios; Manios, Andreas; de Bree, Eelco; Trompoukis, Constantinos; Tsiftsis, Dimitris D

    2010-08-01

    Nowadays, as in the past, much attention is paid to aesthetic operations in women, while only infrequently have such operations been referred to in males. Generally, male aesthetic surgery was introduced to surgical practise during the 19th century. In this study, we analysed the practise of such operations in Byzantine times and in other ancient cultures with surgical knowledge, i.e. ancient India and China The sixth book of Paul of Aegina's "Epitome of Medicine" was studied for description of aesthetic operations in males in the Byzantine period, since this book is completely devoted to surgery and is generally considered to be the most important reference for surgery in Byzantine times. The original text and its excellent translation by Francis Adams were used. References concerning aesthetic operations for males were identified. Accordingly, historical work and reviews on plastic surgery in ancient India and China were studied. Mainly, two aesthetic surgical procedures for males in the Byzantine period were identified. These two procedures comprise gynaecomastia and rhacosis (scrotal relaxation). Two different techniques were reported for the surgical management of gynaecomastia, through sub-mammary or supra-mammary access. Two procedures were noted for rhacosis, for which Paul of Aegina reproduced the respective chapters from Leonides' and Antyllus' works. Evidence supporting male aesthetic surgery in ancient India and China or elsewhere was not found. Despite the dubious aesthetic result, the existence of different aesthetic surgical techniques in males substantiate the advanced level of surgery achieved by physicians in the Byzantine period. Copyright 2010 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pilgrimage of West Siberian Residents to Palestine at the end of XIX – beginning of XX century

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    Tsys' Valerii

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article elaborates upon organization and stages of pilgrimage of West Siberian residents to Palestine at the end of XIX — beginning of XX century. The author makes an attempt to show the motives behind the pilgrimage, as well as organizational and household challenges. The article outlines some details of Siberians’ stay in Russian courtyards in Jerusalem and describes fi nancial situation enabling the pilgrims to travel to Palestine and back. The study is based on personal sources describing the impressions and experience the Western Siberians had when visiting the Holy Land. The author concludes that Russian pilgrims would usually spend about half a month at the Russian courtyards and that the accommodation, catering and living conditions of their stay were quite adequate at the beginning of the XXth century. It is noted that the number of pilgrims from West Siberian provinces at that period reached several dozen people a year. Social and age compound of pilgrims is described. The article outlines local peculiarities of pilgrims, such the predominance of men, including a small number of indigenous residents of Siberia. It is noted that the vast number of pilgrims were farmers and elderly people. The article shows some examples of pilgrims sharing their impressions and spiritual experience with family members, relatives, friends and neighbors after returning to homeland. The paper demonstrates the contribution of the Imperial Orthodox Palestine Society to improvement of pilgrimage routes and services to pilgrims during the above mentioned timeframe. Despite the fact that those the pilgrimages didn’t become a widespread phenomenon, they seized to be something of an extraordinary nature.

  19. Original wall paintings at the church of the Saviour in Chvabiani (Upper Svaneti, Georgia and Byzantine art at the turn of the tenth to eleventh centuries

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    Zakharova Anna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a little known ensemble of wall paintings at the Church of the Saviour in Chvabiani, Upper Svaneti, Georgia. The initial decoration of the church dated to 978- 1001 has survived mainly in the apse. The badly preserved Theophany in the conch attracted the attention of scholars who analyzed its iconography. The Apostles in the lower zone, however, were considered to be repainted at a later date. Our examination of these wall paintings revealed no traces of later additions. Through the analysis of technique and style we aim to prove that the both compositions belong to the turn of the tenth to eleventh century. These wall paintings show unusually high quality and close affinities with Byzantine art of this period. In our view, they could be a work of a visiting artist, probably a Georgian trained at some major Byzantine artistic center. He may well have been among the artists working on wall paintings at the cathedrals built and decorated by order of kings and church hierarchs during the late tenth to early eleventh centuries, in Tao-Klarjeti or other lands of the Georgian kingdom still under formation.

  20. [A development of Byzantine Christian charities during the 4(th)-7(th) centuries and the birth of the hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sung Hyun

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to examine the beginning and the development of Christian Charities during the 4(th)-6(th) centuries which would eventually result in the birth of the hospital in modern sense in the first half of the 7(th) century. For this purpose, I looked carefully into various primary sources concerning the early Christian institutions for the poor and the sick. Above all, it's proper to note that the first xenodocheion where hospitality was combined with a systematic caring, is concerned with the Trinitarian debate of the 4(th) century. In 356, Eustathios, one of the leaders of homoiousios group, established xenodocheion to care for the sick and the lepers in Sebaste of Armenia, whereas his opponent Aetios, doctor and leader of the heteroousios party, was reckoned to have combined the medical treatment with his clerical activities. Then, Basil of Caesarea, disciple of Eustathios of Sebaste, also founded in 372 a magnificent benevolent complex named 'Basileias' after its founder. I scrupulously analysed several contemporary materials mentioning the charitable institution of Caesarea which was called alternatively katagogia, ptochotropheion, xenodocheion. John Chrysostome also founded several nosokomeia in Constantinople at the end of the 4(th) century and the beginning of the 5(th) century. Apparently, the contemporary sources mention that doctors existed for these Charities, but there is no sufficient proof that these 'Christian Hospitals,' Basileias or nosokomeia of Constantinople were hospitals in modern sense. Imperial constitutions began to mention ptochotropheion, xenodocheion and orphanotropheion since the second half of the 5(th) century and then some Justinian laws evoked nosokomium, brephotrophia, gerontocomia. These laws reveal that 'Christian Hospitals' were well clarified and deeply rooted in Byzantine society already in these periods. And then, new benevolent institutions emerged in the 6(th) century: nosokomeia for a specific class and

  1. Holy land, lost lands, Realpolitik. Imperial Byzantine thinking about Syria and Palestine in the later 10th and 11th centuries

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    Shepard, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews Byzantine attitudes and state policy towards the region between Antioch and Mount Sinai, stressing the general cautiousness of imperial strategy and, from the late tenth century onwards, the government’s preference for peaceful coexistence and commerce with the Fatimid caliphate. Caliph al-Ḥākim’s destruction of the church of the Holy Sepulchre in 1009 did not overturn this state of affairs, and the main bone of contention between Cairo and Constantinople was the city of Aleppo, not Jerusalem. Even here, the two powers were inclined to leave the initiative to local parties, rather than insisting on direct rule, and communications between Muslim and Byzantine-ruled territories were mostly fairly straightforward. During the relative détente of the first half of the eleventh century, pilgrimages to the Holy Land increased, and it may well have been primarily in order to impress pilgrims – those travelling from Byzantium itself, but especially those from the Christian west – that emperors lavished resources on reconstructing the church of the Holy Sepulchre in the 1030s and 1040s. Militant intervention on behalf of the Christian populations of south ern Syria and Palestine was not on their agenda. These conclusions rest on the collation of miscellaneous evidence, whose components are mostly well-known but have seldom received consideration side by side. The study highlights the value of trade to Fatimids and Byzantines alike, the esteem for ‘the holy places’ among Byzantines besides westerners, and the emperors’ desire to demonstrate concern for the Holy Sepulchre without jeopardising relations with the FatimidsEste estudio pasa revista a la política oficial del estado bizantino con respecto a la región situada entre Antioquía y el Monte Sinaí, haciendo énfasis en la prudencia adoptada por lo general en la estrategia imperial así como, a partir de finales del siglo X, en la voluntad del gobierno a favor de

  2. Evaluation of aerial microbial pollutants in Al-Haram Al-Nabawi during pilgrimage of 2013

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    Kholoud M. Alananbeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah is the second holiest site in Islam. The possibility of new emerging microbes is valid due to the increased number of pilgrims. The objectives of the current study were to estimate the numbers of fungi and bacteria inside and outside Al-Haram Al-Nabawi and to find whether new bacterial and fungal species have emerged compared to previous studies. Air samples were collected twice a day from 12 spots and four directions during the pilgrim year of 2013 for four consecutive weeks by using the sedimentation method. Thirty five genera and fifty eight species were identified. The most recovered bacterial genera were Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Bacillus, and Dermacoccus with 32.47%, 18.18%, 12.85%, and 11.23%, respectively. Fifty nine isolates of fungi were molecularly identified. Aspergillus species had the highest percentage (78%. The other fungal genera identified (Alternaria triticina, Emericella nidulans, Emericella striata, Mucor circinelloides, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium minioluteum, Rhizopus arrhizus, Rhizopus oryzae, and Syncephalastrum racemosum had less than 5% frequency. In places such as Al-Haram Al-Nabawi, a large and crowded public (millions exist especially during pilgrimages and Ramadan, thus, exposure to microorganisms is high. On the other hand, microorganism infectivity depends on many factors including their virulence, landing site, and person’s immunity. For those reasons, many aspects should be considered to avoid aerosol contaminants.

  3. Memoirs of Archpriest N. Karashevich on the Pilgrimage to Palestine and to Mount Athos in 1872

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    Kirill E. Baldin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the memories of one of Russian Orthodox pilgrims, who travelled across the Eastern Mediterranean priest N. Karashevich of the Starokostyantynov town in the Volyn province. The text gives external and internal criticism of these memories, which were printed in 1874 in the Volyn eparchial sheets magazine. The memoirist told about the journey, held in 1872; he visited Jerusalem, Bethlehem and other shrines of Palestine, as well as Mount Athos. Such category as “the other” is very important in this text, it is nonverbally present in memories describing the various facts, events and phenomena. For the author category “the other” is first and foremost – a Greek Orthodox Church, which was close to the Russian Orthodox Church, but had its differences. The article also addresses the rumors and fears, which had been circulating among Russian pilgrims. They concerned those surprises and dangers, which travelers from Russia could meet on their way. The article examines the provincial priest perception of another ethno-cultural and religious world, in particular, his attitude towards the Greek Orthodox clergy and Catholics in the Middle East. The author shows the attitude of Russian pilgrims to the holy sites of Mount Athos and its monks, which were considered in Russia a model of piety. The end of the article contains important conclusion: during the pilgrimage Russian travelers have experienced ethno-cultural and religious identity. They more clearly felt their place in the world as Russians and Orthodox.

  4. Protestant pilgrimage to Jerusalem: preparations for the kingdom of God in apocalyptic rhetoric strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leppäkari

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of sacred shrines and holy sites host pilgrims united by strong degrees of cultural homogeneity. But Jerusalem differs on this point- it draws pilgrims from a vast multitude of nations and cultural traditions since the city is considered holy by three major religious traditions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The representatives of these traditions go partly to different places at different times where they are engaged in different forms of worship. Often these visits are marked by clashes at the holy places. The notion of Jerusalem in religious belief is constructed by the transmission of various representations concerned with the image of the city. For Western Christianity today, Jerusalem is not only important because of the things which Jesus of Nazareth, according to the tradition, did there. For many Christians Jerusalem is vitally important because of the apocalyptic promise Jesus left his followers with: I'll be back! Therefore, the position of Jerusalem in the religious end-time play is crucial, since apocalyptic representations of the New Jerusalem motivate contemporary believers to make a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and to partake actively in political disputes about the Israeli—Palestinian conflict.

  5. Circulation of respiratory viruses among pilgrims during the 2012 Hajj pilgrimage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkouiten, Samir; Charrel, Rémi; Belhouchat, Khadidja; Drali, Tassadit; Salez, Nicolas; Nougairede, Antoine; Zandotti, Christine; Memish, Ziad A; al Masri, Malak; Gaillard, Catherine; Parola, Philippe; Brouqui, Philippe; Gautret, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    The Hajj is the oldest and largest annual mass gathering in the world and may increase the risk of spread of respiratory viruses. We performed a prospective survey among a cohort of pilgrims departing from Marseille, France, to Mecca in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) for the 2012 Hajj season. Nasal swabs were collected from participants and tested for 11 respiratory viruses by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Of 165 participants sampled before departing to the KSA, 8 (4.8%) were positive for at least 1 virus (5 rhinovirus, 1 influenza C, 1 adenovirus, and 1 enterovirus). Seventy symptomatic pilgrims underwent additional nasal swabs during their pilgrimage in the KSA, of which 27 (38.6%) were positive for at least 1 virus (19 rhinovirus, 6 influenza A, 1 influenza C, 1 respiratory syncytial virus B, 1 metapneumovirus, 1 adenovirus, and 1 enterovirus). This was significantly higher than the 4.8% who were positive before departing for the KSA (P pilgrims sampled before leaving the KSA, 17 (11%) were positive for at least 1 virus (13 rhinovirus, 3 adenovirus, 2 influenza B, and 1 enterovirus), which was also significantly higher than the percentage of positive pilgrims (4.8%), before departing for the KSA (P = .040). This study suggests a rapid acquisition of respiratory viruses among pilgrims during their stay in the KSA, most notably rhinovirus, and highlights the potential of spreading these infections in the pilgrims' home countries upon their return.

  6. On the Number of Synchronous Rounds Sufficient for Authenticated Byzantine Agreement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzi, Matthias; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2009-01-01

    that, in the model with a public-key infrastructure and signatures (aka authenticated Byzantine agreement), d + O(1) deterministic synchronous rounds are sufficient where d is the minimal integer such that n − d > 3(t − d). This improves over the t + 1 necessary deterministic rounds for almost all...

  7. The Depiction of Korčula on an Icon in the Byzantine Museum in Athens

    OpenAIRE

    Demori Staničić, Zoraida

    2015-01-01

    The icon of Miracle by the Virgin attributed to the circle of Theodore Poulakis from Byzantine Museum in Athens is known and published. It is divided in two horizontal registers: the upper depicts Virgin Hodegetria with venerating angels under adorned pointed arch, while in the lower one there is a shipwreck in front of the fortified town. Virgin is accompanied by the eloquent epithet „The Hope of Sinners”. The wreck below this celestial scene is realistically presente...

  8. Cucurbits depicted in Byzantine mosaics from Israel, 350–600 ce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avital, Anat; Paris, Harry S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Thousands of floor mosaics were produced in lands across the Roman and Byzantine empires. Some mosaics contain depictions of agricultural produce, potentially providing useful information concerning the contemporary presence and popularity of crop plants in a particular geographical region. Hundreds of floor mosaics produced in Israel during the Byzantine period have survived. The objective of the present work was to search these mosaics for Cucurbitaceae in order to obtain a more complete picture of cucurbit crop history in the eastern Mediterranean region. Results and Conclusions Twenty-three mosaics dating from 350–600 ce were found that had images positively identifiable as cucurbits. The morphological diversity of the cucurbit fruits in the mosaics of Israel is greater than that appearing in mosaics from any other Roman or Byzantine provincial area. The depicted fruits vary in shape from oblate to extremely long, and some are furrowed, others are striped and others lack definite markings. The cucurbit taxa depicted in the mosaics are Cucumis melo (melon), Citrullus lanatus (watermelon), Luffa aegyptiaca (sponge gourd) and Lagenaria siceraria (bottle gourd). Cucumis melo is the most frequently found taxon in the mosaics and is represented by round dessert melons and long snake melons. Fruits of at least two cultivars of snake melons and of watermelons are represented. To our knowledge, images of sponge gourds have not been found in Roman and Byzantine mosaics elsewhere. Indeed, the mosaics of Israel contain what are probably the oldest depictions of Luffa aegyptiaca in Mediterranean lands. Sponge gourds are depicted often, in 11 of the mosaics at eight localities, and the images include both mature fruits, which are useful for cleaning and washing, and immature fruits, which are edible. Only one mosaic has images positively identifiable as of bottle gourds, and these were round–pyriform and probably used as vessels. PMID:24948671

  9. Sacred byzantine music and its influence on old East Slavic Orthodox music

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    Włodzimierz Wołosiuk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sacred Byzantine music originates from three sources: “the liturgy of heaven”, synagogue music as well as old Greek theory of music and lays at the bottom of the East Slavs liturgical chant. The tonal base of the Byzantine music formed tetrachords. From them the so called Diatonic mode took shape. It was the easiest and the most popular sound arrangement steming from Greek music. The Cristian Church considered it to be in accordance with its Spirit and needs. From the tetrachords mentioned above other tones were created, namely Doric tones, Lydian, Phrygian and Mixolydian and, together withall their derivatives they gave beginning to the Oktoechos tradition. Byzantine music was flourishing in monasteries and in town areas andmany different forms were elaborated on like troparions, kontakions, stichiry, canons, etc. If one speaks about composers then certainly some names cannot be omitted. These are: St. Anatolius (Patriarchof Constantinople, St. Andrew of Crete, St. Romanos the Melodist,St. Sophronius of Jerusalem and, above all, St. John of Damascus who collected and systematized the liturgical chants creating mentioned Oktoechos. The acceptance of the Greek form of Christianity by Rus’ caused a cultivation of the sacred Greek vocal art on its territory which manifested in a form of so called Znamenny chant. This type of chant was at first similar to the Greek model but later on it moved away from it. Musical notation of the Old East Slavic singing was based on neumes which names in Old East Slavic have changed a little and only few survived. Furthermore, liturgical note books together with their genre and music content have been taken over from Byzantium. Especially visible in the Old East Slavic monody, Byzantine patterns were pervading also the later polyphony which proves they were always current. Moreover, this allows to claim that Rus’ became the real successor of the Greek Orthodox traditions in new circumstances of sacral

  10. A Case Study in Byzantine Dragon-Slaying: Digenes and the Serpent

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    Christopher Livanos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Byzantine epic Digenes Akrites has similarities with ancient and medieval Iranian traditions that, in consideration of the epic’s Eastern settings, suggest Iranian influences. Digenes resembles dragon-slaying heroes of other Indo-European traditions. He also resembles the Irish hero Cú Chulainn in that he is not psychologically fit to live in the midst of the community that depends on his protection. Freudian readings of Digenes’ encounters with the dragon and the Amazon Maximou are proposed.

  11. The Byzantine wall-paintings in the church of Saint Theodore at Platanos, Kynouria (Arcadia

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    Agrevi Maria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The church of St Theodore (also known as "Sts Theodoroi" at Platanos, Kynouria, is a single-nave building of small dimensions. The interior surfaces of its walls preserve their Byzantine paintings, which are partially visible under the coat of plaster that covers most of them. The paintings exhibit affinity with wall-paintings of churches in the Peloponnese (neighbouring Laconia included, and can be dated to the last quarter of the thirteenth century.

  12. Spin One’s Wheels? Byzantine Fault Tolerance with a Spinning Primary

    OpenAIRE

    Giuliana Santos Veronese; Miguel Correia; Alysson Neves Bessani; Lau Cheuk Lung

    2009-01-01

    Reviewed by Hans Reiser Most Byzantine fault-tolerant state machine replication (BFT) algorithms have a primary replica that is in charge of ordering the clients requests. Recently it was shown that this dependence allows a faulty primary to degrade the performance of the system to a small fraction of what the environment allows. In this paper we present Spinning, a novel BFT algorithm that mitigates such performance attacks by changing the primary after every batch of pending requests ...

  13. Decoupled Quorum-based Byzantine-resilient Coordination in Open Distributed Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bessani, Alysson Neves; Correia, Miguel; Fraga, Joni da Silva; Lung, Lau Cheuk

    2006-01-01

    Open distributed systems are typically composed by an unknown number of processes running in heterogeneous hosts. Their communication often requires tolerance to temporary disconnections and security against malicious actions. Tuple spaces are a well-known coordination model for this kind of systems. They can support communication that is decoupled both in time and space. There are currently several implementations of distributed fault-tolerant tuple spaces but they are not Byzantine-resilien...

  14. RITMO Y ESPACIO EN LA PINTURA BIZANTINA Rhythm and space in byzantine painting

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    Federico José Xamist

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Durante el siglo XX se lleva a cabo una revalorización de la pintura del medioevo heleno, ignorada durante todo el clasicismo europeo. AAnte la constatación de que el espacio representado en la pintura bizantina no reproduce el espacio natural se llega a la conclusión de que las operaciones pictóricas aplicadas por los pintores bizantinos tienen como objeto simbolizar un espacio sobrenatural. En las siguientes líneas intentaremos abrir la problemática del espacio en la pintura bizantina a una interpretación plástica, es decir, intentaremos presentar una lectura de las operaciones pictóricas en cuanto tales siguiendo los planteamientos de Georgos Kordis, profesor de la cátedra Eikonografia de la Facultad de Teología de la Universidad de Atenas y destacado pintor griego. Nuestro objetivo es plantear algunas directrices para introducirnos en la problemática pictórica de la representación del espacio en la pintura bizantina.During the twentieth century is carried out a revaluation of the Hellenic medieval painting, ignored during the European classicism. Given the finding that the space represented in Byzantine painting does not reproduce the natural space leads to the conclusion that painting operations implemented by the Byzantine painters are intended to symbolize a supernatural space. The following lines try to open the question of space in painting plastic Byzantine interpretation, ie to try to present a reading of the painting operations as such, following the approach of Georges Kordis, chair professor of the Faculty Eikonografia Theology of the University of Athens and prominent Greek painter. Our goal is to propose some guidelines for introducing us to the problem of pictorial representation of space in the Byzantine painting.

  15. Model Checking a Byzantine-Fault-Tolerant Self-Stabilizing Protocol for Distributed Clock Synchronization Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the mechanical verification of a simplified model of a rapid Byzantine-fault-tolerant self-stabilizing protocol for distributed clock synchronization systems. This protocol does not rely on any assumptions about the initial state of the system. This protocol tolerates bursts of transient failures, and deterministically converges within a time bound that is a linear function of the self-stabilization period. A simplified model of the protocol is verified using the Symbolic Model Verifier (SMV) [SMV]. The system under study consists of 4 nodes, where at most one of the nodes is assumed to be Byzantine faulty. The model checking effort is focused on verifying correctness of the simplified model of the protocol in the presence of a permanent Byzantine fault as well as confirmation of claims of determinism and linear convergence with respect to the self-stabilization period. Although model checking results of the simplified model of the protocol confirm the theoretical predictions, these results do not necessarily confirm that the protocol solves the general case of this problem. Modeling challenges of the protocol and the system are addressed. A number of abstractions are utilized in order to reduce the state space. Also, additional innovative state space reduction techniques are introduced that can be used in future verification efforts applied to this and other protocols.

  16. Epidemic waves of the Black Death in the Byzantine Empire (1347-1453 AD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiamis, Costas; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Tsakris, Athanassios; Petridou, Eleni

    2011-09-01

    The lack of valid demographic data and the literary ambiguities of the Byzantine chroniclers raise questions about the actual size and mortality rate of the Black Death in the Byzantine Empire. This study presents for the first time a quantitative overview of the Black Death in Byzantium for the period 1347-1453. Our data were obtained from descriptions of the plague, by prominent Byzantine historians and scholars, grouped by time of appearance and geographical spread. During the period 1347-1453, a total of 61 plague reports were noted, which can be distinguished in nine major epidemic waves, 11 local outbreaks and 16 disease-free periods. The capital Constantinople and the Venetian colonies of the Ionian and Aegean Sea were the areas most affected by the plague. The epidemic waves of the Black Death in Byzantium had a total average duration of 3.2 years. Scientific ignorance of the nature of the disease, a turbulent period of warfare and an organized maritime network seem to have contributed to the spread of the disease. Employing quantitative analysis, our multidisciplinary study sheds light from various standpoints on the evolution and dynamic of the plague in the South-eastern Mediterranean during the 14th and 15th centuries, despite the lack of sound morbidity and mortality data.

  17. Investigation of the foundations of a Byzantine church by three-dimensional seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polymenakos, L.; Papamarinopoulos, S.; Miltiadou, A.; Charkiolakis, N.

    2005-02-01

    Byzantine public buildings are of high historical and cultural value. Churches, in particular, are of high architectural and artistic value because they are built using various materials and construction techniques and may contain significant frescoes and mosaics. The knowledge of the state of foundations and ground material conditions is important for their proper restoration and preservation. Seismic tomography is employed to investigate the foundation structure and ground material of a Byzantine church. Energy sources are placed across the floor of the church and surrounding courts, while recorders are placed in a subterranean crypt. Travel time data are analyzed and processed with a three-dimensional (3D) tomographic inversion software in order to construct seismic velocity images at the foundation and below foundation level. Velocity variations are known to correlate well with the lithological character of the earth materials, thus providing important structural and lithological information. A case study from a Byzantine church of 11th c. A.D. in the suburbs of Athens, Greece, is presented. The objective of this research is the nondestructive investigation of unknown underground structures or void spaces, mainly under the floor of the building. The results are interpreted in terms of the foundation elements as well as of significant variations in the earth material character.

  18. Cosmological Symbolism in the Decorative Cycles of Mid-Byzantine Churches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimplin, V.

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental links between theology and astronomy are widely reflected in the Judaeo-Christian tradition. From Genesis to Revelation, the great mysteries of the beginning and end of the universe, and the cycles of birth and death of individuals, are explained in terms of cosmological concepts. These are in turn reflected in art and architecture and nowhere more broadly, perhaps, than in Byzantine architecture and decoration. Following the Iconoclast prohibition of images in the Orthodox church (726-843), the mid-Byzantine period (843-1204) witnessed the primacy of the representation of the heavens in art and architecture. Reinforced by such writers as Cosmas Indicopleustes and Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, not only were individual images reflective of the heavens (nativity and rebirth at the winter solstice, and rebirth/resurrection at the spring equinox) but entire cycles of church decoration were devised so as to reflect the ordering of God's universe. The architecture and decoration of the quintessential mid-Byzantine cross-in-square church was symbolic itself of the universe, as at Hosios Loukas and Daphni (eleventh century). From the location of the Pantocrator in the central celestial dome, to the descending zones of squinches and pendentives and the lowest earthly zones, decorative schemes are used to reflect the view of the sky/heavens above earth. Hierarchical systems depicting the life of Christ and ascending/descending ranks of saints and angels were rigorously adhered to, with Mary in the apse as bridge between heaven and earth.

  19. A Self-Stabilizing Byzantine-Fault-Tolerant Clock Synchronization Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a rapid Byzantine-fault-tolerant self-stabilizing clock synchronization protocol that is independent of application-specific requirements. It is focused on clock synchronization of a system in the presence of Byzantine faults after the cause of any transient faults has dissipated. A model of this protocol is mechanically verified using the Symbolic Model Verifier (SMV) [SMV] where the entire state space is examined and proven to self-stabilize in the presence of one arbitrary faulty node. Instances of the protocol are proven to tolerate bursts of transient failures and deterministically converge with a linear convergence time with respect to the synchronization period. This protocol does not rely on assumptions about the initial state of the system other than the presence of sufficient number of good nodes. All timing measures of variables are based on the node s local clock, and no central clock or externally generated pulse is used. The Byzantine faulty behavior modeled here is a node with arbitrarily malicious behavior that is allowed to influence other nodes at every clock tick. The only constraint is that the interactions are restricted to defined interfaces.

  20. Verification of a Byzantine-Fault-Tolerant Self-stabilizing Protocol for Clock Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical verification of a simplified model of a rapid Byzantine-fault-tolerant self-stabilizing protocol for distributed clock synchronization systems. This protocol does not rely on any assumptions about the initial state of the system except for the presence of sufficient good nodes, thus making the weakest possible assumptions and producing the strongest results. This protocol tolerates bursts of transient failures, and deterministically converges within a time bound that is a linear function of the self-stabilization period. A simplified model of the protocol is verified using the Symbolic Model Verifier (SMV). The system under study consists of 4 nodes, where at most one of the nodes is assumed to be Byzantine faulty. The model checking effort is focused on verifying correctness of the simplified model of the protocol in the presence of a permanent Byzantine fault as well as confirmation of claims of determinism and linear convergence with respect to the self-stabilization period. Although model checking results of the simplified model of the protocol confirm the theoretical predictions, these results do not necessarily confirm that the protocol solves the general case of this problem. Modeling challenges of the protocol and the system are addressed. A number of abstractions are utilized in order to reduce the state space.

  1. Ранневизантийский Херсонес, Понт и Восточное Средиземноморье (по материалам краснолаковой керамики / Early Byzantine Chersoneses, Pontus and Eastern Mediterranean (on the materials Red nail ceramics

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    S.V. Ushakov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available В статье рассматривается история исследования и современное состояние изучения основных групп ранневизантийской краснолаковой керамики в Херсонесе. Сделаны выводы, что на рынке Херсонеса и в быту доминировала посуда из Понтийского региона (херсонесская сигиллята, затем понтийская позднеримская группа, позднее все больше становилось посуды из Малой Азии (фокейская сигиллята. Импорт краснолаковой посуды из Северной Африки (Карфаген в ранневизантийское время был немногочисленным. Археологические материалы (и амфоры в том числе позволяют утверждать, что Херсонес Таврический (Византийский Херсон в IV — середине VII вв. в экономическом и культурном плане был важной составной частью Понтийско-Восточносредиземноморского региона. The article discusses the history and current state of the research study of the major groups of the early Byzantine red slip ceramics in Chersoneses. It is concluded that the market Chersonese and in everyday life dominated by dishes from the region of Pontus (Chersonese sigillata, then the Pontic late Roman group, and later became more and more dishes from Asia Minor (Phocaean sigillata. Import red slip dishes from North Africa (Carthage in the early Byzantine period was small. Archaeological materials (amphorae and including suggest that the Chersonese (Byzantine Cherson in IV — the middle of VII century

  2. Hyperglycemic emergencies in Indian patients with diabetes mellitus on pilgrimage to Amarnathji yatra

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    Mohd Ashraf Ganie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS represent two distinct metabolic derangements manifested by insulin deficiency and severe hyperglycemia, with estimated mortality rates of 2.5-9%. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM controlled by diet or oral agents, DKA does not occur unless there is significant severe stress such as severe sepsis, major surgery, trauma, etc. We observed many such emergencies occurring in pilgrims. Objective: We analyzed the data of 13 patients with DM admitted in our endocrine department with hyperglycemic emergencies during 2 years of the annual pilgrimage (yatra to Amarnathji. Materials and Methods: We reviewed and analyzed the case records of 13 yatris with DM who were referred and admitted in our hospital with hyperglycemic emergencies during the yatra season (July-August of 2006 and 2007. Results: Eleven of 13 had DKA and 1 each had HHS and hypoglycemia. After initial clinical assessment and blood sampling for blood counts, electrolytes, blood gases, urinalysis, chest radiography, and electrocardiography, these cases were managed with standard protocol published by American Diabetes Association (ADA for the management of DKA and HHS. Average blood glucose was 466 mg/dl and nine subjects had moderate to severe ketonuria. All the cases, except one, were in stable condition at the time of discharge. Conclusion: High altitude, strenuous exertion of going uphill, withdrawal of insulin or oral hypoglycemic drugs, starvation, sepsis, and alcohol intake were recorded as predisposing factors. Therefore, there is an immense need for institution of a special health education program to all the yatris before taking the endeavor.

  3. The Early Khazars and Turks in the Byzantium-Persian Wars of Late 6th and Early 7th Centuries

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    E S Galkina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the political and ethnic history of the Early Khazars and Göktürks in the Ciscaucasia and the problem of balance of forces in this region during the Byzantium-Persian Wars of late 6th and early 7th centuries. In the author's opinion based mainly on Arabic and Byzantine sources, the Western Turkic Khaganate was the main ally of the Byzantine Empire in these wars, and the Khazars remained a part of this Khaganate until at least 630.

  4. The Early Khazars and Turks in the Byzantium-Persian Wars of Late 6th and Early 7th Centuries

    OpenAIRE

    E S Galkina

    2011-01-01

    The article is devoted to the political and ethnic history of the Early Khazars and Göktürks in the Ciscaucasia and the problem of balance of forces in this region during the Byzantium-Persian Wars of late 6th and early 7th centuries. In the author's opinion based mainly on Arabic and Byzantine sources, the Western Turkic Khaganate was the main ally of the Byzantine Empire in these wars, and the Khazars remained a part of this Khaganate until at least 630.

  5. Tradition and modernity in Marques of Tarifa pilgrimage to Jerusalem: Influence on the cultural heritage of Seville

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    María Encarnación Cambil Henández

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Tradition and modernity that characterizes the transition from the Middle Ages to the Modern Age in Spain, will be reflected in the pilgrimage trips to the Holy Land. During the sixteenth century, Christians travelers who came on pilgrimage to Jerusalem did their tour with a fundamentally religious and devotional interest. But he was not alone, as he joined other interests as the search of adventure, knowledge and business. During the journey, the pilgrim, full of emotion and spirituality, visiting shrines and relics for indulgences necessary for the good die and attain eternal life. However, during the return trip, and become traveler, carrying out other planned objectives becoming an experience that would later reflected in their environment and heritage. In this paper we analyze the stay of the Marquis of Tarifa in Jerusalem and his return trip to Seville, for his experience during these sections of the trip will be captured forever in the cultural landscape of the city of Seville.

  6. Pharyngeal carriage rate of Neisseria meningitidis before and after the Hajj pilgrimage, in Zahedan (southeastern Iran), 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metanat, Maliheh; Sharifi-Mood, Batool; Sanei-Moghaddam, Sara; Rad, Nahid Sepehri

    2015-01-01

    The annual Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca, which attracts more than 3 million Muslim pilgrims from around the world, has played a role in the global spread of meningococcal infection. We aimed to compare pharyngeal carriage of Neisseria meningitidis in Hajj pilgrims before departure and after returning to Iran, Zahedan. This prospective and cross-sectional study was conducted among Hajj pilgrims in Zahedan (southeast Iran) in 2012. We studied all pilgrims who agreed to participate in this study and who met the inclusion criteria. Sampling was done by swabbing the posterior pharyngeal wall through the mouth with direct plating or keeping transport time to below 5 h. Specific culture, oxidase test, and carbohydrates tests were done on the positive samples. Among 422 pilgrims (42.2% male, 57.8% female; with age range 21-95 years), 6 (1.4%) were positive for N. meningitidis after the Hajj pilgrimage. Nobody was positive before departure. During the Hajj 58.5% of the participants received antibiotics. According to the results of our study, the prevalence of pharyngeal carriage of N. meningitidis in pilgrims after returning to Zahedan was low (1.4%). The quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine and antibiotic therapy were effective in reducing the number of carriers among pilgrims after travel.

  7. Religious Tourism versus Secular Pilgrimage: The Basilica of La Sagrada Família

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    Estela Marine-Roig

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the number of tourists visiting religious buildings of special cultural attraction, mainly due to their exceptional architecture, has significantly increased. In such cases, it is hard to discern whether it is a question of religious tourism or of so-called secular pilgrimage. This paper analyses this issue by means of a paradigmatic case study: The Basilica of La Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, Catalonia, a Roman Catholic church that receives over 3 million visitors a year; the part of the “unfinished cathedral”, built under the direction of Catalan architect Antoni Gaudi, was registered in 2005 as a cultural site on UNESCO’s World Heritage List; and the church was consecrated in 2010 as a minor basilica by Pope Benedict XVI. The methodology used consists of two parts: the study of events and circumstances that may have influenced the projected religious or secular image of the basilica, and the analysis of the image perceived by visitors. Perceived image is obtained through a quantitative content analysis of more than 10,000 online travel reviews (OTRs on La Sagrada Familia, written by foreign tourists from five English-speaking countries. OTRs, as user-generated content (UGC, are a trustworthy source for analysing perceived and transmitted image. To ensure the quality of the results in the case study, the most suitable websites hosting OTRs are selected by applying a weighted formula, and then these OTRs are downloaded, classified, cleaned and debugged so that the HTML pages collected contain only what is written by the user, preserving the original format. Through a quantitative content analysis, we construct a table displaying the frequencies, density and weight of keywords is constructed, which are in turn categorized, and segmented by nationality, to observe in detail the density and weight of keywords related to feelings and religion. Our findings suggest a prevalence of cultural over religious motives for visiting

  8. New Trends of Pilgrimage: Religion and Tourism, Authenticity and Innovation, Development and Intercultural Dialogue: Notes from the Diary of a Pilgrim of Santiago

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    Corinto Gian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of our society are often contradictory. Despite the "liquidity" theorized by Bauman, aspects and practices deeply related (in appearance and/or in substance with spirituality hold great importance in our days. Among these practices, we found the pilgrimages. In this article we analyse this phenomenon in one of its best-known forms, the religious pilgrimage, in particular that of the Camino de Santiago. Today this forms of “travelling”, the pilgrimage, is studied as a tourism product and a vehicle of local development, and many studies already analysed the profiles and the motivations of the “new pilgrims”, as well as their economic impacts. Nevertheless, we felt the necessity to meet directly the pilgrims and share this experience with them without any filter. We became part of them, by addressing their perception toward their overall experience, using a qualitative approach based on direct observation and unstructured interviews. We collected data during a 400 kilometres walk towards Santiago de Compostela, which enabled us to create a clear overview on this specific, increasing phenomenon: a pilgrimage between religion and tourism, authenticity and innovation, local development and intercultural dialogue.

