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Sample records for early alzheimer disease

  1. Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes: Neuropsychology and Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-11

    Alzheimer Disease, Early Onset; Alzheimer Disease; Alzheimer Disease, Late Onset; Dementia, Alzheimer Type; Logopenic Progressive Aphasia; Primary Progressive Aphasia; Visuospatial/Perceptual Abilities; Posterior Cortical Atrophy; Executive Dysfunction; Corticobasal Degeneration; Ideomotor Apraxia

  2. Estrogen and early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.C. Slooter (Arjen); J.B. Bronzova (Juliana); A. Hofman (Albert); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractEstrogen use may be protective for Alzheimer's disease with late onset. However, the effects on early onset Alzheimer's disease are unclear. This issue was studied in a population based setting. For each female patient, a female control was matched on age (within 5 years) and place of

  3. Cognitive rehabilitation for elderly people with early-stage Alzheimer?s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cognitive rehabilitation including tasks of cognitive training on performance of everyday activities in elderly people with early-stage Alzheimer?s disease. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-three elderly people (15 men, 28 women) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer?s disease who had a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 18 or above were randomly assigned to two groups: the cognitive rehabilitation group (experimental) and co...

  4. Ophthalmic examination in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder causing irreversible deterioration in memory and loss of self-care ability, which is seriously affecting the quality of life. There is no cure for Alzheimer's disease. Medication only can control the progression of the disease. Early diagnosis and control of disease progress is of great significance in improving the quality of life of the patients and reducing the burden of family and society. Ophthalmic examination is seen as a window which can “see” brain directly, and some changes in the eye can reflect the changes of the brain most directly. This paper reviews the ophthalmic examination of Alzheimer's disease, including optical coherence tomography(OCT, visual field, contrast sensitivity and eye movements, et al. We hope to provide a new idea for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Clinical significance and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, K.; Teipel, S.J.; Hampel, H.

    2000-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease describes the recognition and diagnosis in patients with very mild dementia. Internationally accepted diagnostic criteria support the diagnosis based on clinical evaluation. Recent advances in structural and functional neuroimaging as well as studies on specific proteins in the cerebro-spinal fluid that are related to distinct pathophysiological disease processes are most promising approaches to defining biological markers of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.) [de

  6. Early neurovascular dysfunction in a transgenic rat model of Alzheimer?s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Joo, Illsung L.; Lai, Aaron Y.; Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; Koletar, Margaret M.; Dorr, Adrienne; Brown, Mary E.; Thomason, Lynsie A. M.; Sled, John G.; McLaurin, JoAnne; Stefanovic, Bojana

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer?s disease (AD), pathologically characterized by amyloid-? peptide (A?) accumulation, neurofibrillary tangle formation, and neurodegeneration, is thought to involve early-onset neurovascular abnormalities. Hitherto studies on AD-associated neurovascular injury have used animal models that exhibit only a subset of AD-like pathologies and demonstrated some A?-dependent vascular dysfunction and destabilization of neuronal network. The present work focuses on the early stage of disease p...

  7. Cost Analysis of Early Psychosocial Intervention in Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, R.; Sørensen, J.; Waldorff, F.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the impact of early psychosocial intervention aimed at patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their caregivers on resource use and costs from a societal perspective. METHODS: Dyads of patients and their primary caregiver were randomised to intervention (n = 163...

  8. New NIA Booklet By and For People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Booklet By and For People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents ... you have a family member or friends with Alzheimer's disease? Are you wondering what they're going ...

  9. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for patients with Alzheimer's disease. The inherited form is even regarded a 'rare' disease according to the regulations for funding of the European Union (www.erare.eu). Here, we show that mice that are double-deficient for neprilysin (encoded by Mme), one major amyloid-β-degrading enzyme, and the ABC transporter ABCC1, a major contributor to amyloid-β clearance from the brain, develop various aspects of sporadic Alzheimer's disease mimicking the clinical stage of mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows investigations

  10. Research progress in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-sha SUN

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a kind of central nervous system degenerative disease with higher incidence, which has been paid increasing attention. The pathogenesis is not yet clear though it has been studied a lot. The existing theories focused on amyloid β-protein (Aβ deposit, hyperphosphorylation of tau and cholinergic neuronal loss. There is mainly symptomatic treatment which cannot reverse disease course. So early diagnosis is particularly important for prevention and treatment of AD. The article will review recent advances in the studies of early diagnosis of AD. It may help accurately diagnose the process from mild cognitive impairment (MCI to early AD and give advice on prevention and treatment. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2018.03.011

  11. [Cognitive rehabilitation in early stage Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, E; Thöne-Otto, A; Bürger, K; Schröder, S G; Hoffmann, W; Schneider, W; Teipel, S

    2016-07-01

    Dementia impairs the coping with routine daily tasks and social relationships due to an increasing degeneration of cognitive abilities. An appropriate treatment must adequately consider the effects of declined cognitive abilities on patients and their environment. Therefore, in recent times, integrative procedures for cognitive rehabilitation (CR) have become increasingly important for the therapy of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and mild dementia (MD). CR approaches provide compensatory possibilities for clearly defined routine challenges and the individual needs of those affected. This overview article in the form of a selective review elaborates factors for the effectiveness of CR on the basis of the currently available literature: 1) individuality - consideration of personal needs and targets, 2) compensation - mediation of skills and strategies to compensate for cognitive impairments, 3) interaction - inclusion of relatives and environmental conditions and 4) integration - integration of various therapeutic disciplines and methods. On the basis of this assessment with regards to the content, a critical analysis of the methods of short and long-term therapeutic effects on MCD and MD was carried out. Although the resulting factors were of high long-term relevance for the improvement of depression and quality of life, effects on cognition were more pronounced for MCI than for MD, which emphasizes the importance of beginning therapy as early as possible. The results show that future studies on effectiveness must employ endpoints relevant for routine daily life, and that the possibility of an implementation of therapeutic concepts in a healthcare system should be considered as an essential criterion.

  12. Working memory in early Alzheimer's disease: a neuropsychological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, J D; Howard, R J

    2010-02-01

    Reports of the extent of working memory (WM) impairment in early Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been inconsistent. Using the model of WM proposed by Baddeley, neuropsychological evidence for the impairment of WM in early AD is evaluated. Literature searches were performed using Medline, PsycINFO and Embase databases. Individual papers were then examined for additional references not revealed by computerised searches. Phonological loop function is intact at the preclinical and early stages of AD, becoming more impaired as the disease progresses. In mild AD, there is impairment on tasks assessing visuospatial sketchpad (VSS) function; however, these tasks also require executive processing by the central executive system (CES). There is evidence that the CES is impaired in mild AD and may be affected in the earlier preclinical stage of the disease. Episodic buffer function may be impaired but further research is required. Future research into central executive functioning at the earliest stages of the disease, combined with further longitudinal studies, needs to be carried out. Tasks to assess the proposed functions of the episodic buffer and specific tests of the VSS suitable for AD subjects need to be developed and validated. Learning more about these processes and how they are affected in AD is important in understanding and managing the cognitive deficits seen in the early stages of AD.

  13. Impaired awareness of deficits and neuropsychiatric symptoms in early Alzheimer's disease: the Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study (DAISY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, A.; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Waldemar, G.

    2010-01-01

    Impaired awareness may be associated with increased neuropsychiatric symptoms in moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, but relatively little is known about the association in early Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if impaired awareness was associated with a higher...... frequency of neuropsychiatric symptoms in early Alzheimer's disease. In a Danish multicenter study, 321 patients with MMSE score > or =20 were evaluated. Patients with poor insight had significantly more neuropsychiatric symptoms than patients with full insight. When patients had increasing neuropsychiatric...

  14. Predictors of driving safety in early Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, J D; Anderson, S W; Uc, E Y; Dastrup, E; Rizzo, M

    2009-02-10

    To measure the association of cognition, visual perception, and motor function with driving safety in Alzheimer disease (AD). Forty drivers with probable early AD (mean Mini-Mental State Examination score 26.5) and 115 elderly drivers without neurologic disease underwent a battery of cognitive, visual, and motor tests, and drove a standardized 35-mile route in urban and rural settings in an instrumented vehicle. A composite cognitive score (COGSTAT) was calculated for each subject based on eight neuropsychological tests. Driving safety errors were noted and classified by a driving expert based on video review. Drivers with AD committed an average of 42.0 safety errors/drive (SD = 12.8), compared to an average of 33.2 (SD = 12.2) for drivers without AD (p < 0.0001); the most common errors were lane violations. Increased age was predictive of errors, with a mean of 2.3 more errors per drive observed for each 5-year age increment. After adjustment for age and gender, COGSTAT was a significant predictor of safety errors in subjects with AD, with a 4.1 increase in safety errors observed for a 1 SD decrease in cognitive function. Significant increases in safety errors were also found in subjects with AD with poorer scores on Benton Visual Retention Test, Complex Figure Test-Copy, Trail Making Subtest-A, and the Functional Reach Test. Drivers with Alzheimer disease (AD) exhibit a range of performance on tests of cognition, vision, and motor skills. Since these tests provide additional predictive value of driving performance beyond diagnosis alone, clinicians may use these tests to help predict whether a patient with AD can safely operate a motor vehicle.

  15. Alzheimer's disease prevention: from risk factors to early intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Minguillón, Carolina; Gramunt, Nina; Molinuevo, José Luis

    2017-09-12

    Due to the progressive aging of the population, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming a healthcare burden of epidemic proportions for which there is currently no cure. Disappointing results from clinical trials performed in mild-moderate AD dementia combined with clear epidemiological evidence on AD risk factors are contributing to the development of primary prevention initiatives. In addition, the characterization of the long asymptomatic stage of AD is allowing the development of intervention studies and secondary prevention programmes on asymptomatic at-risk individuals, before substantial irreversible neuronal dysfunction and loss have occurred, an approach that emerges as highly relevant.In this manuscript, we review current strategies for AD prevention, from primary prevention strategies based on identifying risk factors and risk reduction, to secondary prevention initiatives based on the early detection of the pathophysiological hallmarks and intervention at the preclinical stage of the disease. Firstly, we summarize the evidence on several AD risk factors, which are the rationale for the establishment of primary prevention programmes as well as revising current primary prevention strategies. Secondly, we review the development of public-private partnerships for disease prevention that aim to characterize the AD continuum as well as serving as platforms for secondary prevention trials. Finally, we summarize currently ongoing clinical trials recruiting participants with preclinical AD or a higher risk for the onset of AD-related cognitive impairment.The growing body of research on the risk factors for AD and its preclinical stage is favouring the development of AD prevention programmes that, by delaying the onset of Alzheimer's dementia for only a few years, would have a huge impact on public health.

  16. Whole Exome Analysis of Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0013 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) Margaret A. Pericak-Vance, Ph.D...Gerald D. Schellenberg, Goldie S . Byrd, Jonathan L. Haines, Margaret A. Pericak-Vance, and the Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium. ABCA7 Frameshift...Alzheimer’s & Parkinson’s Diseases (AD/PD), Vienna, Austria, Mar 29-Apr 2, 2017: Cukier HN, Gross SP, Kunkle BW, Rolati S , Hamilton-Nelson KL, Whitehead PL

  17. 78 FR 9396 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Alzheimer's Disease: Developing Drugs for the Treatment of Early...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry on Alzheimer's Disease: Developing Drugs for the Treatment of Early Stage... ``Alzheimer's Disease: Developing Drugs for the Treatment of Early Stage Disease.'' This guidance outlines FDA... trials that are specifically focused on the treatment of patients with established Alzheimer's disease...

  18. Early detection of Alzheimer disease: methods, markers, and misgivings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R C; Clarke, V C; Thompson, N J; Woodard, J L; Letz, R

    1997-01-01

    There is at present no reliable predictive test for most forms of Alzheimer disease (AD). Although some information about future risk for disease is available in theory through ApoE genotyping, it is of limited accuracy and utility. Once neuroprotective treatments are available for AD, reliable early detection will become a key component of the treatment strategy. We recently conducted a pilot survey eliciting attitudes and beliefs toward an unspecified and hypothetical predictive test for AD. The survey was completed by a convenience sample of 176 individuals, aged 22-77, which was 75% female, 30% African-American, and of which 33% had a family member with AD. The survey revealed that 69% of this sample would elect to obtain predictive testing for AD if the test were 100% accurate. Individuals were more likely to desire predictive testing if they had an a priori belief that they would develop AD (p = 0.0001), had a lower educational level (p = 0.003), were worried that they would develop AD (p = 0.02), had a self-defined history of depression (p = 0.04), and had a family member with AD (p = 0.04). However, the desire for predictive testing was not significantly associated with age, gender, ethnicity, or income. The desire to obtain predictive testing for AD decreased as the assumed accuracy of the hypothetical test decreased. A better short-term strategy for early detection of AD may be computer-based neuropsychological screening of at-risk (older aged) individuals to identify very early cognitive impairment. Individuals identified in this manner could be referred for diagnostic evaluation and early cases of AD could be identified and treated. A new self-administered, touch-screen, computer-based, neuropsychological screening instrument called Neurobehavioral Evaluation System-3 is described, which may facilitate this type of screening.

  19. Estrogen use and early onset Alzheimer's disease: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.C. Slooter (Arjen); J.B. Bronzova (Juliana); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractEstrogen use may be protective for Alzheimer's disease with late onset. However, the effects on early onset Alzheimer's disease are unclear. This issue was studied in a population based setting. For each female patient, a female control was matched on age (within 5

  20. Early diagnostics and Alzheimer's disease: Beyond ‘cure’ and ‘care’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, Y.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/312803931; van Lente, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113255004

    Research on early diagnostics for Alzheimer's disease is supported by what has been labeled as aging-and-innovation discourse, in which innovation is assumed to (partially) resolve the societal problems related to aging. This discourse draws on a specific way of understanding Alzheimer's disease and

  1. Early intranasal insulin therapy halts progression of neurodegeneration: progress in Alzheimer's disease therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Monte, Suzanne M

    Evaluation of Craft S, Baker LD, Montine TJ, Minoshima S, Watson GS, Claxton A, et al. Intranasal Insulin Therapy for Alzheimer Disease and Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Pilot Clinical Trial. Arch Neurol . 2011 Sep 12. Alzheimer's disease is associated with brain insulin deficiency and insulin resistance, similar to the problems in diabetes. If insulin could be supplied to the brain in the early stages of Alzheimer's, subsequent neurodegeneration might be prevented. Administering systemic insulin to elderly non-diabetics poses unacceptable risks of inadvertant hypoglycemia. However, intranasal delivery directs the insulin into the brain, avoiding systemic side-effects. This pilot study demonstrates both efficacy and safety of using intranasal insulin to treat early Alzheimer's and mild cognitive impairment, i.e. the precursor to Alzheimer's. Significant improvements in learning, memory, and cognition occured within a few months, but without intranasal insulin, brain function continued to deteriorate in measurable degrees. Intranasal insulin therapy holds promise for halting progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. CSF N-glycoproteomics for early diagnosis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmigiano, Angelo; Barone, Rita; Sturiale, Luisa; Sanfilippo, Cristina; Bua, Rosaria Ornella; Romeo, Donata Agata; Messina, Angela; Capuana, Maria Luisa; Maci, Tiziana; Le Pira, Francesco; Zappia, Mario; Garozzo, Domenico

    2016-01-10

    This work aims at exploring the human CSF (Cerebrospinal fluid) N-glycome by MALDI MS techniques, in order to assess specific glycosylation pattern(s) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (n:24) and in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n:11), these last as potential AD patients at a pre-dementia stage. For comparison, 21 healthy controls were studied. We identified a group of AD and MCI subjects (about 40-50% of the studied sample) showing significant alteration of CSF N-glycome profiling, consisting of a decrease in the overall sialylation degree and an increase in species bearing bisecting GlcNAc. Noteworthy, all the MCI patients that converted to AD within the clinical follow-up, had an abnormal CSF glycosylation profile. Based on the studied cohort, CSF glycosylation changes may occur before an AD clinical onset. Previous studies specifically focused on the key role of glycosyltransferase GnT-III on AD-pathogenesis, addressing the patho-mechanism to specific sugar modification of BACE-1 glycoprotein with bisecting GlcNAc. Our patients addressed protein N-glycosylation changes at an early phase of the whole biomolecular misregulation on AD, pointing to CSF N-glycome analyses as promising tool to enhance early detection of AD and also suggesting alternative therapeutics target molecules, such as specific glyco-enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Rita; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2016-06-01

    As the discovery of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) genes, APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2, in families with autosomal dominant early-onset AD (EOAD), gene discovery in familial EOAD came more or less to a standstill. Only 5% of EOAD patients are carrying a pathogenic mutation in one of the AD genes or a apolipoprotein E (APOE) risk allele ε4, most of EOAD patients remain unexplained. Here, we aimed at summarizing the current knowledge of EOAD genetics and its role in ongoing approaches to understand the biology of AD and disease symptomatology as well as developing new therapeutics. Next, we explored the possible molecular mechanisms that might underlie the missing genetic etiology of EOAD and discussed how the use of massive parallel sequencing technologies triggered novel gene discoveries. To conclude, we commented on the relevance of reinvestigating EOAD patients as a means to explore potential new avenues for translational research and therapeutic discoveries. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Subjective cognitive impairment: Towards early identification of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ptacek, S; Eriksdotter, M; Jelic, V; Porta-Etessam, J; Kåreholt, I; Manzano Palomo, S

    2016-10-01

    Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease (AD) begins decades before dementia and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) already demonstrate significant lesion loads. Lack of information about the early pathophysiology in AD complicates the search for therapeutic strategies.Subjective cognitive impairment is the description given to subjects who have memory-related complaints without pathological results on neuropsychological tests. There is no consensus regarding this heterogeneous syndrome, but at least some of these patients may represent the earliest stage in AD. We reviewed available literature in order to summarise current knowledge on subjective cognitive impairment. Although they may not present detectable signs of disease, SCI patients as a group score lower on neuropsychological tests than the general population does, and they also have a higher incidence of future cognitive decline. Depression and psychiatric co-morbidity play a role but cannot account for all cognitive complaints. Magnetic resonance imaging studies in these patients reveal a pattern of hippocampal atrophy similar to that of amnestic mild cognitive impairment and functional MRI shows increased activation during cognitive tasks which might indicate compensation for loss of function. Prevalence of an AD-like pattern of beta-amyloid (Aβ42) and tau proteins in cerebrospinal fluid is higher in SCI patients than in the general population. Memory complaints are relevant symptoms and may predict AD. Interpatient variability and methodological differences between clinical studies make it difficult to assign a definition to this syndrome. In the future, having a standard definition and longitudinal studies with sufficient follow-up times and an emphasis on quantifiable variables may clarify aspects of early AD. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Epoch-based Entropy for Early Screening of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houmani, N; Dreyfus, G; Vialatte, F B

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel entropy measure, termed epoch-based entropy. This measure quantifies disorder of EEG signals both at the time level and spatial level, using local density estimation by a Hidden Markov Model on inter-channel stationary epochs. The investigation is led on a multi-centric EEG database recorded from patients at an early stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched healthy subjects. We investigate the classification performances of this method, its robustness to noise, and its sensitivity to sampling frequency and to variations of hyperparameters. The measure is compared to two alternative complexity measures, Shannon's entropy and correlation dimension. The classification accuracies for the discrimination of AD patients from healthy subjects were estimated using a linear classifier designed on a development dataset, and subsequently tested on an independent test set. Epoch-based entropy reached a classification accuracy of 83% on the test dataset (specificity = 83.3%, sensitivity = 82.3%), outperforming the two other complexity measures. Furthermore, it was shown to be more stable to hyperparameter variations, and less sensitive to noise and sampling frequency disturbances than the other two complexity measures.

  6. Towards an All-Polymer Biosensor for Early Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nikolaj Ormstrup; Heegaard, Niels

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is quickly evolving into one of the biggest and most costly health issues in Europe and the United States. AD is a protein misfolding disease, caused by accumulation of abnormally folded β-amyloid and tau protein in the brain. The build-up of protein is believed...... to degenerate the brain tissue literally shrinking the brain. This slowly destroys function of these parts of the brain. It has been discovered that the concentration of A42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a biomarker for this disease. It is therefor of great interest to develop quick and low cost methods...

  7. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... SPECIAL REPORT: FINANCIAL AND PERSONAL BENEFITS OF EARLY DIAGNOSIS Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's provides a number of important benefits ... to detect Alzheimer's disease and provide an accurate diagnosis earlier than at any other time in history. ...

  8. A possible new diagnostic biomarker in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kork, Felix; Holthues, Jan; Hellweg, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Early diagnosis in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of great importance since only a sufficient treatment in early stages of this disease helps to keep patients in an autonomous state for as long as possible. Until now, there is no single diagnostic biomarker for AD derived from material...

  9. Effectiveness of self-generated cues in early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinska, B; Bäckman, L; Mäntylä, T; Viitanen, M

    1994-12-01

    The ability to utilize cognitive support in the form of self-generated cues in mild Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the factors promoting efficient cue utilization in this group of patients, were examined in two experiments on memory for words. Results from both experiments showed that normal old adults as well as AD patients performed better with self-generated cues than with experimenter-provided cues, although the latter type of cues resulted in gains relative to free recall. The findings indicate no qualitative differences in patterns of performance between the normal old and the AD patients. For both groups of subjects, cue effectiveness was optimized when (a) there was self-generation activity at encoding, and (b) encoding and retrieval conditions were compatible.

  10. Neuroimaging of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Main purposes of neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease have been moved from diagnosis of advanced Alzheimer's disease to diagnosis of very early Alzheimer's disease at a prodromal stage of mild cognitive impairment, prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease, and differential diagnosis from other diseases causing dementia. Structural MRI studies and functional studies using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and brain perfusion SPECT are widely used in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Outstanding progress in diagnostic accuracy of these neuroimaging modalities has been obtained using statistical analysis on a voxel-by-voxel basis after spatial normalization of individual scans to a standardized brain-volume template instead of visual inspection or a conventional region of interest technique. In a very early stage of Alzheimer's disease, this statistical approach revealed gray matter loss in the entorhinal and hippocampal areas and hypometabolism or hypoperfusion in the posterior cingulate cortex. These two findings might be related in view of anatomical knowledge that the regions are linked through the circuit of Papez. This statistical approach also offers accurate evaluation of therapeutical effects on brain metabolism or perfusion. The latest development in functional imaging relates to the final pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease-amyloid plaques. Amyloid imaging might be an important surrogate marker for trials of disease-modifying agents. (author)

  11. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease using the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmand, B.; Walstra, G.; Lindeboom, J.; Teunisse, S.; Jonker, C.

    2000-01-01

    Dementia screening instruments, such as the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG), measure a variety of cognitive functions. However, memory impairment generally is the first sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It seems logical, therefore, to use only memory-related items for the early detection of

  12. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... How many Americans over age 65 may have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5 million as many ...

  13. Souvenaid®: a new approach to management of early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, C W; Bajwa, J; Coleman, G; Hope, K; Jones, R W; Lawton, M; Marven, M; Passmore, P

    2014-03-01

    Synaptic loss correlates closely with cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease and represents a new target for intervention. Souvenaid® is the first medical nutrition product to be designed to support synapse formation and function in early Alzheimer's disease, and has undergone an extensive, 12-year development programme. The relatively large amount of clinical data available for Souvenaid® is unusual for a medical nutrition product. Souvenaid® contains omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid), uridine (as uridine monophosphate) and choline which are nutritional precursors required for synaptic membrane phospholipid synthesis, together with phospholipids and other cofactors. Souvenaid® has demonstrated cognitive benefits in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease but not in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. Two randomised, double-blind, controlled trials (duration 12 and 24 weeks) in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease untreated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and/or memantine have demonstrated that Souvenaid® is well tolerated and improves episodic memory performance. The daily intake of Souvenaid® has not been associated with any harmful effects or interactions with medications and none are anticipated. The ongoing, 24-month, European Union-funded LipiDiDiet trial in subjects with prodromal Alzheimer's disease is evaluating the potential benefits of Souvenaid® on memory and in slowing progression to Alzheimer's dementia. If Souvenaid® induces synaptogenesis and improved synaptic function, it may provide benefits in other clinical conditions characterised by neurodegeneration. A number of trials are ongoing and planned to evaluate the potential wider benefits of Souvenaid®.

  14. To Know or Not to Know: Ethical Issues Related to Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Mattsson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD, pathological processes start in the brain long before clinical dementia. Biomarkers reflecting brain alterations may therefore indicate disease at an early stage, enabling early diagnosis. This raises several ethical questions and the potential benefits of early diagnosis must be weighted against possible disadvantages. Currently, there are few strong arguments favouring early diagnosis, due to the lack of disease modifying therapy. Also, available diagnostic methods risk erroneous classifications, with potentially grave consequences. However, a possible benefit of early diagnosis even without disease modifying therapy is that it may enable early decision making when patients still have full decision competence, avoiding problems of hypothetical consents. It may also help identifying patients with cognitive dysfunction secondary to other diseases that may be responsive to treatment already today.

  15. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... home care. Take action. Become an advocate SPECIAL REPORT: FINANCIAL AND PERSONAL BENEFITS OF EARLY DIAGNOSIS Early ... State The 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report contains data on the impact of this disease ...

  16. The Cognitive and Neural Expression of Semantic Memory Impairment in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Early Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Sven; Brambati, Simona M.; Ansado, Jennyfer; Barbeau, Emmanuel J.; Felician, Olivier; Didic, Mira; Lacombe, Jacinthe; Goldstein, Rachel; Chayer, Celine; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    Semantic deficits in Alzheimer's disease have been widely documented, but little is known about the integrity of semantic memory in the prodromal stage of the illness. The aims of the present study were to: (i) investigate naming abilities and semantic memory in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), early Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to…

  17. 7T T-2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reveals cortical phase differences between early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooden, S.; Doan, N.T.; Versluis, M.J.; Goos, J.D.C.; Webb, A.G.; Oleksik, A.M.; van der Flier, W.M.; Scheltens, P.; Barkhof, F.; Weverlinge-Rynsburger, A.W.E.; Blauw, G. J.; Reiber, J.H.C.; van Buchem, M.A.; Milles, J.; van der Grond, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore regional iron-related differences in the cerebral cortex, indicative of Alzheimer's disease pathology, between early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD, LOAD, respectively) patients using 7T magnetic resonance phase images. High-resolution T

  18. Polygenic Risk Score for Alzheimer's Disease: Implications for Memory Performance and Hippocampal Volumes in Early Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrud, Luiza K; Santoro, Marcos L; Pine, Daniel S; Talarico, Fernanda; Gadelha, Ary; Manfro, Gisele G; Pan, Pedro M; Jackowski, Andrea; Picon, Felipe; Brietzke, Elisa; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Miguel, Eurípedes C; Rohde, Luis A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pausova, Zdenka; Belangero, Sintia; Paus, Tomas; Salum, Giovanni A

    2018-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a heritable neurodegenerative disorder in which early-life precursors may manifest in cognition and brain structure. The authors evaluate this possibility by examining, in youths, associations among polygenic risk score for Alzheimer's disease, cognitive abilities, and hippocampal volume. Participants were children 6-14 years of age in two Brazilian cities, constituting the discovery (N=364) and replication samples (N=352). As an additional replication, data from a Canadian sample (N=1,029), with distinct tasks, MRI protocol, and genetic risk, were included. Cognitive tests quantified memory and executive function. Reading and writing abilities were assessed by standardized tests. Hippocampal volumes were derived from the Multiple Automatically Generated Templates (MAGeT) multi-atlas segmentation brain algorithm. Genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease was quantified using summary statistics from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project. Analyses showed that for the Brazilian discovery sample, each one-unit increase in z-score for Alzheimer's polygenic risk score significantly predicted a 0.185 decrement in z-score for immediate recall and a 0.282 decrement for delayed recall. Findings were similar for the Brazilian replication sample (immediate and delayed recall, β=-0.259 and β=-0.232, both significant). Quantile regressions showed lower hippocampal volumes bilaterally for individuals with high polygenic risk scores. Associations fell short of significance for the Canadian sample. Genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease may affect early-life cognition and hippocampal volumes, as shown in two independent samples. These data support previous evidence that some forms of late-life dementia may represent developmental conditions with roots in childhood. This result may vary depending on a sample's genetic risk and may be specific to some types of memory tasks.

  19. Mitophagy and Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerr, Jesse S.; Adriaanse, Bryan A.; Greig, Nigel H.

    2017-01-01

    Neurons affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience mitochondrial dysfunction and a bioenergetic deficit that occurs early and promotes the disease-defining amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and Tau pathologies. Emerging findings suggest that the autophagy/lysosome pathway that removes damaged...

  20. Clustering of transcriptional profiles identifies changes to insulin signaling as an early event in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Harriet M; Soto, Ileana; Graham, Leah C; Carter, Gregory W; Howell, Gareth R

    2013-11-25

    Alzheimer's disease affects more than 35 million people worldwide but there is no known cure. Age is the strongest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease but it is not clear how age-related changes impact the disease. Here, we used a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease to identify age-specific changes that occur prior to and at the onset of traditional Alzheimer-related phenotypes including amyloid plaque formation. To identify these early events we used transcriptional profiling of mouse brains combined with computational approaches including singular value decomposition and hierarchical clustering. Our study identifies three key events in early stages of Alzheimer's disease. First, the most important drivers of Alzheimer's disease onset in these mice are age-specific changes. These include perturbations of the ribosome and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Second, the earliest detectable disease-specific changes occur to genes commonly associated with the hypothalamic-adrenal-pituitary (HPA) axis. These include the down-regulation of genes relating to metabolism, depression and appetite. Finally, insulin signaling, in particular the down-regulation of the insulin receptor substrate 4 (Irs4) gene, may be an important event in the transition from age-related changes to Alzheimer's disease specific-changes. A combination of transcriptional profiling combined with computational analyses has uncovered novel features relevant to Alzheimer's disease in a widely used mouse model and offers avenues for further exploration into early stages of AD.

  1. Novel PET molecular probes for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Yanyan; Guan Yihui; Wu Ping

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and will become increasingly prevalent with population aging. It is accepted that the pathologic changes underlying AD appear in the brain years to decades before the symptomatic stages. Clinical measures of cognitive impairment, as used for definition of dementia, will not allow early diagnosis of AD-pathology in the mild or asymptomatic stages. There has been growing interest in early diagnosis of this disease, particularly regarding the initiation of new treatment strategies ahead of the onset of irreversible neuronal damage. Brain imaging markers are among the most promising candidates for this diagnostic challenge. PET has been demonstrated to be a most sensitive, specific, noninvasive, objective and quantitative method for early identification of AD-pathology and molecular biology, thus for prediction of dementia of the Alzheimer type, even in the mild and asymptomatic stages. (authors)

  2. [Biomarkers of Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel, Wojciech; Grela, Agatha; Zyss, Tomasz; Zieba, Andrzej; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the most abundant age-related psychiatric disorders. The outcome of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease has both individual (the patients and their families) and socio-economic effects. The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease doubles after the age of 65 years, every 4.5 years. An etiologically heterogenic group of disorders related to aging as well as genetic and environmental interactions probably underlie the impairment in Alzheimer's disease. Those factors cause the degeneration of brain tissue which leads to significant cognitive dysfunction. There are two main hypotheses that are linked to the process of neurodegeneration: (i) amyloid cascade and (ii) the role of secretases and dysfunction of mitochondria. From the therapeutic standpoint it is crucial to get an early diagnosis and start with an adequate treatment. The undeniable progress in the field of biomarker research should lead to a better understanding of the early stages of the disorder. So far, the best recognised and described biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease, which can be detected in both cerebrospinal fluid and blood, are: beta-amyloid, tau-protein and phosphorylated tau-protein (phospho-tau). The article discusses the usefulness of the known biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease in early diagnosis.

  3. [Bioethical reflections on ill-considered care due to an early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxó, M Jesús; Casado, María

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease raises important bioethical issues. In the interval between early disease detection and symptom onset, there is a time in which the patient's autonomy, privacy, and dignity may be undermined by certain healthcare measures or by family care and support. These measures may eventually turn patients into an object of care, preventing them from accepting the disease, developing an identity, and rearranging their living spaces. Every effort should be made to ensure that care does not become compassionate harassment or an invasive act, annulling the patient's autonomy, identity, and self-determination. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Reliable determination of new lipid peroxidation compounds as potential early Alzheimer Disease biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Blanco, Ana; Peña-Bautista, Carmen; Oger, Camille; Vigor, Claire; Galano, Jean-Marie; Durand, Thierry; Martín-Ibáñez, Nuria; Baquero, Miguel; Vento, Máximo; Cháfer-Pericás, Consuelo

    2018-07-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays an important role in Alzheimer Disease, so corresponding metabolites found in urine samples could be potential biomarkers. The aim of this work is to develop a reliable ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analytical method to determine a new set of lipid peroxidation compounds in urine samples. Excellent sensitivity was achieved with limits of detection between 0.08 and 17 nmol L -1 , which renders this method suitable to monitor analytes concentrations in real samples. The method's precision was satisfactory with coefficients of variation around 5-17% (intra-day) and 8-19% (inter-day). The accuracy of the method was assessed by analysis of spiked urine samples obtaining recoveries between 70% and 120% for most of the analytes. The utility of the described method was tested by analyzing urine samples from patients early diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia Alzheimer Disease following the clinical standard criteria. As preliminary results, some analytes (17(RS)-10-epi-SC-Δ 15 -11-dihomo-IsoF, PGE 2 ) and total parameters (Neuroprostanes, Isoprostanes, Isofurans) show differences between the control and the clinical groups. So, these analytes could be potential early Alzheimer Disease biomarkers assessing the patients' pro-oxidant condition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Completed suicide in an autopsy-confirmed case of early onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Jennifer Wiener; Geary, Richard; Gyure, Kymberly; Chivukula, Venkata Ravi; Haut, Marc W

    2018-04-01

    We report a case of a 57-year-old male with clinically diagnosed and autopsy-confirmed early onset Alzheimer's disease who completed suicide by gunshot wound to the chest. This case has several unique aspects that have not been discussed in previous case reports of completed suicide in Alzheimer's disease. In particular, our patient's death was highly planned with successful compensation for his cognitive deficits. After all firearms had been removed from the home as a safety precaution, he obtained a new weapon, hid it and left himself cues to find and use it. The case is discussed in the context of literature differentiating the neural circuitry propagating impulsive versus planned suicidal acts.

  6. Utility of axial images in an early Alzheimer disease diagnosis support system (VSRAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Masami; Aoki, Shigeki; Abe, Osamu

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) has become a popular tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. The Voxel-Based Specific Regional Analysis System for Alzheimer's Disease (VSRAD), a VBM system that uses MRI, has been reported to be clinically useful. The able-bodied person database (DB) of VSRAD, which employs sagittal plane imaging, is not suitable for analysis by axial plane imaging. However, axial plane imaging is useful for avoiding motion artifacts from the eyeball. Therefore, we created an able-bodied person DB by axial plane imaging and examined its utility. We also analyzed groups of able-bodied persons and persons with dementia by axial plane imaging and reviewed the validity. After using the DB of axial plane imaging, the Z-score of the intrahippocampal region improved by 8 in 13 instances. In all brains, the Z-score improved by 13 in all instances. (author)

  7. [Utility of axial images in an early Alzheimer disease diagnosis support system (VSRAD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masami; Aoki, Shigeki; Abe, Osamu; Masumoto, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Yasushi; Satake, Yoshiroh; Nishida, Katsuji; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi; Iida, Kyohhito; Mima, Kazuo; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2006-09-20

    In recent years, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) has become a popular tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. The Voxel-Based Specific Regional Analysis System for Alzheimer's Disease (VSRAD), a VBM system that uses MRI, has been reported to be clinically useful. The able-bodied person database (DB) of VSRAD, which employs sagittal plane imaging, is not suitable for analysis by axial plane imaging. However, axial plane imaging is useful for avoiding motion artifacts from the eyeball. Therefore, we created an able-bodied person DB by axial plane imaging and examined its utility. We also analyzed groups of able-bodied persons and persons with dementia by axial plane imaging and reviewed the validity. After using the DB of axial plane imaging, the Z-score of the intrahippocampal region improved by 8 in 13 instances. In all brains, the Z-score improved by 13 in all instances.

  8. Linguistic ability in early life and the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular disease. Findings from the Nun Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, D A; Greiner, L H; Markesbery, W R

    2000-04-01

    Findings from the Nun Study indicate that low linguistic ability in early life has a strong association with dementia and premature death in late life. In the present study, we investigated the relationship of linguistic ability in early life to the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular disease. The analyses were done on a subset of 74 participants in the Nun Study for whom we had handwritten autobiographies completed some time between the ages of 19 and 37 (mean = 23 years). An average of 62 years after writing the autobiographies, when the participants were 78 to 97 years old, they died and their brains were removed for our neuropathologic studies. Linguistic ability in early life was measured by the idea (proposition) density of the autobiographies, i.e., a standard measure of the content of ideas in text samples. Idea density scores from early life had strong inverse correlations with the severity of Alzheimer's disease pathology in the neocortex: Correlations between idea density scores and neurofibrillary tangle counts were -0.59 for the frontal lobe, -0.48 for the temporal lobe, and -0.49 for the parietal lobe (all p values < 0.0001). Idea density scores were unrelated to the severity of atherosclerosis of the major arteries at the base of the brain and to the presence of lacunar and large brain infarcts. Low linguistic ability in early life may reflect suboptimal neurological and cognitive development, which might increase susceptibility to the development of Alzheimer's disease pathology in late life.

  9. Public-private partnerships improve health outcomes in individuals with early stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, James E; Tolea, Magdalena I; George, Nika; Wingbermuehle, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    In a collaborative effort between the Missouri Department of Health, Area Agencies on Aging (AAA), Alzheimer Association, and academic researchers, we tested whether early dementia detection and comprehensive care consultations would improve health outcomes in care receivers (CRs) and their family caregivers (FCGs), therefore addressing an important public health concern. A total of 244 community-dwelling older adults screened for early-stage dementia by the AAA field staff were referred to the Alzheimer Association and participated in Project Learn MORE (Missouri Outreach and Referral Expanded) (PLM) - a 2-year, nonrandomized multisite intervention consisting of comprehensive care consultations to improve coping skills. PLM participants were compared against 96 controls receiving the Alzheimer Association's "usual services" between January 2011 and December 2012. We examined CR and FCG outcomes, including burden, care confidence, and mood, as effects of PLM, on delaying transitions in level of care. CRs showed improved knowledge (P=0.002) and reduced depression (P=0.007), while FCGs demonstrated improved knowledge (P=0.003) and ability to identify sources of support for the CR (P=0.032) and for themselves (P=0.043). However, FCGs were more burdened after PLM (P=0.02), due to increased awareness of Alzheimer's disease. PLM delayed transitions in care (odds ratio [OR] 3.32, 95% confidence level [CI]: 1.25-8.83) with the number needed to treat =6.82. PLM was successful in improving detection of incident cases of dementia in the community and in connecting patients and their families with needed services. Our findings support the use of state agencies and community service partners to detect dementia. Early implementation of psychosocial interventions could have significant impact in improving patient- and family-centered outcomes, potentially providing a cost-efficient alternative to pharmacotherapy.

  10. Six psychotropics for pre-symptomatic & early Alzheimer's (MCI, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C Lauterbach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quest for neuroprotective drugs to slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs, including Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, and Huntington's disease (HD, has been largely unrewarding. Preclinical evidence suggests that repurposing quetiapine, lithium, valproate, fluoxetine, donepezil, and memantine for early and pre-symptomatic disease-modification in NDDs may be promising and can spare regulatory barriers. The literature of these psychotropics in early stage and pre-symptomatic AD, PD, and HD is reviewed and propitious findings follow. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI phase of AD: salutary human randomized controlled trial findings for low-dose lithium and, in selected patients, donepezil await replication. Pre-symptomatic AD: human epidemiological data indicate that lithium reduces AD risk. Animal model studies (AMS reveal encouraging results for quetiapine, lithium, donepezil, and memantine. Early PD: valproate AMS findings show promise. Pre-symptomatic PD: lithium and valproate AMS findings are encouraging. Early HD: uncontrolled clinical data indicate non-progression with lithium, fluoxetine, donepezil, and memantine. Pre-symptomatic HD: lithium and valproate are auspicious in AMS. Many other promising findings awaiting replication (valproate in MCI; lithium, valproate, fluoxetine in pre-symptomatic AD; lithium in early PD; lithium, valproate, fluoxetine in pre-symptomatic PD; donepezil in early HD; lithium, fluoxetine, memantine in pre-symptomatic HD are reviewed. Dose- and stage-dependent effects are considered. Suggestions for signal-enhancement in human trials are provided for each NDD stage.

  11. [Working memory for music in patients with mild cognitive impairment and early stage Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerer, Manuela; Marksteiner, Josef; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Mazzola, Guerino; Kemmler, Georg; Bliem, Harald R; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2013-01-01

    A variety of studies demonstrated that some forms of memory for music are spared in dementia, but only few studies have investigated patients with early stages of dementia. In this pilot-study we tested working memory for music in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) with a newly created test. The test probed working memory using 7 gradually elongated tone-lines and 6 chords which were each followed by 3 similar items and 1 identical item. The participants of the study, namely 10 patients with MCI, 10 patients with early stage AD and 23 healthy subjects were instructed to select the identical tone-line or chord. Subjects with MCI and early AD showed significantly reduced performance than controls in most of the presented tasks. In recognizing chords MCI- participants surprisingly showed an unimpaired performance. The gradual increase of the impairment during the preclinical phase of AD seems to spare this special ability in MCI.

  12. Linguistic ability in early life and cognitive function and Alzheimer's disease in late life. Findings from the Nun Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, D A; Kemper, S J; Mortimer, J A; Greiner, L H; Wekstein, D R; Markesbery, W R

    1996-02-21

    To determine if linguistic ability in early life is associated with cognitive function and Alzheimer's disease in late life. Two measures of linguistic ability in early life, idea density and grammatical complexity, were derived from autobiographies written at a mean age of 22 years. Approximately 58 years later, the women who wrote these autobiographies participated in an assessment of cognitive function, and those who subsequently died were evaluated neuropathologically. Convents in the United States participating in the Nun Study; primarily convents in the Milwaukee, Wis, area. Cognitive function was investigated in 93 participants who were aged 75 to 95 years at the time of their assessments, and Alzheimer's disease was investigated in the 14 participants who died at 79 to 96 years of age. Seven neuropsychological tests and neuropathologically confirmed Alzheimer's disease. Low idea density and low grammatical complexity in autobiographies written in early life were associated with low cognitive test scores in late life. Low idea density in early life had stronger and more consistent associations with poor cognitive function than did low grammatical complexity. Among the 14 sisters who died, neuropathologically confirmed Alzheimer's disease was present in all of those with low idea density in early life and in none of those with high idea density. Low linguistic ability in early life was a strong predictor of poor cognitive function and Alzheimer's disease in late life.

  13. Early- and late-onset Alzheimer disease: Are they the same entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellechea, P; Pujol, N; Esteve-Belloch, P; Echeveste, B; García-Eulate, M R; Arbizu, J; Riverol, M

    2018-05-01

    Early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD), which presents in patients younger than 65 years, has frequently been described as having different features from those of late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). This review analyses the most recent studies comparing the clinical presentation and neuropsychological, neuropathological, genetic, and neuroimaging findings of both types in order to determine whether EOAD and LOAD are different entities or distinct forms of the same entity. We observed consistent differences between clinical findings in EOAD and in LOAD. Fundamentally, the onset of EOAD is more likely to be marked by atypical symptoms, and cognitive assessments point to poorer executive and visuospatial functioning and praxis with less marked memory impairment. Alzheimer-type features will be more dense and widespread in neuropathology studies, with structural and functional neuroimaging showing greater and more diffuse atrophy extending to neocortical areas (especially the precuneus). In conclusion, available evidence suggests that EOAD and LOAD are 2 different forms of a single entity. LOAD is likely to be influenced by ageing-related processes. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Early Detection of Amyloid Plaque in Alzheimer’s Disease via X-ray Phase CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Geraghty, J. A. Seibert, and S. L. Wootton-Gorges, “Dose reduction in pediatric CT : A rational approach,” Radiology 228, 352–360 (2003). Medical...improvement in image quality can be quantified as large as 450 [Fig. 6(c)] and 350 [Fig. 6(d)] Hounsfield units (HUs), where the Hounsfield unit is defined...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0138 TITLE: Early Detection of Amyloid Plaque in Alzheimer’s Disease via X-ray Phase CT PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  15. Microglial TNF and IL-1 as early disease-modifiers in Alzheimer's-like disease in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilkjær, Laura; Babcock, Alicia; Finsen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) signs of microglial activation is evident already in prodromal and early AD. This and other evidence suggest that neuroinflammation contributes to the progression of the early disease development in AD. Microglial cells have the capacity to produce cytokines such as TNF...... in the APPswe/PS1DE9 mouse model of AD. In these mice, cortical As plaque load shows a sigmoidal trajectory with age, as it does in AD. At 12 months of age, when As pathology is welldeveloped, TNF and IL-1s are produced in significantly higher proportions of microglia in the APPswe/PS1DE9 mice, than in wildtype...

  16. Subjective cognitive concerns and neuropsychiatric predictors of progression to the early clinical stages of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Nancy J; Amariglio, Rebecca E; Zoller, Amy S; Rudel, Rebecca K; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Blacker, Deborah; Hyman, Bradley T; Locascio, Joseph J; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A; Marshall, Gad A; Rentz, Dorene M

    2014-12-01

    To examine neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological predictors of progression from normal to early clinical stages of Alzheimer disease (AD). From a total sample of 559 older adults from the Massachusetts Alzheimer's Disease Research Center longitudinal cohort, 454 were included in the primary analysis: 283 with clinically normal cognition (CN), 115 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 56 with subjective cognitive concerns (SCC) but no objective impairment, a proposed transitional group between CN and MCI. Two latent cognitive factors (memory-semantic, attention-executive) and two neuropsychiatric factors (affective, psychotic) were derived from the Alzheimer's Disease Centers' Uniform Data Set neuropsychological battery and Neuropsychiatric Inventory brief questionnaire. Factors were analyzed as predictors of time to progression to a worse diagnosis using a Cox proportional hazards regression model with backward elimination. Covariates included baseline diagnosis, gender, age, education, prior depression, antidepressant medication, symptom duration, and interaction terms. Higher/better memory-semantic factor score predicted lower hazard of progression (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.4 for 1 standard deviation [SD] increase, p factor score predicted higher hazard (HR = 1.3 for one SD increase, p = 0.01). No other predictors were significant in adjusted analyses. Using diagnosis as a sole predictor of transition to MCI, the SCC diagnosis carried a fourfold risk of progression compared with CN (HR = 4.1, p factors as significant predictors of more rapid progression from normal to early stages of cognitive decline and highlight the subgroup of cognitively normal elderly with SCC as those with elevated risk of progression to MCI. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Early-onset Alzheimer's disease: nonamnestic subtypes and type 2 AD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Mario F

    2012-11-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most prevalent neurodegenerative dementia, are usually elderly; however, ∼4-5% develop early-onset AD (EOAD) with onset before age 65. Most EOAD is sporadic, but about 5% of patients with EOAD have an autosomal dominant mutation such as Presenilin 1, Presenilin 2, or alterations in the Amyloid Precursor Protein gene. Although most Alzheimer's research has concentrated on older, late-onset AD (LOAD), there is much recent interest and research in EOAD. These recent studies indicate that EOAD is a heterogeneous disorder with significant differences from LOAD. From 22-64% of EOAD patients have a predominant nonamnestic syndrome presenting with deficits in language, visuospatial abilities, praxis, or other non-memory cognition. These nonamnestic patients may differ in several ways from the usual memory or amnestic patients. Patients with nonamnestic EOAD compared to typical amnestic AD have a more aggressive course, lack the apolipoprotein Eɛ4 (APOE ɛ4) susceptibility gene for AD, and have a focus and early involvement of non-hippocampal areas of brain, particularly parietal neocortex. These differences in the EOAD subtypes indicate differences in the underlying amyloid cascade, the prevailing pathophysiological theory for the development of AD. Together the results of recent studies suggest that nonamnestic subtypes of EOAD constitute a Type 2 AD distinct from the usual, typical disorder. In sum, the study of EOAD can reveal much about the clinical heterogeneity, predisposing factors, and neurobiology of this disease. Copyright © 2012 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multi-method analysis of MRI images in early diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Wolz

    Full Text Available The role of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is becoming more and more emphasized in the early diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease (AD. This study aimed to assess the improvement in classification accuracy that can be achieved by combining features from different structural MRI analysis techniques. Automatically estimated MR features used are hippocampal volume, tensor-based morphometry, cortical thickness and a novel technique based on manifold learning. Baseline MRIs acquired from all 834 subjects (231 healthy controls (HC, 238 stable mild cognitive impairment (S-MCI, 167 MCI to AD progressors (P-MCI, 198 AD from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI database were used for evaluation. We compared the classification accuracy achieved with linear discriminant analysis (LDA and support vector machines (SVM. The best results achieved with individual features are 90% sensitivity and 84% specificity (HC/AD classification, 64%/66% (S-MCI/P-MCI and 82%/76% (HC/P-MCI with the LDA classifier. The combination of all features improved these results to 93% sensitivity and 85% specificity (HC/AD, 67%/69% (S-MCI/P-MCI and 86%/82% (HC/P-MCI. Compared with previously published results in the ADNI database using individual MR-based features, the presented results show that a comprehensive analysis of MRI images combining multiple features improves classification accuracy and predictive power in detecting early AD. The most stable and reliable classification was achieved when combining all available features.

  19. Hypo Activity of Cholinergic System in Patients with Early Stage of Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidescu, L.; Codorean, I.; Matei, C.; Barret, O.; Mazere, J.; Guyot, M.; Rimbu, A.; Allard, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Objective A cholinergic dysfunction was documented in advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease. In order to specify the cholinergic involvement in early stages, we performed a presynaptic imaging study of the cholinergic system using a vesicular Acetylcholine transporter ligand labelled with iodine 123 ( 123 I-IBVM - Iodobenzovesamicol) Materials And Methods Eight patients (5 women and 3 men, 74-89 years, MMS>23) and 8 controls (6 women and 2 men, 72-80 years, MMS>30) have been evaluated using the neuropsychological tests; cerebral SPECT was performed 6 hours after intravenous injection of 218±19 MBq of 123 I - IBVM (30 min, 3 volume, 128x128) and the 3D MRI (T1 weighted images). Acquisition data were processed by filtered retroprojection (Butterworth 5.35) and analysed with SPM software. Each examination was co-registered with the MRI of the patient, normalised in the MNI template and smoothed (10mm). Results The analyse of the group (two sample T-test, p 123 I-IBVM has been detected in the patients group, compared to the control. Conclusions Our results indicate that cholinergic dysfunctions appear very early in the development of Alzheimer's disease and affect the cortical structures involved in the attention process. Some studies are in progress to analyze imaging data with cognitive impairments of each patient. (author)

  20. Alzheimer's Disease Early Diagnosis Using Manifold-Based Semi-Supervised Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajehnejad, Moein; Saatlou, Forough Habibollahi; Mohammadzade, Hoda

    2017-08-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is currently ranked as the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and recent estimates indicate that the disorder may rank third, just behind heart disease and cancer, as a cause of death for older people. Clearly, predicting this disease in the early stages and preventing it from progressing is of great importance. The diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) requires a variety of medical tests, which leads to huge amounts of multivariate heterogeneous data. It can be difficult and exhausting to manually compare, visualize, and analyze this data due to the heterogeneous nature of medical tests; therefore, an efficient approach for accurate prediction of the condition of the brain through the classification of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images is greatly beneficial and yet very challenging. In this paper, a novel approach is proposed for the diagnosis of very early stages of AD through an efficient classification of brain MRI images, which uses label propagation in a manifold-based semi-supervised learning framework. We first apply voxel morphometry analysis to extract some of the most critical AD-related features of brain images from the original MRI volumes and also gray matter (GM) segmentation volumes. The features must capture the most discriminative properties that vary between a healthy and Alzheimer-affected brain. Next, we perform a principal component analysis (PCA)-based dimension reduction on the extracted features for faster yet sufficiently accurate analysis. To make the best use of the captured features, we present a hybrid manifold learning framework which embeds the feature vectors in a subspace. Next, using a small set of labeled training data, we apply a label propagation method in the created manifold space to predict the labels of the remaining images and classify them in the two groups of mild Alzheimer's and normal condition (MCI/NC). The accuracy of the classification using the proposed method is 93

  1. Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely need to plan for their loved one's future care. The final phase of the disease may ... disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  2. Technetium-99m HM-PAO-SPECT study of regional cerebral perfusion in early Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perani, D.; Di Piero, V.; Vallar, G.

    1988-01-01

    Regional cerebral perfusion was evaluated by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using technetium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime ([/sup 99m/Tc]HM-PAO) in sixteen patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in early clinical phase and in 16 healthy elderly controls. In all patients transmission computed tomography (TCT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not show focal brain abnormalities. Relative to normal subjects, AD patients showed significant reductions in cortical/cerebellar activity ratio: cortical perfusion was globally depressed with the largest reductions in frontal and posterior temporo-parietal cortices. Asymmetries of relative perfusion between cerebral hemispheres were also demonstrated when language was affected or visuospatial functions were unevenly impaired. In patients with early AD, SPECT provides functional information to be compared with clinical and psychometric data

  3. Clinical, genetic, and neuroimaging features of Early Onset Alzheimer Disease: the challenges of diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberici, Antonella; Benussi, Alberto; Premi, Enrico; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Early Onset Alzheimer Disease (EOAD) is a rare condition, frequently associated with genetic causes. The dissemination of genetic testing along with biomarker determinations have prompted a wider recognition of EOAD in experienced clinical settings. However, despite the great efforts in establishing the contribution of causative genes to EOAD, atypical disease presentation and clinical features still makes its diagnosis and treatment a challenge for the clinicians. This review aims to provide an extensive evaluation of literature data on EOAD, in order to improve understanding and knowledge of EOAD, underscore its significant impact on patients and their caregivers and influence public policies. This would be crucial to define the urgency of evidence-based treatment approaches.

  4. Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease and Candidate Risk Genes Involved in Endolysosomal Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Brian W; Vardarajan, Badri N; Naj, Adam C; Whitehead, Patrice L; Rolati, Sophie; Slifer, Susan; Carney, Regina M; Cuccaro, Michael L; Vance, Jeffery M; Gilbert, John R; Wang, Li-San; Farrer, Lindsay A; Reitz, Christiane; Haines, Jonathan L; Beecham, Gary W; Martin, Eden R; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Mayeux, Richard P; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A

    2017-09-01

    Mutations in APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 lead to early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) but account for only approximately 11% of EOAD overall, leaving most of the genetic risk for the most severe form of Alzheimer disease unexplained. This extreme phenotype likely harbors highly penetrant risk variants, making it primed for discovery of novel risk genes and pathways for AD. To search for rare variants contributing to the risk for EOAD. In this case-control study, whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed in 51 non-Hispanic white (NHW) patients with EOAD (age at onset 65 years) from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium. The study was conducted from January 21, 2013, to October 13, 2016. Alzheimer disease diagnosed according to standard National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria. Association between Alzheimer disease and genetic variants and genes was measured using logistic regression and sequence kernel association test-optimal gene tests, respectively. Of the 1524 NHW patients with EOAD, 765 (50.2%) were women and mean (SD) age was 60.0 (4.9) years; of the 7046 NHW patients with LOAD, 4171 (59.2%) were women and mean (SD) age was 77.4 (8.6) years; and of the 7001 NHW controls, 4215 (60.2%) were women and mean (SD) age was 77.4 (8.6) years. The gene PSD2, for which multiple unrelated NHW cases had rare missense variants, was significantly associated with EOAD (P = 2.05 × 10-6; Bonferroni-corrected P value [BP] = 1.3 × 10-3) and LOAD (P = 6.22 × 10-6; BP = 4.1 × 10-3). A missense variant in TCIRG1, present in a NHW patient and segregating in 3 cases of a Hispanic family, was more frequent in EOAD cases (odds ratio [OR], 2.13; 95% CI, 0.99-4.55; P = .06; BP = 0.413), and significantly associated with LOAD (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.37-3.62; P = 7.2 × 10-4; BP = 5.0 × 10-3). A missense variant in the LOAD risk

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain ...

  6. SORL1 rare variants: a major risk factor for familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, G; Charbonnier, C; Wallon, D; Quenez, O; Bellenguez, C; Grenier-Boley, B; Rousseau, S; Richard, A-C; Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Le Guennec, K; Bacq, D; Garnier, J-G; Olaso, R; Boland, A; Meyer, V; Deleuze, J-F; Amouyel, P; Munter, H M; Bourque, G; Lathrop, M; Frebourg, T; Redon, R; Letenneur, L; Dartigues, J-F; Génin, E; Lambert, J-C; Hannequin, D; Campion, D

    2016-06-01

    The SORL1 protein plays a protective role against the secretion of the amyloid β peptide, a key event in the pathogeny of Alzheimer's disease. We assessed the impact of SORL1 rare variants in early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) in a case-control setting. We conducted a whole exome analysis among 484 French EOAD patients and 498 ethnically matched controls. After collapsing rare variants (minor allele frequency ≤1%), we detected an enrichment of disruptive and predicted damaging missense SORL1 variants in cases (odds radio (OR)=5.03, 95% confidence interval (CI)=(2.02-14.99), P=7.49.10(-5)). This enrichment was even stronger when restricting the analysis to the 205 cases with a positive family history (OR=8.86, 95% CI=(3.35-27.31), P=3.82.10(-7)). We conclude that predicted damaging rare SORL1 variants are a strong risk factor for EOAD and that the association signal is mainly driven by cases with positive family history.

  7. Early neurovascular dysfunction in a transgenic rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Illsung L; Lai, Aaron Y; Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; Koletar, Margaret M; Dorr, Adrienne; Brown, Mary E; Thomason, Lynsie A M; Sled, John G; McLaurin, JoAnne; Stefanovic, Bojana

    2017-04-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), pathologically characterized by amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, neurofibrillary tangle formation, and neurodegeneration, is thought to involve early-onset neurovascular abnormalities. Hitherto studies on AD-associated neurovascular injury have used animal models that exhibit only a subset of AD-like pathologies and demonstrated some Aβ-dependent vascular dysfunction and destabilization of neuronal network. The present work focuses on the early stage of disease progression and uses TgF344-AD rats that recapitulate a broader repertoire of AD-like pathologies to investigate the cerebrovascular and neuronal network functioning using in situ two-photon fluorescence microscopy and laminar array recordings of local field potentials, followed by pathological analyses of vascular wall morphology, tau hyperphosphorylation, and amyloid plaques. Concomitant to widespread amyloid deposition and tau hyperphosphorylation, cerebrovascular reactivity was strongly attenuated in cortical penetrating arterioles and venules of TgF344-AD rats in comparison to those in non-transgenic littermates. Blood flow elevation to hypercapnia was abolished in TgF344-AD rats. Concomitantly, the phase-amplitude coupling of the neuronal network was impaired, evidenced by decreased modulation of theta band phase on gamma band amplitude. These results demonstrate significant neurovascular network dysfunction at an early stage of AD-like pathology. Our study identifies early markers of pathology progression and call for development of combinatorial treatment plans.

  8. Atypical early-onset Alzheimer's disease caused by the Iranian APP mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, S.G.; Nielsen, J.E.; Stokholm, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 1% of all cases of Alzheimer's disease are inherited autosomal dominantly, and to date, three causative genes have been found, the Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene, the Presenilin 2 (PSEN2) gene and the Amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. We describe atypical phenotypic...... features in a family with a pathogenic APP gene mutation and discuss possible explanations for these atypical features. METHODS AND RESULTS: We report a family with a history of dementia compatible with autosomal dominant transmission. The disease course in the proband was not typical for Alzheimer......'s disease as the diagnosis was preceded by 8 years of an isolated amnesia. Further, the proband had epilepsy with complex partial seizures and central degenerative autonomic failure as determined by clinical physiology. Sequencing the three known causative Alzheimer genes revealed a pathogenic missense...

  9. Measurement of temporal regional cerebral perfusion with single-photon emission tomography predicts rate of decline in language function and survival in early Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claus, J.J.; Walstra, G.J.M.; Hijdra, A.; Gool, W.A. van [Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Royen, E.A. van [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbeeten, B. Jr. [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1999-03-01

    We determined the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measured with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and decline in cognitive function and survival in Alzheimer`s disease. In a prospective follow-up study, 69 consecutively referred patients with early probable Alzheimer`s disease (NINCDS/ADRDA criteria) underwent SPET performed at the time of initial diagnosis using technetium-99m-labelled hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. Neuropsychological function was assessed at baseline and after 6 months and survival data were available on all patients, extending to 5.5 years of follow-up. Lower left temporal (P<0.01) and lower left parietal (P<0.01) rCBF were statistically significantly related to decline in language function after 6 months. The association between left temporal rCBF and survival was also statistically significant (P<0.05) using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Performing analysis with quartiles of the distribution, we found a threshold effect for low left temporal rCBF (rCBF<73.7%, P<0.01) and high risk of mortality. In this lowest quartile, median survival time was 2.7 years (follow-up to 5.2 years), compared with 4.4 years in the other quartiles (follow-up to 5.5 years). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed statistically significant (P<0.05, log rank test) survival curves for the lowest versus other quartiles of left temporal rCBF. All results were unaffected by adjustment for age, sex, dementia severity, duration of symptoms, education and ratings of local cortical atrophy. We conclude that left temporal rCBF predicts decline in language function and survival in patients with early probable Alzheimer`s disease, with a threshold effect of low rCBF and high risk of mortality. (orig.) With 3 figs., 3 tabs., 44 refs.

  10. Perceptions of stigma among people affected by early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Rosalie

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to explore perceptions of stigma among people with early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease and those who support them, using questionnaires ( n = 44) and semi-structured interviews ( n = 14). Perceived stigma reporting was low in the questionnaires, whereas interviews revealed higher levels of perceived stigma in the form of unpredictable reactions to diagnosis, feeling stupid and ignorance of the condition among the public. Perceived stigma was managed in similar ways across age groups, focusing on 'being the lucky ones'. Results support the need to further tackle stigma and challenge expectations, particularly given the drive to diagnose people and thereby expose them to stigma.

  11. Stabilizing ER Ca2+ channel function as an early preventative strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreaya Chakroborty

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative condition with no known cure. While current therapies target late-stage amyloid formation and cholinergic tone, to date, these strategies have proven ineffective at preventing disease progression. The reasons for this may be varied, and could reflect late intervention, or, that earlier pathogenic mechanisms have been overlooked and permitted to accelerate the disease process. One such example would include synaptic pathology, the disease component strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Dysregulated Ca(2+ homeostasis may be one of the critical factors driving synaptic dysfunction. One of the earliest pathophysiological indicators in mutant presenilin (PS AD mice is increased intracellular Ca(2+ signaling, predominantly through the ER-localized inositol triphosphate (IP(3 and ryanodine receptors (RyR. In particular, the RyR-mediated Ca(2+ upregulation within synaptic compartments is associated with altered synaptic homeostasis and network depression at early (presymptomatic AD stages. Here, we offer an alternative approach to AD therapeutics by stabilizing early pathogenic mechanisms associated with synaptic abnormalities. We targeted the RyR as a means to prevent disease progression, and sub-chronically treated AD mouse models (4-weeks with a novel formulation of the RyR inhibitor, dantrolene. Using 2-photon Ca(2+ imaging and patch clamp recordings, we demonstrate that dantrolene treatment fully normalizes ER Ca(2+ signaling within somatic and dendritic compartments in early and later-stage AD mice in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the elevated RyR2 levels in AD mice are restored to control levels with dantrolene treatment, as are synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Aβ deposition within the cortex and hippocampus is also reduced in dantrolene-treated AD mice. In this study, we highlight the pivotal role of Ca(2+ aberrations in AD, and propose a novel strategy to

  12. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Text size: A A A 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Download the full report: Download ... about memory loss? KNOW THE 10 SIGNS Alzheimer's Disease Facts in Each State The 2018 Alzheimer's Disease ...

  13. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dementia >> Home Text size: A A A 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Download the full report: Download ... worried about memory loss? KNOW THE 10 SIGNS Alzheimer's Disease Facts in Each State The 2018 Alzheimer's Disease ...

  14. Enrichment of MCI and early Alzheimer's disease treatment trials using neurochemical and imaging candidate biomarkers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, H

    2012-02-01

    In the earliest clinical stages of Alzheimer\\'s Disease (AD), when symptoms are mild, clinical diagnosis will still be difficult. AD related molecular mechanisms precede symptoms. Biological markers can serve as early diagnostic indicators, as markers of preclinical pathological change, e.g. underlying mechanisms of action (MoA). Hypothesis based candidates are derived from structural and functional neuroimaging as well as from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma. Unbiased exploratory approaches e.g. proteome analysis or rater independent fully automated imaging post-processing methods yield novel candidates. Recent progress in the validation of core feasible imaging and neurochemical biomarkers for functions such as early detection, classification, progression and prediction of AD is summarized. Single core feasible biomarkers can already be used to enrich populations at risk for AD and may be further enhanced using distinct combinations. Some biomarkers are currently in the process of implementation as primary or secondary outcome variables into regulatory guideline documents, e.g. regarding phase II in drug development programs as outcome measures in proof of concept or dose finding studies. There are specific biomarkers available depending on the hypothesized mechanism of action of a medicinal product, e.g. impact on the amyloidogenic cascade or on tauhyperphosphorylation. Ongoing large-scale international controlled multi-center trials will provide further validation of selected core feasible imaging and CSF biomarker candidates as outcome measures in early AD for use in phase III clinical efficacy trials. There is a need of rigorous co-development of biological trait- and statemarker candidates facilitated through planned synergistic collaboration between academic, industrial and regulatory partners.

  15. Driving in Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease: An Integrative Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rebecca L; Ohman, Jennifer M

    2017-03-01

    One of the most difficult decisions for individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is when to stop driving. Because driving is a fundamental activity linked to socialization, independent functioning, and well-being, making the decision to stop driving is not easy. Cognitive decline in older adults can lead to getting lost while driving, difficulty detecting and avoiding hazards, as well as increased errors while driving due to compromised judgment and difficulty in making decisions. The purpose of the current literature review was to synthesize evidence regarding how individuals with early-stage AD, their families, and providers make determinations about driving safety, interventions to increase driving safety, and methods to assist cessation and coping for individuals with early-stage AD. The evidence shows that changes in driving ability start early and progress throughout the trajectory of AD. Some individuals with mild cognitive impairment or early-stage AD may be safe to drive for a period of time. Support groups aimed at helping with the transition have been shown to be helpful for individuals who stop driving. Research and practice must support interventions to help individuals maintain safety while driving, as well as cope with driving cessation. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2017; 10(2):86-100.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Gender's Effects to the Early Symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease in 5 Asian Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan-Han; Meguro, Kenichi; Dominguez, Jacqueline; Chen, Christopher Li-Hsian; Wang, Huali; Ong, Paulus Anam

    2017-06-01

    Asia has the greatest population and more patients with dementia in the world. Early recognition of clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is crucial for dementia care. In order to foster collaboration in AD care, a uniformed manner to report the early clinical symptoms of AD is necessary. We have recruited clinically diagnosed patients with AD at their very mild stage with Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) 0.5 in Taiwan, Japan, China, Philippines, and Singapore. Demographic characteristics and psychometrics including Ascertain of Dementia-8 (AD8) questionnaire were administrated to collect and report the clinical presentation in these countries. In total, 713 clinically diagnosed patients with AD at very mild stage, CDR 0.5, have been recruited from these 5 countries. "Repeats questions, stories, or statements" were consistently the frequently reported symptom across these countries. Taiwan, China, and Singapore have the higher AD8 total score compared to that in Japan and Philippines. Japan and Philippines have the gender-related differences in clinical presentation of early AD. Difficulties in using small trouble appliance and in handling complicated financial affairs were frequently reported in Japan female, compared to male, patients with AD. Identifying the clinical symptom of AD and the gender-related issues would be crucial in the dementia care in Asia.

  17. A new Brief computerized cognitive screening battery (CompCogs for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenice Charchat Fichman

    Full Text Available Abstract Screening tests for early diagnosis of dementia are of great clinical relevance. The ideal test set must be brief and reliable, and should probe cognitive components impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Objectives: To develop a new Computerized Cognitive Screening test (CompCogs, and to investigate its validity for the early diagnosis of AD, and evaluate its heuristic value in understanding the processing of information in AD. Methods: The computerized neuropsychological performance battery, originally including six tests, was applied in forty seven patients with probable mild AD and 97 controls matched for age and education. This computerized neuropsychological test battery, developed with MEL Professional, allows control of timing and order of stimuli presentation, as well as recording of response type and latency. A brief-screening version, CompCogs, was selected using the most discriminative neuropsychological test variables derived from logistic regression analysis. Full battery administration lasted about 40 minutes, while the CompCogs took only 15 minutes. Results: CompCogs included the Face test (correct response and Word and Forms with Short term memory tests (reaction time. CompCogs presented 91.8% sensitivity and 93.6% specificity for the diagnosis of AD using ROC analyses of AD diagnosis probability derived by logistic regression. Conclusions: CompCogs showed high validity for AD early diagnosis and, therefore, may be a useful alternative screening instrument.

  18. Correlation between white matter alterations and cognitive function decline in early Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Hongyan; Qi Ji; Wang Mingshi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) on white matter (WM) integrity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and its relationship with cognitive function decline. Methods: DTI was performed in 32 subjects, including 14 early AD patients and 18 elder controls (ON) with a 1.5 T MR scanner. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (b) values were computed and compared for 9 regions of interest (ROI). Eight standard neuropsychological tests were performed and compared between AD and ON to evaluate basic cognitive capacities of AD. Correlation analysis was applied between FA, D values and scores of neuropsychological tests for all subjects. Results: FA significantly decreased in splenium of the corpus callosum and the posterior parietal-temporal region (S2), and (D)-bar significantly increased in the splenium in AD patients (P<0.05). AD patients showed lower scores compared with ON in all neuropsychological tests (P<0.05). FA of the splenium and S2 positively correlated with several tests scores, while D of multiple ROIs negatively correlated with several tests scores (P<0.05). Conclusions: In the early stage of AD, neuropathology has effect not only on cognitive function, but also on white matter structure, and they have strong relationship. AD patients show white matter changes in specific regions, which reflect loss in cortico-cortical connections. (authors)

  19. Widespread disruption of functional brain organization in early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie M Adriaanse

    Full Text Available Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD patients present a different clinical profile than late-onset AD patients. This can be partially explained by cortical atrophy, although brain organization might provide more insight. The aim of this study was to examine functional connectivity in early-onset and late-onset AD patients. Resting-state fMRI scans of 20 early-onset (<65 years old, 28 late-onset (≥65 years old AD patients and 15 "young" (<65 years old and 31 "old" (≥65 years old age-matched controls were available. Resting-state network-masks were used to create subject-specific maps. Group differences were examined using a non-parametric permutation test, accounting for gray-matter. Performance on five cognitive domains were used in a correlation analysis with functional connectivity in AD patients. Functional connectivity was not different in any of the RSNs when comparing the two control groups (young vs. old controls, which implies that there is no general effect of aging on functional connectivity. Functional connectivity in early-onset AD was lower in all networks compared to age-matched controls, where late-onset AD showed lower functional connectivity in the default-mode network. Functional connectivity was lower in early-onset compared to late-onset AD in auditory-, sensory-motor, dorsal-visual systems and the default mode network. Across patients, an association of functional connectivity of the default mode network was found with visuoconstruction. Functional connectivity of the right dorsal visual system was associated with attention across patients. In late-onset AD patients alone, higher functional connectivity of the sensory-motor system was associated with poorer memory performance. Functional brain organization was more widely disrupted in early-onset AD when compared to late-onset AD. This could possibly explain different clinical profiles, although more research into the relationship of functional connectivity and cognitive

  20. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; Khoury, Joseph El

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia......, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded...... therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease....

  1. Early brain connectivity alterations and cognitive impairment in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Tudela, Raúl; López-Gil, Xavier; Soria, Guadalupe

    2018-02-07

    Animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are essential to understanding the disease progression and to development of early biomarkers. Because AD has been described as a disconnection syndrome, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based connectomics provides a highly translational approach to characterizing the disruption in connectivity associated with the disease. In this study, a transgenic rat model of AD (TgF344-AD) was analyzed to describe both cognitive performance and brain connectivity at an early stage (5 months of age) before a significant concentration of β-amyloid plaques is present. Cognitive abilities were assessed by a delayed nonmatch-to-sample (DNMS) task preceded by a training phase where the animals learned the task. The number of training sessions required to achieve a learning criterion was recorded and evaluated. After DNMS, MRI acquisition was performed, including diffusion-weighted MRI and resting-state functional MRI, which were processed to obtain the structural and functional connectomes, respectively. Global and regional graph metrics were computed to evaluate network organization in both transgenic and control rats. The results pointed to a delay in learning the working memory-related task in the AD rats, which also completed a lower number of trials in the DNMS task. Regarding connectivity properties, less efficient organization of the structural brain networks of the transgenic rats with respect to controls was observed. Specific regional differences in connectivity were identified in both structural and functional networks. In addition, a strong correlation was observed between cognitive performance and brain networks, including whole-brain structural connectivity as well as functional and structural network metrics of regions related to memory and reward processes. In this study, connectivity and neurocognitive impairments were identified in TgF344-AD rats at a very early stage of the disease when most of the pathological hallmarks

  2. Augmentation of sensory-evoked hemodynamic response in an early Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinho; Jeong, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Based on enlarged blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in cognitively normal subjects at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), compensatory neuronal hyperactivation has been proposed as an early marker for diagnosis of AD. The BOLD response results from neurovascular coupling, i.e., hemodynamic response induced by neuronal activity. However, there has been no evidence of task-induced increases in hemodynamic response in animal models of AD. Here, we observed an augmented hemodynamic response pattern in a transgenic AβPP(SWE)/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD using three in vivo imaging methods: intrinsic optical signal imaging, multi-photon laser scanning microscopy, and laser Doppler flowmetry. Sensory stimulation resulted in augmented and prolonged hemodynamic responses in transgenic mice evidenced by changes in total, oxygenated, and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration. This difference between transgenic and wild-type mice was significant at 7 months of age when amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy had developed but not at younger or older ages. Correspondingly, sensory stimulation-induced pial arteriole diameter was also augmented and prolonged in transgenic mice at 7 months of age. Cerebral blood flow response in transgenic mice was augmented but not prolonged. These results are consistent with the existence of BOLD signal hyperactivation in non-demented AD-risk human subjects, supporting its potential use as an early diagnostic marker of AD.

  3. Recall and recognition of verbal paired associates in early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowndes, G J; Saling, M M; Ames, D; Chiu, E; Gonzalez, L M; Savage, G R

    2008-07-01

    The primary impairment in early Alzheimer's disease (AD) is encoding/consolidation, resulting from medial temporal lobe (MTL) pathology. AD patients perform poorly on cued-recall paired associate learning (PAL) tasks, which assess the ability of the MTLs to encode relational memory. Since encoding and retrieval processes are confounded within performance indexes on cued-recall PAL, its specificity for AD is limited. Recognition paradigms tend to show good specificity for AD, and are well tolerated, but are typically less sensitive than recall tasks. Associate-recognition is a novel PAL task requiring a combination of recall and recognition processes. We administered a verbal associate-recognition test and cued-recall analogue to 22 early AD patients and 55 elderly controls to compare their ability to discriminate these groups. Both paradigms used eight arbitrarily related word pairs (e.g., pool-teeth) with varying degrees of imageability. Associate-recognition was equally effective as the cued-recall analogue in discriminating the groups, and logistic regression demonstrated classification rates by both tasks were equivalent. These preliminary findings provide support for the clinical value of this recognition tool. Conceptually it has potential for greater specificity in informing neuropsychological diagnosis of AD in clinical samples but this requires further empirical support.

  4. Mental flexibility impairment in drivers with early Alzheimer's disease: A simulator-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Etienne

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available After memory impairment, one of the most common troubles of early Alzheimer's disease (AD is the impairment of executive functioning. However, it can have major consequences on daily life, notably on the driving activity. The present study focused on one important executive function involved in driving: mental flexibility; and considered how this impairment can affect driving. Ten patients with early AD were matched with 29 healthy older drivers. All participants were given an evaluation of mental flexibility through neuropsychological tests and an experimental test developed on a static driving simulator. The experiment was divided in two conditions; one without mental flexibility and another condition with a mental flexibility demand. AD patients showed impairments in the neuropsychological tests evaluating mental flexibility. These deficits are linked to the deficits they showed in the driving simulator flexibility tests. This study contributes to the understanding of mental flexibility mechanisms and on their role in driving activity. It also confirms that the driving simulator is a suitable tool to explore cognitive disorders and driving ability.

  5. Clinical Evaluation of Brain Perfusion SPECT with Brodmann Areas Mapping in Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Papatriantafyllou, John; Sifakis, Nikolaos; Tzavara, Chara; Tsougos, Ioannis; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Kapsalaki, Eftychia; Hadjigeorgiou, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on clinical criteria alone may be problematic, while current and future treatments should be administered earlier in order to be more effective. Thus, various disease biomarkers could be used for early detection of AD. We evaluated brain perfusion with 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and Brodmann areas (BAs) mapping in mild AD using an automated software (NeuroGam) for the semi-quantitative evaluation of perfusion in BAs and the comparison with the software's normal database. We studied 34 consecutive patients with mild AD: 9 men, 25 women, mean age 70.9 ± 8.1 years, mean Mini-Mental State Examination 22.6 ± 2.5. BAs 25L, 25R, 38L, 38R, 28L, 28R, 36L, and 36R had the lower mean perfusion values, while BAs 31L, 31R, 19R, 18L, 18R, 17L, and 17R had the higher mean values. Compared with healthy subjects of the same age, perfusion values in BAs 25L, 25R, 28R, 28L, 36L, and 36R had the greatest deviations from the healthy sample, while the lowest deviations were found in BAs 32L, 32R, 19R, 24L, 17L, 17R, 18L, and 18R. A percentage of ≥94% of patients had perfusion values more than -2SDs below the mean of healthy subjects in BAs 38R, 38L, 36L, 36R, 23L, 23R, 22L, 44L, 28L, 28R, 25L, and 25R. The corresponding proportion was less than 38% for BAs 11L, 19R, 32L, 32R, 18L, 18R, 24L, and 17R. In conclusion, brain SPECT studies with automated perfusion mapping could be useful as an ancillary tool in daily practice, revealing perfusion impairments in early AD.

  6. Review of the Ethical Issues of a Biomarker-Based Diagnoses in the Early Stage of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderschaeghe, Gwendolien; Dierickx, Kris; Vandenberghe, Rik

    2018-03-12

    Today, many healthcare or dementia organizations, clinicians, and companies emphasize the importance of detection of Alzheimer's disease in an early phase. This idea has gained considerable momentum due to the development of biomarkers, the recent FDA and EMA approval of three amyloid tracers, and the failure of a number of recent therapeutic trials conducted in the early dementia phase. On the one hand, an early etiological diagnosis can lead to early and more efficacious intervention. On the other hand, it is questioned how early an etiological diagnosis is beneficial to the patient. Here we consider ethical issues related to the process of biomarker testing and the impact on the diagnostic disclosure to patients with mild cognitive impairment due to prodromal Alzheimer's disease. A systematic review of the theoretical bioethics literature was performed by using electronic databases. The review was limited to articles published in English between 2003 and 2016. A total of twenty articles were included in our effort to make an analysis of the ethical challenges. One of the biggest challenges was the uncertainty and the predictive value of the biomarker-based diagnosis where patients can be amyloid positive without full certainty whether or when they will develop symptomatic decline due to Alzheimer's disease. Another challenge was the tension between the right to know versus the wish not to know, the limited efficacy of currently available treatment options, and the opportunities and consequences after receiving such an early diagnosis. Based on the results and the additional comments in the discussion, several unanswered questions emerged. Therefore, careful consideration of all these ethical issues is required before the disclosure of a biomarker-based diagnosis to the patient with mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Early etiology of Alzheimer's disease: tipping the balance toward autophagy or endosomal dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric, Aleksandar; Annaert, Wim

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. This brain neuropathology is characterized by a progressive synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss, which lead to decline in memory and other cognitive functions. Histopathologically, AD manifests via synaptic abnormalities, neuronal degeneration as well as the deposition of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles. While the exact pathogenic contribution of these two AD hallmarks and their abundant constituents [aggregation-prone amyloid β (Aβ) peptide species and hyperphosphorylated tau protein, respectively] remain debated, a growing body of evidence suggests that their development may be paralleled or even preceded by the alterations/dysfunctions in the endolysosomal and the autophagic system. In AD-affected neurons, abnormalities in these cellular pathways are readily observed already at early stages of disease development, and even though many studies agree that defective lysosomal degradation may relate to or even underlie some of these deficits, specific upstream molecular defects are still deliberated. In this review we summarize various pathogenic events that may lead to these cellular abnormalities, in light of our current understanding of molecular mechanisms that govern AD progression. In addition, we also highlight the increasing evidence supporting mutual functional dependence of the endolysosomal trafficking and autophagy, in particular focusing on those molecules and processes which may be of significance to AD.

  8. Serum neurofilament light in familial Alzheimer disease: A marker of early neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Philip S J; Poole, Teresa; Ryan, Natalie S; Nair, Akshay; Liang, Yuying; Macpherson, Kirsty; Druyeh, Ronald; Malone, Ian B; Ahsan, R Laila; Pemberton, Hugh; Klimova, Jana; Mead, Simon; Blennow, Kaj; Rossor, Martin N; Schott, Jonathan M; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fox, Nick C

    2017-11-21

    To investigate whether serum neurofilament light (NfL) concentration is increased in familial Alzheimer disease (FAD), both pre and post symptom onset, and whether it is associated with markers of disease stage and severity. We recruited 48 individuals from families with PSEN1 or APP mutations to a cross-sectional study: 18 had symptomatic Alzheimer disease (AD) and 30 were asymptomatic but at 50% risk of carrying a mutation. Serum NfL was measured using an ultrasensitive immunoassay on the single molecule array (Simoa) platform. Cognitive testing and MRI were performed; 33 participants had serial MRI, allowing calculation of atrophy rates. Genetic testing established mutation status. A generalized least squares regression model was used to compare serum NfL among symptomatic mutation carriers, presymptomatic carriers, and noncarriers, adjusting for age and sex. Spearman coefficients assessed associations between serum NfL and (1) estimated years to/from symptom onset (EYO), (2) cognitive measures, and (3) MRI measures of atrophy. Nineteen of the asymptomatic participants were mutation carriers (mean EYO -9.6); 11 were noncarriers. Compared with noncarriers, serum NfL concentration was higher in both symptomatic ( p < 0.0001) and presymptomatic mutation carriers ( p = 0.007). Across all mutation carriers, serum NfL correlated with EYO (ρ = 0.81, p < 0.0001) and multiple cognitive and imaging measures, including Mini-Mental State Examination (ρ = -0.62, p = 0.0001), Clinical Dementia Rating Scale sum of boxes (ρ = 0.79, p < 0.0001), baseline brain volume (ρ = -0.62, p = 0.0002), and whole-brain atrophy rate (ρ = 0.53, p = 0.01). Serum NfL concentration is increased in FAD prior to symptom onset and correlates with measures of disease stage and severity. Serum NfL may thus be a feasible biomarker of early AD-related neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Hippocampal disconnection in early Alzheimer's disease: a 7 tesla MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisse, L.E.; Reijmer, Y.D.; Telgte, A. ter; Kuijf, H.J.; Leemans, A.; Luijten, P.R.; Koek, H.L.; Geerlings, M.I.; Biessels, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), atrophy of the entorhinal cortex (ERC) and hippocampal formation may induce degeneration of connecting white matter tracts. OBJECTIVE: We examined the association of hippocampal subfield and ERC atrophy at 7 tesla MRI with fornix and

  10. Scoring by nonlocal image patch estimator for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coupé, Pierrick; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Manjón, José V.

    2012-01-01

    Detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at the first stages of the pathology is an important task to accelerate the development of new therapies and improve treatment. Compared to AD detection, the prediction of AD using structural MRI at the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or pre-MCI stage is more...

  11. Cerebral serotonin 4 receptors and amyloid-β in early Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karine; Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Holst, Klaus Kähler

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) patients in relation to cortical Aß burden. Eleven newly diagnosed untreated AD patients (mean MMSE 24, range 19–27) and twelve age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent a two-hour dynamic [11C]SB207145 PET scan to measure the binding potential of the 5-HT4 receptor. All AD...

  12. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... health and long-term care costs. worried about memory loss? KNOW THE 10 SIGNS Alzheimer's Disease Facts ... Copyright © 2018 Alzheimer's Association ® . All rights reserved. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, ...

  13. What can we learn from study of Alzheimer's disease in patients with Down syndrome for early-onset Alzheimer's disease in the general population?

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Robyn A; Dalton, Arthur J

    2011-01-01

    The clinical and scientific study of dementia in adults with Down syndrome led to the development of the amyloid hypothesis as a fundamental concept in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. The journey started with the discovery of the structure and metabolic processing of ?-amyloid brain deposits associated with Alzheimer's dementia in adults with Down syndrome, and then the prediction and confirmation of the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21. The processes and genes responsible fo...

  14. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heneka, Michael T.; Carson, Monica J.; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E.; Brosseron, Frederic; Feinstein, Douglas L.; Jacobs, Andreas H.; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A.; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C.; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L.; Perry, V. Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Brooks, David J.; Hunot, Stephane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A.; Breitner, John C.; Cole, Greg M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Kummer, Markus P.

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and

  15. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heneka, M.T.; Carson, M.J.; Khoury, J. El; Landreth, G.E.; Brosseron, F.; Feinstein, D.L.; Jacobs, A.H.; Wyss-Coray, T.; Vitorica, J.; Ransohoff, R.M.; Herrup, K.; Frautschy, S.A.; Finsen, B.; Brown, G.C.; Verkhratsky, A.; Yamanaka, K.; Koistinaho, J.; Latz, E.; Halle, A.; Petzold, G.C.; Town, T.; Morgan, D.; Shinohara, M.L.; Perry, V.H.; Holmes, C.; Bazan, N.G.; Brooks, D.J.; Hunot, S.; Joseph, B.; Deigendesch, N.; Garaschuk, O.; Boddeke, E.; Dinarello, C.A.; Breitner, J.C.; Cole, G.M.; Golenbock, D.T.; Kummer, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and

  16. Functional implications of hippocampal degeneration in early Alzheimer's disease: a combined DTI and PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakushev, Igor; Mueller, Matthias J.; Schermuly, Ingrid; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Schreckenberger, Matthias; Cumming, Paul; Stoeter, Peter; Gerhard, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Hypometabolism of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in early Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to arise in part due to AD-specific neuronal damage to the hippocampal formation. Here, we explored the association between microstructural alterations within the hippocampus and whole-brain glucose metabolism in subjects with AD, also in relation to episodic memory impairment. Twenty patients with early AD (Mini-Mental State Examination 25.7 ± 1.7) were studied with [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and diffusion tensor imaging. Episodic memory performance was assessed using the free delayed verbal recall task (DVR). Voxel-wise relative FDG uptake was correlated to diffusivity indices of the hippocampus, followed by extraction of FDG uptake values from significant clusters. Linear regression analysis was performed to test for unique contributions of diffusivity and metabolic indices in the prediction of memory function. Diffusivity in the left anterior hippocampus negatively correlated with FDG uptake primarily in the left anterior hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and the PCC (p< 0.005). The same correlation pattern was found for right hippocampal diffusivity (p< 0.05). In linear regression analysis, left anterior hippocampal diffusivity and FDG uptake from the PCC cluster were the only significant predictors for performance on DVR, together explaining 60.6% of the variance. We found an inverse association between anterior hippocampal diffusivity and PCC glucose metabolism, which was in turn strongly related to episodic memory performance in subjects with early AD. These findings support the diaschisis hypothesis of AD and implicate a dysfunction of structures along the hippocampal output pathways as a significant contributor to the genesis of episodic memory impairment. (orig.)

  17. A sensitive detection assay based on signal amplification technology for Alzheimer's disease's early biomarker in exosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Meng, Lingchang; Ye, Weiran; Wang, Qiaolei; Geng, Shizhen; Sun, Chong

    2018-08-31

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) considered as the third health "killer" has seriously threatened the health of the elderly. However, the modern diagnostic strategies of AD present several disadvantages: the low accuracy and specificity resulting in some false-negative diagnoses, and the poor sensitivity leading to a delayed treatment. In view of this situation, a enzyme-free and target-triggered signal amplification strategy, based on graphene oxide (GO) and entropy-driven strand displacement reaction (ESDR) principle, was proposed. In this strategy, when the hairpin structure probes (H)specially binds with beta-amyloid-(1-42) oligomers (Aβ42 oligomers), it's structure will be opened, causing the bases complementary to FAM-labeled replacement probes R (R1 and R2) exposed. At this time, R1 and R2 will hybridize with H, resulting in the bound Aβ42 oligomers released. The released Aβ42 oligomers would participate in the next cycle reaction, making the signal amplified. As a quencher, GO could absorb the free single-stranded DNA R1 and R2 and quench their fluorescence; however, the DNA duplex still exists free and keeps its signal-on. Through the detection of Aβ42 oligomers in exosomes, this ultrasensitive detection method with the advantages of low limit of detection (LOD, 20 pM), great accuracy, excellent precision and convenience provides an excellent prospect for AD's early diagnosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. High frequency of potentially pathogenic SORL1 mutations in autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, C; Hannequin, D; Coutant, S; Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Wallon, D; Rousseau, S; Legallic, S; Paquet, C; Bombois, S; Pariente, J; Thomas-Anterion, C; Michon, A; Croisile, B; Etcharry-Bouyx, F; Berr, C; Dartigues, J-F; Amouyel, P; Dauchel, H; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, C; Thauvin, C; Frebourg, T; Lambert, J-C; Campion, D

    2012-09-01

    Performing exome sequencing in 14 autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) index cases without mutation on known genes (amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin1 (PSEN1) and presenilin2 (PSEN2)), we found that in five patients, the SORL1 gene harbored unknown nonsense (n=1) or missense (n=4) mutations. These mutations were not retrieved in 1500 controls of same ethnic origin. In a replication sample, including 15 ADEOAD cases, 2 unknown non-synonymous mutations (1 missense, 1 nonsense) were retrieved, thus yielding to a total of 7/29 unknown mutations in the combined sample. Using in silico predictions, we conclude that these seven private mutations are likely to have a pathogenic effect. SORL1 encodes the Sortilin-related receptor LR11/SorLA, a protein involved in the control of amyloid beta peptide production. Our results suggest that besides the involvement of the APP and PSEN genes, further genetic heterogeneity, involving another gene of the same pathway is present in ADEOAD.

  19. Efficient mining of association rules for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, R; Gorriz, J M; Ramirez, J; Illan, I A; Salas-Gonzalez, D; Gomez-RIo, M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel technique based on association rules (ARs) is presented in order to find relations among activated brain areas in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. In this sense, the aim of this work is to discover associations among attributes which characterize the perfusion patterns of normal subjects and to make use of them for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Firstly, voxel-as-feature-based activation estimation methods are used to find the tridimensional activated brain regions of interest (ROIs) for each patient. These ROIs serve as input to secondly mine ARs with a minimum support and confidence among activation blocks by using a set of controls. In this context, support and confidence measures are related to the proportion of functional areas which are singularly and mutually activated across the brain. Finally, we perform image classification by comparing the number of ARs verified by each subject under test to a given threshold that depends on the number of previously mined rules. Several classification experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the proposed methods using a SPECT database that consists of 41 controls (NOR) and 56 AD patients labeled by trained physicians. The proposed methods were validated by means of the leave-one-out cross validation strategy, yielding up to 94.87% classification accuracy, thus outperforming recent developed methods for computer aided diagnosis of AD.

  20. Efficient mining of association rules for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, R.; Górriz, J. M.; Ramírez, J.; Illán, I. A.; Salas-Gonzalez, D.; Gómez-Río, M.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, a novel technique based on association rules (ARs) is presented in order to find relations among activated brain areas in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. In this sense, the aim of this work is to discover associations among attributes which characterize the perfusion patterns of normal subjects and to make use of them for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Firstly, voxel-as-feature-based activation estimation methods are used to find the tridimensional activated brain regions of interest (ROIs) for each patient. These ROIs serve as input to secondly mine ARs with a minimum support and confidence among activation blocks by using a set of controls. In this context, support and confidence measures are related to the proportion of functional areas which are singularly and mutually activated across the brain. Finally, we perform image classification by comparing the number of ARs verified by each subject under test to a given threshold that depends on the number of previously mined rules. Several classification experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the proposed methods using a SPECT database that consists of 41 controls (NOR) and 56 AD patients labeled by trained physicians. The proposed methods were validated by means of the leave-one-out cross validation strategy, yielding up to 94.87% classification accuracy, thus outperforming recent developed methods for computer aided diagnosis of AD.

  1. Cerebral imaging revealing Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral imaging is the only non-invasive means of examining the brain and is essential in studying Alzheimer's disease. As a tool for early diagnosis, evaluation and treatment monitoring, this technology is at the heart of the research being done to further improve its reliability and sensitivity. (authors)

  2. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutritional supplementation for Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Thomas B; Remington, Ruth

    2015-03-01

    Evidence for the benefit of nutrition in Alzheimer's disease continues to accumulate. Many studies with individual vitamins or supplements show marginal, if any, benefit. However, new findings with combinatorial formulations demonstrate improvement in cognitive performance and behavioral difficulties that accompany Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we review some of the most recent clinical advances and summarize supportive preclinical studies. We present novel positive effects on Alzheimer's disease derived from diet, trace elements, vitamins and supplements. We discuss the inherent difficulty in conducting nutritional studies because of the variance in participants' nutritional history, versus pharmacological interventions in which participants are naive to the intervention. We examine the evidence that epigenetics play a role in Alzheimer's disease and how nutritional intervention can modify the key epigenetic events to maintain or improve cognitive performance. Overall consideration of the most recent collective evidence suggests that the optimal approach for Alzheimer's disease would seem to combine early, multicomponent nutritional approaches (a Mediterranean-style diet, multivitamins and key combinatorial supplements), along with lifestyle modifications such as social activity and mental and physical exercise, with ultimate addition of pharmacological agents when warranted.

  4. Doença de Alzheimer esporádica de início precoce Sporadic early onset Alzheimer´s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annibal Truzzi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Alzheimer (DA é a principal causa de demência. Um subgrupo de pacientes apresenta sua forma familiar ou precoce (Alzheimer's disease (AD is the main cause of dementia. A subgroup of patients has the familial or early-onset (<65 years form of AD, with rapid course and a dominant genetic transmission through many generations. We report a case of a patient without a positive familiar history for AD, who presented early memory problems and progressive functional and cognitive (speech, praxis, executive functions e viso-spatial habilities decline. Behavioural (imnsonia, psychomotor agitation and hypersexuality and psychological (depression symptoms of AD were noticed in different stages of the disease. Structural and functional neuroimaging techniques showed impairment of posterior cortical areas. Early onset AD can be confounded with psychiatric disorders especially when there is no familiar history for AD. The presenile impact on both patient and family is intense and treatment in the early stages is very important to reduce patient and caregivers' burden.

  5. Precuneus atrophy in early-onset Alzheimer's disease: a morphometric structural MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karas, Giorgos; Scheltens, Philip; Jones, Bethany; Rombouts, Serge; Schijndel, Ronald van; Klein, Martin; Flier, Wiesje van der; Vrenken, Hugo; Barkhof, Frederik

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) usually first presents in elderly patients, but may also develop at an earlier age. Patients with an early age at onset tend to present with complaints other than memory impairment, such as visuospatial problems or apraxia, which may reflect a different distribution of cortical involvement. In this study we set out to investigate whether age at onset in patients with AD determines the pattern of atrophy on cerebral MRI scans. We examined 55 patients with AD over a wide age range and analyzed their 3-D T1-weighted structural MRI scans in standard space using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Regression analysis was performed to estimate loss of grey matter as a function of age, corrected for mini-mental state examination (MMSE) scores and sex. The VBM analyses identified multiple areas (including the temporal and parietal lobes), showing more atrophy with advancing age. By contrast, a younger age at onset was found to be associated with lower grey matter density in the precuneus. Regionalized volumetric analysis of this region confirmed the existence of disproportionate atrophy in the precuneus in patients with early-onset AD. Application of a multivariate model with precuneus grey matter density as input, showed that precuneal and hippocampal atrophy are independent from each other. Additionally, we found that a smaller precuneus is associated with impaired visuospatial functioning. Our findings support the notion that age at onset modulates the distribution of cortical involvement, and that disproportionate precuneus atrophy is more prominent in patients with a younger age of onset. (orig.)

  6. Early Astrocytic Atrophy in the Entorhinal Cortex of a Triple Transgenic Animal Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yu Yeh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The EC (entorhinal cortex is fundamental for cognitive and mnesic functions. Thus damage to this area appears as a key element in the progression of AD (Alzheimer's disease, resulting in memory deficits arising from neuronal and synaptic alterations as well as glial malfunction. In this paper, we have performed an in-depth analysis of astroglial morphology in the EC by measuring the surface and volume of the GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein profiles in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD [3xTg-AD (triple transgenic mice of AD]. We found significant reduction in both the surface and volume of GFAP-labelled profiles in 3xTg-AD animals from very early ages (1 month when compared with non-Tg (non-transgenic controls (48 and 54%, reduction respectively, which was sustained for up to 12 months (33 and 45% reduction respectively. The appearance of Aβ (amyloid β-peptide depositions at 12 months of age did not trigger astroglial hypertrophy; nor did it result in the close association of astrocytes with senile plaques. Our results suggest that the AD progressive cognitive deterioration can be associated with an early reduction of astrocytic arborization and shrinkage of the astroglial domain, which may affect synaptic connectivity within the EC and between the EC and other brain regions. In addition, the EC seems to be particularly vulnerable to AD pathology because of the absence of evident astrogliosis in response to Aβ accumulation. Thus we can consider that targeting astroglial atrophy may represent a therapeutic strategy which might slow down the progression of AD.

  7. Modeling screening, prevention, and delaying of Alzheimer's disease: an early-stage decision analytic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siemers Eric R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's Disease (AD affects a growing proportion of the population each year. Novel therapies on the horizon may slow the progress of AD symptoms and avoid cases altogether. Initiating treatment for the underlying pathology of AD would ideally be based on biomarker screening tools identifying pre-symptomatic individuals. Early-stage modeling provides estimates of potential outcomes and informs policy development. Methods A time-to-event (TTE simulation provided estimates of screening asymptomatic patients in the general population age ≥55 and treatment impact on the number of patients reaching AD. Patients were followed from AD screen until all-cause death. Baseline sensitivity and specificity were 0.87 and 0.78, with treatment on positive screen. Treatment slowed progression by 50%. Events were scheduled using literature-based age-dependent incidences of AD and death. Results The base case results indicated increased AD free years (AD-FYs through delays in onset and a reduction of 20 AD cases per 1000 screened individuals. Patients completely avoiding AD accounted for 61% of the incremental AD-FYs gained. Total years of treatment per 1000 screened patients was 2,611. The number-needed-to-screen was 51 and the number-needed-to-treat was 12 to avoid one case of AD. One-way sensitivity analysis indicated that duration of screening sensitivity and rescreen interval impact AD-FYs the most. A two-way sensitivity analysis found that for a test with an extended duration of sensitivity (15 years the number of AD cases avoided was 6,000-7,000 cases for a test with higher sensitivity and specificity (0.90,0.90. Conclusions This study yielded valuable parameter range estimates at an early stage in the study of screening for AD. Analysis identified duration of screening sensitivity as a key variable that may be unavailable from clinical trials.

  8. Modeling screening, prevention, and delaying of Alzheimer's disease: an early-stage decision analytic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furiak, Nicolas M; Klein, Robert W; Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Siemers, Eric R; Sarpong, Eric; Klein, Timothy M

    2010-04-30

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) affects a growing proportion of the population each year. Novel therapies on the horizon may slow the progress of AD symptoms and avoid cases altogether. Initiating treatment for the underlying pathology of AD would ideally be based on biomarker screening tools identifying pre-symptomatic individuals. Early-stage modeling provides estimates of potential outcomes and informs policy development. A time-to-event (TTE) simulation provided estimates of screening asymptomatic patients in the general population age > or =55 and treatment impact on the number of patients reaching AD. Patients were followed from AD screen until all-cause death. Baseline sensitivity and specificity were 0.87 and 0.78, with treatment on positive screen. Treatment slowed progression by 50%. Events were scheduled using literature-based age-dependent incidences of AD and death. The base case results indicated increased AD free years (AD-FYs) through delays in onset and a reduction of 20 AD cases per 1000 screened individuals. Patients completely avoiding AD accounted for 61% of the incremental AD-FYs gained. Total years of treatment per 1000 screened patients was 2,611. The number-needed-to-screen was 51 and the number-needed-to-treat was 12 to avoid one case of AD. One-way sensitivity analysis indicated that duration of screening sensitivity and rescreen interval impact AD-FYs the most. A two-way sensitivity analysis found that for a test with an extended duration of sensitivity (15 years) the number of AD cases avoided was 6,000-7,000 cases for a test with higher sensitivity and specificity (0.90,0.90). This study yielded valuable parameter range estimates at an early stage in the study of screening for AD. Analysis identified duration of screening sensitivity as a key variable that may be unavailable from clinical trials.

  9. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... SPECIAL REPORT: FINANCIAL AND PERSONAL BENEFITS OF EARLY DIAGNOSIS Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's provides a number of ... is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Copyright © 2018 Alzheimer's Association ® . All rights reserved. Our ...

  10. Mismatch negativity as a potential neurobiological marker of early-stage Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shixiang; Yan, Chang; Qiao, Zhengxue; Yao, Haiqian; Jiang, Shiquan; Qiu, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiuxian; Fang, Deyu; Yang, Yanjie; Zhang, Limei; Wang, Lina; Zhang, Liming

    2017-04-24

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) are serious, irreversible forms of cognitive impairment, which means that an early diagnosis is essential to slow down their progression. One potential neurophysiological biomarker of these diseases is the mismatch negativity (MMN) event-related potentials (ERP) component, which reflects an automatic detection mechanism at the pre-attentive stages of information processing. We evaluated the auditory MMN response in individuals from two patient groups: those in the prodromal stages of AD (P-AD) and those in the prodromal stages of VD (P-VD). Thirty patients (15 P-AD patients and 15 P-VD patients) and 30 age-matched controls were recruited to undergo electrophysiological recordings during the presentation of an auditory deviant-standard-reverse oddball paradigm that was used to elicit genuine MMN responses. We show that over the frontal-central area, the mean amplitude of the MMN was significantly reduced in both the P-AD (p=0.017) and P-VD groups (p=0.013) compared with controls. The MMN peak latency in P-VD patients was significantly shorter than in controls (p=0.027). No MMN response differences between the P-AD and P-VD were found in either the frontal-central or the temporal areas. These results indicate that P-AD and P-VD patients exhibit impaired pre-attentive information processing mechanisms as revealed by the frontal-central area MMN response, which is associated with sensory memory and cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... THE 10 SIGNS Alzheimer's Disease Facts in Each State The 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report ... on the impact of this disease in every state across the nation. Click below to see the ...

  12. Treatment of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Bradford T; Onysko, Mary K; Stob, Christian M; Hazlewood, Kathleen A

    2011-06-15

    Alzheimer disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting nearly one-half [corrected] of Americans older than 85 years. It is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. Amyloid plaque accumulation, neurofibrillary tau tangles, and depletion of acetylcholine are among the pathologic manifestations of Alzheimer disease. Although there are no proven modalities for preventing Alzheimer disease, hypertension treatment, omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, physical activity, and cognitive engagement demonstrate modest potential. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are first-line medications for the treatment of Alzheimer disease, and are associated with mild improvements in cognitive function, behavior, and activities of daily living; however, the clinical relevance of these effects is unclear. The most common adverse effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, confusion, and cardiac arrhythmias. Short-term use of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine can modestly improve measures of cognition, behavior, and activities of daily living in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer disease. Memantine can also be used in combination with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Memantine is generally well tolerated, but whether its benefits produce clinically meaningful improvement is controversial. Although N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can slow the progression of Alzheimer disease, no pharmacologic agents can reverse the progression. Atypical antipsychotics can improve some behavioral symptoms, but have been associated with increased mortality rates in older patients with dementia. There is conflicting evidence about the benefit of selegiline, testosterone, and ginkgo for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. There is no evidence supporting the beneficial effects of vitamin E, estrogen, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy.

  13. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneka, Michael T.; Carson, Monica J.; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E.; Brosseron, Frederik; Feinstein, Douglas L.; Jacobs, Andreas H.; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A.; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C.; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L.; Perry, V. Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Brooks, David J.; Hunot, Stephane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A.; Breitner, John C.; Cole, Greg M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Kummer, Markus P.