  9. ‘Pseudomonas saudiphocaensis’ sp. nov., a new bacterial species isolated from currency notes collected during the Hajj pilgrimage in 2012 at Makkah, Saudi Arabia

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    E.I. Azhar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here the main characteristics of ‘Pseudomonas saudiphocaensis’ strain 20_BNT (CSUR P1224, a new species of the Pseudomonas genus that was isolated from currency notes collected during the Hajj pilgrimage in 2012 at Makkah, Saudi Arabia.

  10. Archaeomagnetic intensity of ceramic sherds from two Rhodian Byzantine churches: A preliminary initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, W. S.; Liritzis, I.

    Archaeointensity results were obtained from ceramic sherds incorporated in the 'mortar' of two Rhodian Byzantine churches. Samples were analysed using a modified Thellier method with samples orientated so that the Natural Remanent Magnetization is at right angles to the applied laboratory field. Only a few samples showed high magnetic stability and an archaeointensity result was obtained from ceramic sherds (tilebrick) from the lower interior walls of the church (Afandou Katholiki). Comparison with the Geomagnetic Field Variation plot indicated the probability density of possible dates between ~1000 to ~1500 AD. a date, broadly consistent with historical records.

  11. Self-stabilizing byzantine-fault-tolerant clock synchronization system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Systems and methods for rapid Byzantine-fault-tolerant self-stabilizing clock synchronization are provided. The systems and methods are based on a protocol comprising a state machine and a set of monitors that execute once every local oscillator tick. The protocol is independent of specific application specific requirements. The faults are assumed to be arbitrary and/or malicious. All timing measures of variables are based on the node's local clock and thus no central clock or externally generated pulse is used. Instances of the protocol are shown to tolerate bursts of transient failures and deterministically converge with a linear convergence time with respect to the synchronization period as predicted.

  12. Water and Gender in Recreating Family Life with Maa Ganga: The Confluence of Nature and Culture in a North Indian River Pilgrimage

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    Catrien Notermans

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the meaning of water and gender in the North Indian pilgrimage to the sacred river Ganges. It joins the recent criticism in anthropology concerning the nature/culture divide and aims to transcend that divide by focusing on water, not apart from but as part of social life. Assuming that water’s sociality is gendered, the authors look at how both the river water—itself as a landscape material—and the pilgrims’ engagements with that water are gendered. Starting from the central question: How do men’s and women’s ritual engagements with the sacred female river water (mutually construct social life? The article investigates men’s and women’s ritual use of water at different sites. It focuses on more than the central pilgrimage shrine and links the sacred river site to people’s homes to know how the moving river water, collected by pilgrims at the shrine, is used in water rituals back home. Trying to counterbalance the male and scriptural bias which is prominent in the literature on Ganges’ pilgrimage sites, the pilgrimage is studied from the perspective of lived religion that takes people’s embodied practices and sensory experiences of nature into account as well as people’s everyday life. By showing how men’s and women’s rituals differ and complement each other, it argues that men’s rituals at the pilgrimage site and women’s rituals at home serve the recreation of the family in a paired way. The argument is built on longitudinal and multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork at the Ganges river shrine in Haridwar (Uttarakhand and pilgrims’ residence in Udaipur (Rajasthan.

  13. Byzantine wall paintings from Kastoria, northern Greece: Spectroscopic study of pigments and efflorescing salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanidis, Andreas; Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Strati, Aggeliki; Gkimourtzina, Amalia; Papoulidou, Androniki

    2011-02-01

    This study concerns the investigation of pigments and efflorescence phenomena on the wall paintings of Kastoria, a rural, non-metropolitan Byzantine town. A large number of representative samples were collected from the murals of three churches, dated to post-Byzantine era (14th-17th c. AD). The identified pigments for the red colour were hematite (Fe 2O 3), cinnabar (HgS) and minium (Pb 3O 4), while brown and yellow colours were attributed to mixtures of ochres (Fe-oxides and hydroxides) and lime. The utilization of admixtures of iron, lead and mercury compounds was also attested in order to render specific tones on the painted surfaces. Black and dark blue hues were prepared using black carbon and Mn in some cases. Grey colours were assigned to a mixture of black carbon and lime. Green colour is rather attributed to admixtures of Fe-rich minerals and lime and not to the commonly used green earths. Baryte (BaSO 4) was also evidenced as a filler or extender. Phosphorous was detected and connected to proteinaceous material and Mo and Sb were traced which are probably affiliated to Fe-oxides. Regarding efflorescing salts, the determined compounds are: calcite, dolomite, gypsum, halite, nitratine, natron and mirabilite, all of which are related to temperature and humidity changes and moisture fluctuations inside the wall paintings.

  14. Archaeometric studies of Byzantine pottery from Hârşova-Carsium, Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugoi, Roxana, E-mail: bugoi@nipne.ro [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering, Mǎgurele 077125 (Romania); Talmaţchi, Cristina, E-mail: ctalmatchi@gmail.com [Museum of National History and Archaeology, Constanţa 900745 (Romania); Haitǎ, Constantin, E-mail: costel_haita@yahoo.com [National Museum of Romania History, Bucharest 030026 (Romania); Ceccato, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.ceccato@lnl.infn.it [Università di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”, Padova 35131 (Italy); INFN – LNL, Legnaro 35020 (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    A set of 36 ceramic shards excavated at Hârşova, Romania, dated to the 11th century A.D., was investigated using Optical Microscopy (OM) and PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission). The study aimed at revealing the raw materials and the manufacturing techniques employed by the potters from the Lower Danube zone during the Byzantine period and to distinguish the local products from the supposedly imported ones. The division of the ceramic shards based on stylistic grounds was refined by the petrographic observations that identified four types of fabrics. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the PIXE data singled out two categories of ceramic: one made from kaolinitic clays and another produced from local sedimentary resources, with or without temper addition. Micro-PIXE scans of the interfaces between the green glaze and the underlying ceramic body indicated a high Pb content in the decorative layers. Glazing was made through the application of PbO onto a non-calcareous clay body. The petrographic and compositional data interpreted in correlation with archaeological information led to the characterization of a representative assemblage of ceramic finds from the Byzantine period, subject rarely tackled in the scientific literature.

  15. Byzantine influence on the Serbian customary law in the 9th century

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    Đekić Đorđe N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By the 10th century Serbian law recognized the following ways of dispute resolution: revenge and appeasement, and it may be indirectly proved that there was a system of compensation. As punishments, there was banishment into exile, blinding and a death sentence. Since revenge, appeasement and compensation system appear in the pre-state period, while the death penalty has its roots in the blood feud, that indicates they are all of local origin. A question remains about the origin of banishment and blinding a fallen ruler, that is, a rival to the throne. In the first half of the 9th century the Byzantine Empire managed to reinstate its power over the Adriatic Sea, to impose itself over the Serbian states, to Christianise them and to legalise ruling families in the Serbian lands. Suffice to say that in 869 the Serbian states fight wars on the Byzantine side. Origin of influences on the ways of the punishment we seek in Byzantium, or better still, in its legal practice. It has been found that Byzantium used to send their conquered rivals to the throne into exile, punishing them by blinding them, so we draw a conclusion that in the matter of punishment, i.e. in the customary law, it exercised its influence on Serbia.

  16. "Just Keep Going, Stay Together, and Sing OUT." Learning Byzantine Music in an Informal and Situated Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brashier, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This project examines the communal process of music learning as it occurs in a Byzantine chant learning group at a Greek Orthodox Church. The goal of this project was to investigate the act of music making, as situated in a particular sociocultural context, in order to address the question: Through what processes do individuals share music…

  17. Regional Exchange and the Role of the Shop in Byzantine and Early Islamic Syria-Palestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmsley, Alan George

    2012-01-01

    a significant factor in the prosperity of Syria-Palestine at that time, facilitating not only local exchange but also, on a wider scale, the transportation of goods from outside the immediate region. Crucial to this trade system at the local level was the shop. Archaeological evidence for a shop-based market...... as a system of economic exchange and cultural interaction in post-classical Syria-Palestine. Attention will focus on how the physical centrality of the shop was matched by its defining social role on a daily basis; therefore, the study of the shop and its contents also promises to offers a fascinating insight...

  18. Roads, travel, and time ‘across Jordan' in Byzantine and early Islamic times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmsley, Alan George

    2009-01-01

    Roads, means of travel and travel times required to journey from one place to another in antiquity are essential components in assessing the political, cultural and economic history of a region. This paper reviews archaeological and documentary material detailing the major routes that crossed...... Jordan, the manner in which they were transversed, and the time required to travel over them in the period ca. 300-800 CE. In this post-Roman period, roadways took on new meaning as the needs of empire gave way to wider, and more self-defining, social and economic requirements of late antiquity...

  19. Early Byzantine metallurgical object at the site Gamzigrad - Romuliana in Eastern Serbia

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    Živić Maja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The processing of waste powders from steel production in electric arc furnaces is a world problem. The presence of Fe, Zn, Cd, Pb, etc. in the powders makes them a valuable source for these metals. Zinc is the metal that is most often utilized, which leads to reduction of environmental pollution. The greatest problem in this connection is the presence of chlorine and fluorine in the powders, which influences the electroextraction of zinc in a significantly negative way. The presented paper shows the results from the study of the possibilities for zinc leaching from powders obtained in the steel production in Bulgaria. A detailed characterization of the powders was made using chemical analysis, XRD, DTA and TGA and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The results from the powder leaching with different solvents give the reason to recommend a technological scheme for the complete and total processing of the waste powders from steel production.

  20. Chemical and spectroscopic investigation on the plaster of a Byzantine church.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Davide; Scarabino, Carla; Inverso, Donato; Proto, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The discovery of a Byzantine church under the floor of one of the oldest churches of Salerno (Italy) has given us the opportunity to investigate the fine composition of the plaster through chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, considering that plasters are generally formed by a carbonate phase (carbonates) and an inert phase (silicates), the characterization, performed on the carbonate phase by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), has revealed the presence of dolomite minerals. This information indicates that, during the building process, some accessory minerals of marble were added in the mortar to be used like fillers. The carbonate phase makes too difficult the spectroscopic characterization of the inert phase. Only by acid attack of the plaster the inert phase has been isolated and its characterization, by XRD and optical microscopy, has indicated the presence of olivine minerals and other typical silicates of river sands.

  1. Maria Angelina Doukaina Palaiologina and her depictions in post-byzantine mural paintings

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    Agoritsas Demetrios C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Serbian Despot of Ioannina Thomas Preljubović and his wife Maria Angelina Doukaina Palaiologina were frequently connected with religious endowments and artefacts that were donated in churches and monasteries. One of them, an icon of the “Doubting Thomas” with the depiction of Maria Palaiologina among the Apostles, was donated by Maria to the monastery of Metamorphosis (Great Meteoron most probably in the memory of her husband Thomas. This rare iconographic type is traced in post-byzantine painted monuments in Epirus, Thessaly and Macedonia from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. The transmis­sion of the above iconography is due to the spiritual and artistic influence of two important monastic centers, the Philanthropenos monastery in Ioannina and the Varlaam monastery in Meteora region, whose founders - the Philanthropenos and Apsaras families - were strongly connected to the Serbian rulers of Ioannina and especially Maria Palaiologina.

  2. Last years in the last century of the Serbian Byzantine relationships

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    Ćirković Sima

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the Battle of Marica (1371, there has been in the Serbian literature an increasing tendency to recognize "signs" of the fulfillment of pristine prophecies that the Ismaelits would subdue the Christians, that all liturgy would come to an end and such suffering ensue that the living would envy the dead. Prophecies originating from the time of the spread of Islam regained topicality at the time of the spread of the Ottoman power and the breakdown of the Christian states headed by the Byzantine Empire. This pessimistic tenor was only intensified by the belief in the 84 "last years", the years of suffering and sorrow, between the thirteenth 532-year Great Paschal Cycle (6916 = 1st September 1407 — 31st August 1408 and the year 7000 (1st September 1491 — 31st August 1492. .

  3. Byzantine history and the discourse of the Russian political/intellectual underground

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    Dmitry Shlapentokh

    2012-01-01

    In the view of the producer, the Byzantine Empire was strong when it followed its autocratic tradition and was attached to Orthodoxy. The movie generated extensive discussions, including among those who belong to Russia's political and intellectual fringe. Quite a few of them were neo-pagans; for them, Christianity, including Orthodox Christianity, was Russia's curse. For them, it was an Asian creed foreign to Aryan Russians. The fact that it was accepted by Russians implied that Russians had been subjugated by an alien, Asiatic, force. Many of these neo-pagans were quite pessimistic in regard to the country's future; and, indeed, their response indicates the deep alienation of quite a few Russians, which hardly bodes well for the country's future.

  4. Earthquakes and plague during Byzantine times: can lessons from the past improve epidemic preparedness.

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    Tsiamis, Costas; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Marketos, Spyros

    2013-01-01

    Natural disasters have always been followed by a fear of infectious diseases. This raised historical debate about one of the most feared scenarios: the outbreak of bubonic plague caused by Yersinia pestis. One such event was recorded in the Indian state Maharashtra in 1994 after an earthquake. In multidisciplinary historical approach to the evolution of plague, many experts ignore the possibility of natural foci and their activation. This article presents historical records from the Byzantine Empire about outbreaks of the Plague of Justinian occurring months or even up to a year after high-magnitude earthquakes. Historical records of plague outbreaks can be used to document existence of natural foci all over the world. Knowledge of these historical records and the contemporary examples of plague support the assumption that, in terms of organising humanitarian aid, poor monitoring of natural foci could lead to unpredictable epidemiological consequences after high-magnitude earthquakes.

  5. Colchicum genus in the writings of ancient Greek and Byzantine physicians.

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    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Papaioannou, Theodoros; Panayiotakopoulos, George; Saridaki, Zenia; Vrachatis, Dimitrios A; Karamanou, Marianna

    2018-01-14

    The plants of the Colchicum family were known during the archaic period in Greece for their deleterious properties. Later on, they were used for the treatment of podagra. The treatment was introduced by the ancient Greek physicians and passed on to the Byzantine and Arabian physicians to endure until nowadays. The first plant was most probably named "Medea" from the notorious Colchican witch. As the most common member of the family blossoms in autumn, the plant was named Colchicum autumnale. Various nominations were also used, such as Ephemeron, Hermodactyl, Anima articulorum and Surugen. Our article discusses them, while at the same time presents the most notable authorities who have used Colchicum plants in herbal medicine and toxicology. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Prophets carrying texts by other authors in Byzantine painting: Mistakes or intentional substitutions?

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    Popovich Ljubica D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Since there are no two identical churches in Byzantine art, consequently there are no two identical iconographic programs. This observation also applies to the representation of prophets in the drums of the domes or in other locations in Byzantine churches. Research dealing with this group of Old Testament figures reveals many variations regarding the planned selection of prophets and choices of the texts that they carry inscribed on their scrolls. This study examines the instances when one of the authors of the prophetic books carries the text by another author. These occurrences are neither frequent nor accidental. Such deviations from standard practice that are explored in this article demonstrate the following: first of all exchanges of text can occur due to the mistake by the artist, as exemplified in the Palace Chapel in Palermo, or by the mistake of the person who inscribed the texts, as in the Chapel of Joachim and Anna in the Monastery Studenica. Secondly, in a number of monuments the text-bearer and the selection of the text by another prophet-author are not accidental. For example, if a number of quotations to be used are chosen from the book by the prophet Isaiah, and he is only represented once, because repetition of the same prophet within a group of Old Testament figures was not practiced, what is to be done? Therefore, other, usually minor, prophets, were selected to hold the scrolls inscribed with the text by other authors, for example Isaiah. Such cases are well documented in the churches of Panagia ton Chalkeon and the Holy Apostles in Thessalonike, and in the church of the Resurrection in Verroia, where the selection of prophets’ quotations, usually inspired by the liturgical tradition, furthermore serves to underscore a certain idea of a theological or iconographic nature.

  7. A repertoire of comic figures of the antique theatre in miniatures of Byzantine Psalters with marginal

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    Bemabò Massimo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations on ninth-century Byzantine Psalters have focused mostly on the impact of the iconoclast controversy on the iconography of the marginal illustrations in these manuscripts. In fact this impact has been greatly exaggerated and the Psalter illustrations that can be connected to the debates on icon are less than a dozen out of a total of a few hundreds. The present article focuses on the iconography of figures illustrating social and moral types in the psalms. These figures cannot be considered as novel inventions of the ninth-century artists who painted our manuscripts. Their origin must be drawn back to late antique prototypes; in particular it is inferred that most of these figures represent characters that were originally modeled after the moral and social types acted on stage in late antique theater, mime and pantomime. A number of examples out of the miniatures in the Carolingian manuscripts of Terence and other media provides parallels to gestures, postures and features of the figures in the Psalter illustrations. The iconographical invention of these characters for the psalms must date from fourth to sixth century, a period during which theater was still very popular, notwithstanding the strong opposition of the Christian Fathers. Chroricius of Gaza' Apologia memoriam and other late antique writings witness the popularity of mime up to the middle sixth century and the ample variety of types that were acted on stage. The figures scissor out of marginal illustrations in the Byzantine Psalters are arranged in five plates collecting examples of, respectively, moral types, emotions caricatures, social types and professions, gods and devils.

  8. The Byzantine city between 5th and 9th centuries: historiographical perspective

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    Luca Zavagno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at presenting a historiographical overview of the traditional debate on the fate of Byzantine cities during the so-called Dark Ages. This debate has always begun from the point of departure of illustrating and also proving either the continuity or the discontinuity of the classic city, of the Greco-Roman concept of polis, during the middle ages; this was the framing of the discussion by scholars such as Kazhdan and Ostrogorsky, and has continued in the views of modern authors such as Foss. Some scholars (Liebeschuetz, Trombley seem to have developed a conservative reaction to Foss, trying mainly to adapt the decline-continuity polemic to the new “archaeological” environment. Others (Ward-Perkins, Spieser, Zanini have deliberately chosen to limit their analytical model of the urban trajectories chronologically, without crossing the symbolic threshold of the seventh century. In contrast Brandes, Walmsey and, partially, Whittow have followed in the footsteps of Foss in developing archaeologically exhaustive regional studies which propose peculiar solutions to the problem of the changing appearance of Byzantine urbanism in seventh and eighth century. Lastly, Wickham and Haldon have moved along (economic guidelines, recognizing the underlying structural tendencies that these have in the evolution of cities in the context of the late Roman state and society, as well as describing the functional distinctions between different types of settlements and their changing types of permutations within the slow process of transformation of late Roman urban society, which entail a number of changes in the physical appearance and extent of towns.

  9. La musicalisation de Pilgrimage de Dorothy Richardson: l’emprunt de la forme musicale, le récit et le temps

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    Ivana Trajanoska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hormis dans quelques articles occasionnels, le grand potentiel d’une recherche musico-littéraire du roman Pilgrimage de Dorothy Richardson reste encore peu exploré. Dans ce sens, cet article tente de dévoiler le lien fondamental entre la musique et ce roman moderniste. En s’appuyant sur Barthes, Huxley, Prieto, nous cernons la musicalisation du roman que Richardson met en avant. Nous recherchons la possibilité d’un emprunt de forme musicale comme modèle narratif, la nature et le but de cette expérimentation moderniste. En outre, nous examinons ce que la musicalisation de Pilgrimage apporte à ce récit, comment elle l’enrichit et l’approfondit, et la façon dont elle a permis à Richardson d’exprimer son avis sur la structure, le contenu du roman et sur la représentation du temps. Apart from occasional contributions, the great potential of a musico-literary research on Pilgrimage by Dorothy Richardson remains underexplored. In this perspective, the present article aims at revealing the fundamental link between music and the writing of Richardson’s modernist novel. Building upon Barthes, Huxley, Prieto critical statements, the article outlines how Richardson achieves the musicalisation of fiction in her novel. The possibility of borrowing a musical form as a narrative model, as well as the nature and the purpose of such modernist experimentation, will be explored. Furthermore, the article scrutinises the effect of the muscalisation of Pilgrimage on its narrative form, how it enriched and deepened the novel, and helped Richardson express her opinions on the structure and content of the novel and its strategies of representation of time.

  10. The Camino de Santiago de Compostela (Spain) and The Via Francigena (Italy): a comparison between two important historic pilgrimage routes in Europe

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    Lucarno, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The Italian section of the Via Francigena, a Medieval pilgrimage route to Rome, has not yet been commercialised to its full potential when compared to the Camino de Santiago in Spain. There are many reasons for this under development. First, there is an absence of a specialised organisation focused on utilising the resources available; a difficulty that could be overcome by the forming a tourism body with the specific charter for developing these resources and attracting tourism. Second, the ...

  11. Tuberculosis and mass gatherings-opportunities for defining burden, transmission risk, and the optimal surveillance, prevention, and control measures at the annual Hajj pilgrimage.

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    Zumla, Alimuddin; Saeed, Abdulaziz Bin; Alotaibi, Badriah; Yezli, Saber; Dar, Osman; Bieh, Kingsley; Bates, Matthew; Tayeb, Tamara; Mwaba, Peter; Shafi, Shuja; McCloskey, Brian; Petersen, Eskild; Azhar, Esam I

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is now the most common infectious cause of death worldwide. In 2014, an estimated 9.6 million people developed active TB. There were an estimated three million people with active TB including 360000 with multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) who were not diagnosed, and such people continue to fuel TB transmission in the community. Accurate data on the actual burden of TB and the transmission risk associated with mass gatherings are scarce and unreliable due to the small numbers studied and methodological issues. Every year, an estimated 10 million pilgrims from 184 countries travel to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) to perform the Hajj and Umrah pilgrimages. A large majority of pilgrims come from high TB burden and MDR-TB endemic areas and thus many may have undiagnosed active TB, sub-clinical TB, and latent TB infection. The Hajj pilgrimage provides unique opportunities for the KSA and the 184 countries from which pilgrims originate, to conduct high quality priority research studies on TB under the remit of the Global Centre for Mass Gatherings Medicine. Research opportunities are discussed, including those related to the definition of the TB burden, transmission risk, and the optimal surveillance, prevention, and control measures at the annual Hajj pilgrimage. The associated data are required to develop international recommendations and guidelines for TB management and control at mass gathering events. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Laser-based systems for the structural diagnostic of artwork: an application to XVII-century Byzantine icons

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    Tornari, Vivi; Bonarou, Antonia; Castellini, Paolo; Esposito, Enrico; Osten, Wolfgang; Kalms, Michael K.; Smyrnakis, Nikos; Stasinopulos, Stergios

    2001-10-01

    Laser diagnostic systems based on shearography, vibrometry, and holography principles were employed to investigate the potential implementation of laser techniques in art conservation structural diagnostic field. The employed techniques offered the required measuring variability to allow a first discrimination on complex diagnostic uncertainties encountered often in art conservation. The systems were tested and used to assess the structural condition of well-documented Byzantine icons with known structural problems. Defects and mechanical deformations were identified in various distances from the artworks by alternative employment of techniques. In this way simultaneous eligibility classification of the used systems was also obtained. Results of the on-field application on the XVII century Byzantine icons are herein presented with discussion on the prospects of the techniques in the diagnostic field of art conservation.

  13. First Foreign-Policy Success of Kievan Commanding Elite in Europe: Byzantine Military Campaign of 860 and Askold's Christianization

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    Igor A. Melnichuk

    2013-01-01

    The article, using annalistic sources and Byzantine literary monuments of VIII–IX centuries, attempts to conduct historical and political analysis and estimate major successes of Rus under Askol'd’s reign: Rusichi march on Constantinople in 860 and as a result Christianization of prince and his druzhina. The article presents obvious success of Askold and military and political elite of Rus:- Breakthrough of Russia to the European political space and, consequently, access to economic space: ex...

  14. Population Movement and Virus Spreading: HEV Spreading in a Pilgrimage City, Mashhad in Northeast Iran; an Example

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    Ahmadi Ghezeldasht, Sanaz; Miri, Rahele; Hedayatimoghadam, Mohamadreza; Shamsian, Aliakbar; Bidkhori, Hamidreza; Fathimoghadam, Fahad; Rezaee, Seyyed Abdorrahim

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) infection is a significant public health concern and responsible for large outbreaks of acute hepatitis in poor sanitary and living conditions. Objectives To investigate the impact of population movements on virus spreading, a large-scale population-based survey was performed in a pilgrimage- tourism area, the great Mashhad, capital city of Khorasan province. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among 1582 randomly selected individuals from general population of Mashhad, north east of Iran, between May to September 2009. Serum samples were tested for total anti-HEV antibody using a specific enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) kit. Results The prevalence of HEV infection was 14.2% (225/1582) with a maximum of 25.5 % (14/55) in densely populated areas. The highest prevalence was observed in visitant areas (≥ 20%) near the holly shrine with crowded hotels and inns. The differences between these areas and other districts were statistically significant (P prevalence of HEV is related to populated district, which can reach to the highest rate in hotels and inns close to visitants. Traditional sanitation and water supplying systems are the second important factor for the virus transmission. Therefore, it can be concluded that such areas need efficient surveillance systems to prevent the spreading of infectious diseases. PMID:24171006

  15. An Unpublished Byzantine Medical Fragment (Parisinus Suppl. gr. 607: Pharmaceutical Knowledge and Practice in Tenth-Century Constantinople

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    Philip Rance

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to introduce, edit and translate an unpublished fragment of Byzantine medical writing. Parisinus suppl. gr. 607 preserves a short and seemingly acephalous anthology of pharmaceutical remedies.  A consideration of recipe collections as a distinctive but hard-to-define species of Byzantine Fachliteratur seeks to integrate this text into recent scholarship concerning a broad category of informal therapeutic writings, which testify to Byzantine drug lore, clinical practice and medicinal book culture. Investigation of the codicological structure clarifies that a secondary hand copied the fragment onto a blank folio in the mid-tenth century, contemporary with the compilation this manuscript in a high socio-cultural and intellectual milieu in Constantinople. Examination of compositional contexts, embracing philological, textual, literary-historical and medical dimensions, suggests a ‘private’ remedy collection indicative of the use of texts in ‘household medicine’. This fragment draws particular attention as one of the earliest surviving specimens, while the codex has escaped the notice of previous inventories of Greek manuscripts with medical content.

  16. A comparison between two migrations in the Byzantine Empire: the Goths and the Pechenegs

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    Alexandru Madgearu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study compares from several points of view two migratory movements across the Lower Danube: the Tervingi Goths in 376 and the Pechenegs in 1045-1047. In both cases the imperial authorities hoped they would gain supplementary military forces, but the events turned both migratory groups into internal enemies. There are some similarities in the causes of the aforementioned migrations, in the way the Danube was crossed, and as concerns the places granted for settlement, and the integration in the Roman /Byzantine army. In other respects, the movements differed, especially because of the nomadic type of life of the Pechenegs, the Goths being sedentary people who moved from a homeland to another. Both migrations had disastrous effects for the empire, because the emperors were not able to foresee or to prevent the rebellions of these warrior people received as refugees. Instead of more economic and military resources, both the Goths and the Pechenegs caused much trouble in the South-East European provinces.

  17. On some exotic urine colors in ancient and Byzantine Greek literature.

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    Goudas, Pavlos C; Diamandopoulos, Athanasios A

    2011-01-01

    This work does not analyze the entire subject of uroscopy but focuses on a very small part thereof: i.e., some rare urine colors, in particular green and blue. These are so rare that most modern nephrologists have never encountered them. We conducted a small survey comparing contemporary knowledge with that of the past, with the participation of 40 Greek nephrologists (25 juniors and 15 seniors). Of these, 63% rejected the notion that green or blue urine even exists, while of those who were aware of them, only 20% had personally encountered them. According to our search of the modern literature, such colors result from either consumption of green or blue pigments, liver dysfunction or urine infection by certain bacteria. We searched and traced several passages on these rare urine colors, referred to in ancient Greek fewer than 7 different names, in the Greek medical literature of the Classical, Roman and Byzantine eras. In these passages, the authors not only gave detailed descriptions of the medical conditions of the corresponding patients but also explained this appearance of the urine. Surprisingly, in the studied texts we also found identical explanations with those in modern texts: consumption of certain foods, liver disease and inflammation. We present and comment on these passages, concluding that many uroscopical findings of antiquity were not quackery, but rather reliable medical statements based on thorough observation and rational reasoning.

  18. Searching the seat of the soul in Ancient Greek and Byzantine medical literature.

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    Lykouras, Eleftherios; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Ploumpidis, Demetrios N

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this paper was to examine the ancient and medieval concepts about the seat of the mental functions, as exposed in Greek texts from Antiquity to Byzantine times. The review of the philosophical and medical literature from the original ancient Greek language from the Homeric epics to the Holy Fathers of Christianity, as the problem of the seat of the soul remained without a certain answer through the centuries. Primitive concepts attributed great significance to the soul and dictated cannibal behaviours for the possession and eating of the defeated enemy's heart. Mental functions, such as thinking, feeling and mainly those related to affective manifestations, were attributed to the heart and to some other internal organs (liver, diaphragm) from the times of Greek mythology. Philosophy and empirical medicine had underestimated the brain probably because it is a 'silent' organ, contrary to the palpitating heart, with its obvious participations in the emotional reactions. The role of the brain as the mental organ and the seat of emotions has been gradually recognized. The permanent question of the seat of the soul had been for many centuries a critical dispute and the contribution of Greek philosophical and medical thought was decisive for the contemporary transformation of the whole concept.

  19. Spectroscopic Investigation Leading to the Documentation of Three Post-Byzantine Wall Paintings.

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    Lampakis, Dimitrios; Karapanagiotis, Ioannis; Katsibiri, Olga

    2017-01-01

    The main churches of three monasteries in Thessalia, Central Greece, were decorated with wall paintings in the post-Byzantine period. The main goal of the present study is to characterize the inorganic and organic materials present in the paint layers of areas that have been gilded. Optical microscopic examination was carried out on samples taken from the gilded decoration of the paintings to view their layer build-up. The combined use of micro Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and micro-Raman spectroscopy led to the detection of the pigments and the binding media used. The results from specimens taken from different wall paintings were compared with each other to observe their differences and similarities. The three investigated churches are believed to have been painted by the same iconographer, Tzortzis, who however has only been identified in only one of them. The comparison led to the conclusion that there are many similarities in the painting materials used and the general methodology adopted and, therefore, this study offers support to the belief that the mural paintings of the three monasteries could have been painted by the same iconographer. While not authenticating the two painting as being by Tzortzis, the results provide further critical material that is consistent with this attribution. However, this statement must be carefully considered because the pigments identified have been commonly and diffusely used in historic mural paintings.

  20. An isotopic perspective on the transport of Byzantine mining camp laborers into southwestern Jordan.

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    Perry, Megan A; Coleman, Drew S; Dettman, David L; al-Shiyab, Abdel Halim

    2009-11-01

    The Byzantine Empire managed a complex administrative network that controlled the mining and processing of natural resources from within its boundaries. Scholars relying upon archeological and textual evidence debate the level of imperial involvement in these ventures, particularly in the provinces. Ancient sources note that many mining camps, for instance, purportedly contained criminal laborers and elite administrators transported from distant locales, indicating significant organization and expenditures by the imperial administration to run the mines. This analysis explores the presence of these nonlocal individuals in a cemetery associated with the third to seventh century A.D. mining camp of Phaeno (Faynan), located in modern Jordan. Strontium isotope analysis of 31 burials indicates that most spent their childhood in a similar geological region as Phaeno, implying that they were locally born. The delta(18)O results mirror the homogeneous (87)Sr/(86)Sr values, confirming a local origin for most of the sample. Isotopic evidence therefore suggests that the Phaeno mining camp was largely a local operation, contrary to the picture presented in textual sources, although the profits surely padded imperial coffers.

  1. HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES AND FUTURE PERCEPTIONS OF SACRED PILGRIMAGE SPOT OF CENTRAL GUJARAT, INDIA – A CASE STUDY OF GOMTI WATER TANK

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    Sheju Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hindu pilgrimage sites in India always experience tremendous influxes of pilgrims and they are eventually subjected to considerable environmental impact. This article demonstrates how this sacred wetland has been established, and how since then it has been a religious – urban place which receives thousands of pilgrims daily. The present review is the case study of one of the anthropogenicfreshwater wetland ecosystem of viz. Gomti Pond of Dakor Town, Kheda District of Central Gujarat, India. The pond is one of the esteemed and religious Hindu pilgrimage places, associated with exodus of Lord Krishna and his devotee Bodana. Geographically, the place is a regional province, fringed by mainly three districts viz. Anand, Kheda (Charotar and Ahmedabad, reflected by identical culture, heritage, traditions, rites, and rituals. The present article has been prepared referring to various printed and on-line published literatures, visiting the place several times, and gathering information from the locals by semi-structured questionnaires. Besides, the screening of the entire area was done and a complete scenario was observed. This article delineates how the most sacred town ‘Dakor’ got recognized as a renowned pilgrimage spot, attracting the people from all over the State and the Country for its splendid historical significance, vivid geographical features, natural habitats, prevalent biotic community, variegated human population, and its holistic scenario. Keeping in mind the future challenges and projected perceptions about Gomti Pond, Dakor, many questions are still to be unanswered about how it is losing its natural habitats and biotic components. The information provided in the form of an article undoubtedly offers an insight for better understanding the environmental aspects to be addressed effectively for its better protection, conservation and management

  2. Participation in mass gatherings can benefit well-being: longitudinal and control data from a North Indian Hindu pilgrimage event.

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    Shruti Tewari

    Full Text Available How does participation in a long-duration mass gathering (such as a pilgrimage event impact well-being? There are good reasons to believe such collective events pose risks to health. There are risks associated with communicable diseases. Moreover, the physical conditions at such events (noise, crowding, harsh conditions are often detrimental to well-being. Yet, at the same time, social psychological research suggests participation in group-related activities can impact well-being positively, and we therefore investigated if participating in a long-duration mass gathering can actually bring such benefits. In our research we studied one of the world's largest collective events - a demanding month-long Hindu religious festival in North India. Participants (comprising 416 pilgrims who attended the gathering for the whole month of its duration, and 127 controls who did not completed measures of self-assessed well-being and symptoms of ill-health at two time points. The first was a month before the gathering commenced, the second was a month after it finished. We found that those participating in this collective event reported a longitudinal increase in well-being relative to those who did not participate. Our data therefore imply we should reconceptualise how mass gatherings impact individuals. Although such gatherings can entail significant health risks, the benefits for well-being also need recognition. Indeed, an exclusive focus on risk is misleading and limits our understanding of why such events may be so attractive. More importantly, as our research is longitudinal and includes a control group, our work adds robust evidence to the social psychological literature concerning the relationship between participation in social group activities and well-being.

  3. Faith, entertainment, and conflicts on the Camino de Santiago (The Way of St. James: a case study on the mediatization of the pilgrimage experience on Facebook groups

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    Marco Túlio de SOUSA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We call upon the concepts of mediatization, circulation, and discussions about the pilgrimage ritual to reflect on the media interference in the experience of pilgrims going to Santiago de Compostela. From these concepts and the methodology of case studies, we analyze posts in four Facebook groups. The evidence points to a certain distance regarding the Catholic institutional sphere and the linking of this experience to media consumption and entertainment through the expression of the most diverse motivations (self-help, tourism, spiritual, sports, etc.. It also consolidates a totem image of The Camino de Santiago (The Way of St. James as a transforming experience for the different types of pilgrims.

  4. Acquisition of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases by Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Gut Microbiota of Pilgrims during the Hajj Pilgrimage of 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leangapichart, Thongpan; Dia, Ndèye Méry; Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa; Gautret, Philippe; Brouqui, Philippe; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2016-05-01

    We reported the acquisition of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in rectal samples of 129 pilgrims during the 2013 Hajj (pilgrimage to Makkah). When returning from the Hajj, there was a significant increase in the number of pilgrims carrying E. coli resistant to ceftriaxone (P = 0.008). The CTX-M gene was detected in rectal samples, with the detection rate increasing from 10.08% to 32.56% of samples after the Hajj (P < 0.001). Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Ekphrasis Earos. Le topos de la venue du printemps chez des auteurs byzantins

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    Marina Loukaki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available La description de la venue du printemps (ekphrasis earos, un topos aux composantes spécifiques dans la littérature de la seconde sophistique, devint l’ objet d’ enseignement reproduit de façon stéréotypée dans les écoles de Rhétorique protobyzantines. La symbolique de la renaissance de la nature s’ est révélée particulièrement favorable à la didascalie chrétienne comme image du Christ ressuscité ; ainsi, l’ekphrasis earos se retrouve dans plusieurs homélies sur Pâques, le Baptême, la Nativité du Christ, l’Annonciation de la Vierge, etc. La jonction de la tradition chrétienne avec la tradition païenne dans la composition des descriptions du printemps semble qu’ elle fut favorisée dans le milieu scolaire de l’ époque médio-byzantine. Les ekphraseis earos de Libanius (Progym. XII 7, de Grégoire de Nazianze (Or. 44 et de Pseudo-Méléagre (AP IX 363 furent des modèles. À partir du XIIe siècle, les nouvelles tendances de la littérature, qui ont remis à l’honneur le roman d’ amour, le monde naturel et les détails de la vie quotidienne, ont donné lieu à des compositions dépourvues de toute allusion chrétienne.

  6. The “Whirling Disk” in the Byzantine Iconography. Search for Meaning

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    Leshcheva Yana Igorevna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Τhe article studies the plot of «whirling disk», as an example of light symbolics of the Byzantine iconography of the 11-14th centuries. The author brings up the existing hypotheses of interpretations of this phenomenon and analyzes theological sources which serve as the basis for conclusion about possible symbolic value of this iconographic plot. The author studies the specific iconographic monuments of Cappadocia, Sinai, Thessalonica, Serbia. The analysis of disks’ images allows to make the following supervision: disks were often represented in the most important places of temple space and significant iconographic plots; disks had various art execution and color scheme; the form of disk and idea of whirling were common for all examples. When the disk consists of three segments, it makes sense to assume this trinity, as a symbol of the Holy Trinity. The form of a rotating or shining disk, especially on the Sinai monuments where gold color is the main and form-building element of a luminescence suggests symbolical parallels with a solar disk especially as both in the Scriptus, and in theological works the sun is the image of God or sanctity and good fortune granted by Him. The following assumption of symbolics of rotating or shining disks is consolidated to understanding them as Divine energy. Considering all possible options, the most convincing assumption, from our point of view, is that understanding of rotating disks as Divine energy it has rather serious theological justification in the developed orthodox doctrine about Divine light and energies.

  7. A Quantitative Comparison of Chrysanthine Theory and Performance Practice of Scale Tuning, Steps, and Prominence of the Octoechos in Byzantine Chant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panteli, Maria; Purwins, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    as the frame of the first tetra- chord is more consistent with the theory than the VI. and the VII. scale degree. In practice, smaller scale degree steps (67-133 cents) appear to be increased and the highest scale step of 333 cents appears to be decreased compared to theory. In practice, the first four scale......Byzantine Chant performance practice is computationally compared to the Chrysanthine theory of the eight Byzantine Tones (octoechos). Intonation, steps, and prominence of scale degrees are quantified, based on pitch class profiles. The novel procedure introduced here comprises the following...

  8. The late Greco-Roman and Byzantine contribution to the evolution of laboratory examinations of bodily excrement. Part 1: Urine, sperm, menses and stools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, Athanasios A; Goudas, Pavlos C

    2003-07-01

    It is a common belief that laboratory investigation processes were developed after the 16th century and that before that time no attempts were made to attain a diagnosis by investigating material coming from the human body. In this paper we present data extracted from Byzantine codices that support the following thesis: The idea of examining human excrement for diagnostic purposes has its roots in the Roman and Byzantine eras. The lack of technological means was no obstacle for the doctor to create an "examinational" mind, i.e., to try to correlate the macroscopic findings in the excrement with the pathophysiological mechanism that induced it, using only the human senses.

  9. 'Our queen of hearts' - the glorification of Lady Diana Spencer: a critical appraisal of the glorification of celebrities and new pilgrimage

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    Céline Grünhagen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Religiosity and spirituality respectively have always been and will be subject to change. The emergence of the manifold forms of new religious and spiritual movements in the last century includes a variety of cult-like vener­ations of specific individuals, such as politicians (e.g. Mao, Lenin and modern idols (e.g. Elvis Presley, Princess Diana, Michael Jackson, who are glorified like saints. Devotees gather annually for memorials of their departed idols or travel­ long distances to visit the tomb, former home, etc. of a specific person to pay tribute to him or her. Due to the motivations of these devotees, the trouble they take, the practices and the tangible emotionality that are connected with this phenomenon, it can be considered a form of pilgrimage. This article presents some thoughts about the glorification of celebrities which leads to these considerable forms of cult and pilgrimage, using as an example the case of Lady Diana Frances Spencer (d. 1997.

  10. Pilot use of a novel smartphone application to track traveller health behaviour and collect infectious disease data during a mass gathering: Hajj pilgrimage 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Amani S; BinDhim, Nasser F; Tashani, Mohamed; Willaby, Harold W; Wiley, Kerrie E; Heywood, Anita E; Booy, Robert; Rashid, Harunor

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the feasibility of using a smartphone application (app) to conduct surveys among travellers during the Hajj pilgrimage, where the use of apps has not been evaluated for infectious disease surveillance. A longitudinal study was conducted among pilgrims at the Hajj 2014 using an iPhone app with separate questionnaires for three study phases covering before, during, and after Hajj. Forty-eight pilgrims from 13 countries downloaded the app. Respondents were aged between 21 and 61 (median 36) years and 58.5% (24/41) were male. Of these, 85% (41/48) completed the first phase, 52% (25/41) completed both the second and third phases, and 25 of these reported meningococcal vaccination, with 36% (9/25) receiving other vaccines. All (25) reported hand hygiene use and 64% (16/25) wore a facemask at some point during the pilgrimage. Four (6%) reported close contact with camels. Respiratory symptoms commenced from the 4th day of Hajj, with sore throat (20%) and cough (12%) being the most common. Three participants (12%) reported respiratory symptoms after returning home. Conducting a prospective survey using a smartphone app to collect data on travel-associated infections and traveller compliance to prevention is feasible at mass gatherings and can provide useful data associated with health-related behaviour. Copyright © 2015 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. New Sphragistic Finds from the Environs of Byzantine Cherson (to the iIssue of the Correspondence Addressees

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    Nikolay A. Alekseenko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased interest to the sigillographic artifacts found over the large areas adjacent to the chief administrative and economic centers of medieval Crimea currently allows to expand greatly the geographical map of the molybdoboulloi finds in this region. The topography of the finds in the areas surrounding Cherson had recently expanded significantly as well. Seals originating apparently from the settlements adjacent immediately to the ancient city, as well as from the places very remote from it became known. New finds of Byzantine seals (for instance, the seals of kommerkiarios Theodore, the end of the 6th century, of patrikios and genikos logothetes Petronas, the first half of the 9th century, of anthypatos, patrikios, imperial protospatharios and genikos logothetes Elissios, the second half of the 10th century, of (protospatharios and strategos of Cefalonia, of imperial protospatharios ™pr toà Crusotriklßnou and strategos of Cherson Theodore, the 10th – 11th centuries, as well as of protospatharios and strategos Joseph, with a sufficiently accurate localization of their origin provide new information about this sigillographic artifacts themselves, as well as clarify the geography of the Byzantine presence in the southwestern Taurica, particularly showing places yet poorly highlighted by other types of sources.

  12. Are the classical historical geography of the Byzantine world and Gis technology a contradiction? On the usage of contemporary technologies in the humanities

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    Popović St. Mihailo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the latest developments in the field of Digital Humanities. It indicates in which ways these technologies are already used in the historical and geographical science throughout the world and how they could be integrated systematically into Byzantine Studies. In the first part of the article international projects, which are based on GIS (Geographic Information Systems, and their links in the World Wide Web are presented. In the second part the author shows on the basis of his scholarly results on the historical geography of Byzantine Macedonia, how medieval written sources can be transferred into digital format in order to achieve a higher level of spatial data analysis. The neglect of this important and recent scholarly approach in the 21st century could lead to the marginalisation of Byzantine Studies in general, and of the historical geography of the Byzantine Empire in particular. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177015: Hrišćanska kultura na Balkanu u srednjem veku: Vizantijsko carstvo, Srbi i Bugari od 9. do 15. veka

  13. Traces of 'Simple Psalmody' in late- and post-Byzantine musical manuscripts. Melodic, modal and textual analysis of the Kekragarion tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfratello, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    , primarily dealing with the rubrics reported in late Byzantine written musical manuscripts, and a contribution by Annette Jung, presenting a synchronic analysis of the fifteenth-century manuscript Sinai gr. 1255 – with focus on the modal intonations. The possibility of using the melodic profiles...

  14. The News on “the Germans” (οἱ Νεμίτζοι) in Byzantine Narrative Essays of 10-12th Centuries

    OpenAIRE

    Maksim Igorevich Drobyshev

    2015-01-01

    The article is a review of the news of the Byzantine narrative sources of the 10-12th centuries, in which an ethnonym “the Germans” is mentioned. The use of this term is extremely rare in Byzantine historiography of the eleventh and twelfth centuries. This term can be found in a composition by the Emperor of the Byzantine Empire Constantine Porphyrogenitus called “De ceremoniis aulae Byzantinae”. It is used to describe the lands of German kings. And his work term appears among the possessions...

  15. First Foreign-Policy Success of Kievan Commanding Elite in Europe: Byzantine Military Campaign of 860 and Askold's Christianization

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    Igor A. Melnichuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article, using annalistic sources and Byzantine literary monuments of VIII–IX centuries, attempts to conduct historical and political analysis and estimate major successes of Rus under Askol'd’s reign: Rusichi march on Constantinople in 860 and as a result Christianization of prince and his druzhina. The article presents obvious success of Askold and military and political elite of Rus:- Breakthrough of Russia to the European political space and, consequently, access to economic space: extremely important markets of Byzantium and other states.- Launch of the irreversible process of Christianization of the state, which has become one of the key stages of its development and the important step towards equal access of Russia to the European family of nations.- Selection of Eastern (Orthodox version of Christian doctrine.

  16. A Byzantine Chant Collection From Sicily. A Cοllaboration Between Cοpenhagen and Piana degli Albanesi (Palermo

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    Giuseppe Sanfratello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to give an account of the collaboration between a collector of the Byzantine chant tradition of Piana degli Albanesi (Palermo in Sicily, namely fr. Bartolomeo Di Salvo, and the editorial board of the Monumenta Musicae Byzantinae, i.e. an institution under the aegis of the University of Copenhagen. Before describing precisely how this collaboration has developed, I will briefly introduce the “Sicilian-Albanian” oral liturgical chant tradition. Among his publications are Oral performances in a (post-literate society (Lund, 2016, The songs of the roots (forthcoming chapter on Cretan music, University of Vienna, Creative performance in the liturgy: a formulaic melodic language in the Sicilian-Albanian chant tradition (forthcoming, University of Joensuu, Finland, and several articles as chapters of his doctoral thesis.

  17. إمارة الحج العراقي في عهدي حسن باشا واحمد باشا (1704- 1747م دراسة تاريخية Iraqi pilgrimage Emirate in the reigns of Hassan Pasha and Ahmed Pasha (1704 - 1747 AD Historical Study

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    Ali Kamil Hamza Alsarhan علي كامل حمزة السرحان

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Pilgrimage to Mecca is obligatory for all Muslims who have enough money to do that. It is considered one of major branches of Islamic religion. Because of that task was always very hard and difficult and no one can do it. Therefore it appeared the need to trails to organize the arrival of those who do pilgrimage to Sacred House in Mecca easily and simply. Those trails were very huge in number and materials . it is obvious that during the pilgrimage, there were many risks and difficulties, so it appeared the need in Ottoman reign to form the prince of pilgrimage (Ameer Al- Haj , taking on his responsibility to secure the road of pilgrimage caravans from nomads attacks and to secure the ration and all other requirements for arriving the privilege caravans to the Sacred House in exact time.

  18. The impact of financial institutions on the development of the Byzantine economy (10th-12th centuries

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    Maniatis George C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to ascertain the nature of the financial institutions fashioned diachronically to ensure the orderly operation of the Byzantine economy, encompassing the currency in circulation, credit availability, and the nexus of financial services; to analyze their role and evolution over time; to examine their ability to make rational use of the available financial resources; and ultimately to assess their contribution in ensuring the effective functioning of the marketplace and the economy in the 10th-12th centuries. Emphasis is placed on the effectiveness of the monetary system in providing the requisite liquidity to meet the needs of the productive sectors of the economy; the determining factors of money supply and its sectorial penetration; the measures taken to prevent hoarding and alleviate the gold-dependence of the fiscus; the functional distinction between money-changing and moneylending and its rationale; the rules established for the orderly conduct of currency transactions to prevent unsavory practices; the participants involved in lending operations and the extent of market competition; the importance of credit (and hence debt financing in promoting agriculture, manufacturing, and trade; and the role of the state in safeguarding the soundness of the monetary system, banking services, deals in precious metals and valuables, and in the pricing of capital. Moreover, the paper addresses collateral issues in dispute providing more cogent answers, identifies misinterpreted sources and unsupported assertions, and fills in lacunae. It is hoped that the searching examination of the design and operation of the enacted financial institutional arrangements will provide valuable insights as to their genesis, adaptation over time, and likely performance in light of the Byzantine economic, social and political realities.

  19. ANKARA’DA ERKEN BİZANS DÖNEMİ MEZAR ALANI KAZISI / EARLY BYZANTINE CEMETERY EXCAVATION IN ANKARA

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    Mahmut AYDIN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Roma Dönemi’nde Galatia Eyaleti’nin başkentliğini yapan Ankyra kentinin anıtsal yapıları ve diğer çarpıcı kalıntıları ile olası nekropol alanları genellikle Ankara’nın Erken Cumhuriyet Dönemi imar faaliyetleri sırasında gerçekleşen hafriyat çalışmaları ile açığa çıkarılmıştır. Ankara Celal Bayar Bulvarı üzerindeki Gazi Üniversitesi Sıhhiye Kampüsünde inşa edilen Mühendislik ve Mimarlık Fakültesindeki yapılaşma faaliyetleri sırasında ortaya çıkarılan Maltepe Erken Bizans Dönemi Mezar Alanı olasılıkla Ankyra kentinin daha önce bir bölümü tespit edilen güney nekropolü’nün devamı niteliğindedir. Gerçekleştirilen kurtarma kazısı sonucunda bu alanda tahrip edilmiş olası bir kilisenin küçük bir kısmı ve kilise cemaatine ait olması muhtemel beşik tonozlu bir mezar yapısı ortaya çıkarılmıştır.

  20. Studying pigments on painted plaster in Minoan, Roman and early Byzantine Crete. A multi-analytical technique approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, Polly; Siozos, Panayiotis; Philippidis, Aggelos; Apostolaki, Chryssa; Derham, Brendan; Terlixi, Agni; Perdikatsis, Vasilios; Jones, Richard; Anglos, Demetrios

    2012-02-01

    Wall paintings spanning two millennia of Cretan painting history and technology were analysed in an effort to determine similarities and evolutions of painting materials and technology. A multi-technique approach was employed that combined the use of (a) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman microspectroscopy, based on mobile instrumentation, appropriate for rapid, routine-level object characterization, and (b) non-destructive X-ray diffractometry (XRD), performed directly on the wall painting fragment, which provides detailed information on the minerals constituting the paint. Elemental analysis data obtained through LIBS were compared with molecular and crystal structure information from Raman spectroscopy and XRD. Cross-sections from selected samples were also investigated by means of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled to micro-probe analysis and X-ray mapping that enabled identification of several mineral components of the paint confirming the results of the XRD analysis. In parallel, replica wall paintings, created with known pigments and binding media for reference purposes, were examined with optical microscopy and stain tested for organic materials. The overall study shows that the LIBS and Raman techniques offer key advantages, such as instrument mobility and speed of data collection and interpretation that are particularly important when dealing with on-site investigations. Thus, they are capable of providing important compositional information in an effective manner that enables quick surveying of wall paintings and permit targeted sample selection for further analysis by advanced laboratory techniques.

  1. The Slavs and Vlachs in the Byzantine system of provincial organization in the Southern Balkans until the XI century: Similarities and differencies

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    Cvetković Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to establishing the circumstances and manner under which the Slav tribes and Vlachs in the southern Balkans were being integrated into the Byzantine system of provincial administration. Constantinople militarily imposed sovereignty on the settled Slavs, which was the first step towards their integration into the Byzantine state and society. When it comes to Vlachs, there was no use of military force. Special methods were applied to fit their autonomous organization into the frames oh the empire. In this regard, the paper compares the patterns of the integration processes of the two mentioned ethnic groups. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177032: Tradicija, inovacija i identitet u vizantijskom svetu

  2. First foreign-policy success of Kievan commanding elite in Europe: byzantine military campaign of 860 and Askold’s Сhristianization

    OpenAIRE

    Melnichuk, I.; Мельничук, І. А.; Мельничук, И. А.

    2013-01-01

    The article, using annalistic sources and Byzantine literary monuments of VIII–IX centuries, attempts to conduct historical and political analysis and estimate major successes of Rus under Askold’s reign: Rusichi march on Constantinople in 860 and as a result Christianization of prince and his druzhina. The article presents obvious success of Askold and military and political elite of Rus: Breakthrough of Russia to the European political space and, consequently, access to economic space: extr...

  3. Al-qarāfa, la Città dei Morti del Cairo. Il circuito delle sette tombe sacre - Al-Qarāfa: the pilgrimage to the holy seven tombs in Cairene Muslim cemetery

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    Anna Tozzi Di Marco

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A key aspect of al-Qarāfa, the Muslim inhabitated cemetery in Cairo is the devotion to seven ancient sacred tombs and its relative pilgrimage. The Cairene graveyard was renowned for the local and interregional pilgrimages because of its high concentration of awliyā’s graves (literally friends of God, as holders of baraka, the divine grace. In particular, in the XIII century the famous circuit of the Seven tombs was formalized by the shaykh al- Fārsī who, according to the scholar El Kadi, also called it “pilgrimage of the seven sleepers”. Hence the multitude of Muslim pilgrims who spent the night on the holy spot without taking into account the social code about the separation between sexes. Nowadays some mausoleums of the circuit have disappeared and local people have no memories of them, whereas the most renowned holy men’ tombs are still venerated by a large crowd of devotees, even if the nightly practice of incubation is missing. The author, in considering the scholars’ studies on this issue, explores the current veneration and the contemporary pilgrims’ pattern of habits, comparing it with the Medieval ones.

  4. A novel painted monument. Byzantine Art between Aesthetic Redefining and Dogmatic Perennity. The church Saint John the Baptist of Bârnova

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    Mihail M. Gheaţău

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Being remarkable through the monumentality and elegance of proportions, the architecture of the Church “Saint John the Baptist” from Bârnova derives from the so-called old Wallachian style, skillfully reshaping a structure which combines elements which are specific to Byzantine Balkanic ecclesiastical buildings. The unseen pictural work of Ștefan Constantinescu is characterized by the attempt to associate the results of experiencing freedom of interpretation and expression with the rules of the iconographic canon, inside the same ensemble. Its representations do not reproduce the traditional Byzantine manner, nor it is delivered as a form of quoting reality, but it is filtered and interpreted. From a theological point of view, the author respects the iconographic program, except for the topographic placement of some episodes, adapting the discourse according to the configuration and features of the liturgical space. We are in front of a case which places us in the position of managing the relationship between the value of artistic creation and the meticulosity of theological involvement. Neither Byzantine, nor realistic, the artistic solution of the mural painting from Bârnova is closer to the manner of iconic transfiguration than to the one of improvisation or artistic intermediation through which the daily tridimensional world is reflected.

  5. Characterization of paint and varnish on a medieval Coptic-Byzantine icon: novel usage of dammar resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghani, M; Edwards, H G M; Stern, B; Janaway, R

    2009-08-01

    A comprehensive study has been undertaken into a 13th century Coptic-Byzantine icon from the St. Mercurius Church, St. Mercurius monastery, Old Cairo, Egypt. The layered structure, pigment composition and varnish identification were revealed by means of optical and Raman microscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The structure of the icon comprised six layers; wooden panel, canvas, white ground, two bole layers and a single paint layer. Azurite (2CuCO(3) x Cu(OH)(2)), cinnabar (mercuric (II) sulfide alpha-HgS), yellow ochre (Fe(2)O(3) x H(2)O), hydromagnesite Mg(5)(CO(3))(4)(OH)(2) x 4 H(2)O and lamp black (carbon, C) are the pigments identified in the icon. The green paint area is of interest as it is applied neither with a green pigment nor with a mixture of a blue and yellow pigment. Instead, a yellow layer of dammar resin was applied on top of blue azurite to obtain the green colour. Pinaceae sp. resin mixed with drying oil was used as a protective varnish.

  6. 3D DOCUMENTATION OF A HISTORICAL MONUMENT USING TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING CASE STUDY: BYZANTINE WATER CISTERN, ISTANBUL

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    T. Temizer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D modelling of architectural structures for monitoring, conservation and restoration alterations in heritage sites has special challenges for data acquisition and processing. The accuracy of created 3D model is very important. In general, because of the complexity of the structures, 3D modelling can be time consuming and may include some difficulties. 3D terrestrial laser scanning technique is a reliable and advantageous method for reconstruction and conservation of monuments. This technique is commonly acknowledged due to its accuracy, speed and flexibility. Terrestrial laser scanners can be used for documentation of the cultural heritage for the future. But it is also important to understand the capabilities and right conditions of use and limitations of this technology. Istanbul is a rich city with cultural monuments, buildings and cultural heritage. The presented study consists of documentation of a Byzantine water cistern situated underground the court of Sarnicli Han building. The cistern which represents a very good living example of its period has been modelled in 3D by using terrestrial laser scanning technology and the accuracy assessment of this modelling is examined.

  7. The use of the kidneys in secular and ritual practices according to ancient Greek and Byzantine texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, Athanasios; Skarpelos, Andreas; Tsiros, Georgios

    2005-07-01

    The use of kidneys in secular and spiritual practices was very common for centuries. In this article we present some references on their employment as sacrificial offers, as plain food or as a source for medicaments. Our material derives from Greek texts of the Classical, Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine eras. Relevant extracts from the Old Testament are also included, as they have become part of a common cultural heritage in that period of syncretism, when Jews were Hellenized and Greeks orientized. From the fragments cited in this article, it is obvious that the practical use of kidneys by priests, doctors, and lay persons in the periods under discussion was widespread. The sacrificial offering was based on the religious significance of the organ. The dietary consumption of the kidneys was limited by their function as urine producers. Their medicinal use was dictated first, by the abundance of the adipose tissue surrounding them, which was an ideal warming and binding substance. Second, it may be explained by the deeply rooted conviction that eating a particular organ led to the incorporation of its strength, thus protecting the corresponding eater's organs. Those practices should not surprise us in view of their corresponding modern use. Currently, kidney donors offer their organs in a sacrificial gesture, kidneys are consumed as a delicacy worldwide, and renal tissue is therapeutically used in transplantations and, until very recently, as a source for hormonal substances.

  8. Resource-aware system architecture model for implementation of quantum aided Byzantine agreement on quantum repeater networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherkhani, Mohammand Amin; Navi, Keivan; Van Meter, Rodney

    2018-01-01

    Quantum aided Byzantine agreement is an important distributed quantum algorithm with unique features in comparison to classical deterministic and randomized algorithms, requiring only a constant expected number of rounds in addition to giving a higher level of security. In this paper, we analyze details of the high level multi-party algorithm, and propose elements of the design for the quantum architecture and circuits required at each node to run the algorithm on a quantum repeater network (QRN). Our optimization techniques have reduced the quantum circuit depth by 44% and the number of qubits in each node by 20% for a minimum five-node setup compared to the design based on the standard arithmetic circuits. These improvements lead to a quantum system architecture with 160 qubits per node, space-time product (an estimate of the required fidelity) {KQ}≈ 1.3× {10}5 per node and error threshold 1.1× {10}-6 for the total nodes in the network. The evaluation of the designed architecture shows that to execute the algorithm once on the minimum setup, we need to successfully distribute a total of 648 Bell pairs across the network, spread evenly between all pairs of nodes. This framework can be considered a starting point for establishing a road-map for light-weight demonstration of a distributed quantum application on QRNs.

  9. Investigation of the gilding technique in two post-Byzantine wall paintings using micro-analytical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsibiri, Olga; Boon, Jaap J.

    2004-10-01

    The main churches of two important monasteries in Thessalia, Central Greece, are decorated with wall paintings that hail from the post-Byzantine period. The mural decoration of the main church of the St. Byssarionas Monastery at Doussiko has been attributed to the iconographer Tzortzis. The same painter is believed to have also operated in the main church of the Transfiguration Monastery at the monastic community of Meteora. The light microscopic (LM) examination of the cross-sections of samples taken from the gilded areas of the wall paintings, together with the direct temperature resolved mass spectrometric (DTMS) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (SEM-EDX) analysis, revealed a further resemblance of the materials and the methodology employed. The gold leaf was applied to the paintings by means of a mordant, which contains linseed oil mixed with a lead-containing dryer and an earth pigment or clay. The present study can constitute additional evidence to reinforce the idea that the two churches may have been painted by the same painter or workshop.

  10. Investigation of the gilding technique in two post-Byzantine wall paintings using micro-analytical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsibiri, Olga [Molecular Painting Research Group, FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: katsibiri@amolf.nl; Boon, Jaap J. [Molecular Painting Research Group, FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-10-08

    The main churches of two important monasteries in Thessalia, Central Greece, are decorated with wall paintings that hail from the post-Byzantine period. The mural decoration of the main church of the St. Byssarionas Monastery at Doussiko has been attributed to the iconographer Tzortzis. The same painter is believed to have also operated in the main church of the Transfiguration Monastery at the monastic community of Meteora. The light microscopic (LM) examination of the cross-sections of samples taken from the gilded areas of the wall paintings, together with the direct temperature resolved mass spectrometric (DTMS) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (SEM-EDX) analysis, revealed a further resemblance of the materials and the methodology employed. The gold leaf was applied to the paintings by means of a mordant, which contains linseed oil mixed with a lead-containing dryer and an earth pigment or clay. The present study can constitute additional evidence to reinforce the idea that the two churches may have been painted by the same painter or workshop.

  11. A tragic case of complicated labour in early Byzantium (404 A.D.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascaratos, J; Lazaris, D; Kreatsas, G

    2002-10-10

    Presentation and comment on the problematic delivery of the Byzantine empress Eudoxia's stillborn child. The original Greek language Byzantine histories, chronicles and hagiographical sources were investigated. Comparisons were then made of the knowledge of obstetrics among contemporary and ancient physicians. The case of Eudoxia's delivery is described in various literary sources with details regarding the fatal clinical picture of the parturient after the embryo's death. The study of early and contemporary medical texts proves that in similar cases conservative treatment was preferred but embryotomy was followed in the event of failure. Eudoxia's labour represents a characteristic paradigm of the difficulties involved in the confrontation of complicated deliveries in mediaeval times, often resulting in the death of both the mother and embryo. The treatments follow the ancient Hippocratic, Hellenistic and Roman traditions and influence medieval European medicine, thus constituting significant roots of obstetrics.

  12. The Byzantine apocalyptic tradition a fourteenth-century Serbian version of the Apocalypse of Anastasia

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    Marjanović-Dušanić Smilja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Early translations of the Apocalypse of Anastasia into Old Church Slavonic appear in several versions incorporated into miscellanies of the zbornik (collection type. These texts belong to various genres of religious prose and are usually assembled in apocryphal collections about journeys to the other world. The earliest known Serbian version of the Apocalypse of Anastasia is the fourteenth-century manuscript dated to about 1380 (MS 29. The present paper gives an analysis of this narrative.

  13. The Byzantine ceramics from Pergamon excavations. Characterization of local and imported productions by elementary analysis using PIXE and INAA methods and by petrography; Les ceramiques byzantines des fouilles de Pergame. Caracterisation des productions locales et importees par analyse elementaire par les methodes PIXE et INAA et par petrographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waksman, S.Y.

    1995-01-12

    An important ceramics material dated back to the 12th-14th centuries has been excavated in Pergamon (Turkey). Among these findings, wasters, tripod stilts and unfinished ware attest to local production in the Byzantine period. Elemental analysis by the methods PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) and INAA (Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis) has been performed on a representative sampling of 160 sherds, including attested local material. Multivariate statistical techniques were used to classify the sherds into groups of similar composition and thus to distinguish ceramics made in Pergamon from imported wares. Several groups of local production have been constituted, which correspond to wares differing in date and fabric. The geochemical characterization of the pastes, complemented with petrographical and mineralogical data, shows that specific raw materials have been used to manufacture each ware. The analytical data related to ceramics made in Pergamon will serve as reference data for future provenance studies. Such reference groups of Byzantine ceramics are very rare, and therefore the ceramics imported into Pergamon cannot be attributed as to their origin. Among the ceramics widely diffused in the Byzantine world, some importations belonging to the ``fine sgraffito`` and ``Zeuxippus ware`` types have been identified. The latter type has been a source of stylistic influence for the workshops of Pergamon, since the analyses show that imitated ``Zeuxippus ware`` has been produced there. These imitations were probably themselves diffused on a regional scale. (author). 238 refs., 48 figs., 53 tabs., 22 photos., 8 appends.

  14. The annual Hajj pilgrimage-minimizing the risk of ill health in pilgrims from Europe and opportunity for driving the best prevention and health promotion guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Shuja; Dar, Osman; Khan, Mishal; Khan, Minal; Azhar, Esam I; McCloskey, Brian; Zumla, Alimuddin; Petersen, Eskild

    2016-06-01

    Mass gatherings at religious events can pose major public health challenges, particularly the transmission of infectious diseases. Every year the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) hosts the Hajj pilgrimage, the largest gathering held on an annual basis where over 2 million people come to KSA from over 180 countries. Living together in crowded conditions exposes the pilgrims and the local population to a range infectious diseases. Respiratory and gastrointestinal tract bacterial and viral infections can spread rapidly and affect attendees of mass gatherings. Lethal infectious disease outbreaks were common during Hajj in the 19th and 20th centuries although they have now been controlled to a great extent by the huge investments made by the KSA into public health prevention and surveillance programs. The KSA provides regular updated Hajj travel advice and health regulations through international public health agencies such as the WHO, Public Health England, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Hajj travel agencies. During the Hajj, an additional 25 000 health workers are deployed; there are eight hospitals in Makkah and Mina complete with state-of-the-art surgical wards and intensive care units made specifically available for pilgrims. All medical facilities offer high quality of care, and services are offered free to Hajj pilgrims to ensure the risks of ill health to all pilgrims and KSA residents are minimal. A summary of the key health issues that arise in pilgrims from Europe during Hajj and of the KSA Hajj guidelines, together with other factors that may play a role in reducing the risks to pilgrims and to wider global health security, is provided herein. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Byzantine Taurica in the Second Half of the 11th Century and New Seal of Leon Aliates from Cherson

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    Nikolay A. Alekseenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available he discovery of a valuable and important sphragistic source in Cherson – the seal of Strategos and Patrikios Leon Aliates, known by the inscription of 1059, brings us back to the old problems of the development of the administrative system of the Crimean region. Basing the research on the other data as well, today we can confidently state that the presence of the imperial administration in Taurica in the second half of the 11th century does not only decrease, but even expands and reinforces. This is associated, firstly, with Sougdea joining Cherson, and, secondly, with the creation of Cherson katepanate and making Sougdea an independent theme. The seal of vetarch Nicephorus Alan, catepan of Cherson and Khazaria, proves the existence of a new military administrative district in Taurica in the second half of the 11th – at the turn of the 11th / 12th centuries. This fact makes it necessary not only to look in a new way at the history of the region during the collapse of the feudal system, but also in a certain sense to reestimate the role and significance of Cherson in Byzantine politics and diplomacy of that time. The appearance of the katepanate in Taurica, which included not only the traditional regions around Cherson, but also the vast Khazar lands of the Steppe and Northeast Crimea in the sphere of its jurisdiction, was caused by the need to increase the military force of borderlands in the face of an ever-increasing threat from the nomads of the north. For the same reason, Sougdea becomes an independent theme, designed to control the East-Crimean region, the Azov Sea and the Caucasian coast of Ponta. It is possible that a similar situation could apply to Bosporus. The finds of the seals of Russian princes and governors of Tmutarakan in the very area of Bosporus and Sougdea serve as indirect evidence in favor of this fact.

  16. BYZANTINE AND SASANIAN INFLUENCE IN ANATOLIA (IVth - VIIth CENTURIES ANADOLU’DA BİZANS-SASANİ ETKİLEŞİMİ (IV.-VII. YÜZYILLAR

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    Gürhan BAHADIR

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nearly three centuries of Byzantine and Sasanid States ruled eastern Anatolia which separated the foundation of Byzantine state, in the middle of the seventh, have long been viewed as a period of bitter enmity between the Byzantine and Sasanid States. Byzantine army and Sasanid army raided between themselves in eastern Anatolia during three centuries. Despite these overt proclamations of hostility, the two empires survived side by side as acknowledged equals and also had the points of resemblance and mutual influence. Two adjacent worlds struggled themselves in eastern Anatolia. However they were torn between their religions and intellectual tradition, to come to rest in either sphere or to achieve political stability between them. Byzantine and Sasanid history in Anatolia between fourth and seventh century, subject of this article consists of three sections, which are political and military influence, religion and cultural influence, and economical influence. Bizans ve Sasani Devletleri yaklaşık üç yüzyıl Anadolu’nun doğusunda sınır komşusu olarak hâkimiyet kurmuşlardır. Üç yüz otuz yılında Bizans Devleti’nin kuruluşundan başlayıp yedinci yüzyılın ortalarında III. Yezdigirt döneminin sona ermesine kadar devam eden dönem, Sasanilerle Bizanslılar arasında şiddetli düşmanlığın yaşandığı zaman dilimi olarak bilinir. Anadolu’nun doğusunda Bizans ve Sasani orduları üç yüzyıl boyunca karşılıklı akınlar yapmalarına rağmen Bizans ve Sasani Devletleri birbirlerinin eşitliğini kabul ederek yüzyıllarca yan yana yaşadılar. Bu makalede bu süreç açıklanırken Anadolu’nun doğu sınırında üç yüzyıl boyunca bir arada yaşamış iki toplumun benzerlikleri ve karşılıklı etkileşimi de tartışılmıştır. Ayrıca Bizans ve Sasani Devletleri arasında dini, kültürel ve siyasi durumlarının farklılıkları da vurgulandı. Bu makalede IV ile VII. yüzyıllar arasında Anadolu

  17. REVIEW ARTICLE: JUAN SIGNES CODOÑER, The emperor Theophilos and the East, 829-842.Court and frontier in Byzantium during the last phase of Iconoclasm, Birmingham Byzantine and Ottoman Studies, vol. 13, Ashgate 2014.