    2018-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment but strongly interacts with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on micro- and astroglia and trigger an innate immune response, characterized by the release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome wide analysis suggests that several genes, which increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease en-code for factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded proteins and the inflammatory reaction. External factors, including systemic inflammation and obesity are likely to interfere with the immunological processes of the brain and further promote disease progression. This re-view provides an overview on the current knowledge and focuses on the most recent and exciting findings. Modulation of risk factors and intervention with the described immune mechanisms are likely to lead to future preventive or therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25792098

  14. Early astrocytic atrophy in the entorhinal cortex of a triple transgenic animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yeh, C. Y.; Vadhwana, B.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 5 (2011), e00071 ISSN 1759-0914 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/09/1696; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA305/08/1384; GA ČR GA309/08/1381 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Alzheimer 's disease * astrocyte * dementia Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.750, year: 2011

  15. Advanced Glycation End-Products Are Associated With the Presence and Severity of Paratonia in Early Stage Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenth, Hans; Zuidema, Sytse U; Krijnen, Wim P; Bautmans, Ivan; van der Schans, Cees; Hobbelen, Hans

    2017-07-01

    Paratonia, a distinctive form of hypertonia in patients with dementia, causes loss of functional mobility in early stage dementia to severe contractures and pain in the late stages. The pathogenesis of paratonia is not well understood. Patients in early stage dementia with diabetes mellitus showed a significantly higher risk for the development of paratonia. Both Alzheimer disease and diabetes mellitus are related to higher concentrations of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). The purpose of this study is to explore the association of AGEs with the prevalence and severity of paratonia in patients with Alzheimer disease. Observational longitudinal, 1-year follow-up cohort study with 3 assessments. Day care centers for patients with dementia. A total of 144 community-dwelling patients with early stage Alzheimer or Alzheimer/vascular disease were recruited from 24 dementia day care centers in The Netherlands. The presence of paratonia (Paratonia Assessment Instrument), the severity of paratonia (Modified Ashworth Scale for paratonia), and AGE levels (AGE-reader). From the 144 participants (56.3% female and 43.7% male, with a mean [standard deviation] age of 80.7 [7.7] years), 118 participants were available for final follow-up. A significant association between AGE levels and the presence of paratonia (odds ratio 3.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.87-6.44, P factor to paratonia and its severity and could be the result of peripheral biomechanical changes reducing elasticity and increasing stiffness. These results provide a new perspective on paratonia and gives rise to further research whether paratonia could be postponed or movement stiffness can be improved by reducing AGE levels. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Epidemiology of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeux, Richard; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-08-01

    The global prevalence of dementia has been estimated to be as high as 24 million, and is predicted to double every 20 years until at least 2040. As the population worldwide continues to age, the number of individuals at risk will also increase, particularly among the very old. Alzheimer disease is the leading cause of dementia beginning with impaired memory. The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease include diffuse and neuritic extracellular amyloid plaques in brain that are frequently surrounded by dystrophic neurites and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles. The etiology of Alzheimer disease remains unclear, but it is likely to be the result of both genetic and environmental factors. In this review we discuss the prevalence and incidence rates, the established environmental risk factors, and the protective factors, and briefly review genetic variants predisposing to disease.

  17. Epidemiology of Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeux, Richard; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    The global prevalence of dementia has been estimated to be as high as 24 million, and is predicted to double every 20 years until at least 2040. As the population worldwide continues to age, the number of individuals at risk will also increase, particularly among the very old. Alzheimer disease is the leading cause of dementia beginning with impaired memory. The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease include diffuse and neuritic extracellular amyloid plaques in brain that are frequently surrounded by dystrophic neurites and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles. The etiology of Alzheimer disease remains unclear, but it is likely to be the result of both genetic and environmental factors. In this review we discuss the prevalence and incidence rates, the established environmental risk factors, and the protective factors, and briefly review genetic variants predisposing to disease. PMID:22908189

  18. Alzheimer\\'s Disease: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Fadaei

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is the most common and well - known cause of dementia, as a progressive, irreversible brain disorder that affects cognitive function, personality, thought, perception and behaviour. Alzheimer's disease is the fourth leading cause of death in western countries. Interesting to know that this disease was unknown in medical community till 100 years ago and had no name. Dr. Alois Alzheimer, a German psychiatrist was the person who suspected the presence of this new illness and by succinct clinical, neuroanatomic, and neuropathologic examination of some cases; including the first known case of this disease- a woman named Auguste Deter- documented it. In further Emil Kraepe1inby knowing about the cases that Dr. Alzheimer reported, and another reports of this disease that were published in the first decade of the twentieth century, set the name of Alzbeimer on this new disease. Descriptions of Dr. Alzheimer and Kraepelin are the same as the present day descriptions of this disease. Electron microscopy, quantitative morphology and modem biochemistry emerging in the second half of the twentieth century opened a new era in dementia research with description of the ultra structure and biochemistry of senileplaques and neuronfibrillary tangles, the major disease markers of Alzheimer's disease. Basic research gave insight into the molecular genetics and pathophysiology of Alzheimers disease and based on the biochemical findings, new pharmacological treatment options were opened. The future attempts will probably be concentrated on the prevention of this disease. Oxidative stress, excessive transition metal ions, and misfolded / aggregated proteins and inflammation are among the probable causes of Alzheimer's disease and the future research will focus on their better understanding and prevention of their occurrence. As the last word, stem cells grafts that in animals have led to remarkable improvement of brain function may also be a

  19. Identification and validation of novel cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for staging early Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Perrin

    Full Text Available Ideally, disease modifying therapies for Alzheimer disease (AD will be applied during the 'preclinical' stage (pathology present with cognition intact before severe neuronal damage occurs, or upon recognizing very mild cognitive impairment. Developing and judiciously administering such therapies will require biomarker panels to identify early AD pathology, classify disease stage, monitor pathological progression, and predict cognitive decline. To discover such biomarkers, we measured AD-associated changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF proteome.CSF samples from individuals with mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR] 1 (n = 24 and cognitively normal controls (CDR 0 (n = 24 were subjected to two-dimensional difference-in-gel electrophoresis. Within 119 differentially-abundant gel features, mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS identified 47 proteins. For validation, eleven proteins were re-evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Six of these assays (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I, transthyretin, cystatin C distinguished CDR 1 and CDR 0 groups and were subsequently applied (with tau, p-tau181 and Aβ42 ELISAs to a larger independent cohort (n = 292 that included individuals with very mild dementia (CDR 0.5. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses using stepwise logistic regression yielded optimal biomarker combinations to distinguish CDR 0 from CDR>0 (tau, YKL-40, NrCAM and CDR 1 from CDR<1 (tau, chromogranin A, carnosinase I with areas under the curve of 0.90 (0.85-0.94 95% confidence interval [CI] and 0.88 (0.81-0.94 CI, respectively.Four novel CSF biomarkers for AD (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I can improve the diagnostic accuracy of Aβ42 and tau. Together, these six markers describe six clinicopathological stages from cognitive normalcy to mild dementia, including stages defined by increased risk of cognitive decline. Such a panel might improve clinical trial efficiency by guiding

  20. Deleterious ABCA7 mutations and transcript rescue mechanisms in early onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Roeck, Arne; Van den Bossche, Tobi; van der Zee, Julie; Verheijen, Jan; De Coster, Wouter; Van Dongen, Jasper; Dillen, Lubina; Baradaran-Heravi, Yalda; Heeman, Bavo; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Gelpi, Ellen; Grau-Rivera, Oriol; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Maria A; Graff, Caroline; Thonberg, Håkan; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Martins, Madalena; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santana, Isabel; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Koutroumani, Maria; Matěj, Radoslav; Rohan, Zdenek; De Deyn, Peter; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Cras, Patrick; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Sleegers, Kristel

    2017-09-01

    Premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in the ATP-Binding Cassette, Sub-Family A, Member 7 gene (ABCA7) have recently been identified as intermediate-to-high penetrant risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). High variability, however, is observed in downstream ABCA7 mRNA and protein expression, disease penetrance, and onset age, indicative of unknown modifying factors. Here, we investigated the prevalence and disease penetrance of ABCA7 PTC mutations in a large early onset AD (EOAD)-control cohort, and examined the effect on transcript level with comprehensive third-generation long-read sequencing. We characterized the ABCA7 coding sequence with next-generation sequencing in 928 EOAD patients and 980 matched control individuals. With MetaSKAT rare variant association analysis, we observed a fivefold enrichment (p = 0.0004) of PTC mutations in EOAD patients (3%) versus controls (0.6%). Ten novel PTC mutations were only observed in patients, and PTC mutation carriers in general had an increased familial AD load. In addition, we observed nominal risk reducing trends for three common coding variants. Seven PTC mutations were further analyzed using targeted long-read cDNA sequencing on an Oxford Nanopore MinION platform. PTC-containing transcripts for each investigated PTC mutation were observed at varying proportion (5-41% of the total read count), implying incomplete nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Furthermore, we distinguished and phased several previously unknown alternative splicing events (up to 30% of transcripts). In conjunction with PTC mutations, several of these novel ABCA7 isoforms have the potential to rescue deleterious PTC effects. In conclusion, ABCA7 PTC mutations play a substantial role in EOAD, warranting genetic screening of ABCA7 in genetically unexplained patients. Long-read cDNA sequencing revealed both varying degrees of NMD and transcript-modifying events, which may influence ABCA7 dosage, disease severity, and may

  1. Biallelic Loss of Function of SORL1 in an Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guennec, Kilan; Tubeuf, Hélène; Hannequin, Didier; Wallon, David; Quenez, Olivier; Rousseau, Stéphane; Richard, Anne-Claire; Deleuze, Jean-François; Boland, Anne; Frebourg, Thierry; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Campion, Dominique; Martins, Alexandra; Nicolas, Gaël

    2018-01-01

    Heterozygous SORL1 protein truncating variants (PTV) are a strong risk factor for early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD). In case control studies performed at the genome-wide level, PTV definition is usually straightforward. Regarding splice site variants, only those affecting canonical sites are typically included. Some other variants, not annotated as PTV, could, however, affect splicing and hence result in a loss of SORL1 function. We took advantage of the whole exome sequencing data from the 9/484 patients with a previously reported SORL1 PTV in the French EOAD series and searched for a second variant which may affect splicing and eventually result in more than 50% loss of function overall. We found that one patient, known to carry a variant predicted to disrupt the canonical 5' splice site of exon 8, also carried a second novel intronic variant predicted to affect SORL1 splicing of exon 29. Segregation analysis showed that the second variant was located in trans from the known PTV. We performed ex vivo minigene splicing assays and showed that both variants led to the generation of transcripts containing a premature stop codon. This is therefore the first evidence of a human carrying biallelic SORL1 PTV. This patient had a family history of dementia in both maternal and paternal lineages with later ages of onset than the proband himself. However, his 55 years age at onset was in the same ranges as previously published SORL1 heterozygous PTV carriers. This suggests that biallelic loss of SORL1 function is an extremely rare event that was not associated with a dramatically earlier age at onset than heterozygous SORL1 loss-of-function variant carriers, in this single patient.

  2. Low Prevalence and Clinical Effect of Vascular Risk Factors in Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaohua; Sillaire, Adeline Rollin; Dallongeville, Jean; Skrobala, Emilie; Wallon, David; Dubois, Bruno; Hannequin, Didier; Pasquier, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Determinants of early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) are not well known. In late-onset AD, vascular risk factors (VRFs) are associated with earlier clinical manifestation. The objective of this study was to assess the putative association between VRFs and EOAD. We studied participants with dementia meeting criteria for EOAD (recruited into the French CoMAJ prospective cohort study from 1 June 2009 to 28 February 2014) and age-, gender-matched controls (ratio 1:3, drawn randomly from the French MONA-LISA population-based survey between 2005 and 2007). Demographic data, VRFs, comorbidities, treatments, and APOE genotypes were compared in multivariable logistic regression analyses. We studied 102 participants with dementia (mean±standard deviation age: 59.5±3.8; women: 59.8%) and 306 controls. Compared with controls, EOAD participants had spent less time in formal education (9.9±2.9 versus 11.7±3.8 y; p < 0.0001), were less likely to be regular alcohol consumers (p < 0.0001), had a lower body mass index (-2 kg/m2; p < 0.0004), and a lower mean systolic blood pressure (-6.2 mmHg; p = 0.0036). The prevalence of APOE ɛ4 allele was higher in participants with dementia than in controls (50% versus 29.4%; p = 0.0002), as was the prevalence of depression (48% versus 32%; p < 0.001). Similar results were observed in multivariable analysis. Compared with EOAD participants lacking VRFs, EOAD participants with at least one VRF had a higher prevalence of depression (29.6% versus 53.3%, respectively; p = 0.03). The prevalence of VRFs is not elevated in EOAD patients (in contrast to older AD patients). Extensive genetic testing should be considered more frequently in the context of EOAD.

  3. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of death among those age 65 and older. It also is a leading cause of disability and ... development of biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease is making it possible to detect Alzheimer's disease and provide an ...

  4. Benzodiazepine receptor and cerebral blood flow in early Alzheimer's disease. SPECT study using 123I-Iomazenil and 123I-IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Shin; Koshi, Yasuhiko; Komiyama, Tasuku; Sakayori, Osamu; Komaba, Yuichi; Ohyama, Masashi; Mishina, Masahiro; Tsuganesawa, Toshikazu; Terashi, Akiro

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate benzodiazepine receptors (BZR) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with early Alzheimer's disease. Imaging of BZR and measurement of CBF were performed by SPECT using 123 I-Iomazenil (IMZ) and 123 I-IMP respectively, in seven patients with early Alzheimer's disease and five patients with unilateral left cerebral infarction as controls. The values for the normal cerebral hemisphere (ratio to the contralateral cerebellum) in patients with cerebral infarction were adopted as control values. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, the CBF (ratio to cerebellum) decreased significantly in the frontal cortex and the parietal cortex compared with the control values. There was no significant difference in late IMZ SPECT counts (ratio to cerebellum) and washout (the ratio of late-to-early IMZ SPECT counts) between patients with Alzheimer's disease and the controls. However, the late IMZ SPECT counts and washout decreased in one patient with moderate dementia. There was a significant correlation between the severity of dementia and the late IMZ SPECT counts in the temporal cortex and the parietal cortex. These results suggest that benzodiazepine binding sites are relatively well preserved in patients with early Alzheimer's disease, and reduction of the CBF is caused by neuronal dysfunction rather than by neuronal loss. IMZ SPECT study is useful and necessary for clarifying the pathophysiological state in Alzheimer's disease. (author)

  5. Explicit (semantic) memory for music in patients with mild cognitive impairment and early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerer, Manuela; Marksteiner, Josef; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Mazzola, Guerino; Kemmler, Georg; Bliem, Harald R; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/STUDY CONTEXT: Explicit memory for music was investigated by using a new test with 24 existing and 3 newly composed pieces. Ten patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 10 patients with early stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) were compared with 23 healthy subjects, in terms of verbal memory of music by the identification of familiar music excerpts and the discrimination of distortion and original timbre of musical excerpts. MCI and Alzheimer's patients showed significantly poorer performances in tasks requiring verbal memory of musical excerpts than the healthy participants. For discrimination of musical excerpts, MCI and AD patients surprisingly performed significantly better than the healthy comparison subjects. Our results support the notion of a specialized memory system for music.

  6. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and social benefits and facilitating participation in important clinical trials, early diagnosis enables ... in Alzheimer's treatments, care and research. Get tips for living with Alzheimer's as well ...

  7. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 272.3900 Donate Alzheimer's & Dementia What Is Alzheimer's? Brain Tour Younger/Early Onset Risk Factors Genetics Myths ... Dementia Korsakoff Syndrome Related Conditions CTE MCI Traumatic Brain Injury Facts and Figures Know the 10 Signs ...

  8. Galantamine for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olin, J; Schneider, L

    2001-01-01

    Galantamine (also called galanthamine, marketed as Reminyl (Janssen)) can be isolated from several plants, including daffodil bulbs, and now synthesized. Galantamine is a specific, competitive, and reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. It is also an allosteric modulator at nicotinic cholinergic receptor sites potentiating cholinergic nicotinic neurotransmission. A small number of early studies showed mild cognitive and global benefits for patients with Alzheimer's disease, and recently several multicentre clinical trials have been published with positive findings. Galantamine has received regulatory approval in Sweden, is available in Austria, and awaits marketing approval in the United States, Europe, and other countries. The objective of this review is to assess the clinical effects of galantamine in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease, and to investigate potential moderators of an effect. The Cochrane Dementia Group specialized register of clinical trials was searched using the terms 'galantamine,' and 'galanthamine' (15 February 2000) as was the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (2000, Issue 2). These terms were also used to search the following databases: EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychLit; Combined Health Information Database, NRR (National Research Register), ADEAR (Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Centre clinical database, BIOMED (Biomedicine and Health), Glaxo-Wellcome Clinical Trials Register, National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Databases, Current Controlled Trials, Dissertation Abstracts (mainly North American dissertations) 1961-1994, Index to UK Theses (British dissertations) 1970-1994. Published reviews were inspected for further sources. Additional information was collected from an unpublished investigational brochure for galantamine. Trials selected were randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, and unconfounded comparisons of galantamine with placebo for a treatment duration of greater than 4 weeks in people with Alzheimer

  9. [How to define Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet, Michel

    2011-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease, which was considered to be a rare disease in subjects aged under 65 until the seventies/eighties, has become a very common disease affecting mostly older subjects. Many consider that it is important to review the meaning of the eponym "Alzheimer's disease", and a revolution, quite literally, is likely to occur. The role of vascular lesions in the onset of dementias among older subjects is widely acknowledged; considering those dementias as Alzheimer's disease may have negative consequences for patient management. Indeed, vascular lesions can be prevented and treated, while Alzheimer's lesions cannot. It may be justified to use "Alzheimer syndrome" instead of "Alzheimer's disease" when vascular risk factors and, all the more so, vascular lesions are present. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of the pathological proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease, as well as their effects on neurons and synapses. However, the etiology of the disease is still unknown, except in the rare hereditary cases, and there is no cure for Alzheimer's disease at present. Clinical research is progressing, and diagnostic criteria for the pre-dementia stage of Alzheimer's disease were suggested. In France, the outstanding Alzheimer plan 2008-2012 should play an important role in enhancing the understanding of Alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's syndromes and related disorders.

  10. Early Statin Use and the Progression of Alzheimer Disease: A Total Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng-Cheng; Chuang, Yun-Shiuan; Hsieh, Hui-Min; Lee, Tzu-Chi; Chiu, Kuei-Fen; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2015-11-01

    The protective effect of statin on Alzheimer disease (AD) is still controversial, probably due to the debate about when to start the use of statin and the lack of any large-scale randomized evidence that actually supports the hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to examine the protective effect of early statin use on mild-to-moderate AD in the total Taiwanese population.This was a total population-based case-control study, using the total population of Taiwanese citizens seen in general medical practice; therefore, the findings can be applied to the general population. The study patients were those with newly diagnosed dementia (ICD-9 290.x) and prescribed any acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI) from the Taiwan National Health Insurance dataset in 1997 to 2008. The newly diagnosed eligible mild-to-moderate AD patients were traced from the dates of their index dates, which was defined as the first day to receive any AChEI treatment, back to 1 year (exposure period) to categorize them into AD with early statin use and without early statin use. Early statin use was defined as patients using statin before AChEI treatment. Alzheimer disease patients with early statin use were those receiving any statin treatment during the exposure period. Then, we used propensity-score-matched strategy to match these 2 groups as 1:1. The matched study patients were followed-up from their index dates. The primary outcome was the discontinuation of AChEI treatment, indicating AD progression.There were 719 mild-to-moderate AD-paired patients with early statin use and without early statin use for analyses. Alzheimer disease progression was statistically lower in AD patients with early statin use than those without (P = 0.00054). After adjusting for other covariates, mild-to-moderate AD patients with early stain use exhibited a 0.85-risk (95% CI = 0.76-0.95, P = 0.0066) to have AD progression than those without.Early statin use was significantly associated with a reduction in AD

  11. The power of personality in discriminating between healthy aging and early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchek, Janet M; Balota, David A; Storandt, Martha; Larsen, Randy

    2007-11-01

    This study examined differences in personality in the earliest stages of dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) relative to healthy aging, and the power of personality in discriminating healthy aging from early-stage DAT. Four groups of participants (middle-aged controls, older controls, persons with very mild DAT, and persons with mild DAT) and their families were administered Costa and McCrae's NEO Five-Factor Inventory. On the basis of both self-report and informant report, there was an increase in neuroticism and a decrease in conscientiousness in persons with very mild DAT relative to healthy individuals without it, and in persons with mild DAT relative to those with very mild DAT. Moreover, informant reports of neuroticism and conscientiousness capture substantial unique variance in discriminating healthy aging and very mild DAT, above and beyond standard neuropsychological tests. Discussion focuses on the importance of personality traits as a noncognitive indicator of early-stage DAT.

  12. Rethinking the Food and Drug Administration's 2013 guidance on developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lon S

    2014-03-01

    The February 2013 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance for developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) creates certain challenges as they guide toward the use of one cognitive outcome to gain accelerated marketing approval for preclinical AD drugs, and a composite clinical scale - the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale in particular - for the primary outcome for prodromal AD clinical trials. In light of the developing knowledge regarding early stage diagnoses and clinical trials outcomes, we recommend that FDA describe its requirements for validating preclinical AD diagnoses for drug development purposes, maintain the principle for requiring coprimary outcomes, and encourage the advancement of outcomes for early stage AD trials. The principles for drug development for early stage AD should not differ from those for clinical AD, especially as the diagnoses of prodromal and early AD impinge on each other. The FDA should not recommend that a composite scale be used as a sole primary efficacy outcome to support a marketing claim unless it requires that the cognitive and functional components of such a scale are demonstrated to be individually meaningful. The current draft guidelines may inadvertently constrain efforts to better assess the clinical effects of new drugs and inhibit innovation in an area where evidence-based clinical research practices are still evolving. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inflammation and Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akiyama, H.; Barger, S.; Barnum, S.; Bradt, B.; Bauer, J.; Cole, G. M.; Cooper, N. R.; Eikelenboom, P.; Emmerling, M.; Fiebich, B. L.; Finch, C. E.; Frautschy, S.; Griffin, W. S.; Hampel, H.; Hull, M.; Landreth, G.; Lue, L.; Mrak, R.; Mackenzie, I. R.; McGeer, P. L.; O'Banion, M. K.; Pachter, J.; Pasinetti, G.; Plata-Salaman, C.; Rogers, J.; Rydel, R.; Shen, Y.; Streit, W.; Strohmeyer, R.; Tooyoma, I.; van Muiswinkel, F. L.; Veerhuis, R.; Walker, D.; Webster, S.; Wegrzyniak, B.; Wenk, G.; Wyss-Coray, T.

    2000-01-01

    Inflammation clearly occurs in pathologically vulnerable regions of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, and it does so with the full complexity of local peripheral inflammatory responses. In the periphery, degenerating tissue and the deposition of highly insoluble abnormal materials are classical

  14. Synaptosomal bioenergetic defects are associated with cognitive impairment in a transgenic rat model of early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino Adami, Pamela V; Quijano, Celia; Magnani, Natalia; Galeano, Pablo; Evelson, Pablo; Cassina, Adriana; Do Carmo, Sonia; Leal, María C; Castaño, Eduardo M; Cuello, A Claudio; Morelli, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic bioenergetic deficiencies may be associated with early Alzheimer's disease (AD). To explore this concept, we assessed pre-synaptic mitochondrial function in hemizygous (+/-)TgMcGill-R-Thy1-APP rats. The low burden of Aβ and the wide array of behavioral and cognitive impairments described in 6-month-old hemizygous TgMcGill-R-Thy1-APP rats (Tg(+/-)) support their use to investigate synaptic bioenergetics deficiencies described in subjects with early Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this report, we show that pre-synaptic mitochondria from Tg(+/-) rats evidence a decreased respiratory control ratio and spare respiratory capacity associated with deficits in complex I enzymatic activity. Cognitive impairments were prevented and bioenergetic deficits partially reversed when Tg(+/-) rats were fed a nutritionally complete diet from weaning to 6-month-old supplemented with pyrroloquinoline quinone, a mitochondrial biogenesis stimulator with antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. These results provide evidence that, as described in AD brain and not proven in Tg mice models with AD-like phenotype, the mitochondrial bioenergetic capacity of synaptosomes is not conserved in the Tg(+/-) rats. This animal model may be suitable for understanding the basic biochemical mechanisms involved in early AD. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Alzheimer's. Today, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer's every 65 seconds. By mid-century, someone in the United States will develop the disease every 33 seconds. GET INVOLVED. Join ...

  16. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... Join the Cause alz.org >> Alzheimer's & Dementia >> Home Text size: A A A 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Download the full report: Download the Infographic: English Spanish Share the ...

  17. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dementia >> Home Text size: A A A 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Download the full report: ... twice as high. Invest in a world without Alzheimer's. Donate Caregivers Eighty-three percent of the help ...

  18. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dementia >> Home Text size: A A A 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures Download the full report: ... twice as high. Invest in a world without Alzheimer's. Donate Caregivers Eighty-three percent of the help ...

  19. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... Help | Join the Cause alz.org >> Alzheimer's & Dementia >> Home Text size: A A A 2018 Alzheimer's Disease ... people who receive adult day services and nursing home care. Take action. Become an advocate SPECIAL REPORT: ...

  20. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... existing cases of Alzheimer's. Today, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer's every 65 seconds. By mid-century, someone in the United States will develop the disease every 33 seconds. GET ...

  1. Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A A Share Plus on Google Plus Alzheimer's & Dementia alz.org | IHaveAlz Overview What Is Dementia ... chapter Join our online community Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease As they age, those affected by Down ...

  2. Design of the NL-ENIGMA study: Exploring the effect of Souvenaid on cerebral glucose metabolism in early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheltens, Nienke M E; Kuyper, Ingrid S; Boellaard, Ronald; Barkhof, Frederik; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Broersen, Laus M; Lansbergen, Marieke M; van der Flier, Wiesje M; van Berckel, Bart N M; Scheltens, Philip

    2016-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with early synaptic loss. Specific nutrients are known to be rate limiting for synapse formation. Studies have shown that administering specific nutrients may improve memory function, possibly by increasing synapse formation. This Dutch study explores the Effect of a specific Nutritional Intervention on cerebral Glucose Metabolism in early Alzheimer's disease (NL-ENIGMA, Dutch Trial Register NTR4718, http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=4718). The NL-ENIGMA study is designed to test whether the specific multinutrient combination Fortasyn Connect present in the medical food Souvenaid influences cerebral glucose metabolism as a marker for improved synapse function. This study is a double-blind, randomized controlled parallel-group single-center trial. Forty drug-naive patients with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia with evidence of amyloid deposition are 1:1 randomized to receive either the multinutrient combination or placebo once daily. Main exploratory outcome parameters include absolute quantitative positron emission tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (including arterial sampling) and standard uptake value ratios normalized for the cerebellum or pons after 24 weeks. We expect the NL-ENIGMA study to provide further insight in the potential of this multinutrient combination to improve synapse function.

  3. Dogs with cognitive dysfunction as a spontaneous model for early Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schütt, Trine; Helboe, Lone; Pedersen, Lars Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    Aged companion dogs with canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD) spontaneously develop varying degrees of progressive cognitive decline and particular neuropathological features correspondent to the changes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans. The aim of the present study...... was to characterize certain aspects of neuropathology and inflammatory markers related to aging and CCD in dogs in comparison with human AD. Fifteen brains from aged dogs with normal cognitive function, mild cognitive impairment, or CCD were investigated and compared with two control brains from young dogs and brain...... sections from human AD subjects. The neuropathological investigations included evaluation of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque deposition (N-terminally truncated and pyroglutamyl-modified Aβ included), tau pathology, and inflammatory markers in prefrontal cortex. Cortical Aβ deposition was found to be only...

  4. The Harvard Automated Phone Task: new performance-based activities of daily living tests for early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Gad A; Dekhtyar, Maria; Bruno, Jonathan M; Jethwani, Kamal; Amariglio, Rebecca E; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A; Rentz, Dorene M

    2015-12-01

    Impairment in activities of daily living is a major burden for Alzheimer's disease dementia patients and caregivers. Multiple subjective scales and a few performance-based instruments have been validated and proven to be reliable in measuring instrumental activities of daily living in Alzheimer's disease dementia but less so in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and preclinical Alzheimer's disease. To validate the Harvard Automated Phone Task, a new performance-based activities of daily living test for early Alzheimer's disease, which assesses high level tasks that challenge seniors in daily life. In a cross-sectional study, the Harvard Automated Phone Task was associated with demographics and cognitive measures through univariate and multivariate analyses; ability to discriminate across diagnostic groups was assessed; test-retest reliability with the same and alternate versions was assessed in a subset of participants; and the relationship with regional cortical thickness was assessed in a subset of participants. Academic clinical research center. One hundred and eighty two participants were recruited from the community (127 clinically normal elderly and 45 young normal participants) and memory disorders clinics at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital (10 participants with mild cognitive impairment). As part of the Harvard Automated Phone Task, participants navigated an interactive voice response system to refill a prescription (APT-Script), select a new primary care physician (APT-PCP), and make a bank account transfer and payment (APT-Bank). The 3 tasks were scored based on time, errors, and repetitions from which composite z-scores were derived, as well as a separate report of correct completion of the task. We found that the Harvard Automated Phone Task discriminated well between diagnostic groups (APT-Script: p=0.002; APT-PCP: pHarvard Automated Phone Task and executive function (APT-PCP: pHarvard Automated Phone Task, which

  5. Tau-PET Binding Distinguishes Patients With Early-stage Posterior Cortical Atrophy From Amnestic Alzheimer Disease Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Gregory S; Gordon, Brian A; Jackson, Kelley; Christensen, Jon J; Rosana Ponisio, Maria; Su, Yi; Ances, Beau M; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Morris, John C

    2017-01-01

    Flortaucipir (tau) positron emission tomography (PET) binding distinguishes individuals with clinically well-established posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) due to Alzheimer disease (AD) from cognitively normal (CN) controls. However, it is not known whether tau-PET binding patterns differentiate individuals with PCA from those with amnestic AD, particularly early in the symptomatic stages of disease. Flortaucipir and florbetapir (β-amyloid) PET imaging were performed in individuals with early-stage PCA (N=5), amnestic AD dementia (N=22), and CN controls (N=47). Average tau and β-amyloid deposition were quantified using standard uptake value ratios and compared at a voxelwise level, controlling for age. PCA patients [median age-at-onset, 59 (51 to 61) years] were younger at symptom onset than similarly staged individuals with amnestic AD [75 (60 to 85) years] or CN controls [73 (61 to 90) years; P=0.002]. Flortaucipir uptake was higher in individuals with early-stage symptomatic PCA versus those with early-stage amnestic AD or CN controls, and greatest in posterior regions. Regional elevations in florbetapir were observed in areas of greatest tau deposition in PCA patients. Flortaucipir uptake distinguished individuals with PCA and amnestic AD dementia early in the symptomatic course. The posterior brain regions appear to be uniquely vulnerable to tau deposition in PCA, aligning with clinical deficits that define this disease subtype.

  6. Tau PET binding distinguishes patients with early-stage posterior cortical atrophy from amnestic Alzheimer disease dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Gregory S.; Gordon, Brian A.; Jackson, Kelley; Christensen, Jon J.; Ponisio, Maria Rosana; Su, Yi; Ances, Beau M; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Morris, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Flortaucipir (tau) PET binding distinguishes individuals with clinically well-established posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) due to Alzheimer disease (AD) from cognitively normal (CN) controls. However, it is not known whether tau PET binding patterns differentiate individuals with PCA from those with amnestic AD, particularly early in the symptomatic stages of disease. Methods Flortaucipir and florbetapir (β-amyloid) PET-imaging were performed in individuals with early-stage PCA (N=5), amnestic AD dementia (N=22), and CN controls (N=47). Average tau and β-amyloid deposition were quantified using standard uptake value ratios and compared at a voxel-wise level, controlling for age. Results PCA patients (median age-at-onset, 59 [51–61] years) were younger at symptom-onset than similarly-staged individuals with amnestic AD (75 [60–85] years) or CN controls (73 [61–90] years; p=0.002). Flortaucipir uptake was higher in individuals with early-stage symptomatic PCA versus those with early-stage amnestic AD or CN controls, and greatest in posterior regions. Regional elevations in florbetapir were observed in areas of greatest tau deposition in PCA patients. Conclusions and Relevance Flortaucipir uptake distinguished individuals with PCA and amnestic AD dementia early in the symptomatic course. The posterior brain regions appear to be uniquely vulnerable to tau deposition in PCA, aligning with clinical deficits that define this disease subtype. PMID:28394771

  7. [Calcium hypothesis of Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazantseva, M A; Mozhaeva, G N; Kaznacheeva, E V

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory and cognitive abilities loss. The etiology of Alzheimer's disease is poorly understood. In this regard, there is no effective treatment for the disease. Various hypotheses to explain the nature of the pathology of Alzheimer's disease led to the development of appropriate therapeutics. Despite of decades of research and clinical trials available therapeutics, at best, can only slow down the progression of the disease, but cannot cure it. This review dedicated to the one of modern hypotheses of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis implied the impairment of calcium homeostasis as a key event for the development of neurodegenerative processes.

  8. An Investigation of the Late Excitatory Potentials in the Hand following Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Early Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Balla

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent neuroimaging studies in humans support the clinical observations that the motor cortex is affected early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Patients and Methods: We measured the silent period (SP induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation in AD patients in the very early stage of the disease, and we explored whether and in which way the pharmacologic manipulation of the cholinergic system could modify it. Results: An increase in the duration of the SP was observed in AD patients in the early stage in comparison to controls. After 2 months of treatment with donepezil, the duration did not differ significantly from that of normal subjects. The results of our study show a fragmentation and an enlargement of the SP in the presence of multiple late excitatory potentials (LEPs in early untreated AD patients. These LEPs were also modulated by donepezil. Conclusions: The results suggest an early functional impairment of cholinergic neurotransmission in AD. The disturbance in acetylcholine output in early AD leads to a decrease in excitability of the motor system.

  9. TREM2 Variants in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Rita; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Bras, Jose; Carrasquillo, Minerva; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Majounie, Elisa; Cruchaga, Carlos; Sassi, Celeste; Kauwe, John S.K.; Younkin, Steven; Hazrati, Lilinaz; Collinge, John; Pocock, Jennifer; Lashley, Tammaryn; Williams, Julie; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Amouyel, Philippe; Goate, Alison; Rademakers, Rosa; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in TREM2, encoding the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 protein, have previously been associated with an autosomal recessive form of early-onset dementia. METHODS We used genome, exome, and Sanger sequencing to analyze the genetic variability in TREM2 in a series of 1092 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 1107 controls (the discovery set). We then performed a meta-analysis on imputed data for the TREM2 variant rs75932628 (predicted to cause a R47H substitution) from three genomewide association studies of Alzheimer's disease and tested for the association of the variant with disease. We genotyped the R47H variant in an additional 1887 cases and 4061 controls. We then assayed the expression of TREM2 across different regions of the human brain and identified genes that are differentially expressed in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and in control mice. RESULTS We found significantly more variants in exon 2 of TREM2 in patients with Alzheimer's disease than in controls in the discovery set (P = 0.02). There were 22 variant alleles in 1092 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 5 variant alleles in 1107 controls (P<0.001). The most commonly associated variant, rs75932628 (encoding R47H), showed highly significant association with Alzheimer's disease (P<0.001). Meta-analysis of rs75932628 genotypes imputed from genomewide association studies confirmed this association (P = 0.002), as did direct genotyping of an additional series of 1887 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 4061 controls (P<0.001). Trem2 expression differed between control mice and a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. CONCLUSIONS Heterozygous rare variants in TREM2 are associated with a significant increase in the risk of Alzheimer's disease. (Funded by Alzheimer's Research UK and others.) PMID:23150934

  10. 7T T₂*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reveals cortical phase differences between early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooden, Sanneke; Doan, Nhat Trung; Versluis, Maarten J; Goos, Jeroen D C; Webb, Andrew G; Oleksik, Ania M; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Weverling-Rynsburger, Annelies W E; Blauw, Gerard Jan; Reiber, Johan H C; van Buchem, Mark A; Milles, Julien; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore regional iron-related differences in the cerebral cortex, indicative of Alzheimer's disease pathology, between early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD, LOAD, respectively) patients using 7T magnetic resonance phase images. High-resolution T2(∗)-weighted scans were acquired in 12 EOAD patients and 17 LOAD patients with mild to moderate disease and 27 healthy elderly control subjects. Lobar peak-to-peak phase shifts and regional mean phase contrasts were computed. An increased peak-to-peak phase shift was found for all lobar regions in EOAD patients compared with LOAD patients (p < 0.05). Regional mean phase contrast in EOAD patients was higher than in LOAD patients in the superior medial and middle frontal gyrus, anterior and middle cingulate gyrus, postcentral gyrus, superior and inferior parietal gyrus, and precuneus (p ≤ 0.042). These data suggest that EOAD patients have an increased iron accumulation, possibly related to an increased amyloid deposition, in specific cortical regions as compared with LOAD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Screening of Early and Late Onset Alzheimer's Disease Genetic Risk Factors in a Cohort of Dementia Patients from Liguria, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Ferrara, Michela; Alinani, Anwar; Sutton, Roger Brian; Famà, Francesco; Picco, Agnese; Rodriguez, Guido; Nobili, Flavio; Momeni, Parastoo

    2015-01-01

    Cohorts from a defined geographical area enable ad hoc genotype-phenotype correlation studies providing novel and unique insight into disease. We analysed genetic risk factors associated with early and late onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD and LOAD) in a population from Liguria (northern Italy), as part of an ongoing longitudinal study. We screened 37 AD, 8 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 3 AD and CVD (cerebrovascular disease), 3 MCI and CVD, 8 frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and 2 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) patients, and 28 normal controls (NCs).We sequenced PSEN1, PSEN2 and APP (EOAD risk factors), as well as MAPT, GRN and TARDBP for all cases and NCs, and analysed the APOE, CLU, CR1 and PICALM genotypes as well as the MAPT and ACE haplotypes (LOAD risk factors) for the AD (n = 37) and AD + MCI (n = 45) cases and NCs (n = 28).We identified variants in PSEN1, PSEN2 and TARDBP across a range of phenotypes (AD, AD and CVD, FTD and PSP), suggesting that screening of all known candidate genes of Alzheimer's and non-Alzheimer's forms of dementias in all dementia cases might be warranted. The analysis of the LOAD risk factors revealed no association with AD or AD + MCI status after Bonferroni correction. Lack of association with APOE is supported by previous studies in the Italian population. Our data also evidenced: 1) a potentially protective haplotype at the PSEN2 locus; 2) a nominal association with the GWAS-risk allele A for rs3818361 in CR1 and; 3) a threefold prevalence of AD in the female population compared to men.Our results will need to be further assessed and confirmed in larger cohorts from this area. 

  12. A selective egocentric topographical working memory deficit in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, F; Di Vita, A; Palermo, L; Piccardi, L; Blundo, C; Guariglia, C

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an egocentric topographical working memory (WM) deficit is present in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with respect to other forms of visuospatial WM. Further, we would investigate whether this deficit could be present in patients having AD without topographical disorientation (TD) signs in everyday life assessed through an informal interview to caregivers. Seven patients with AD and 20 healthy participants performed the Walking Corsi Test and the Corsi Block-Tapping Test. The former test requires memorizing a sequence of places by following a path and the latter is a well-known visuospatial memory task. Patients with AD also performed a verbal WM test to exclude the presence of general WM impairments. Preliminary results suggest that egocentric topographical WM is selectively impaired, with respect to visuospatial and verbal WM, even without TD suggesting an important role of this memory in the early stages of AD. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. How Should Clinicians Counsel a Woman with a Strong Family History of Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease about Her Pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Marianna V; O'Brien, Barbara M; King, Louise P

    2017-07-01

    Counseling patients regarding the benefits, harms, and dilemmas of genetic testing is one of the greatest ethical challenges facing reproductive medicine today. With or without test results, clinicians grapple with how to communicate potential genetic risks as patients weigh their reproductive options. Here, we consider a case of a woman with a strong family history of early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD). She is early in her pregnancy and unsure about learning her own genetic status. We address the ethical ramifications of each of her options, which include genetic testing, genetic counseling, and termination versus continuation of the pregnancy. Our analysis foregrounds clinicians' role in helping to ensure autonomous decision making as the patient reflects on these clinical options in light of her goals and values. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Impairment in proverb interpretation as an executive function deficit in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyhe, Thomas; Saur, Ralf; Eschweiler, Gerhard W; Milian, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Proverb interpretation is assumed to reflect executive functions. We hypothesized that proverb interpretation is impaired in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) diagnosed as single-domain impairment by common neuropsychological testing. We compared performance in a proverb interpretation test in single-domain aMCI patients and patients with early Alzheimer's disease (EAD). The groups with aMCI and EAD performed significantly worse than healthy controls. Both patient groups gave concrete answers with a similar frequency. However, patients with EAD tended to give senseless answers more frequently. Our data suggest that in patients diagnosed as single-domain aMCI, deterioration of executive functions is detectable with subtle and appropriate neuropsychological testing. Implementation of these procedures may improve the early prediction of AD.

  15. Early brain connectivity alterations and cognitive impairment in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Munoz-Moreno, Emma; Tudela, Raúl; López-Gil, Xavier; Soria, Guadalupe

    2018-01-01

    Background Animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are essential to understanding the disease progression and to development of early biomarkers. Because AD has been described as a disconnection syndrome, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based connectomics provides a highly translational approach to characterizing the disruption in connectivity associated with the disease. In this study, a transgenic rat model of AD (TgF344-AD) was analyzed to describe both cognitive performance and brain c...

  16. Cerebral blood flow of patients with age-associated memory impairment and the early stage of Alzheimer`s disease. A study by SPECT using the ARG method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwata, Akiko; Kitamura, Shin; Nagazumi, Atushi; Terashi, Akiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    In order to further understand the pathology of Alzheimer`s disease (AD), we have utilized image analysis in diagnosing the early stages of AD in patients with cognitive disorders. CT and MRI, however, have not been feasible since only atrophy is seen and it is difficult to differentiate the changes in AD from age associated changes. In this study we tried to determine whether regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurements using single photon emission CT (SPECT) are feasible for the early diagnosis of AD. Regional CBF (rCBF) was measured using SPECT in three subject groups: Age-associated memory impairment (AAMI, n=9), mild AD (n=16), and normal aged patients (mean age=68.3; n=20). The subjects were then observed for three years. The region of interest (ROI) for the medial temporal lobe was set at OM-30deg to cover the maximum area of the hippocampus. The absolute values of rCBF in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes and the cerebellum were significantly lower in the mild AD subjects than in the normal aged subjects. A significant decrease in rCBF was also seen in the medial temporal lobe in both the AD and the AAMI subjects compared to the normal controls. During the three years of follow up, no cases of dementia were seen in the AAMI subjects. However, there were two patients who appeared to have difficulty in adapting to daily life due to amnesia, one with a decrease in rCBF of the medial temporal lobe on the second SPECT, and the other showing a low rCBF the first time. This study suggests that AAMI subjects may comprise both AD and normal subjects. Therefore a more prospective study is needed. (author)

  17. Cerebral hemodynamic difference between early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease by circumferential profile analysis with 123I-IMP brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Hisayuki; Hanyu, Haruo; Abe, Shinei; Asano, Tetsuichi; Takasaki, Masaru; Suzuki, Takanari; Abe, Kimihiko; Katsunuma, Hideyo.

    1992-01-01

    We conducted investigation to determine whether early- and late-onset Alzheimer's diseases differ pathophysiologically. Five patients with the early-onset (65 years and under) of the disease and 11 with the late-onset (65 years and over) of the disease were studied by single photon emission CT (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I]iodoamphetamine (IMP). Circumferential profile analysis (CPA) was performed to examine differences in the predominant hypoperfusion in the temporoparietal lobe, which is considered to be functionally damaged the most in Alzheimer's disease. The Xm values, calculated from gradients between the motorsensory or occipital cortices and temporoparietal cortex in the circumferential profile curve, were compared in both groups. The Xm values for patients with early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease were 6.81±2.10 (counts/degree) and 3.28±1.58, respectively, the difference being significant. Our results suggest that functional abnormalities in the temporoparietal area severer in early- than late-onset Alzheimer's disease and that the application of CPA to IMP SPECT is useful to elucidate the pathophysiological difference between each of the disease. (author)

  18. Metabolic pattern analysis of early detection in Alzheimer's disease from other types of dementias and correlated with cognitive function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, R. H.; Lee, C. W.; Jung, Y. A.; Sohn, H. S.; Kim, S. H.; Seo, T. S

    2004-01-01

    PET/CT studies have demonstrated temporoparietal hypometabolism in probable and definite Alzheimer's disease (AD), a pattern that may help differentiate AD from other types of dementias. Seeking to distinguish Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we examined brain glucose metabolism of DLB and AD. Identification of individual differences in patterns of regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) interactions may be important for early detection of AD. We elucidate the relationship between reduced cognitive function and cerebral metabolism. Ten patients with the diagnosis of AD, 3 DLB patients underwent 18F-FDG PET CT. We applied statistical mapping procedure to evaluate the diagnostic power of rCMRglc patterns for differentiation and also correlated with Korean-mini mental status exam (K-MMSE) score include orientation time, place, registration, attention, calculation, recaIl, language and visuospatial function. Glucose metabolic pattern analysis confirmed AD and DLB patients showed significant metabolic reductions involving parietotemporal association, posterior cingulate, and frontal association cortex. DLB patients showed significant metabolic reductions in the occipital cortex, particularly in the primary visual cortex. Covariate analysis revealed that occipital metabolic changes in DLB were independent from those in the adjacent parietotemporal cortices. AnaIysis of clinically diagnosed probable AD patients showed a significantly higher frequency of primary visual metabolic reduction among patients who fulfilled clinical criteria for DLB. occipital hypometabolism is a potential discriminate marker to distinguish DLB versus AD

  19. Laser Raman detection of platelet as a non-invasive approach for early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P; Wang, X H; Cheng, Y; Peng, J; Shen, A G; Hu, J M; Tian, Q; Shang, X L; Liu, Z C; Yao, X Q; Wang, J Z; Baek, S J; Park, A

    2011-01-01

    Early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a problem that puzzled many doctors. Reliable markers in easy-assembling samples are of considerable clinical diagnostic value. In this work, laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) was developed a new method that potentially allows early and differential diagnosis of AD from the platelet sample. Raman spectra of platelets isolated from different ages of AD transgenic mice and non-transgenic controls were collected and analyzed. Multilayer perceptron networks (MLP) classification method was used to classify spectra and establish the diagnostic models. For differential diagnosis, spectra of platelets isolated from AD, Parkinson's disease (PD) and vascular dementia (VD) mice were also discriminated. Two notable spectral differences at 740 and 1654 cm -1 were revealed in the mean spectrum of platelets isolated from AD transgenic mice and the controls. MLP displayed a powerful ability in the classifying of early, advanced AD and the control group, and in differential diagnosis of PD and advanced AD, as well as VD and advanced AD. The results suggest that platelet detecting by LRS coupled with MLP analysis appears to be an easy and accurate method for early and differential diagnosis of AD. This technique could be rapidly promoted from laboratory to the hospital

  20. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Become an advocate SPECIAL REPORT: FINANCIAL AND PERSONAL BENEFITS OF EARLY DIAGNOSIS Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's provides a number of important benefits to diagnosed individuals, their caregivers and loved ones, ...

  1. Phospholipase A2 activation as a therapeutic approach for cognitive enhancement in early-stage Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Evelin L; Forlenza, Orestes V; Gattaz, Wagner F

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and has no known cure. Evidence suggests that reduced activity of specific subtypes of intracellular phospholipases A2 (cPLA2 and iPLA2) is an early event in AD and may contribute to memory impairment and neuropathology in the disease. The objective of this study was to review the literature focusing on the therapeutic role of PLA2 stimulation by cognitive training and positive modulators, or of supplementation with arachidonic acid (PLA2 product) in facilitating memory function and synaptic transmission and plasticity in either research animals or human subjects. MEDLINE database was searched (no date restrictions) for published articles using the keywords Alzheimer disease (mild, moderate, severe), mild cognitive impairment, healthy elderly, rats, mice, phospholipase A(2), phospholipid metabolism, phosphatidylcholine, arachidonic acid, cognitive training, learning, memory, long-term potentiation, protein kinases, dietary lipid compounds, cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and neuritogenesis. Reference lists of the identified articles were checked to select additional studies of interest. Overall, the data suggest that PLA2 activation is induced in the healthy brain during learning and memory. Furthermore, learning seems to regulate endogenous neurogenesis, which has been observed in AD brains. Finally, PLA2 appears to be implicated in homeostatic processes related to neurite outgrowth and differentiation in both neurodevelopmental processes and response to neuronal injury. The use of positive modulators of PLA2 (especially of cPLA2 and iPLA2) or supplementation with dietary lipid compounds (e.g., arachidonic acid) in combination with cognitive training could be a valuable therapeutic strategy for cognitive enhancement in early-stage AD.

  2. Measurement of fluorescent probes concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, begins years before the clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a novel method which may detect AD up to nine years earlier than current exams, minimally invasive, with minimal risk, pain and side effects. The method is based on previous reports which relate the concentrations of biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) (Aβ and Tau proteins) to the future development of AD in mild cognitive impairment patients. Our method, which uses fluorescence measurements of the relative concentrations of the CSF biomarkers, replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing. The process uses a miniature needle coupled trough an optical fiber to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites fluorescent probes which were prior injected and bond to the CSF biomarkers. Using the ratio between the fluorescence intensities emitted from the two biomarkers, which is correlated to their concentration ratio, the patient's risk of developing AD is estimated. A theoretical model was developed and validated using Monte Carlo simulations, demonstrating the relation between fluorescence emission and biomarker concentration. The method was tested using multi-layered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, the CSF in the sub-arachnoid space and the bone. These phantoms were prepared with different scattering and absorption coefficients, thicknesses and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate variations in human anatomy and in the needle location. The theoretical and in-vitro results are compared and the method's accuracy is discussed.

  3. Regional Cerebral Blood Flow differences in early and severe Alzheimer Disease as assessed by SPECT and Principal Component Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagani, M.M.E.; Sanchez-Creaspo, A.; Jonsson, C.; Engelin, L.; Danielsson, A.M.; Larsson, S.A.; Jacobsson, H.; Waegner, A.; Salmaso, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: In its development into severe Alzheimer's Disease (AD), early Alzheimer Disease (eAD) involves progressively larger regions of the brain. These regions share close anatomo-functional relationships. The aim of this study was to investigate the rCBF changes occurring in eAD and AD as compared to a group of normal individuals by means of SPECT and Principal Component Analysis. Materials and Methods. Thirty eAD, 17 AD and 66 normal controls (CTR) were included in the study. 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT, using a three-headed gamma camera, was performed at rest and the uptake in 27 functional bilateral sub-volumes of the brain was assessed by a standardised digitalised brain atlas. Data were grouped into anatomo-functionally connected regions by means of PCA analysis performed on all 113 individuals. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the significance of the differences in flow in such functional regions and data were co-variated for age differences. Results. In the global analysis, rCBF significantly differed between groups (0.001) with a progressive reduction of flow from CTR to AD. PCA reduced the 54 variables to 11 anatomo-functional regions that interacted with groups (p<0.001) and gender (p<0.001). In the overall analysis the three groups differed significantly in all functional regions except for bilateral occipital cortex, anterior cingulated cortex, thalamus and putamen. In both CTR/eAD and CTR/AD comparisons the largest rCBF reductions were found in functional regions including left (p<0.0001) and right (p<0.0001) temporo-parietal cortex and associative parietal cortex (p<0.0001). When eAD was compared to AD, this latter showed the largest reductions in right temporo-parietal cortex (p<0.0001) and in right prefrontal cortex (p<0.005). Conclusions. In this study the rCBF was investigated in early and severe Alzheimer's Disease taking into account the functional connectivity among brain regions. Our results confirm previous findings on the progression of

  4. Use of multimodality imaging and artificial intelligence for diagnosis and prognosis of early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaonan; Chen, Kewei; Wu, Teresa; Weidman, David; Lure, Fleming; Li, Jing

    2018-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia. Currently, no treatment exists to slow down or stop the progression of AD. There is converging belief that disease-modifying treatments should focus on early stages of the disease, that is, the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and preclinical stages. Making a diagnosis of AD and offering a prognosis (likelihood of converting to AD) at these early stages are challenging tasks but possible with the help of multimodality imaging, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission topography (PET), amyloid-PET, and recently introduced tau-PET, which provides different but complementary information. This article is a focused review of existing research in the recent decade that used statistical machine learning and artificial intelligence methods to perform quantitative analysis of multimodality image data for diagnosis and prognosis of AD at the MCI or preclinical stages. We review the existing work in 3 subareas: diagnosis, prognosis, and methods for handling modality-wise missing data-a commonly encountered problem when using multimodality imaging for prediction or classification. Factors contributing to missing data include lack of imaging equipment, cost, difficulty of obtaining patient consent, and patient drop-off (in longitudinal studies). Finally, we summarize our major findings and provide some recommendations for potential future research directions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The French series of autosomal dominant early onset Alzheimer's disease cases: mutation spectrum and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, David; Rousseau, Stéphane; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Quillard-Muraine, Muriel; Guyant-Maréchal, Lucie; Martinaud, Olivier; Pariente, Jérémie; Puel, Michèle; Rollin-Sillaire, Adeline; Pasquier, Florence; Le Ber, Isabelle; Sarazin, Marie; Croisile, Bernard; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Thomas-Antérion, Catherine; Paquet, Claire; Moreaud, Olivier; Gabelle, Audrey; Sellal, François; Sauvée, Mathilde; Laquerrière, Annie; Duyckaerts, Charles; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Lannes, Béatrice; Frebourg, Thierry; Hannequin, Didier; Campion, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    We describe 56 novel autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) families with PSEN1, PSEN2, and AβPP mutations or duplications, raising the total of families with mutations on known genes to 111 (74 PSEN1, 8 PSEN2, 16 AβPP, and 13 AβPP duplications) in the French series. In 33 additional families (23% of the series), the genetic determinism remained uncharacterized after this screening. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker levels were obtained for patients of 58 families (42 with known mutations and 16 without genetic characterization). CSF biomarkers profile was consistent with an AD diagnosis in 90% of families carrying mutations on known genes. In families without mutation, CSF biomarkers were consistent with AD diagnosis in 14/16 cases. Overall, these results support further genetic heterogeneity in the determinism of ADEOAD and suggest that other major genes remain to be characterized.