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    Τilemachos LOUNGHIS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available REVIEW ARTICLE Juan Signes Codoñer, The emperor Theophilos and the East, 829-842.Court and frontier in Byzantium during the last phase of Iconoclasm, Birmingham Byzantine and Ottoman Studies, vol. 13, Ashgate 2014. ISBN 978-0-7546-6489-5

  18. Byzantine People’s Anthropology. The Force of the Foot And Its Reflection in the Life of St. Theodore Sikeot

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    Nikolay Dmitrievich Barabanov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with one aspect of Byzantine folk anthropology in its religious incarnation. We are speaking about human limbs, feet of the Saint, who showed specific ability of miracles using them. Among the many wonders which were committed by Holy Theodore Sikeot, who was Abbot of Sikeon monastery and former Bishop of Anastasiopol (date of death – April 22, 613, three of them deserve special attention. In the narration of life of the Saint it is told about healing the patients who suffered from paralysis of limbs and, consequently, were deprived of their ability to move. Saint Theodore saved them from illness not only by the power of prayer. In all cases he put his foot on the body of the patient, in particular, on chest and knees. This kind of touch makes us think about the meaning of committed ritual and about that complex of ideas which was connected with it. Presumably, the described action reflected not only the individual attitude of the hagiographer but also an attitude of the audience, to which it was addressed. For this reason, this phenomenon should be considered not as a hagiographic topos, but as an element of the mythological-ritual continuum, which is connected with religious contemplation of the specificity of the different parts of the human body, in particular, of the lower limbs. The tradition of honoring the legs and their prints are well known and are rooted in “deep antiquity”. In the pre-Christian world of the Graeco- Roman time there was the cult of the legs, the image of which was regarded as an amulet, which had an apotropaic power. The feet can be associated with different deities, however, most of all, the following cult was associated with Serapis, the God of fertility, underworld and healing. It was believed that the right foot of Serapis had healing force. However, the process of transferring of the properties of Serapis foot to the foot of Christian Saint raises some questions. First of all, about

  19. The News on “the Germans” (οἱ Νεμίτζοι in Byzantine Narrative Essays of 10-12th Centuries

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    Maksim Igorevich Drobyshev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is a review of the news of the Byzantine narrative sources of the 10-12th centuries, in which an ethnonym “the Germans” is mentioned. The use of this term is extremely rare in Byzantine historiography of the eleventh and twelfth centuries. This term can be found in a composition by the Emperor of the Byzantine Empire Constantine Porphyrogenitus called “De ceremoniis aulae Byzantinae”. It is used to describe the lands of German kings. And his work term appears among the possessions of “Saxon” and “Gallic” kings. Then, the term “the Germans” is mentioned in the essay of Anna Komnena “Alexiad”. She dedicated this composition to her father, the Emperor of the Byzantine Empire Alexios Komnenos and it covers the period from 1079 to 1118 years. She used two terms – οἱ Νεμίτζοι and οἱ Γερμάνοι belonging to the same nation. The problem, in our view, is that these ethnonyms are distinguished only by belonging to the Empire. Under the first term, the author implies mercenaries in the service of the Byzantine Empire, and in the second one, the direct enemies of the Empire. The term “German” has Slavic roots. The word is derived from the common Slavic root “nem”. The ethnonym was borrowed in medieval Greek from the language of the Slavs and came to mean natives of Germany.

  20. Recherches sur l’apocalyptique syriaque et byzantine au viie siècle : la place de l’Empire romain dans une histoire du salut

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    Pablo Ubierna

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available L’occupation perse et la littérature apocalyptiqueLa perception des événements militaires du début du viie siècle – d’abord l’occupation perse et ensuite la guerre arabe – n’est pas écartée, chez les contemporains, de la vision d’un empire, l’empire byzantin, secoué par de fortes controverses religieuses.La préoccupation intellectuelle à propos de la situation de l’Empire fut extrêmement marquée au commencement du viie siècle. Une vie anonyme de l’empereur Maurice inclut un récit de sa mort d...

  1. Etude dynamique de l’environnement des villages romano-byzantins de Syrie du Nord ; localisation des structures parcellaires et cadastrales qui leurs sont liées

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    Georges Tate

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available L’étude porte sur une région de 30.000 km2, allant de la frontière turque à Homs, et communément appelé "le Plateau Calcaire". Sept cents villages, d’époque romaine et byzantine y ont été recensés. Les objectifs Ils sont de deux types : comprendre l’histoire du peuplement, en particulier l’abondon progressif de très nombreux villages entre le 8éme et le 10ème siècle. A cette fin sont notamment indispensables les connaissances relatives, aux terroirs et aux terres arables effectivement disponi...

  2. Aristotle and Byzantine Iconoclasm

    OpenAIRE

    Thalia Anagnostopoulos

    2013-01-01

    The defense of icons shifted gradually from a theory of mimesis to Aristotelian symbolism; this reflected not a revival of learning but arguments developed in the debate itself and hinted at already by Constantine V and at the Council of 787.

  3. Aristotle and Byzantine Iconoclasm

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    Thalia Anagnostopoulos

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The defense of icons shifted gradually from a theory of mimesis to Aristotelian symbolism; this reflected not a revival of learning but arguments developed in the debate itself and hinted at already by Constantine V and at the Council of 787.

  4. A pilgrimage through superheavy valley

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-27

    Apr 27, 2014 ... We searched for the shell closure proton and neutron numbers in the superheavy region beyond = 82 and = 126 within the framework of non-relativistic Skryme–Hartree–Fock (SHF) with FITZ, SIII, SkMP and SLy4 interactions. We have calculated the average proton pairing gap p, average neutron ...

  5. A pilgrimage through superheavy valley

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    heavy region. Recent theoretical calculations for superheavy elements have generated quite an excitement where new magic numbers are predicted for both protons and neu- trons. Many theoretical models predict the magic shells at Z = 114 and N = 184 [2–5], which could have surprisingly long lifetime, even of the order of ...

  6. Rus, Varangian and Frankish mercenaries in the service of the Byzantine Emperors (9th-11th c.: Numbers, Organisation and Battle Tactics in the operational theatres of Asia Minor and the Balkans.

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    Georgios THEOTOKIS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study will attempt to examine two significantly different types of mercenaries serving the Byzantine Emperors - the Varangians and the Franks - from the mid-10th to the mid-11th centuries. Not structuring my analysis on a chronological basis but rather on the different enemies that these mercenaries were facing in different geographical conditions, the main objective of my research is to give answers to a series of questions; what evidence do we have about the organisation of the mercenary units of the Rus, the Varangians and the Franks and in what numbers were they descending at Constantinople? What were the political circumstances that led to their employment by the Emperors throughout our period of study? What was their standing in the Byzantine military establishment? Did they pose any threat to the central government? What evidence do we have about their battle and siege tactics and their overall role in each operational theatre?

  7. Byzantine kalophonia, illustrated by St. John Koukouzeles’ piece Φρούρησον πανένδοξε in honour of St. Demetrios from Thessaloniki. Issues of notation and analysis

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    Maria Alexandru

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores some aspects of the so-called kalophonic musical style which flourished during the last centuries of Byzantium. It focuses on a masterpiece by St. John Koukouzeles, namely the epibole Φρούρησον πανένδοξε (Ο Allglorious, keep watch over the city, in honor of St. Demetrios, the protector of Thessaloniki, and is complementary to some previous musicological analysis of this piece by Stephania Meralidou. After a brief presentation of the old sticheron Ἔχει μὲν ἡ θειοτάτη σου ψυχή, whereof St. John takes his departing point for the kalophonic composition, the paper concentrates on a multi-level analysis of the epibole, firstly on the ground of the late middle-Byzantine notation, according to the ms Vlatadon 46 (A.D. 1551, and secondly by comparing the old notation to its slow exegesis in new-Byzantine notation by Chourmouzios Chartophylax (score and recording issued by the Greek Byzantine Choir, dir. L. Angelopoulos. The analysis comprises several approaches like textual, music-architectural, modal, micro-syntactical, rhetorical, macro-syntactical, generative, comparative (cf. plates 7-12, 17-20. Since this material is also suitable for didactic purposes, the different plates are given again in the appendix, in form of exercises to be filled in by interested students. The different analytical approaches reveal the highly refined melodic fabric of kalophonia with its plethora of theseis-combinations, the extensive use of music-rhetorical devices, basic norms of the complex art of musical exegesis in this style, as well as the beauty of this kind of melodies, which have been acknowledged to represent the ‘zenith’ of Byzantine music (Wellesz.

  8. APPLYING SATELLITE DATA SOURCES IN THE DOCUMENTATION AND LANDSCAPE MODELLING FOR GRAECO-ROMAN/BYZANTINE FORTIFIED SITES IN THE TŪR ABDIN AREA, EASTERN TURKEY

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    K. Silver

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In 2015-2016 the Finnish-Swedish Archaeological Project in Mesopotamia (FSAPM initiated a pilot study of an unexplored area in the Tūr Abdin region in Northern Mesopotamia (present-day Mardin Province in southeastern Turkey. FSAPM is reliant on satellite image data sources for prospecting, identifying, recording, and mapping largely unknown archaeological sites as well as studying their landscapes in the region. The purpose is to record and document sites in this endangered area for saving its cultural heritage. The sites in question consist of fortified architectural remains in an ancient border zone between the Graeco-Roman/Byzantine world and Parthia/Persia. The location of the archaeological sites in the terrain and the visible archaeological remains, as well as their dimensions and sizes were determined from the ortorectified satellite images, which also provided coordinates. In addition, field documentation was carried out in situ with photographs and notes. The applicability of various satellite data sources for the archaeological documentation of the project was evaluated. Satellite photographs from three 1968 CORONA missions, i.e. the declassified US government satellite photograph archives were acquired. Furthermore, satellite images included a recent GeoEye-1 Satellite Sensor Image from 2010 with a resolution of 0.5 m. Its applicability for prospecting archaeological sites, studying the terrain and producing landscape models in 3D was confirmed. The GeoEye-1 revealed the ruins of a fortified town and a fortress for their documentation and study. Landscape models for the area of these sites were constructed fusing GeoEye-1 with EU-DEM (European Digital Elevation Model data using SRTM and ASTER GDEM data in order to understand their locations in the terrain.

  9. Acquisition of a High Diversity of Bacteria during the Hajj Pilgrimage, Including Acinetobacter baumannii with blaOXA-72 and Escherichia coli with blaNDM-5 Carbapenemase Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leangapichart, Thongpan; Gautret, Philippe; Belhouchat, Khadidja; Memish, Ziad; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Pilgrims returning from the Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca) can be carriers of multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR). Pharyngeal and rectal swab samples were collected from 98 pilgrims before and after they traveled to the Hajj in 2014 to investigate the acquisition of MDR bacteria. The bacterial diversity in pharyngeal swab samples was assessed by culture with selective media. There was a significantly higher diversity of bacteria in samples collected after the return from the Hajj than in those collected before (P = 0.0008). Surprisingly, Acinetobacter baumannii strains were isolated from 16 pharyngeal swab samples (1 sample taken during the Hajj and 15 samples taken upon return) and 26 post-Hajj rectal swab samples, while none were isolated from samples taken before the Hajj. Testing of all samples by real-time PCR targeting blaOXA-51 gave positive results for only 1% of samples taken during the Hajj, 21/90 (23.3%) pharyngeal swab samples taken post-Hajj, and 35/90 (38.9%) rectal swab samples taken post-Hajj. One strain of A. baumannii isolated from the pharynx was resistant to imipenem and harbored a blaOXA-72 carbapenemase gene. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of 43 A. baumannii isolates revealed a huge diversity of 35 sequence types (STs), among which 18 were novel STs reported for the first time in this study. Moreover, we also found one Escherichia coli isolate, collected from a rectal swab sample from a pilgrim taken after the Hajj, which harbored blaNDM-5, blaCTX-M-15, blaTEM-1, and aadA2 (ST2659 and ST181). In conclusion, pilgrims are at a potential risk of acquiring and transmitting MDR Acinetobacter spp. and carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria during the Hajj season. PMID:27458222

  10. Acquisition of a High Diversity of Bacteria during the Hajj Pilgrimage, Including Acinetobacter baumannii with blaOXA-72 and Escherichia coli with blaNDM-5 Carbapenemase Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leangapichart, Thongpan; Gautret, Philippe; Griffiths, Karolina; Belhouchat, Khadidja; Memish, Ziad; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    Pilgrims returning from the Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca) can be carriers of multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR). Pharyngeal and rectal swab samples were collected from 98 pilgrims before and after they traveled to the Hajj in 2014 to investigate the acquisition of MDR bacteria. The bacterial diversity in pharyngeal swab samples was assessed by culture with selective media. There was a significantly higher diversity of bacteria in samples collected after the return from the Hajj than in those collected before (P = 0.0008). Surprisingly, Acinetobacter baumannii strains were isolated from 16 pharyngeal swab samples (1 sample taken during the Hajj and 15 samples taken upon return) and 26 post-Hajj rectal swab samples, while none were isolated from samples taken before the Hajj. Testing of all samples by real-time PCR targeting blaOXA-51 gave positive results for only 1% of samples taken during the Hajj, 21/90 (23.3%) pharyngeal swab samples taken post-Hajj, and 35/90 (38.9%) rectal swab samples taken post-Hajj. One strain of A. baumannii isolated from the pharynx was resistant to imipenem and harbored a blaOXA-72 carbapenemase gene. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of 43 A. baumannii isolates revealed a huge diversity of 35 sequence types (STs), among which 18 were novel STs reported for the first time in this study. Moreover, we also found one Escherichia coli isolate, collected from a rectal swab sample from a pilgrim taken after the Hajj, which harbored blaNDM-5, blaCTX-M-15, blaTEM-1, and aadA2 (ST2659 and ST181). In conclusion, pilgrims are at a potential risk of acquiring and transmitting MDR Acinetobacter spp. and carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria during the Hajj season. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. La Graeca fides e la falsità moscovitanel discorso polacco premoderno. Storia di un topos ["Graeca fides and the Perfidy of the Muscovites in the Polish Early Modern Discourse. History of a Topos "

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    Roman Krzywy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available "The article discusses the usage of the classical topos Graeca fides to describe the citizens of the Grand Duchy of Moscow in early modern Polish literature (chronicles, diaries, journalistic writings, diplomatic reports etc.. This way of speaking was justified by the identification of the Eastern Orthodox Church with the Greek Byzantine Rite. The formula was used to deprecate Russians and became part of a negative stereotype. The author demonstrates, with diverse examples, how this formula became a constant topos in statements about a country considered hostile in Poland since the 16th century, and in which contexts it was developed."

  12. Visible induced luminescence reveals invisible rays shining from Christ in the early Christian wall painting of the Transfiguration in Shivta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Yotam; Bar-Oz, Guy

    2017-01-01

    The Transfiguration scene depicted in a Byzantine church at Shivta, Israel, is one of two figurative examples of the scene from the early Christian period. The use of Egyptian blue pigment in the wall painting was investigated with various analytical methods. Visible Induced Luminescence (VIL) imaging was used in-situ in order to map the distribution of the Egyptian blue pigment in the painting. The VIL imaging revealed surprising insights into the understanding of the iconography and the technology of this rare painting. Previously undetected elements of the painting include rays of light that were discovered emerging from the body of Christ and illuminating the other figures in the painting. Although this motif is an important part of the Transfiguration narrative and appears in most of its scenes depicted elsewhere, it had not been previously identified in this painting as it was undetectable by any other inspection technique. Another important result is the identification of Egyptian blue as a common blue pigment used at Shivta during the Byzantine period, when it is considered to be very rare. PMID:28949982

  13. Leo Sgouros – Tyrant and Patriot. The Ruler of the Northeastern Peloponnese in the Early 13th Century

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    Viktor N. Chkhaidze

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Leo Sgouros is one of the Byzantine magnates who ruled in the northeastern Peloponnese in the late 12th – early 13th centuries. The paper discusses the separatist activity of the Leo Sgouros which allowed him in a short time to create ephemeral ‘state’ in the South of Thessaly, Boeotia, Attica, Corinth and the Argolid. In order to give legitimacy to his authority Leo Sgouros married the daughter of the deposed Emperor Alexios III. But his way from separatism to Imperial idea was interrupted by the clash with the knights of the Latin Empire who have predetermined his defeat. Among the reasons for the defeat we can name the enmity with the clergy and nonpossibility of joining with other governors in fighting the crusaders. According to later legend, Leo Sgouros died, throwing himself with his horse from the cliff of the Acrocorinth fortress, besieged by the crusaders. According to another version, Leo Sgouros died under the walls of his native city Nauplius. The study examined the seal of the Leo Sgouros with a rare title of sebastohypertatos (higher sebastos, and similar seal which was reused by John Branas. Data analysis suggests that such a contradictory personality as Leo Sgouros’ may be characterized not only as an ambitious tyrant and the defender of Byzantine Hellenism. The Annex contains information about the seven of Sgouros names that have become known in recent years by virtue of the monuments of sphragistics.

  14. Sustained Experiential Learning: Modified Monasticism and Pilgrimage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This article outlines a template for sustained experiential learning designed to provide a context for learning the affective and performative as well as intellectual power of religion. This approach was developed for a traditional academic framework, adapting pedagogies developed for experiential learning, aesthetic training, and study abroad,…

  15. A pilgrimage to gravity on GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédorf, J.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2012-08-01

    In this short review we present the developments over the last 5 decades that have led to the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) for astrophysical simulations. Since the introduction of NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) in 2007 the GPU has become a valuable tool for N-body simulations and is so popular these days that almost all papers about high precision N-body simulations use methods that are accelerated by GPUs. With the GPU hardware becoming more advanced and being used for more advanced algorithms like gravitational tree-codes we see a bright future for GPU like hardware in computational astrophysics.

  16. Therapeutic properties and uses of marine invertebrates in the ancient Greek world and early Byzantium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voultsiadou, Eleni

    2010-07-20

    Marine organisms are currently investigated for the therapeutic potential of their natural products with very promising results. The human interest for their use in healing practices in the Eastern Mediterranean goes back to the antiquity. An attempt is made in the present work to investigate the therapeutic properties of marine invertebrates and the ways they were used in the medical practice during the dawn of the western medicine. The classical Greek texts of the Ancient Greek (Classical, Hellenistic and Roman) and early Byzantine period were studied and the data collected were analysed in order to extract detailed information on the parts of animal bodies and the ways they were used for healing purposes. Thirty-eight marine invertebrates were recorded for their therapeutic properties and uses in 40 works of 20 classical authors, covering a time period of 11 centuries (5th c. BC to 7th c. AD). The identified taxa were classified into 7 phyla and 11 classes of the animal kingdom, while molluscs were the dominant group. Marine invertebrates were more frequently used for their properties relevant to digestive, genitourinary and skin disorders. Flesh, broth, skeleton, or other special body parts of the animals were prepared as drinks, collyria, suppositories, cataplasms, compresses, etc. Marine invertebrates were well known for their therapeutic properties and had a prominent role in the medical practice during the Ancient Greek and the early Byzantine period. The diversity of animal species and their medicinal uses reflect the maritime nature of the Greek civilization, which flourished on the coasts and islands of the Aegean Sea. Most of them were common species exploited by humans for food or other everyday uses. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Life-giving springs and The Mother of God Zhivonosen Istochnik / Zoodochos Pege / Balikliyska. Byzantine-Greek-Ottoman intercultural influence and its aftereffects in iconography, religious writings and ritual practices in the region of Plovdiv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Lubańska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Life-giving springs and The Mother of God  Zhivonosen Istochnik / Zoodochos Pege / Balikliyska. Byzantine-Greek-Ottoman intercultural influence and its aftereffects in iconography, religious writings and ritual practices in the region of Plovdiv This article looks at veneration of healing springs (ayazma in Orthodox Christian churches and monasteries in the region of Plovdiv and Asenovgrad (Bulgaria to raise the problem of its connections to Byzantine, Greek and Ottoman religious cultures of Constantinople/Istanbul. My argument is based on the fieldwork and archival research I conducted in 2012–2014 to seek an answer to a research question that had kept me intrigued for over a decade: namely, what is the meaning, in practical terms, of the claim frequently made by Orthodox Christians that the various religious rituals they engaged in (with the exception of funerary ones were practiced “for health” (za zdrave.   Życiodajne źródła i Bogurodzica Żiwonosen Iztocznik / Zoodochos Pege / Baliklijska. Bizantyńsko-grecko-osmańskie oddziaływania międzykulturowe i ich reperkusje w ikonografii, piśmiennictwie i praktykach rytualnych w regionie Płowdiwu Niniejszy artykuł poświęcono problematyce kultu leczniczych wód (ajazma na terenie bułgarskich prawosławnych cerkwi i monasterów w regionie Płowdiwu i Asenowgradu oraz jego domniemanych związków z bizantyńską, grecką i osmańską kulturą religijną Konstantynopola/Stambułu. Swoje tezy autorka opiera na badaniach terenowych i kwerendach archiwalnych prowadzonych w latach 2012–2014. Badania miały na celu odnalezienie odpowiedzi na nękające autorkę od ponad dekady pytanie badawcze, co prawosławni wierni mają na myśli, gdy uzasadniają praktycznie wszystkie podejmowane przez siebie religijne rytuały (z wyjątkiem funeralnych tym, że wykonują je „dla zdrowia” (za zdrave.

  18. ATTEMPT TO ANALYSE THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN EARLY MEDIEVAL FEMALE SILVER JEWELLERY FROM THE SOUTHWESTERN AND SOUTHEASTERN AREA OF POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Krol

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is an attempt to analyze female silver jewellery produces and used during Early Middle Ages in regions of southeastern and southwestern Poland. Those regions correspond to the area of nowadays Poland, respectively southwestern voivodeships: Dolnoslaskie, Slaskie, Opolskie, Malopolskie and southeastern voivodeships: Podkarpackie and Lubuskie.The presented work deals with similarities and differences in quality and types of jewellery from those regions. The analysis focuses on silver items found in settlements, cemeteries and hoards. The recovered female jewellery highlights the divergence between east, under influence of culture from Byzantine Empire, and west.Thanks to described archeological relics, the southern region of present Poland can be easily divided into two distinguishable parts representing different cultures.

  19. Early literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Skriver

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses findings from the Danish contribution to the EASE project, a European research project running from 2008 to 2010 on early literacy in relation to the transition from childcare to school. It explores a holistic, inclusive approach to early literacy that resists a narrow...... and schools. The paper also draws on Gee’s (2001, 2003, 2004, 2008) sociocultural approach to literacy, and Honneth’s (2003, 2006) concept of recognition. Emphasizing participation and recognition as key elements, it claims that stakeholders in early liter- acy must pay attention to how diverse early literacy...... opportunities empower children, especially when these opportunities are employed in a project-based learning environ- ment in which each child is able to contribute to the shared literacy events....

  20. The byzantine title of Constantine Bodin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komatina Predrag

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the use of the title exousiastes on the newly discovered seal of Constantine Bodin. It analyses the meaning and use of this title in the sources of a diplomatic character of the 10th century, as well as its use in the 11th century sources. The question is posed why this title was used on Bodin’s seal instead of the title archon, which had been used for former Serbian rulers, as well as whether this phenomenon had any connection to the fact that Serbian rulers, beginning at the end of the rule of Bodin’s father Michael, used the title of king.

  1. Issues of early ethnic history of the Hungarians-Magyars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastoropov Aleksandr V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of archaeological and written sources and linguistic studies, the issues of Hungarians’ early ethnic history before they found their homeland on the Danube are analyzed in the article. The ethnic core of the Magyars (proto-Magyars was formed in the Tobol-Irtysh forest-steppe zone within the Sargat archaeological community. After the split of the latter in the 2nd quarter of the 1st millennium, a part of the population migrated to the southern areas of Eastern Europe with the Hun Horde. The remaining component groups of the Sargatskaya archaeological community formed closely related ethno-cultural entities, mixing up with the forest population of the border zone. In written sources, the ancestors of Magyars are fixed as the Savirs (Savyrs, Savarts. For the first time, they are mentioned in the works by Byzantine authors after the collapse of the Hun ethno-political union in the mid-5th c. The Savirs inhabited the territory of the Volga-Don interfluve and had stayed under the aegis of the Khazar Khaganate since its formation in the mid-7th c. and until the Pecheneg intrusion from the Trans-Volga steppes in the late 9th c. Later, the Savirs got divided, and a part of them, led by the Magyars, resettled to the Northern Black Sea area, and soon to Pannonia. The groups of population closely related to them, who had left the Kushnarenkovo-type (2nd half of the 6th c. and the Karayakupovo-type (2nd half of the 8th c sites, moved from the trans-Urals to the Volga-Urals regions. Ultimately, they mixed up and dissolved in the alien cultural medium, as well as the related Bakalskaya culture population in southern forest steppe of the Trans-Urals

  2. Caracterización epidemiológica y factores de riesgo asociados a la peregrinación religiosa a Arabia Saudí: Resultados de una cohorte prospectiva 2008-2009 Epidemiology and risk factors associated with religious pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia: Results of a prospective cohort 2008-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Valerio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La peregrinación religiosa a Arabia Saudí o Hajj es un precepto básico en la doctrina islámica. Anualmente millones de peregrinos (un 5% procedente de la Unión Europea se concentran en La Meca después del Ramadán, con los riesgos sanitarios que eso conlleva. Métodos: Estudio observacional y prospectivo de una cohorte de peregrinos atendidos en visita de actividades preventivas predesplazamiento en la Unidad de Salud Internacional Metropolitana Norte (Santa Coloma de Gramenet, Barcelona, España durante 2009-2010. Resultados: Se valoraron 193 peregrinos (135 hombres, 69,9%, con una edad media (DE de 37,1 (16,9 años. Eran inmigrantes 176 (91,2%, originarios de Pakistán (54,9%, Marruecos (29%, Bangladesh (4,1% y otros (7,2%. Se desplazaban a Arabia Saudí por una media (DE de 16,3 (9,2 días; optaban por la peregrinación larga (Hajj 80 (41,5% y por la corta (Umra 113 (58,5%. Presentaban antecedentes patológicos 29 (15%. Se obtuvo una cobertura vacunal superior al 75% para tétanos-difteria, antineumocócica y antimeningocócica tetravalente, y sólo de un 70,4% para la antigripal. Presentaron algún problema de salud 41 (13,5%, el 61% de ellos síntomas de vías respiratorias. Los factores de riesgo independientemente relacionados con presentar enfermedades fueron los días de estancia (odds ratio [OR]=1,06; intervalo de confianza del 95% [IC95%]: 1,01-1,11 y realizar el Hajj frente a la Umra (OR=1,08; IC95%: 1,07-1,12. Conclusiones: Los peregrinos a Arabia Saudí procedentes de España son un colectivo fundamentalmente joven y sano. Presentaron un mayor número de enfermedades aquellos con estancias más largas.Introduction: Religious pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia, or Hajj, is a basic tenet of the Islamic doctrine and, after Ramadan, annually represents the largest human concentration (with up to 5% of from the EU around the world. Such a gathering entails health risks. Methods: A prospective observational study was

  3. Will Early Retirement Retire Early?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James W.

    1976-01-01

    Management should recognize and consider both the advantages of early retirement programs and the countervailing forces of financial conditions, individual attitudes, and age discrimination laws. (Available from American Management Associations, Subscription Services, Box 319, Saranac Lake, NY 12983; $15.00 annually) (Author/MLF)

  4. Early discontinuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Felde, Lina; Gichangi, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Discontinuation of medical drug treatment is a serious problem in primary care. The need for a better understanding of the processes, including physician-specific mechanisms, is apparent. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between general practitioners' prescribing....... There was a positive association between the prevalence of prescribing for the specific drugs studied (antidepressants, antidiabetics, drugs against osteoporosis and lipid-lowering drugs) and early discontinuation (r = 0.29 -0.44), but not for anti-hypertensive drugs. The analysis of the association between prevalence...... of all drugs and drug-specific early discontinuation showed some degree of positive association - strongest for anti-hypertensive drugs (r = 0.62) and antidepressants (r = 0.43). Conclusion This study confirmed our hypothesis that general practitioners with high levels of prescribing attain higher rates...

  5. A Japanese Media Pilgrimage to a Tasmanian Bakery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Norris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    A small bakery in regional Tasmania, Australia, has been reimagined as a pop culture destination by Japanese tourists who claim it is the inspiration for a key location in the anime Kiki's Delivery Service...

  6. International Studies Become Pilgrimages: Geography in a Multidiscipline Overseas Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moline, Norm

    2009-01-01

    One of the goals of international education is to help students learn about different regions of the world. Such education is inherently multidisciplinary, including geographical and historical perspectives to put the places and regions in spatial, ecological, and temporal context. A wide variety of systematic disciplines also can be involved in…

  7. An Ornithological Pilgrimage to Lake Manasarowar and Mount ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    official advice. Not only was much valuable scientific material lost without a gun; not only would an occasional roast goose have provided welcome change from the eternal dal and rice; but also the couple of ugly .... Flocks of these birds were to be seen gleaning in the fields of young barley and gram surrounding the village.

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Gastroenteritis in Hajj pilgrimage

    KAUST Repository

    Padron Regalado, Eriko

    2014-05-01

    Hajj is the annual gathering of Islam practitioners in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. During the event, gastrointestinal infections are usually experienced and outbreaks have always been a concern; nevertheless, a deep and integrative study of the etiological agents has never been carried out. Here, I describe for the first time the epidemiology of pathogenic enteric viruses during Hajj 2011, 2012 and 2013. The focus of this study was the common enteric viruses Astrovirus, Norovirus, Rotavirus and Adenovirus. An enzyme Immunoassay established their presence in 14.9%, 15.0% and 6.6% of the reported cases of acute diarrhea for 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively. For the three years of study, Astrovirus accounted for the majority of the viral infections. To our knowledge, this is the first time an epidemiological study depicts Astrovirus as the main viral agent of gastroenteritis in a mass gathering event. Hajj is rich in strains of Astrovirus, Norovirus and Rotavirus. A first screening by RT-PCR resulted in ten different genotypes. Strains HAstV 2, HAstV 1 and HAstV 5 were identified for Astrovirus. GI.6, GII.3, GII.4 and GII.1 were described for Norovirus and G1P[8], G4P[8] and G3P[8] were found for Rotavirus. The majority of the Astrovirus isolates could not be genotyped suggesting the presence of a new variant(s). Cases like this encourage the use of metagenomics (and nextgeneration sequencing) as a state-of-the-art technology in clinical diagnosis. A sample containing Adenovirus particles is being used to standardize a process for detection directly from stool samples and results will be obtained in the near future. The overall findings of the present study support the concept of Hajj as a unique mass gathering event that potentiates the transmission of infectious diseases. The finding of Norovirus GII.4 Sydney, a variant originated from Australia, suggests that Hajj is a receptor of infectious diseases worldwide. This work is part of the Hajj project, a collaborative effort with the Ministry of Health of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in order to describe entirely the epidemiology of gastrointestinal diseases in Hajj. It is expected that the results of this study will serve in the refinement of public health policies.

  9. CITY LOGISTICS DURING THE PEAK INTENSITY OF PILGRIMAGE TOURISM

    OpenAIRE

    STEFAN NOWAK; ROBERT ŠTEFKO; AGNIESZKA ULFIK

    2014-01-01

    Czestochowa and located in the area sanctuary is a place of worship of Mary. Every year, more than 4.5 million pilgrims visit the sanctuary, which the local authorities are obliged to ensure adequate logistical support. The influx of many thousands of pilgrims is an opportunity for the development of the city and also difficulty in daily life of its inhabitants. The article discusses the issues of the factors limiting the efficiency of local public transport, and identifies the main causes of...

  10. Young Adult Women and the Pilgrimage of Motherhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipperini, Patricia T.

    2016-01-01

    Motherhood is a complex experience that can be transformative, offering women opportunities for personal enrichment and spiritual development. Because the largest incidence of births occurs to women in the Millennial or late Generation X generations, this complex, potentially transformative experience occurs at a critical time in young adult…

  11. Calendars of the Serbian early 15™ century manuscripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subotin-Golubović Tatjana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the corpus of Byzantine manuscripts, a prominent place is occupied by synaxaria, collections of texts in which hagiographic material is arranged according to the calendar order. The differences among such collections are to be noted in the structure, composition and size of the texts included. The existence of text collections in which early hagiographies are compiled and partly codified can be traced back into the 6th to 7th centuries. The principle center of agglomeration and codification of this type of materials used to be Constantinople. The older type synaxaria, known as prolog in Slavonic tradition, authored by Constantin from Mokissa, have been preserved in relatively large numbers of Southern Slavic transcripts. The prologs of the newer type, the so called "verse prologs" (regularly preceded by a few short verses, might have been translated, according to the opinion of D. Bogdanović, as early as the end of the 13th century, and in the Serbian environment. This opinion is corroborated by the fact that the oldest hitherto preserved prologs of this type, dating from the 14th century, were written in the Serbian redaction of Old Church Slavonic. Bogdanović's studies of prologs is based on manuscripts from the monastery of Decani. A relative abundance of verse prologs is treasured in the library of the monastery of Chilandar. Introduction of the new type of prolog has undoubtedly been caused by the introduction of the Jerusalem typicon into the liturgical practice of the Serbian church. Occasionally, hagiographic texts used to be inserted into menaion acolouthia after the sixth ode of the canon. Presently the oldest Serbian menaion containing hagiographies of the new type is the MS nr. 11 from the Archives of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, written sometime around 1400 A.D. Thus menaia also include multiply augmented hagiographic materials. The comparative analysis of prologs and menaia for the months of July (MS Decani 53

  12. Paesaggi monastici della Basilicata altomedievale / Monastic landscapes of the Early Medieval Basilicata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Sogliani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Le ricerche sul paesaggio altomedievale e medievale della Basilicata, disegnato dalle fonti documentarie e da quelle materiali, sono state incentrate di recente sulla lettura archeologica delle trasformazioni insediative del territorio. Ai precedenti sistemi di gestione, rappresentati da pochi centri urbani e dalle ville rurali che mantengono il loro assetto fino all’età tardoantica, pur se con alcune a volte sostanziali modifiche, si sostituiscono a partire dall’VIII secolo altre realtà: nuovi centri urbani, siti fortificati, villaggi e chiese rurali, insediamenti monastici. Questi ultimi, sia di rito latino che di rito greco, giocheranno un ruolo fondamentale nello sfruttamento delle risorse del territorio rurale nonché nella riorganizzazione della compagine demografica ed economica della regione, all’indomani dei conflitti politici e delle crisi istituzionali rappresentati dal conflitto greco-gotico e dalle lotte tra potere longobardo, bizantino e normanno. The researches on early medieval and medieval landscape of Basilicata, drawn from documentary and archaeological sources, have been focused recently on the settlement transformations of the territory. Previous systems of land management, consisting of a few urban centers and rural villas that retain their structure, while offering some significant changes at times, until Late Antiquity, are replaced from the 8th c. by new items: new urban centers, fortified sites, villages and rural churches and monastic settlements. These last, both Latin and Greek, will play a key role in the exploitation of the resources of rural areas as well as in the reorganization of the demographic and economic structure of the region, in the aftermath of the political conflicts and institutional crisis represented by the Gothic war and power struggles between the Lombard, Byzantine and Norman role.

  13. La Riḥla de Omar Patún: el viaje de peregrinación a la Meca de un musulmán de Ávila a finales del siglo XV (1491–1495 = Omar Patún’s Riḥla : The Journey of the Pilgrimage to Mecca of a Muslim from Ávila at the End of the Fifteenth Century (1491–1495

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Casassas Canals

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo presentamos la Riḥla de Omar Patún, un relato de viaje y de peregrinación desde Ávila a la Meca realizado por un musulmán castellano a finales del siglo XV. Se trata de un manuscrito inédito hallado en Calanda y conservado en la Biblioteca de Las Cortes de Aragón. Publicamos una selección de textos mostrando las principales etapas del viaje, las circunstancias del mismo y la descripción de algunas de las principales ciudades que visitó Omar Patún. A partir de algunas noticias y referencias, directas e indirectas, a acontecimientos históricos determinamos la fecha exacta del viaje de Omar Patún (1491–1495 y establecemos la cronología de las diferentes etapas y escalas. Ponemos así en conocimiento un documento fundamental para todos aquellos interesados en el estudio de la comunidad musulmana de época mudéjar, que aporta datos novedosos que habrá de tener en cuenta a partir de ahora cuando se hable de la religiosidad de los mudéjares castellanos y de los desplazamientos de éstos a Oriente y en especial a la Meca.This article presents Omar Patún’s Riḥla, an itinerary of the pilgrimage from Ávila to Mecca undertaken by a Castilian Muslim at the end of the fifteenth century. This is an unpublished manuscript found in Calanda and preserved in the Library of the Cortes de Aragón. The selection of texts offered here will identify the most important stages of the journey, its circumstances and the description of some of the cities visited by Patún. Certain news and references in the text to historical events, both direct and indirect, help to date Omar Patún’s journey between 1491–1495, and to establish the chronology of the different stages of the trip and stops on the way. We bring to light an outstanding source for those interested in the Islamic community in Mudejar times as it provides new insights into the religiosity of Castilian Mudejars and their journeys to the Middle

  14. Autism: Why Act Early?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Autism: Why Act Early? Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... helped the world make sense." Florida teenager with Autism Spectrum Disorder "Because my parents acted early, I ...

  15. Gender and Early Warning

    OpenAIRE

    Schmeidl, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that the introduction of gender into early warning will lead to more practical, realistic and usable early warning approaches, especially if early warning is understood as a flexible system that is sensitive to the diverse situations or on the ground necessitating customised solution. A gender-sensitive approach can enhance early warning models in their basic assumption (what we consider as important or not and the questions we are asking), in their modelling (incorporating ...

  16. Early rehabilitation after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhardt, Julie; Godeckeb, Erin; Johnson, Liam; Langhorne, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: \\ud Early rehabilitation is recommended in many guidelines, with limited evidence to guide practice. Brain\\ud neurobiology suggests that early training, at the right dose, will aid recovery. In this review, we highlight\\ud recent trials of early mobilization, aphasia, dysphagia and upper limb treatment in which intervention is\\ud commenced within 7 days of stroke and discuss future research directions.\\ud Recent findings: \\ud Trials in this early time window are few. Althou...

  17. Early juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzan, Katherine Anne B; Shaham, Bracha

    2012-05-01

    Early juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is important to recognize as timely diagnosis and treatment improves prognosis. It is a misconception that complications of JIA arise only from long-standing disease and that children will outgrow it. Early aggressive treatment is the paradigm as early disease activity has long-term consequences. There are predictors of persistent disease and joint erosions that may identify patients at higher risk. Control of disease activity within the first 6 months of onset confers improved clinical course and outcomes. The treatment perspective is thus one of early aggressive treatment for induction of disease control and ultimately remission. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Jamaica on Early Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richason, Benjamin F., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Columbus sighted Jamaica during his second voyage and was marooned there for more than a year during his fourth. The succession of early maps of Jamaica betrays its slow development and its unimportance to early colonizers. Modern tourism is the elusive "gold" which the Spanish fortune hunters did not find. (CS)

  19. Early detection of psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T. K.; Melle, I.; Auestad, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background During the last decades we have seen a new focus on early treatment of psychosis. Several reviews have shown that duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is correlated to better outcome. However, it is still unknown whether early treatment will lead to a better long-term outcome. This st...

  20. Early College High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    For at-risk students who stand little chance of going to college, or even finishing high school, a growing number of districts have found a solution: Give them an early start in college while they still are in high school. The early college high school (ECHS) movement that began with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 10 years ago…

  1. Waterford Early Reading Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of the Waterford Early Reading Program (WERP), which is designed to shift teaching and learning away from remediation and failure to prevention, early achievement, and sustained growth for every student. WERP includes three levels of instruction: emergent, beginning, and fluent readers. It targets pre-K through…

  2. Rethinking Early Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeste, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) says in its current policy paper that, for high-quality early education to exist outside of tiny islands across the country, the following must be addressed: (1) teacher preparation; (2) ongoing professional learning; and (3) disparity in early education teacher pay. To achieve…

  3. Achieving Agreement in Three Rounds with Bounded-Byzantine Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar, R.

    2017-01-01

    A three-round algorithm is presented that guarantees agreement in a system of K greater than or equal to 3F+1 nodes provided each faulty node induces no more than F faults and each good node experiences no more than F faults, where, F is the maximum number of simultaneous faults in the network. The algorithm is based on the Oral Message algorithm of Lamport, Shostak, and Pease and is scalable with respect to the number of nodes in the system and applies equally to traditional node-fault model as well as the link-fault model. We also present a mechanical verification of the algorithm focusing on verifying the correctness of a bounded model of the algorithm as well as confirming claims of determinism.

  4. Secure Network Coding against Wiretapping and Byzantine Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In wireless networks, an attacker can tune a receiver and tap the communication between two nodes. Whether or not some meaningful information is obtained by tapping a wireless connection depends on the transmission scheme. In this paper, we design some secure network coding by combining information-theoretic approaches with cryptographic approaches. It ensures that the wiretapper cannot get any meaningful information no matter how many channels are wiretapped. In addition, if each source packet is augmented with a hash symbol which is computed from a simple nonlinear polynomial function of the data symbols, then the probability of detecting the modification is very high.

  5. The role of the icon in Byzantine piety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Rydén

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a history of doctrinal controversies settled by the six ecumenical councils, from Nicaea (325 to Constantinople (680. It appears that he who makes a picture of a man and calls the man in the picture "Christ" is guilty of heresy. For either he thinks that he can circumscribe Christ's divine nature together with His human and so confuses Christ's two natures, which is monophysitism, or he says that he only wants to make a picture of Christ's flesh. But, in so doing, he gives the flesh of Christ a separate existence and adds a fourth person to the Trinity, and this is Nestorianism. The pictures of Christ that the painters produce are false pictures. What, then, constitutes a true image of Christ? This question was answered by Christ Himself on the eve of His passion, when He took bread, blessed it and said, "This is my body," and distributed wine and said, "This is my blood." The bread and wine that pass from the realm of the common to that of the holy through the blessing of the priest constitute the only true image of the body of Christ. This image does not have the form of man and therefore does not provoke idolatrous practices. It is further pointed out that there is no prayer that could transform the icons from mere matter into something holy. The pictures of the Virgin, the saints and the prophets do not offer the doctrinal dilemma which makes the picture of Christ unacceptable. Yet they must be rejected. The craft of idol-making, which makes what is not present seem to be present, was invented by the pagans, as they had no hope of resurrection.

  6. The Administration of Sasanian Egypt: New Masters and Byzantine Continuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Sänger

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The papyri and literary testimonia that mention various administrative positions and functions, especially as regards taxation, allow us to trace elements of change and continuity in the period of Persian occupation of Egypt (A.D. 619-629.

  7. L’édition des textes astronomiques grecs et byzantins

    OpenAIRE

    Tihon, Anne

    2009-01-01

    I. Première conférence Cette leçon avait pour thème les différents états dans lesquels un texte scientifique peut apparaître dans les manuscrits. À l’aide d’exemples, nous avons montré qu’un commentaire scientifique peut se rencontrer sous les formes suivantes : a) Les notes prises au cours d’un enseignement oral. Ce cas a été illustré par le commentaire marginal qui se trouve dans les marges du Petit Commentaire de Théon dans le Paris. gr. 2394. L’histoire de ce manuscrit, copié en 1733 dan...

  8. Persistence of W135 Neisseria meningitidis Carriage in Returning Hajj Pilgrims: Risk for Early and Late Transmission to Household Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkham, Timothy M.S.; Ravindran, Sindhu; Earnest, Arul; Paton, Nicholas I.

    2003-01-01

    After an outbreak of meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis W135, associated with the Hajj pilgrimage in 2001, 15% of returning vaccinated pilgrims carried a single W135 clone, and 55% were still carriers 6 months later. Transmission to 8% of their unvaccinated household contacts occurred within a few weeks, but no late transmission took place. Public health interventions are needed to protect household contacts. PMID:12533295

  9. Early Option Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Vestergaard; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    A classic result by Merton (1973) is that, except just before expiration or dividend payments, one should never exercise a call option and never convert a convertible bond. We show theoretically that this result is overturned when investors face frictions. Early option exercise can be optimal when...... it reduces short-sale costs, transaction costs, or funding costs. We provide consistent empirical evidence, documenting billions of dollars of early exercise for options and convertible bonds using unique data on actual exercise decisions and frictions. Our model can explain as much as 98% of early exercises...

  10. Early Life Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood should be viewed as a sequence of lifestages, from birth through infancy and adolescence. When assessing early life risks, consideration is given to risks resulting from fetal exposure via the pregnant mother, as well as postnatal exposures.

  11. Early stage colon cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2013-01-01

    .... After resection of malignant pedunculated colon polyps or early stage colon cancers, long-term repeated surveillance programs can also lead to detection and removal of asymptomatic high risk advanced...

  12. Tooth decay - early childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottle mouth; Bottle carries; Baby bottle tooth decay; Early childhood caries (ECC) ... inside of your baby's mouth healthy and prevents tooth decay. If you are bottle-feeding your baby: Give babies, ages newborn to ...

  13. Early warning scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    A free app available from the Apple App Store is aimed at supporting health professionals in Wales to use the National Early Warning Score (NEWS). The tool helps staff identify patients who are developing serious illness.

  14. Early Head Start Evaluation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Early Head Start or community services as usual;direct assessments and...

  15. Overview of Early Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eligible babies and toddlers learn the basic and brand-new skills that typically develop during the first ... Services in Natural Environments Transition to Preschool Public Awareness & the Referral System Early Intervention, Then and Now ...

  16. Guideline for Early Interventions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vries, de, Maaike

    2006-01-01

    .... During the last years, the demand for early interventions has been increasing. International literature has shown that the psychosocial effects of disaster and military deployment may last for years...

  17. Early-onset schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Hojka Gregorič Kumperščak

    2013-01-01

    Early-onset schizophrenia is defined as schizophrenia with onset before the age of 18 years. While schizophrenia is a very rare disorder in childhood, it becomes increasingly common during adolescence and peaks in early adulthood. Even though childhood and adolescent schizophrenia lie on a continuum with adult schizophrenia and show roughly the same clinical picture, they both have some developmental specifics. They display greater symptom variability making the ...

  18. Embracing early literacy indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig; Hansen, Ole Henrik; Jensen, Anders Skriver

    2010-01-01

    Abstract til paper om early literacy indikatorer. Det paper abstractet er knyttet til var en del af et inviteret, selvorganiseret symposium som afrapporterede EASE-projektet (www.ease-eu.com) på OMEP's 26. verdenskongres.......Abstract til paper om early literacy indikatorer. Det paper abstractet er knyttet til var en del af et inviteret, selvorganiseret symposium som afrapporterede EASE-projektet (www.ease-eu.com) på OMEP's 26. verdenskongres....

  19. Redefining early gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Savio G; Windsor, John A

    2016-01-01

    The problem is that current definitions of early gastric cancer allow the inclusion of regional lymph node metastases. The increasing use of endoscopic submucosal dissection to treat early gastric cancer is a concern because regional lymph nodes are not addressed. The aim of the study was thus to critically evaluate current evidence with regard to tumour-specific factors associated with lymph node metastases in "early gastric cancer" to develop a more precise definition and improve clinical management. A systematic and comprehensive search of major reference databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed and the Cochrane Library) was undertaken using a combination of text words "early gastric cancer", "lymph node metastasis", "factors", "endoscopy", "surgery", "lymphadenectomy" "mucosa", "submucosa", "lymphovascular invasion", "differentiated", "undifferentiated" and "ulcer". All available publications that described tumour-related factors associated with lymph node metastases in early gastric cancer were included. The initial search yielded 1494 studies, of which 42 studies were included in the final analysis. Over time, the definition of early gastric cancer has broadened and the indications for endoscopic treatment have widened. The mean frequency of lymph node metastases increased on the basis of depth of infiltration (mucosa 6% vs. submucosa 28%), presence of lymphovascular invasion (absence 9% vs. presence 53%), tumour differentiation (differentiated 13% vs. undifferentiated 34%) and macroscopic type (elevated 13% vs. flat 26%) and tumour diameter (≤2 cm 8% vs. >2 cm 25%). There is a need to re-examine the diagnosis and staging of early gastric cancer to ensure that patients with one or more identifiable risk factor for lymph node metastases are not denied appropriate chemotherapy and surgical resection.

  20. Patriarch Photios and his Role in the East-West Opposition in Assessing the Representatives of Russian Theological Academies in the late 19th - early 20th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhova Nataliia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the research of Russian theologians dedicated to one of the most famous historical figures in the history of the Christian Church of the fi rst millennium – the Patriarch of Constantinople Photios (IX. Personality and acts of patriarch Photios are evaluated extremely ambiguous and assessed not only Western but also Eastern theologians of both Church history and theological viewpoints. For the Russian Christianity patriarch Photius has a special significance: it is enough to recall the “Photios baptism”, Photios homily “on the invasion of Russia” (860, “Encyclical Letter” to the East the patriarchal throne (1867, first teachers Cyril and Methodius. The article covers 30 years (1885–1915 and has two time “assemblies”: 1885–1900s and 1900–1915s. On the basis of published and unpublished documents, the author considers the range of estimates of the Most Holy Patriarch Photios, given by the Russian theologians and Church leaders, highlighting three areas: Slavic, who valued the role the Patriarch Photios played in the Christian education of the Slavs; “grekofilos”, who demanded the incorporation of Patriarch Photios’ name in Russian calendars; fighters against “east Popery”, who recognized the historical and theological merits of the Patriarch Photios, but stand firm on non-recognition of his canonization. However, all of these items together were largely due to the views of the late 19th – early 20th century: the relationship of the Orthodox Churches of the era, the specifi cs of church-state relations in Russia, which were often relocated on “Byzantine symphony”. Thus, “the matter of the Patriarch Photios” became certain litmus test for identifying the “hot spots” and the internal discussions in the Russian academic theology.

  1. Early diagnosis of early stage lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Debeljak

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: For the detection of premalignant changes of bronchial mucosa and early stages of lung cancer frequent chest X-ray, spiral low dose computed tomography, fluorescence bronchoscopy, sputum cytology (also with automated systems with genetic and molecular changes in the sputum cells and bronchial mucosa were used. These screening methods of the high-risk groups for lung cancer achieved: earlier diagnosis of lung cancer in lower stage, higher operability, longer 5-year survival, but without mortality reduction.Conclusions: In the clinical practice we can examine higher risk groups for lung cancer in randomised control trials with multimodality approach: frequent chest low-dose fast spiral computed tomography, sputum cytology with genetic and molecular examinations and fluorescence bronchoscopy. Smoking cessation remains the best means to achieve mortality reduction from lung cancer.

  2. Introduction to "Early psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGorry, Patrick; Nordentoft, Merete; Simonsen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Early intervention in psychiatry has taken a long time to emerge as a key strategy to reduce morbidity and mortality. In other fields of medicine it has received consistent support and great efforts are expended to educate the public about the value of early diagnosis and the benefits of timely...... intervention. There is finally substantial momentum behind similar endeavours in psychotic disorders, which, now they have reached "proof of concept" stage, could begin to be extended across the spectrum of serious mental disorders. There is also ambivalence and resistance to this evidence-based reform which...

  3. Early Islamic Syria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmsley, Alan

    After more than a century of neglect, a profound revolution is occurring in the way archaeology addresses and interprets developments in the social history of early Islamic Syria-Palestine. This concise book offers an innovative assessment of social and economic developments in Syria-Palestine...... for considerable cultural and economic continuity rather than devastation and unrelenting decline. Much new, and increasingly non-elite, architectural evidence and an ever-growing corpus of material culture indicate that Syria-Palestine entered a new age of social richness in the early Islamic period, even...

  4. Early life vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazerai, Loulieta; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Uddbäck, Ida Elin Maria

    2016-01-01

    the first period of life and provide a pertinent alternative in infant vaccinology. To address this, infant mice were vaccinated with three different adenoviral vectors and the CD8+ T-cell response after early life vaccination was explored. We assessed the frequency, polyfunctionality and in vivo...... cytotoxicity of the elicited memory CD8+ T cells, as well as the potential of these cells to respond to secondary infections and confer protection. We further tested the impact of maternal immunity against our replication-deficient adenoviral vector during early life vaccination. Overall, our results indicate...

  5. 75 FR 20830 - Early Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... Early Learning AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of public..., is seeking input from State agencies responsible for early learning and development, families..., researchers of early learning, stakeholders who work with early learning and development for young children...

  6. Early Islamic Syria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmsley, Alan George

    This book presents a new interpretation of social and economic developments in Syria-Palestine in the decades before and during the two centuries after the Islamic expansion into the region (roughly the later 6th to the early 9th century AD). Drawing on a wide range of evidence from recent archae...

  7. Creativity: The Early Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett

    2016-01-01

    There is a myth that some people are creative and others are not. However, all children are born creative. They love to explore, ask questions, and are incredibly imaginative. Parents are key in nurturing their child's creativity in the early years. This article offers resources and strategies parents can use at different ages and stages (newborn,…

  8. Teaching polymorphism early

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Is it possible to teach dynamic polymorphism early? What techniques could facilitate teaching it in Java. This panel will bring together people who have considered this question and attempted to implement it in various ways, some more completely than others. It will also give participants...

  9. Early hominin auditory capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Rosa, Manuel; Bonmatí, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Carlos; de Ruiter, Darryl J; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Conde Valverde, Mercedes; Jarabo, Pilar; Menter, Colin G; Thackeray, J Francis; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-09-01

    Studies of sensory capacities in past life forms have offered new insights into their adaptations and lifeways. Audition is particularly amenable to study in fossils because it is strongly related to physical properties that can be approached through their skeletal structures. We have studied the anatomy of the outer and middle ear in the early hominin taxa Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus and estimated their auditory capacities. Compared with chimpanzees, the early hominin taxa are derived toward modern humans in their slightly shorter and wider external auditory canal, smaller tympanic membrane, and lower malleus/incus lever ratio, but they remain primitive in the small size of their stapes footplate. Compared with chimpanzees, both early hominin taxa show a heightened sensitivity to frequencies between 1.5 and 3.5 kHz and an occupied band of maximum sensitivity that is shifted toward slightly higher frequencies. The results have implications for sensory ecology and communication, and suggest that the early hominin auditory pattern may have facilitated an increased emphasis on short-range vocal communication in open habitats.

  10. Prenatal depression: Early intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cheryl A; Lieser, Carol

    2015-07-15

    Frequently undiagnosed and untreated, prenatal depression affects approximately one in four childbearing women. Screening and appropriate management is essential to prevent adverse consequences to both the woman and her unborn infant. Early conversations between the woman and her nurse practitioner are essential to making medical management decisions.

  11. Early Developments in Crystallography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    molecules to treat different diseases, make materials of desired properties and attempt to understand unknown territories far away from the Earth such as the exploration of the surface of. Mars. In this article, we will try to trace the early historical events in the development of X-ray crystallography, and the Indian contributions ...

  12. Early Mover Advantages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.E. Bijwaard (Govert); M.C.W. Janssen (Maarten); E. Maasland (Emiel)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we analyze empirically whether and if so to what extent later entrants in the European mobile telephony industry have a disadvantage vis-à-vis incumbents and early mover entrants. To analyze this question we consider a series of static models and a dynamic model of market

  13. Early Islamic Syria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmsley, Alan George

    This book presents a new interpretation of social and economic developments in Syria-Palestine in the decades before and during the two centuries after the Islamic expansion into the region (roughly the later 6th to the early 9th century AD). Drawing on a wide range of evidence from recent...

  14. Early Childhood--Love

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sylvia

    1976-01-01

    If children are to love themselves and others, they must experience love early. And they need to be taught the value of love, since it tends to fall victim to other lesser emotions. Provides suggestions for helping young children to grow in love. (Author/RK)

  15. Music in Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feierabend, John

    1990-01-01

    Argues that music activities in early childhood education foster a variety of developmental skills. Analyzes Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, contending that music intelligence is a separate intelligence. Provides ways to identify and promote musical intelligence. Suggests methods for encouraging musical development. Using songs…

  16. Early hominin auditory capacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Rosa, Manuel; Bonmatí, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Carlos; de Ruiter, Darryl J.; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Conde Valverde, Mercedes; Jarabo, Pilar; Menter, Colin G.; Thackeray, J. Francis; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Studies of sensory capacities in past life forms have offered new insights into their adaptations and lifeways. Audition is particularly amenable to study in fossils because it is strongly related to physical properties that can be approached through their skeletal structures. We have studied the anatomy of the outer and middle ear in the early hominin taxa Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus and estimated their auditory capacities. Compared with chimpanzees, the early hominin taxa are derived toward modern humans in their slightly shorter and wider external auditory canal, smaller tympanic membrane, and lower malleus/incus lever ratio, but they remain primitive in the small size of their stapes footplate. Compared with chimpanzees, both early hominin taxa show a heightened sensitivity to frequencies between 1.5 and 3.5 kHz and an occupied band of maximum sensitivity that is shifted toward slightly higher frequencies. The results have implications for sensory ecology and communication, and suggest that the early hominin auditory pattern may have facilitated an increased emphasis on short-range vocal communication in open habitats. PMID:26601261

  17. Early childhood aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alink, Lenneke Rosalie Agnes

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the development, stability, and correlates of early childhood aggression were investigated. The normative development was examined in a general population sample using questionnaires completed by the parents of 12-, 24-, and 36-month-old children and again one year later. Results

  18. Early Childhood Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  19. Early Option Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heje Pedersen, Lasse; Jensen, Mads Vestergaard

    A classic result by Merton (1973) is that, except just before expiration or dividend payments, one should never exercise a call option and never convert a convertible bond. We show theoretically that this result is overturned when investors face frictions. Early option exercise can be optimal whe...

  20. Early intervention in psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csillag, Claudio; Nordentoft, Merete; Mizuno, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Early intervention in psychosis (EIP) is a well-established approach with the intention of early detection and treatment of psychotic disorders. Its clinical and economic benefits are well documented. This paper presents basic aspects of EIP services, discusses challenges to their implementa......AIM: Early intervention in psychosis (EIP) is a well-established approach with the intention of early detection and treatment of psychotic disorders. Its clinical and economic benefits are well documented. This paper presents basic aspects of EIP services, discusses challenges...... implemented EIP services into the mental healthcare system have generated evidence, concepts and specific strategies that might serve as guidance or inspiration in other countries or systems where EIP is less well developed or not developed at all. Previous experience has made clear that evidence of clinical...... benefits alone is not enough to promote implementation, as economic arguments and political and social pressure have shown to be important elements in efforts to achieve implementation. CONCLUSIONS: Users' narratives, close collaboration with community organizations and support from policy-makers and known...

  1. Early Years Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Waldfogel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the role that early years policy might play in narrowing educational attainment gaps. We begin by examining gaps in school readiness between low-, middle-, and high-income children, drawing on data from new large and nationally representative birth cohort studies in the USA and UK. We find that sizable income-related gaps in school readiness are present in both countries before children enter school and then decompose these gaps to identify the factors that account for the poorer scores of low-income children. We then consider what role early years policy could play in tackling these gaps, drawing on the best available evidence to identify promising programs.

  2. Samuel Goudsmit - Early Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudsmit, Esther

    2010-03-01

    Samuel Goudsmit, born in 1902 in The Hague, Netherlands, earned his Ph.D. at the University of Leiden in 1926 with Paul Ehrenfest. The present talk will describe some aspects of his background and early formative years in order to provide context for the broad range of his professional life. Sam belonged to a large tribe of paternal and maternal uncles, aunts and first cousins; including his parents, grandparents and sister Ro, they numbered forty. Sam was the first of the tribe to be educated beyond high school. Early interests as a child and later as a university student in the Netherlands prefigured his significant and diverse contributions in several realms including not only physics but also teaching, Egyptology and scientific Intelligence. Bibliographic sources will include: The American Institute of Physics' Oral History Transcripts and photographs from the Emilio Segre visual archives, memoirs and conversations of those who knew Sam and also letters to his daughter, Esther.

  3. Early Permian bipedal reptile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, D S; Reisz, R R; Scott, D; Henrici, A C; Sumida, S S; Martens, T

    2000-11-03

    A 290-million-year-old reptilian skeleton from the Lower Permian (Asselian) of Germany provides evidence of abilities for cursorial bipedal locomotion, employing a parasagittal digitigrade posture. The skeleton is of a small bolosaurid, Eudibamus cursoris, gen. et sp. nov. and confirms the widespread distribution of Bolosauridae across Laurasia during this early stage of amniote evolution. E. cursoris is the oldest known representative of Parareptilia, a major clade of reptiles.

  4. Early Detection Of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V B Bhatnagar

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available Farly detection of cancer is based upon three fundamental assumptions, firstly that the trea'ment of benign and precancerous lesions reduces the incidence of cancer, secondly, that the treatment of in situ cancers is conducive to total cure and thirdly that early diagnosis and management of invasive cancer ensures be.ter survival. When patient seeks medical advice for vague symptoms, which could however be due to a possible malignant tumour at a particular site, the alert clinician should investigate the patient immediately to exclude cancer. At this stage cancer is usually not significantly advanced.Currently the U. I. C. C. (International Union for Cancer Control} is studying the epidemiology of cancers in various countries The importance of this is two folds : Firstly by focussing attention on a section of population vulnerable to a particular cancer an early detection is facilitated Secondly by changing the causative factors responsible to a particular cancer, the incidence of that cancer can be reduced e. g. reduction in lung cancer following campaigns against ciguette smoking and reductioi in breast cancer after campaigns for advocating breast feeding of infants, lowering fat consumption and encouraging self palpation of breast regularly.Indeed early diagnosis of cancer implies diagnosis of cancer in almost a symptomatic stage It involves motiva’ion of the population towards acquisitio : of knowledge, attitude and practice.. Epidemiologies and clinicians should be able to recognise high risk cases exposed to particular neoplasia and knowledge of alarming symptoms should be pro- pogated for wide publicity through common available media and means. Probable cases should have regular clhrcal examination periodically and relevant investigations including radiological, imaging techniques and Bio-Chemical examination should be undertaken as and when desired Suspicious lesions should be investigated by specific tests including smear cytology

  5. Early prevention of obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Maffeis

    2014-01-01

    Childhood obesity is the metabolic disorder with the highest prevalence in both children and adults. Urgency to treat and prevent childhood obesity is based on the clear evidence that obesity tends to track from childhood to adulthood, is associated to morbidity also in childhood and to long-term mortality. Early life, i.e., intrauterine life and the first two years, is a sensitive window for prevention. Anatomical and functional maturation of the hypothalamic structures devoted to regulating...

  6. Early Building Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergård, Torben; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Maagaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •Development of a design methodology that can handle the vast design space in early building design. •A global design space is modelled from extensive Monte Carlo simulations. •Sensitivity analysis methods applied to guide decision-makers. •Interactive visualizations help the multi......-actor design team explore thousands of building performance simulations. •Metamodels are used to run additional simulations and demonstrate the holistic consequences of input changes....

  7. Coaching in Early Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germeroth, Carrie; Sarama, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Falling scores in math have prompted a renewed interest in math instruction at early ages. By their own admission, early childhood educators are generally underprepared and not always comfortable teaching math. Professional development (PD) in early mathematics is widely considered a main way to increase teachers' skills and efficacy (e.g., Guskey, 2000; Hyson & Woods, 2014; Munby, Russell, & Martin, 2001; Piasta, Logan, Pelatti, Capps, & Petrill, 2015; Richardson & Placier, 2001; Sarama, Clements, Wolfe, & Spitler, 2016; Sarama & DiBiase, 2004; Zaslow, 2014). However, it has been documented that stand-alone PD is not as effective in changing practice (e.g., Biancarosa & Bryk, 2011; Garet et al., 2008; Guskey, 2000; Hyson & Woods, 2014; Institute of Medicine and National Research Council, 2015; Joyce & Showers, 2002; Zaslow, 2014). Site-embedded ongoing support in the form of coaching or mentoring has been shown to be critical for successful implementation (Neuman & Cunningham, 2009; Powell, Diamond, Burchinal, & Koehler, 2010). In this chapter, we describe coaching models and abstract characteristics of effective coaching from the research. With this background, we provide an in-depth view of the coaching aspect of two large empirical studies in early mathematics. We introduce the theoretical framework from which the coaching models for these projects were developed and describe the research on which they were based. We then summarize how the planned models were instantiated and challenges to their implementation within each project. In the final section, we summarize what we have learned and described implications and challenges for the field. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Early Treatment in Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Figure 1). We conclude the inclusion of L-2 arginine in the resuscitation fluid has a statistically significant early beneficial and pro-3 tective...contribution of the intervention on survival. Statistical Analysis Sample size for rats used in both the acute and chronic experiments was calculated...prolongs survival in a rat model of lethal hypoxemia . Crit Care Med. 2000;28:1968-1972. 6. Giassi LJ, Gilchrist MJ, Graham BA, Gainer JL. Trans-sodium

  9. Hands of early primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Doug M; Yapuncich, Gabriel S; Chester, Stephen G B; Bloch, Jonathan I; Godinot, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Questions surrounding the origin and early evolution of primates continue to be the subject of debate. Though anatomy of the skull and inferred dietary shifts are often the focus, detailed studies of postcrania and inferred locomotor capabilities can also provide crucial data that advance understanding of transitions in early primate evolution. In particular, the hand skeleton includes characteristics thought to reflect foraging, locomotion, and posture. Here we review what is known about the early evolution of primate hands from a comparative perspective that incorporates data from the fossil record. Additionally, we provide new comparative data and documentation of skeletal morphology for Paleogene plesiadapiforms, notharctines, cercamoniines, adapines, and omomyiforms. Finally, we discuss implications of these data for understanding locomotor transitions during the origin and early evolutionary history of primates. Known plesiadapiform species cannot be differentiated from extant primates based on either intrinsic hand proportions or hand-to-body size proportions. Nonetheless, the presence of claws and a different metacarpophalangeal [corrected] joint form in plesiadapiforms indicate different grasping mechanics. Notharctines and cercamoniines have intrinsic hand proportions with extremely elongated proximal phalanges and digit rays relative to metacarpals, resembling tarsiers and galagos. But their hand-to-body size proportions are typical of many extant primates (unlike those of tarsiers, and possibly Teilhardina, which have extremely large hands). Non-adapine adapiforms and omomyids exhibit additional carpal features suggesting more limited dorsiflexion, greater ulnar deviation, and a more habitually divergent pollex than observed plesiadapiforms. Together, features differentiating adapiforms and omomyiforms from plesiadapiforms indicate increased reliance on vertical prehensile-clinging and grasp-leaping, possibly in combination with predatory behaviors in

  10. Early Archaean hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, S. T.; Nijman, W.

    2003-04-01

    Although many people have written about hydrothermal systems in the early Earth, little real evidence is available. New data from the Barberton greenstone belt (South Africa) and greenstone belts of the East Pilbara (Western Australia), provide proof of the existence and nature of hydrothermal systems in the Early Archaean (around 3.4 Ga). Detailed field relationships between vein systems, host rock and overlying sediments are combined with data from fluid inclusions studies on quartz fills in the sediments. An intimate relationship between chert veins and the overlying sediments has been established (the veins are syn-sedimentary). The salinity and temperature of the fluids in the inclusions shows that these are of hydrothermal origin. Similar types of hydrothermal systems, of approximately the same age, have been found at different locations; in the Barberton greenstone belt and at various locations in the East Pilbara. The setting of these hydrothermal systems is not always identical however. Although a felsic substratum is more common, in the North Pole area (Pilbara) the hydrothermal systems rise from a basaltic substratum. In the Barberton greenstone belt, the systems are closely related to shallow intrusive (felsic) bodies. The study of these ancient hydrothermal systems forms an important framework for studies of early life on Earth. This study forms part of an international project on Earth's Earliest Sedimentary Basins, supported by the Foundation Dr. Schürmannfonds.

  11. [Early stimulation > programs evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnier, C

    2007-09-01

    Early intervention include educational and neuroprotection strategies. Early educational strategies are based on the cerebral plasticity concept. Neuroprotection, initially reserved for molecules preventing cell death phenomena, can be extended now to all actions promoting harmonious development and preventing handicaps, and include organisational, therapeutic and environmental aspects. Early stimulation programs have been first devised in United States for vulnerable children who belong to an unfavorable socio-economic category ; positive effects were recorded in school failure rates and social problems ; programs have also been launched in several countries for premature infants and infants with a low birth weight, population exposed to a high risk of deficiencies. The programs are targetted either to the child, or to the parents, or combined to provide assistance for both the child and the parents. The programs given the best evaluation are NIDCAP Program in Sweden (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program), intended for babies neonatal intensive care units, then a longitudinal, multisite program, known as IHDP (Infant Health and Development Program). It was launched in United States for infants stimulation is maintained and when mothers have a low level of education.

  12. Developmental Milestones of Early Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Email Print Share Developmental Milestones of Early Literacy Page Content ​In the spirit of making both ... at the well-defined developmental milestones of early literacy. Younger Than 6 Months: Never Too Young Unlike ...

  13. Early Mobilization: Changing the Mindset

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Castro, Emily; Turcinovic, Michael; Platz, John; Law, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    .... To assess and improve the mindset of SICU staff toward early mobilization of patients receiving mechanical ventilation before, 6 months after, and 1 year after implementation of early mobilization...

  14. Early Life Exposures and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early-life events and exposures have important consequences for cancer development later in life, however, epidemiological studies of early-life factors and cancer development later in life have had significant methodological challenges.

  15. Early prevention of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Maffeis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Childhood obesity is the metabolic disorder with the highest prevalence in both children and adults. Urgency to treat and prevent childhood obesity is based on the clear evidence that obesity tends to track from childhood to adulthood, is associated to morbidity also in childhood and to long-term mortality. Early life, i.e., intrauterine life and the first two years, is a sensitive window for prevention. Anatomical and functional maturation of the hypothalamic structures devoted to regulating energy intake and expenditure and body size mainly occurs in the first 1,000 days of life. Therefore, factors affecting the foetal exposition to maternal metabolic environment and early postnatal nutrition are crucial in modulating the definition of the metabolic programming processes in the brain. Maternal diseases, mainly malnutrition for defect or excess, obesity and diabetes, placental disorders and dysfunctions, maternal use of alcohol and drugs, smoking, affect long term metabolic programming of the foetus with lifelong consequences. Similarly, early nutrition contributes to complete the long-term metabolic regulating framework initiated in the uterus. Breastfeeding, adequate weaning, attention to portion size and diet composition are potential tools for reducing the obesity risk later in childhood. Longitudinal randomized controlled studies are needed for exploring the efficacy of obesity prevention strategies initiated after conception.Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  16. Early Onset Werner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna İmge Aydoğan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a rare autosomal recessive adult-onset progeroid disorder characterized by the early onset of aged-appearance and age-related metabolic disorders. Symptoms of premature aging usually first develop in the second-third decades of life. We report a 27-year-old female who was admitted to our clinic at the age of eighteen with hyperglycemia. She was diagnosed with diabetes and type 4 dyslipidemia at the age of seven. In her family history, her parents were first cousins and she had three healthy brothers. On her first physical examination; she had bird-like face appearance, global hair loss, beaked nose, short stature and she was overweight. She had global hair loss with gray and thin hair. Hoarseness of voice and hyperkeratosis of skin were observed. She had bilateral cataracts and moderate sensorineural hearing loss. On psychiatric examination, borderline mental retardation was detected. She had severe insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia despite levothyroxine, gemfibrozil, omega-3 and intensive insulin treatment. Routine lipid apheresis was performed to lower the triglyceride levels reaching 5256 mg/dL. She also had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, hepatosteatosis, osteoporosis and epilepsy. Disease was accompanied by several congenital deformities, such as Rathke’s cleft cyst, angiomyolipoma and femoral neck hypoplasia. WS is a rare genetic disorder characterized by multiple endocrine manifestations as well as soft tissue changes. We present a case of early disturbances that were diagnosed before typical clinical signs and symptoms. We propose that WS should be kept in mind when type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia are diagnosed early in childhood. Turk Jem 2015; 19: 99-104

  17. Value-Added Early Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, Harriet

    2011-01-01

    Elected state leaders often prioritize economic prosperity and competitiveness, which provides an important opportunity too rarely taken for investing in early education. In 2003, Pennsylvania recognized the connection between early education and the economy, and smartly embraced early learning as part of its economic prosperity and…

  18. Early Attrition among Suicidal Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgenor, P. W. G.; Meehan, V.; Moore, A.

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the level of suicidal ideation in early attrition clients and their reasons for the early termination of their therapy. The cross-sectional design involved early attrition clients (C[subscript A]) who withdrew from therapy before their second session (n = 61), and continuing clients who (C[subscript C]) progressed…

  19. [Early gastric cancer. Clinical contribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillitu, A; Carletti, N; Durzi, S; Terzi, G; Menghini, L; Degli Albizi, S

    1992-01-01

    The authors report their experience on 37 cases of Early Gastric Cancer on 1978-1990 period. They underline the excellent results obtained with subtotal gastrectomy and lynphectomy without deaths neither returns. They stress the diagnostic precision of endoscopic exam now of first choice in the early diagnosis of Early Gastric Cancer.

  20. Sonority and early words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbæk, Laila; Boeg Thomsen, Ditte; Lambertsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Syllables play an important role in children’s early language acquisition, and children appear to rely on clear syllabic structures as a key to word acquisition (Vihman 1996; Oller 2000). However, not all languages present children with equally clear cues to syllabic structure, and since...... acquisition therefore presents us with the opportunity to examine how children respond to the task of word learning when the input language offers less clear cues to syllabic structure than usually seen. To investigate the sound structure in Danish children’s lexical development, we need a model of syllable...