  6. Regional 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Hypometabolism is Associated with Higher Apathy Scores Over Time in Early Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatchel, Jennifer R; Donovan, Nancy J; Locascio, Joseph J; Becker, J Alex; Rentz, Dorene M; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Marshall, Gad A

    2017-07-01

    Apathy is among the earliest and most pervasive neuropsychiatric symptoms in prodromal and mild Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia that correlates with functional impairment and disease progression. We investigated the association of apathy with regional 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) metabolism in cognitively normal, mild cognitive impairment, and AD dementia subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. 57 North American research sites. 402 community dwelling elders. Apathy was assessed using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire. Baseline FDG metabolism in five regions implicated in the neurobiology of apathy and AD was investigated in relationship to apathy at baseline (cross-sectional general linear model) and longitudinally (mixed random/fixed effect model). Covariates included age, sex, diagnosis, apolipoprotein E genotype, premorbid intelligence, cognition, and antidepressant use. Cross-sectional analysis revealed that posterior cingulate hypometabolism, diagnosis, male sex, and antidepressant use were associated with higher apathy scores. Longitudinal analysis revealed that the interaction of supramarginal hypometabolism and time, posterior cingulate hypometabolism, and antidepressant use were associated with higher apathy scores across time; only supramarginal hypometabolism was positively related to rate of increase of apathy. Results support an association of apathy with hypometabolism in parietal regions commonly affected in early stages of AD, rather than medial frontal regions implicated in the neurobiology of apathy in later stages. Further work is needed to substantiate whether this localization is specific to apathy rather than to disease stage, and to investigate the potential role of AD proteinopathies in the pathogenesis of apathy. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... Mortality Alzheimer's disease is the only top 10 cause of death in the United States that cannot be prevented, ... even slowed. Alzheimer's disease is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States, and the fifth-leading ...

  8. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... get Alzheimer's disease were diagnosed in the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stage — before dementia — it would collectively save $7 trillion to $7.9 trillion in health and long-term care costs. worried about memory loss? KNOW THE 10 SIGNS Alzheimer's Disease Facts ...

  9. Asbestos exposure and Alzheimer disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, C; Bittesini, L; Brollo, A

    1986-02-01

    10 cases in which an asbestos-related disease (malignant pleural mesothelioma or asbestosis) was associated with severe Alzheimer type lesions in the brain are reported. The patients, all males aged between 67 and 78 years, had been occupationally exposed to asbestos in the shipbuilding industry. The hypothesis that asbestos is a favoring factor in the genesis of Alzheimer disease is discussed.

  10. [Decision-making and apathy in early stage of Alzheimer's disease and in mild cognitive impairment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacus, Jean-Pierre; Bayard, Sophie; Raffard, Stéphane; Gély-Nargeot, Marie-Christine

    2013-06-01

    Decision-making and apathy have common neuropsychological processes and neuroanatomical substrates. However, their links in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain unclear. in order to evaluate these links, we compared 3 groups of 20 control subjects to 20 patients with MCI and 20 patients with mild AD. All participants completed the mini mental state examination (MMSE), the Lille apathy rating scale (LARS, a multidimensional scale of apathy), the game of dice task (GDT, assessing decision under risk) and the Iowa gambling task (IGT, assessing decision under ambiguity). 60% of patients in both clinical groups were apathetic versus 5% of control subjects. In both clinical groups the IGT and GDT net scores were comparable (respectively: p = 0.76 and p = 0.84), while the control group had higher scores than MCI and AD's groups (respectively, GDT p decision under risk (× 6), and under ambiguity (× 3.5). No global contribution of apathy was found for decision-making performances (all PS > 0.05), but on the LARS, the "intellectual curiosity" (cognitive dimension) was a predictor for the performances on GDT's (OR = 1.73, p = 0.05), while the "action initiation" (behavioral dimension) was a predictor of those on IGT (OR = 1.57, p = 0.05). these results highlight the behavioral and the cognitive sensitivity of the IGT and the GDT, and are analyzed according to Levy and Dubois's model of apathy, and to the three steps of the decision-making process of Gleichgerrcht et al. (2010). However, more researches are necessary to explain the causality links between action initiation and decision under ambiguity.

  11. Distinct neural systems underlying reduced emotional enhancement for positive and negative stimuli in early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistridis, Panagiota; Taylor, Kirsten I; Kissler, Johanna M; Monsch, Andreas U; Kressig, Reto W; Kivisaari, Sasa L

    2013-01-01

    Emotional information is typically better remembered than neutral content, and previous studies suggest that this effect is subserved particularly by the amygdala together with its interactions with the hippocampus. However, it is not known whether amygdala damage affects emotional memory performance at immediate and delayed recall, and whether its involvement is modulated by stimulus valence. Moreover, it is unclear to what extent more distributed neocortical regions involved in e.g., autobiographical memory, also contribute to emotional processing. We investigated these questions in a group of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), which affects the amygdala, hippocampus and neocortical regions. Healthy controls (n = 14), patients with AD (n = 15) and its putative prodrome amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 11) completed a memory task consisting of immediate and delayed free recall of a list of positive, negative and neutral words. Memory performance was related to brain integrity in region of interest and whole-brain voxel-based morphometry analyses. In the brain-behavioral analyses, the left amygdala volume predicted the immediate recall of both positive and negative material, whereas at delay, left and right amygdala volumes were associated with performance with positive and negative words, respectively. Whole-brain analyses revealed additional associations between left angular gyrus integrity and the immediate recall of positive words as well as between the orbitofrontal cortex and the delayed recall of negative words. These results indicate that emotional memory impairments in AD may be underpinned by damage to regions implicated in emotional processing as well as frontoparietal regions, which may exert their influence via autobiographical memories and organizational strategies.

  12. [Molecular markers of Alzheimer disease early diagnostic: investigation perspectives of peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltsev, M A; Zuev, V A; Kozhevnikova, E O; Linkova, N S; Kvetnaia, T V; Polyakova, V O; Kvetnoy, I M

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of elderly and old age people. For intravital diagnosis of the expression of signaling molecules - AD markers, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral tissues are used: lymphocytes and blood platelets, buccal and olfactory epithelium, skin fibroblasts. There are several changes in the production of hyper phosphorylated form of τ-protein, BACE1 and peptide Аβ42 in CSF in case of AD, but CSF taking may have a number of side effects. Less traumatic taking of sampling tissues for the diagnosis of AD is in use of epithelium biopsy and blood portion. An increase in the expression of the hyper phosphorylated form of τ-protein is shown in blood lymphocytes of AD patients. An increase in the content of high molecular weight forms of phosphorylated t-protein and amyloid precursor protein-APP was also revealed in blood platelets of AD patients. Changes in the amount of 2 miRNA families - miR-132 family and miR-134 family were revealed in blood cells 1-5 years before the manifestation of clinical signs of AD. An increase in the concentration of bound calcium, synthesis of peptides Aβ40 and Aβ42, τ protein was observed in AD skin fibroblasts. In the olfactory and buccal epithelium an increase in the expression of hyper phosphorylated form of τ-protein and Aβ peptide was detected in patients with AD. Verification of AD markers in peripheral tissues for biopsy have the important significant for life diagnostics, prevention and and target AD treatment.

  13. Strategic lesions in the anterior thalamic radiation and apathy in early Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Torso

    Full Text Available Behavioural disorders and psychological symptoms of Dementia (BPSD are commonly observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD, and strongly contribute to increasing patients' disability. Using voxel-lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM, we investigated the impact of white matter lesions (WMLs on the severity of BPSD in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI.Thirty-one a-MCI patients (with a conversion rate to AD of 32% at 2 year follow-up and 26 healthy controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examination at 3T, including T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated-inversion-recovery images, and T1-weighted volumes. In the patient group, BPSD was assessed using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-12. After quantitative definition of WMLs, their distribution was investigated, without an a priori anatomical hypothesis, against patients' behavioural symptoms. Unbiased regional grey matter volumetrics was also used to assess the contribution of grey matter atrophy to BPSD.Apathy, irritability, depression/dysphoria, anxiety and agitation were shown to be the most common symptoms in the patient sample. Despite a more widespread anatomical distribution, a-MCI patients did not differ from controls in WML volumes. VLSM revealed a strict association between the presence of lesions in the anterior thalamic radiations (ATRs and the severity of apathy. Regional grey matter atrophy did not account for any BPSD.This study indicates that damage to the ATRs is strategic for the occurrence of apathy in patients with a-MCI. Disconnection between the prefrontal cortex and the mediodorsal and anterior thalamic nuclei might represent the pathophysiological substrate for apathy, which is one of the most common psychopathological symptoms observed in dementia.

  14. Detecting early egocentric and allocentric impairments deficits in Alzheimer's disease: an experimental study with virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serino, Silvia; Morganti, Francesca; Di Stefano, Fabio; Riva, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have pointed out that egocentric and allocentric spatial impairments are one of the earliest manifestations of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). It is less clear how a break in the continuous interaction between these two representations may be a crucial marker to detect patients who are at risk to develop dementia. The main objective of this study is to compare the performances of participants suffering from amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI group), patients with AD (AD group) and a control group (CG), using a virtual reality (VR)-based procedure for assessing the abilities in encoding, storing and syncing different spatial representations. In the first task, participants were required to indicate on a real map the position of the object they had memorized, while in the second task they were invited to retrieve its position from an empty version of the same virtual room, starting from a different position. The entire procedure was repeated across three different trials, depending on the object location in the encoding phase. Our finding showed that aMCI patients performed significantly more poorly in the third trial of the first task, showing a deficit in the ability to encode and store an allocentric viewpoint independent representation. On the other hand, AD patients performed significantly more poorly when compared to the CG in the second task, indicating a specific impairment in storing an allocentric viewpoint independent representation and then syncing it with the allocentric viewpoint dependent representation. Furthermore, data suggested that these impairments are not a product of generalized cognitive decline or of general decay in spatial abilities, but instead may reflect a selective deficit in the spatial organization Overall, these findings provide an initial insight into the cognitive underpinnings of amnestic impairment in aMCI and AD patient exploiting the potentiality of VR.

  15. Neurogenesis and Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Taupin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disease, characterized in the brain by amyloid plaque deposits and neurofibrillary tangles. It is the most common form of dementia among older people. There is at present no cure for AD, and current treatments consist mainly in drug therapy. Potential therapies for AD involve gene and cellular therapy. The recent confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain and neural stem cells (NSCs reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS provide new opportunities for cellular therapy in the CNS, particularly for AD, and to better understand brain physiopathology. Hence, researchers have aimed at characterizing neurogenesis in patients with AD. Studies show that neurogenesis is increased in these patients, and in animal models of AD. The effect of drugs used to treat AD on neurogenesis is currently being investigated, to identify whether neurogenesis contributes to their therapeutic activities.

  16. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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  17. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE IS THE 6TH LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH IN THE UNITED STATES. 16.1 MILLION AMERICANS ... AT OVER $323 BILLION. BETWEEN 2000 AND 2015 DEATHS FROM HEART DISEASE HAVE DECREASED 11% WHILE DEATHS ...

  18. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... disease is the only top 10 cause of death in the United States that cannot be prevented, ... Alzheimer's disease is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States, and the fifth-leading ...

  19. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... 323 BILLION. BETWEEN 2000 AND 2015 DEATHS FROM HEART DISEASE HAVE DECREASED 11% WHILE DEATHS FROM ALZHEIMER'S ... deaths from the number one cause of death (heart disease) decreased 11 percent. Among people age 70, ...

  20. Galantamine for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olin, J; Schneider, L

    2002-01-01

    Galantamine (also called galanthamine, marketed by Janssen as Reminyl) was originally isolated from several plants, including daffodil bulbs, but is now synthesized. Galantamine is a specific, competitive, and reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. It is also an allosteric modulator at nicotinic cholinergic receptor sites potentiating cholinergic nicotinic neurotransmission. A small number of early studies showed mild cognitive and global benefits for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and recently several multicentre clinical trials have been published with positive findings. Galantamine has received regulatory approval in 29 counties: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Czechia, the European Union (except for The Netherlands), Iceland, Korea, Mexico, Norway, Poland, Singapore, South Africa, Switzerland, Thailand, and the United States. The objective of this overview is to assess the clinical effects of galantamine in patients with probable AD, and to investigate potential moderators of an effect. The trials were identified from a search of the Specialized Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group on 15 May 2002 using the terms galantamine and Reminyl. Published reviews were inspected for further sources. Additional information was collected from an unpublished investigational brochure for galantamine. Trials selected were randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, unconfounded comparisons of galantamine with placebo for a treatment duration of greater than 4 weeks for people with AD. Data were extracted independently by the reviewers and pooled where appropriate and possible. The pooled odds ratios (95%CI) or the average differences (95%CI) were estimated. Intention-to-treat and observed cases data were both reported, if the data were available. Outcomes of interest include the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog), clinical global impression of change (CIBIC-plus or CGIC), Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative

  1. Improvement of memory recall by quercetin in rodent contextual fear conditioning and human early-stage Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Toshiyuki; Itoh, Masanori; Ohta, Kazunori; Hayashi, Yuichi; Hayakawa, Miki; Yamada, Yasushi; Akanabe, Hiroshi; Chikaishi, Tokio; Nakagawa, Kiyomi; Itoh, Yoshinori; Muro, Takato; Yanagida, Daisuke; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Mori, Tetsuya; Saito, Kazuki; Ohzawa, Kaori; Suzuki, Chihiro; Li, Shimo; Ueda, Masashi; Wang, Miao-Xing; Nishida, Emika; Islam, Saiful; Tana; Kobori, Masuko; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2016-06-15

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience a wide array of cognitive deficits, which typically include the impairment of explicit memory. In previous studies, the authors reported that a flavonoid, quercetin, reduces the expression of ATF4 and delays memory deterioration in an early-stage AD mouse model. In the present study, the effects of long-term quercetin intake on memory recall were assessed using contextual fear conditioning in aged wild-type mice. In addition, the present study examined whether memory recall was affected by the intake of quercetin-rich onion (a new cultivar of hybrid onion 'Quergold') powder in early-stage AD patients. In-vivo analysis indicated that memory recall was enhanced in aged mice fed a quercetin-containing diet. Memory recall in early-stage AD patients, determined using the Revised Hasegawa Dementia Scale, was significantly improved by the intake of quercetin-rich onion (Quergold) powder for 4 weeks compared with the intake of control onion ('Mashiro' white onion) powder. These results indicate that quercetin might influence memory recall.

  2. Genetic Aspects of Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jennifer; Goldman, Jill; Marder, Karen S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease (AD) is a genetically complex disorder. Mutations in 3 genes, presenilin 1, amyloid precursor protein, and presenilin 2, lead to early-onset familial AD in rare families with onset of disease occurring prior to age 65. Specific polymorphisms in apolipoprotein E are associated with the more common, late-onset AD occurring after age 65. In this review, we discuss current advances in AD genetics, the implications of the known AD genes, presenilin 1, presenilin 2, amyloid precursor protein, and apolipoprotein E, and other possible genes on the clinical diagnosis, treatment, and genetic counseling of patients and families with early- and late-onset AD. Review Summary In addition to the mutations in 4 known genes associated with AD, mutations in other genes may be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. Most recently, 2 different research groups have reported genetic association between 2 genes, sortilin-related receptor and GAB2, and AD. These associations have not changed the diagnostic and medical management of AD. Conclusions New research in the genetics of AD have implicated novel genes as having a role in the disease, but these findings have not been replicated nor have specific disease causing mutations been identified. To date, clinical genetic testing is limited to familial early-onset disease for symptomatic individuals and asymptomatic relatives and, although not recommended, amyloid precursor protein apolipoprotein E testing as an adjunct to diagnosis of symptomatic individuals. PMID:19276785

  3. Korean Brain Aging Study for the Early Diagnosis and Prediction of Alzheimer's Disease: Methodology and Baseline Sample Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Min Soo; Yi, Dahyun; Lee, Jun Ho; Choe, Young Min; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Lee, Jun-Young; Choi, Hyo Jung; Baek, Hyewon; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Yun-Sang; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Choi, Murim; Lee, Yu Jin; Lee, Dong Woo; Ryu, Seung-Ho; Kim, Shin Gyeom; Kim, Jee Wook; Woo, Jong Inn; Lee, Dong Young

    2017-11-01

    The Korean Brain Aging Study for the Early Diagnosis and Prediction of Alzheimer's disease (KBASE) aimed to recruit 650 individuals, aged from 20 to 90 years, to search for new biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to investigate how multi-faceted lifetime experiences and bodily changes contribute to the brain changes or brain pathologies related to the AD process. All participants received comprehensive clinical and neuropsychological evaluations, multi-modal brain imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, [ 11 C]Pittsburgh compound B-positron emission tomography (PET), and [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, blood and genetic marker analyses at baseline, and a subset of participants underwent actigraph monitoring and completed a sleep diary. Participants are to be followed annually with clinical and neuropsychological assessments, and biannually with the full KBASE assessment, including neuroimaging and laboratory tests. As of March 2017, in total, 758 individuals had volunteered for this study. Among them, in total, 591 participants-291 cognitively normal (CN) old-aged individuals, 74 CN young- and middle-aged individuals, 139 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 87 individuals with AD dementia (ADD)-were enrolled at baseline, after excluding 162 individuals. A subset of participants (n=275) underwent actigraph monitoring. The KBASE cohort is a prospective, longitudinal cohort study that recruited participants with a wide age range and a wide distribution of cognitive status (CN, MCI, and ADD) and it has several strengths in its design and methodologies. Details of the recruitment, study methodology, and baseline sample characteristics are described in this paper.

  4. Effectiveness of diffusion tensor imaging in differentiating early-stage subcortical ischemic vascular disease, Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Chien Tu

    Full Text Available To describe and compare diffusion tensor imaging (DTI parameters between patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD and Alzheimer's disease (AD diagnosed using structuralized neuropsychiatric assessments, and investigate potential neuronal substrates related to cognitive performance.Thirty-five patients with SIVD, 40 patients with AD, and 33 cognitively normal control (NC subjects matched by age and education level were consecutively recruited and underwent cognitive function assessments and DTI examinations. Comparisons among these three subgroups with regards to cognitive performance and DTI parameters including fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD values were performed. Partial correlation analysis after controlling for age and education was used to evaluate associations between cognitive performance and DTI parameters.With regards to cognitive performance, the patients with SIVD had lower total scores in frontal assessment battery (FAB compared to those with AD (p < 0.05 in the context of comparable Mini-Mental Status Examination and Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument scores. With regards to DTI parameters, there were more regions of significant differences in FA among these three subgroups compared with MD. Compared with NC group, the patients with SIVD had significant global reductions in FA (p < 0.001 ~ 0.05, while significant reductions in FA among the patients with AD were regionally confined within the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, and bilateral forceps major, and the anterior thalamic radiation, uncinate fasciculus, and cingulum of the left side (p < 0.01 ~ 0.05. Analysis of FA values within the left forceps major, left anterior thalamic radiation, and genu of the corpus callosum revealed a 71.8% overall correct classification (p < 0.001 with sensitivity of 69.4%, specificity of 73.8%, positive predictive value of 69.4%, and negative predictive value

  5. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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  6. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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  7. Inflammatory mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Zhan, S. S.; van Gool, W. A.; Allsop, D.

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is aetiologically heterogeneous, but the pathogenesis is often considered to be initiated by the deposition of amyloid fibrils, followed by neuritic tau pathology and neuronal death. A variety of inflammatory proteins has been identified in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's

  8. Efficacy of psychosocial intervention in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, F B; Buss, D V; Eckermann, A

    2012-01-01

    To assess the efficacy at 12 months of an early psychosocial counselling and support programme for outpatients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their primary care givers.......To assess the efficacy at 12 months of an early psychosocial counselling and support programme for outpatients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their primary care givers....

  9. Cost-effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging with a new contrast agent for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Biasutti

    Full Text Available Used as contrast agents for brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, markers for beta-amyloid deposits might allow early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of such a diagnostic test, MRI+CLP (contrastophore-linker-pharmacophore, should it become clinically available.We compared the cost-effectiveness of MRI+CLP to that of standard diagnosis using currently available cognition tests and of standard MRI, and investigated the impact of a hypothetical treatment efficient in early AD. The primary analysis was based on the current French context for 70-year-old patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI. In alternative "screen and treat" scenarios, we analyzed the consequences of systematic screenings of over-60 individuals (either population-wide or restricted to the ApoE4 genotype population. We used a Markov model of AD progression; model parameters, as well as incurred costs and quality-of-life weights in France were taken from the literature. We performed univariate and probabilistic multivariate sensitivity analyses. The base-case preferred strategy was the standard MRI diagnosis strategy. In the primary analysis however, MRI+CLP could become the preferred strategy under a wide array of scenarios involving lower cost and/or higher sensitivity or specificity. By contrast, in the "screen and treat" analyses, the probability of MRI+CLP becoming the preferred strategy remained lower than 5%.It is thought that anti-beta-amyloid compounds might halt the development of dementia in early stage patients. This study suggests that, even should such treatments become available, systematically screening the over-60 population for AD would only become cost-effective with highly specific tests able to diagnose early stages of the disease. However, offering a new diagnostic test based on beta-amyloid markers to elderly patients with MCI might prove cost-effective.

  10. Selective alterations of neurons and circuits related to early memory loss in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María eLlorens-Martín

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A progressive loss of episodic memory is a well-known clinical symptom that characterizes Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The beginning of this loss of memory has been associated with the very early, pathological accumulation of tau and neuronal degeneration observed in the entorhinal cortex (EC. Tau-related pathology is thought to then spread progressively to the hippocampal formation and other brain areas as the disease progresses. The major cortical afferent source of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus is the EC through the perforant pathway. At least two main circuits participate in the connection between EC and the hippocampus; one originating in layer II and the other in layer III of the EC giving rise to the classical trisynaptic (ECII→dentate gyrus→CA3→CA1 and monosynaptic (ECIII→CA1 circuits. Thus, the study of the early pathological changes in these circuits is of great interest. In this review, we will discuss mainly the alterations of the granule cell neurons of the dentate gyrus and the atrophy of CA1 pyramidal neurons that occur in AD in relation to the possible differential alterations of these two main circuits.

  11. Glial alterations from early to late stages in a model of Alzheimer's disease: Evidence of autophagy involvement in Aβ internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomilio, Carlos; Pavia, Patricio; Gorojod, Roxana Mayra; Vinuesa, Angeles; Alaimo, Agustina; Galvan, Veronica; Kotler, Monica Lidia; Beauquis, Juan; Saravia, Flavia

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease without effective therapy. Brain amyloid deposits are classical histopathological hallmarks that generate an inflammatory reaction affecting neuronal and glial function. The identification of early cell responses and of brain areas involved could help to design new successful treatments. Hence, we studied early alterations of hippocampal glia and their progression during the neuropathology in PDAPP-J20 transgenic mice, AD model, at 3, 9, and 15 months (m) of age. At 3 m, before deposits formation, microglial Iba1+ cells from transgenic mice already exhibited signs of activation and larger soma size in the hilus, alterations appearing later on stratum radiatum. Iba1 immunohistochemistry revealed increased cell density and immunoreactive area in PDAPP mice from 9 m onward selectively in the hilus, in coincidence with prominent amyloid Congo red + deposition. At pre-plaque stages, GFAP+ astroglia showed density alterations while, at an advanced age, the presence of deposits was associated with important glial volume changes and apparently being intimately involved in amyloid degradation. Astrocytes around plaques were strongly labeled for LC3 until 15 m in Tg mice, suggestive of increased autophagic flux. Moreover, β-Amyloid fibrils internalization by astrocytes in in vitro conditions was dependent on autophagy. Co-localization of Iba1 with ubiquitin or p62 was exclusively found in microglia contacting deposits from 9 m onward, suggesting torpid autophagy. Our work characterizes glial changes at early stages of the disease in PDAPP-J20 mice, focusing on the hilus as an especially susceptible hippocampal subfield, and provides evidence that glial autophagy could play a role in amyloid processing at advanced stages. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Trends in brain oxygenation during mental and physical exercise measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS): potential for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Monica S.; Allen, Jeffery W.; Mikkilineni, Shweta; Liu, Hanli

    2005-04-01

    Motivation: Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is crucial because symptoms respond best to available treatments in the initial stages of the disease. Recent studies have shown that marked changes in brain oxygenation during mental and physical tasks can be used for noninvasive functional brain imaging to detect Alzheimer"s disease. The goal of our study is to explore the possibility of using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and mapping (NIRM) as a diagnostic tool for AD before the onset of significant morphological changes in the brain. Methods: A 16-channel NIRS brain imager was used to noninvasively measure spatial and temporal changes in cerebral hemodynamics induced during verbal fluency task and physical activity. The experiments involved healthy subjects (n = 10) in the age range of 25+/-5 years. The NIRS signals were taken from the subjects' prefrontal cortex during the activities. Results and Conclusion: Trends of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin in the prefrontal cortex of the brain were observed. During the mental stimulation, the subjects showed significant increase in oxygenated hemoglobin [HbO2] with a simultaneous decrease in deoxygenated hemoglobin [Hb]. However, physical exercise caused a rise in levels of HbO2 with small variations in Hb. This study basically demonstrates that NIRM taken from the prefrontal cortex of the human brain is sensitive to both mental and physical tasks and holds potential to serve as a diagnostic means for early detection of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Advancing frontiers in Alzheimer's disease research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenner, G.G.; Wurtman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 16 chapters. Some of the titles are: Transmitter Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease: Relation to Cortical Dysfunction as Suggested by Positron Emission Tomography; Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Clinical Evaluation of Dementia; Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease; Down's Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease: What is the Relationship; and Beta Protein: A Possible Marker for Alzheimer's Disease

  14. Anxiety-like behavior as an early endophenotype in the TgF344-AD rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentkowski, Nathan S; Berkowitz, Laura E; Thompson, Shannon M; Drake, Emma N; Olguin, Carlos R; Clark, Benjamin J

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline and the presence of aggregates of amyloid beta (plaques) and hyperphosphorylated tau (tangles). Early diagnosis through neuropsychological testing is difficult due to comorbidity of symptoms between AD and other types of dementia. As a result, there is a need to identify the range of behavioral phenotypes expressed in AD. In the present study, we utilized a transgenic rat (TgF344-AD) model that bears the mutated amyloid precursor protein as well as presenilin-1 genes, resulting in progressive plaque and tangle pathogenesis throughout the cortex. We tested young adult male and female TgF344-AD rats in a spatial memory task in the Morris water maze and for anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze. Results indicated that regardless of sex, TgF344-AD rats exhibited increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze, which occurred without significant deficits in the spatial memory. Together, these results indicate that enhanced anxiety-like behavior represents an early-stage behavioral marker in the TgF344-AD rat model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of the Addenbrooke's cognitive examination for detecting early Alzheimer's disease and mild vascular dementia in a German population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, P; Greim, B; Nadler, K; Martens, U; Krecklow, B; Domes, G; Herpertz, S; Kurz, A

    2006-01-01

    We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of the German version of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE) in identifying early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild vascular dementia (VaD) in comparison with the conventional Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The study refers to 50 patients with mild dementia of AD, 26 patients with mild dementia of vascular etiology and to 54 cognitively normal subjects. The ACE and MMSE were validated against an expert diagnosis based on a comprehensive diagnostic workup. Statistical analysis was performed using the receiver operator characteristics method. The optimal cut-off score for the ACE for detecting dementia in patients with early AD was 85/86, which had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 86%. The optimal cut-off for the ACE for the identification of dementia in patients with mild VaD was also 85/86 and it had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 100%. The kappa values imply a substantial agreement between the diagnoses made by the ACE and the MMSE. The German version of the ACE is a short and practical but accurate test battery for the identification of AD and VaD, assessing a broad range of cognitive functions and providing a wide profile of cognitive functions/dysfunctions.

  16. Everyday Decision Making in Individuals with Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease: An Integrative Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rebecca; Ziomkowski, Mary K; Veltkamp, Amy

    2017-09-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) demonstrate fluctuation in cognitive abilities that can affect their ability to make decisions. Everyday decision making encompasses the types of decisions about typical daily activities, such as what to eat, what to do, and what to wear. Everyday decisions are encountered many times per day by individuals with AD/dementia and their caregivers. However, not much is known about the ability of individuals with AD/dementia to make these types of decisions. The purpose of the current literature review was to synthesize the evidence regarding everyday decision making in individuals with early-stage AD/dementia. Findings from the review indicate there is beginning evidence that individuals with early to moderate stages of AD/dementia desire to have input in daily decisions, have the ability to state their wishes consistently at times, and having input in decision making is important to their selfhood. The literature revealed few interventions to assist individuals with AD/dementia in everyday decision making. Findings from the review are discussed with implications for nursing practice and research. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2017; 10(5):240-247.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Early-stage differentiation between presenile Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia using arterial spin labeling MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steketee, Rebecca M.E.; Meijboom, Rozanna; Lugt, Aad van der; Smits, Marion [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Medical Informatics and Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Houston, Gavin C. [GE Healthcare, Hatfield (United Kingdom); Mutsaerts, Henri J.M.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, PO Box 22660, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mendez Orellana, Carolina P. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jong, Frank Jan de; Swieten, John C. van [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    To investigate arterial spin labeling (ASL)-MRI for the early diagnosis of and differentiation between the two most common types of presenile dementia: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and for distinguishing age-related from pathological perfusion changes. Thirteen AD and 19 FTD patients, and 25 age-matched older and 22 younger controls underwent 3D pseudo-continuous ASL-MRI at 3 T. Gray matter (GM) volume and cerebral blood flow (CBF), corrected for partial volume effects, were quantified in the entire supratentorial cortex and in 10 GM regions. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic performance were evaluated in regions showing significant CBF differences between patient groups or between patients and older controls. AD compared with FTD patients had hypoperfusion in the posterior cingulate cortex, differentiating these with a diagnostic performance of 74 %. Compared to older controls, FTD patients showed hypoperfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex, whereas AD patients showed a more widespread regional hypoperfusion as well as atrophy. Regional atrophy was not different between AD and FTD. Diagnostic performance of ASL to differentiate AD or FTD from controls was good (78-85 %). Older controls showed global hypoperfusion compared to young controls. ASL-MRI contributes to early diagnosis of and differentiation between presenile AD and FTD. (orig.)

  18. Early-stage differentiation between presenile Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia using arterial spin labeling MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steketee, Rebecca M.E.; Meijboom, Rozanna; Lugt, Aad van der; Smits, Marion; Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan; Houston, Gavin C.; Mutsaerts, Henri J.M.M.; Mendez Orellana, Carolina P.; Jong, Frank Jan de; Swieten, John C. van

    2016-01-01

    To investigate arterial spin labeling (ASL)-MRI for the early diagnosis of and differentiation between the two most common types of presenile dementia: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and for distinguishing age-related from pathological perfusion changes. Thirteen AD and 19 FTD patients, and 25 age-matched older and 22 younger controls underwent 3D pseudo-continuous ASL-MRI at 3 T. Gray matter (GM) volume and cerebral blood flow (CBF), corrected for partial volume effects, were quantified in the entire supratentorial cortex and in 10 GM regions. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic performance were evaluated in regions showing significant CBF differences between patient groups or between patients and older controls. AD compared with FTD patients had hypoperfusion in the posterior cingulate cortex, differentiating these with a diagnostic performance of 74 %. Compared to older controls, FTD patients showed hypoperfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex, whereas AD patients showed a more widespread regional hypoperfusion as well as atrophy. Regional atrophy was not different between AD and FTD. Diagnostic performance of ASL to differentiate AD or FTD from controls was good (78-85 %). Older controls showed global hypoperfusion compared to young controls. ASL-MRI contributes to early diagnosis of and differentiation between presenile AD and FTD. (orig.)

  19. Disease-modifying drugs in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezzi L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laura Ghezzi, Elio Scarpini, Daniela Galimberti Neurology Unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Fondazione Cà Granda, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder and the most common cause of dementia. The early stages of AD are characterized by short-term memory loss. Once the disease progresses, patients experience difficulties in sense of direction, oral communication, calculation, ability to learn, and cognitive thinking. The median duration of the disease is 10 years. The pathology is characterized by deposition of amyloid beta peptide (so-called senile plaques and tau protein in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. Currently, two classes of drugs are licensed by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of AD, ie, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for mild to moderate AD, and memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, for moderate and severe AD. Treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or memantine aims at slowing progression and controlling symptoms, whereas drugs under development are intended to modify the pathologic steps leading to AD. Herein, we review the clinical features, pharmacologic properties, and cost-effectiveness of the available acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, and focus on disease-modifying drugs aiming to interfere with the amyloid beta peptide, including vaccination, passive immunization, and tau deposition. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, disease-modifying drugs, diagnosis, treatment

  20. Alzheimer disease and anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Gözde; Özköse Satirlar, Zerrin

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases and the most prevalent form of dementia. Some factors in the development of AD, age being the best-known one, have been suggested; however, no causes have been found yet. The pathophysiology of the disease is highly complex, current therapies are palliative, and a cure is still lacking. Adverse effects of anesthetics in the elderly have been reported since the 1950s; however, awareness of this old problem has recently gained inportance again. Whether exposure to surgery and general anesthesia (GA) is associated with the development of AD has been questioned. As the population is aging, many elderly patients will need to be anesthetized, and maybe some were already anesthetized before they were diagnosed. Exposure to anesthetics has been demonstrated to promote pathogenesis of AD in both in vitro and in vivo studies. However, to date, there have not been any clinical trials to address a link between exposure to GA and the development of AD in humans. Therefore, before making any conclusions we need further studies, but we should be aware of the potential risks and take cautions with vulnerable elderly patients.

  1. Neural Dynamics of Multiple Object Processing in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease: Future Early Diagnostic Biomarkers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagattini, Chiara; Mazza, Veronica; Panizza, Laura; Ferrari, Clarissa; Bonomini, Cristina; Brignani, Debora

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the behavioral and electrophysiological dynamics of multiple object processing (MOP) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and to test whether its neural signatures may represent reliable diagnostic biomarkers. Behavioral performance and event-related potentials [N2pc and contralateral delay activity (CDA)] were measured in AD, MCI, and healthy controls during a MOP task, which consisted in enumerating a variable number of targets presented among distractors. AD patients showed an overall decline in accuracy for both small and large target quantities, whereas in MCI patients, only enumeration of large quantities was impaired. N2pc, a neural marker of attentive individuation, was spared in both AD and MCI patients. In contrast, CDA, which indexes visual short term memory abilities, was altered in both groups of patients, with a non-linear pattern of amplitude modulation along the continuum of the disease: a reduction in AD and an increase in MCI. These results indicate that AD pathology shows a progressive decline in MOP, which is associated to the decay of visual short-term memory mechanisms. Crucially, CDA may be considered as a useful neural signature both to distinguish between healthy and pathological aging and to characterize the different stages along the AD continuum, possibly becoming a reliable candidate for an early diagnostic biomarker of AD pathology.

  2. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) - the novel trend of targeting Alzheimer's disease in its early stages - methodological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pater, C

    2011-11-01

    While much uncertainty exists in the estimates of the global burden of Alzheimer's disease and about the potential impact of various interventions, there is a widespread acceptance of the fact that the steady increase in the incidence and prevalence of the condition worldwide is becoming a massive public health problem as well as a huge economic burden for all healthcare systems and societies. These heavy demands are further compounded by the poor quality of life of the affected individuals, of their families and of their caregivers. The epidemic proportion of Alzheimer's disease has triggered relentless attempts for development of treatment approaches during the past two decades by a multitude of pharmaceuticals and biotech companies. Commercial development of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors has, until recently, virtually dominated the field and, although efficacy has been demonstrated for five different products, the longterm clinical results suggested that alternate approaches were warranted. Disease modifying strategies targeting the β- amyloid plaques (e.g., decreasing β-amyloid formation through β- and γ-secretase inhibition, diminishing β-amyloid aggregation through anti-aggregants or enhancement of β-amyloid clearance through active/passive immunization), targeting the neurofibrillary tangles through inhibition of tau protein hyperphosphorilation or, more recently, by increasing mitochondrial permeability, all these potential treatment modalities are facing major methodological challenges during the conduct of a myriad of clinical trials meant to bring the novel therapies to the market. Failure of more than 400 products tested in more than 800 clinical trials to date, with many of these failures occurring in late stage development (phase III) have triggered a paradigm shift toward targeting of the early stages of cognitive deficiencies (mild cognitive impairment- MCI) and a refinement of the investigative methodologies. The great heterogeneity of

  3. The clinical utility of informants' appraisals on prospective and retrospective memory in patients with early Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Hsuan Hsu

    Full Text Available Increasing studies suggest the importance of including prospective memory measures in clinical evaluation of dementia due to its sensitivity and functional relevance. The Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRQM is originally a self-rated memory inventory that offers a direct comparison between prospective and episodic memory. However, the informant's report has been recognized as a more valid source of cognitive complaints. We thus aimed to examine the validity of the informant-rated form of the PRMQ in assessing memory function of the patients and in detecting individuals with early dementia. The informants of 140 neurological outpatients with memory complaints completed the Taiwan version of the PRMQ. Tests of prospective memory, short-term memory, and general cognitive ability were also administered to non-demented participants and patients with early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Results showed significant relationships between the PRMQ ratings and objective cognitive measures, and showed that higher ratings on the PRMQ were associated with increasing odds of greater dementia severity. Receiver operative characteristic (ROC curves showed an adequate ability of the PRMQ to identify patients with dementia (93% sensitivity and 84% specificity. Hierarchical regression revealed that the PRMQ has additional explanatory power for dementia status after controlling for age, education and objective memory test results, and that the prospective memory subscale owns predictive value for dementia beyond the retrospective memory subscale. The present study demonstrated the external validity and diagnostic value of informants' evaluation of their respective patients' prospective and retrospective memory functioning, and highlighted the important role of prospective memory in early dementia detection. The proxy-version of the PRMQ is a useful tool that captures prospective and episodic memory problems in patients with early AD, in

  4. [Proceeding memory in Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Anlló, Eva Ma; Chamorro-Sánchez, Jorge; Díaz-Marta, Juan Poveda; Gil, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Procedural learning can acquire or develop skills through performance and repetition of a task unconsciously or unintentionally. Procedural skills are considered as the cornerstone in the neuropsychological rehabilitation to promote the autonomy of patients with brain damage, as those with Alzheimer's disease. This review presents data about procedural skills in Alzheimer's disease. Over the past three decades, we have found 40 articles studying various procedural skills in the Alzheimer's disease: motor, perceptual-motor, cognitive, perceptual-cognitive and those developed through serial reaction-time paradigm. We analyzed every study evaluating a procedural skill, indicating the used task and preservation or no preservation of procedural learning. Overall, most of the papers published describe conservation of learning procedures or relatively conserved in Alzheimer's disease, which could be used to promote patient autonomy.

  5. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Today, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer's every 65 seconds. By mid-century, someone in the United States will develop the disease every 33 seconds. GET INVOLVED. Join the cause Mortality ...

  6. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Argentina ADNI Amyloid Imaging Task Force Alzheimer’s Association Business Consortia (AABC) Biomarker Consortium GBSC Working Groups Global Alzheimer’s Association Interactive Network International Alzheimer's Disease Research ...

  7. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as well as society as a whole. The development of biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease is making it ... I am a caregiver I am a care professional I am a physician I am a researcher ...

  8. The genetics of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagyinszky E

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Eva Bagyinszky,1 Young Chul Youn,2 Seong Soo A An,1,* SangYun Kim3,*1Department of BioNano Technology Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, 2Department of Neurology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, 3Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Budang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a complex and heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder, classified as either early onset (under 65 years of age, or late onset (over 65 years of age. Three main genes are involved in early onset AD: amyloid precursor protein (APP, presenilin 1 (PSEN1, and presenilin 2 (PSEN2. The apolipoprotein E (APOE E4 allele has been found to be a main risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Additionally, genome-wide association studies (GWASs have identified several genes that might be potential risk factors for AD, including clusterin (CLU, complement receptor 1 (CR1, phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM, and sortilin-related receptor (SORL1. Recent studies have discovered additional novel genes that might be involved in late-onset AD, such as triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2 and cluster of differentiation 33 (CD33. Identification of new AD-related genes is important for better understanding of the pathomechanisms leading to neurodegeneration. Since the differential diagnoses of neurodegenerative disorders are difficult, especially in the early stages, genetic testing is essential for diagnostic processes. Next-generation sequencing studies have been successfully used for detecting mutations, monitoring the epigenetic changes, and analyzing transcriptomes. These studies may be a promising approach toward understanding the complete genetic mechanisms of diverse genetic disorders such as AD.Keywords: dementia, amyloid precursor protein, presenilin 1, presenilin 2, APOE, mutation, diagnosis, genetic testing

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, H.; Padberg, F.; Koetter, H.U.; Teipel, S.J.; Ehrhardt, T.; Hegerl, U.; Stuebner, S.; Moeller, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is often diagnosed too late. Its etiology is still largely unknown and remains one of the big challenges in neurobiological fundamental research. Optimized early and differential diagnosis can be ensured by a dynamic concept of multidisciplinary diagnosis in cooperation between practitioners specializing in brain disorders, clinical psychogeriatric deprtments, and general practitioners. This, in turn, will enable individualized planning of further living conditions and care of Alzheimer patients and their relations as well as efficient and early pharmacotherapy and psychological intervention. (orig) [de

  10. Spatial memory in the early stages of frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer´s disease and vascular dementia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlček, Kamil; Laczó, J.; Kalina, M.; Hort, J.; Bureš, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 65, S (2005) ISSN 0065-1400. [Annual General Meeting of the European Brain and Behaviour Society /37./. 24.09.2005-28.09.2005, Dublin] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/0693 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : memory * Alzheimer ´disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  11. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of ... How many people in the United States have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5.1 million as ...

  12. Functional implications of hippocampal degeneration in early Alzheimer's disease: a combined DTI and PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakushev, Igor; Mueller, Matthias J.; Schermuly, Ingrid; Fellgiebel, Andreas [University Medical Center Mainz, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Mainz (Germany); Schreckenberger, Matthias [University Medical Center Mainz, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Mainz (Germany); Cumming, Paul [University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Stoeter, Peter [University Medical Center Mainz, Institute of Neuroradiology, Mainz (Germany); Gerhard, Alex [University Medical Center Mainz, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Mainz (Germany); University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Hypometabolism of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in early Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to arise in part due to AD-specific neuronal damage to the hippocampal formation. Here, we explored the association between microstructural alterations within the hippocampus and whole-brain glucose metabolism in subjects with AD, also in relation to episodic memory impairment. Twenty patients with early AD (Mini-Mental State Examination 25.7 {+-} 1.7) were studied with [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and diffusion tensor imaging. Episodic memory performance was assessed using the free delayed verbal recall task (DVR). Voxel-wise relative FDG uptake was correlated to diffusivity indices of the hippocampus, followed by extraction of FDG uptake values from significant clusters. Linear regression analysis was performed to test for unique contributions of diffusivity and metabolic indices in the prediction of memory function. Diffusivity in the left anterior hippocampus negatively correlated with FDG uptake primarily in the left anterior hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and the PCC (p< 0.005). The same correlation pattern was found for right hippocampal diffusivity (p< 0.05). In linear regression analysis, left anterior hippocampal diffusivity and FDG uptake from the PCC cluster were the only significant predictors for performance on DVR, together explaining 60.6% of the variance. We found an inverse association between anterior hippocampal diffusivity and PCC glucose metabolism, which was in turn strongly related to episodic memory performance in subjects with early AD. These findings support the diaschisis hypothesis of AD and implicate a dysfunction of structures along the hippocampal output pathways as a significant contributor to the genesis of episodic memory impairment. (orig.)

  13. Diagnostic value of β amyloid plaques imaging agent 131I-IMPY brain imaging in early Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Wanzhong; Lu Chunxiong; Yang Min; Bao Jiandong; Cheng Zhaohuo; Cai Deliang; Wang Zhiqiang; Yang Bixiu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of β-amyloid plaques imaging agent [ 131 I] 2( 4-dimethylaminop henyl)-6-iodoimidazo [1, 2-α] pyridine ( 131 I-IMPY) SPECT imaging in early Alzheimer's Disease. Methods: 24 cases of AD (7 males, 17 females, aged 48∼79 years) and 14 normal (6 males, 8 females, aged 42∼67 years) control subjects were selected for this study. 131 I-IMPY SPECT imaging was carried out 2-3 h post injection. 131 I-IMPY uptake defined as the ratio of each brain gyrus and cerebellum uptake on fixed region of interest (ROI) (Rcl/cb) was calculated. Comparative analysis between the two groups was carried out using t-test. Results: In patients with early AD (MCI), 131 I-IMPY was increased in parietal gyrus, temporal gyrus and frontal gyrus compared with normal control group and it were found to be statistically significant (t = 1.3967∼2.8757, all P 0.05). In patients with AD, increase in 131 I-IMPY were observed in parietal, temporal, occipital lobes and basal ganglia compared with normal control group and it were found to be statistically significant (t=2.1001∼6.2789, all P 0.05), and 131 I-IMPY was increased in occipital lobes and basal ganglia compared with MCI group and it were found to be statistically significant (t=2.0850∼3.6772, all P 131 I-IMPY was lightly increased in each brain of left side gyrus compared with right but without statistically significant difference (t=0.1273∼0.5571, all P>0.05). Conclusions: 131 I-IMPY SPECT Imaging was helpful for early diagnosis of AD. (authors)

  14. The genetics of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2012-10-01

    Family history is the second strongest risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD) following advanced age. Twin and family studies indicate that genetic factors are estimated to play a role in at least 80% of AD cases. The inheritance of AD exhibits a dichotomous pattern. On one hand, rare mutations in APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 virtually guarantee early-onset (<60 years) familial AD, which represents ∼5% of AD. On the other hand, common gene polymorphisms, such as the ε4 and ε2 variants of the APOE gene, can influence susceptibility for ∼50% of the common late-onset AD. These four genes account for 30%-50% of the inheritability of AD. Genome-wide association studies have recently led to the identification of 11 additional AD candidate genes. This paper reviews the past, present, and future attempts to elucidate the complex and heterogeneous genetic underpinnings of AD.

  15. Early induction of oxidative stress in mouse model of Alzheimer disease with reduced mitochondrial superoxide dismutase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Pil Lee

    Full Text Available While oxidative stress has been linked to Alzheimer's disease, the underlying pathophysiological relationship is unclear. To examine this relationship, we induced oxidative stress through the genetic ablation of one copy of mitochondrial antioxidant superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2 allele in mutant human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP transgenic mice. The brains of young (5-7 months of age and old (25-30 months of age mice with the four genotypes, wild-type (Sod2(+/+, hemizygous Sod2 (Sod2(+/-, hAPP/wild-type (Sod2(+/+, and hAPP/hemizygous (Sod2(+/- were examined to assess levels of oxidative stress markers 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and heme oxygenase-1. Sod2 reduction in young hAPP mice resulted in significantly increased oxidative stress in the pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Interestingly, while differences resulting from hAPP expression or Sod2 reduction were not apparent in the neurons in old mice, oxidative stress was increased in astrocytes in old, but not young hAPP mice with either Sod2(+/+ or Sod2(+/-. Our study shows the specific changes in oxidative stress and the causal relationship with the pathological progression of these mice. These results suggest that the early neuronal susceptibility to oxidative stress in the hAPP/Sod2(+/- mice may contribute to the pathological and behavioral changes seen in this animal model.

  16. Serial position effects in patients with mild cognitive impairment and early and moderate Alzheimer's disease compared with healthy comparison subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, B; Deisenhammer, E A; Marksteiner, J; Papousek, I; Fink, A; Weiss, E M

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the serial position effects in memory can differentiate patients with different subtypes of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from healthy controls and patients with different stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The serial position effects was tested with the CERAD word list task in 184 persons (39 healthy control subjects, 15 amnestic MCI single domain subjects, 23 amnestic MCI multiple domain subjects, 31 nonamnestic MCI subjects, 45 early or mild AD patients, and 31 moderate AD patients). With progression of dementia, memory deficits increased and the impairment in the primacy effect during the learning trials advanced, whereas the recall of recent items was less impaired. The serial position profile of nonamnestic MCI patients resembled that of healthy control subjects, whereas amnestic MCI patients showed poorer performance in all 3 positions but no significant difference as a function of serial word position. Analyses of the serial position effect may be a useful complement to clinical neuropsychological measures for distinguishing amnestic MCI patients from normal aging and patients with different stages of dementia. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Evaluation of Anosognosia in Alzheimer's Disease Using the Symptoms of Early Dementia-11 Questionnaire (SED-11Q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohko Maki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The objective is to propose a brief method to evaluate anosognosia in Alzheimer's disease (AD using the Symptoms of Early Dementia-11 Questionnaire (SED-11Q, a short informant-based screening questionnaire for identifying dementia. Methods: The participants were 107 elderly individuals: 13 with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR of 0.5, 73 with mild AD of CDR 1, and 21 with moderate AD of CDR 2. The patients and caregivers answered the SED-11Q independently, and the degree of discrepancy indicated the severity of anosognosia. Results: The scores were as follows: caregiver scores were 2.46 ± 1.85 (mean ± SD in CDR 0.5, 6.36 ± 3.02 in CDR 1, and 9.00 ± 1.14 in CDR 2; patient scores were 2.00 ± 1.78, 2.55 ± 2.33, and 1.33 ± 2.46, respectively. Discrepancy was 0.46 ± 1.61, 3.81 ± 3.95, and 7.67 ± 2.87, respectively, and the caregiver assessments were significantly higher than the patient assessments in CDR 1 and CDR 2 (p Conclusion: The SED-11Q serves a dual purpose: caregiver assessment is useful for the screening of dementia, and any discrepancy between the patient and the caregiver assessment is considered as an indication of the severity of anosognosia; this can be informative for caregivers and essential for successful care.

  18. A comparison of early diagnostic utility of Alzheimer disease biomarkers in brain magnetic resonance and cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge Argilés, J A; Blanco Cantó, M A; Leiva Salinas, C; Flors, L; Muñoz Ruiz, C; Sánchez Payá, J; Gasparini Berenguer, R; Leiva Santana, C

    2014-09-01

    The goals of this study were to compare the early diagnostic utility of Alzheimer disease biomarkers in the CSF with those in brain MRI in conditions found in our clinical practice, and to ascertain the diagnostic accuracy of both techniques used together. Between 2008 and 2009, we included 30 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who were examined using 1.5 Tesla brain MRI and AD biomarker analysis in CSF. MRI studies were evaluated by 2 radiologists according to the Korf́s visual scale. CSF biomarkers were analysed using INNOTEST reagents for Aβ1-42, total-tau and phospho-tau181p. We evaluated clinical changes 2 years after inclusion. By 2 years after inclusion, 15 of the original 30 patients (50%) had developed AD (NINCDS-ADRA criteria). The predictive utility of AD biomarkers in CSF (RR 2.7; 95% CI, 1.1-6.7; Pde Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Alzheimer's disease and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, R A; Arden, R; Jung, R E

    2011-06-01

    A significant body of evidence has accumulated suggesting that individual variation in intellectual ability, whether assessed directly by intelligence tests or indirectly through proxy measures, is related to risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) in later life. Important questions remain unanswered, however, such as the specificity of risk for AD vs. other forms of dementia, and the specific links between premorbid intelligence and development of the neuropathology characteristic of AD. Lower premorbid intelligence has also emerged as a risk factor for greater mortality across myriad health and mental health diagnoses. Genetic covariance contributes importantly to these associations, and pleiotropic genetic effects may impact diverse organ systems through similar processes, including inefficient design and oxidative stress. Through such processes, the genetic underpinnings of intelligence, specifically, mutation load, may also increase the risk of developing AD. We discuss how specific neurobiologic features of relatively lower premorbid intelligence, including reduced metabolic efficiency, may facilitate the development of AD neuropathology. The cognitive reserve hypothesis, the most widely accepted account of the intelligence-AD association, is reviewed in the context of this larger literature.