  1. Crowdsourced earthquake early warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minson, Sarah E.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Glennie, Craig L.; Murray, Jessica R.; Langbein, John O.; Owen, Susan E.; Heaton, Thomas H.; Iannucci, Robert A.; Hauser, Darren L.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquake early warning (EEW) can reduce harm to people and infrastructure from earthquakes and tsunamis, but it has not been implemented in most high earthquake-risk regions because of prohibitive cost. Common consumer devices such as smartphones contain low-cost versions of the sensors used in EEW. Although less accurate than scientific-grade instruments, these sensors are globally ubiquitous. Through controlled tests of consumer devices, simulation of an Mw (moment magnitude) 7 earthquake on California’s Hayward fault, and real data from the Mw 9 Tohoku-oki earthquake, we demonstrate that EEW could be achieved via crowdsourcing.

  2. Early solar physics

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    1970-01-01

    Early Solar Physics reviews developments in solar physics, particularly the advent of solar spectroscopy and the discovery of relationships between the various layers of the solar atmosphere and between the different forms of solar activity. Topics covered include solar observations during 1843; chemical analysis of the solar atmosphere; the spectrum of a solar prominence; and the solar eclipse of December 12, 1871. Spectroscopic observations of the sun are also presented. This book is comprised of 30 chapters and begins with an overview of ideas about the sun in the mid-nineteenth century, fo

  3. Early Identification of Reading Difficulties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads; Nielsen, Anne-Mette Veber; Juul, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Early screening for reading difficulties before the onset of instruction is desirable because it allows intervention that is targeted at prevention rather than remediation of reading difficulties. However, early screening may be too inaccurate to effectively allocate resources to those who need...... as much information as the early measures combined. In the light of these results and a less than perfect early screening accuracy, a new strategy for screening is introduced and discussed. The strategy proposes multi-point screening with gradually increasing sensitivity to strike a balance between...... manageable screening procedures and outcomes and early identification of students who are most likely in need of extra resources....

  4. [In-patient (early) rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallesch, Claus-W; Lautenschläger, Sindy

    2017-04-01

    It is difficult to develop the financing and hospital provision of interventions for early rehabilitation within the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system. In addition to a range of partially rehabilitative complex interventions, the system recognizes three main forms of early rehabilitative interventions: geriatric, neurological/neurosurgical, and interdisciplinary and others. In this article, the appropriate definitions and cost-effectiveness of these procedures are analyzed and compared. The early rehabilitative interventions are characterized by constant cooperation in the therapeutic team, especially neurological early rehabilitation through the incorporation of nursing as a therapeutic profession. Whereas geriatric and neurological early rehabilitation are reflected in the DRG system, the former provided in many general hospitals and the latter mainly in specialized institutions, interdisciplinary early rehabilitation has only occasionally been represented in the DRG system so far. If all acute in-patients who require early rehabilitation should receive such an intervention, an additional fee must be implemented for this this interdisciplinary service.

  5. Early-Onset Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konijnenberg, Elles; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Kate, Mara Ten

    2017-01-01

    of this study was to investigate quality-of-care indicators in subjects with EOD from 3 tertiary memory clinics in 3 European countries. METHODS: We included 1325 newly diagnosed EOD patients, ages 65 years or younger, between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2013, from the Danish Dementia Registry......BACKGROUND: Early-onset dementia (EOD) is a rare condition, with an often atypical clinical presentation, and it may therefore be challenging to diagnose. Specialized memory clinics vary in the type of patients seen, diagnostic procedures applied, and the pharmacological treatment given. The aim...... (Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen), the Swedish Dementia Registry ("SveDem", Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm), and the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort (VU University Medical Center). RESULTS: The frequency of EOD among all dementia patients was significantly lower in Copenhagen (410, 20%) and Stockholm (284, 21...

  6. [Early cardiotoxicity of Hydroxychloroquine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Y; Guillaumont, M P; Touati, G; Duhaut, P; Schmidt, J

    2016-03-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is most frequently used in the treatment of systemic inflammatory diseases. Cardiac complications of anti-malarial drugs are uncommon, and most of the time are the result of a long-term exposition. In this case, cardiotoxicity is the consequence of the lysosomal dysfunction and the result of intracytoplasmic granular material inclusions. We report a 77-year-old woman who presented a very early and reversible cardiotoxicity, probably related to the quinidine like effect of the HCQ, 10 days after initiation of therapy for Whipple endocarditis. We discuss the different mechanisms of cardiotoxicity of anti-malarial drugs and their clinical manifestations. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. FLITECAM: early commissioning results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, Sarah E.; McLean, Ian S.; Becklin, Eric E.; Dunham, Edward W.; Hamilton, Ryan T.; Johnson, Christopher; Milburn, Jennifer W.; Savage, Maureen L.; Shenoy, Sachindev S.; Smith, Erin C.; Vacca, William D.

    2014-07-01

    We present a status report and early commissioning results for FLITECAM, the 1-5 micron imager and spectrometer for SOFIA (the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy). In February 2014 we completed six flights with FLITECAM mounted in the FLIPO configuration, a co-mounting of FLITECAM and HIPO (High-speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations; PI Edward W. Dunham, Lowell Observatory). During these flights, the FLITECAM modes from ~1-4 μm were characterized. Since observatory verification flights in 2011, several improvements have been made to the FLITECAM system, including the elimination of a light leak in the FLITECAM filter wheel enclosure, and updates to the observing software. We discuss both the improvements to the FLITECAM system and the results from the commissioning flights, including updated sensitivity measurements. Finally, we discuss the utility of FLITECAM in the FLIPO configuration for targeting exoplanet transits.

  8. Changing features of the concept of pilgrimage: the example of the Mevlana's museum in Konya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay Hosta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi was a philosopher who influenced our era with his ‘humanist’ thoughts, his invitation towards everybody to friendship and brotherhood and his ideas about love and humanism. The museum, opened in his name in 1926 in Konya, Turkey, has been converted into a special place, describing Mevlevi’s way of life, telling the history of the Mevlana Dervish lodge and exhibiting related works with religious historical values. This important Museum, attracting many visitors from all over the world, including Turkey, represents unique examples both in architecture and genuine works of arts from Seljuk and the Ottoman period.Today faith tourism, emerging as a business sector, due to the increasing number of travelling people everyday, fulfils the space of the religious obligations related to travelling and also shows itself in religious aspects, not only pertaining to the major dimensions of a religion, but also by affecting all other religion-related rituals. The Mevlana Museum has become one of the places affected by the faith tourism. It has turned into an economic resource and become an important place for advertising Turkey, having visitors any time of year.

  9. Moved by Mary: The power of pilgrimage in the modern world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermkens, A.K.; Jansen, W.H.M.; Notermans, C.D.

    2009-01-01

    The Virgin Mary continues to attract devotees to her images and shrines. In Moved by Mary, anthropologists, geographers and historians explore how people and groups around the world identify and join with Mary in their struggle against social injustice, and how others mobilize Mary to impose ideas

  10. "Lonely, tragic, but legally necessary pilgrimages": transnational abortion travel in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Beth

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the work of the Calgary Birth Control Association with a particular focus on their referral service to help Albertan women obtain abortions in Seattle. The fact that Canadian women were travelling to the United States for abortions highlights the shortcomings of the Canadian health-care system and the legal changes in the 1969 omnibus bill. Cross-border travel is also compelling evidence for the argument that reproductive rights are an international issue. More particularly, this study demonstrates the tensions that reproductive-rights activists faced in addressing the needs of individual women vs the long-term objective of changing the laws and improving accessibility.

  11. CULTURE: Mesmerizing Mauritius; India's best music and dance artistes pilgrimage to paradise island

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    .... TV cameras turn and capture their arrival, too, for evening news. This portrait of musical culture clash is unforgettable -- India's hottest "pop" prince landing on the same flight as six of Bharat's greatest classical superstars...

  12. Between Fan Pilgrimage and Dark Tourism: Competing Agendas in Overseas Field Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorran, Chris

    2015-01-01

    An overseas field learning itinerary can be a powerful pedagogical tool for both directing student attention and complicating preexisting spatial narratives. However, one must beware of using the itinerary to replace one narrative with another. This paper examines the itinerary negotiation for a 15-day overseas field module conducted three…

  13. Anti-retroviral therapy among HIV infected travelers to Hajj pilgrimage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Abdulrazaq G; Abdulmumini, Murjanatu; Dalhat, Mahmoud M; Hamza, Muhammad; Iliyasu, Garba

    2010-01-01

    Many countries with high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection also have substantial Muslim populations. HIV-infected patients who travel to Hajj in Saudi-Arabia may encounter challenges regarding their anti-retroviral therapy (ART). In a cohort study in Nigeria, clinically stable patients on ART who were traveling for the 2008 to 2009 Hajj (Hajj-pilgrims [HP]) were selected and compared with consecutively selected Muslim patients who were clinically stable and traveled to and from distances within the country to access ART (non-pilgrims [NP]). Participants were clinically evaluated and interviewed regarding their adherence to ART pre-travel and post-travel, international border passage with medications and reasons for missing ART doses. Post-travel change in CD4 counts and RNA-PCR viral load were measured. Outcomes were proportion who missed >or=1 dose of ART during Hajj compared with pre-travel or post-travel and failure of ART, defined as decline in CD4 cell counts or high viral load or both. Thirty-one HP and 27 NP had similar characteristics and were away for (median [range]) 36 days (28-43 days) and 84 days (28-84 days), respectively (p or= 1 ART doses among HP and NP while away were 16/31 (51.6%) and 5/27 (18.5%), respectively with risk ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) 2.79 (1.18-6.60). Among HP, the proportions who missed >or= 1 ART doses pre-travel and post-travel were lower than those who missed it during Hajj. Those who failed ART among HP compared with NP were 15/31 (48.4%) and 5/27 (18.5%), respectively with odds ratio (95% CI) 4.13 (1.10-17.21). Reasons for missing ART included forgetfulness, exhaustion of supplies, stigma, spiritual alternatives, or disinclination; five patients were unable to cross airports with medications. Patients who went on Hajj were more likely to miss medications and to have ART failure due to several reasons including inability to cross borders with medications.

  14. Analysis of the problematic during in the pilgrimages in Juazeiro of the North - Ce

    OpenAIRE

    Cieusa Maria Calou e Pereira

    2005-01-01

    O presente trabalho analisa, em Juazeiro do Norte â CearÃ, a problemÃtica do lixo durante os dias de romarias, enfocando as condiÃÃes sociais, econÃmicas e ambientais do MunicÃpio. A cidade possui uma populaÃÃo de 214 mil habitantes, a qual à duplicada durante as trÃs festas religiosas que acontecem as romarias, ocorrendo uma sobrecarga nos serviÃos pÃblicos, especialmente no manejo adequado do lixo. Durante a pesquisa, foi usada metodologia dialÃtica, a qual possibilitou inicialmente fazer d...

  15. Walking the Spiritual Ways – West of Ireland experience of modern pilgrimage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Power

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the modern phenomenon of pilgrim walking along routes in the west of Ireland county of Clare. It relates it to possible medieval practice; to traditional practices by local people on one hand and the reconstruction of the international medieval pilgrim routes to places like Compostela. It suggests the reasons why people may walk in search of spiritual growth and experience, the resources they may wish for, the ways in which the contemporary search functions in a largely post-Catholic manner, and the position of those from other Christina, or religious traditions

  16. Volunteers: Their Role in the Management of the Visitor and Pilgrimage Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wiltshier

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the key conditions and parameters for management under which volunteers perform a valuable service to visitors in the context of sacred or secular visits to specific key sites. The paper considers consumers as visitors for sacred and secular purposes; it is situated at the CathedralchurchofAll SaintsinDerby,England. It is based on the premise that satisfied consumers will spread the word of how well expectations were exceeded by perceptions. It is further based on the premise that resources provided for tour guiding, visitor support and explanation and information provision by volunteers are exceptionally well located and an integral part of the aim and objectives of the Cathedral. Satisfied consumers are more likely to return and to tell friends and relatives about their positive experience. When the service provided is less than expected it is for one or more of several reasons – management does not know what is important to the customer; management is aware of what is important but fails to set service quality standards in the areas that are important; standards are set but employees fail to deliver on them; promises are made to guests that are not delivered. By bringing service promises in line with what is currently being offered management begins to manage customer expectations. Research is being conducted to identify what is important to the guest. Service quality standards are then set based on what is discovered (Mill, 2011; 17. By using a socio-psychological model to identify and explore options to improve consumer experiences the paper reinforces and prioritises five elements of consumer satisfaction; functional, social, emotional, epistemic and values (after Williams & Soutar, 2000. A new approach is therefore used to validate service quality attributes that are fundamental to any evaluation of the contribution made by volunteers. Following a thematic model explored by Dalton et al (2009 the following criteria are used to map the consumer experience to management outcomes; experience coupled with memorabilia, a themed narrative attached to market alignment, knowledge transfer coupled to the contemporary and expected market environment, participation and absorption mapped to design elements, emotional crescendos and memorabilia linked to influence and defined participation opportunities, unique and personal benefits clearly attached to a wide, yet appropriate range of market segments identified (Dalton et al, 2009.

  17. Battered women venerating a vicious Virgin: reconsidering marianismo at a Bolivian pilgrimage shrine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, S.W.; Heessels, M.

    2011-01-01

    Scholarly literature on domestic violence in Latin America often relates it to machismo and marianismo. Within this gender paradigm, women are understood to embrace the values of the Virgin Mary as a passive submissive role model. However, these studies omit facts relating to the actual role of the

  18. Mary Poppins and the Soviet Pilgrimage: P.L.Travers's Moscow Excursion (1934

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McNair

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Like the journey it chronicles, Moscow Excursion, P.L.Travers’s account of her 1932 visit to Russia, was in part inspired by the genre it effectively parodies: the ‘Soviet pilgrimage’ ‘truth about Russia’ narrative characteristic of the Stalin decades and exemplified (in the Australian context by Katharine Susannah Prichard’s The Real Russia, also published in 1934. The paper examines the ways in which Travers’s book is written against this genre to produce an avowedly ‘un-political’ record whose narrator rejects the restrictions of organized travel, and whose idiosyncratic and critical observations on Soviet reality contrast with the admiration of her more orthodox fellow-travellers for the usual showcase institutions on the official itinerary. At the same time, it is argued that in its blend of self-deprecating irony, whimsy and disillusioned idealism Moscow Excursion suggests parallels with Travers’s personal quest for ‘the truth’ and even with Mary Poppins, published only two months later.

  19. Tuberculosis infection during Hajj pilgrimage. The risk to pilgrims and their communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Orainey, Ibrahim O

    2013-07-01

    Millions of Muslims travel to Makkah every year to perform Hajj. Many pilgrims come from countries with a high incidence of tuberculosis (TB). Over-crowding, physical exhaustion, heat, and co-morbid conditions of mostly middle-aged and elderly pilgrims make them susceptible to infection, or reactivation of latent TB. Evidence from previous reports indicated a significant risk of acquiring infection during Hajj. Pilgrims infected in Makkah may spread the infection to contacts in their countries. Spread of multi-drug resistant TB is a real concern. Control efforts are required to reduce the risk of infection and transmission. Screening of pilgrims from high burden countries before travel with chest x-ray will help to detect and treat active TB, and prevent infection of others. Low incidence countries may consider carrying out tuberculin skin test or Quanti-FERON TB assay for pilgrims before and after Hajj, to identify and treat recent converters. National and international coordinated efforts are essential for successful implementation of control measures to prevent the spread of the disease.

  20. The Mother and the Son as pilgrims: two models of catholic pilgrimage in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    MAUÉS, Raymundo Heraldo

    2013-01-01

    Duas formas de peregrinação, em duas regiões distintas do Brasil. Em São Paulo, no sudeste brasileiro, em direção à cidade-santuário de Bom Jesus de Pirapora, um "sacerdote particular" imita Cristo ao carregar enorme cruz que afirma pesar mais de cem quilos, em um trajeto de cerca de sessenta quilômetros. Isso é feito também, todos os anos, por muitos outros, homens e mulheres, durante a Semana Santa, partindo de várias cidades da região, embora carreguem cruzes bem menos pesadas. Em Belém do...

  1. Non-pharmaceutical interventions for the prevention of respiratory tract infections during Hajj pilgrimage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkouiten, Samir; Brouqui, Philippe; Gautret, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Overcrowding during the yearly Hajj mass gatherings is associated with increased risk of spreading infectious diseases, particularly respiratory diseases. Non-pharmaceutical interventions (e.g., hand hygiene, wearing face masks, social distancing) are known to reduce the spread of respiratory viruses from person to person and are therefore recommended to pilgrims by public health agencies. The implementation of effective public health policies and recommendations involves evaluating the adherence to and effectiveness of these measures in the specific context of the Hajj. This review summarizes the evidence related to the effectiveness of non-pharmaceutical interventions in preventing the spread of respiratory infectious diseases during the Hajj. Overall, although hand hygiene compliance is high among pilgrims, face mask use and social distancing remain difficult challenges. Data about the effectiveness of these measures at the Hajj are limited, and results are contradictory, highlighting the need for future large-scale studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Peer Bullying During Early Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Hatice UYSAL; Çağlayan DİNÇER

    2012-01-01

    Peer bullying during early childhood is discussed along with the literature reviewed in this article with the purpose of drawing attention to peer bullying during early childhood and its significance, and contributing to studies which are few in number in Turkey. Peer bullying during early childhood was considered with its definition and types, people who play key roles in peer bullying, factors (gender, age, parents, and friendship) that relate to peer bullying, and what should be done befor...

  3. [The early diagnosis of spondyloarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Srdan

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent early symptoms of spondyloarthritides are inflammatory back pain and asymetric peripheral arthritis. Currently the mean delay between the onset of first symptoms and diagnosing ankylosing spondylitis which is the frequent type of spondyloarthritis is over 5 years. The availability of effective therapies makes an early diagnosis mandatory. The clinical symptoms of inflammatory back pain, active inflamation on MR, and positivity for HLA-B27 are the most important parameters for an early diagnosis of spondyloarthritis, especially in combination. Moreover, the combination of clinical and laboratory parameters is necessary for the early diagnosis.

  4. Early onset dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadil, Halim; Borazanci, Aimee; Ait Ben Haddou, Elhachmia; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Korniychuk, Elena; Jaffe, Stephen L; Minagar, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    Dementia is characterized by a decline in cognitive faculties and occurrence of behavioral abnormalities which interfere with an individual's activities of daily living. Dementing disorders usually affect elderly individuals but may occur in individuals younger than 65 years (early-onset dementia or EOD). EOD is often misdiagnosed or its diagnosis is delayed due to the fact that it has a more varied differential diagnosis than late-onset dementia. EOD affects individuals at the height of their career and productivity and produces devastating consequences and financial loss for the patient's family as well as society. EOD is not uncommon and is diagnosed in up to a third of patients presenting with dementia. Most importantly, some of the causes of EOD are curable which makes the need for a specific and timely diagnosis crucial. The present chapter presents a systematic approach to the differential diagnosis of EOD and provides readers with the clinical and neuroimaging features of these disorders as well as important considerations for their diagnostic evaluation. Specifically, the nuances of assessing the history and examination are discussed with careful attention to the various methods of cognitive and behavioral evaluation. A step-wise approach to diagnostic testing is followed by a discussion of anatomical localization, which often aids in identifying specific etiologies. Finally, in order to organize the subject for the reader, the various etiologies are grouped under the general categories of vascular, infectious, toxic-metabolic, immune-mediated, neoplastic/metastatic, and neurodegenerative.

  5. Early diagnosis of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Babic-Erceg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A 25-years old man from Zagreb, Croatia, was admitted to the University Hospital for Infectious Diseases four days after the onset of symptoms such as fever, intense pain in the calves and anuria. The patient owned a rabbit and, before the onset of the disease, repaired some rubber pipes damaged by rodents. At admission, he had a severe clinical picture with fever, hypotension, jaundice, immobility, and pain in leg muscles. Treatment with ceftriaxone was initiated in combination with volume restitution. Renal failure soon ensued. Consequently continuous venovenous hemodiaphiltration therapy was performed. Due to acute respiratory distress syndrome, the patient was mechanically ventilated. The patient’s condition gradually improved and he recovered fully from multi-organ failure. Diagnosis was confirmed by a microscopic agglutination test (MAT covering 15 leptospira serovars and real-time polymerase-chain reaction (PCR. The first serum sample taken on day 6 tested negative for leptospira, while PCR showed positive results for leptospiral DNA. The second serum sample taken on day 13 tested positive for serovar Canicola serogroup Canicola, serovar Patoc, serovar Grippotyphosa serogroup Grippotyphosa and serovar Tarassovi serogroup Tarassovi (titre 4000, 4000, 1000 and 2000, respectively, while PCR was negative. This report highlights the benefits of combining MAT and PCR methods in early diagnosis of leptospirosis.

  6. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Earl R. Berry; Fred Brent; Ming He; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

    2003-09-09

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

  7. Early Repolarization Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Sacher

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiographic pattern of early repolarization (ER is common, with a particularly high prevalence reported amongst athletes and adolescents. It has long been associated with benign outcome [1-3]. Recently, an association between inferolateral ER pattern and sudden cardiac death (SCD has been established by different groups [4-7]. Population-based studies have also reported an increased mortality rate among patients with inferolateral ER pattern compared to controls [7-9]. To bring back together these differences, it is important to focus on the definition of ER pattern used in these different studies as well as the population included. The definition of ER pattern associated with sudden cardiac death was the presence of J point elevation more than or equal to 0.1mV in at least 2 contiguous inferior and/or lateral leads of a standard 12-lead ECG and not ST elevation as it was often the case in the studies with benign outcome. Any study dealing with ER should clearly indicate the definition used. Otherwise it cannot be interpreted. Talking about definition, ER syndrome is an ER pattern (as defined above associated with symptoms (syncope or aborted SCD and/or familial history of SCD as mentioned in the last HRS/EHRA/APHRS Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Inherited Primary Arrhythmia Syndromes [10]. It is important to recognise that having only an ER pattern is not a disease.

  8. Early tetrapod relationships revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruta, Marcello; Coates, Michael I; Quicke, Donald L J

    2003-05-01

    In an attempt to investigate differences between the most widely discussed hypotheses of early tetrapod relationships, we assembled a new data matrix including 90 taxa coded for 319 cranial and postcranial characters. We have incorporated, where possible, original observations of numerous taxa spread throughout the major tetrapod clades. A stem-based (total-group) definition of Tetrapoda is preferred over apomorphy- and node-based (crown-group) definitions. This definition is operational, since it is based on a formal character analysis. A PAUP* search using a recently implemented version of the parsimony ratchet method yields 64 shortest trees. Differences between these trees concern: (1) the internal relationships of aïstopods, the three selected species of which form a trichotomy; (2) the internal relationships of embolomeres, with Archeria crassidisca and Pholiderpeton scut collapsed in a trichotomy with a clade formed by Anthracosaurus russelli and Pholiderpeton attheyi; (3) the internal relationships of derived dissorophoids, with four amphibamid species forming an unresolved node with a clade consisting of micromelerpetontids and branchiosaurids and a clade consisting of albanerpetontids plus basal crown-group lissamphibians; (4) the position of albenerpetontids and Eocaecilia micropoda, which form an unresolved node with a trichotomy subtending Karaurus sharovi, Valdotriton gracilis and Triadobatrachus massinoti; (5) the branching pattern of derived diplocaulid nectrideans, with Batrachiderpeton reticulatum and Diceratosaurus brevirostris collapsed in a trichotomy with a clade formed by Diplocaulus magnicornis and Diploceraspis burkei. The results of the original parsimony run--as well as those retrieved from several other treatments of the data set (e.g. exclusion of postcranial and lower jaw data; character reweighting; reverse weighting)--indicate a deep split of early tetrapods between lissamphibian- and amniote-related taxa. Colosteids, Crassigyrinus

  9. Early onset sebaceous carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaltreider Sara A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular sebaceous carcinoma can masquerade as benign lesions resulting in delay of diagnosis. Early recognition is even more difficult in young patients where the disease rarely occurs. Here, we provide a clinicopathological correlation of ocular sebaceous carcinoma in a young individual lacking history of hereditary cancer or immunosuppression. Findings A detailed histopathological study including p53 DNA sequencing was performed on an aggressive sebaceous carcinoma presenting in a healthy 32 year-old Caucasian woman. She had no history of retinoblastoma, evidence for a hereditary cancer syndrome, or radiation therapy. However, she potentially was at risk for excessive UV light exposure. A detailed review of the literature is also provided. A moderately well differentiated sebaceous carcinoma was established histopathologically arising from the meibomian gland of the upper eyelid. In most areas, the cytoplasm contained small but distinct Oil-red-O positive vacuoles. Direct sequencing of p53 identified a G:C→A:T mutation at a dipyrimidine site. The mutation results in substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine at residue 199 located at the p53 dimer-dimer interface. Energy minimization structural modeling predicts that G199R will neutralize negative charges contributed by nearby inter- and intramonomeric glutamate residues. Discussion This study points to the importance of recognizing that sebaceous carcinoma can occur in young patients with no evidence for hereditary cancer risk or radiation therapy. The G199R substitution is anticipated to alter the stability of the p53 tetrameric complex. The role of UV light in the etiology of sebaceous carcinoma deserves further study. Our findings, taken together with those of others, suggest that different environmental factors could lead to the development of sebaceous carcinoma in different patients.

  10. Early Entrance Coproduction Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

    2004-01-26

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The work performed under Phase II will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

  11. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

    2003-12-16

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The work performed under Phase II will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

  12. Early identification of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nies, Jessica Annemarie Bernadette van

    2016-01-01

    The first part is focused on early recognition of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Two large early arthritis recognition clinics were started in Leiden and Groningen. The results showed that this initiative reduces the GP-delay significantly. Secondly, it was investigated whether an association between

  13. Early Intervention in Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieta, Eduard; Salagre, Estela; Grande, Iria; Carvalho, André F; Fernandes, Brisa S; Berk, Michael; Birmaher, Boris; Tohen, Mauricio; Suppes, Trisha

    2018-01-24

    Bipolar disorder is a recurrent disorder that affects more than 1% of the world population and usually has its onset during youth. Its chronic course is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, making bipolar disorder one of the main causes of disability among young and working-age people. The implementation of early intervention strategies may help to change the outcome of the illness and avert potentially irreversible harm to patients with bipolar disorder, as early phases may be more responsive to treatment and may need less aggressive therapies. Early intervention in bipolar disorder is gaining momentum. Current evidence emerging from longitudinal studies indicates that parental early-onset bipolar disorder is the most consistent risk factor for bipolar disorder. Longitudinal studies also indicate that a full-blown manic episode is often preceded by a variety of prodromal symptoms, particularly subsyndromal manic symptoms, therefore supporting the existence of an at-risk state in bipolar disorder that could be targeted through early intervention. There are also identifiable risk factors that influence the course of bipolar disorder, some of them potentially modifiable. Valid biomarkers or diagnosis tools to help clinicians identify individuals at high risk of conversion to bipolar disorder are still lacking, although there are some promising early results. Pending more solid evidence on the best treatment strategy in early phases of bipolar disorder, physicians should carefully weigh the risks and benefits of each intervention. Further studies will provide the evidence needed to finish shaping the concept of early intervention.

  14. Early determinants of mental health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Räikkönen, Katri; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Roseboom, Tessa J.; Eriksson, Johan G.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental adversities in pre- and early postnatal life may have life-long consequences. Based upon a series of epidemiological and clinical studies and natural experiments, this review describes how the early life environment may affect psychological functions and mental disorders later in life.

  15. Early Childhood Inclusion in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giné, Climent; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Cañadas, Margarita; Paniagua, Gema

    2016-01-01

    This article describes early childhood inclusion in educational settings in Spain. First, we address the legislative framework of preschool education in Spain and offer a brief analysis of some relevant issues, including the current situation of early childhood education and inclusion at this stage. Second, current policies and practices relating…

  16. Early Complications of Heart Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Schnee, Mark

    1987-01-01

    In cyclosporine-treated cardiac allograft recipients, rejection and infection are two principal early complications. The following report describes our approach to the diagnosis and management of rejection. Infectious complications are discussed elsewhere in this journal. Lymphoproliferative disorders have not been reported in our series of transplant recipients. Other early complications particularly related to cyclosporine immuno-suppressive therapy include systemic hypertension, renal insu...

  17. Early experience and brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Johanna; Nelson, Charles A

    2017-01-01

    Healthy brain development takes place within the context of individual experience. Here, we describe how certain early experiences are necessary for typical brain development. We present evidence from multiple studies showing that severe early life neglect leads to alterations in brain development, which compromises emotional, behavioral, and cognitive functioning. We also show how early intervention can reverse some of the deleterious effects of neglect on brain development. We conclude by emphasizing that early interventions that start at the earliest possible point in human development are most likely to support maximal recovery from early adverse experiences. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1387. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1387 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Early diagnosis and early intervention in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijna eHadders-Algra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the opportunities and challenges for early diagnosis and early intervention in cerebral palsy (CP. CP describes a group of disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation, that are attributed to disturbances that occurred in the fetal or infant brain. Therefore the paper starts with a summary of relevant information from developmental neuroscience. Most lesions underlying CP occur in the second half of gestation, when developmental activity in the brain reaches its summit. Variations in timing of the damage not only result in different lesions, but also in different neuroplastic reactions and different associated neuropathologies. This turns CP into a heterogeneous entity. This may mean that the best early diagnostics and the best intervention methods may differ for various subgroups of children with CP. Next, the paper addresses possibilities for early diagnosis. It discusses the predictive value of neuromotor and neurological exams, neuro-imaging techniques and neurophysiological assessments. Prediction is best when complementary techniques are used in longitudinal series. Possibilities for early prediction of CP differ for infants admitted to neonatal intensive care and other infants. In the former group best prediction is achieved with the combination of neuro-imaging and the assessment of general movements, in the latter group best prediction is based on carefully documented milestones and neurological assessment. The last part reviews early intervention in infants developing CP. Most knowledge on early intervention is based on studies in high risk infants without CP. In these infants early intervention programs promote cognitive development until preschool age; motor development profits less. The few studies on early intervention in infants developing CP suggest that programs that stimulate all aspects of infant development by means of family coaching are most promising. More research is

  19. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Storm; Govanon Nongbri; Steve Decanio; Ming He; Lalit Shah; Charles Schrader; Earl Berry; Peter Ricci; Belma Demirel; Charles Benham; Mark Bohn

    2004-01-12

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc., GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I, a design basis for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis section was developed based on limited experience with the specified feed gas and operating conditions. The objective of this Task in Phase II RD&T work was to confirm the performance of the F-T reactor at the set design conditions. Although much of the research, development, and testing work were done by TES outside of this project, several

  20. The 'Eastern Suburbium' proasteion of Sagalassos. A chronological, functional and socio-economic study of an almost uncharted ancient urban phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Claeys, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Sagalassos is an ancient Pisidian city, located on a south-facing mountain slope of the Western Taurus mountains in Southwest Anatolia. The city has been inhabited from Classical to Mid Byzantine times, with Late Hellenistic to Early Byzantine times (2nd century BC until the 7th century AD) representing its most intensive period of occupation. Sagalassos has been the subject of ongoing archaeology-driven research since 1986, first as part of the Pisidia Survey Project and from 1989 onwards as...

  1. The 'Eastern Suburbium' Proasteion of Sagalassos. A chronological, functional and socio-economic Study of an almost uncharted antique urban Phenomenon.:Het ‘Oostelijke Suburbium’ proasteion van Sagalassos. Een chronologische, functionele en socio-economische studie van een bijna onbekend antiek stedelijk fenomeen

    OpenAIRE

    Claeys, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Sagalassos is an ancient Pisidian city, located on a south-facing mountain slope of the Western Taurus mountains in Southwest Anatolia. The city has been inhabited from Classical to Mid Byzantine times, with Late Hellenistic to Early Byzantine times (2nd century BC until the 7th century AD) representing its most intensive period of occupation. Sagalassos has been the subject of ongoing archaeology-driven research since 1986, first as part of the Pisidia Survey Project and from 1989 onwards as...

  2. Early eruption of permanent canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic and local factors can modify the eruption time of teeth. Generalized eruption time changes could be due to some systemic diseases like hyperthyroidism, hypophosphatasia, precocious puberty, Proteus syndrome, etc. Localized early eruption of permanent teeth could be due to early extraction of deciduous teeth. Presented here is an extremely rare case of early eruption of permanent canines in a 7-year old female child. Though the number of such cases is very limited, the clinician should poses adequate knowledge and keeps an open eye to identify such cases.

  3. Early vision and visual attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdenović Vasilije P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The question whether visual perception is spontaneous, sudden or is running through several phases, mediated by higher cognitive processes, was raised ever since the early work of Gestalt psychologists. In the early 1980s, Treisman proposed the feature integration theory of attention (FIT, based on the findings of neuroscience. Soon after publishing her theory a new scientific approach appeared investigating several visual perception phenomena. The most widely researched were the key constructs of FIT, like types of visual search and the role of the attention. The following review describes the main studies of early vision and visual attention.

  4. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Anderson; Mark Anselmo; Earl Berry; Mark Bohn; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit Shah; Donald Todd; Robert Schavey

    2004-01-12

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to its detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC (TES) (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR). The work was under cooperative agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing the gasification technology and the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech Inc., GE is providing the combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing the air separation technology, and KBR is providing overall engineering. Each of the EECP's subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers in Phase I. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified catalyst/wax separation as a potential technical and economic risk. To mitigate risks to the proposed EECP concept, Phase II RD&T included

  5. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; Ming He; James F. Stevens; Centha A. Davis; Michael Henley; Jerome Mayer; Harry Tsang; Jimell Erwin; Jennifer Adams; Michael Tillman; Chris Taylor; Marjan J. Roos; Robert F. Earhart

    2004-01-27

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The potential technical and economic risks to the EECP from Task 2.5 can be mitigated by demonstrating that the end-use products derived from the upgrading of the F-T synthesis total liquid product can meet or exceed current specifications for the

  6. The Use of Slovenian in Education, the Church, and Early Theatre Performances in the 17th Century and the First Half of the 18th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozma Ahačič

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Use of Slovenian in Education, the Church, and Early Theatre Performances in the 17th Century and the First Half of the 18th Century Summary The paper provides a sociolinguistic survey of the use of Slovenian in education, the church, and early theatre performances in the 17th century and the first half of the 18th century. The extant studies and primary sources serve to identify the occasions for, and forms of, its use. The practice of elementary education shows no significant changes between the 16th and 17th centuries; there are, however, some changes at the ideological level. There is no explicit request for elementary education in Slovenian, either in the period of the Catholic reformation or later, while the demand for the use of Slovenian in education is primarily limited to catechesis: in catechesis, however, the emphasis was not on reading texts but on listening and on spoken reproduction. Some sources do suggest the use of Slovenian in elementary education at certain “non-Slovenian” schools, but it was not systematic. The same applies to the Ljubljana Jesuit gymnasium, where the use of Slovenian is likely – especially at the early stages – but lacks immediate evidence. On the other hand, the presence of Slovenian can be proved for the theological seminary adjoining the Ljubljana Cathedral, as well as for the educational centre at Gornji Grad. Moreover, the great number of Jesuit gymnasia significantly improved the general language knowledge in their localities as compared to the previous periods. The use of Slovenian in church was concentrated in preaching. All Slovenian priests were encouraged by the bishops to preach, and there were ecclesiastical orders that particularly fostered this activity. Sources testify to the delivery of Slovenian sermons by the Capuchin Friars, Jesuits, and Franciscans, while the role of Slovenian in the sermons by the Dominicans, Augustinians and Cistercians has received less attention. Of

  7. The evolution of early Foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Jan; Holzmann, Maria; Berney, Cédric; Fahrni, José; Gooday, Andrew J; Cedhagen, Tomas; Habura, Andrea; Bowser, Samuel S

    2003-09-30

    Fossil Foraminifera appear in the Early Cambrian, at about the same time as the first skeletonized metazoans. However, due to the inadequate preservation of early unilocular (single-chambered) foraminiferal tests and difficulties in their identification, the evolution of early foraminifers is poorly understood. By using molecular data from a wide range of extant naked and testate unilocular species, we demonstrate that a large radiation of nonfossilized unilocular Foraminifera preceded the diversification of multilocular lineages during the Carboniferous. Within this radiation, similar test morphologies and wall types developed several times independently. Our findings indicate that the early Foraminifera were an important component of Neoproterozoic protistan community, whose ecological complexity was probably much higher than has been generally accepted.

  8. The early universe and cosmogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukash, V. N.; Mikheeva, E. V.; Strokov, V. N.