  20. Computed tomography study of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, H; Kobayashi, K; Ikeda, Y; Nagao, Y; Ogihara, R; Kosaka, K

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to study cerebral atrophy in 18 patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease of presenile type and in 14 healthy age-matched subjects as controls. Using the computerized planimetric method, Subarachnoid Space Volume Index and Ventricle Volume Index were calculated as the measure of cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation respectively. From the results the following conclusions were drawn: 1. The cerebral atrophy in Alzheimer patients could be attributable to the disease processes rather than to physiological aging of the brain. 2. The degree of atrophy increases in parallel with the progress of the clinical stage, and the cortical atrophy is already apparent at an early stage, whereas the ventricular dilatation becomes pronounced at later stages. 3. CT could be one of the most useful clinical tests available for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. A computed tomography study of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Juntendo Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo; Ikeda, Y.; Nagao, Y.; Ogihara, R.; Kosaka, K.; Psychiatric Research Inst. of Tokyo

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to study cerebral atrophy in 18 patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease of presenile type and in 14 healthy age-matched subjects as controls. Using the computerized planimetric method, Subarachnoid Space Volume Index and Ventricle Volume Index were calculated as the measure of cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation respectively. From the results the following conclusions were drawn: 1. The cerebral atrophy in Alzheimer patients could be attributable to the disease processes rather than to physiological aging of the brain. 2. The degree of atrophy increases in parallel with the progress of the clinical stage, and the cortical atrophy is already apparent at an early stage, whereas the ventricular dilatation becomes pronounced at later stages. 3. CT could be one of the most useful clinical tests available for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.) [de

  2. The Vallecas Project: a cohort to identify early markers and mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier eOlazarán

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a major threat for the well-being of an increasingly aged world population. The physiopathological mechanisms of late-onset AD are multiple, possibly heterogeneous, and not well understood. Different combinations of variables from several domains (i.e., clinical, neuropsychological, structural, and biochemical markers may predict dementia conversion, according to distinct physiopathological pathways, in different groups of subjects. Methods. We launched the Vallecas Project (VP, a cohort study of non-demented people aged 70 to 85, to characterize the social, clinical, neuropsychological, structural, and biochemical underpinnings of AD inception. Given the exploratory nature of the VP, multidimensional and machine learning techniques will be applied, in addition to the traditional multivariate statistical methods. Results. A total of 1,169 subjects were recruited between October 2011 and December 2013. Mean age was 74.4 years (SD 3.9, 63.5% of the subjects were women, and 17.9% of the subjects were carriers of at least one ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE gene. Cognitive diagnoses at inclusion were as follows: normal cognition 93.0% and mild cognitive impairment (MCI 7.0% (3.1% amnestic MCI, 0.1% non-amnestic MCI, 3.8% mixed MCI. Blood samples were obtained and stored for future determinations in 99.9% of the subjects and 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI study was conducted in 89.9% of the volunteers. The cohort is being followed up annually for four years after the baseline. Conclusion. We have established a valuable homogeneous single-center cohort which, by identifying groups of variables associated with high risk of MCI or dementia conversion, should help to clarify the early physiopathological mechanisms of AD and should provide avenues for prompt diagnosis and AD prevention.

  3. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of all elderly people who receive adult day services and nursing home care. Take action. Become an advocate SPECIAL REPORT: FINANCIAL AND PERSONAL BENEFITS OF EARLY DIAGNOSIS Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's ... and long-term care costs. worried about memory ...

  4. The biological substrates of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheibel, A.B.; Wechsler, A.F.; Brazier, M.A.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Dementia of the Alzheimer Type: Genetic Aspects; Determination of Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Dementia Using Positron Emission Tomography; Pathology of the Basal Forebrain in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias; Characterization of Neurofibrillary Tangles with Monoclonal Antibodies Raised Against Alzheimer Neurofibrillary Tangles; and HLA Associations in Alzheimer's Disease

  5. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  6. [In vitro early detection of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease by Pittsburgh compound B-modified magnetic nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, J Q; Wu, J Q; Li, M H; Wang, P J

    2017-11-07

    Objective: To construct magnetic nanoparticles targeting β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, the pathological biomarker of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to study their binding capability in vitro . Methods: Superparamagnetic nanoparticles Mn(0.6)Zn(0.4)Fe(2)O(4) (MZF) were coated with amphiphilic star-block copolymeric micelles and modified with Aβ-specific probe Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) to construct a novel magnetic nanoparticle MZF-PiB, which specifically targeted amyloid plaques. Transmission electron microscope was used to study the morphological features of MZF-PiB. Superparamagnetism of MZF-PiB was assessed by its r(2) relaxation rate by using 3.0 T MRI scanner. Cytotoxic test was applied to determine biosafety of MZF-PiB nanoparticles in differentiated human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK). In vitro binding tests were conducted via immunohistochemistry on 6-month old AD mice brain sections. Differences of cell viability between groups were compared with one-way analysis of variance. Results: MZF-PiB nanoparticles were successfully constructed. Transmission electron microscope images showed that the nanoparticles were about 100 nm in size. The r(2) relaxation rate was 163.11 mMS(-1). No differences were found in cell viability of SH-SY5Y and MDCK incubated with MZF-PiB suspension for 24 h or 48 h when compared with those of untreated cells ( F =2.336, 2.539, 0.293, 1.493, all P >0.05). In vitro binding tests indicated that the MZF-PiB were specifically bound to amyloid plaques. The smallest size of detected plaques was 27 μm. Conclusion: PiB-modified nanoparticles targeting Aβ are biologically safe and highly superparamagnetic, possessing the capability to detect amyloid plaques early in vitro and the potential for early diagnosis of AD.

  7. Differences of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT imaging in the early stage of subcortical vascular dementia compared with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyung Won; Kang, Do Young; Park, Min Jeong; Cheon, Sang Myung; Cha, Jae Kwan; Kim, Sang Ho; Kim, Jae Woo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the specific patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with the early stage of subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) using Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT, and to compare the differences between the two conditions. Sixteen SVaD, 46 AD and 12 control subjects participated in this study. We included the patients with SVaD and AD according to NINCDS-ADRDA and NINDS-AIREN criteria. They were all matched for age, education and clinical dementia rating scores. Three groups were evaluated by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for measuring rCBF. The SPECT data of patients with SVaD and AD were compared with those of normal control subjects and then compared with each other. SPM analysis of the SPECT image showed significant perfusion deficits on the right temporal region and thalamus, left insula and superior temporal gyrus, both cingulate gyri and frontal subgyri in patients with SVaD and on the left supramarginal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, postcentral gyrus and inferior parietal lobule, right fugiform gyrus and both cingulate gyri in AD compared with control subjects (uncorrected ρ < 0.01). SVaD patients revealed significant hypoperfusion in the right parahippocampal gyrus with cingulated gyrus, left insula and both frontal subgyral regions compared with AD (uncorrected ρ < 0.01). Our study shows characteristic and different pattern of perfusion deficits in patients with SVaD and AD, and these results may be helpful to discriminate the two conditions in the early stage of illness

  8. An evaluation of deficits in semantic cueing and proactive and retroactive interference as early features of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocco, Elizabeth; Curiel, Rosie E; Acevedo, Amarilis; Czaja, Sara J; Loewenstein, David A

    2014-09-01

    To determine the degree to which susceptibility to different types of semantic interference may reflect the initial manifestations of early Alzheimer's disease (AD) beyond the effects of global memory impairment. Normal elderly (NE) subjects (n = 47), subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI; n = 34), and subjects with probable AD (n = 40) were evaluated by using a unique cued recall paradigm that allowed for evaluation of both proactive and retroactive interference effects while controlling for global memory impairment (i.e., Loewenstein-Acevedo Scales of Semantic Interference and Learning [LASSI-L] procedure). Controlling for overall memory impairment, aMCI subjects had much greater proactive and retroactive interference effects than NE subjects. LASSI-L indices of learning by using cued recall revealed high levels of sensitivity and specificity, with an overall correct classification rate of 90%. These measures provided better discrimination than traditional neuropsychological measures of memory function. The LASSI-L paradigm is unique and unlike other assessments of memory in that items posed for cued recall are explicitly presented, and semantic interference and cueing effects can be assessed while controlling for initial level of memory impairment. This is a powerful procedure that allows the participant to serve as his or her own control. The high levels of discrimination between subjects with aMCI and normal cognition that exceeded traditional neuropsychological measures makes the LASSI-L worthy of further research in the detection of early AD. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease : a genetic-epidemiologic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThe work presented in this thesis has been motivated by the Jack of knowledge of risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. It has been long recognised that genetic factors are implicated, in particular in early-onset Alzheimer's disease.4 But to what extent are genetic factors involved?

  10. Feelings Without Memory in Alzheimer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Guzmán-Vélez, Edmarie; Feinstein, Justin S.; Tranel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) typically have impaired declarative memory as a result of hippocampal damage early in the disease. Far less is understood about AD’s effect on emotion. Objective: We investigated whether feelings of emotion can persist in patients with AD, even after their declarative memory for what caused the feelings has faded. Methods: A sample of 17 patients with probable AD and 17 healthy comparison participants (case-matched for age, sex, and education) ...

  11. Proverb and idiom comprehension in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, D; Van Lancker, D; Read, S

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with Probable Alzheimer Disease were administered tests of word, familiar phrases (idioms and proverbs), and novel phrase comprehension. From the early stage of the disease, patients performed worse at understanding familiar phrases than single words or novel phrases. The results uphold common observations that AD patients have difficulty interpreting abstract meanings. Cognitive variables responsible for poor idiom/proverb comprehension and the clinical implications of this new protocol are discussed.

  12. Insulin and Alzheimer disease: type 3 diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Jagua Gualdrón

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer Disease is a neurodegenerative disease of central nervous system whose incidence will increase in next years. Recent investigations relate alzheimer with insulin signaling defects in neurons. Is alzheimer Disease a type 3 diabetes? In this communication write a brief article about evidences from this alzheimer‘s disease model.

  13. CT study in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Heii; Kobayashi, Kazunari; Ikeda, Kenji; Nagao, Yoshiko; Ogihara, Ryuji; Kosaka, Kenji [Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital (Japan)

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral atrophy on CT was studied in 18 patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease and in 14 healthy age-matched subjects as the control. The patients with Alzheimer's disease were divided into three groups of Stages I, II and III, according to their clinical symptoms. The study of the measurement method disclosed that the computerized measurement involving calculation of the number of pixels contained within the range of the designated CT numbers is liable to produce errors for the determination of the subarachnoid spaces and the ventricles with calcified colloid plexus. Therefore, for the present study was the method adopted, in which the subarachnoid spaces and the ventricles are measured based on the number of pixels contained in the region of interest by tracing them on the display monitor. Then, both Subarachnoid Space Volume Index (SVI) and Ventricle Volume Index (VVI) were calculated as the indices for cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation in a slice through the level of the foramen interventriculare Monroi and other three successive ones through upper regions. Cerebral atrophy observed on CT in Alzheimer patients is attributable to Alzheimer's disease processes, rather than to physiological aging of the brain. The degree of the atrophy increases in proportion to the clinical stage, and cortical atrophy is apparent even at Stage I, whereas ventricular dilatation becomes pronounced at later stage. CT is one of effective clinical tests for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. CT study in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Heii; Kobayashi, Kazunari; Ikeda, Kenji; Nagao, Yoshiko; Ogihara, Ryuji; Kosaka, Kenji

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral atrophy on CT was studied in 18 patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease and in 14 healthy age-matched subjects as the control. The patients with Alzheimer's disease were divided into three groups of Stages I, Ii and III, according to their clinical symptoms. The study of the measurement method disclosed that the computerized measurement involving calculation of the number of pixels contained within the range of the designated CT numbers is liable to produce errors for the determination of the subarachnoid spaces and the ventricles with calcified colloid plexus. Therefor, for the present study was the method adopted, in which the subarachnoid spaces and the ventricles are measured based on the number of pixels contained in the region of interest by tracing them on the display monitor. Then, both Subarachnoid Space Volume Index (SVI) and Ventricle Volume Index (VVI) were calculated as the indices for cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation in a slice through the level of the foramen interventriculare Monroi and other three successive ones through upper regions. Cerebral atrophy observed on CT in Alzheimer patients is attributable to Alzheimer's disease processes, rather than to physiological aging of the brain. The degree of the atrophy increases in proportion to the clinical stage, and cortical atrophy is apparent even at Stage I, whereas ventricular dilatation becomes pronounced at later stage. CT is one of effective clinical tests for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. (J.P.N.)

  15. Cingulum correlates of cognitive functions in patients with mild cognitive impairment and early Alzheimer's disease: a diffusion spectrum imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Cheng; Shih, Yao-Chia; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Chu, Yu-Hsiu; Wu, Meng-Tien; Chen, Ta-Fu; Tang, Pei-Fang; Chiu, Ming-Jang

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) of MRI can detect neural fiber tract changes. We investigated integrity of cingulum bundle (CB) in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early Alzheimer's disease (EAD) using DSI tractography and explored its relationship with cognitive functions. We recruited 8 patients with MCI, 9 with EAD and 15 healthy controls (HC). All subjects received a battery of neuropsychological tests to access their executive, memory and language functions. We used a 3.0-tesla MRI scanner to obtain T1- and T2-weighted images for anatomy and used a pulsed gradient twice-refocused spin-echo diffusion echo-planar imaging sequence to acquire DSI. Patients with EAD performed significantly poorer than the HC on most tests in executive and memory functions. Significantly smaller general fractional anisotropy (GFA) values were found in the posterior and inferior segments of left CB and of the anterior segment of right CB of the EAD compared with those of the HC. Spearman's correlation on the patient groups showed that GFA values of the posterior segment of the left CB were significantly negatively associated with the time used to complete Color Trails Test Part II and positively correlated with performance of the logical memory and visual reproduction. GFA values of inferior segment of bilateral CB were positively associated with the performance of visual recognition. DSI tractography demonstrates significant preferential degeneration of the CB on the left side in patients with EAD. The location-specific degeneration is associated with corresponding declines in both executive and memory functions.

  16. Cerebral amyloid-beta protein accumulation with aging in cotton-top tamarins: a model of early Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemere, Cynthia A; Oh, Jiwon; Stanish, Heather A; Peng, Ying; Pepivani, Imelda; Fagan, Anne M; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Westmoreland, Susan V; Mansfield, Keith G

    2008-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive form of dementia in the elderly. Two major neuropathological hallmarks of AD include cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) into plaques and blood vessels, and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles in brain. In addition, activated microglia and reactive astrocytes are often associated with plaques and tangles. Numerous other proteins are associated with plaques in human AD brain, including Apo E and ubiquitin. The amyloid precursor protein and its shorter fragment, Abeta, are homologous between humans and non-human primates. Cerebral Abeta deposition has been reported previously for rhesus monkeys, vervets, squirrel monkeys, marmosets, lemurs, cynomologous monkeys, chimpanzees, and orangutans. Here we report, for the first time, age-related neuropathological changes in cotton-top tamarins (CTT, Saguinus oedipus), an endangered non-human primate native to the rainforests of Colombia and Costa Rica. Typical lifespan is 13-14 years of age in the wild and 15-20+ years in captivity. We performed detailed immunohistochemical analyses of Abeta deposition and associated pathogenesis in archived brain sections from 36 tamarins ranging in age from 6-21 years. Abeta plaque deposition was observed in 16 of the 20 oldest tamarins (>12 years). Plaques contained mainly Abeta42, and in the oldest animals, were associated with reactive astrocytes, activated microglia, Apo E, and ubiquitin-positive dystrophic neurites, similar to human plaques. Vascular Abeta was detected in 14 of the 20 aged tamarins; Abeta42 preceded Abeta40 deposition. Phospho-tau labeled dystrophic neurites and tangles, typically present in human AD, were absent in the tamarins. In conclusion, tamarins may represent a model of early AD pathology.

  17. Screening of dementia genes by whole-exome sequencing in early-onset Alzheimer disease: input and lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Gaël; Wallon, David; Charbonnier, Camille; Quenez, Olivier; Rousseau, Stéphane; Richard, Anne-Claire; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Coutant, Sophie; Le Guennec, Kilan; Bacq, Delphine; Garnier, Jean-Guillaume; Olaso, Robert; Boland, Anne; Meyer, Vincent; Deleuze, Jean-François; Munter, Hans Markus; Bourque, Guillaume; Auld, Daniel; Montpetit, Alexandre; Lathrop, Mark; Guyant-Maréchal, Lucie; Martinaud, Olivier; Pariente, Jérémie; Rollin-Sillaire, Adeline; Pasquier, Florence; Le Ber, Isabelle; Sarazin, Marie; Croisile, Bernard; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Thomas-Antérion, Catherine; Paquet, Claire; Sauvée, Mathilde; Moreaud, Olivier; Gabelle, Audrey; Sellal, François; Ceccaldi, Mathieu; Chamard, Ludivine; Blanc, Frédéric; Frebourg, Thierry; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier

    2016-05-01

    Causative variants in APP, PSEN1 or PSEN2 account for a majority of cases of autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD, onset before 65 years). Variant detection rates in other EOAD patients, that is, with family history of late-onset AD (LOAD) (and no incidence of EOAD) and sporadic cases might be much lower. We analyzed the genomes from 264 patients using whole-exome sequencing (WES) with high depth of coverage: 90 EOAD patients with family history of LOAD and no incidence of EOAD in the family and 174 patients with sporadic AD starting between 51 and 65 years. We found three PSEN1 and one PSEN2 causative, probably or possibly causative variants in four patients (1.5%). Given the absence of PSEN1, PSEN2 and APP causative variants, we investigated whether these 260 patients might be burdened with protein-modifying variants in 20 genes that were previously shown to cause other types of dementia when mutated. For this analysis, we included an additional set of 160 patients who were previously shown to be free of causative variants in PSEN1, PSEN2 and APP: 107 ADEOAD patients and 53 sporadic EOAD patients with an age of onset before 51 years. In these 420 patients, we detected no variant that might modify the function of the 20 dementia-causing genes. We conclude that EOAD patients with family history of LOAD and no incidence of EOAD in the family or patients with sporadic AD starting between 51 and 65 years have a low variant-detection rate in AD genes.

  18. Rare variants in calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1 found in early onset Alzheimer's disease patients alter calcium homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Rubio-Moscardo

    Full Text Available Calcium signaling in the brain is fundamental to the learning and memory process and there is evidence to suggest that its dysfunction is involved in the pathological pathways underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD. Recently, the calcium hypothesis of AD has received support with the identification of the non-selective Ca(2+-permeable channel CALHM1. A genetic polymorphism (p. P86L in CALHM1 reduces plasma membrane Ca(2+ permeability and is associated with an earlier age-at-onset of AD. To investigate the role of CALHM1 variants in early-onset AD (EOAD, we sequenced all CALHM1 coding regions in three independent series comprising 284 EOAD patients and 326 controls. Two missense mutations in patients (p.G330D and p.R154H and one (p.A213T in a control individual were identified. Calcium imaging analyses revealed that while the mutation found in a control (p.A213T behaved as wild-type CALHM1 (CALHM1-WT, a complete abolishment of the Ca(2+ influx was associated with the mutations found in EOAD patients (p.G330D and p.R154H. Notably, the previously reported p. P86L mutation was associated with an intermediate Ca(2+ influx between the CALHM1-WT and the p.G330D and p.R154H mutations. Since neither expression of wild-type nor mutant CALHM1 affected amyloid ß-peptide (Aß production or Aß-mediated cellular toxicity, we conclude that rare genetic variants in CALHM1 lead to Ca(2+ dysregulation and may contribute to the risk of EOAD through a mechanism independent from the classical Aß cascade.

  19. Optimizing the diagnosis of early Alzheimer's disease in mild cognitive impairment subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattila, Jussi; Soininen, Hilkka; Koikkalainen, Juha

    2012-01-01

    of the disease. Several studies have analyzed data of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, showing that conversion from MCI to AD can be predicted with a classification accuracy of 60-80%. This accuracy may not be high enough for influencing diagnostic decisions. In this work, the prediction problem...

  20. Longitudinal analysis of the behavioral phenotype in a novel transgenic rat model of early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Pablo; Martino Adami, Pamela V; Do Carmo, Sonia; Blanco, Eduardo; Rotondaro, Cecilia; Capani, Francisco; Castaño, Eduardo M; Cuello, A Claudio; Morelli, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid β (iAβ) has been linked to mild cognitive impairment that may precede Alzheimer's disease (AD) onset. This neuropathological trait was recently mimicked in a novel animal model of AD, the hemizygous transgenic McGill-R-Thy1-APP (Tg(+/-)) rat. The characterization of the behavioral phenotypes in this animal model could provide a baseline of efficacy for earlier therapeutic interventions. The aim of the present study was to undertake a longitudinal study of Aβ accumulation and a comprehensive behavioral evaluation of this transgenic rat model. We assessed exploratory activity, anxiety-related behaviors, recognition memory, working memory, spatial learning and reference memory at 3, 6, and 12 months of age. In parallel, we measured Aβ by ELISA, Western blots and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry in hippocampal samples. SDS-soluble Aβ peptide accumulated at low levels (~9 pg/mg) without differences among ages. However, Western blots showed SDS-resistant Aβ oligomers (~30 kDa) at 6 and 12 months, but not at 3 months. When compared to wild-type (WT), male Tg(+/-) rats exhibited a spatial reference memory deficit in the Morris Water Maze (MWM) as early as 3 months of age, which persisted at 6 and 12 months. In addition, Tg(+/-) rats displayed a working memory impairment in the Y-maze and higher anxiety levels in the Open Field (OF) at 6 and 12 months of age, but not at 3 months. Exploratory activity in the OF was similar to that of WT at all-time points. Spatial learning in the MWM and the recognition memory, as assessed by the Novel Object Recognition Test, were unimpaired at any time point. The data from the present study demonstrate that the hemizygous transgenic McGill-R-Thy1-APP rat has a wide array of behavioral and cognitive impairments from young adulthood to middle-age. The low Aβ burden and early emotional and cognitive deficits in this transgenic rat model supports its potential use for drug discovery purposes in

  1. The Existence of Primary Age-Related Tauopathy Suggests that not all the Cases with Early Braak Stages of Neurofibrillary Pathology are Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaccone, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The distinction between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Primary Age-Related Tauopathy (PART) is a hotly debated issue. As most lines of evidence support the tenet that tau pathology occurs downstream of amyloid-β deposition, it seems reasonable to consider PART as a separate disease process not necessarily related to Aβ and hence AD. Following this view, the early stages of neurofibrillary pathology may not always be the forerunner of diffuse neurofibrillary changes and AD. The ongoing debate further enhances the need for greater caution against any future predictions using tau cerebrospinal fluid and imaging biomarkers.

  2. Ayurvedic Profiling of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredesen, Dale E; Rao, Rammohan V

    2017-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated, progressive neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by severe memory loss, personality changes, and an overall decline in cognitive function. The cause of AD is not yet completely defined and efforts to find a cure for it have so far been disappointing. AD is one of the most significant health care problems nationally and globally. Recently, we described a personalized therapeutic approach called metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration (MEND) that successfully reversed the cognitive decline in patients with early AD. The magnitude of the improvement was exceptional, providing testimony to the fact that a personalized and programmatic approach to cognitive decline is highly effective. Ayurveda is a personalized system of traditional medicine native to India and the Indian subcontinent. Although a direct reference to AD in the ancient Ayurvedic literature is missing, concepts including forgetfulness, memory loss, and brain cell loss have been described. Using the clinical information and the metabolic profiling of AD individuals we recently reported using the MEND program, we now describe in this commentary, 3 subtypes of AD based on the Ayurvedic interpretation. Ayurvedic profiling of patients with AD reveals 3 readily distinguishable subtypes, namely Vata, Pitta, and Krimi, which will prove useful in patients with cognitive decline and those at risk for such decline from the standpoint of specific subtype-based Ayurvedic intervention.

  3. Characteristic pattern of cerebral perfusion in patients with the early stage of subcortical vascular dementia compared with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Cheon, Sang Myung; Kim, Jong Kuk; Kim, Jae Woo

    2004-01-01

    Brain perfusion SPECT has been commonly used to evaluate several different types of dementia. The aim of this study is to assess the specific patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with the early stage of subcortical vascular dementia (SVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) using Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT, and to compare the differences between the two conditions. Sixteen SVD (mean age; 68.0±7.0 years, educational period; 6.3±5.6 years, CDR; 0.80±0.26). 46 AD (mean age; 69.9±7.4 years, educational period; 5.4±4.7 years, CDR; 0.86±0.23) and 12 normal control subjects (mean age; 67.1±7.7 years, educational period; 6.2±4.2 years) participated in this study. We included the patients with SVD and AD according to NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for probable AD and NINDS-AIREN criteria for probable or possible VD. They were all matched for age, education and clinical dementia scale scores. SPM analysis of the SPECT image showed significant perfusion deficits on the right temporal region and right thalamus, left insula and superior temporal gyrus, both cingulate gyri and frontal subgyral regions in patients with SVD and on the left supramarginal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, postcentral gyrus and inferior parietal lobule, right fugiform gyrus and both cingulate gyri in patients with AD compared with control subjects (uncorrected p<0.01). SVD patients revealed significant hypoperfusion in the right parahippocampal gyrus, right cingulated gyrus, left insula, and both frontal subgyral regions compared with AD patients (uncorrected p<0.01). SVD patients revealed significant hyperperfusion in right superior frontal gyrus, left pre- and postcentral gyri, left paracentral lobule, left precuneus and both medial frontal gyri compared with AD patients (uncorrected p<0.01). Our study shows characteristic and different pattern of perfusion deficits in patients with SVD and AD, and these results may be helpful to discriminate the two conditions in the early stage of illness

  4. Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, V W

    2007-10-01

    Menopausal status and estrogen-containing hormone therapy may influence several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, migraine headache, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, sleep disorders, and stroke. For most of these illnesses, evidence on hormone therapy is insufficient to guide practice decisions. For stroke, clinical trial evidence indicates that hormone therapy increases risk of cerebral infarction. For women with Alzheimer's disease, estrogen treatment trials have tended to be small and of short duration. Most suggest that estrogen started after the onset of dementia symptoms does not meaningfully improve cognition or slow disease progression. Hormone therapy initiated after age 64 increased all-cause dementia in the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study. Many observational studies, however, report protective associations between hormone use and Alzheimer risk. Apparent risk reduction may represent a bias toward hormone therapy, since hormones are more often prescribed to healthier women. However, when compared to the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study, estrogen exposures in many observational studies reflect hormone initiation at a younger age, closer to the time of menopause. One intriguing hypothesis is that hormone therapy initiated or used during an early critical window may reduce later Alzheimer incidence. Public health implications of this hypothesis are important, but current data are inadequate to decide the issue.

  5. Microsatellite D21D210 (GT-12) allele frequencies in sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lannfelt, L; Lilius, L; Viitanen, M; Winblad, B; Basun, H [Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Dept. of Geriatric Medicine, (Sweden); Houlden, H; Rossor, M [St. Mary` s Hospital, Dept. of Neurology, Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Hardy, J [University of South Florida, Suncoast Alzheimer` s Disease Research Labs, Department of Psychiatry, Tampa (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Four disease-causing mutations have so far been described in the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 in familial early-onset Alzheimer`s disease. Linkage analysis with a fourteen-allele microsatellite at D21S210 named GT-12 has proven useful in the elucidation of amyloid presursor protein gene involvement in Alzheimer`s disease families, as it is closely linked to the gene. Most cases of Alzheimer`s disease are thought to be sporadic and not familial. However, evidence from earlier studies suggests an important genetic contribution also in sporadic cases, where gene-environment interaction may contribute to the disease. We have determined frequencies of the GT-12 alleles in 78 Swedish and 49 British sporadic Alzheimer`s disease cases and 104 healthy elderly control subjects, to investigate if the disease associates with a particular genotype in GT-12. However, no differences in allele frequencies were observed between any of the groups. (au) (26 refs.).

  6. Alzheimer's disease: synaptic dysfunction and Abeta

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shankar, Ganesh M

    2009-11-23

    Abstract Synapse loss is an early and invariant feature of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) and there is a strong correlation between the extent of synapse loss and the severity of dementia. Accordingly, it has been proposed that synapse loss underlies the memory impairment evident in the early phase of AD and that since plasticity is important for neuronal viability, persistent disruption of plasticity may account for the frank cell loss typical of later phases of the disease. Extensive multi-disciplinary research has implicated the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in the aetiology of AD and here we review the evidence that non-fibrillar soluble forms of Aβ are mediators of synaptic compromise. We also discuss the possible mechanisms of Aβ synaptotoxicity and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Genome instability in Alzheimer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yujun; Song, Hyundong; Croteau, Deborah L

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Autosomal dominant, familial AD (fAD) is very rare and caused by mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin-1 (PSEN-1), and presenilin-2 (PSEN-2) genes. The pathogenesis...

  8. Head trauma and Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandoe, Rishi D. S.; Scheltens, Philip; Eikelenboom, Piet

    2002-01-01

    The authors describe a case of a 55 year old woman who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease 1.5 years after a car accident in which she experienced a mild concussion. Extensive history taking disclosed no cognitive changes prior to the car accident. The case is discussed in view of the

  9. Early cost-utility analysis of general and cerebrospinal fluid-specific Alzheimer's disease biomarkers for hypothetical disease-modifying treatment decision in mild cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handels, Ron L. H.; Joore, Manuela A.; Tran-Duy, An; Wimo, Anders; Wolfs, Claire A. G.; Verhey, Frans R. J.; Severens, Johan L.

    Introduction: The study aimed to determine the room for improvement of a perfect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker and the societal incremental net monetary benefit of CSF in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) assuming a hypothetical disease-modifying Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment.

  10. Pharmacologic management of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Deborah

    2008-02-01

    Although the diagnosis of AD can be devastating, treatment options exist that can slow the disease's progression and allow patients to continue performing ADLs, thereby improving the quality of life for both patient and caregiver. Research is ongoing, and it is estimated by the Alzheimer's Association that finding a treatment that could delay onset by only 5 years could reduce the number of individuals with AD by nearly 50% over the next 50 years (Alzheimer's Association, 2007). Although pharmacotherapy is not yet a cure, it does remain an important part of a total approach to caring for patients and families affected by AD.

  11. Linkage of familial Alzheimer disease to chromosome 14 in two large early-onset pedigrees: effects of marker allele frequencies on lod scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechiporuk, A; Fain, P; Kort, E; Nee, L E; Frommelt, E; Polinsky, R J; Korenberg, J R; Pulst, S M

    1993-05-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease leading to global dementia. In addition to sporadic forms of AD, familial forms (FAD) have been recognized. Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene on chromosome (CHR) 21 have been shown to cause early-onset AD in a small number of pedigrees. Recently, linkage to markers on CHR 14 has been established in several early-onset FAD pedigrees. We now report lod scores for CHR 14 markers in two large early-onset FAD pedigrees. Pairwise linkage analysis suggested that in these pedigrees the mutation is tightly linked to the loci D14S43 and D14S53. However, assumptions regarding marker allele frequencies had a major and often unpredictable effect on calculated lod scores. Therefore, caution needs to be exercised when single pedigrees are analyzed with marker allele frequencies determined from the literature or from a pool of spouses.

  12. Efficacy of psychosocial intervention in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease: the multicentre, rater blinded, randomised Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study (DAISY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, F.B.; Buss, D.V.; Eckermann, A.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the efficacy at 12 months of an early psychosocial counselling and support programme for outpatients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their primary care givers.......To assess the efficacy at 12 months of an early psychosocial counselling and support programme for outpatients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their primary care givers....

  13. Alzheimer's disease: studies of diagnosis and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Claus (Jules Johan)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractDespite tremendous recent advances in the clinical neurology, neurobiology and epidemiology of Alzheimer's disease, the cause as well as its treatment remains as much a mystery today as when it was first described in 1907 by Alois Alzheimer.' Alzheimer's disease, the most common type

  14. Medical foods for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Raj C

    2011-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition associated with cognitive loss, behavioural changes, functional ability decline and caregiver burden. Given the worldwide public health impact of AD, novel interventions to reduce suffering experienced by AD patients need to be developed. Foods may offer a mechanism for intervention complementary to drugs, devices, biologicals and vaccines. Apart from foods with health claims (including dietary supplements), medical foods are also being explored as an intervention option. The purpose of this article is to describe how medical foods may complement other interventions for AD patients by: (i) defining what a medical food is; (ii) discussing whether AD is a condition amenable to medical food intervention; (iii) reviewing current clinical trial data on medical foods used in participants with AD; and (iv) highlighting steps needed to establish a more comprehensive framework for developing medical foods for AD. While medical foods may be defined differently in other countries, the US Orphan Drug Act of 1998 defined a medical food as a food formulated for enteral intake, taken under physician supervision, and intended to meet the distinctive nutritional requirements identified for a disease or condition. For AD to be amenable to medical food intervention, it must: (i) result in limited or impaired capacity to ingest, digest, absorb or metabolize ordinary foodstuff or certain nutrients; or (ii) have unique, medically determined nutrient requirements; and (iii) require dietary management that cannot be achieved by modification of the normal diet alone. While these criteria are most likely met in advanced AD, identifying unique nutritional requirements in early AD that cannot be met by normal diet modification requires a better understanding of AD pathophysiology. A PubMed search using the terms 'medical food' and 'Alzheimer', limited to clinical trials published in English with human participants with AD aged >65

  15. Early-stage reduction of the dendritic complexity in basolateral amygdala of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Congdi; Long, Ben; Hu, Yarong; Yuan, Jing; Gong, Hui; Li, Xiangning

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a representative age-related neurodegenerative disease that could result in loss of memory and cognitive deficiency. However, the precise onset time of Alzheimer's disease affecting neuronal circuits and the mechanisms underlying the changes are not clearly known. To address the neuroanatomical changes during the early pathologic developing process, we acquired the neuronal morphological characterization of AD in APP/PS1 double-transgenic mice using the Micro-Optical Sectioning Tomography system. We reconstructed the neurons in 3D datasets with a resolution of 0.32 × 0.32 × 1 μm and used the Sholl method to analyze the anatomical characterization of the dendritic branches. The results showed that, similar to the progressive change in amyloid plaques, the number of dendritic branches were significantly decreased in 9-month-old mice. In addition, a distinct reduction of dendritic complexity occurred in third and fourth-order dendritic branches of 9-month-old mice, while no significant changes were identified in these parameters in 6-month-old mice. At the branch-level, the density distribution of dendritic arbors in the radial direction decreased in the range of 40–90 μm from the neuron soma in 6-month-old mice. These changes in the dendritic complexity suggest that these reductions contribute to the progressive cognitive impairment seen in APP/PS1 mice. This work may yield insights into the early changes in dendritic abnormality and its relevance to dysfunctional mechanisms of learning, memory and emotion in Alzheimer's disease. - Highlights: • Neuron-level, reduction of dendritic complexity in BLA of 9-month-old AD mice. • Specific range of branch decrease in density of 6-month-old AD mice. • 3D imaging with high resolution will provide insights into brain aging.

  16. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease and prion disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Bate, C.; van Gool, W. A.; Hoozemans, J. J. M.; Rozemuller, J. M.; Veerhuis, R.; Williams, A.

    2002-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and prion disease are characterized neuropathologically by extracellular deposits of Abeta and PrP amyloid fibrils, respectively. In both disorders, these cerebral amyloid deposits are co-localized with a broad variety of inflammation-related proteins (complement factors,

  17. Compensatory responses induced by oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULA I MOREIRA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer disease, significantly before the development of the pathologic hallmarks, neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. In the first stage of development of the disease, amyloid-β deposition and hyperphosphorylated tau function as compensatory responses and downstream adaptations to ensure that neuronal cells do not succumb to oxidative damage. These findings suggest that Alzheimer disease is associated with a novel balance in oxidant homeostasis.

  18. Early counselling and support for patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: a qualitative study on outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth V; Waldorff, Frans B; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this qualitative study was to identify and analyse the participants' experienced outcome of an intensive structured psychosocial intervention programme with tailored counselling, education and support groups for home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease...... with the challenges their partner's disease involved, and they were able to face everyday life and social relations with more serenity and competence. After the intervention, both patients and caregivers sought suitable support groups they could join as a permanent activity and caregivers sought permanent counselling...... revealed that patients found support groups relevant: they found it stimulating to be with peers, it supported their self-esteem, and it supported them in finding new ways of managing everyday life and social relations. During and after the intervention, caregivers were better able to cope...

  19. Measurement of temporal regional cerebral perfusion with single-photon emission tomography predicts rate of decline in language function and survival in early Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, J.J.; Walstra, G.J.M.; Hijdra, A.; Gool, W.A. van; Royen, E.A. van; Verbeeten, B. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    We determined the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measured with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and decline in cognitive function and survival in Alzheimer's disease. In a prospective follow-up study, 69 consecutively referred patients with early probable Alzheimer's disease (NINCDS/ADRDA criteria) underwent SPET performed at the time of initial diagnosis using technetium-99m-labelled hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. Neuropsychological function was assessed at baseline and after 6 months and survival data were available on all patients, extending to 5.5 years of follow-up. Lower left temporal (P<0.01) and lower left parietal (P<0.01) rCBF were statistically significantly related to decline in language function after 6 months. The association between left temporal rCBF and survival was also statistically significant (P<0.05) using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Performing analysis with quartiles of the distribution, we found a threshold effect for low left temporal rCBF (rCBF<73.7%, P<0.01) and high risk of mortality. In this lowest quartile, median survival time was 2.7 years (follow-up to 5.2 years), compared with 4.4 years in the other quartiles (follow-up to 5.5 years). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed statistically significant (P<0.05, log rank test) survival curves for the lowest versus other quartiles of left temporal rCBF. All results were unaffected by adjustment for age, sex, dementia severity, duration of symptoms, education and ratings of local cortical atrophy. We conclude that left temporal rCBF predicts decline in language function and survival in patients with early probable Alzheimer's disease, with a threshold effect of low rCBF and high risk of mortality. (orig.)

  20. Economic considerations in the management of Alzheimer?s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Carolyn W; Sano, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer?s disease is a devastating chronic disease that significantly increases healthcare costs and affects the quality of life (QoL) of the afflicted patients and their caregivers. Population aging and other demographic changes may further increase the already staggering costs of this devastating disease. While few pharmacoeconomic studies have used a prospective health economics design to assess resource utilization, most studies showed beneficial treatment effects and suggested potentia...

  1. Biological markers of Alzheimer?s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Cruz de Souza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The challenges for establishing an early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD have created a need for biomarkers that reflect the core pathology of the disease. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of total Tau (T-tau, phosphorylated Tau (P-Tau and beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ42 reflect, respectively, neurofibrillary tangle and amyloid pathologies and are considered as surrogate markers of AD pathophysiology. The combination of low Aβ42 and high levels of T-tau and P-Tau can accurately identify patients with AD at early stages, even before the development of dementia. The combined analysis of the CSF biomarkers is also helpful for the differential diagnosis between AD and other degenerative dementias. The development of these CSF biomarkers has evolved to a novel diagnostic definition of the disease. The identification of a specific clinical phenotype combined with the in vivo evidence of pathophysiological markers offers the possibility to make a diagnosis of AD before the dementia stage with high specificity.

  2. Crowdsourced estimation of cognitive decline and resilience in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Genevera I; Amoroso, Nicola; Anghel, Catalina; Balagurusamy, Venkat; Bare, Christopher J; Beaton, Derek; Bellotti, Roberto; Bennett, David A; Boehme, Kevin L; Boutros, Paul C; Caberlotto, Laura; Caloian, Cristian; Campbell, Frederick; Chaibub Neto, Elias; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Beibei; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chien, Ting-Ying; Clark, Tim; Das, Sudeshna; Davatzikos, Christos; Deng, Jieyao; Dillenberger, Donna; Dobson, Richard J B; Dong, Qilin; Doshi, Jimit; Duma, Denise; Errico, Rosangela; Erus, Guray; Everett, Evan; Fardo, David W; Friend, Stephen H; Fröhlich, Holger; Gan, Jessica; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Glaab, Enrico; Green, Robert C; Guan, Yuanfang; Hong, Ming-Yi; Huang, Chao; Hwang, Jinseub; Ibrahim, Joseph; Inglese, Paolo; Iyappan, Anandhi; Jiang, Qijia; Katsumata, Yuriko; Kauwe, John S K; Klein, Arno; Kong, Dehan; Krause, Roland; Lalonde, Emilie; Lauria, Mario; Lee, Eunjee; Lin, Xihui; Liu, Zhandong; Livingstone, Julie; Logsdon, Benjamin A; Lovestone, Simon; Ma, Tsung-Wei; Malhotra, Ashutosh; Mangravite, Lara M; Maxwell, Taylor J; Merrill, Emily; Nagorski, John; Namasivayam, Aishwarya; Narayan, Manjari; Naz, Mufassra; Newhouse, Stephen J; Norman, Thea C; Nurtdinov, Ramil N; Oyang, Yen-Jen; Pawitan, Yudi; Peng, Shengwen; Peters, Mette A; Piccolo, Stephen R; Praveen, Paurush; Priami, Corrado; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y; Senger, Philipp; Shen, Xia; Simmons, Andrew; Sotiras, Aristeidis; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Tangaro, Sabina; Tateo, Andrea; Tung, Yi-An; Tustison, Nicholas J; Varol, Erdem; Vradenburg, George; Weiner, Michael W; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Lei; Xie, Yang; Xu, Jia; Yang, Hojin; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yunyun; Zhu, Fan; Zhu, Hongtu; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-06-01

    Identifying accurate biomarkers of cognitive decline is essential for advancing early diagnosis and prevention therapies in Alzheimer's disease. The Alzheimer's disease DREAM Challenge was designed as a computational crowdsourced project to benchmark the current state-of-the-art in predicting cognitive outcomes in Alzheimer's disease based on high dimensional, publicly available genetic and structural imaging data. This meta-analysis failed to identify a meaningful predictor developed from either data modality, suggesting that alternate approaches should be considered for prediction of cognitive performance. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Is Alzheimer's disease a homogeneous disease entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2013-10-01

    The epidemic proportions of dementia in old age are a cause of great concern for the medical profession and the society at large. It is customary to consider Alzheimer's disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, and vascular dementia (VaD) as being the second. This dichotomous view of a primary neurodegenerative disease as opposed to a disorder where extrinsic factors cause brain damage led to separate lines of research in these two entities. New biomarkers, particularly the introduction of modern neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid changes, have, in recent years, helped to identify anatomical and chemical changes of VaD and of AD. Nevertheless, there is a substantial difference between the two entities. While it is clear that VaD is a heterogeneous entity, AD is supposed to be a single disorder. Nobody attempts to use CADASIL as a template to develops treatment for sporadic VaD. On the other hand, early-onset AD is used to develop therapy for sporadic AD. This paper will discuss the problems relating to this false concept and its consequences.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehericy, Stephane; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Mesrob, Lilia; Kinkingnehun, Serge; Sarazin, Marie

    2007-01-01

    A modern challenge for neuroimaging techniques is to contribute to the early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Early diagnosis includes recognition of pre-demented conditions, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or having a high risk of developing AD. The role of neuroimaging therefore extends beyond its traditional role of excluding other conditions such as neurosurgical lesions. In addition, early diagnosis would allow early treatment using currently available therapies or new therapies in the future. Structural imaging can detect and follow the time course of subtle brain atrophy as a surrogate marker for pathological processes. New MR techniques and image analysis software can detect subtle brain microstructural, perfusion or metabolic changes that provide new tools to study the pathological processes and detect pre-demented conditions. This review focuses on markers of macro- and microstructural, perfusion, diffusion and metabolic MR imaging and spectroscopy in AD. (orig.)

  5. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on the latest news and advances in Alzheimer's treatments, care and research. Get tips for living with ... dementia What is Alzheimer's 7 stages of Alzheimer's Treatments Contact us 24/7 Helpline: 1-800-272- ...

  6. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... c)(3) organization. Copyright © 2018 Alzheimer's Association ® . All rights reserved. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association is the world's leading voluntary health ...

  7. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... is Alzheimer's 7 stages of Alzheimer's Treatments Contact us 24/7 Helpline: 1-800-272-3900 Find ... Walk to End Alzheimer's Become an advocate About Us | News | Events | Press | About this Site | Privacy Policy | ...

  8. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... In My Area | Alzheimer's & Dementia | Life with ALZ | Research | Professionals | We Can Help | Join the Cause alz. ... news and advances in Alzheimer's treatments, care and research. Get tips for living with Alzheimer's as well ...

  9. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Copyright © 2018 Alzheimer's Association ® . All rights reserved. Our ... Alzheimer's Association is the world's leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research.

  10. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... 501(c)(3) organization. Copyright © 2018 Alzheimer's Association ® . All rights reserved. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association ...

  11. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... a rate twice as high. Invest in a world without Alzheimer's. Donate Caregivers Eighty-three percent of ... Association ® . All rights reserved. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association ...

  12. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your chapter: search by state In My Area | Alzheimer's & Dementia | Life with ALZ | Research | Professionals | We Can Help | Join the Cause alz.org >> Alzheimer's & Dementia >> Home Text size: A A A 2018 Alzheimer's ...

  13. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... Alzheimer's & Dementia | Life with ALZ | Research | Professionals | We Can Help | Join the Cause alz.org >> Alzheimer's & Dementia >> ... as well as simple ideas on how you can support the fight to end Alzheimer's. First name: ...

  14. Early Detection of Alzheimer's Disease Based on the Patient's Creative Drawing Process: First Results with a Novel Neuropsychological Testing Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Petra; Gienger, Regine; Hett, Andreas; Müller, Stephan; Laske, Christoph; Robens, Sibylle; Ostermann, Thomas; Elbing, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    Based on the knowledge of art therapy, we developed a new neuropsychological drawing test in order to identify individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) as well as dementia patients and healthy controls (HC). By observing a variety of drawing characteristics of 92 participants with a mean age of 67.7, art therapy and dementia experts discriminate HC from MCI, early dementia of the Alzheimer-type (eDAT), and moderate dementia of the Alzheimer-type (mDAT) by the process analysis of tree drawings on a digitizing tablet. The art therapist's average categorical rating of healthy and MCI or demented individuals matched the clinical diagnosis by 88%. In a first small study, we analyzed interrater reliability, sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predicted values of our tree drawing test (TDT) in comparison with the clock drawing test (CDT). Similar values of moderate interrater reliability were found for the TDT (0.56) as well as for the CDT (0.54). A significant high sensitivity of 0.9 within this binary impairment scale (HC versus impaired or demented) can be demonstrated. Substantial values for the specificity (0.67) could be obtained that however remain under a perfect value of the CDT (1.0). Considering 31 individuals that received the clinical diagnosis "impaired or demented" the TDT shows a higher recognition rate for the MCI group than the CDT. Furthermore in 8 of 12 borderline cases of clinical diagnosis, the outcome of the TDT diagnosis was consistent with the final clinical result.

  15. beta. -Amyloid gene dosage in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdoch, G H; Manuelidis, L; Kim, J H; Manuelidis, E E

    1988-01-11

    The 4-5 kd amyloid ..beta..-peptide is a major constituent of the characteristic amyloid plaque of Alzheimer's disease. It has been reported that some cases of sporatic Alzheimer's disease are associated with at least a partial duplication of chromosome 21 containing the gene corresponding to the 695 residue precursor of this peptide. To contribute to an understanding of the frequency to such a duplication event in the overall Alzheimer's population, the authors have determined the gene dosage of the ..beta..-amyloid gene in this collection of cases. All cases had a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's confirmed neuropathologically. Each Alzheimer's case had an apparent normal diploid ..beta..-amyloid gene dosage, while control Down's cases had the expected triploid dosage. Thus partial duplication of chromosome 21 may be a rare finding in Alzheimer's disease. Similar conclusions were just reported in several studies of the Harvard Alzheimer collection.

  16. Risk profiles of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbul, Melanie; Schipper, Hyman M

    2011-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a dementing, neurodegenerative disorder that affects approximately 500,000 Canadians and its prevalence is expected to double over the next 30 years. Although several medications may temporarily augment cognitive abilities in AD, there presently exists no proven method to avoid the inevitable clinical deterioration in this devastating condition. The delineation of risk factors for the development of AD offers hope for the advent of effective prevention or interventions that might retard the onset of symptoms. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of midlife risk factors implicated in the etiopathogenesis of sporadic AD. Although some risk factors are heritable and largely beyond our control, others are determined by lifestyle or environment and are potentially modifiable. In a companion paper, we introduce the concept of an Alzheimer Risk Assessment Clinic for ascertainment and mitigation of these and other putative dementia risk factors in middle-aged adults.

  17. Diagnostic Value of a Tablet-Based Drawing Task for Discrimination of Patients in the Early Course of Alzheimer's Disease from Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan; Preische, Oliver; Heymann, Petra; Elbing, Ulrich; Laske, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    There is a considerable delay in the diagnosis of dementia, which may reduce the effectiveness of available treatments. Thus, it is of great interest to develop fast and easy to perform, non-invasive and non-expensive diagnostic measures for the early detection of cognitive impairment and dementia. Here we investigate movement kinematics between 20 patients with early dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (eDAT), 30 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and 20 cognitively healthy control (HC) individuals while copying a three-dimensional house using a digitizing tablet. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves and logistic regression analyzes have been conducted to explore whether alterations in movement kinematics could be used to discriminate patients with aMCI and eDAT from healthy individuals. Time-in-air (i.e., transitioning from one stroke to the next without touching the surface) differed significantly between patients with aMCI, eDAT, and HCs demonstrating an excellent sensitivity and a moderate specificity to discriminate aMCI subjects from normal elderly and an excellent sensitivity and specificity to discriminate patients affected by mild Alzheimer's disease from healthy individuals. Time-on-surface (i.e., time while stylus is touching the surface) differed only between HCs and patients with eDAT but not between HCs and patients with aMCI. Furthermore, total-time (i.e., time-in-air plus time-on-surface) did not differ between patients with aMCI and early dementia due to AD. Modern digitizing devices offer the opportunity to measure a broad range of visuoconstructive abilities that may be used as a fast and easy to perform screening instrument for the early detection of cognitive impairment and dementia in primary care.

  18. The neuropsychological profile of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Sandra; Wicklund, Alissa H; Salmon, David P

    2012-04-01

    Neuropsychological assessment has featured prominently over the past 30 years in the characterization of dementia associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). Clinical neuropsychological methods have identified the earliest, most definitive cognitive and behavioral symptoms of illness, contributing to the identification, staging, and tracking of disease. With increasing public awareness of dementia, disease detection has moved to earlier stages of illness, at a time when deficits are both behaviorally and pathologically selective. For reasons that are not well understood, early AD pathology frequently targets large-scale neuroanatomical networks for episodic memory before other networks that subserve language, attention, executive functions, and visuospatial abilities. This chapter reviews the pathognomonic neuropsychological features of AD dementia and how these differ from "normal," age-related cognitive decline and from other neurodegenerative diseases that cause dementia, including cortical Lewy body disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and cerebrovascular disease.

  19. The Neuropsychological Profile of Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Sandra; Wicklund, Alissa H.; Salmon, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropsychological assessment has featured prominently over the past 30 years in the characterization of dementia associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). Clinical neuropsychological methods have identified the earliest, most definitive cognitive and behavioral symptoms of illness, contributing to the identification, staging, and tracking of disease. With increasing public awareness of dementia, disease detection has moved to earlier stages of illness, at a time when deficits are both behaviorally and pathologically selective. For reasons that are not well understood, early AD pathology frequently targets large-scale neuroanatomical networks for episodic memory before other networks that subserve language, attention, executive functions, and visuospatial abilities. This chapter reviews the pathognomonic neuropsychological features of AD dementia and how these differ from “normal,” age-related cognitive decline and from other neurodegenerative diseases that cause dementia, including cortical Lewy body disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and cerebrovascular disease. PMID:22474609

  20. Purine-related metabolites and their converting enzymes are altered in frontal, parietal and temporal cortex at early stages of Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Andrés, Patricia; Albasanz, José Luis; Ferrer, Isidro; Martín, Mairena

    2018-01-24

    Adenosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, guanosine and inosine levels were assessed by HPLC, and the activity of related enzymes 5'-nucleotidase (5'-NT), adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) measured in frontal (FC), parietal (PC) and temporal (TC) cortices at different stages of disease progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in age-matched controls. Significantly decreased levels of adenosine, guanosine, hypoxanthine and xanthine, and apparently less inosine, are found in FC from the early stages of AD; PC and TC show an opposing pattern, as adenosine, guanosine and inosine are significantly increased at least at determinate stages of AD whereas hypoxanthine and xanthine levels remain unaltered. 5'-NT is reduced in membranes and cytosol in FC mainly at early stages but not in PC, and only at advanced stages in cytosol in TC. ADA activity is decreased in AD when considered as a whole but increased at early stages in TC. Finally, PNP activity is increased only in TC at early stages. Purine metabolism alterations occur at early stages of AD independently of neurofibrillary tangles and β-amyloid plaques. Alterations are stage dependent and region dependent, the latter showing opposite patterns in FC compared with PC and TC. Adenosine is the most affected of the assessed purines. © 2018 International Society of Neuropathology.

  1. Neurogenesis and Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Taupin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disease, characterized in the brain by amyloid plaque deposits and neurofibrillary tangles. It is the most common form of dementia among older people. There is at present no cure for AD, and current treatments consist mainly in drug therapy. Potential therapies for AD involve gene and cellular therapy. The recent confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain and neural stem cells (NSCs reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS provide new opportunities for cellular therapy in the CNS, particularly for AD, and to better understand brain physiopathology. Hence, researchers have aimed at characterizing neurogenesis in patients with AD. Studies show that neurogenesis is increased in these patients, and in animal models of AD. The effect of drugs used to treat AD on neurogenesis is currently being investigated, to identify whether neurogenesis contributes to their therapeutic activities.

  2. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... people without Alzheimer's — a rate twice as high. Invest in a world without Alzheimer's. Donate Caregivers Eighty- ... IL 60601 Alzheimer's Association is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Copyright © 2018 Alzheimer's Association ® . ...

  3. Comparison between Early-Onset and Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Amnestic Presentation: CSF and 18F-FDG PET Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Chiaravalloti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To investigate the differences in brain glucose consumption between patients with early onset of Alzheimer's disease (EOAD, aged ≤65 years and patients with late onset of Alzheimer's disease (LOAD, aged >65 years. Methods: Differences in brain glucose consumption between the groups have been evaluated by means of Statistical Parametric Mapping version 8, with the use of age, sex, Mini-Mental State Examination and cerebrospinal fluid values of Aβ1-42, phosphorylated Tau and total Tau as covariates in the comparison between EOAD and LOAD. Results: As compared to LOAD, EOAD patients showed a significant decrease in glucose consumption in a wide portion of the left parietal lobe (BA7, BA31 and BA40. No significant differences were obtained when subtracting the EOAD from the LOAD group. Conclusions: The results of our study show that patients with EOAD show a different metabolic pattern as compared to those with LOAD that mainly involves the left parietal lobe.

  4. Comparison between Early-Onset and Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Amnestic Presentation: CSF and 18F-FDG PET Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Koch, Giacomo; Toniolo, Sofia; Belli, Lorena; Lorenzo, Francesco Di; Gaudenzi, Sara; Schillaci, Orazio; Bozzali, Marco; Sancesario, Giuseppe; Martorana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To investigate the differences in brain glucose consumption between patients with early onset of Alzheimer's disease (EOAD, aged ≤65 years) and patients with late onset of Alzheimer's disease (LOAD, aged >65 years). Methods Differences in brain glucose consumption between the groups have been evaluated by means of Statistical Parametric Mapping version 8, with the use of age, sex, Mini-Mental State Examination and cerebrospinal fluid values of AΒ1-42, phosphorylated Tau and total Tau as covariates in the comparison between EOAD and LOAD. Results As compared to LOAD, EOAD patients showed a significant decrease in glucose consumption in a wide portion of the left parietal lobe (BA7, BA31 and BA40). No significant differences were obtained when subtracting the EOAD from the LOAD group. Conclusions The results of our study show that patients with EOAD show a different metabolic pattern as compared to those with LOAD that mainly involves the left parietal lobe. PMID:27195000

  5. Mathematical model on Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2016-11-18

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that destroys memory and cognitive skills. AD is characterized by the presence of two types of neuropathological hallmarks: extracellular plaques consisting of amyloid β-peptides and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. The disease affects 5 million people in the United States and 44 million world-wide. Currently there is no drug that can cure, stop or even slow the progression of the disease. If no cure is found, by 2050 the number of alzheimer's patients in the U.S. will reach 15 million and the cost of caring for them will exceed $ 1 trillion annually. The present paper develops a mathematical model of AD that includes neurons, astrocytes, microglias and peripheral macrophages, as well as amyloid β aggregation and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. The model is represented by a system of partial differential equations. The model is used to simulate the effect of drugs that either failed in clinical trials, or are currently in clinical trials. Based on these simulations it is suggested that combined therapy with TNF- α inhibitor and anti amyloid β could yield significant efficacy in slowing the progression of AD.

  6. Effect of hydroxychloroquine on progression of dementia in early Alzheimer's disease: an 18-month randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, W. A.; Weinstein, H. C.; Scheltens, P.; Walstra, G. J.; Scheltens, P. K.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Results of epidemiological studies, neuropathological observations, and in-vitro experiments all suggest that inflammatory mechanisms contribute to the destructive lesions in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to establish the effect of the anti-inflammatory drug hydroxychloroquine on the

  7. Recent developments in Alzheimer's disease therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisen Paul S

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease is a devastating neurological disorder that affects more than 37 million people worldwide. The economic burden of Alzheimer's disease is massive; in the United States alone, the estimated direct and indirect annual cost of patient care is at least $100 billion. Current FDA-approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease do not prevent or reverse the disease, and provide only modest symptomatic benefits. Driven by the clear unmet medical need and a growing understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, the number of agents in development has increased dramatically in recent years. Truly *disease-modifying' therapies that target the underlying mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease have now reached late stages of human clinical trials. Primary targets include beta-amyloid, whose presence and accumulation in the brain is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease, and tau protein which, when hyperphosphorylated, results in the self-assembly of tangles of paired helical filaments also believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we briefly discuss the current status of Alzheimer's disease therapies under study, as well the scientific context in which they have been developed.

  8. Attention Measures of Accuracy, Variability, and Fatigue Detect Early Response to Donepezil in Alzheimer's Disease: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Castelar, Clara; Ly, Jenny J; Kaplan, Lillian; Van Dyk, Kathleen; Berger, Jeffrey T; Macina, Lucy O; Stewart, Jennifer L; Foldi, Nancy S

    2018-04-09

    Donepezil is widely used to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD), but detecting early response remains challenging for clinicians. Acetylcholine is known to directly modulate attention, particularly under high cognitive conditions, but no studies to date test whether measures of attention under high load can detect early effects of donepezil. We hypothesized that load-dependent attention tasks are sensitive to short-term treatment effects of donepezil, while global and other domain-specific cognitive measures are not. This longitudinal, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03073876) evaluated 23 participants newly diagnosed with AD initiating de novo donepezil treatment (5 mg). After baseline assessment, participants were randomized into Drug (n = 12) or Placebo (n = 11) groups, and retested after approximately 6 weeks. Cognitive assessment included: (a) attention tasks (Foreperiod Effect, Attentional Blink, and Covert Orienting tasks) measuring processing speed, top-down accuracy, orienting, intra-individual variability, and fatigue; (b) global measures (Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale, Mini-Mental Status Examination, Dementia Rating Scale); and (c) domain-specific measures (memory, language, visuospatial, and executive function). The Drug but not the Placebo group showed benefits of treatment at high-load measures by preserving top-down accuracy, improving intra-individual variability, and averting fatigue. In contrast, other global or cognitive domain-specific measures could not detect treatment effects over the same treatment interval. The pilot-study suggests that attention measures targeting accuracy, variability, and fatigue under high-load conditions could be sensitive to short-term cholinergic treatment. Given the central role of acetylcholine in attentional function, load-dependent attentional measures may be valuable cognitive markers of early treatment response.

  9. Caregiving for Alzheimer's Disease or Other Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Caregiving for Person with Alzheimer's Disease or a related Dementia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Alzheimer’s Disease? Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form ...

  10. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially.

  11. Early Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease Pathology in Urban Children: Friend versus Foe Responses—It Is Time to Face the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Kavanaugh, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to particulate matter air pollution is known to cause inflammation leading to respiratory- and cardiovascular-related sickness and death. Mexico City Metropolitan Area children exhibit an early brain imbalance in genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, and innate and adaptive immune responses. Early dysregulated neuroinflammation, brain microvascular damage, production of potent vasoconstrictors, and perturbations in the integrity of the neurovascular unit likely contribute to progressive neurodegenerative processes. The accumulation of misfolded proteins coincides with the anatomical distribution observed in the early stages of both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We contend misfolding of hyperphosphorylated tau (HPπ), alpha-synuclein, and beta-amyloid could represent a compensatory early protective response to the sustained systemic and brain inflammation. However, we favor the view that the chronic systemic and brain dysregulated inflammation and the diffuse vascular damage contribute to the establishment of neurodegenerative processes with childhood clinical manifestations. Friend turns Foe early; therefore, implementation of neuroprotective measures to ameliorate or stop the inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes is warranted in exposed children. Epidemiological, cognitive, structural, and functional neuroimaging and mechanistic studies into the association between air pollution exposures and the development of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in children are of pressing importance for public health. PMID:23509683

  12. Early Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease pathology in urban children: Friend versus Foe responses--it is time to face the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Kavanaugh, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to particulate matter air pollution is known to cause inflammation leading to respiratory- and cardiovascular-related sickness and death. Mexico City Metropolitan Area children exhibit an early brain imbalance in genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, and innate and adaptive immune responses. Early dysregulated neuroinflammation, brain microvascular damage, production of potent vasoconstrictors, and perturbations in the integrity of the neurovascular unit likely contribute to progressive neurodegenerative processes. The accumulation of misfolded proteins coincides with the anatomical distribution observed in the early stages of both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We contend misfolding of hyperphosphorylated tau (HPπ), alpha-synuclein, and beta-amyloid could represent a compensatory early protective response to the sustained systemic and brain inflammation. However, we favor the view that the chronic systemic and brain dysregulated inflammation and the diffuse vascular damage contribute to the establishment of neurodegenerative processes with childhood clinical manifestations. Friend turns Foe early; therefore, implementation of neuroprotective measures to ameliorate or stop the inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes is warranted in exposed children. Epidemiological, cognitive, structural, and functional neuroimaging and mechanistic studies into the association between air pollution exposures and the development of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in children are of pressing importance for public health.

  13. Positive and negative early life experiences differentially modulate long term survival and amyloid protein levels in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesuis, Sylvie L; Maurin, Herve; Borghgraef, Peter; Lucassen, Paul J; Van Leuven, Fred; Krugers, Harm J

    2016-06-28

    Stress has been implicated as a risk factor for the severity and progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Early life experiences determine stress responsivity in later life, and modulate age-dependent cognitive decline. Therefore, we examined whether early life experiences influence AD outcome in a bigenic mouse model which progressively develops combined tau and amyloid pathology (biAT mice).Mice were subjected to either early life stress (ELS) or to 'positive' early handling (EH) postnatally (from day 2 to 9). In biAT mice, ELS significantly compromised long term survival, in contrast to EH which increased life expectancy. In 4 month old mice, ELS-reared biAT mice displayed increased hippocampal Aβ levels, while these levels were reduced in EH-reared biAT mice. No effects of ELS or EH were observed on the brain levels of APP, protein tau, or PSD-95. Dendritic morphology was moderately affected after ELS and EH in the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, while object recognition memory and open field performance were not affected. We conclude that despite the strong transgenic background, early life experiences significantly modulate the life expectancy of biAT mice. Parallel changes in hippocampal Aβ levels were evident, without affecting cognition of young adult biAT mice.

  14. Brain Imaging in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith A.; Fox, Nick C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Klunk, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging has played a variety of roles in the study of Alzheimer disease (AD) over the past four decades. Initially, computed tomography (CT) and then magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used diagnostically to rule out other causes of dementia. More recently, a variety of imaging modalities including structural and functional MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral metabolism with fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and amyloid tracers such as Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) have shown characteristic changes in the brains of patients with AD, and in prodromal and even presymptomatic states that can help rule-in the AD pathophysiological process. No one imaging modality can serve all purposes as each have unique strengths and weaknesses. These modalities and their particular utilities are discussed in this article. The challenge for the future will be to combine imaging biomarkers to most efficiently facilitate diagnosis, disease staging, and, most importantly, development of effective disease-modifying therapies. PMID:22474610

  15. Turning principles into practice in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindesay, J.; Bullock, R.; Daniels, H.; Emre, M.; Foerstl, H.; Froelich, L.; Gabryelewicz, T.; Martinez-Lage, P.; Monsch, A. U.; Tsolaki, M.; van Laar, T.

    P>The prevalence of dementia is reaching epidemic proportions globally, but there remain a number of issues that prevent people with dementia, their families and caregivers, from taking control of their condition. In 2008, Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI) launched a Global Alzheimer's Disease

  16. Associations of Bcl-2 rs956572 genotype groups in the structural covariance network in early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chang, Ya-Ting; Huang, Chi-Wei; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Huang, Shu-Hua; Lee, Chen-Chang; Chang, Wen-Neng; Lui, Chun-Chung; Lien, Chia-Yi

    2018-02-08

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease, and genetic differences may mediate neuronal degeneration. In humans, a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) gene, rs956572, has been found to significantly modulate Bcl-2 protein expression in the brain. The Bcl-2 AA genotype has been associated with reduced Bcl-2 levels and lower gray matter volume in healthy populations. We hypothesized that different Bcl-2 genotype groups may modulate large-scale brain networks that determine neurobehavioral test scores. Gray matter structural covariance networks (SCNs) were constructed in 104 patients with AD using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with seed-based correlation analysis. The patients were stratified into two genotype groups on the basis of Bcl-2 expression (G carriers, n = 76; A homozygotes, n = 28). Four SCNs characteristic of AD were constructed from seeds in the default mode network, salience network, and executive control network, and cognitive test scores served as the major outcome factor. For the G carriers, influences of the SCNs were observed mostly in the default mode network, of which the peak clusters anchored by the posterior cingulate cortex seed determined the cognitive test scores. In contrast, genetic influences in the A homozygotes were found mainly in the executive control network, and both the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex seed and the interconnected peak clusters were correlated with the clinical scores. Despite a small number of cases, the A homozygotes showed greater covariance strength than the G carriers among all four SCNs. Our results suggest that the Bcl-2 rs956572 polymorphism is associated with different strengths of structural covariance in AD that determine clinical outcomes. The greater covariance strength in the four SCNs shown in the A homozygotes suggests that different Bcl-2 polymorphisms play different modulatory roles.

  17. Neuroimaging Measures as Endophenotypes in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith N. Braskie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD is moderately to highly heritable. Apolipoprotein E allele ε4 (APOE4 has been replicated consistently as an AD risk factor over many studies, and recently confirmed variants in other genes such as CLU, CR1, and PICALM each increase the lifetime risk of AD. However, much of the heritability of AD remains unexplained. AD is a complex disease that is diagnosed largely through neuropsychological testing, though neuroimaging measures may be more sensitive for detecting the incipient disease stages. Difficulties in early diagnosis and variable environmental contributions to the disease can obscure genetic relationships in traditional case-control genetic studies. Neuroimaging measures may be used as endophenotypes for AD, offering a reliable, objective tool to search for possible genetic risk factors. Imaging measures might also clarify the specific mechanisms by which proposed risk factors influence the brain.

  18. Discriminative analysis of early Alzheimer's disease based on two intrinsically anti-correlated networks with resting-state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Jiang, Tianzi; Liang, Meng; Wang, Liang; Tian, Lixia; Zhang, Xinqing; Li, Kuncheng; Liu, Zhening

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we proposed a discriminative model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) on the basis of multivariate pattern classification and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This model used the correlation/anti-correlation coefficients of two intrinsically anti-correlated networks in resting brains, which have been suggested by two recent studies, as the feature of classification. Pseudo-Fisher Linear Discriminative Analysis (pFLDA) was then performed on the feature space and a linear classifier was generated. Using leave-one-out (LOO) cross validation, our results showed a correct classification rate of 83%. We also compared the proposed model with another one based on the whole brain functional connectivity. Our proposed model outperformed the other one significantly, and this implied that the two intrinsically anti-correlated networks may be a more susceptible part of the whole brain network in the early stage of AD.

  19. Diagnosis of Cognitive Impairment Compatible with Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease. A Bayesian Network Model based on the Analysis of Oral Definitions of Semantic Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, J M; Martínez-Tomás, R; Rincón, M; Peraita, H

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become one of the principal focuses of research in medicine, particularly when the disease is incipient or even prodromic, because treatments are more effective in these stages. Lexical-semantic-conceptual deficit (LSCD) in the oral definitions of semantic categories for basic objects is an important early indicator in the evaluation of the cognitive state of patients. The objective of this research is to define an economic procedure for cognitive impairment (CI) diagnosis, which may be associated with early stages of AD, by analysing cognitive alterations affecting declarative semantic memory. Because of its low cost, it could be used for routine clinical evaluations or screenings, leading to more expensive and selective tests that confirm or rule out the disease accurately. It should necessarily be an explanatory procedure, which would allow us to study the evolution of the disease in relation to CI, the irregularities in different semantic categories, and other neurodegenerative diseases. On the basis of these requirements, we hypothesise that Bayesian networks (BNs) are the most appropriate tool for this purpose. We have developed a BN for CI diagnosis in mild and moderate AD patients by analysing the oral production of semantic features. The BN causal model represents LSCD in certain semantic categories, both of living things (dog, pine, and apple) and non-living things (chair, car, and trousers), as symptoms of CI. The model structure, the qualitative part of the model, uses domain knowledge obtained from psychology experts and epidemiological studies. Further, the model parameters, the quantitative part of the model, are learnt automatically from epidemiological studies and Peraita and Grasso's linguistic corpus of oral definitions. This corpus was prepared with an incidental sampling and included the analysis of the oral linguistic production of 81 participants (42 cognitively healthy elderly people and 39

  20. APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 mutations in early-onset Alzheimer disease: A genetic screening study of familial and sporadic cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène-Marie Lanoiselée

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid protein precursor (APP, presenilin-1 (PSEN1, and presenilin-2 (PSEN2 mutations cause autosomal dominant forms of early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD-EOAD. Although these genes were identified in the 1990s, variant classification remains a challenge, highlighting the need to colligate mutations from large series.We report here a novel update (2012-2016 of the genetic screening of the large AD-EOAD series ascertained across 28 French hospitals from 1993 onwards, bringing the total number of families with identified mutations to n = 170. Families were included when at least two first-degree relatives suffered from early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD with an age of onset (AOO ≤65 y in two generations. Furthermore, we also screened 129 sporadic cases of Alzheimer disease with an AOO below age 51 (44% males, mean AOO = 45 ± 2 y. APP, PSEN1, or PSEN2 mutations were identified in 53 novel AD-EOAD families. Of the 129 sporadic cases screened, 17 carried a PSEN1 mutation and 1 carried an APP duplication (13%. Parental DNA was available for 10 sporadic mutation carriers, allowing us to show that the mutation had occurred de novo in each case. Thirteen mutations (12 in PSEN1 and 1 in PSEN2 identified either in familial or in sporadic cases were previously unreported. Of the 53 mutation carriers with available cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers, 46 (87% had all three CSF biomarkers-total tau protein (Tau, phospho-tau protein (P-Tau, and amyloid β (Aβ42-in abnormal ranges. No mutation carrier had the three biomarkers in normal ranges. One limitation of this study is the absence of functional assessment of the possibly and probably pathogenic variants, which should help their classification.Our findings suggest that a nonnegligible fraction of PSEN1 mutations occurs de novo, which is of high importance for genetic counseling, as PSEN1 mutational screening is currently performed in familial cases only. Among the 90 distinct mutations found in the

  1. APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 mutations in early-onset Alzheimer disease: A genetic screening study of familial and sporadic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanoiselée, Hélène-Marie; Nicolas, Gaël; Wallon, David; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Lacour, Morgane; Rousseau, Stéphane; Richard, Anne-Claire; Pasquier, Florence; Rollin-Sillaire, Adeline; Martinaud, Olivier; Quillard-Muraine, Muriel; de la Sayette, Vincent; Boutoleau-Bretonniere, Claire; Etcharry-Bouyx, Frédérique; Chauviré, Valérie; Sarazin, Marie; le Ber, Isabelle; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Jonveaux, Thérèse; Rouaud, Olivier; Ceccaldi, Mathieu; Félician, Olivier; Godefroy, Olivier; Formaglio, Maite; Croisile, Bernard; Auriacombe, Sophie; Chamard, Ludivine; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Sauvée, Mathilde; Marelli-Tosi, Cecilia; Gabelle, Audrey; Ozsancak, Canan; Pariente, Jérémie; Paquet, Claire; Hannequin, Didier; Campion, Dominique

    2017-03-01

    Amyloid protein precursor (APP), presenilin-1 (PSEN1), and presenilin-2 (PSEN2) mutations cause autosomal dominant forms of early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD-EOAD). Although these genes were identified in the 1990s, variant classification remains a challenge, highlighting the need to colligate mutations from large series. We report here a novel update (2012-2016) of the genetic screening of the large AD-EOAD series ascertained across 28 French hospitals from 1993 onwards, bringing the total number of families with identified mutations to n = 170. Families were included when at least two first-degree relatives suffered from early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) with an age of onset (AOO) ≤65 y in two generations. Furthermore, we also screened 129 sporadic cases of Alzheimer disease with an AOO below age 51 (44% males, mean AOO = 45 ± 2 y). APP, PSEN1, or PSEN2 mutations were identified in 53 novel AD-EOAD families. Of the 129 sporadic cases screened, 17 carried a PSEN1 mutation and 1 carried an APP duplication (13%). Parental DNA was available for 10 sporadic mutation carriers, allowing us to show that the mutation had occurred de novo in each case. Thirteen mutations (12 in PSEN1 and 1 in PSEN2) identified either in familial or in sporadic cases were previously unreported. Of the 53 mutation carriers with available cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, 46 (87%) had all three CSF biomarkers-total tau protein (Tau), phospho-tau protein (P-Tau), and amyloid β (Aβ)42-in abnormal ranges. No mutation carrier had the three biomarkers in normal ranges. One limitation of this study is the absence of functional assessment of the possibly and probably pathogenic variants, which should help their classification. Our findings suggest that a nonnegligible fraction of PSEN1 mutations occurs de novo, which is of high importance for genetic counseling, as PSEN1 mutational screening is currently performed in familial cases only. Among the 90 distinct mutations found in the whole

  2. [A case report of early-onset Alzheimer's disease with multiple psychotic symptoms, finally diagnosed as APPV717I mutation by genetic testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Takashi; Ochi, Shinichiro; Matsumoto, Teruhisa; Yoshida, Taku; Abe, Masao; Toyota, Yasutaka; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Tanimukai, Satoshi; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to confirm a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) because patients sometimes have non-specific cortical features, such as psychiatric symptoms, executive functional impairment, and pyramidal symptoms, along with typical symptoms, such as recent memory impairment and disorientation. We encountered a patient with multiple psychotic symptoms, finally diagnosed with EOAD on genetic testing. A right-handed sixty-year-old man, whose mother was suspected of having dementia, developed memory impairment at the age of fifty, disorientation at the age of fifty-six, and both visual hallucination and dressing apraxia at the age of fifty-nine. After admission to a psychiatric hospital for treatment, his symptoms disappeared with antipsychotic medication. However, his ADL were declining and so he was referred to our university hospital. He had frontal lobe symptoms, pyramidal signs, and extrapyramidal signs with severe dementia. Neuropsychological examinations were not possible because of sedation. On brain MRI, he showed diffuse atrophy of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. HMPO-SPECT showed hypoperfusion of cerebral cortices diffusely. We decided to perform genetic testing because he had both family and alcohol abuse histories. He showed EOAD with V717I mutation of the amyloid precursor protein gene. After the discontinuation of antipsychotics, excessive sedation and extrapyramidal signs disappeared. A dose of 10 mg of donepezil was effective to improve motivation and activity, and his mini mental examination score was calculable after recovery. The case supports usefulness of applying genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease to patients with early onset dementia, even when they do not have a family history.

  3. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... were diagnosed in the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stage — before dementia — it would collectively save $7 trillion ... symptoms What is dementia What is Alzheimer's 7 stages of Alzheimer's Treatments Contact us 24/7 Helpline: ...

  4. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... and privacy policy . Plan ahead Get help and support I have Alzheimer's I am a caregiver I ... world's leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research.

  5. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... age 65 and older and approximately 200,000 individuals under age 65 who have younger-onset Alzheimer's. ... of health care and long-term care for individuals with Alzheimer's or other dementias are substantial. Dementia ...

  6. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... state. Read past editions . Sign up for our e-newsletter Stay up-to-date on the latest ... Alzheimer's. First name: Last name: *Email: *Zip: Weekly E-Newsletter Breaking Research Updates The Alzheimer's Association does ...

  7. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... ACTION > Read past editions . Sign up for our e-newsletter Stay up-to-date on the latest ... Alzheimer's. First name: Last name: *Email: *Zip: Weekly E-Newsletter Breaking Research Updates The Alzheimer's Association does ...

  8. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... This number includes an estimated 5.5 million people age 65 and older and approximately 200,000 ... who have younger-onset Alzheimer's. One in 10 people age 65 and older (10 percent) has Alzheimer's ...

  9. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... care. Caring for someone with Alzheimer's? Get Resources Cost to Nation Alzheimer's places a huge burden on the health care system, with annual costs exceeding a quarter of a trillion dollars. In ...

  10. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... Share the facts: Quick Facts Prevalence Mortality Caregivers Cost Special Report Alzheimer's in each state Quick Facts Share the facts: Prevalence The number of Americans living with Alzheimer's is growing — and growing fast. An ...

  11. Neuropathological Alterations in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Frosch, Matthew P.; Masliah, Eliezer; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2011-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD) include “positive” lesions such as amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, neurofibrillary tangles, and glial responses, and “negative” lesions such as neuronal and synaptic loss. Despite their inherently cross-sectional nature, postmortem studies have enabled the staging of the progression of both amyloid and tangle pathologies, and, consequently, the development of diagnostic criteria that are now used worldwide. In addition, clinicopathological correlation studies have been crucial to generate hypotheses about the pathophysiology of the disease, by establishing that there is a continuum between “normal” aging and AD dementia, and that the amyloid plaque build-up occurs primarily before the onset of cognitive deficits, while neurofibrillary tangles, neuron loss, and particularly synaptic loss, parallel the progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, these cross-sectional neuropathological data have been largely validated by longitudinal in vivo studies using modern imaging biomarkers such as amyloid PET and volumetric MRI. PMID:22229116

  12. [Alzheimer's disease: New therapeutic strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Sandra

    2015-07-20

    The rapid increase in prevalence rates of Alzheimer's disease means that treatments to prevent, stop or reverse this devastating disease are urgently needed. Despite advances in understanding its molecular pathology, there are no drugs that can halt its progression. This review takes a tour through phase 2, or higher studies, probing receptor agonist agents interfering with aggregation, inhibitors/modulators of secretases, lipid-lowering agents, and, finally and most extensively, immunotherapy. The fact that phase 3 studies with bapineuzumab and solaneuzumab have recently failed does not invalidate the potential of immunotherapy, as more information is available and new clinical trials are being initiated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... date on the latest news and advances in Alzheimer's treatments, care and research. Get tips for living with ... is dementia What is Alzheimer's 7 stages of Alzheimer's Treatments Contact us 24/7 Helpline: 1-800-272- ...

  14. 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents The ... Suncoast Gerontology Center, University of South Florida. How Alzheimer's Changes the Brain The only definite way to ...

  15. Differences in abundances of cell-signalling proteins in blood reveal novel biomarkers for early detection of clinical Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Rocha de Paula

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In November 2007 a study published in Nature Medicine proposed a simple test based on the abundance of 18 proteins in blood to predict the onset of clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease (AD two to six years before these symptoms manifest. Later, another study, published in PLoS ONE, showed that only five proteins (IL-1, IL-3, EGF, TNF- and G-CSF have overall better prediction accuracy. These classifiers are based on the abundance of 120 proteins. Such values were standardised by a Z-score transformation, which means that their values are relative to the average of all others. METHODOLOGY: The original datasets from the Nature Medicine paper are further studied using methods from combinatorial optimisation and Information Theory. We expand the original dataset by also including all pair-wise differences of z-score values of the original dataset ("metafeatures". Using an exact algorithm to solve the resulting Feature Set problem, used to tackle the feature selection problem, we found signatures that contain either only features, metafeatures or both, and evaluated their predictive performance on the independent test set. CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to show that a specific pattern of cell signalling imbalance in blood plasma has valuable information to distinguish between NDC and AD samples. The obtained signatures were able to predict AD in patients that already had a Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI with up to 84% of sensitivity, while maintaining also a strong prediction accuracy of 90% on a independent dataset with Non Demented Controls (NDC and AD samples. The novel biomarkers uncovered with this method now confirms ANG-2, IL-11, PDGF-BB, CCL15/MIP-1; and supports the joint measurement of other signalling proteins not previously discussed: GM-CSF, NT-3, IGFBP-2 and VEGF-B.

  16. Classification and localization of early-stage Alzheimer's disease in magnetic resonance images using a patch-based classifier ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoes, Rita; Slump, Cornelis H.; Cappellen van Walsum, Anne-Marie van

    2014-01-01

    Classification methods have been proposed to detect Alzheimer's disease (AD) using magnetic resonance images. Most rely on features such as the shape/volume of brain structures that need to be defined a priori. In this work, we propose a method that does not require either the segmentation of specific brain regions or the nonlinear alignment to a template. Besides classification, we also analyze which brain regions are discriminative between a group of normal controls and a group of AD patients. We perform 3D texture analysis using Local Binary Patterns computed at local image patches in the whole brain, combined in a classifier ensemble. We evaluate our method in a publicly available database including very mild-to-mild AD subjects and healthy elderly controls. For the subject cohort including only mild AD subjects, the best results are obtained using a combination of large (30 x 30 x 30 and 40 x 40 x 40 voxels) patches. A spatial analysis on the best performing patches shows that these are located in the medial-temporal lobe and in the periventricular regions. When very mild AD subjects are included in the dataset, the small (10 x 10 x 10 voxels) patches perform best, with the most discriminative ones being located near the left hippocampus. We show that our method is able not only to perform accurate classification, but also to localize discriminative brain regions, which are in accordance with the medical literature. This is achieved without the need to segment-specific brain structures and without performing nonlinear registration to a template, indicating that the method may be suitable for a clinical implementation that can help to diagnose AD at an earlier stage.

  17. Bilingualism, executive control, and age at diagnosis among people with early-stage Alzheimer's disease in Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Linda; Whitaker, Christopher J; Craik, Fergus I M; Bialystok, Ellen; Martyr, Anthony; Martin-Forbes, Pamela A; Bastable, Alexandra J M; Pye, Kirstie L; Quinn, Catherine; Thomas, Enlli M; Gathercole, Virginia C Mueller; Hindle, John V

    2016-09-01

    The observation of a bilingual advantage in executive control tasks involving inhibition and management of response conflict suggests that being bilingual might contribute to increased cognitive reserve. In support of this, recent evidence indicates that bilinguals develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) later than monolinguals, and may retain an advantage in performance on executive control tasks. We compared age at the time of receiving an AD diagnosis in bilingual Welsh/English speakers (n = 37) and monolingual English speakers (n = 49), and assessed the performance of bilinguals (n = 24) and monolinguals (n = 49) on a range of executive control tasks. There was a non-significant difference in age at the time of diagnosis, with bilinguals being on average 3 years older than monolinguals, but bilinguals were also significantly more cognitively impaired at the time of diagnosis. There were no significant differences between monolinguals and bilinguals in performance on executive function tests, but bilinguals appeared to show relative strengths in the domain of inhibition and response conflict. Bilingual Welsh/English speakers with AD do not show a clear advantage in executive function over monolingual English speakers, but may retain some benefits in inhibition and management of response conflict. There may be a delay in onset of AD in Welsh/English bilinguals, but if so, it is smaller than that found in some other clinical populations. In this Welsh sample, bilinguals with AD came to the attention of services later than monolinguals, and reasons for this pattern could be explored further. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Serotonin 6 receptor controls alzheimer?s disease and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Kim, Sanghyeon; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer?s disease (AD) and depression in late life are one of the most severe health problems in the world disorders. Serotonin 6 receptor (5-HT6R) has caused much interest for potential roles in AD and depression. However, a causative role of perturbed 5-HT6R function between two diseases was poorly defined. In the present study, we found that a 5-HT6R antagonist, SB271036 rescued memory impairment by attenuating the generation of A? via the inhibition of ?-secretase activity and the inact...

  19. Corpus callosum atrophy in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Garde, Ellen; Skimminge, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have found atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether callosal atrophy is already present in the early stages of AD, and to what extent it may be associated with other structural changes in the brain......, such as age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) and progression of the disease....

  20. Memory Correlates of Alzheimer's Disease Cerebrospinal Fluid Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reijs, Babette L R; Ramakers, Inez H G B; Köhler, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Performance on episodic, semantic, and working memory tests is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type dementia, but it is unclear which type of memory test is most strongly associated with early AD biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and most useful for monitoring disease...

  1. Moving forward with nutrition in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheltens, P

    2009-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the epidemic of the 21st century but still relatively little is known about the causes of the disease. Nutrient deficiencies, associated with loss of cognitive function, are frequently reported in patients with AD and currently available epidemiologic evidence suggests that an increased intake of certain nutrients may lower the risk of AD. Current treatment options offer only symptomatic relief, however, there is a growing body of evidence that nutrition in general and 'nutritional intervention' in a clinical setting may be able to play a key role in the management of the disease. However, randomized clinical trials are needed to test this approach. The Souvenir study is the first randomized, controlled, double-blind, multi-centre study designed to evaluate the efficacy of a multi-nutrient dietary approach on cognitive performance in drug-naïve early AD patients.

  2. Imaging Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology with PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Porcello Schilling

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alzheimer's disease (AD has been reconceptualised as a dynamic pathophysiological process characterized by preclinical, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and dementia stages. Positron emission tomography (PET associated with various molecular imaging agents reveals numerous aspects of dementia pathophysiology, such as brain amyloidosis, tau accumulation, neuroreceptor changes, metabolism abnormalities and neuroinflammation in dementia patients. In the context of a growing shift toward presymptomatic early diagnosis and disease-modifying interventions, PET molecular imaging agents provide an unprecedented means of quantifying the AD pathophysiological process, monitoring disease progression, ascertaining whether therapies engage their respective brain molecular targets, as well as quantifying pharmacological responses. In the present study, we highlight the most important contributions of PET in describing brain molecular abnormalities in AD.

  3. Multiscale deep neural network based analysis of FDG-PET images for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Donghuan; Popuri, Karteek; Ding, Gavin Weiguang; Balachandar, Rakesh; Beg, Mirza Faisal

    2018-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases with a commonly seen prodromal mild cognitive impairment (MCI) phase where memory loss is the main complaint progressively worsening with behavior issues and poor self-care. However, not all individuals clinically diagnosed with MCI progress to AD. A fraction of subjects with MCI either progress to non-AD dementia or remain stable at the MCI stage without progressing to dementia. Although a curative treatment of AD is currently unavailable, it is extremely important to correctly identify the individuals in the MCI phase that will go on to develop AD so that they may benefit from a curative treatment when one becomes available in the near future. At the same time, it would be highly desirable to also correctly identify those in the MCI phase that do not have AD pathology so they may be spared from unnecessary pharmocologic interventions that, at best, may provide them no benefit, and at worse, could further harm them with adverse side-effects. Additionally, it may be easier and simpler to identify the cause of the cognitive impairment in these non-AD cases, and hence proper identification of prodromal AD will be of benefit to these individuals as well. Fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) captures the metabolic activity of the brain, and this imaging modality has been reported to identify changes related to AD prior to the onset of structural changes. Prior work on designing classifier using FDG-PET imaging has been promising. Since deep-learning has recently emerged as a powerful tool to mine features and use them for accurate labeling of the group membership of given images, we propose a novel deep-learning framework using FDG-PET metabolism imaging to identify subjects at the MCI stage with presymptomatic AD and discriminate them from other subjects with MCI (non-AD / non-progressive). Our multiscale deep neural network obtained 82.51% accuracy of classification

  4. Potential of the Antibody Against cis-Phosphorylated Tau in the Early Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention of Alzheimer Disease and Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kun Ping; Kondo, Asami; Albayram, Onder; Herbert, Megan K; Liu, Hekun; Zhou, Xiao Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) share a common neuropathologic signature-neurofibrillary tangles made of phosphorylated tau-but do not have the same pathogenesis or symptoms. Although whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) could cause AD has not been established, CTE is shown to be associated with TBI. Until recently, whether and how TBI leads to tau-mediated neurodegeneration was unknown. The unique prolyl isomerase Pin1 protects against the development of tau-mediated neurodegeneration in AD by converting the phosphorylated Thr231-Pro motif in tau (ptau) from the pathogenic cis conformation to the physiologic trans conformation, thereby restoring ptau function. The recent development of antibodies able to distinguish and eliminate both conformations specifically has led to the discovery of cis-ptau as a precursor of tau-induced pathologic change and an early driver of neurodegeneration that directly links TBI to CTE and possibly to AD. Within hours of TBI in mice or neuronal stress in vitro, neurons prominently produce cis-ptau, which causes and spreads cis-ptau pathologic changes, termed cistauosis. Cistauosis eventually leads to widespread tau-mediated neurodegeneration and brain atrophy. Cistauosis is effectively blocked by the cis-ptau antibody, which targets intracellular cis-ptau for proteasome-mediated degradation and prevents extracellular cis-ptau from spreading to other neurons. Treating TBI mice with cis-ptau antibody not only blocks early cistauosis but also prevents development and spreading of tau-mediated neurodegeneration and brain atrophy and restores brain histopathologic features and functional outcomes. Thus, cistauosis is a common early disease mechanism for AD, TBI, and CTE, and cis-ptau and its antibody may be useful for early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these devastating diseases.

  5. Mitochondrial Drugs for Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongwei Zhu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer disease (AD have yet to offer a diseasemodifying effect to stop the debilitating progression of neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. Rather, treatments thus far are limited to agents that slow disease progression without halting it, and although much work towards a cure is underway, a greater understanding of disease etiology is certainly necessary for any such achievement. Mitochondria, as the centers of cellular metabolic activity and the primary generators of reactive oxidative species in the cell, received particular attention especially given that mitochondrial defects are known to contribute to cellular damage. Furthermore, as oxidative stress has come to the forefront of AD as a causal theory, and as mitochondrial damage is known to precede much of the hallmark pathologies of AD, it seems increasingly apparent that this metabolic organelle is ultimately responsible for much, if not all of disease pathogenesis. In this review, we review the role of neuronal mitochondria in the pathogenesis of AD and critically assess treatment strategies that utilize this upstream access point as a method for disease prevention. We suspect that, with a revived focus on mitochondrial repair and protection, an effective and realistic therapeutic agent can be successfully developed.

  6. Harmonized diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, J C; Blennow, K; Froelich, L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two major sets of criteria for the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) recently have been published, one from an International Working Group (IWG) and the other from working groups convened by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the Alzheimer's Association (AA...

  7. Change of central cholinergic receptors following lesions of nucleus basalis magnocellularis in rats: search for an imaging index suitable for the early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Mikako; Iida, Yasuhiko; Nakagawa, Masaki; Kuge, Yugi; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Tominaga, Akiko; Ueda, Masashi; Magata, Yasuhiro; Saji, Hideo

    2006-01-01

    Cholinergic system in the central nervous system is involved in the memory function. Thus, because the dysfunction of cholinergic system that project to the cerebral cortex from nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) would be implicated in the memory function deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD), evaluating cholinergic function may be useful for the early detection of AD. In this study, because the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) in rats is equivalent to nbM in human, we investigated the change in cholinergic receptors in the frontal cortex of rats with unilateral lesion to the NBM to find an appropriate index for the early detection of AD using techniques of nuclear medicine. The right NBM was injected with ibotenic acid. [ 18 F]FDG-PET images were obtained 3 days later. Some rats were sacrificed at 1 week, whereas others were subjected to a second [ 18 F]FDG-PET at 4 weeks then sacrificed for membrane preparation. The prepared membranes were subjected to radioreceptor assays to measure the density of nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Glucose metabolism had decreased on the damaged side compared to the control side at 3 days, but at 4 weeks, there was no difference between the sides. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors had significantly decreased in density compared to the control side at both 1 and 4 weeks. However, muscarinic receptors were not affected. These results suggested that neuronal dysfunction in AD could be diagnosed at an early stage by imaging nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

  8. Precision pharmacology for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Harald; Vergallo, Andrea; Aguilar, Lisi Flores; Benda, Norbert; Broich, Karl; Cuello, A Claudio; Cummings, Jeffrey; Dubois, Bruno; Federoff, Howard J; Fiandaca, Massimo; Genthon, Remy; Haberkamp, Marion; Karran, Eric; Mapstone, Mark; Perry, George; Schneider, Lon S; Welikovitch, Lindsay A; Woodcock, Janet; Baldacci, Filippo; Lista, Simone

    2018-04-01

    The complex multifactorial nature of polygenic Alzheimer's disease (AD) presents significant challenges for drug development. AD pathophysiology is progressing in a non-linear dynamic fashion across multiple systems levels - from molecules to organ systems - and through adaptation, to compensation, and decompensation to systems failure. Adaptation and compensation maintain homeostasis: a dynamic equilibrium resulting from the dynamic non-linear interaction between genome, epigenome, and environment. An individual vulnerability to stressors exists on the basis of individual triggers, drivers, and thresholds accounting for the initiation and failure of adaptive and compensatory responses. Consequently, the distinct pattern of AD pathophysiology in space and time must be investigated on the basis of the individual biological makeup. This requires the implementation of systems biology and neurophysiology to facilitate Precision Medicine (PM) and Precision Pharmacology (PP). The regulation of several processes at multiple levels of complexity from gene expression to cellular cycle to tissue repair and system-wide network activation has different time delays (temporal scale) according to the affected systems (spatial scale). The initial failure might originate and occur at every level potentially affecting the whole dynamic interrelated systems within an organism. Unraveling the spatial and temporal dynamics of non-linear pathophysiological mechanisms across the continuum of hierarchical self-organized systems levels and from systems homeostasis to systems failure is key to understand AD. Measuring and, possibly, controlling space- and time-scaled adaptive and compensatory responses occurring during AD will represent a crucial step to achieve the capacity to substantially modify the disease course and progression at the best suitable timepoints, thus counteracting disrupting critical pathophysiological inputs. This approach will provide the conceptual basis for effective

  9. The application of lipidomics to biomarker research and pathomechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Matthew W; Braidy, Nady; Poljak, Anne; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2017-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia. There are still no disease modifying treatments that can cure or slow disease progression. Recently, Alzheimer's disease researchers have attempted to improve early detection and diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease, with the rationale that treatment of disease, or even prevention, may be more successful during the early preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease when neurodegenerative damage is not as widespread. As the brain has a high lipid content, lipidomics may offer novel insights into the underlying pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. This review reports on recent developments in the relatively unexplored field of lipidomics in Alzheimer's disease, including novel biomarkers and pathomechanisms of Alzheimer's disease. Numerous biomarker panels involving phospholipids and sphingolipids have been proposed, indicating perturbed lipid metabolism in early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Future strategies targeting these metabolic changes through dietary supplementation could have therapeutic benefits in at-risk individuals. Dysregulated lipid metabolism could reflect pathological changes in synaptic function and neuronal membranes, leading to cognitive decline. However, extensive validation in large independent cohorts is required before lipid biomarkers can be used clinically to assess Alzheimer's disease risk and progression.

  10. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... mail addresses with third parties. Please read our security and privacy policy . Plan ahead ... | Contact Us National Headquarters Alzheimer's Association National Office, 225 N. Michigan ...

  11. Social influence on associative learning: double dissociation in high-functioning autism, early-stage behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kéri, Szabolcs

    2014-05-01

    Most of our learning activity takes place in a social context. I examined how social interactions influence associative learning in neurodegenerative diseases and atypical neurodevelopmental conditions primarily characterised by social cognitive and memory dysfunctions. Participants were individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA, n = 18), early-stage behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n = 16) and Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 20). The leading symptoms in HFA and bvFTD were social and behavioural dysfunctions, whereas AD was characterised by memory deficits. Participants received three versions of a paired associates learning task. In the game with boxes test, objects were hidden in six candy boxes placed in different locations on the computer screen. In the game with faces, each box was labelled by a photo of a person. In the real-life version of the game, participants played with real persons. Individuals with HFA and bvFTD performed well in the computer games, but failed on the task including real persons. In contrast, in patients with early-stage AD, social interactions boosted paired associates learning up to the level of healthy control volunteers. Worse performance in the real life game was associated with less successful recognition of complex emotions and mental states in the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test. Spatial span did not affect the results. When social cognition is impaired, but memory systems are less compromised (HFA and bvFTD), real-life interactions disrupt associative learning; when disease process impairs memory systems but social cognition is relatively intact (early-stage AD), social interactions have a beneficial effect on learning and memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Synaptic changes in Alzheimer's disease in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Gaertner, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    The article describes the current knowledge on biochemical changes in Alzheimer's disease. Following a summary on post mortem findings, results from positron emission tomography will be focused on. This synopsis shows that patients with Alzheimer's disease show very consistently changes in the cholinergic transmission. In addition to this, changes of the dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic system are observed. It is possible, that clinical, pathological and functional differences in Alzheimer's disease between different patients reflect variations of a single disease process. It is also thinkable, that there are subclassifications in Alzheimer's disease which are reflected in the above described biochemical abnormalities. In this case it is important in therapeutical terms to investigate these subtypes. (orig.) [de

  13. The genetics of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Lars; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors play a major role in determining a person's risk to develop Alzheimer's disease (AD). Rare mutations transmitted in a Mendelian fashion within affected families, for example, APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2, cause AD. In the absence of mutations in these genes, disease risk is largely determined by common polymorphisms that, in concert with each other and nongenetic risk factors, modestly impact risk for AD (e.g., the ε4-allele in APOE). Recent genome-wide screening approaches have revealed several additional AD susceptibility loci and more are likely to be discovered over the coming years. In this chapter, we review the current state of AD genetics research with a particular focus on loci that now can be considered established disease genes. In addition to reviewing the potential pathogenic relevance of these genes, we provide an outlook into the future of AD genetics research based on recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Archer, John K. J.; Black, Richard A.; Mann, David

    2006-02-01

    Within the next 50 years Alzheimer's disease is expected to affect 100 million people worldwide. The progressive decline in the mental health of the patient is caused by severe brain atrophy generated by the breakdown and aggregation of proteins, resulting in β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The greatest challenge to Alzheimer's disease lies in the pursuit of an early and definitive diagnosis, in order that suitable treatment can be administered. At the present time, definitive diagnosis is restricted to post-mortem examination. Alzheimer's disease also remains without a long-term cure. This research demonstrates the potential role of Raman spectroscopy, combined with principle components analysis (PCA), as a diagnostic method. Analyses of ethically approved ex vivo post-mortem brain tissues (originating from frontal and occipital lobes) from control (3 normal elderly subjects and 3 Huntingdon's disease subjects) and Alzheimer's disease (12 subjects) brain sections, and a further set of 12 blinded samples are presented. Spectra originating from these tissues are highly reproducible, and initial results indicate a vital difference in protein content and conformation, relating to the abnormally high levels of aggregated proteins in the diseased tissues. Further examination of these spectra using PCA allows for the separation of control from diseased tissues. The validation of the PCA models using blinded samples also displays promise for the identification of Alzheimer's disease, in conjunction with secondary information regarding other brain diseases and dementias. These results provide a route for Raman spectroscopy as a possible non-invasive, non-destructive tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Active Vaccines for Alzheimer Disease Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterner, Rosalie M; Takahashi, Paul Y; Yu Ballard, Aimee C

    2016-09-01

    Vaccination against peptides specific to Alzheimer disease may generate an immune response that could help inhibit disease and symptom progression. PubMed and Scopus were searched for clinical trial articles, review articles, and preclinical studies relevant to the field of active Alzheimer disease vaccines and raw searches yielded articles ranging from 2016 to 1973. ClinicalTrials.gov was searched for active Alzheimer disease vaccine trials. Manual research and cross-referencing from reviews and original articles was performed. First generation Aβ42 phase 2a trial in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease resulted in cases of meningoencephalitis in 6% of patients, so next generation vaccines are working to target more specific epitopes to induce a more controlled immune response. Difficulty in developing these vaccines resides in striking a balance between providing a vaccine that induces enough of an immune response to actually clear protein sustainably but not so much of a response that results in excess immune activation and possibly adverse effects such as meningoencephalitis. Although much work still needs to be done in the field to make this a practical possibility, the enticing allure of being able to treat or even prevent the extraordinarily impactful disease that is Alzheimer disease makes the idea of active vaccination for Alzheimer disease very appealing and something worth striving toward. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. New cardiovascular targets to prevent late onset Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2015-09-15

    The prevalence of dementia rises to between 20% and 40% with advancing age. The dominant cause of dementia in approximately 70% of these patients is Alzheimer disease. There is no effective disease-modifying pharmaceutical treatment for this neurodegenerative disease. A wide range of Alzheimer drugs that appeared effective in animal models have recently failed to show clinical benefit in patients. However, hopeful news has emerged from recent studies that suggest that therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular disease may also reduce the prevalence of dementia due to Alzheimer disease. This review summarizes the evidence for this link between cardiovascular disease and late onset Alzheimer dementia. Only evidence from human research is considered here. Longitudinal studies show an association between high blood pressure and pathological accumulation of the protein amyloid-beta42, and an even stronger association between vascular stiffness and amyloid accumulation, in elderly subjects. Amyloid-beta42 accumulation is considered to be an early marker of Alzheimer disease, and increases the risk of subsequent cognitive decline and development of dementia. These observations could provide an explanation for recent observations of reduced dementia prevalence associated with improved cardiovascular care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III profile in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease: performance in subtests sensitive to and resistant to normal decline with ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Osamu; Saito, Masahiko; Kato, Mayumi; Azami, Hiroki; Shido, Emi

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the significance of age-related subtest scores from the Japanese version of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III in patients in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The subjects of this study included 58 elderly Japanese persons classified into two groups: AD group (n = 29) and control group (n = 29). These groups did not differ in age, years of education, gender ratio, Hasegawa's Dementia Scale-Revised score, or Full-Scale IQ score. No subject scored below the cut-off point on Hasegawa's Dementia Scale-Revised, a frequently used dementia screen test in Japan. At the index score level, General Ability Index scores were the only scores that differed significantly between the groups, with the AD group scoring significantly lower than the control group (P Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III profile of very early AD may be characterized by weak performance on subtests normally resistant to decline with ageing. © 2014 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2014 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  18. Education and the risk for Alzheimers disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Letenneur, L; Launer, L J; Andersen, K

    2000-01-01

    The hypothesis that a low educational level increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. The authors studied the association of years of schooling with the risk for incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease by using pooled data from four European population-based follow......-up studies. Dementia cases were identified in a two-stage procedure that included a detailed diagnostic assessment of screen-positive subjects. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease were diagnosed by using international research criteria. Educational level was categorized by years of schooling as low (...), middle (8-11), or high (> or =12). Relative risks (95% confidence intervals) were estimated by using Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex, study center, smoking status, and self-reported myocardial infarction and stroke. There were 493 (328) incident cases of dementia (Alzheimer's disease) and 28...

  19. Alzheimer's disease: A review of recent developments

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... Keywords:Advancing age, Alzheimer's disease, cognitive dysfunction, dementia, neuropsychological testing, primary ..... of associated behavioral and neurologic problems. ... whether to continue therapy with a particular drug.

  20. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... and support I have Alzheimer's I am a caregiver I am a care professional I am a physician I am a researcher Message boards Get the facts 10 warning signs & symptoms What is dementia What is Alzheimer's 7 stages of ...

  1. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are women. Older African-Americans are about twice as likely to have Alzheimer's or other dementias as older whites. Hispanics are about one and one-half times as likely to have Alzheimer's or other dementias as ...

  2. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ide

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation.