    2013-05-01

    We extrapolate the Cosmological Standard Model to the past, determine initial geometrical conditions in the early universe, and consider a new cosmogenesis paradigm based on the concept of black-and-white holes with integrable singularities.

  9. Early rheumatoid arthritis: therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, P

    1994-01-01

    The early stage of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a unique and critical phase of disease which is often characterized by profound inflammation, severe symptomatology and a high likelihood of radiological progression. Decisions on treatment strategies need to be taken before irreversible damage and functional deterioration occur. There is evidence that early intervention with disease-modifying drugs may reduce functional deterioration and improve long-term outcome. Stable genetic markers and rheumatoid factor are useful in predicting disease severity and thus in identifying those patients who require early aggressive therapy. The acute phase response (APR) is a valuable marker of disease activity and catabolism in RA, and suppression of the APR improves outcome. The use of early aggressive therapy to suppress disease efficiently in patients with a poor prognosis should improve the long-term morbidity and mortality associated with RA.

  10. Early onset type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo, A; Thomsen, R W; Nielsen, J S

    2017-01-01

    was more frequent and meeting physical activity recommendations less likely in persons with early-onset type 2 DM. CONCLUSIONS: We found a clear age-gradient, with increasing prevalence of clinical and behavioural risk factors the younger the onset age of type 2 DM. Younger persons with early-onset type 2......AIM: To examine the association between early onset of type 2 diabetes (DM) and clinical and behavioural risk factors for later diabetes complications. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 5115 persons with incident type 2 DM enrolled during 2010-2015 in the Danish Centre for Strategic...... Research in Type 2 Diabetes-cohort. We compared risk factors at time of diagnosis among those diagnosed at ≤45 years (early-onset) with diagnosis age 46-55, 56-65 (average-onset = reference), 66-75, and >75 years (late-onset). Prevalence ratios (PRs) were computed using Poisson regression. RESULTS: Poor...

  11. [Early management of cerebrovascular accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libot, Jérômie; Guillon, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    A cerebrovascular accident requires urgent diagnosis and treatment.The management of a stroke must be early and adapted in order to improve the overall clinical outcome and lower the risk of mortality.

  12. The Diets of Early Hominins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter S. Ungar; Matt Sponheimer

    2011-01-01

    Diet changes are considered key events in human evolution. Most studies of early hominin diets focused on tooth size, shape, and craniomandibular morphology, as well as stone tools and butchered animal bones...

  13. STARDUST NAVCAM EARLY CRUISE IMAGES

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This volume contains the results of the early cruise images of the Stardust Navigation Camera. These images are of no clear scientific or engineering use. They were...

  14. Early Retiree Reinsurance Program Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Early Retiree Reinsurance Program (ERRP) was established by section 1102 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the Affordable Care Act) enacted on...

  15. [Early diagnosis of skin cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolm, Isabell; Hofbauer, Günther; Braun, Ralph P

    2010-09-01

    The skin is the most affected organ by cancer. The incidence rates of skin cancer are steadily increasing, both for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers (squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma). Over 90 % of the death cases from skin cancers attribute to melanoma. Survival from melanoma is strongly related to tumour thickness. Therefore early detection is the most important step to improve prognosis. In the last years a number of new non invasive techniques for the early diagnosis of melanoma have been developed which are superior to the naked eye examination. In this overview article we present some non-invasive diagnostic techniques like total body photography, digital dermoscopy and confocal microscopy which in addition to dermoscopy assist the dermatologist in differentiating nevi from early melanomas.Non-melanoma skin cancer can be prevented by accurate sun protection. Early squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas can be treated either invasively or non-invasively with excellent prognosis.

  16. Early Child Care In France

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Myriam; Lezine, Irene

    1974-01-01

    The present monograph describes in detail the history and current status of early child care in France and discusses it in the contexts of family and cultural realities and attitudes toward children and upbringing. (Ed)

  17. NASA Early Career Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Early Career Fellowship program was established in 2005 to facilitate the integration of outstanding early career planetary science researchers into established research funding programs by providing tools and experience useful to maintain a successful research program. Executing a successful research program requires a few key elements such as: successful proposal writing; adequate (paid) research time; management of a laboratory; collaboration and networking; frequent and high-quality publications; and adequate start-up equipment funds. These elements may be particularly critical for early career researchers searching for a tenure- track or equivalent position. The Early Career Fellowship program recognizes the importance of these skills and provides extra funding and resources to begin a successful research program. For consideration into The Early Career Fellowship program, the candidate needs to be the P. I. or Science P.I. of a funded research proposal from one of the participating R&A program areas, be within 7 years of earning a PhD, hold a non-tenure track position, and indicate the early career candidacy when submitting the research proposal. If the research proposal is funded and the discipline scientist nominates the candidate as an early career fellow, the candidate is then considered a Fellow and eligible to propose for Step 2. Upon obtaining a tenure-track equivalent position the Fellow submits a Step 2 proposal for up to one hundred thousand dollars in start-up funds. Start-up funds may be used for salary; undergraduate and/or graduate research assistants; supplies and instrument upgrades; travel to conferences, meetings, and advisory groups; time and travel for learning new skills; publication page charges; books and journal subscriptions; computer time and/or specialized software; and other justified research-specific needs. The early career fellowship program provides resources that a more established scientist would have acquired allowing

  18. Epigenetics of Early Child Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eMurgatroyd

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive clinical studies show that adverse conditions in early life can severely impact the developing brain and increase vulnerability to mood disorders later in life. During early postnatal life the brain exhibits high plasticity which allows environmental signals to alter the trajectories of rapidly developing circuits. Adversity in early life is able to shape the experience-dependent maturation of stress-regulating pathways underlying emotional functions and endocrine responses to stress, such as the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA system, leading to long-lasting altered stress responsivity during adulthood.To date, the study of gene-environment interactions in the human population has been dominated by epidemiology. However, recent research in the neuroscience field is now advancing clinical studies by addressing specifically the mechanisms by which gene-environment interactions can predispose individuals towards psychopathology. To this end, appropriate animal models are being developed in which early environmental factors can be manipulated in a controlled manner. Here we will review recent studies performed with the common aim of understanding the effects of the early environment in shaping brain development and discuss the newly developing role of epigenetic mechanisms in translating early life conditions into long-lasting changes in gene expression underpinning brain functions. Particularly, we argue that epigenetic mechanisms can mediate the gene-environment dialogue in early life and give rise to persistent epigenetic programming of adult physiology and dysfunction eventually resulting in disease. Understanding how early life experiences can give raise to lasting epigenetic memories conferring increased risk for mental disorders, how they are maintained and how they could be reversed, is increasingly becoming a focus of modern psychiatry and should pave new guidelines for timely therapeutic interventions.

  19. Early Learner Engagement in the Clinical Workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recent calls for medical education reform advocate for the integration of knowledge with clinical experience through early clinical immersion. Yet, early learners rarely are invited to participate in workplace activities and early clinical experiences remain largely observational.

  20. Early childhood intervention : rationale, timing, and efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Orla Doyle; Richard E. Tremblay; Colm Harmon; James J. Heckman

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of the economic rationale for investing in early childhood. It discusses the optimal timing of intervention, with reference to recent work in developmental neuroscience, and asks how early is early? It motivates the need for early intervention by providing an overview of the impact of adverse factors during the antenatal and early childhood period on outcomes later in life. Early childhood interventions, even poorly designed ones, are costly to implement,...

  1. [Early attention to learning disabilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millá, M G

    2006-02-13

    In the early stages of their development, children acquire the skills and knowledge that provide them with the foundations on which they will later add what they learn at school, including skills such as reading, writing and mathematics. The presence of learning difficulties at the infantile stage can affect the development of these academic skills during the period of compulsory schooling. Some children show learning difficulties in their earliest years. Early learning difficulties refer specifically to those problems that occur in the time between birth and the age of six and which reduce the chances of accomplishing the skills and knowledge that are typically acquired during the stage of infancy. There is a correlation between these problems and difficulties linked to cognition, to attention, perception and memory processes, to language skills involving both comprehension and expression, and to visuospatial processing. Their aetiology involves neuropsychological, social and cultural factors, as well as others that derive from the actual learning processes themselves. Following an interdisciplinary model using development scales, psychometric tests and neurodevelopmental monitoring will allow an early diagnosis to be reached. The intervention will be carried out in the medical, social, educational and family areas, and will focus on the aspects that favour maturing, development and the learning of curricular material. The new socio-educational scenario makes it necessary to attend to early learning difficulties in infants' education. Prevention and early attention offer guidelines and strategies to deal with them in a satisfactory manner.

  2. early bolting in short days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Mena, Concepción; Piñeiro, Manuel; Franco-Zorrilla, José M.; Salinas, Julio; Coupland, George; Martínez-Zapater, José M.

    2001-01-01

    The time of flowering in Arabidopsis is controlled by multiple endogenous and environmental signals. Some of these signals promote the onset of flowering, whereas others repress it. We describe here the isolation and characterization of two allelic mutations that cause early flowering and define a new locus, EARLY BOLTING IN SHORT DAYS (EBS). Acceleration of flowering time in the ebs mutants is especially conspicuous under short-day photoperiods and results from a reduction of the adult vegetative phase of the plants. In addition to the early flowering phenotype, ebs mutants show a reduction in seed dormancy, plant size, and fertility. Double mutant analysis with gibberellin-deficient mutants indicates that both the early-flowering and the precocious-germination phenotypes require gibberellin biosynthesis. Analysis of the genetic interactions among ebs and several mutations causing late flowering shows that the ft mutant phenotype is epistatic over the early flowering of ebs mutants, suggesting that the precocious flowering of ebs requires the FT gene product. Finally, the ebs mutation causes an increase in the level of expression of the floral homeotic genes APETALA3 (AP3), PISTILLATA (PI), and AGAMOUS (AG) and partially rescues the mutant floral phenotype of leafy-6 (lfy-6) mutants. These results suggest that EBS participates as a negative regulator in developmental processes such as germination, flowering induction, and flower organ specification. PMID:11340178

  3. Early Literacy and Early Numeracy: The Value of Including Early Literacy Skills in the Prediction of Numeracy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpura, David J.; Hume, Laura E.; Sims, Darcey M.; Lonigan, Cristopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether early literacy skills uniquely predict early numeracy skills development. During the first year of the study, 69 3- to 5-year-old preschoolers were assessed on the Preschool Early Numeracy Skills (PENS) test and the Test of Preschool Early Literacy Skills (TOPEL). Participants were assessed again a…

  4. What is 'early onset dementia'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Koho

    2009-06-01

    There are two types of dementia with early onset: (i) presenile dementias; and (ii) senile dementias with early onset. Most patients who develop dementia before 65 years of age have Alzheimer's disease (AD). The remainder are likely to have vascular dementia (VaD), frontotemporal dementia, head injury, alcohol intoxication, or metabolic disorder. Presenile dementias, caused by frontotemporal lobar degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration, usually occur in patients of presenile and are rarely seen in patients of senile age. Although the factors responsible for the accelerated onset of the illness are not fully known, genetic abnormalities appear to be important in some types of presenile dementia, such as frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17. Conversely, senile dementias such as sporadic AD and VaD commonly occur in patients of senile age. These disorders may also occur in patients of presenile age, although less frequently. Alzheimer's disease was originally classified as a 'presenile dementia'. Since the 1980s, 'senile dementia of Alzheimer type' (SDAT) and 'Alzheimer's disease' have been considered to belong to the same pathological entity and both are now known as 'dementia of Alzheimer's type (DAT)' or merely 'Alzheimer's disease'. Rapid progression of cognitive impairment with neuropsychological syndromes and neurological symptoms has been considered a characteristic of early onset AD. However, recently, neurological symptoms such as spastic paraparesis, seizures, and myoclonic convulsions have been reported to occur infrequently in early onset AD, although language problems and visuospatial dysfunctions are common. There are at least three dominant genes that have been identified in cases of familial Alzheimer's disease with early onset, namely the amyloid precursor gene (APP), and the genes encoding presenilin 1 (PSEN1) and presenilin 2 (PSEN2). Therefore, genetic abnormalities are important

  5. Early intervention as a catalyst for effective early childhood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Early childhood intervention is an essential contributor and catalyst for the development of a culture of positive attitudes towards children with disabilities in a country like Ghana. ... This would provide mutual benefits for children with disabilities, parents and families, educators and professionals and the society at large.

  6. Overdiagnosis in early detection programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidov, Ori; Zelen, Marvin

    2004-10-01

    Overdiagnosis refers to the situation where a screening exam detects a disease that would have otherwise been undetected in a person's lifetime. The disease would have not have been diagnosed because the individual would have died of other causes prior to its clinical onset. Although the probability of overdiagnosis is an important quantity for understanding early detection programs it has not been rigorously studied. We analyze an idealized early detection program and derive the mathematical expression for the probability of overdiagnosis. The results are studied numerically for prostate cancer and applied to a variety of screening schedules. Our investigation indicates that the probability of overdiagnosis is remarkably high.

  7. The Early Origins of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, John N; Marrus, Natasha

    2017-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are neurodevelopmental disorders whose core features of impaired social communication and atypical repetitive behaviors and/or restrictions in range of interests emerge in toddlerhood and carry significant implications at successive stages of development. The ability to reliably identify most cases of the condition far earlier than the average age of diagnosis presents a novel opportunity for early intervention, but the availability of such an intervention is disparate across US communities, and its impact is imperfectly understood. New research may transform the clinical approach to these conditions in early childhood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Shocks in the Early Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Turok, Neil

    2016-09-23

    We point out a surprising consequence of the usually assumed initial conditions for cosmological perturbations. Namely, a spectrum of Gaussian, linear, adiabatic, scalar, growing mode perturbations not only creates acoustic oscillations of the kind observed on very large scales today, it also leads to the production of shocks in the radiation fluid of the very early Universe. Shocks cause departures from local thermal equilibrium as well as create vorticity and gravitational waves. For a scale-invariant spectrum and standard model physics, shocks form for temperatures 1  GeVUniverse as early as 10^{-30}  sec after the big bang.

  9. Early Development Economics Debates Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Alacevich, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Development economics in its early years created the image of a fierce fight between advocates of contrasting theories or approaches- "balanced growth" vs. "unbalanced growth" or "program loans" vs. "project loans." This view has the merit to highlight such conflicts in great detail; yet it fails to take into account the reality of development economics as it was practiced in the field. Th...

  10. Electromigration early resistance increase measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niehof, J.; Flinn, P.A.; Maloney, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    An early resistance change measurement set-up, using an AC bridge technique, has been developed, and measurements have been performed. Large sample-to-sample variations occur. The characteristic time for the resistance change curve is shorter for resistance increase (under current stress) than for

  11. Early Childhood Inclusion in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Yagon, Michal; Aram, Dorit; Margalit, Malka

    2016-01-01

    This article describes conceptual aspects, current policies and practices, and research representing the Israeli perspective regarding early childhood inclusion (ECI) at preschool ages (3-6 years). We review legislative, historical, attitudinal, philosophical, practical, empirical, and cultural issues regarding ECI in Israel. Finally, we focus on…

  12. Suicidal Behavior among Early Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, F. Jill

    There is a great deal of concern about teenage suicide. This study obtained a prevalence rate of suicidal behaviors among non-psychiatric early adolescents (ages 11-16) and investigated personal and family variables that may characterize the young teenagers who report varying degrees of suicidal behavior. A self-report questionnaire was…

  13. Tucson Early Education Psychological Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergan, John R.; And Others

    This report describes the Tucson Early Education Psychological Services (TEEPS) program during its third year of operation. TEEPS is based on the position that the quality of psychological services in the public schools can be increased by establishing educational systems in which the functions of psychology in education are embodied in system…

  14. Physical Education in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, Steve; Sanders, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the incidence and quality of physical activity instruction during early childhood. Although the positive effect of physical activity on the cognitive, social, and physical development of young children is generally acknowledged, there is little emphasis nationally on ensuring appropriate physical educational experiences…

  15. ABCDEs of ICU: Early mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Stephanie L

    2013-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) provides a critical level of care to medically unstable patients. Patients need intensive monitoring and treatment that may require emergency interventions. The vulnerability and complexity of the ICU unintentionally creates an environment that limits and poorly defines the intervention of early mobility in the unstable critically ill patients. The short- and long-term effects of immobility and bed rest increase acute complications, the length of stay in the ICU and hospital, and mortality and morbidity rates. According to current research, instituting early mobility programs can improve patient outcomes. Current research has demonstrated the safety and feasibility of the initiation of early mobility programs in the critically ill. The benefits to patients enhance recovery of functional exercise capacity, weaning outcomes, self-perceived functional status, and muscle force and strength. Consequently, patient's length of stay in the ICU and in hospital decreases and improves health outcomes. The scope of practice for nurses and other health care providers should guide by evidenced-based research to reduce complications and enhance patient outcomes. Further research is necessary to establish and institute policies and protocols on early mobility programs in the ICU to direct patient care. The role of the clinical nurse specialist can contribute by conducting evidence-based research, educating health care providers and patients, and implementing protocols. The hope is to change the culture of the ICU for the better.

  16. The Early Years: Mixing Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2017-01-01

    Engaging children's interest, inspiring active exploration of materials, and fostering cooperation between children and adults is the best way to promote the construction of knowledge. Some popular early childhood activities can be expanded to provide experiences and time for children to build on their prior knowledge. This column discusses…

  17. Early Learning Theories Made Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloglovsky, Miriam; Daly, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Go beyond reading about early learning theories and see what they look like in action in modern programs and teacher practices. With classroom vignettes and colorful photographs, this book makes the works of Jean Piaget, Erik Erikson, Lev Vygotsky, Abraham Maslow, John Dewey, Howard Gardner, and Louise Derman-Sparks visible, accessible, and easier…

  18. Early Children's Literature and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased longevity is a worldwide phenomenon placing emphasis on the need for preparation for life's later years. Today's children will be the older adults of tomorrow. A resource that can help to educate them about aging and prepare them for the long life ahead is early children's literature (Preschool-Primary). This literature can provide…

  19. SEL Interventions in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Megan M.; Tominey, Shauna L.; Schmitt, Sara A.; Duncan, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Young children who enter school without sufficient social and emotional learning (SEL) skills may have a hard time learning. Yet early childhood educators say they do not get enough training to effectively help children develop such skills. In this article, Megan McClelland, Shauna Tominey, Sara Schmitt, and Robert Duncan examine the theory and…

  20. HPLC: Early and Recent Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Barry L.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a perspective on what it was like in the early days of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and several of the key developments. Focuses on the advances in HPLC generally, and more specifically for the biological sciences, that were necessary for the method to reach the preeminent stage of today. Contains 20 references. (JRH)

  1. Defeating cancer with early detection

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A meeting of scientists and industry experts will hold an open review of the Three Dimension Complete Body Screening System (3D-CBS) on the 1st of July 2003. This new imaging technlogy is potentially powerful and safe enough to offer routine screening of healthy patients for early signs of cancer (1 page).

  2. Early identification of communication problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, M; Holloway, K; Roulstone, S

    1994-10-01

    Questions have been raised about the effectiveness of routine early screening of children's speech development. Mary Gale et al describe an innovative package which can be used by health visitors and parents to ensure they correctly identify those children needing referral for specialist intervention.

  3. Early Childhood Intervention in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuzhu; Maude, Susan P.; Brotherson, Mary Jane

    2015-01-01

    With rapid economic development and increasing awareness of the importance of early childhood intervention (ECI), China is re-examining its social and educational practices for young children with disabilities. This re-examination may have a significant impact on young children with disabilities in China. It may also set an example for other…

  4. Early-delayed radiation rhombencephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nightingale, S.; Dawes, P.J.D.K.; Cartlidge, N.E.F. (Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (UK); Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Newcastle General Hospital)

    1982-03-01

    A 37-year-old woman developed an early-delayed rhombencephalopathy 7 weeks after completing a course of radiotherapy to a glomus jugulare tumour. The clinical features, comprising nystagmus, skew strabismus, unilateral facial weakness, dysarthria and ataxia, are compared with four previously reported patients with this syndrome.

  5. Early Signs of Entrepreneurial Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavinina, Larisa V.

    2008-01-01

    Although successful entrepreneurship is important for the economic prosperity of any society, one should acknowledge that entrepreneurial giftedness is terra incognita from a research viewpoint. This article analyzes early manifestations of entrepreneurial giftedness in the cases of Richard Branson, Michael Dell, and Bill Gates and thus opens a…

  6. Uganda Early Generation Seed Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastenbroek, A.; Ntare, Bonny

    2016-01-01

    One of the major bottlenecks limiting farmers’ access to good quality seed for food crops in Uganda is the shortage of early generation seed (EGS - breeder and foundation) to produce sufficient quantities of certified and/or quality declared) to satisfy the needs of farmers. A national study was

  7. Early Childhood Inclusion in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Coral R.

    2016-01-01

    From the introduction of early intervention services in Australian in the mid-1970s, the families of children with intellectual and multiple disabilities have been encouraged to enroll their children in local preschools and childcare centers. Children with disabilities have also accessed a range of alternatives to full inclusion, such as reverse…

  8. [Early career of Michael Sendivogius].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinke, Rafał T

    2012-01-01

    One of the most influential alchemical authors of the early modern period was Michael Sendivogius whose early life is shrouded in mystery. He may be labelled the most famous Polish scientific writer between Copernicus and Marie Skłodowska-Curie, but because of the difficulties involved in researching the biography of any alchemist, there has been relatively little interest in him among Polish historians. The early work of Roman Bugaj (author of the still fundamental monograph) and Włodzimierz Hubicki (who made his research available to the international community) has been continued only by the English-born Zbigniew Szydło and the author of this article. The roots of many legends about Sendivogius were three mid-17th century short biographies, none of which is trustworthy, so it is crucial to verify the received myth and the version constructed in the 1960's and 1970's with primary sources and evidence from the recent "new historiography of alchemy". The present article examines them in the light of newly discovered sources and reinterpretation of the old ones. The genealogy of the Sedzimir family is discussed at length to show that Sendivogius most probably was not its member but only a pretender in order to assume (or prove) the status of a nobleman. Several possible hypotheses about his origins are presented. He is known to have studied at three universities (Leipzig, Vienna and Altdorf) but authors of early panegyrics dedicated to Sendivogius list more universities which he may have attended. The most interesting is that of Cambridge, listed as the first one, because practically no Poles or Czechs went there at the time. Finally, his marriage to Veronica Stiebar, a wealthy widow of a Franconian knightly family, and her interesting family relationships (links to Erasmus, Camerarius, Paracelsus and the original Doctor Faustus) are discussed. The period covered is that before Sendivogius moved to Prague in about 1597, having already been a courtier of Rudolf II

  9. Early lunar geology and geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick-Bethell, Ian

    2009-06-01

    Despite a number of human and robotic missions to the Moon, there are still important unanswered questions about its early evolution, and how it came to be the object we observe today. Here we use observational, experimental, and theoretical techniques to examine three important events that took place early in lunar history and have left a lasting signature. The first event is the formation of the largest basin on the Moon, the South Pole-Aitken Basin. We develop a systematic method to define the previously unknown boundaries of this degraded structure and quantify its gross shape. We also combine a number of remote sensing data sets to constrain the origin of heat producing elements in its interior. The second event we examine is the evolution of the lunar orbit, and the coupling between the Moon's early geophysical properties and the growth of orbital eccentricity. We use analytical models for tidal deformations and orbit evolution to show that the shape of the Moon suggests its early orbit was highly eccentric. However, we are also able to explain the presently high eccentricity entirely by traditional, secular tidal growth while the early Moon was hot. The third event we examine is the magnetization of lunar samples. We perform extensive paleomagnetic measurements of an ancient, deep-seated lunar sample, and determine that a long-lived magnetic field like that of a core dynamo is the most plausible explanation for its magnetic remanence. In sum, the earliest portion of lunar history has been largely obscured by later geologic events, but a great deal can still be learned from this formative epoch. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  10. Early care in children with neurodevelopmental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Ponce-Meza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the importance of early care in child development, guiding a neuropsychological perspective of development. The early care model seeks to refer to the set of interventions aimed at children and their work in conjunction with a multidisciplinary team. It presents recommendations for the implementation of programs that allow early intervention in the early years, so that the process of care for the affected children can be optimized by the different early developmental and learning alterations.

  11. Penatalaksanaan early childhood caries Management of early childhood caries

    OpenAIRE

    Fajriani Fajriani; Hendrastuty Handayani

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood caries (ECC), also known as milk bottle caries is a syndrome of severe tooth decay, occurs in infants and children, is an infectious disease that develops rapidly and lead to health problems in children. This syndrome can be caused by inappropriate use of bottles. Most cases of untreated ECC to children aged 20 months. At this stage many children need serious treatment, because this will result in trauma to both the children and parents. The most common treatment E...

  12. Pompe Disease: Early Diagnosis and Early Treatment Make a Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Hsiu Chien

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease (glycogen storage disease type II or acid maltase deficiency is a lysosomal disorder in which acid α-glucosidase (GAA deficiencies lead to intralysosomal accumulation of glycogen in all tissues; most notably in skeletal muscles. Both the patient's age at the onset of Pompe disease symptoms and the rate of deterioration caused by the disease can vary considerably. In classical infant-onset Pompe disease (IOPD, symptoms start very early in life, and death occurs soon afterward if the disease remains untreated. In later-onset Pompe disease, symptoms are slower to appear, and patients often progress to wheelchair confinement and eventual respiratory failure. A diagnosis can be made by screening for GAA in dried blood samples, followed either by GAA assessment in lymphocytes or in fibroblasts or by the genetic analysis of mutations. Treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with alglucosidase alfa was approved for human use in 2006. In classical IOPD, treatment significantly lengthens survival and improves motor development and cardiac function. The sooner ERT begins, the better are the results. Newborn screening aims to take advantage of different technologies for diagnosing and treating newborns early on and it yields better outcomes. However, newborns diagnosed early and other long-term survivors may encounter fresh problems, making up a new phenotype of IOPD patients. Further modifications of the treatment, such as a decrease in immune responses to ERT, a higher dosage, a better uptake formulation, and gene therapy delivered locally or systemically are being explored.

  13. Famines in Africa: is early warning early enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeeyon Janet Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the second Sahelian famine in 1984–1985, major investments were made to establish Early Warning Systems. These systems help to ensure that timely warnings and vulnerability information are available to decision makers to anticipate and avert food crises. In the recent crisis in the Horn of Africa, alarming levels of acute malnutrition were documented from March 2010, and by August 2010, an impending food crisis was forecast. Despite these measures, the situation remained unrecognised, and further deteriorated causing malnutrition levels to grow in severity and scope. By the time the United Nations officially declared famine on 20 July 2011, and the humanitarian community sluggishly went into response mode, levels of malnutrition and mortality exceeded catastrophic levels. At this time, an estimated 11 million people were in desperate and immediate need for food. With warnings of food crises in the Sahel, South Sudan, and forecast of the drought returning to the Horn, there is an immediate need to institutionalize change in the health response during humanitarian emergencies. Early warning systems are only effective if they trigger an early response.

  14. The Smell of Relics: Authenticating Saintly Bones and the Role of Scent in the Sensory Experience of Medieval Christian Veneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Anthony Brazinski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ''The archaeology of smell is a burgeoning field in recent scholarship. This paper adds to existing literature by investigating the function of smell in relation to relic sales and veneration in medieval Europe, a hitherto understudied area of research. Collating historical texts concerning the translatio of saintly relics in Western Europe and the Byzantine Empire with archaeological sources associated with relic veneration and religious worship (including ampullae, unguentaria, sarcophagi, holy oils, pillow graves, and silk, this paper suggests that (1 smell was used in the medieval world as a means to challenge or confirm a relic’s authenticity, and (2 olfactory liquids that imbued or permeated material objects in the context of worship functioned as a means of focusing attention on relic veneration and were an essential part of the cult and/or pilgrimage experience.

  15. A Study of the Relationship between Early Childhood Program Attributes and Early Childhood Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Novella M.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative correlational study focuses on the relationship between early childhood program attributes and early childhood reading success. Data will be gathered from early childhood sites with grades prekindergarten through second grade in which early childhood program attributes exist and early childhood reading is measured by the…

  16. Early Management and Fluid Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaya Yorgancı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Initial management of severely burned patient is similar with a trauma victim. Determination of airway patency, evaluation of respiration and circulation, early recognition of concomitant trauma has vital importance in burn patients. In the early phase, mortality mainly depends on missed or un-treated severe injuries or pathologies, but not burn injury itself.In patients that have TBSA greater than 15 %, fluid resuscitation should be started. In the first 24 hours, crystalloid solutions should be preferred. .Several formulas can guide fluid resuscitation; however the amount of fluid that is given to the patient should be individualized according to the patient’s need. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 7-10

  17. Robert Abbe: early American brachytherapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, Jesse N

    2012-01-01

    To assess Robert Abbe's career and contributions to brachytherapy, in the context of the work of contemporary European and American investigators. Examination of his lectures and journal articles, as well as contemporaneous newspaper accounts, textbooks, and archival material. Although not the first American to apply radium therapeutically, Robert Abbe was among the earliest to acquire and systematically use a clinically significant quantity. He replicated early European experimental and clinical work, and published a large series of cases treated with generally favorable results. Abbe was the first American to emphasize the role of radiobiology in optimizing therapeutic ratio. His eloquence and stature helped legitimize the new therapeutic modality. Robert Abbe was probably the nation's most influential early brachytherapist. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nanotechnology for Early Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Won Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vast numbers of studies and developments in the nanotechnology area have been conducted and many nanomaterials have been utilized to detect cancers at early stages. Nanomaterials have unique physical, optical and electrical properties that have proven to be very useful in sensing. Quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, gold nanowires and many other materials have been developed over the years, alongside the discovery of a wide range of biomarkers to lower the detection limit of cancer biomarkers. Proteins, antibody fragments, DNA fragments, and RNA fragments are the base of cancer biomarkers and have been used as targets in cancer detection and monitoring. It is highly anticipated that in the near future, we might be able to detect cancer at a very early stage, providing a much higher chance of treatment.

  19. Early intervention services in psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csillag, Claudio; Nordentoft, Merete; Mizuno, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Early intervention (EI) in psychosis is a comprehensive and evidence-based approach aimed at detection and treatment of psychotic symptoms in their early stages. This paper presents core features and noteworthy aspects of the evidence basis and limitations of EI, the importance of programme ....... Wider dissemination of EI services will probably benefit from better integration of potential funders, promotion of joint targets and shared financial or budgetary incentives....... overcome these difficulties. CONCLUSIONS: Funding for mental health in general and for EI services appears low relative to need. One key argument for better funding for EI can be found in its favourable cost-effectiveness, but not all stakeholders beyond mental health administrators are aware of this...

  20. Early stages of Ostwald ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneidman, Vitaly A

    2013-07-01

    The Becker-Döring (BD) nucleation equation is known to predict a narrow double-exponential front (DEF) in the distribution of growing particles over sizes, which is due to early transient effects. When mass conservation is included, nucleation is eventually exhausted while independent growth is replaced by ripening. Despite the enormous difference in the associated time scales, and the resulting demand on numerics, within the generalized BD model the early DEF is shown to be crucial for the selection of the unique self-similar Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner asymptotic regime. Being preserved till the latest stages of growth, the DEF provides a universal part of the initial conditions for the ripening problem, regardless of the mass exchange mechanism between the nucleus and the matrix.

  1. Болгаро-византийское навершие рукояти сабли с территории Северо-Восточного Причерноморья / A Bulgarian-Byzantine saber pommel from the northeast Black Sea region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Баранов Г.В. / Baranov G.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available В статье рассматривается новая находка сабли с территории Северо-Восточного Причерноморья и вводится в научный оборот нехарактерный для данного региона тип навершия рукояти, известный до сих пор только по памятникам Болгарии и Чехии. Новая находка расширяет область распространения таких наверший и позволяет предположить их византийское происхождение. / This article regards a recently found saber from the north-east Black Sea region and introduces a new uncharacteristic type of pommel ending which was previously only known from artefacts from Bulgaria and the Czech Republic. The new discovery allows to extend the area of occurence of such pommel endings and to assume their Byzantine origin.

  2. Early BHs: simulations and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, Nico; di-Matteo, Tiziana; Schawinski, Kevin; Fragos, Tassos

    We report recent investigations in the field of Early Black Holes. We summarize recent theoretical and observational efforts to understand how Black Holes formed and eventually evolved into Super Massive Black Holes at high-z. This paper makes use of state of the art computer simulations and multiwavelength surveys. Although non conclusive, we present results and hypothesis that pose exciting challenges to modern astrophysics and to future facilities.

  3. Markers of Early Vascular Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsis, Vasilios; Antza, Christina; Doundoulakis, Ioannis; Stabouli, Stella

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular damage is clinically manifested as coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke and peripheral artery disease. The prevalence of these adverse conditions is higher with advancing age. Although many patients present cardiovascular damage late in their life, it is common to see patients with early atherosclerosis in cardiovascular intensive care units at ages lower than 50 years in men and 55 for women. In this review of the literature we identified risk factors of early vascular damage. The classic risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, smoking, alcohol, hypertension, obesity, family history and newer biomarkers such as hs-CRP, folic acid, homocysteine, fibrinogen are neither strong nor predictive of the individual patient's risk to present early cardiovascular disease. All these risk factors have been used to propose risk scores for possible future events but we still lack a single strong marker indicating new onset of disease that will predict the future independently of the classical factors. The role of vascular imaging techniques to identify patients with subclinical atherosclerotic vascular damage before clinical disease, including the effect of known and unknown risk factors on the vascular tree, seems to be very important for intensifying preventive measures in high risk patients. Early arteriosclerosis measured from pulse wave velocity is associated with reduced arterial elasticity and is associated with future cardiovascular events. Vascular measurements may better represent the continuum of cardiovascular disease from a young healthy to an aged diseased vessel that is going to produce adverse clinical events. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Στρατός και κοινωνία στο ύστερο Βυζάντιο: το μεταρρυθμιστικό πρόγραμμα του Γεωργίου Πλήθωνα Γεμιστού

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eυστρατία ΣΥΓΚΕΛΛΟΥ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Army and Society in Late Byzantium: the reform program of George Plethon Gemistos     In the early 15th century the Byzantine state was surrounded by the Ottomans, whereas the Peloponnese was the last defensive stronghold of the Byzantines in the Greek area. There, the need of defense became a major social issue and provided matter for discussion about the institutional and social function of the army. Plethon’ s proposals for the establishment of local professional army, as formulated in his  texts addressed to the emperor Manuel II Palaeologus and the despot Theodore are associated with the social and economic reformation of the region and reflect the general need for the political reorganization of the Byzantine Empire. This paper examines Gemistos’ reform program regarding the military and political-economic conditions of the era. The thoughts of the philosopher of Mystras on the Byzantine army, which have occupied scientific research from time to time, re-evaluated in order to emphasize the role of the army in the society of the late Byzantine period. The latter remains as powerful as necessary in the contest of a revived Byzantine state.    

  5. Prevention of early childhood caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A I

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods used for the prevention of early childhood caries (ECC). The education of mothers or caregivers to promote healthy dietary habits in infants has been the main strategy used for the prevention of ECC. This review found that education has a modest impact on the development of ECC. While education should be promoted especially in high risk communities and population groups (low-income families and native populations), it should not be the only preventive strategy of ECC. Early screening for signs of caries development, starting from the first year of life, could identify infants and toddlers who are at risk of developing ECC and assist in providing information to parents about how to promote oral health and prevent the development of tooth decay. High risk children include those with early signs of ECC, poor oral hygiene, limited exposure to fluorides, and frequent exposure to sugary snacks and drinks. These children should be targeted with a professional preventive program that includes fluoride varnish application, fluoridated dentifrices, fluoride supplements, sealants, diet counseling, and chlorhexidine. Prevention of ECC also requires addressing the social and economic factors that face many families where ECC is endemic.

  6. Early science results from SOFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Erick T.; Herter, Terry L.; Güsten, Rolf; Dunham, Edward W.; Becklin, Eric E.; Marcum, Pamela M.; Krabbe, Alfred; Andersson, B.-G.; Reach, William T.; Zinnecker, Hans

    2012-09-01

    SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is an airborne observatory with a 2.7-m telescope that is under development by NASA and the German Aerospace Center DLR. From late 2010 and through the end of 2011, SOFIA conducted a series of science demonstration flights, Early Science, using FORCAST (the Faint Object InfraRed Camera for the SOFIA Telescope), HIPO (the High-speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations), and GREAT (the German REceiver for Astronomy at Terahertz frequencies). Flying at altitudes as high as 13.7 km (45,000 ft), SOFIA operates above more than 99.8% of the water vapor in the Earth’s atmosphere, opening up most of the far-infrared and sub-millimeter parts of the spectrum. During Early Science, 30 science missions were flown with results in solar system astronomy, star formation, the interstellar medium, the Galactic Center, and extragalactic studies. Many of these investigations were conducted by the first group of SOFIA General Investigators, demonstrating the operation of SOFIA as a facility for the astronomical community. This paper presents some recent highlights from Early Science.

  7. Early pregnancy wastage: ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Mori, Maurizio; Ford, Norman; Grudzinskas, Gedis

    2011-06-01

    Information on early embryo wastage is relevant for debating the status of human embryos. Two main points of view confront each other. Theists hold that human embryos should be treated as human persons from the moment of conception because, even accepting that human beings are the fruit of evolution, they are part of a divine project. Without a developmental event prior to which the human embryo could not be considered a human being, embryos should be regarded as if they were human subjects. After all, if one believes in the resurrection of the dead, it makes no difference at what stage one's life ends. Secularists oppose the idea of granting absolute value to human life from its beginning because early human embryos lack individuality and sentience. Personifying embryos is morally absurd because it would mean that countless human beings never had even the slightest chance to express their potential and, in the light of this catastrophic loss, one would expect early pregnancy wastage to have become an important research priority; this is not the case. In practical terms, most Western countries have legalized first-trimester abortion, de facto giving embryos a lower status than that of full person. Copyright © 2011 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxygen and Early Animal Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, S.

    2012-12-01

    It is often hypothesized that the rise of animals was triggered by an increase in O2 levels in the atmosphere and oceans. However, this hypothesis is remarkably difficult to test, because the timing of animal divergences is poorly resolved, the physiology of early animals is often unknown, estimates of past pO2 levels come with large error bars, and causal relationships between oxygenation and animal evolution are difficult to establish. Nonetheless, existing phylogenetic, paleontological, and geochemical data indicate that the evolution of macroscopic animals and motile macrometazoans with energetically expensive lifestyles may be temporally coupled with ocean oxygenation events in the Ediacaran Period. Thus, it is plausible that ocean oxygenation may have been a limiting factor in the early evolution of macroscopic, complex, and metabolically aggressive animals (particularly bilaterian animals). However, ocean oxygenation and animal evolution were likely engaged in two-way interactions: Ediacaran oxygenation may have initially lifted a physiological barrier for the evolution of animal size, motility, and active lifestyles, but subsequent animal diversification in the Paleozoic may have also changed oceanic redox structures. Viewed in a broader context, the early evolutionary history of animals was contingent upon a series of events, including genetic preparation (developmental genetics), environmental facilitation (oceanic oxygenation), and ecological escalation (Cambrian explosion), but the rise of animals to ecological importance also had important geobiological impacts on oceanic redox structures, sedimentary fabrics, and global geochemical cycles.

  9. Turystyka religijna do sanktuarium Matki Boskiej Kodeńskiej

    OpenAIRE

    Jażdżewska, Iwona; Wasiluk, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    The image of Our Lady of Kodeń has been worshiped by the inhabitants, who were touched by numerous graced as early as the 12th century. Owing to that, it was crowned by pope Clement XI in 1723. For over 300 years, pilgrims have travelled to Kodeń, and the pilgrimage traffic continues. The purpose of this article is to show the spatial extent of the impact of the sanctuary at the beginning of the 21st century through a study of pilgrimages and a presentation of the pilgrims. It ...

  10. Supporting Families through Early Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy McConkey

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Internationally early intervention programmes for infants and preschoolers with disabilities have proved to be remarkably successful. In many countries, they began with teachers for visually impaired or hearing impaired children visiting the family home to teach parents how they could overcome the child's impairments. The logic of early intervention was inequitable. For example, the sooner children with visual impairments learnt to be independently mobile, then the greater their potential to learn and to kad an ordinary life. In time, this philosophy was extended to children with neurological and developmental delays, such as mental retardation, although success could be variable. In part, many different factors contributed to this variability: the form the interventions took, the extent of family involvement in the intervention and the lack of sensitivity of the measures used to assess a child's progress, to name but three. Perhaps the most extensive and intensive Early intervention schemes have been in the United States with their Head Start programmes. They were aimed at promoting the educational potential of preschoolers from deprived socio - economic backgrounds. Although the first phase of programmes had varying success, those in the second phase yielded impressive results which were mainly attributed to a greater focus on parental participation and links forged with the school system. Recently in developing countries, priority has been given to establishing early intervention as a means of creating new styles of family-based and community-based service in these countries in contrast to the hospital or institutional-services that were a legacy from a previous generation. Although formal evaluations are largely lacking, informal reports have been broadly enthusiastic. In sum, early intervention is no longer a new approach to developmental disabilities. It is an approach of proven effectiveness with children who have different impairments

  11. Early Childhood Special Education and Early Intervention Personnel Preparation Standards of the Division for Early Childhood: Field Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Deborah C.; Gallagher, Peggy A.; Stayton, Vicki D.; Dinnebeil, Laurie A.; Lifter, Karin; Chandler, Lynette K.; Christensen, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Results of the field validation survey of the revised initial and new advanced Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) Division for Early Childhood (DEC) early childhood special education (ECSE)/early intervention (EI) personnel standards are presented. Personnel standards are used as part of educational accountability systems and in teacher…

  12. Early rehabilitation and participation in focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Hanne; Buhl, Inge; Roenn-Smidt, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Early neurorehabilitation is an interdisciplinary field. Thus, in order to eliminate unnecessary barriers for individuals with severe acquired brain injury in early rehabilitation, we need rehabilitation science that supports both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Participation can...

  13. Early rehabilitation and participation in focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Hanne; Buhl, Inge; Roenn-Smidt, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Early neurorehabilitation is an interdisciplinary field. Thus, in order to eliminate unnecessary barriers for individuals with severe acquired brain injury in early rehabilitation, we need rehabilitation science that supports both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Participation can b...

  14. International research in early childhood education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2010-01-01

    "The journal of International Research in Early Childhood Education (IRECE) is an electronic peer-reviewed journal designed to provide an international forum for scholarship and research within the field of early childhood education...

  15. Early vocabulary inventory for Mandarin Chinese

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hao, Meiling; Shu, Hua; Xing, Ailing; Li, Ping

    2008-01-01

    .... However, there have been no published CDI norms for Mandarin Chinese. Given the importance of large-scale comparative data sets for understanding the early childhood lexicon, we have developed an early vocabulary inventory for Mandarin...

  16. Early Parkinson's May Prompt Vision Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167131.html Early Parkinson's May Prompt Vision Problems Changes in sight could ... in vision may be an early sign of Parkinson's disease, researchers report. The neurodegenerative condition is caused ...

  17. Early detection of first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor K; Melle, Ingrid; Auestad, Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Early intervention is assumed to improve outcome in first-episode psychosis, but this has not been proven.......Early intervention is assumed to improve outcome in first-episode psychosis, but this has not been proven....

  18. Genetics Home Reference: early-onset glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Early-onset glaucoma Early-onset glaucoma Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Glaucoma is a group of eye disorders in which ...

  19. Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skinner, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early...

  20. Perceived Stress and Canadian Early Childcare Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Shannon L.; Forer, Barry; Cepeda, Ivan L.; Goelman, Hillel; Maggi, Stefania; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Wessel, Julie; Hertzman, Clyde; Grunau, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Occupational stress for early childcare educators is an area of apparent understudy in the literature. The present study attempted to address this gap and provide some updated data regarding the experiences of this occupational group. Methods: Early childhood workers across a variety of early childhood education settings (N = 69)…

  1. Strategies for Supporting Early Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Lindsay R.; Horn, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The development of early literacy skills is critical to children's later success in reading and reading-related activities; therefore, understanding how teachers can support early literacy development is equally important. In this article, the authors provide information on how early childhood teachers can use specific strategies and techniques as…

  2. Teen Parents in Early Childhood Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfmacher, Jon

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews five large national studies that include significant findings about the effects of early care and intervention on the children of teens. Five large-scale, national early childhood intervention research trials have included teen parents: Early Head Start, Nurse Family Partnership, Parents as Teachers, Healthy Start/Healthy…

  3. Leadership in Early Childhood Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Samita Berry

    2013-01-01

    With the demands of high quality early childhood special education programs within public school settings, there is a need to place emphasis on research and training regarding early childhood leaders and managers in this complex and diverse field. The focus of this research is to examine what early childhood special education (ECSE) leadership…

  4. Ethics dilemmas of early detection of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Signild

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To discuss the ethics dilemmas of the early detection of overweight and obesity. Methods: Analysis of the ethical aspects of early detection. Results: The early detection of overweight and obesity entails a number of ethical dilemmas because it may both be helpful and harmful. It may help...

  5. Early Learning and Educational Technology Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing the growth of technology use in early learning settings, the U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services collaborated in the development of the "Early Learning and Educational Technology Policy Brief" to promote developmentally appropriate use of technology in homes and early learning…

  6. Alcoholism in College: Early Case Finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benforado, Joseph M.

    1982-01-01

    Problem drinking occurs on college campuses. Attempts at early case finding by health professionals may prove valuable as a form of secondary prevention of a potentially serious illness, alcoholism. Early awareness of alcohol-related problems can lead to early referral for diagnosis and treatment. (CJ)

  7. Supporting Mathematical Development in the Early Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Linda

    2006-01-01

    This book provides practical guidance for parents, teachers, and other early years workers who want to give children a good start in mathematical development. Showing how competent children are as mathematicians from an early age, the book offers an overview of young children's mathematical behaviour at home and in early years settings. This book…

  8. Ideology and the rise of early states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijl, A.H.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Professor Carneiro is a distinguished American scholar who made a seminal contribution to the debate about the rise of the early state. As early as in 1970, he published a landmark paper in the authoritative journal Science on the circumscription theory about the emergence of the (early) state. This

  9. Early infection and prognosis after acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Reith, J

    2001-01-01

    Infection is a frequent complication in the early course of acute stroke and may adversely affect stroke outcome. In the present study, we investigate early infection developing in patients within 3 days of admission to the hospital and its independent relation to recovery and stroke outcome....... In addition, we identify predictors for early infections, infection subtypes, and their relation to initial stroke severity....

  10. Early Childhood Inclusion in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    A policy-to-practice paper is presented of early childhood inclusion in England. The article aims to report the benefits of early intervention services and early childhood inclusion for children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), document the chronology of policy development, and discuss research evidence about…

  11. Early Smoking, Education, and Labor Market Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palali, Ali

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of early smoking on educational attainment and labor market performance. The results show that early smoking adversely affects educational attainment and initial labor market performance, but only for males. The effect of early smoking on initial labor market

  12. The Environment of Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Yo

    2013-12-01

    A hydrologic routing model was applied to the Noachian cratered highlands to establish the climatic conditions required to maintain lakes and valley networks on early Mars. We used the ratio of precipitation and evaporation (the X-ratio) to express climatic conditions. Simulations were conducted using various X-ratios. The results from the lake analysis showed that many of the lakes that were not identified as overflowing probably overflowed as well. Because overflowing lakes can place constrain on possible climatic condition of early Mars, it is essential to identify as many overflowing craters as possible to understand the environment of early Mars. The multiple regression analyses indicate that incision depth is strongly influenced by gradient and weakly related to discharge. The factors determining incision depend partly on the type of channel bed. However, post-flow modification of the valleys precludes direct determination of bed morphology. We found through both lake and incision depth analysis that climatic conditions on early Mars were at least as moist as those that occurred in the Great Basin region during the Pleistocene (X ≤ 4). We also report on two studies motivated by the occurrence of sinuous paleochannels on Mars. Unconfined meanders require cohesive channel banks, which is obtained commonly by a vegetation cover coupled with high suspended sediment load. The Quinn River, Nevada is a sinuous channel that flows through lacustrine sediments resulting in the river having both bed and banks composed of sediment containing at least 40% mud. In addition, ion chromatography data and SEM images indicate the presence of high solute concentrations. In the absence of vegetation, bank cohesion is provided by mud with salts aiding flocculation and possibly providing additional cohesion through cementation. A 1D depth-averaged linearized meander evolution model was calibrated using the field data collected at the Quinn River. Both approaches gave similar

  13. Excess Early Mortality in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Nordentoft, Merete; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is often referred to as one of the most severe mental disorders, primarily because of the very high mortality rates of those with the disorder. This article reviews the literature on excess early mortality in persons with schizophrenia and suggests reasons for the high mortality...... as well as possible ways to reduce it. Persons with schizophrenia have an exceptionally short life expectancy. High mortality is found in all age groups, resulting in a life expectancy of approximately 20 years below that of the general population. Evidence suggests that persons with schizophrenia may...

  14. Early detection of congenital syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagalakshmi Chowdhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Late congenital syphilis is a very rare clinical entity, and its early diagnosis and treatment is essential. Dental findings often provide valuable evidence for the diagnosis of late congenital syphilis. It occurs due to the transmission of the disease from an infected mother to her fetus through placenta. This long forgotten disease continues to effect pregnant women resulting in perinatal morbidity and mortality. Congenital syphilis is a preventable disease, and its presence reflects a failure of prenatal care delivery system, as well as syphilis control programs. We are reporting a case of late congenital syphilis with only Hutchinson′s teeth.

  15. Early detection of congenital syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Nagalakshmi; Rani, Bs Kavya; Mukunda, K S; Kiran, N K

    2014-01-01

    Late congenital syphilis is a very rare clinical entity, and its early diagnosis and treatment is essential. Dental findings often provide valuable evidence for the diagnosis of late congenital syphilis. It occurs due to the transmission of the disease from an infected mother to her fetus through placenta. This long forgotten disease continues to effect pregnant women resulting in perinatal morbidity and mortality. Congenital syphilis is a preventable disease, and its presence reflects a failure of prenatal care delivery system, as well as syphilis control programs. We are reporting a case of late congenital syphilis with only Hutchinson's teeth.

  16. Selectivity in early prosocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmeier, Valerie A; Dunfield, Kristen A; O'Neill, Amy C

    2014-01-01

    Prosocial behavior requires expenditure of personal resources for the benefit of others, a fact that creates a "problem" when considering the evolution of prosociality. Models that address this problem have been developed, with emphasis typically placed on reciprocity. One model considers the advantages of being selective in terms of one's allocation of prosocial behavior so as to improve the chance that one will be benefitted in return. In this review paper, we first summarize this "partner choice" model and then focus on prosocial development in the preschool years, where we make the case for selective partner choice in early instances of human prosocial behavior.

  17. Early prosocial development across cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Tara; Corbit, John

    2017-08-17

    Human prosociality is ubiquitous, even though it may be manifested differently across cultures. Low cost helping and sharing emerge early in development, and at similar levels, across cultures having vastly different sociocultural niches. Developmental trajectories for costly sharing diverge across cultures around middle childhood, in line with differences in the sociocultural niches that children experience. Cultural developmental research has focussed primarily on the emergence and development of prosocial behaviour, and would benefit from an examination of the interplay between psychological (cognitive, motivational) and sociocultural (norms, developmental niche) foundations over ontogeny. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Selectivity in Early Prosocial Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie eKuhlmeier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Prosocial behavior requires expenditure of personal resources for the benefit of others, a fact that creates a ‘problem’ when considering the evolution of prosociality. Models that address this problem have been developed, with emphasis typically placed on reciprocity. One model considers the advantages of being selective in terms of one’s allocation of prosocial behavior so as to improve the chance that one will be benefitted in return. In this review paper, we first summarize this partner choice model and then focus on prosocial development in the preschool years, where we make the case for selective partner choice in early instances of human prosocial behavior.

  19. A Case of Early Neurosyphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M; Wisler, R; Simmons, J; Johnson, A

    2017-01-01

    Neurosyphilis is an infection of the central nervous system by Treponema pallidum, which can occur after the initial syphilis infection. Although commonly associated with late stage disease, patients with early neurosyphilis may present with acute syphilitic meningitis, meningovascular syphilis, or uveitis. A 28 year old man with a past medical history of HIV (CD4 364);, and recent diagnosis of uveitis presented to the Emergency Department with a positive RPR result. His visual acuity had been gradually declining over the past few months. He denied painless or painful ulcerating lesions on his penis, or scrotum, difficulty concentrating, dermatitis on the soles/palms, or difficulty with proprioception. Physical exam was notable for atrophic hyperpigmented polycyclic, annular plaques and patches along the hairline as well as several areas of confluent hyperpigmented polycyclic plaques and nodules on the patient's face, back, left arm, and right posterior leg. Fundoscopic exam revealed bilateral posterior uveitis and chorioretinitis. Evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid revealed a lymphocytic pleocytosis with a positive VDRL and FTA-ABS. Aqueous crystalline penicillin G was initiated for treatment of early neurosyphilis. Within six hours of beginning the infusion, the patient had a documented temperature of 101.8°F, heart rate of 128 beats per minute, blood pressure 142/84, with generalized malaise and headache. Fever and tachycardia resolved over the next 12 hours, with weakness and headache resolving within 1-2 days. His symptom complex was consistent with the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction. Histopathology of skin biopsy of the back showed perivascular inflammation and rare spirochetes, consistent with secondary syphilis. The patient completed 14 days of aqueous crystalline penicillin G and was discharged after receiving the first of three benzathine penicillin injections. The initial manifestations of syphilis in this patient were posterior uveitis and pruritic skin

  20. Early Events of DNA Photodamage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a leading external hazard to the integrity of DNA. Exposure to UV radiation triggers a cascade of chemical reactions, and many molecular products (photolesions) have been isolated that are potentially dangerous for the cellular system. The early steps that take place after UV absorption by DNA have been studied by ultrafast spectroscopy. The review focuses on the evolution of excited electronic states, the formation of photolesions, and processes suppressing their formation. Emphasis is placed on lesions involving two thymine bases, such as the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, the (6-4) lesion, and its Dewar valence isomer.

  1. How Love for the Image Cast out Fear of It in Early Christianity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Carnes

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Iconoclastic and iconophilic impulses have long vied for pre-eminence in Christianity, coming to one particularly fraught crisis point in the Byzantine Iconomachy of the eighth and ninth centuries. Funding both impulses, this paper argues, is a profound Platonic ambivalence about the image. For Plato, the image not only deceives and enslaves; it also reveals and inspires. Plotinus, Gregory of Nyssa, Augustine, John of Damascus, and Theodore of Stoudios articulate their own iterations of Plato’s hopes and fears about the image as they attempt different strategies for resolving these dueling inclinations. This paper traces the evolution of image theory across these thinkers to illumine how Theodore of Stoudios’ approach magnifies Platonic image hopes and quells fears in a way that prepares for the ongoing resolution of image anxiety in the iconographic tradition. More than a purely historical interest, this arc of image thought have continuing relevance for image theory today.

  2. [Early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belics, Zoran; Gérecz, Balázs; Csákány, M György

    2014-07-20

    Ectopic pregnancy is a high-risk condition that occurs in 2% of reported pregnancies. This percentage is fivefold higher than that registered in the 1970s. Since 1970 there has been a two-fold increase in the ratio of ectopic pregnancies to all reported pregnancies in Hungary and in 2012 7.4 ectopic pregnancies per thousand registered pregnancies were reported. Recently, the majority (80%) of cases can be diagnosed in early stage, and the related mortality objectively decreased in the past few decades to 3.8/10,000 ectopic pregnancies. If a woman with positive pregnancy test has abdominal pain and/or vaginal bleeding the physician should perform a work-up to safely exclude the possibility of ectopic pregnancy. The basis of diagnosis is ultrasonography, especially vaginal ultrasound examination and measurement of the β-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin. The ultrasound diagnosis is based on the visualization of an ectopic mass rather than the inability to visualize an intrauterine pregnancy. In some questionable cases the diagnostic uterine curettage or laparoscopy may be useful. The actuality of this topic is justified by practical difficulties in obtaining correct diagnosis, especially in the early gestational time.

  3. Early history of scapular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoníček, Jan; Kozánek, Michal; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2016-01-01

    The first to use the term Scapula was Vesalius (1514-1564) and thus it has remained ever since. Probably the oldest injured scapula, from 250 million years ago, was described by Chinese authors of a skeletal examination of a fossilised remains of a dinosaur Yangchuanosaurus hepingensis. In humans, the oldest known scapular fractures date back to the prehistoric and early historic times. In ancient times, a fracture of acromion was described in the treatises of Hippocrates. Early modern history of the treatment of scapular fractures is closely interlinked with the history of the French surgery. The first to point out the existence of these fractures were Petit, Du Verney and Desault in the 18th century. The first study devoted solely to scapular fractures was published by Traugott Karl August Vogt in 1799. Thomas Callaway published in 1849 an extensive dissertation on injuries to the shoulder girdle, in which he discussed a number of cases known at that time. The first radiograph of a scapular fracture was published by Petty in 1907. Mayo Robson (1884), Lambotte (1913) and Lane (1914) were pioneers in the surgical treatment of these fractures, followed in 1923 by the French surgeons Lenormat, Dujarrier and Basset. The first internal fixation of the glenoid fossa, including a radiograph, was published by Fischer in 1939.

  4. Early Soil Moisture Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, T.

    2008-12-01

    Before the large scale field experiments described in the call for papers, there were a number of experiments devoted to a single parameter, e.g. soil moisture. In the early 1970's, before the launch of the first microwave radiometer by NASA, there were a number of aircraft experiments to determine utility of these sensors for land observations. For soil moisture, these experiments were conducted in southwestern United States over irrigated agricultural areas which could provide a wide range of moisture conditions on a given day. The radiometers covered the wavelength range from 0.8 to 21 cm. These experiments demonstrated that it is possible to observe soil moisture variations remotely using a microwave radiometer with a sensitivity of about 3 K / unit of soil moisture. The results also showed that the longer wavelengths were better, with a radiometer at the 21 cm wavelength giving the best results. These positive results led to the development of Push Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) and the Electrically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instruments at the 21-cm wavelength. They have been used extensively in the large-scale experiments such as HAPEX-MOBILHY, FIFE, Monsoon90, SMEX, etc. The multi-beam nature of these instruments makes it possible to obtain more extensive coverage and thus to map spatial variations of surface soil moisture. Examples of the early results along with the more recent soil moisture maps will be presented.

  5. Iron in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, K. L.; Hill, G. J.; Elston, R.

    1994-12-01

    New observations of iron emission in high redshift QSOs indicate significant heavy element synthesis at very early epochs. We have identified Fe II emission near the Mg II lambda2798 broad emission line in 3 QSOs with z ~ 4.5, using near-infrared spectroscopy at KPNO and CTIO. Since iron is thought to be produced primarily in supernovae type Ia, which take about 1 Gyr to begin enrichment of the ISM, strong constraints can be put on cosmological parameters if we require SN Ia as the source of iron. Our previous observations have indicated strong optical Fe II in QSOs with redshifts up to z = 3.4, which begins to put constraints on cosmological models since the combination of H_o = 100 km/s/Mpc and q_o = 0.5 gives an age of ~ 0.7 Gyr at that redshift. Significant iron at a redshift of 4.5 is inconsistent with any H_o textstyle > ~ 50 if q_o = 0.5, and limits q_o <= 0.15 for the more popular value of H_o = 85. Further analysis and observations of these high redshift QSOs should address the issue of the source of the iron, since SN Ia and the much faster-evolving SN II synthesize elements with very different ratios. In any event, the early and rapid star formation required to produce the large abundance of iron supports the notion that luminous QSOs are hosted by massive galaxies.

  6. Mechanical Valve Replacement: Early Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Cakir

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Valve diseases in developing countries like Turkey which often occur as a complication of rheumatic fever are a serious disease. Surgical treatment of valve diseases should be done before irreversible damage to the myocardium occurred. In this study, we aimed to present the early results of mechanical valve replacement operations. Method: A hundred patients with mechanical valve replacement surgery were retrospectively evaluated in Seyhan Application Center attached to our clinic between July 2007 and August 2011. Results: Fifty patients were male and 50 were women. The mean age of patients was 47.88 (18-78. Isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR was performed to 23 patients, isolated mitral valve replacement (MVR was 32, double valve replacement (AVR + MVR was 12, MVR + aortic valve valvuloplasty was 1, AVR + mitral kommissurotomi was 1, AVR + coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG was 17, MVR + CABG was 8, MVR + atrial septal defect closure was 2 and Bentall procedure.was 4 patients. In addition, ablation procedure was performed to 5 patients intraoperatively because of preoperative atrial fibrillation. Two patients (2 % died in early postoperative period. Conclusion: Mechanical prosthetic valves are used for surgical treatment of valve disease with low mortality and morbidity in a large group of patients like women that not to think to get pregnant, non advanced age group and patients have less risky for anticoagulation drug in our clinic. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(1.000: 49-54

  7. Planck early results. VII. The Early Release Compact Source Catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2011-01-01

    if they meet the high reliability criterion. The Planck ERCSC sources have known associations to stars with dust shells, stellar cores, radio galaxies, blazars, infrared luminous galaxies and Galactic interstellar medium features. A significant fraction of unclassified sources are also present in the catalogs...... the entire sky once and 60% of the sky a second time by Planck, thereby comprising the first high sensitivity radio/submillimetre observations of the entire sky. Four source detection algorithms were run as part of the ERCSC pipeline. A Monte-Carlo algorithm based on the injection and extraction....... In addition, two early release catalogs that contain 915 cold molecular cloud core candidates and 189 SZ cluster candidates that have been generated using multifrequency algorithms are presented. The entire source list, with more than 15 000 unique sources, is ripe for follow-up characterisation with Herschel...

  8. Early Number Skills Gains and Mathematics Achievement: Intervening to Establish Successful Early Mathematics Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Lina; Clarke, Ben; Doabler, Christian T.; Kurtz-Nelson, Evangeline; Fien, Hank

    2017-01-01

    Early number skills, comprised of both informal and formal skills, are associated with later mathematics achievement. Thus, the development of foundational early number skills is an important aspect of early mathematics instruction. This study explored relations between early number skills gains and mathematics achievement for students at risk for…

  9. Recent Coverage of Early Childhood Education Approaches in Open Access Early Childhood Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Burhanettin

    2016-01-01

    A content analysis of the coverage of the major approaches to early childhood education in the early childhood research journals, published between 2010 and 2014, that are early childhood research oriented and have free online access were investigated. Among 21 journals in early childhood education, two journals were selected for the content…

  10. Overview of Play: Its Uses and Importance in Early Intervention/Early Childhood Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifter, Karin; Foster-Sanda, Suzanne; Arzamarski, Caley; Briesch, Jacquelyn; McClure, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Play is a natural activity of early childhood, which has great relevance to the fields of early intervention, early childhood special education, and early childhood education. Within these fields, ongoing tensions persist in how play is described and used. These tensions compromise activities of assessment, intervention, and curriculum development…

  11. Early identification and intervention in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Anna; Greisen, Gorm; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    Infants with possible cerebral palsy (CP) are commonly assumed to benefit from early diagnosis and early intervention, but substantial evidence for this is lacking. There is no consensus in the literature on a definition of 'early', but this review focuses on interventions initiated within...... the first 6 months after term age. We cover basic neuroscience, arguing for a beneficial effect of early intervention, and discuss why clinical research to support this convincingly is lacking. We argue that infants offered early intervention in future clinical studies must be identified carefully......, and that the intervention should be focused on infants showing early signs of CP to determine an effect of treatment. Such signs may be efficiently detected by a combination of neuroimaging and the General Movements Assessment. We propose a research agenda directed at large-scale identification of infants showing early...

  12. Study of settlement distribution pattern in the Kolkheti lowland (Black Sea coast of Georgia) starting from early Bronze Age - natural and human influence and adaptation to landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elashvili, Mikheil; Akhvlediani, Dimitri; Navrozashvili, Levan; Sukhishvili, Lasha; Kirkitadze, Giorgi; Kelterbaum, Daniel; Laermans, Hannes

    2015-04-01

    During the past decades the question of a changing environment/nature became crucial. Actually we are trying to understand its nature or to predict future changes and their possible effects represent the main goals of many interdisciplinary studies. Therefore, the study of paleoenvironmental changes delivers key information for a better understanding of the whole process and especially the influence of these changes on human society. The selected research topic is dictated by the fact that the Colchis lowland played an important role in the history of old societies (countries and empires). Especially the interaction between developing human societies under the pressure of a changing environment are most interesting in this context. The Kolkheti valley and the Black Sea shore represent a region involved in many global historical events, starting from the Myth of Argonauts and followed by the ancient greek colonization, the Kingdom of Pontus ending at the Roman and Byzantine empires. River Phasis (present Rioni) was an important segment in trade way between the Mediterranean and India and the East in general. In addition it is the area of the "lost or vanished" city of Phasis, an ancient and early medieval city, founded in the 7th or 6th century BC as a colony of the Milesian Greeks at the mouth of the river Phasis, near the modern-day seaport Poti. Considering the local history of Georgia, this is the area of formation of the Kolkhys (Colchis) culture in late bronze-early iron periods, forming Colchis and later on the Lazika kingdoms. It is important to note that the archaeology and geomorphology of the seashore of Georgia is rather scarcely studied (mainly in the 1970s during soviet era). It is quite clear that the history of the region will not be deciphered without the reconstruction of the paleo and historical environment. The study based on an ongoing collaboration between the University of Cologne and the Ilia State University. Actually, geomorphological and

  13. Causes of early neonatal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Y S; Dattal, M S; Khadilker, V V; Kshirsager, V Y; Walimbe, A V; Shetti, S B

    1992-06-01

    The early neonatal period extends up to the 7th day of the infant's life. 75% of infant deaths occur within the first 28 days of life, and most of them occur within the first 7 days. In a retrospective study undertaken from June 1, 1987, to May 31, 1990, data was obtained from the Neonatal Care Section of Krishna Hospital, Karad, District Satara, in south western Maharashtra. Most of the villagers wee of low socioeconomic status, and the women had poor educational level. Most of the deliveries in this area are conducted by untrained dais under unhygienic conditions. The early neonatal mortality rate (ENMR) was defined as neonatal death of babies weighing over 1000 g during the first 7 days per 1000 live births. A total of 1013 live births with weight more than 1000 g were included in the study: 533 wee males and 480 females. The incidence of low-birth-weight (=or- 2.5 kg) babies was 77.1%, and that of prematurity (gestational age 37 weeks) was 58.9%. There were 37 neonatal deaths, with an ENMR of 36.6. The chief causes of ENMR were perinatal asphyxia (40.5%), prematurity (29.7%), bacterial infections (27.0%), and congenital malformations (2.8%). The mortality was higher in low-birth-weight as compared to the normal-birth-weight babies. A total of 59% of all births were preterms who contributed to 29.7% of deaths. The high incidence of low-birth-weight babies was attributable to the fact that this hospital received 79.4% of total admissions for delivery of complicated pregnancy referrals from the peripheries. The difference between mortality of babies with birth weight of less than and more than 2.5 kg was statistically significant (p0.05). Regular antenatal checkups, health education of pregnant and lactating mothers, professional child delivery, and timely referral of pregnancy complications to well-equipped hospitals may cut down on early neonatal mortality.

  14. Art, antiquarianism and early anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Clare E L

    2014-12-01

    Discussions of the early relationship between art and anatomy are shaped by Vasari's account of Florentine artists who dissected bodies in order to understand the causes of movement, and the end of movement in action. This account eclipses the role of the study of antiquities in Renaissance anatomical illustration. Beyond techniques of presentation, such as sectioning and analytic illustration, or a preoccupation with the mutilated fragment, antiquarianism offered a reflection on the variant and the role of temperament which could be adapted for anatomical purposes. With its play on ambiguities of life and death, idealisation and damage, antiquarianism also provided a way of negotiating the difficulties of content inherent in anatomical illustration. As such, it goes beyond exclusively historical interest to provoke reflection on the modes, possibilities and humane responsibilities of medical illustration. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. How early and how long?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Løvgren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Day care centres have become a normal part of Norwegian childhood, even among quite small children. In 1970 less than 3 per cent of Norwegian children of pre-school were enrolled. At the end of 2009 as much as 70 per cent of children aged 12 to 24 months were enrolled and for 90 per cent of them a full day stay had been arranged. Norwegian children with small children opt for an early start at a day care centre. However, the day care centre employees do not share the same views as the users of the services they provide. Only one third of them express the opinion that children may start at the age of one and have a full day stay at this age. The article discusses this discrepancy between the users and providers of public financed day care.

  16. LEP vacuum chamber, early prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The structure of LEP, with long bending magnets and little access to the vacuum chamber between them, required distributed pumping. This is an early prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, made from extruded aluminium. The main opening is for the beam. The small channel to the right is for cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchroton radiation from the beam. The 4 slots in the channel to the left house the strip-shaped ion-getter pumps (see 7810255). The ion-getter pumps depended on the magnetic field of the bending magnets, too low at injection energy for the pumps to function well. Also, a different design was required outside the bending magnets. This design was therefore abandoned, in favour of a thermal getter pump (see 8301153 and 8305170).

  17. LHCb Early Career Scientist Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrick Koppenburg for the LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    On 15 September 2016, the LHCb collaboration awarded the first set of prizes for outstanding contributions of early career scientists.   From left to right: Guy Wilkinson (LHCb spokesperson), Sascha Stahl, Kevin Dungs, Tim Head, Roel Aaij, Conor Fitzpatrick, Claire Prouvé, Patrick Koppenburg (chair of committee) and Sean Benson. Twenty-five nominations were submitted and considered by the committee, and 5 prizes were awarded to teams or individuals for works that had a significant impact within the last year. The awardees are: Roel Aaij, Sean Benson, Conor Fitzpatrick, Rosen Matev and Sascha Stahl for having implemented and commissioned the revolutionary changes to the LHC Run-2 high-level-trigger, including the first widespread deployment of real-time analysis techniques in High Energy Physics;   Kevin Dungs and Tim Head for having launched the Starterkit initiative, a new style of software tutorials based on modern programming methods. “Starterkit is a group of ph...

  18. Atypical manifestations of early syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R V Koranne

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of 36 untreated patients with early syphilis revealed atypical variations namely; long incubation period of 101 days in I patient, more than 3 chancres in 1, undermined margin of the chancre along with tenderness in 1 and moderate to severe tenderness of the ulcers in 2 cases. In 3 patients there was no indurations of the ulcers. Three patients with primary syphilis had unilateral lymphadenitis, and in I case the lymph nodes were not only tender but showed tendency towardsmatingawell. Insecondarysyphilis, 11 out of 16 patients having condylomata lata had no other muco-cutaneous lesions. Concomitant presence of other venereal disease to account for the atypical manifestations was discounted- by appropriate laboratory tests, response to therapeutic agents and follow up.

  19. Deafness and Diversity: Early Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Rebecca L; Ammerman, Sarah B; Trautwein, Blane A

    2015-01-01

    earlier identification has increased the number of infants identified with hearing loss. A significant and growing proportion of children who are D/deaf or hard of hearing have a disability (DWD). Literature related to infants and toddlers who are DWD is scarce because of the heterogeneity of the population and because many disabilities may go undiagnosed until a child is older. Service availability, professional preparation, and use of evidence-based practices must improve to best meet the needs of these children and their families. An examination of theory, research, and practice in early intervention for children who are DWD revealed a lack of qualified professionals and a need for targeted instruction in teacher preparation programs and for technological advances paired with treatment (e.g., telepractice). Increased transdisciplinary collaboration and technology utilization in teacher preparation hold promise as ways of improving service provision to young children who are DWD.

  20. Galaxies in the Early Universe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogager, Jens-Kristian

    in Chapter 3 is found to be a young, star-forming galaxy with evidence for strong outflows of gas. This suggests that the more evolved and metal-rich DLAs overlap with the faint end of the luminosity selected galaxies in terms of mass, metallicity, star formation rate, and age. DLAs are generally observed......Understanding how galaxies evolved from the early Universe through cosmic time is a fundamental part of modern astrophysics. In order to study this evolution it is important to sample the galaxies at various times in a consistent way through time. In regular luminosity selected samples, our...... analyses are biased towards the brightest galaxies at all times (as these are easier to observe and identify). A complementary method relies on the absorption imprint from neutral gas in galaxies, the so-called damped Ly absorbers (DLAs) seen towards distant bright objects. This thesis seeks to understand...