  3. Early multidomain intervention to stave off Alzheimer's disease%早期综合干预有助延缓阿尔茨海默症的发生

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赫荣乔

    2016-01-01

    阿尔茨海默症(Alzheimer's disease,AD)的典型病变包括认知异常、脑内amyloid β(Aβ)沉积形成的老年斑(senile plaque)、异常磷酸化Tau蛋白形成的神经纤维缠结(neurofibrillary tangles,NFTs)、胶质细胞激活以及脑萎缩.在近100多年的研究过程中,国内外同行把研究重点集中在AD的临床阶段,追求单一靶点的药物.然而,这些努力尚未在临床治疗上实现重大突破.当前,AD临床前阶段(preclinical phases)的早期病理变化和干预措施研究受到了相当的重视.为了延缓老年痴呆的发生,在强调多靶点药物研发的同时,其他干预方法,包括改善生活习惯、调节饮食、参与社会活动、进行适当的体育锻炼等,也在AD的防治中得以研究与应用.%Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible,progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills,and eventually the ability to carry out the simplest tasks.In most people with Alzheimer's symptoms first appear in their mid-60s.The typical lesions of Alzheimer's disease (AD) feature in cognitive impairment,amyloid β(Aβ) deposits (senile plaque),hyperphosphorylation of Tau in neurofibrillary tangles (NTFs),glial cells activation and cerebral atrophy.The plaques and tangles in the brain are considered to be the main features of Alzheimer's disease.Loss of connections between neurons in the brain deteriorates neuronal message transmission between different parts of the brain,and from the brain to muscles and organs in the body.Over one hundred years,a great deal of research has been focused on the dementia of clinical phase,and on single-target drugs to intervene the progression of AD.However,a real breakthrough in the treatment still needs to be made to stave off AD.Currently,to clarify early pathological changes of pre-clinical stage is imperative to understand AD.Although aging,family history and susceptibility genes have been considered to be the most important factors,the rapid

  4. Epigenetic Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mut, Jose V; Gräff, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia in Western societies. It progresses asymptomatically during decades before being belatedly diagnosed when therapeutic strategies have become unviable. Although several genetic alterations have been associated with AD, the vast majority of AD cases do not show strong genetic underpinnings and are thus considered a consequence of non-genetic factors. Epigenetic mechanisms allow for the integration of long-lasting non-genetic inputs on specific genetic backgrounds, and recently, a growing number of epigenetic alterations in AD have been described. For instance, an accumulation of dysregulated epigenetic mechanisms in aging, the predominant risk factor of AD, might facilitate the onset of the disease. Likewise, mutations in several enzymes of the epigenetic machinery have been associated with neurodegenerative processes that are altered in AD such as impaired learning and memory formation. Genome-wide and locus-specific epigenetic alterations have also been reported, and several epigenetically dysregulated genes validated by independent groups. From these studies, a picture emerges of AD as being associated with DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation, suggesting a general repressed chromatin state and epigenetically reduced plasticity in AD. Here we review these recent findings and discuss several technical and methodological considerations that are imperative for their correct interpretation. We also pay particular focus on potential implementations and theoretical frameworks that we expect will help to better direct future studies aimed to unravel the epigenetic participation in AD.

  5. Molecular subtypes of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Maderna, Emanuela; Ghidoni, Roberta; Benussi, Luisa; Tonoli, Elisa; Giaccone, Giorgio; Moda, Fabio; Paterlini, Anna; Campagnani, Ilaria; Sorrentino, Stefano; Colombo, Laura; Kubis, Adriana; Bistaffa, Edoardo; Ghetti, Bernardino; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2018-02-19

    Protein misfolding and aggregation is a central feature of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), in which assemblies of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides accumulate in the brain in the form of parenchymal and/or vascular amyloid. A widely accepted concept is that AD is characterized by distinct clinical and neuropathological phenotypes. Recent studies revealed that Aβ assemblies might have structural differences among AD brains and that such pleomorphic assemblies can correlate with distinct disease phenotypes. We found that in both sporadic and inherited forms of AD, amyloid aggregates differ in the biochemical composition of Aβ species. These differences affect the physicochemical properties of Aβ assemblies including aggregation kinetics, resistance to degradation by proteases and seeding ability. Aβ-amyloidosis can be induced and propagated in animal models by inoculation of brain extracts containing aggregated Aβ. We found that brain homogenates from AD patients with different molecular profiles of Aβ are able to induce distinct patterns of Aβ-amyloidosis when injected into mice. Overall these data suggest that the assembly of mixtures of Aβ peptides into different Aβ seeds leads to the formation of distinct subtypes of amyloid having distinctive physicochemical and biological properties which result in the generation of distinct AD molecular subgroups.

  6. Understanding Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Understanding Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... and brain scans. No treatment so far stops Alzheimer's. However, for some in the disease's early and ...

  7. Examination of level of knowledge in Italian general practitioners attending an education session on diagnosis and management of the early stage of Alzheimer's disease: pass or fail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneziani, Federica; Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Capozzo, Rosa; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Leo, Antonio; Lozupone, Madia; Fontana, Andrea; Arcuti, Simona; Copetti, Massimiliano; Cardinali, Valentina; Grasso, Alessandra; Tursi, Marianna; Iurillo, Annalisa; Imbimbo, Bruno Pietro; Seripa, Davide; Logroscino, Giancarlo

    2016-07-01

    We detected the general level of knowledge about the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and subsequent care in general practitioners (GPs) from Southern Italy. We explored also the GP perception about their knowledge and training on diagnosis and management of AD. On a sample of 131 GPs, we administered two questionnaires: the GP-Knowledge, evaluating GPs' expertise about AD epidemiology, differential diagnosis, and available treatments, and the GP-QUestionnaire on Awareness of Dementia (GP-QUAD), assessing the GPs' attitudes, awareness, and practice regarding early diagnosis of dementia. Specific screening tests or protocols to diagnose and manage dementia were not used by 53% of our GPs. The training on the recognition of early AD signs and symptoms was considered inadequate by 55% of the participants. Females were more likely to consider their training insufficient (58%) compared to males (53%). Female GPs were less likely to prescribe antipsychotic drugs to control neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) and suggest specialist advice in late stage of cognitive impairment. Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA) performed only on GP-QUAD suggested two dimensions explaining 26.1% ("GP attitude") and 20.1% ("GP knowledge") of the inertia for a total of 46.2%, In our survey on GP clinical practice, several problems in properly recognizing early AD symptoms and subsequently screening patients to be referred to secondary/tertiary care centers for diagnosis confirmation have emerged. In the future, specific training programs and educational projects for GPs should be implemented also in Italy to improve detection rates and management of dementia in primary care.

  8. Taking Control of Alzheimer's Disease: A Training Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Nina M.; Sherman, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate a training program for persons with early-stage Alzheimer's disease and their care partners. Care partners were mailed two surveys, one for themselves and one for the person with dementia. Domains covered in the training included an overview of cognitive disorders, treatment of symptoms including…

  9. [Aβ immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kenji; Yamada, Masahito

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the deposition of amyloid-β-protein (Aβ) as senile plaques in the brain parenchyma and phosphorylated-tau accumulation as neurofibrillary tangles in the neurons. Although details of the disease pathomechanisms remain unclear, Aβ likely acts as a key protein for AD initiation and progression, followed by abnormal tau phosphorylation and neuronal death (amyloid-cascade hypothesis). According to this hypothesis, Aβ immunization therapies are created to eliminate Aβ from the brain, and to prevent the neurons from damage by these pathogenic proteins. There are two methods for Aβ immunotherapies: active and passive immunization. Previous studies have shown Aβ removal and improved cognitive function in animal models of AD. Clinical trials on various drugs, including AN1792, bapineuzumab, and solanezumab, have been carried out; however, all trials have failed to demonstrate apparent clinical benefits. On the contrary, side effects emerged, such as meningoencephalitis, vasogenic edema, which are currently called amyloid related imaging abnormalities (ARIA)-E and microhemorrhage (ARIA-H). In neuropathological studies of immunized cases, Aβ was removed from the brain parenchyma and phosphorylated-tau was reduced in the neuronal processes. Moreover, deterioration of the cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and an increase of microhemorrhages and microinfarcts were described. Aβ is cleared from the brain mainly via the lymphatic drainage pathway. ARIA could stem from severe CAA due to dysfunction of the drainage pathway after immunotherapy. Aβ immunization has a potential of cure for AD patients, although the above-described problems must be overcome before applying this therapy in clinical treatment.

  10. Deconstructing Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega García-Escudero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is mounting evidence showing that mitochondrial damage plays an important role in Alzheimer disease. Increased oxygen species generation and deficient mitochondrial dynamic balance have been suggested to be the reason as well as the consequence of Alzheimer-related pathology. Mitochondrial damage has been related to amyloid-beta or tau pathology or to the presence of specific presenilin-1 mutations. The contribution of these factors to mitochondrial dysfunction is reviewed in this paper. Due to the relevance of mitochondrial alterations in Alzheimer disease, recent works have suggested the therapeutic potential of mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant. On the other hand, autophagy has been demonstrated to play a fundamental role in Alzheimer-related protein stress, and increasing data shows that this pathway is altered in the disease. Moreover, mitochondrial alterations have been related to an insufficient clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy. Consequently, different approaches for the removal of damaged mitochondria or to decrease the related oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease have been described. To understand the role of mitochondrial function in Alzheimer disease it is necessary to generate human cellular models which involve living neurons. We have summarized the novel protocols for the generation of neurons by reprogramming or direct transdifferentiation, which offer useful tools to achieve this result.

  11. PET and SPECT investigations in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenbaum, S.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear medicine offers a wide range of possibilities to investigate dementia. Various SPECT and PET tracers will be introduced in this article first. Different questions concerning evaluation of dementia are discussed taking Alzheimer's disease (AD) as an example. It is important to perform nuclear medicine investigations on high technical level, using standardized methods as statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for evaluation. If neuroprotective therapies are available, an early diagnosis, the determination of risk factors and longitudinal investigations will be the focus of interest and the main goal of nuclear medicine. Apart from measuring cerebral perfusion and glucose metabolism the development of new ligands, concerning the cholinergic system and the visualization of amyloid plaques, is of great importance. (orig.) [de

  12. New Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Mehta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE remains a highly viable target for the symptomatic improvement in Alzheimer's disease (AD because cholinergic deficit is a consistent and early finding in AD. The treatment approach of inhibiting peripheral AchE for myasthenia gravis had effectively proven that AchE inhibition was a reachable therapeutic target. Subsequently tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine were developed and approved for the symptomatic treatment of AD. Since then, multiple cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI continue to be developed. These include newer ChEIs, naturally derived ChEIs, hybrids, and synthetic analogues. In this paper, we summarize the different types of ChEIs in development and their respective mechanisms of actions. This pharmacological approach continues to be active with many promising compounds.

  13. Functional neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Recent progress in the title is reviewed often referring to authors' investigations. The method eZIS developed by them is for automated diagnosis of brain perfusion SPECT, where voxel-based analysis can be done using a Z-score map calculable from patient's data and standard database with 3D-stereotactic surface projection. Decreases of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and of glucose metabolism detectable in specified brain regions by PET or SPECT in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), are found useful for predicting the stage progression of MCI to Alzheimer disease (AD) in future. Partial volume correction method, essentially the division of images of a gray matter SPECT by MR, has elevated the precision of cerebral image analysis. Differential diagnosis of AD and dementia with Lewy bodies, the second most common form of dementia, is possible by the difference of occipital perfusion or glucose metabolism. Evidences by rCBF SPECT as well as by symptomatic ones have been accumulated recently for the therapeutic effect of donepezil, an inhibitor of acetylcholine esterase used for AD treatment. PET and SPECT imaging for the assessment of rCBF and metabolism has thus played very important roles in AD diagnosis, staging, differentiation, prediction and drug effect assessment. Recent advance in voxel-based statistical analysis of PET and SPECT images has raised the value of neuroimaging in dementia. (T.I.)

  14. Slower Dynamics and Aged Mitochondria in Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargini, Ricardo; García, Esther; Perry, George

    2017-01-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease corresponds to 95% of cases whose origin is multifactorial and elusive. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major feature of Alzheimer's pathology, which might be one of the early events that trigger downstream principal events. Here, we show that multiple genes that control mitochondrial homeostasis, including fission and fusion, are downregulated in Alzheimer's patients. Additionally, we demonstrate that some of these dysregulations, such as diminished DLP1 levels and its mitochondrial localization, as well as reduced STOML2 and MFN2 fusion protein levels, take place in fibroblasts from sporadic Alzheimer's disease patients. The analysis of mitochondrial network disruption using CCCP indicates that the patients' fibroblasts exhibit slower dynamics and mitochondrial membrane potential recovery. These defects lead to strong accumulation of aged mitochondria in Alzheimer's fibroblasts. Accordingly, the analysis of autophagy and mitophagy involved genes in the patients demonstrates a downregulation indicating that the recycling mechanism of these aged mitochondria might be impaired. Our data reinforce the idea that mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the key early events of the disease intimately related with aging. PMID:29201274

  15. Functional neuroimaging of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ruimin

    2001-01-01

    Dementing illnesses comprise Alzheimer's disease (AD), Pick's disease, Multi-infarct dementia (MID) and other neurological disorders. These diseases have different clinical characters respectively. Neuropsychological examinations can help to diagnose and differential diagnose dementias. The development of neuroimaging dementias is more and more rapid. 18 F-FDG PET method shows neo-cortical hypometabolism occurring in the biparietal-temporal lobes and left-right asymmetry of AD patients in the early stage. It can also differential diagnose Ad from other dementias

  16. Physical mapping of the major early-onset familial Alzheimer`s disease locus on chromosome 14 and analysis of candidate gene sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanzi, R.E.; Romano, D.M.; Crowley, A.C. [Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Genetic studies of kindreds displaying evidence for familial AD (FAD) have led to the localization of gene defects responsible for this disorder on chromosomes 14, 19, and 21. A minor early-onset FAD gene on chromosome 21 has been identified to enode the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and the late-onset FAD susceptibility locus on chromosome 19 has been shown to be in linkage disequilibrium with the E4 allele of the APOE gene. Meanwhile, the locus responsible for the major form of early-onset FAD on chromosome 14q24 has not yet been identified. By recombinational analysis, we have refined the minimal candidate region containing the gene defect to approximately 3 megabases in 14q24. We will describe our laboratory`s progress on attempts to finely localize this locus, as well as test known candidate genes from this region for either inclusion in the minimal candidate region or the presence of pathogenic mutations. Candidate genes that have been tested so far include cFOS, heat shock protein 70 member (HSF2A), transforming growth factor beta (TGFB3), the trifunctional protein C1-THF synthase (MTHFD), bradykinin receptor (BR), and the E2k component of a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. HSP2A, E2k, MTHFD, and BR do not map to the current defined minimal candidate region; however, sequence analysis must be performed to confirm exclusion of these genes as true candidates. Meanwhile, no pathogenic mutations have yet been found in cFOS or TGFB3. We have also isolated a large number of novel transcribed sequences from the minimal candidate region in the form of {open_quotes}trapped exons{close_quotes} from cosmids identified by hybridization to select YAC clones; we are currently in the process of searching for pathogenic mutations in these exons in affected individuals from FAD families.

  17. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... My Area | Alzheimer's & Dementia | Life with ALZ | Research | Professionals | We Can Help | Join the Cause alz.org >> ... I am a caregiver I am a care professional I am a physician I am a researcher ...

  18. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... Alzheimer's Live Well Taking Care of Yourself Reducing Stress Tips for Daily Life Helping Family and Friends ... Glossary Caregiver Health Be a Healthy Caregiver Caregiver Stress Caregiver Stress Check Caregiver Depression Changes to Your ...

  19. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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  20. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... 277 billion, including $186 billion in Medicare and Medicaid payments. Unless something is done, in 2050, Alzheimer's ... increases both in government spending under Medicare and Medicaid and in out-of-pocket spending. The costs ...

  1. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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  3. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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    Full Text Available ... search by state In My Area | Alzheimer's & Dementia | Life with ALZ | Research | Professionals | We Can Help | Join ... individuals to prepare legal, financial and end-of-life plans while they are still cognitively able to ...

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    Full Text Available ... as many hospital stays per year as other older people. Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer's or other dementias are ... dementias make up a large proportion of all elderly people who receive adult day services and nursing ...

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  9. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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  11. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

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  • Early-stage attenuation of phase-amplitude coupling in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex in a transgenic rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; Beckett, Tina L; Koletar, Margaret M; Lai, Aaron Y; Joo, Illsung L; Brown, Mary E; Carlen, Peter L; McLaurin, JoAnne; Stefanovic, Bojana

    2018-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is pathologically characterized by amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, neurofibrillary tangle formation, and neurodegeneration. Preclinical studies on neuronal impairments associated with progressive amyloidosis have demonstrated some Aβ-dependent neuronal dysfunction including modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic signaling. The present work focuses on the early stage of disease progression and uses TgF344-AD rats that recapitulate a broad repertoire of AD-like pathologies to investigate the neuronal network functioning using simultaneous intracranial recordings from the hippocampus (HPC) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), followed by pathological analyses of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA A ) receptor subunits α1 , α5, and δ, and glutamic acid decarboxylases (GAD65 and GAD67). Concomitant to amyloid deposition and tau hyperphosphorylation, low-gamma band power was strongly attenuated in the HPC and mPFC of TgF344-AD rats in comparison to those in non-transgenic littermates. In addition, the phase-amplitude coupling of the neuronal networks in both areas was impaired, evidenced by decreased modulation of theta band phase on gamma band amplitude in TgF344-AD animals. Finally, the gamma coherence between HPC and mPFC was attenuated as well. These results demonstrate significant neuronal network dysfunction at an early stage of AD-like pathology. This network dysfunction precedes the onset of cognitive deficits and is likely driven by Aβ and tau pathologies. This article is part of the Special Issue "Vascular Dementia". © 2017 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Journal of Neurochemistry © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  • Diagnostic performance of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT for early and late onset Alzheimer's disease. A clinical evaluation of linearization correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsumoto, Tatsuya; Sakaguchi, Yuichi; Morishita, Junji; Sasaki, Masayuki; Ohya, Nobuyoshi; Abe, Koichiro; Ichimiya, Atsushi; Kiyota, Aya

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the influence of linearization correction (LC) on brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The early onset group (<65 years old) consisted of 10 patients with AD, and the late onset group (≥65 years old) of 13 patients with AD. Age-matched controls included seven younger and seven older normal volunteers. Tc-99m hexamethyl propyleneamine oxine (HMPAO) SPECT images were reconstructed with or without LC [LC (+) or LC (-)] and a statistical analysis was performed using a three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP). In addition, a fully automatic diagnostic system was developed, which calculated the proportion of the number of abnormal pixels in the superior and inferior parietal lobule, as well as in the precuneus and posterior cingulate gyrus. The areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUCs) of the early onset group for conventional axial SPECT images, SPECT+3D-SSP images and the fully automatic diagnostic system were 0.71, 0.88, and 0.92 in LC (-) and 0.67, 0.85, and 0.91 in LC (+), respectively. The AUCs of the late onset group were 0.50, 0.61, and 0.79 in LC (-) and 0.49, 0.67, and 0.85 in LC (+), respectively. LC on Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT did not significantly influence the diagnostic performance for differentiating between AD and normal controls in either early or late onset AD. Further examination with individuals suffering from very mild dementia is, therefore, expected to elucidate the effect of LC on minimally hypoperfused areas. (author)

  • Demonstration of a reduction in muscarinic receptor binding in early Alzheimer's disease using iodine-123 dexetimide single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, J.J.; Dubois, E.A.; Booij, J.; Habraken, J.; Munck, J.C. van; Herk, M. van; Verbeeten, B. Jr.; Royen, E.A. van

    1997-01-01

    Decreased muscarinic receptor binding has been suggested in single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies of Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unclear whether these changes are present in mildly demented patients, and the role of cortical atrophy in receptor binding assessment has not been investigated. We studied muscarinic receptor binding normalized to neostriatum with SPET using [ 123 I[4-iododexetimide in five mildly affected patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and in five age-matched control subjects. Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed in a consensus procedure blind to clinical diagnosis using matched magnetic resonance (MRI) images. Cortical atrophy was assessed by calculating percentages of cerebrospinal fluid in each ROI. An observer study with three observers was conducted to validate this method. Alzheimer patients showed statistically significantly less [ 123 I[4-iododexetimide binding in left temporal and right temporo-parietal cortex compared with controls, independent of age, sex and cortical atrophy. Mean intra-observer variability was 3.6% and inter-observer results showed consistent differences in [ 123 I[4-iododexetimide binding between observers. However, differences between patients and controls were comparable among observers and statistically significant in the same regions as in the consensus procedure. Using an MRI-SPET matching technique, we conclude that [ 123 I[4-iododexetimide binding is reduced in patients with mild probable Alzheimer's disease in areas of temporal and temporo-parietal cortex. (orig.). With 1 fig., 4 tabs

  • Imaging epigenetics in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista, Simone; Garaci, Francesco G; Toschi, Nicola; Hampel, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a prevalent, complex and chronically progressive brain disease. Its course is non-linear, dynamic, adaptive to maladaptive, and compensatory to decompensatory, affecting large-scale neural networks through a plethora of mechanistic and signaling pathway alterations that converge into regional and cell type-specific neurodegeneration and, finally, into clinically overt cognitive and behavioral decline. This decline includes reductions in the activities of daily living, quality of life, independence, and life expectancy. Evolving lines of research suggest that epigenetic mechanisms may play a crucial role during AD development and progression. Epigenetics designates molecular mechanisms that alter gene expression without modifications of the genetic code. This topic includes modifications on DNA and histone proteins, the primary elements of chromatin structure. Accumulating evidence has revealed the relevant processes that mediate epigenetic modifications and has begun to elucidate how these processes are apparently dysregulated in AD. This evidence has led to the clarification of the roles of specific classes of therapeutic compounds that affect epigenetic pathways and characteristics of the epigenome. This insight is accompanied by the development of new methods for studying the global patterns of DNA methylation and chromatin alterations. In particular, high-throughput sequencing approaches, such as next-generation DNA sequencing techniques, are beginning to drive the field into the next stage of development. In parallel, genetic imaging is beginning to answer additional questions through its ability to uncover genetic variants, with or without genome-wide significance, that are related to brain structure, function and metabolism, which impact disease risk and fundamental network-based cognitive processes. Neuroimaging measures can further be used to define AD systems and endophenotypes. The integration of genetic neuroimaging

  • Astrocytes in physiological aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Arellano, J J; Parpura, V; Zorec, R; Verkhratsky, A

    2016-05-26

    Astrocytes are fundamental for homoeostasis, defence and regeneration of the central nervous system. Loss of astroglial function and astroglial reactivity contributes to the aging of the brain and to neurodegenerative diseases. Changes in astroglia in aging and neurodegeneration are highly heterogeneous and region-specific. In animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) astrocytes undergo degeneration and atrophy at the early stages of pathological progression, which possibly may alter the homeostatic reserve of the brain and contribute to early cognitive deficits. At later stages of AD reactive astrocytes are associated with neurite plaques, the feature commonly found in animal models and in human diseased tissue. In animal models of the AD reactive astrogliosis develops in some (e.g. in the hippocampus) but not in all regions of the brain. For instance, in entorhinal and prefrontal cortices astrocytes do not mount gliotic response to emerging β-amyloid deposits. These deficits in reactivity coincide with higher vulnerability of these regions to AD-type pathology. Astroglial morphology and function can be regulated through environmental stimulation and/or medication suggesting that astrocytes can be regarded as a target for therapies aimed at the prevention and cure of neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Early-versus Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease: Long-Term Functional Outcomes, Nursing Home Placement, and Risk Factors for Rate of Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattmo, Carina; Wallin, Åsa K

    2017-01-01

    Whether age at onset influences functional deterioration in Alzheimer disease (AD) is unclear. We, therefore, investigated risk factors for progression in activities of daily living (ADL) and nursing home placement (NHP) in cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI)-treated patients with early-onset AD (EOAD) versus late-onset AD (LOAD). This 3-year, prospective, observational, multicenter study included 1,017 participants with mild-to-moderate AD; 143 had EOAD (onset factors that could affect functional outcome and NHP were analyzed using mixed-effects models and logistic regression, respectively. Younger individuals exhibited longer illness duration before AD diagnosis, whereas 6-month functional response to ChEI therapy, 3-year changes in ADL capacities, time from diagnosis to NHP, and survival time in nursing homes were similar between the groups. In LOAD, a higher ChEI dose, no antidepressant use, and lower education level were protective factors for slower instrumental ADL (IADL) decline. In EOAD, antihypertensives/cardiac therapy implied faster IADL progression but lower risk of NHP. This study highlights the clinical importance of an earlier diagnosis and treatment initiation and the need for functional evaluations in EOAD. Despite the age differences between EOAD and LOAD, a similar need for nursing homes was observed.

  • Early- versus Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease: Long-Term Functional Outcomes, Nursing Home Placement, and Risk Factors for Rate of Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Wattmo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Whether age at onset influences functional deterioration in Alzheimer disease (AD is unclear. We, therefore, investigated risk factors for progression in activities of daily living (ADL and nursing home placement (NHP in cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI-treated patients with early-onset AD (EOAD versus late-onset AD (LOAD. Methods: This 3-year, prospective, observational, multicenter study included 1,017 participants with mild-to-moderate AD; 143 had EOAD (onset <65 years and 874 LOAD (onset ≥65 years. Possible sociodemographic and clinical factors that could affect functional outcome and NHP were analyzed using mixed-effects models and logistic regression, respectively. Results: Younger individuals exhibited longer illness duration before AD diagnosis, whereas 6-month functional response to ChEI therapy, 3-year changes in ADL capacities, time from diagnosis to NHP, and survival time in nursing homes were similar between the groups. In LOAD, a higher ChEI dose, no antidepressant use, and lower education level were protective factors for slower instrumental ADL (IADL decline. In EOAD, antihypertensives/cardiac therapy implied faster IADL progression but lower risk of NHP. Conclusion: This study highlights the clinical importance of an earlier diagnosis and treatment initiation and the need for functional evaluations in EOAD. Despite the age differences between EOAD and LOAD, a similar need for nursing homes was observed.

    1. Deletion of exons 9 and 10 of the Presenilin 1 gene in a patient with Early-onset Alzheimer Disease generates longer amyloid seeds.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Le Guennec, Kilan; Veugelen, Sarah; Quenez, Olivier; Szaruga, Maria; Rousseau, Stéphane; Nicolas, Gaël; Wallon, David; Fluchere, Frédérique; Frébourg, Thierry; De Strooper, Bart; Campion, Dominique; Chávez-Gutiérrez, Lucía; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne

      2017-08-01

      Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) mutations are the main cause of autosomal dominant Early-onset Alzheimer Disease (EOAD). Among them, deletions of exon 9 have been reported to be associated with a phenotype of spastic paraparesis. Using exome data from a large sample of 522 EOAD cases and 584 controls to search for genomic copy-number variations (CNVs), we report here a novel partial, in-frame deletion of PSEN1, removing both exons 9 and 10. The patient presented with memory impairment associated with spastic paraparesis, both starting from the age of 56years. He presented a positive family history of EOAD. We performed functional analysis to elucidate the impact of this novel deletion on PSEN1 activity as part of the γ-secretase complex. The deletion does not affect the assembly of a mature protease complex but has an extreme impact on its global endopeptidase activity. The mutant carboxypeptidase-like activity is also strongly impaired and the deleterious mutant effect leads to an incomplete digestion of long Aβ peptides and enhances the production of Aβ43, which has been shown to be potently amyloidogenic and neurotoxic in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    2. Identification of a novel PSEN1 mutation (Leu232Pro) in a Korean patient with early-onset Alzheimer's disease and a family history of dementia.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Park, Jiyun; An, Seong Soo A; Giau, Vo Van; Shim, Kyuhwan; Youn, Young Chul; Bagyinszky, Eva; Kim, SangYun

      2017-08-01

      In the present study, a novel mutation in exon 7 of presenilin 1 (Leu232Pro) was discovered in a Korean patient with early-onset Alzheimer's disease, who represented memory decline at 37 years of age, followed by impairment in spatial activity and concentrations and personality changes. Imaging analyses with magnetic resonance scan showed diffuse atrophy in the frontoparietal regions. Targeted next generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing identified a heterozygous T to C transition at position 695 (c.695T>C) of in presenilin 1 gene (PSEN1), resulting in a novel missense mutation at codon 232 from leucine to proline (L232P). Several family members of the patient developed dementia, suggesting an autosomal dominant inheritance; however, we were unable to perform a segregation analysis to confirm this. Since the proline may play a role as a helix breaker, this mutation could significantly disturb the transmembrane helix domain-V of PSEN1 and perturb its protein functions. This hypothesis was supported by the results from the in silico analyses, predicted a major kink on this helix. Several leucine>proline substitutions in other PSEN1 transmembrane helices revealed aggressive AD phenotypes. Future functional studies would be needed to evaluate the pathogenicity of this mutation in AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    3. [Anti-ageing therapies in Alzheimer's disease].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Alonso Abreu, Gara S; Brito Armas, José M; Castro Fuentes, Rafael

      Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly population. Currently, there are no effective treatments to prevent or delay the natural course of the disease. Numerous studies have provided information about the molecular processes underlying biological ageing and, perhaps more importantly, potential interventions to slow ageing and promote healthy longevity in laboratory model systems. The main issue addressed in this review is whether an intervention that has anti-ageing properties can alter the appearance and/or progression of Alzheimer's disease, a disease in which age is the biggest risk factor. Different anti-ageing interventions have been shown to prevent (and in some cases possibly restore) several parameters recognised as central symptoms to the development of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, they are taking the first steps towards translating these laboratory discoveries into clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

    4. The olfactory deficit and fMRI in the Alzheimer's disease

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Yin Jianzhong; Wang Jianli; Yang Qingxian; Qi Ji

      2008-01-01

      Olfactory deficit is a common symptom occurring at the early stage of Alzheimer's disease, the purpose of this review is to summarize MRI research on olfactory deficit in the Alzheimer's disease and potential clinical relevance of fMRI in this area. (authors)

    5. [Anesthesia and Alzheimer disease - Current perceptions].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Marques, Ana Filipa Vieira da Silva Ferreira; Lapa, Teresa Alexandra Santos Carvalho

      It has been speculated that the use of anesthetic agents may be a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer disease. The objective of this review is to describe and discuss pre-clinical and clinical data related to anesthesia and this disease. Alzheimer disease affects about 5% of the population over 65 years old, with age being the main risk factor and being associated with a high morbidity. Current evidence questions a possible association between anesthesia, surgery, and long-term cognitive effects, including Alzheimer disease. Although data from some animal studies suggest an association between anesthesia and neurotoxicity, this link remains inconclusive in humans. We performed a review of the literature in which we selected scientific articles in the PubMed database, published between 2005 and 2016 (one article from 1998 due to its historical relevance), in English, which address the possible relationship between anesthesia and Alzheimer disease. 49 articles were selected. The possible relationship between anesthetic agents, cognitive dysfunction, and Alzheimer disease remains to be clarified. Prospective cohort studies or randomized clinical trials for a better understanding of this association will be required. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

    6. Metabolite profiling of Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Christian Czech

      Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of cognitive functions. Today the diagnosis of AD relies on clinical evaluations and is only late in the disease. Biomarkers for early detection of the underlying neuropathological changes are still lacking and the biochemical pathways leading to the disease are still not completely understood. The aim of this study was to identify the metabolic changes resulting from the disease phenotype by a thorough and systematic metabolite profiling approach. For this purpose CSF samples from 79 AD patients and 51 healthy controls were analyzed by gas and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS and LC-MS/MS in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. In total 343 different analytes have been identified. Significant changes in the metabolite profile of AD patients compared to healthy controls have been identified. Increased cortisol levels seemed to be related to the progression of AD and have been detected in more severe forms of AD. Increased cysteine associated with decreased uridine was the best paired combination to identify light AD (MMSE>22 with specificity and sensitivity above 75%. In this group of patients, sensitivity and specificity above 80% were obtained for several combinations of three to five metabolites, including cortisol and various amino acids, in addition to cysteine and uridine.

    7. Fully automatic diagnostic system for early- and late-onset mild Alzheimer's disease using FDG PET and 3D-SSP

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Ishii, Kazunari; Kono, Atsushi K.; Sasaki, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Naokazu; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Sakamoto, Setsu; Mori, Etsuro

      2006-01-01

      The purpose of this study was to design a fully automatic computer-assisted diagnostic system for early- and late-onset mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Glucose metabolic images were obtained from mild AD patients and normal controls using positron emission tomography (PET) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Two groups of 20 mild AD patients with different ages of onset were examined. A fully automatic diagnostic system using the statistical brain mapping method was established from the early-onset (EO) and late-onset (LO) groups, with mean ages of 59.1 and 70.9 years and mean MMSE scores of 23.3 and 22.8, respectively. Aged-matched normal subjects were used as controls. We compared the diagnostic performance of visual inspection of conventional axial FDG PET images by experts and beginners with that of our fully automatic diagnostic system in another 15 EO and 15 LO AD patients (mean age 58.4 and 71.7, mean MMSE 23.6 and 23.1, respectively) and 30 age-matched normal controls. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to compare data. The diagnostic performance of the automatic diagnostic system was comparable with that of visual inspection by experts. The area under the ROC curve for the automatic diagnostic system was 0.967 for EO AD patients and 0.878 for LO AD patients. The mean area under the ROC curve for visual inspection by experts was 0.863 and 0.881 for the EO and LO AD patients, respectively. The mean area under the ROC curve for visual inspection by beginners was 0.828 and 0.717, respectively. The fully automatic diagnostic system for EO and LO AD was able to perform at a similar diagnostic level to visual inspection of conventional axial images by experts. (orig.)

    8. Cerebral blood flow of patients with age-associated memory impairment and the early stage of Alzheimer's disease. A study by SPECT using the ARG method

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Ishiwata, Akiko; Kitamura, Shin; Nagazumi, Atushi; Terashi, Akiro

      1998-01-01

      In order to further understand the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we have utilized image analysis in diagnosing the early stages of AD in patients with cognitive disorders. CT and MRI, however, have not been feasible since only atrophy is seen and it is difficult to differentiate the changes in AD from age associated changes. In this study we tried to determine whether regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurements using single photon emission CT (SPECT) are feasible for the early diagnosis of AD. Regional CBF (rCBF) was measured using SPECT in three subject groups: Age-associated memory impairment (AAMI, n=9), mild AD (n=16), and normal aged patients (mean age=68.3; n=20). The subjects were then observed for three years. The region of interest (ROI) for the medial temporal lobe was set at OM-30deg to cover the maximum area of the hippocampus. The absolute values of rCBF in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes and the cerebellum were significantly lower in the mild AD subjects than in the normal aged subjects. A significant decrease in rCBF was also seen in the medial temporal lobe in both the AD and the AAMI subjects compared to the normal controls. During the three years of follow up, no cases of dementia were seen in the AAMI subjects. However, there were two patients who appeared to have difficulty in adapting to daily life due to amnesia, one with a decrease in rCBF of the medial temporal lobe on the second SPECT, and the other showing a low rCBF the first time. This study suggests that AAMI subjects may comprise both AD and normal subjects. Therefore a more prospective study is needed. (author)

    9. Reduced benefit from mnemonic strategies in early-stage Alzheimer's disease: a brief testing-the-limits paradigm for clinical practice.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Uttner, Ingo; Schurig, Niklas; von Arnim, Christine A F; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Christian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Riepe, Matthias W

      2010-10-01

      Discriminating incipient Alzheimer's disease (AD) from major depression (MD) and age related memory decline is a challenge in clinical practice. Since AD is characterized by an early loss of neuronal and functional plasticity, a dynamic test strategy, such as the testing-the-limits (TtL) approach, that measures learning capacity can be a helpful diagnostic tool. To evaluate this, a short recognition paradigm consisting of a pre-test (baseline) and two post-test conditions with an interposed encoding instruction was developed and administered to individuals with incipient AD (n = 19; Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 26.5), patients with depressive disorders (n = 11; MMSE 30), and healthy controls (n = 11; MMSE 30). In addition, participants completed a set of traditional neuropsychological tests that focused on the subjects' cognitive baseline performance. Intergroup comparisons (Kruskal-Wallis, U test) revealed significantly higher post-test failure rates in AD patients. Pre-test performance of MD and AD patients did not differ. Intra-group comparisons (Friedman, Wilcoxon test) showed that all three subject samples benefit from intervention in post-test 1. In contrast to MD and healthy individuals, who revealed significantly lower failure rates in post-test 2 compared to the pre-test, AD patients did not improve. Out of the 15 traditional test scores obtained, only two discriminated simultaneously between AD and each of the other groups. Our data confirm the finding of an impaired cognitive plasticity already present in very early stages of AD and illustrate the efficiency of a dynamic test approach in identifying incipient dementia.

    10. Differences of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT imaging in the early stage of subcortical vascular dementia compared with Alzheimer's disease

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Park, Kyung Won; Kang, Do Young; Park, Min Jeong; Cheon, Sang Myung; Cha, Jae Kwan; Kim, Sang Ho; Kim, Jae Woo [College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

      2007-12-15

      The aim of this study is to assess the specific patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with the early stage of subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) using Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT, and to compare the differences between the two conditions. Sixteen SVaD, 46 AD and 12 control subjects participated in this study. We included the patients with SVaD and AD according to NINCDS-ADRDA and NINDS-AIREN criteria. They were all matched for age, education and clinical dementia rating scores. Three groups were evaluated by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for measuring rCBF. The SPECT data of patients with SVaD and AD were compared with those of normal control subjects and then compared with each other. SPM analysis of the SPECT image showed significant perfusion deficits on the right temporal region and thalamus, left insula and superior temporal gyrus, both cingulate gyri and frontal subgyri in patients with SVaD and on the left supramarginal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, postcentral gyrus and inferior parietal lobule, right fugiform gyrus and both cingulate gyri in AD compared with control subjects (uncorrected {rho} < 0.01). SVaD patients revealed significant hypoperfusion in the right parahippocampal gyrus with cingulated gyrus, left insula and both frontal subgyral regions compared with AD (uncorrected {rho} < 0.01). Our study shows characteristic and different pattern of perfusion deficits in patients with SVaD and AD, and these results may be helpful to discriminate the two conditions in the early stage of illness.

    11. Unraveling Alzheimer?s: Making Sense of the Relationship between Diabetes and Alzheimer?s Disease 1

      OpenAIRE

      Schilling, Melissa A.

      2016-01-01

      Numerous studies have documented a strong association between diabetes and Alzheimer?s disease (AD). The nature of the relationship, however, has remained a puzzle, in part because of seemingly incongruent findings. For example, some studies have concluded that insulin deficiency is primarily at fault, suggesting that intranasal insulin or inhibiting the insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) could be beneficial. Other research has concluded that hyperinsulinemia is to blame, which implies that intra...

    12. Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Loss of Synaptic Akt1 Signaling Leads to Deficient Activity-Dependent Protein Translation Early in Alzheimer's Disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ahmad, Faraz; Singh, Kunal; Das, Debajyoti; Gowaikar, Ruturaj; Shaw, Eisha; Ramachandran, Arathy; Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Kommaddi, Reddy Peera; Bennett, David A; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

      2017-12-01

      Synaptic deficits are known to underlie the cognitive dysfunction seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by β-amyloid has also been implicated in AD pathogenesis. However, it is unclear whether ROS contributes to synaptic dysfunction seen in AD pathogenesis and, therefore, we examined whether altered redox signaling could contribute to synaptic deficits in AD. Activity dependent but not basal translation was impaired in synaptoneurosomes from 1-month old presymptomatic APP Swe /PS1ΔE9 (APP/PS1) mice, and this deficit was sustained till middle age (MA, 9-10 months). ROS generation leads to oxidative modification of Akt1 in the synapse and consequent reduction in Akt1-mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, leading to deficiency in activity-dependent protein translation. Moreover, we found a similar loss of activity-dependent protein translation in synaptoneurosomes from postmortem AD brains. Loss of activity-dependent protein translation occurs presymptomatically early in the pathogenesis of AD. This is caused by ROS-mediated loss of pAkt1, leading to reduced synaptic Akt1-mTOR signaling and is rescued by overexpression of Akt1. ROS-mediated damage is restricted to the synaptosomes, indicating selectivity. We demonstrate that ROS-mediated oxidative modification of Akt1 contributes to synaptic dysfunction in AD, seen as loss of activity-dependent protein translation that is essential for synaptic plasticity and maintenance. Therapeutic strategies promoting Akt1-mTOR signaling at synapses may provide novel target(s) for disease-modifying therapy in AD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1269-1280.

    13. Differing astrocytic cytoskeleton alterations in alzheimer's disease

      Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

      Olabarria, M.; Noristani, H.; Chvátal, Alexandr; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio

      2009-01-01

      Roč. 57, č. 13 (2009), S103-S104 ISSN 0894-1491. [European Meeting on Glial Cells in Health and Disease /9./. 09.09.2009-12.09.2009, Paris] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

    14. Llama VHH as immunotherapeutics in Alzheimer's disease

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Dorresteijn, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31401635X

      2013-01-01

      Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among elderly in the Western world. AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disease where patients starting with episodic memory problems end up completely bedridden and care dependent. At present there is no real therapy stopping or

    15. Alzheimer's disease therapies: Selected advances and future ...

      African Journals Online (AJOL)

      Among the neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents one of the biggest challenges that the modern health care system has to deal with. The lack of data about the etiology and the complexity of the underlying pathogenesis constitute the biggest struggle facing the development of new therapeutical ...

    16. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

      Medline Plus

      Full Text Available ... caregivers are "sandwich generation" caregivers — meaning that they care not only for an aging parent, but also for children under age 18. Alzheimer's takes a devastating toll on caregivers. Compared with caregivers of people ... long-term care expenses or from the value of unpaid care. ...

    17. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

      Medline Plus

      Full Text Available ... Almost two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer's are women. Older African-Americans are about twice as likely ... or older. Approximately two-thirds of caregivers are women; more specifically, over one-third of dementia caregivers ...

    18. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

      Medline Plus

      Full Text Available ... About one in three caregivers (34 percent) is age 65 or older. Approximately two-thirds of caregivers are women; more specifically, over one-third of dementia caregivers are daughters. Approximately one-quarter of ... under age 18. Alzheimer's takes a devastating toll on caregivers. ...

    19. Current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Osborn, Gerald G; Saunders, Amanda Vaughn

      2010-09-01

      There is neither proven effective prevention for Alzheimer disease nor a cure for patients with this disorder. Nevertheless, a spectrum of biopsychosocial therapeutic measures is available for slowing progression of the illness and enhancing quality of life for patients. These measures include a range of educational, psychological, social, and behavioral interventions that remain fundamental to effective care. Also available are a number of pharmacologic treatments, including prescription medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Alzheimer disease, "off-label" uses of medications to manage target symptoms, and controversial complementary therapies. Physicians must make the earliest possible diagnosis to use these treatments most effectively. Physicians' goals should be to educate patients and their caregivers, to plan long-term care options, to maximally manage concurrent illnesses, to slow and ameliorate the most disabling symptoms, and to preserve effective functioning for as long as possible. The authors review the various current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

    20. Extensive proteomic screening identifies the obesity-related NYGGF4 protein as a novel LRP1-interactor, showing reduced expression in early Alzheimer's disease

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Taddei Kevin

      2010-01-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background The low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 (LRP1 has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD but its signalling has not been fully evaluated. There is good evidence that the cytoplasmic domain of LRP1 is involved in protein-protein interactions, important in the cell biology of LRP1. Results We carried out three yeast two-hybrid screens to identify proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of LRP1. The screens included both conventional screens as well as a novel, split-ubiquitin-based screen in which an LRP1 construct was expressed and screened as a transmembrane protein. The split-ubiquitin screen was validated in a screen using full-length amyloid protein precursor (APP, which successfully identified FE65 and FE65L2, as well as novel interactors (Rab3a, Napg, and ubiquitin b. Using both a conventional screen as well as the split-ubiquitin screen, we identified NYGGF4 as a novel LRP1 interactor. The interaction between LRP1 and NYGGF4 was validated using two-hybrid assays, coprecipitation and colocalization in mammalian cells. Mutation analysis demonstrated a specific interaction of NYGGF4 with an NPXY motif that required an intact tyrosine residue. Interestingly, while we confirmed that other LRP1 interactors we identified, including JIP1B and EB-1, were also able to bind to APP, NYGGF4 was unique in that it showed specific binding with LRP1. Expression of NYGGF4 decreased significantly in patients with AD as compared to age-matched controls, and showed decreasing expression with AD disease progression. Examination of Nyggf4 expression in mice with different alleles of the human APOE4 gene showed significant differences in Nyggf4 expression. Conclusions These results implicate NYGGF4 as a novel and specific interactor of LRP1. Decreased expression of LRP1 and NYGGF4 over disease, evident with the presence of even moderate numbers of neuritic plaques, suggests that LRP1-NYGGF4 is a system altered

    1. FKBP immunophilins and Alzheimer's disease: A chaperoned affair

      Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

      2011-07-08

      Jul 8, 2011 ... FKBP immunophilins and Alzheimer's disease: A chaperoned affair. Weihuan Cao Mary ... Keywords. Alzheimer's disease; amyloid precursor protein; beta amyloid; FKBP; FK506; immunophilins; tau ... 43 | Issue 1. March 2018.

    2. The pilot European Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Frisoni, G.B.; Henneman, W.J.; Weiner, M.W.

      2008-01-01

      BACKGROUND: In North America, the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has established a platform to track the brain changes of Alzheimer's disease. A pilot study has been carried out in Europe to test the feasibility of the adoption of the ADNI platform (pilot E-ADNI). METHODS: Seven...... academic sites of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium (EADC) enrolled 19 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 22 with AD, and 18 older healthy persons by using the ADNI clinical and neuropsychological battery. ADNI compliant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, cerebrospinal fluid...

    3. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease: Definition, natural history, and diagnostic criteria.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Dubois, Bruno; Hampel, Harald; Feldman, Howard H; Scheltens, Philip; Aisen, Paul; Andrieu, Sandrine; Bakardjian, Hovagim; Benali, Habib; Bertram, Lars; Blennow, Kaj; Broich, Karl; Cavedo, Enrica; Crutch, Sebastian; Dartigues, Jean-François; Duyckaerts, Charles; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Gauthier, Serge; Genthon, Remy; Gouw, Alida A; Habert, Marie-Odile; Holtzman, David M; Kivipelto, Miia; Lista, Simone; Molinuevo, José-Luis; O'Bryant, Sid E; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rowe, Christopher; Salloway, Stephen; Schneider, Lon S; Sperling, Reisa; Teichmann, Marc; Carrillo, Maria C; Cummings, Jeffrey; Jack, Cliff R

      2016-03-01

      During the past decade, a conceptual shift occurred in the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) considering the disease as a continuum. Thanks to evolving biomarker research and substantial discoveries, it is now possible to identify the disease even at the preclinical stage before the occurrence of the first clinical symptoms. This preclinical stage of AD has become a major research focus as the field postulates that early intervention may offer the best chance of therapeutic success. To date, very little evidence is established on this "silent" stage of the disease. A clarification is needed about the definitions and lexicon, the limits, the natural history, the markers of progression, and the ethical consequence of detecting the disease at this asymptomatic stage. This article is aimed at addressing all the different issues by providing for each of them an updated review of the literature and evidence, with practical recommendations. Copyright © 2016 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    4. Survival of Alzheimer's disease patients in Korea.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Go, Seok Min; Lee, Kang Soo; Seo, Sang Won; Chin, Juhee; Kang, Sue J; Moon, So Young; Na, Duk L; Cheong, Hae-Kwan

      2013-01-01

      The natural history of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has rarely been studied in the Korean population. Our study on survival analyses in Korean AD patients potentially provides a basis for cross-cultural comparisons. We studied 724 consecutive patients from a memory disorder clinic in a tertiary hospital in Seoul, who were diagnosed as having AD between April 1995 and December 2005. Deaths were identified by the Statistics Korea database. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis, and a Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess factors related to patient survival. The overall median survival from the onset of first symptoms and from the time of diagnosis was 12.6 years (95% confidence interval 11.7-13.4) and 9.3 years (95% confidence interval 8.7-9.9), respectively. The age of onset, male gender, history of diabetes mellitus, lower Mini-Mental State Examination score, and higher Clinical Dementia Rating score were negatively associated with survival. There was a reversal of risk of AD between early-onset and later-onset AD, 9.1 years after onset. The results of our study show a different pattern of survival compared to those studies carried out with western AD populations. Mortality risk of early-onset AD varied depending on the duration of follow-up. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

    5. A Critical Proton MR Spectroscopy Marker of Alzheimer's Disease Early Neurodegenerative Change: Low Hippocampal NAA/Cr Ratio Impacts APOE ɛ4 Mexico City Children and Their Parents.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Melo-Sánchez, Gastón; Rodríguez-Díaz, Joel; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Styner, Martin; Mukherjee, Partha S; Lin, Weili; Jewells, Valerie

      2015-01-01

      Severe air pollution exposures produce systemic, respiratory, myocardial, and brain inflammation and Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmarks in clinically healthy children. We tested whether hippocampal metabolite ratios are associated with contrasting levels of air pollution, APOE, and body mass index (BMI) in paired healthy children and one parent sharing the same APOE alleles. We used 1H-MRS to interrogate bilateral hippocampal single-voxel in 57 children (12.45 ± 3.4 years) and their 48 parents (37.5 ± 6.78 years) from a low pollution city versus Mexico City (MC). NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr metabolite ratios were analyzed. The right hippocampus NAA/Cr ratio was significantly different between cohorts (p = 0.007). The NAA/Cr ratio in right hippocampus in controls versus APOE ɛ4 MC children and in left hippocampus in MC APOE ɛ4 parents versus their children was significantly different after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI (p = 0.027 and 0.01, respectively). The NAA/Cr ratio is considered reflective of neuronal density/functional integrity/loss of synapses/higher pTau burden, thus a significant decrease in hippocampal NAA/Cr ratios may constitute a spectral marker of early neurodegeneration in young urbanites. Decreases in NAA/Cr correlate well with cognitive function, behavioral symptoms, and dementia severity; thus, since the progression of AD starts decades before clinical diagnosis, our findings support the hypothesis that under chronic exposures to fine particulate matter and ozone above the standards, neurodegenerative processes start in childhood and APOE ɛ4 carriers are at higher risk. Gene and environmental factors are critical in the development of AD and the identification and neuroprotection of young urbanites at high risk must become a public health priority.

    6. Insight on AV-45 binding in white and grey matter from histogram analysis: a study on early Alzheimer's disease patients and healthy subjects

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Nemmi, Federico; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Peran, Patrice; Adel, Djilali; Salabert, Anne-Sophie; Payoux, Pierre; Pariente, Jeremie; Barbeau, Emmanuel J.

      2014-01-01

      AV-45 amyloid biomarker is known to show uptake in white matter in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), but also in the healthy population. This binding, thought to be of a non-specific lipophilic nature, has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the differential pattern of AV-45 binding in white matter in healthy and pathological populations. We recruited 24 patients presenting with AD at an early stage and 17 matched, healthy subjects. We used an optimized positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) registration method and an approach based on an intensity histogram using several indices. We compared the results of the intensity histogram analyses with a more canonical approach based on target-to-cerebellum Standard Uptake Value (SUVr) in white and grey matter using MANOVA and discriminant analyses. A cluster analysis on white and grey matter histograms was also performed. White matter histogram analysis revealed significant differences between AD and healthy subjects, which were not revealed by SUVr analysis. However, white matter histograms were not decisive to discriminate groups, and indices based on grey matter only showed better discriminative power than SUVr. The cluster analysis divided our sample into two clusters, showing different uptakes in grey, but also in white matter. These results demonstrate that AV-45 binding in white matter conveys subtle information not detectable using the SUVr approach. Although it is not more efficient than standard SUVr in discriminating AD patients from healthy subjects, this information could reveal white matter modifications. (orig.)

    7. Maximal COX-2 and ppRb expression in neurons occurs during early Braak stages prior to the maximal activation of astrocytes and microglia in Alzheimer's disease

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Arendt Thomas

      2005-11-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Neuronal expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and cell cycle proteins is suggested to contribute to neurodegeneration during Alzheimer's disease (AD. The stimulus that induces COX-2 and cell cycle protein expression in AD is still elusive. Activated glia cells are shown to secrete substances that can induce expression of COX-2 and cell cycle proteins in vitro. Using post mortem brain tissue we have investigated whether activation of microglia and astrocytes in AD brain can be correlated with the expression of COX-2 and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (ppRb. The highest levels of neuronal COX-2 and ppRb immunoreactivity are observed in the first stages of AD pathology (Braak 0–II, Braak A. No significant difference in COX-2 or ppRb neuronal immunoreactivity is observed between Braak stage 0 and later Braak stages for neurofibrillary changes or amyloid plaques. The mean number of COX-2 or ppRb immunoreactive neurons is significantly decreased in Braak stage C compared to Braak stage A for amyloid deposits. Immunoreactivity for glial markers KP1, CR3/43 and GFAP appears in the later Braak stages and is significantly increased in Braak stage V-VI compared to Braak stage 0 for neurofibrillary changes. In addition, a significant negative correlation is observed between the presence of KP1, CR3/43 and GFAP immunoreactivity and the presence of neuronal immunoreactivity for COX-2 and ppRb. These data show that maximal COX-2 and ppRb immunoreactivity in neurons occurs during early Braak stages prior to the maximal activation of astrocytes and microglia. In contrast to in vitro studies, post mortem data do not support a causal relation between the activation of microglia and astrocytes and the expression of neuronal COX-2 and ppRb in the pathological cascade of AD.

    8. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus basalis of Meynert attenuates early EEG components associated with defective sensory gating in patients with Alzheimer disease - a two-case study.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Dürschmid, Stefan; Reichert, Christoph; Kuhn, Jens; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen

      2017-10-20

      Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with deterioration of memory and cognitive function and a degeneration of neurons of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM). The NBM is the major input source of acetylcholine (ACh) to the cortex. The decreasing cholinergic innervation of the cortex due to degeneration of the NBM might be the cause of loss of memory function. NBM-Deep brain stimulation (NBM-DBS) is considered to serve as a potential therapeutic option for patients with AD by supporting residual cholinergic transmission to stabilize oscillatory activity in memory-relevant circuits. However, whether DBS could improve sensory memory functions in patients with AD is not clear. Here, in a passive auditory oddball paradigm, patients with AD (N = 2) listened to repetitive background tones (standard tones) randomly interrupted by frequency deviants in two blocks with NBM-DBS OFF and then NBM-DBS ON, while age-matched healthy controls (N = 6) repeated the experiment twice. The mismatch negativity in NBM-DBS OFF significantly differed from controls in both blocks, but not under NBM-DBS, which was likely due to a pronounced P50 increase overlapping with the N1 in NBM-DBS OFF. This early complex of EEG components recovered under stimulation to a normal level as defined by responses in controls. In this temporal interval, we found in patients with NBM-DBS ON (but not with NBM-DBS OFF) and in controls a strong repetition suppression effect to standard tones - with more attenuated responses to frequently repeated standard tones. This highlights the role of NBM-DBS for sensory gating of familiar auditory information into sensory memory. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

    9. Lycopene mitigates β-amyloid induced inflammatory response and inhibits NF-κB signaling at the choroid plexus in early stages of Alzheimer's disease rats.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Liu, Chong-Bin; Wang, Rui; Yi, Yan-Feng; Gao, Zhen; Chen, Yi-Zhu

      2018-03-01

      The choroid plexus is able to modulate the cognitive function, through changes in the neuroinflammatory response and in brain immune surveillance. However, whether lycopene is involved in inflammatory responses at the choroid plexus in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, and its molecular underpinnings are elusive. In this rat study, lycopene was used to investigate its protective effects on inflammation caused by β-amyloid. We characterized the learning and memory abilities, cytokine profiles of circulating TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6β in the serum and the expressions of Toll like receptor 4 and nuclear factor-κB p65 mRNA and protein at the choroid plexus. The results showed that functional deficits of learning and memory in lycopene treatment groups were significantly improved compared to the control group without lycopene treatment in water maze test. The levels of serum TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6β were significantly increased, and the expressions of TLR4 and NF-κB p65 mRNA and protein at the choroid plexus were up-regulated, indicating inflammation response was initiated following administration of Aβ 1-42 . After intragastric pretreatment with lycopene, inflammatory cytokines were significantly reduced and lycopene also reversed the Aβ 1-42 induced up-regulation of TLR4 and NF-κB p65 mRNA and protein expressions at the choroid plexus. These results provided a novel evidence that lycopene significantly improved cognitive deficits and were accompanied by the attenuation of inflammatory injury via blocking the activation of NF-κB p65 and TLR4 expressions and production of cytokines, thereby endorsing its usefulness for diminishing β-amyloid deposition in the hippocampus tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    10. Enhancing memory and activities of daily living in patients with early Alzheimer's disease using memory stimulation intervention: A randomized controlled trial

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Swati Bajpai

      2017-01-01

      Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of memory stimulation intervention added to donepezil treatment as compared to donepezil alone in patients with early Alzheimer's disease (eAD. Materials and Methods: Patients in the combined treatment group (CTG = 21 received standard dosages of donepezil and weekly memory stimulation activities sessions for 2 months, whereas the treatment as usual group (TAU = 22 received only standard dosages of donepezil. Each session had extensive tasks on memory and its implied practice on instrumental activities of daily living. After 8 sessions, both groups were evaluated for changes in memory and functional outcomes by administering the mini-mental state examination (MMSE, memory (Postgraduate Institute of Memory Scale, and instrumental activities of daily living scale (IADLS. This trial was registered on the Clinical Trials Registry - India (CTRI/2014/04/004550. Results: Statistical analysis was done using independent t-test, which revealed a significant difference between the groups on MMSE, memory, and IADLS post intervention. The MMSE score in the TAU group, while it increased in the CTG group by 4 points. A similar trend was evident in the memory and IADLS scores as well. Effect size in the CTG group was relatively large as compared to the TAU group where the effects were small and negative on some outcomes. Conclusion: The CTG group showed positive treatment effect on cognitive tests suggesting that combined memory stimulation and donepezil treatment has potential to improve the cognitive and functional performance of patients with eAD.

    11. Insight on AV-45 binding in white and grey matter from histogram analysis: a study on early Alzheimer's disease patients and healthy subjects

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Nemmi, Federico; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Peran, Patrice [Inserm, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Adel, Djilali; Salabert, Anne-Sophie; Payoux, Pierre [Inserm, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Pole Imagerie, Toulouse (France); Pariente, Jeremie [Inserm, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Service de Neurologie, Pole Neurosciences, Toulouse (France); Barbeau, Emmanuel J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Service de Neurologie, Pole Neurosciences, Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition, CNRS, CerCo, Toulouse (France)

      2014-07-15

      AV-45 amyloid biomarker is known to show uptake in white matter in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), but also in the healthy population. This binding, thought to be of a non-specific lipophilic nature, has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the differential pattern of AV-45 binding in white matter in healthy and pathological populations. We recruited 24 patients presenting with AD at an early stage and 17 matched, healthy subjects. We used an optimized positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) registration method and an approach based on an intensity histogram using several indices. We compared the results of the intensity histogram analyses with a more canonical approach based on target-to-cerebellum Standard Uptake Value (SUVr) in white and grey matter using MANOVA and discriminant analyses. A cluster analysis on white and grey matter histograms was also performed. White matter histogram analysis revealed significant differences between AD and healthy subjects, which were not revealed by SUVr analysis. However, white matter histograms were not decisive to discriminate groups, and indices based on grey matter only showed better discriminative power than SUVr. The cluster analysis divided our sample into two clusters, showing different uptakes in grey, but also in white matter. These results demonstrate that AV-45 binding in white matter conveys subtle information not detectable using the SUVr approach. Although it is not more efficient than standard SUVr in discriminating AD patients from healthy subjects, this information could reveal white matter modifications. (orig.)

    12. Lexical priming in Alzheimer's disease and aphasia.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Arroyo-Anlló, Eva Maria; Beauchamps, Mireille; Ingrand, Pierre; Neau, Jean Philippe; Gil, Roger

      2013-01-01

      Lexical priming was examined in patients with Alzheimer's disease and in aphasic patients. Control participants were divided into young and elderly [cf. Arroyo-Anlló et al.: Eur J Cogn Psychol 2004;16:535-553]. For lexical priming, a word-stem completion task was used. Normal elderly participants had lexical priming scores that were significantly lower than those of young individuals. Analysis of covariance with age and educational level as covariates showed that the control participants, aphasic and Alzheimer patients did not differ significantly on the lexical priming task. Our results suggest that performance in the lexical priming task diminishes with physiological aging, but is not significantly affected by mild or moderate Alzheimer's disease or by fluent or non-fluent aphasia. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

    13. The neural substrates of semantic memory deficits in early Alzheimer's disease: Clues from semantic priming effects and FDG-PET

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Giffard, B.; Laisney, M.; Mezenge, F.; De la Sayette, V.; Eustache, F.; Desgranges, B.

      2008-01-01

      The neural substrates responsible for semantic dysfunction during the early stages of AD have yet to be clearly identified. After a brief overview of the literature on normal and pathological semantic memory, we describe a new approach, designed to provide fresh insights into semantic deficits in AD. We mapped the correlations between resting-state brain glucose utilisation measured by FDG-PET and semantic priming scores in a group of 17 AD patients. The priming task, which yields a particularly pure measurement of semantic memory, was composed of related pairs of words sharing an attribute relationship (e.g. tiger-stripe). The priming scores correlated positively with the metabolism of the superior temporal areas on both sides, especially the right side, and this correlation was shown to be specific to the semantic priming effect.This pattern of results is discussed in the light of recent theoretical models of semantic memory, and suggests that a dysfunction of the right superior temporal cortex may contribute to early semantic deficits, characterised by the loss of specific features of concepts in AD. (authors)

    14. Alzheimer's Disease and Glaucoma: Imaging the Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Disease

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Denise A. Valenti

      2010-01-01

      Full Text Available Imaging through the visual system in Alzheimer's disease, with the technology currently in widespread use for the diagnosis and management of eye disease such as glaucoma and macular degeneration, is proving to be promising. In vivo cross-section imaging during an annual comprehensive eye exam has been available for a decade for glaucoma and macular degeneration, and this same imaging, using Optical Coherence Tomography, has been demonstrated to show deficits specific to AD and mild cognitive impairment. These deficits are in the form of nerve fiber layer tissue drop out in the retina and optic nerve. The retrograde loss of nerve fiber layer tissue in the retina and optic nerve may be an early biomarker of AD, and these deficits in the nerve fiber layer of the retina and optic nerve may be the earliest sign of AD, even prior to damage to the hippocampal region that impacts memory.

    15. Feelings without memory in Alzheimer disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Guzmán-Vélez, Edmarie; Feinstein, Justin S; Tranel, Daniel

      2014-09-01

      Patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) typically have impaired declarative memory as a result of hippocampal damage early in the disease. Far less is understood about AD's effect on emotion. We investigated whether feelings of emotion can persist in patients with AD, even after their declarative memory for what caused the feelings has faded. A sample of 17 patients with probable AD and 17 healthy comparison participants (case-matched for age, sex, and education) underwent 2 separate emotion induction procedures in which they watched film clips intended to induce feelings of sadness or happiness. We collected real-time emotion ratings at baseline and at 3 post-induction time points, and we administered a test of declarative memory shortly after each induction. As expected, the patients with AD had severely impaired declarative memory for both the sad and happy films. Despite their memory impairment, the patients continued to report elevated levels of sadness and happiness that persisted well beyond their memory for the films. This outcome was especially prominent after the sadness induction, with sustained elevations in sadness lasting for more than 30 minutes, even in patients with no conscious recollection for the films. These findings indicate that patients with AD can experience prolonged states of emotion that persist well beyond the patients' memory for the events that originally caused the emotion. The preserved emotional life evident in patients with AD has important implications for their management and care, and highlights the need for caretakers to foster positive emotional experiences.

    16. Alzheimer Disease: Scientific Breakthroughs and Translational Challenges.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Caselli, Richard J; Beach, Thomas G; Knopman, David S; Graff-Radford, Neill R

      2017-06-01

      Alzheimer disease (AD) was originally conceived as a rare disease that caused presenile dementia but has come to be understood as the most prevalent cause of dementia at any age worldwide. It has an extended preclinical phase characterized by sequential changes in imaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers with subtle memory decline beginning more than a decade before the emergence of symptomatic memory loss heralding the beginning of the mild cognitive impairment stage. The apolipoprotein E ε4 allele is a prevalent and potent risk factor for AD that has facilitated research into its preclinical phase. Cerebral Aβ levels build from preclinical through early dementia stages followed by hyperphosphorylated tau-related pathology, the latter driving cognitive deficits and dementia severity. Structural and molecular imaging can now recapitulate the neuropathology of AD antemortem. Autosomal dominant forms of early-onset familial AD gave rise to the amyloid hypothesis of AD, which, in turn, has led to therapeutic trials of immunotherapy designed to clear cerebral amyloid, but to date results have been disappointing. Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple additional risk factors, but to date none have yielded an effective alternate therapeutic target. Current and future trials aimed at presymptomatic individuals either harboring cerebral amyloid or at genetically high risk offer the hope that earlier intervention might yet succeed where trials in patients with established dementia have failed. A major looming challenge will be that of expensive, incompletely effective disease-modifying therapy: who and when to treat, and how to pay for it. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    17. Alzheimer's Disease and Stem Cell Therapy

      OpenAIRE

      Choi, Sung S.; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Seung U.; Lee, Hong J.

      2014-01-01

      The loss of neuronal cells in the central nervous system may occur in many neurodegenerative diseases. Alzheimer's disease is a common senile disease in people over 65 years, and it causes impairment characterized by the decline of mental function, including memory loss and cognitive impairment, and affects the quality of life of patients. However, the current therapeutic strategies against AD are only to relieve symptoms, but not to cure it. Because there are only a few therapeutic strategie...

    18. Simultaneous analysis of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers using microsphere-based xMAP multiplex technology for early detection of Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kang, Ju-Hee; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M

      2012-04-01

      The xMAP-Luminex multiplex platform for measurement of Alzheimer's disease (AD) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers using Innogenetics AlzBio3 immunoassay reagents that are for research use only has been shown to be an effective tool for early detection of an AD-like biomarker signature based on concentrations of CSF Aβ(1-42), t-tau and p-tau(181). Among the several advantages of the xMAP-Luminex platform for AD CSF biomarkers are: a wide dynamic range of ready-to-use calibrators, time savings for the simultaneous analyses of three biomarkers in one analytical run, reduction of human error, potential of reduced cost of reagents, and a modest reduction of sample volume as compared to conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) methodology. Recent clinical studies support the use of CSF Aβ(1-42), t-tau and p-tau(181) measurement using the xMAP-Luminex platform for the early detection of AD pathology in cognitively normal individuals, and for prediction of progression to AD dementia in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Studies that have shown the prediction of risk for progression to AD dementia by MCI patients provide the basis for the use of CSF Aβ(1-42), t-tau and p-tau(181) testing to assign risk for progression in patients enrolled in therapeutic trials. Furthermore emerging study data suggest that these pathologic changes occur in cognitively normal subjects 20 or more years before the onset of clinically detectable memory changes thus providing an objective measurement for use in the assessment of treatment effects in primary treatment trials. However, numerous previous ELISA and Luminex-based multiplex studies reported a wide range of absolute values of CSF Aβ(1-42), t-tau and p-tau(181) indicative of substantial inter-laboratory variability as well as varying degrees of intra-laboratory imprecision. In order to address these issues a recent inter-laboratory investigation that included a common set of CSF pool aliquots from

    19. The European Medicines Agency's strategies to meet the challenges of Alzheimer disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Haas, Manuel; Mantua, Valentina; Haberkamp, Marion; Pani, Luca; Isaac, Maria; Butlen-Ducuing, Florence; Vamvakas, Spiros; Broich, Karl

      2015-04-01

      Regulatory agencies have a key role in facilitating the development of new drugs for Alzheimer disease, particularly given the challenges associated with early intervention. Here, we highlight the strategies of the European Medicines Agency to help address such challenges.

    20. What Are the Signs of Alzheimer's Disease?

      Science.gov (United States)

      ... changes in behavior and personality Conduct tests of memory, problem solving, attention, counting, and language Carry out standard medical tests, ... or her to check for changes in your memory and thinking. Read More "Living with Alzheimer's Disease" Articles ... Information | Contact Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National ...

    1. Hypocretin (orexin) loss in Alzheimer's disease.

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Fronczek, R.; Geest, S. de; Frolich, M.; Overeem, S.; Roelandse, F.W.; Lammers, G.J.; Swaab, D.F.

      2012-01-01

      Sleep disturbances in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients are associated with the severity of dementia and are often the primary reason for institutionalization. These sleep problems partly resemble core symptoms of narcolepsy, a sleep disorder caused by a general loss of the neurotransmitter

    2. Hypocretin (orexin) loss in Alzheimer's disease

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Fronczek, Rolf; van Geest, Sarita; Frölich, Marijke; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Roelandse, Freek W. C.; Lammers, Gert Jan; Swaab, Dick F.

      2012-01-01

      Sleep disturbances in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients are associated with the severity of dementia and are often the primary reason for institutionalization. These sleep problems partly resemble core symptoms of narcolepsy, a sleep disorder caused by a general loss of the neurotransmitter

    3. A light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wang, Xue; Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

      2017-02-01

      It is generally believed that there are some connections between Alzheimer's disease and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. The typical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings, loss of motivation and behavioral issues. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. Infrared light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research we have studied the effect of infrared light on Alzheimer's disease through transgenic mouse model. We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily included a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emitted infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by performing two tests: cognitive performance of mice in Morris water maze, and plaque load by immunofluorescence analysis. Immunofluorescence analysis was based on measuring the quantity of plaques in mouse brain slices. Our results show that infrared therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

    4. Normal tension glaucoma and Alzheimer disease

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kessing, Svend Vedel; Mogensen, Ulla Brasch

      2012-01-01

      Purpose: To investigate whether normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is associated with increased risk of developing dementia/Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: A total of 69 patients with NTG were identified in the case note files in the Glaucoma Clinic, University Hospital of Copenhagen (Rigshospitalet...

    5. Alzheimer disease : presenilin springs a leak

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Gandy, S.; Doeven, M.K.; Poolman, B.

      2006-01-01

      Presenilins are thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease through a protein cleavage reaction that produces neurotoxic amyloid-beta peptides. A new function for presenilins now comes to light - controlling the leakage of calcium out of the endoplasmic reticulum. Is this a serious challenge to the

    6. Progression of Alzheimer Disease in Europe

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Vellas, B; Hausner, L; Frolich, L

      2012-01-01

      The clinical progression of Alzheimer disease (AD) was studied in European subjects under treatment with AChE inhibitors (AChE-I) in relation to geographical location over a 2-years period. One thousand three hundred and six subjects from 11 European countries were clustered into 3 regions (North...

    7. Retrograde amnesia in patients with Alzheimer's disease

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Meeter, M.; Eijsackers, E; Mulder, J

      2006-01-01

      Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and normal controls were tested on two retrograde memory tests, one based on public events, and the other querying autobiographical memory. On both tests, patients showed strong decrements as compared to normal controls, pointing to retrograde

    8. Aripiprazole in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      De Deyn, P.P.; Drenth, Annemieke F. J.; Kremer, B.P.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Van Dam, D.

      Introduction: Psychosis is a common and difficult to treat symptom in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is a cause of diminished quality of life and care-giver distress. Atypical antipsychotics are frequently used for the treatment of dementia-related psychosis, despite FDA warnings because of increased

    9. Quantitative longitudinal interrelationships between brain metabolism and amyloid deposition during a 2-year follow-up in patients with early Alzheimer's disease

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Foerster, Stefan; Yousefi, Behrooz H.; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Klupp, Elisabeth; Rominger, Axel; Foerstl, Hans; Kurz, Alexander; Grimmer, Timo; Drzezga, Alexander

      2012-01-01

      Similar regional anatomical distributions were reported for fibrillary amyloid deposition [measured by 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) positron emission tomography (PET)] and brain hypometabolism [measured by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET] in numerous Alzheimer's disease (AD) studies. However, there is a lack of longitudinal studies evaluating the interrelationships of these two different pathological markers in the same AD population. Our most recent AD study suggested that the longitudinal pattern of hypometabolism anatomically follows the pattern of amyloid deposition with temporal delay, which indicates that neuronal dysfunction may spread within the anatomical pattern of amyloid pathology. Based on this finding we now hypothesize that in early AD patients quantitative longitudinal decline in hypometabolism may be related to the amount of baseline amyloid deposition during a follow-up period of 2 years. Fifteen patients with mild probable AD underwent baseline (T1) and follow-up (T2) examination after 24 ± 2.1 months with [ 18 F]FDG PET, [ 11 C]PIB PET, structural T1-weighted MRI and neuropsychological testing [Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) neuropsychological battery]. Longitudinal cognitive measures and quantitative PET measures of amyloid deposition and metabolism [standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs)] were obtained using volume of interest (VOI)-based approaches in the frontal-lateral-retrosplenial (FLR) network and in predefined bihemispheric brain regions after partial volume effect (PVE) correction of PET data. Statistical group comparisons (SUVRs and cognitive measures) between patients and 15 well-matched elderly controls who had undergone identical imaging procedures once as well as Pearson's correlation analyses within patients were performed. Group comparison revealed significant cognitive decline and increased mean PIB/decreased FDG SUVRs in the FLR network as well as in several AD-typical regions in

    10. Quantitative longitudinal interrelationships between brain metabolism and amyloid deposition during a 2-year follow-up in patients with early Alzheimer's disease

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Foerster, Stefan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM-Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Yousefi, Behrooz H.; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Klupp, Elisabeth [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Rominger, Axel [Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Foerstl, Hans; Kurz, Alexander; Grimmer, Timo [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Munich (Germany); Drzezga, Alexander [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM-Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Munich (Germany)

      2012-12-15

      Similar regional anatomical distributions were reported for fibrillary amyloid deposition [measured by {sup 11}C-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) positron emission tomography (PET)] and brain hypometabolism [measured by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET] in numerous Alzheimer's disease (AD) studies. However, there is a lack of longitudinal studies evaluating the interrelationships of these two different pathological markers in the same AD population. Our most recent AD study suggested that the longitudinal pattern of hypometabolism anatomically follows the pattern of amyloid deposition with temporal delay, which indicates that neuronal dysfunction may spread within the anatomical pattern of amyloid pathology. Based on this finding we now hypothesize that in early AD patients quantitative longitudinal decline in hypometabolism may be related to the amount of baseline amyloid deposition during a follow-up period of 2 years. Fifteen patients with mild probable AD underwent baseline (T1) and follow-up (T2) examination after 24 {+-} 2.1 months with [{sup 18}F]FDG PET, [{sup 11}C]PIB PET, structural T1-weighted MRI and neuropsychological testing [Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) neuropsychological battery]. Longitudinal cognitive measures and quantitative PET measures of amyloid deposition and metabolism [standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs)] were obtained using volume of interest (VOI)-based approaches in the frontal-lateral-retrosplenial (FLR) network and in predefined bihemispheric brain regions after partial volume effect (PVE) correction of PET data. Statistical group comparisons (SUVRs and cognitive measures) between patients and 15 well-matched elderly controls who had undergone identical imaging procedures once as well as Pearson's correlation analyses within patients were performed. Group comparison revealed significant cognitive decline and increased mean PIB/decreased FDG SUVRs in the FLR network as well as

    11. Characteristic pattern of cerebral perfusion in patients with the early stage of subcortical vascular dementia compared with Alzheimer's disease

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Cheon, Sang Myung; Kim, Jong Kuk; Kim, Jae Woo [Dong-A University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

      2004-07-01

      Brain perfusion SPECT has been commonly used to evaluate several different types of dementia. The aim of this study is to assess the specific patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with the early stage of subcortical vascular dementia (SVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) using Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT, and to compare the differences between the two conditions. Sixteen SVD (mean age; 68.0{+-}7.0 years, educational period; 6.3{+-}5.6 years, CDR; 0.80{+-}0.26). 46 AD (mean age; 69.9{+-}7.4 years, educational period; 5.4{+-}4.7 years, CDR; 0.86{+-}0.23) and 12 normal control subjects (mean age; 67.1{+-}7.7 years, educational period; 6.2{+-}4.2 years) participated in this study. We included the patients with SVD and AD according to NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for probable AD and NINDS-AIREN criteria for probable or possible VD. They were all matched for age, education and clinical dementia scale scores. SPM analysis of the SPECT image showed significant perfusion deficits on the right temporal region and right thalamus, left insula and superior temporal gyrus, both cingulate gyri and frontal subgyral regions in patients with SVD and on the left supramarginal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, postcentral gyrus and inferior parietal lobule, right fugiform gyrus and both cingulate gyri in patients with AD compared with control subjects (uncorrected p<0.01). SVD patients revealed significant hypoperfusion in the right parahippocampal gyrus, right cingulated gyrus, left insula, and both frontal subgyral regions compared with AD patients (uncorrected p<0.01). SVD patients revealed significant hyperperfusion in right superior frontal gyrus, left pre- and postcentral gyri, left paracentral lobule, left precuneus and both medial frontal gyri compared with AD patients (uncorrected p<0.01). Our study shows characteristic and different pattern of perfusion deficits in patients with SVD and AD, and these results may be helpful to discriminate the two conditions in the

    12. Why Do We Get Alzheimer's Disease?

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Wyss-Coray, Tony

      2006-01-01

      Neurodegenerative diseases and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, are among the major health concerns of the elderly in industrialized societies. The cause of AD is unknown and no disease-modifying treatments are available. The disease is characterized clinically by a progressive dementia and pathologically by the accumulation of protein aggregates in the brain and a profound loss of nerve cells. It has also become clear recently that local immune responses are activated in the AD brain and may have a role in the disease. Our laboratory uses genetic mouse models to understand the disease process and to identify potential therapeutic targets.

    13. Application of PET in Alzheimer's disease

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Zhang Chun

      2003-01-01

      Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease of central nervous system that causes progressive cognitive and memory deterioration in the elderly people. Affected brains of AD patients are characterized by the presence of senile plaques (SP) and neurofilbrillary tangles (NFT). The review will focus on the application of positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnosis, progression prediction, treatment and evaluation of neurotransmission activity of AD

    14. Memory binding and white matter integrity in familial Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Parra, Mario A; Saarimäki, Heini; Bastin, Mark E; Londoño, Ana C; Pettit, Lewis; Lopera, Francisco; Della Sala, Sergio; Abrahams, Sharon

      2015-05-01

      Binding information in short-term and long-term memory are functions sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. They have been found to be affected in patients who meet criteria for familial Alzheimer's disease due to the mutation E280A of the PSEN1 gene. However, only short-term memory binding has been found to be affected in asymptomatic carriers of this mutation. The neural correlates of this dissociation are poorly understood. The present study used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether the integrity of white matter structures could offer an account. A sample of 19 patients with familial Alzheimer's disease, 18 asymptomatic carriers and 21 non-carrier controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and memory binding assessment. The short-term memory binding task required participants to detect changes across two consecutive screens displaying arrays of shapes, colours, or shape-colour bindings. The long-term memory binding task was a Paired Associates Learning Test. Performance on these tasks were entered into regression models. Relative to controls, patients with familial Alzheimer's disease performed poorly on both memory binding tasks. Asymptomatic carriers differed from controls only in the short-term memory binding task. White matter integrity explained poor memory binding performance only in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease. White matter water diffusion metrics from the frontal lobe accounted for poor performance on both memory binding tasks. Dissociations were found in the genu of corpus callosum which accounted for short-term memory binding impairments and in the hippocampal part of cingulum bundle which accounted for long-term memory binding deficits. The results indicate that white matter structures in the frontal and temporal lobes are vulnerable to the early stages of familial Alzheimer's disease and their damage is associated with impairments in two memory binding functions known to

    15. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

      Medline Plus

      Full Text Available ... of all elderly people who receive adult day services and nursing home care. Take action. Become an advocate SPECIAL REPORT: FINANCIAL AND PERSONAL BENEFITS OF EARLY DIAGNOSIS Early diagnosis ...

    16. A Critical Assessment of Research on Neurotransmitters in Alzheimer's Disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Reddy, P Hemachandra

      2017-01-01

      The purpose of this mini-forum, "Neurotransmitters and Alzheimer's Disease", is to critically assess the current status of neurotransmitters in Alzheimer's disease. Neurotransmitters are essential neurochemicals that maintain synaptic and cognitive functions in mammals, including humans, by sending signals across pre- to post-synaptic neurons. Authorities in the fields of synapses and neurotransmitters of Alzheimer's disease summarize the current status of basic biology of synapses and neurotransmitters, and also update the current status of clinical trials of neurotransmitters in Alzheimer's disease. This article discusses the prevalence, economic impact, and stages of Alzheimer's dementia in humans.

    17. A disease state fingerprint for evaluation of Alzheimer's disease

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Mattila, Jussi; Koikkalainen, Juha; Virkki, Arho

      2011-01-01

      Diagnostic processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are evolving. Knowledge about disease-specific biomarkers is constantly increasing and larger volumes of data are being measured from patients. To gain additional benefits from the collected data, a novel statistical modeling and data visualization...... interpretation of the information. To model the AD state from complex and heterogeneous patient data, a statistical Disease State Index (DSI) method underlying the DSF has been developed. Using baseline data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), the ability of the DSI to model disease...

    18. The autonomic higher order processing nuclei of the lower brain stem are among the early targets of the Alzheimer's disease-related cytoskeletal pathology.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Rüb, U; Del Tredici, K; Schultz, C; Thal, D R; Braak, E; Braak, H

      2001-06-01

      The nuclei of the pontine parabrachial region (medial parabrachial nucleus, MPB; lateral parabrachial nucleus, LPB; subpeduncular nucleus, SPP) together with the intermediate zone of the medullary reticular formation (IRZ) are pivotal relay stations within central autonomic regulatory feedback systems. This study was undertaken to investigate the evolution of the Alzheimer's disease-related cytoskeletal pathology in these four sites of the lower brain stem. We examined the MPB, LPB, SPP and IRZ in 27 autopsy cases and classified the cortical Alzheimer-related cytoskeletal anomalies according to an established staging system (neurofibrillary tangle/neuropil threads [NFT/NT] stages I-VI). The lesions were visualized either with the antibody AT8, which is immunospecific for the abnormally phosphorylated form of the cytoskeletal protein tau, or with a modified Gallyas silver iodide stain. The MPB, SPB, and IRZ display cytoskeletal pathology in stage I and the LPB in stage II, whereby bothstages correspond to the preclinical phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In stages III-IV (incipient AD), the MPB and SPP are severely affected. In all of the stage III-IV cases, the lesions in the LPB and IRZ are well developed. In stages V and VI (clinical phase of AD), the MPB and SPP are filled with the abnormal intraneuronal material. At stages V-VI, the LPB is moderately involved and the IRZ shows severe damage. The pathogenesis of the AD-related cytoskeletal lesions in the nuclei of the pontine parabrachial region and in the IRZ conforms with the cortical NFT/NT staging sequence I-VI. In the event that the cytoskeletal pathology observed in this study impairs the function of the nerve cells involved, it is conceivable that autonomic mechanisms progressively deteriorate with advancing cortical NFT/NT stages. This relationship remains to be established, but it could provide insights into the illusive correlation between the AD-related cytoskeletal pathology and the function of

    19. PET studies in Alzheimer disease and other degenerative dementias

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Jeong, Yong; Na, Duk L.

      2003-01-01

      Neurodegenerative disorders cause a variety of dementia including Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Huntington's disease. PET scan is useful for early detection and differential diagnosis of theses dementing disorders. Also, it provides valuable information about clinico-anatomical correlation, allowing better understanding of function of brain. Here we discuss recent achievements PET studies regarding these dementing disorders. Future progress in PET technology, new tracers, and image analysis will play an important role in further clarifying the disease pathophysiology and brain functions

    20. Accelerating stem cell trials for Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hunsberger, Joshua G; Rao, Mahendra; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Bulte, Jeff W M; Atala, Anthony; LaFerla, Frank M; Greely, Henry T; Sawa, Akira; Gandy, Sam; Schneider, Lon S; Doraiswamy, P Murali

      2016-02-01

      At present, no effective cure or prophylaxis exists for Alzheimer's disease. Symptomatic treatments are modestly effective and offer only temporary benefit. Advances in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology have the potential to enable development of so-called disease-in-a-dish personalised models to study disease mechanisms and reveal new therapeutic approaches, and large panels of iPSCs enable rapid screening of potential drug candidates. Different cell types can also be produced for therapeutic use. In 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration granted investigational new drug approval for the first phase 2A clinical trial of ischaemia-tolerant mesenchymal stem cells to treat Alzheimer's disease in the USA. Similar trials are either underway or being planned in Europe and Asia. Although safety and ethical concerns remain, we call for the acceleration of human stem cell-based translational research into the causes and potential treatments of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    1. Alzheimer's disease due to loss of function

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Kepp, Kasper Planeta

      2016-01-01

      Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a highly complex disease involving a broad range of clinical, cellular, and biochemical manifestations that are currently not understood in combination. This has led to many views of AD, e.g. the amyloid, tau, presenilin, oxidative stress, and metal hypotheses....... The amyloid hypothesis has dominated the field with its assumption that buildup of pathogenic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide causes disease. This paradigm has been criticized, yet most data suggest that Aβ plays a key role in the disease. Here, a new loss-of-function hypothesis is synthesized that accounts...

    2. Early brain response to low-dose radiation exposure involves molecular networks and pathways associated with cognitive functions, advanced aging and Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J

      2009-01-01

      Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy and environmental nuclear contamination as well as for Earth-orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of mouse brain tissue after whole-body irradiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high-dose radiation (2 Gy) and that low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues and pathways that were specific for brain tissue. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (P < 10(-53)) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified nine neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose irradiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down-regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    3. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Lowe, Xiu R.; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

      2008-01-01

      Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p -53 ) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease

    4. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

      2008-06-06

      Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    5. Lexical retrieval in discourse: an early indicator of Alzheimer's dementia.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Pekkala, Seija; Wiener, Debra; Himali, Jayandra J; Beiser, Alexa S; Obler, Loraine K; Liu, Yulin; McKee, Ann; Auerbach, Sanford; Seshadri, Sudha; Wolf, Philip A; Au, Rhoda

      2013-12-01

      We examined the progression of lexical-retrieval deficits in individuals with neuropathologically determined Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 23) and a comparison group without criteria for AD (n = 24) to determine whether linguistic changes were a significant marker of the disease. Our participants underwent multiple administrations of a neuropsychological battery, with initial administration occurring on average 16 years prior to death. The battery included the Boston Naming Test (BNT), a letter fluency task (FAS) and written description of the Cookie Theft Picture (CTP). Repeated measures analysis revealed that the AD-group showed progressively greater decline in FAS and CTP lexical performance than the comparison group. Cross-sectional time-specific group comparisons indicated that the CTP differentiated performance between the two groups at 7-9 years prior to death and FAS and BNT only at 2-4 years. These results suggest that lexical-retrieval deficits in written discourse serve as an early indicator of AD.

    6. Drawing Disorders in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Forms of Dementia.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Trojano, Luigi; Gainotti, Guido

      2016-04-21

      Drawing is a multicomponential process that can be impaired by many kinds of brain lesions. Drawing disorders are very common in Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, and can provide clinical information for the distinction of the different dementing diseases. In our review we started from an overview of the neural and cognitive bases of drawing, and from a recollection of the drawing tasks more frequently used for assessing individuals with dementia. Then, we analyzed drawing disorders in dementia, paying special attention to those observed in Alzheimer's disease, from the prodromal stages of the amnesic mild cognitive impairment to the stages of full-blown dementia, both in the sporadic forms with late onset in the entorhino-hippocampal structures and in those with early onset in the posterior neocortical structures. We reviewed the drawing features that could differentiate Alzheimer's disease from vascular dementia and from the most frequent forms of degenerative dementia, namely frontotemporal dementia and Lewy body disease. Finally, we examined some peculiar aspects of drawing disorders in dementia, such as perseverations, rotations, and closing-in. We argue that a careful analysis of drawing errors helps to differentiate the different forms of dementia more than overall accuracy in drawing.

    7. Anti-amyloid treatments in Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sapra, Mamta; Kim, Kye Y

      2009-06-01

      Alzheimer's disease is one of the most challenging threats to the healthcare system in society. One of the main characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is formation of amyloid plaques from accumulation of amyloid beta peptide. The therapeutic agents that are currently available for AD including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AchEIs) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist are focused on improving the symptoms and do not revert the progression of the disease. This limitation coupled with the burgeoning increase in the prevalence of AD and resultant impact on healthcare economics calls for more substantial treatments for AD. According to the leading amyloid hypothesis, cleavage of amyloid precursor protein to release amyloid beta peptide is the critical event in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently treatment strategies have been focused on modifying the formation, clearance and accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid beta peptide. This article reviews different therapeutic approaches that have been investigated to target amyloid beta ranging from secretase modulators, antiaggregation agents to amyloid immunotherapy. Authors review the different novel drugs which are in clinical trials.

    8. The Alzheimer's disease β-secretase enzyme, BACE1

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Vassar Robert

      2007-11-01

      Full Text Available Abstract The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is highly complex. While several pathologies characterize this disease, amyloid plaques, composed of the β-amyloid peptide are hallmark neuropathological lesions in Alzheimer's disease brain. Indeed, a wealth of evidence suggests that β-amyloid is central to the pathophysiology of AD and is likely to play an early role in this intractable neurodegenerative disorder. The BACE1 enzyme is essential for the generation of β-amyloid. BACE1 knockout mice do not produce β-amyloid and are free from Alzheimer's associated pathologies including neuronal loss and certain memory deficits. The fact that BACE1 initiates the formation of β-amyloid, and the observation that BACE1 levels are elevated in this disease provide direct and compelling reasons to develop therapies directed at BACE1 inhibition thus reducing β-amyloid and its associated toxicities. However, new data indicates that complete abolishment of BACE1 may be associated with specific behavioral and physiological alterations. Recently a number of non-APP BACE1 substrates have been identified. It is plausible that failure to process certain BACE1 substrates may underlie some of the reported abnormalities in the BACE1-deficient mice. Here we review BACE1 biology, covering aspects ranging from the initial identification and characterization of this enzyme to recent data detailing the apparent dysregulation of BACE1 in Alzheimer's disease. We pay special attention to the putative function of BACE1 during healthy conditions and discuss in detail the relationship that exists between key risk factors for AD, such as vascular disease (and downstream cellular consequences, and the pathogenic alterations in BACE1 that are observed in the diseased state.

    9. High-resolution PET studies in Alzheimer's disease

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Kumar, A.; Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.; Haxby, J.V.; Wagner, E.; Salerno, J.A.; Friedland, R.P.; Rapoport, S.I.

      1991-01-01

      Forty-seven patients with probable dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) and 30 healthy age-matched controls were scanned using [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose on a Scanditronix PC 1024-7B tomograph (inplane resolution = 6 mm, axial resolution = 10 mm). Patients and controls were scanned in the resting state with their eyes patched and ears occluded. The regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMRglc) in most major neocortical and subcortical gray matter regions, and certain metabolic ratios (rCMRglc/ calcarine rCMRglc), quantitatively discriminated even the mildly demented patients from healthy controls. The association neocortices showed metabolic abnormalities that were more severe than those in the sensorimotor and calcarine regions. All demented groups showed significant neuropsychological disturbances when compared to healthy controls. These data demonstrated widespread metabolic disturbances, particularly in the association areas, relatively early in Alzheimer's disease, and more profound involvement with disease progression

    10. Alzheimer's Disease at a Glance

      Science.gov (United States)

      ... R S T U V W X Y Z Alzheimer’s Disease at a Glance Researchers have explored many ... health approaches for preventing or slowing dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. Currently, there is no strong evidence that ...

    11. Microprobe PIXE analysis and EDX analysis on the brain of patients with Alzheimer`s disease

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Yumoto, S. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Horino, Y.; Mokuno, Y.; Fujii, K.; Kakimi, S.; Mizutani, T.; Matsushima, H.; Ishikawa, A.

      1996-12-31

      To investigate the cause of Alzheimer`s disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer`s disease type), we examined aluminium (Al) in the brain (hippocampus) of patients with Alzheimer`s disease using heavy ion (5 MeV Si{sup 3+}) microprobe particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Heavy ion microprobes (3 MeV Si{sup 2+}) have several times higher sensitivity for Al detection than 2 MeV proton microprobes. We also examined Al in the brain of these patients by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). (1) Al was detected in the cell nuclei isolated from the brain of patients with Alzheimer`s disease using 5 MeV Si{sup 3+} microprobe PIXE analysis, and EDX analysis. (2) EDX analysis demonstrated high levels of Al in the nucleolus of nerve cells in frozen sections prepared from the brain of these patients. Our results support the theory that Alzheimer`s disease is caused by accumulation of Al in the nuclei of brain cells. (author)

    12. Does prevention for Alzheimer's disease exist?

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Sonia Maria Dozzi Brucki

      Full Text Available Abstract The prevention of Alzheimer's disease is a growing public health concern amidst an ageing population. Meanwhile, there is no effective or curative treatment available where prevention could greatly reduce health costs. This review was based on reports of potential preventive factors, including modifiable lifestyle factors, as well as preventive pharmacological strategies. Although the present review was not systematic, the reports selected from PubMed using "Alzheimer's disease" and "prevention" as key-words, allow us to affirm that pursuing a healthy lifestyle; physical, cognitive, leisure activities; good social engagement; a high consumption of fish, low consumption of dietary fat and moderate consumption of wine, and control of vascular risk factors appear to be potential factors for delaying dementia.

    13. 18F PET with florbetaben for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease dementia and other dementias in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

      Science.gov (United States)

      Martínez, Gabriel; Vernooij, Robin Wm; Fuentes Padilla, Paulina; Zamora, Javier; Flicker, Leon; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier

      2017-11-22

      18 F-florbetaben uptake by brain tissue, measured by positron emission tomography (PET), is accepted by regulatory agencies like the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicine Agencies (EMA) for assessing amyloid load in people with dementia. Its added value is mainly demonstrated by excluding Alzheimer's pathology in an established dementia diagnosis. However, the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) revised the diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease and confidence in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer's disease may be increased when using some amyloid biomarkers tests like 18 F-florbetaben. These tests, added to the MCI core clinical criteria, might increase the diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) of a testing strategy. However, the DTA of 18 F-florbetaben to predict the progression from MCI to Alzheimer's disease dementia (ADD) or other dementias has not yet been systematically evaluated. To determine the DTA of the 18 F-florbetaben PET scan for detecting people with MCI at time of performing the test who will clinically progress to ADD, other forms of dementia (non-ADD), or any form of dementia at follow-up. The most recent search for this review was performed in May 2017. We searched MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP), BIOSIS Citation Index (Thomson Reuters Web of Science), Web of Science Core Collection, including the Science Citation Index (Thomson Reuters Web of Science) and the Conference Proceedings Citation Index (Thomson Reuters Web of Science), LILACS (BIREME), CINAHL (EBSCOhost), ClinicalTrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) (http://www.who.int/ictrp/search/en/). We also searched ALOIS, the Cochrane Dementia & Cognitive Improvement Group's specialised register of dementia studies (http://www.medicine.ox.ac.uk/alois/). We checked the reference lists of any

    14. Microsatellite D21D210 (GT-12) allele frequencies in sporadic Alzheimer's disease

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Lannfelt, L.; Lilius, L.; Viitanen, M.; Winblad, B.; Basun, H.; Houlden, H.; Rossor, M.; Hardy, J.

      1995-01-01

      Four disease-causing mutations have so far been described in the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 in familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Linkage analysis with a fourteen-allele microsatellite at D21S210 named GT-12 has proven useful in the elucidation of amyloid presursor protein gene involvement in Alzheimer's disease families, as it is closely linked to the gene. Most cases of Alzheimer's disease are thought to be sporadic and not familial. However, evidence from earlier studies suggests an important genetic contribution also in sporadic cases, where gene-environment interaction may contribute to the disease. We have determined frequencies of the GT-12 alleles in 78 Swedish and 49 British sporadic Alzheimer's disease cases and 104 healthy elderly control subjects, to investigate if the disease associates with a particular genotype in GT-12. However, no differences in allele frequencies were observed between any of the groups. (au) (26 refs.)

    15. Neurogenesis in Alzheimer´s disease

      Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

      Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Verkhratsky, Alexei

      2011-01-01

      Roč. 219, č. 1 (2011), s. 78-89 ISSN 0021-8782 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/09/1696; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/08/1381; GA ČR GA305/08/1384 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Alzheimer 's disease * hippocampus * neurodegeneration Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.370, year: 2011

    16. Bilingualism delays clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease

      OpenAIRE

      Woumans, Evy; Santens, Patrick; Sieben, Anne; Versijpt, Jan; Stevens, Michaël; Duyck, Wouter

      2015-01-01

      The current study investigated the effects of bilingualism on the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a European sample of patients. We assessed all incoming AD patients in two university hospitals within a specified timeframe. Sixty-nine monolinguals and 65 bilinguals diagnosed with probable AD were compared for time of clinical AD manifestation and diagnosis. The influence of other potentially interacting variables was also examined. Results indicated a significant delay f...

    17. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

      Medline Plus

      Full Text Available ... an accurate diagnosis earlier than at any other time in history. In addition to providing significant medical, emotional and social benefits and facilitating participation in important clinical trials, early diagnosis enables individuals to prepare ...

    18. 10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer's

      Science.gov (United States)

      ... with Alzheimer's may start to remove themselves from hobbies, social activities, work projects or sports. They may ... team or remembering how to complete a favorite hobby. They may also avoid being social because of ...

    19. Personalized medicine in Alzheimer's disease and depression.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Souslova, Tatiana; Marple, Teresa C; Spiekerman, A Michael; Mohammad, Amin A

      2013-11-01

      Latest research in the mental health field brings new hope to patients and promises to revolutionize the field of psychiatry. Personalized pharmacogenetic tests that aid in diagnosis and treatment choice are now becoming available for clinical practice. Amyloid beta peptide biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease are now available. For the first time, radiologists are able to visualize amyloid plaques specific to Alzheimer's disease in live patients using Positron Emission Tomography-based tests approved by the FDA. A novel blood-based assay has been developed to aid in the diagnosis of depression based on activation of the HPA axis, metabolic, inflammatory and neurochemical pathways. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors have shown increased remission rates in specific ethnic subgroups and Cytochrome P450 gene polymorphisms can predict antidepressant tolerability. The latest research will help to eradicate "trial and error" prescription, ushering in the most personalized medicine to date. Like all major medical breakthroughs, integration of new algorithms and technologies requires sound science and time. But for many mentally ill patients, diagnosis and effective therapy cannot happen fast enough. This review will describe the newest diagnostic tests, treatments and clinical studies for the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease and unipolar, major depressive disorder. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    20. Early stages of Alzheimer's disease are alarming signs in injury deaths caused by traffic accidents in elderly people (≥60 years of age): A neuropathological study.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wijesinghe, Printha; Gorrie, Catherine; Shankar, S K; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T; Amaratunga, Dhammika; Hulathduwa, Sanjayah; Kumara, K Sunil; Samarasinghe, Kamani; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Steinbusch, H W M; De Silva, K Ranil D

      2017-01-01

      There is little information available in the literature concerning the contribution of dementia in injury deaths in elderly people (≥60 years). This study was intended to investigate the extent of dementia-related pathologies in the brains of elderly people who died in traffic accidents or by suicide and to compare our findings with age- and sex-matched natural deaths in an elderly population. Autopsy-derived human brain samples from nine injury death victims (5 suicide and 4 traffic accidents) and nine age- and sex-matched natural death victims were screened for neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular pathologies using histopathological and immunohistochemical techniques. For the analysis, Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0 was used. There was a greater likelihood for Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related changes in the elders who succumbed to traffic accidents (1 out of 4) compared to age- and sex-matched suicides (0 out of 5) or natural deaths (0 out of 9) as assessed by the National Institute on Aging - Alzheimer's Association guidelines. Actual burden of both neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and (SPs) was comparatively higher in the brains of traffic accidents, and the mean NFT counts were significantly higher in the region of entorhinal cortex ( P traffic accidents in elderly people whereas suicidal brain neuropathologies resembled natural deaths.

    1. Validated Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index (ANU-ADRI) is associated with smaller volumes in the default mode network in the early 60s.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Cherbuin, Nicolas; Shaw, Marnie E; Walsh, Erin; Sachdev, Perminder; Anstey, Kaarin J

      2017-12-14

      Strong evidence is available suggesting that effective reduction of exposure to demonstrated modifiable risk factors in mid-life or before could significantly decrease the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and delay its onset. A key ingredient to achieving this goal is the reliable identification of individuals at risk well before they develop clinical symptoms. The aim of this study was to provide further neuroimaging evidence of the effectiveness of a validated tool, the ANU Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index, for the assessment of future risk of cognitive decline. Participants were 461 (60-64 years, 48% female) community-living individuals free of dementia at baseline. Associations between risk estimates obtained with the ANU-ADRI, total and regional brain volumes including in the default mode network (DMN) measured at the same assessment and diagnosis of MCI/dementia over a 12-year follow-up were tested in a large sample of community-living individuals free of dementia at baseline. Higher risk estimates on the ANU-ADRI were associated with lower cortical gray matter and particularly in the DMN. Importantly, difference in participants with high and low risk scores explained 7-9% of the observed difference in gray matter volume. In this sample, every one additional risk point on the ANU-ADRI was associated with an 8% increased risk of developing MCI/dementia over a 12-year follow-up and this association was partly mediated by a sub-region of the DMN. Risk of cognitive decline assessed with a validated instrument is associated with gray matter volume, particularly in the DMN, a region known to be implicated in the pathological process of the disease.

    2. Protein Networks in Alzheimer's Disease

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Carlsen, Eva Meier; Rasmussen, Rune

      2017-01-01

      Overlap of RNA and protein networks reveals glia cells as key players for the development of symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease in humans......Overlap of RNA and protein networks reveals glia cells as key players for the development of symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease in humans...

    3. Predicting cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease: an integrated analysis

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Lopez, Oscar L; Schwam, Elias; Cummings, Jeffrey

      2010-01-01

      Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined.......Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined....

    4. Seizures in dominantly inherited Alzheimer disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Zarea, Aline; Charbonnier, Camille; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Nicolas, Gaël; Rousseau, Stéphane; Borden, Alaina; Pariente, Jeremie; Le Ber, Isabelle; Pasquier, Florence; Formaglio, Maite; Martinaud, Olivier; Rollin-Sillaire, Adeline; Sarazin, Marie; Croisile, Bernard; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Ceccaldi, Mathieu; Gabelle, Audrey; Chamard, Ludivine; Blanc, Frédéric; Sellal, François; Paquet, Claire; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier; Wallon, David

      2016-08-30

      To assess seizure frequency in a large French cohort of autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) and to determine possible correlations with causative mutations. A national multicentric study was performed in patients with ADEOAD harboring a pathogenic mutation within PSEN1, PSEN2, APP, or a duplication of APP, and a minimal follow-up of 5 years. Clinical, EEG, and imaging data were systematically recorded. We included 132 patients from 77 families: 94 PSEN1 mutation carriers (MCs), 16 APP duplication carriers, 15 APP MCs, and 7 PSEN2 MCs. Seizure frequency was 47.7% after a mean follow-up of 8.4 years (range 5-25). After 5-year follow-up and using a Cox model analysis, the percentages of patients with seizures were respectively 19.1% (10.8%-26.7%) for PSEN1, 28.6% (0%-55.3%) for PSEN2, 31.2% (4.3%-50.6%) for APP duplications, and no patient for APP mutation. APP duplication carriers showed a significantly increased seizure risk compared to both APP MCs (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.55 [95% confidence interval 1.87-16.44]) and PSEN1 MCs (HR = 4.46 [2.11-9.44]). Among all PSEN1 mutations, those within the domains of protein hydrophilic I, transmembrane II (TM-II), TM-III, TM-IV, and TM-VII were associated with a significant increase in seizure frequency compared to other domains (HR = 4.53 [1.93-10.65], p = 0.0005). Seizures are a common feature of ADEOAD. In this population, risk was significantly higher in the APP duplication group than in all other groups. Within PSEN1, 5 specific domains were associated with a higher seizure risk indicating specific correlations between causative mutation and seizures. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

    5. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

      Medline Plus

      Full Text Available ... number of older Americans grows rapidly, so too will the numbers of new and existing cases of ... By mid-century, someone in the United States will develop the disease every 33 seconds. GET INVOLVED. ...

    6. 18F PET with flutemetamol for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease dementia and other dementias in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

      Science.gov (United States)

      Martínez, Gabriel; Vernooij, Robin Wm; Fuentes Padilla, Paulina; Zamora, Javier; Flicker, Leon; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier

      2017-11-22

      18 F-flutemetamol uptake by brain tissue, measured by positron emission tomography (PET), is accepted by regulatory agencies like the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicine Agencies (EMA) for assessing amyloid load in people with dementia. Its added value is mainly demonstrated by excluding Alzheimer's pathology in an established dementia diagnosis. However, the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) revised the diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease and the confidence in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer's disease may be increased when using some amyloid biomarkers tests like 18 F-flutemetamol. These tests, added to the MCI core clinical criteria, might increase the diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) of a testing strategy. However, the DTA of 18 F-flutemetamol to predict the progression from MCI to Alzheimer's disease dementia (ADD) or other dementias has not yet been systematically evaluated. To determine the DTA of the 18 F-flutemetamol PET scan for detecting people with MCI at time of performing the test who will clinically progress to ADD, other forms of dementia (non-ADD) or any form of dementia at follow-up. The most recent search for this review was performed in May 2017. We searched MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP), BIOSIS Citation Index (Thomson Reuters Web of Science), Web of Science Core Collection, including the Science Citation Index (Thomson Reuters Web of Science) and the Conference Proceedings Citation Index (Thomson Reuters Web of Science), LILACS (BIREME), CINAHL (EBSCOhost), ClinicalTrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) (http://www.who.int/ictrp/search/en/). We also searched ALOIS, the Cochrane Dementia & Cognitive Improvement Group's specialised register of dementia studies (http://www.medicine.ox.ac.uk/alois/). We checked the reference lists of any

    7. 18F PET with florbetapir for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease dementia and other dementias in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

      Science.gov (United States)

      Martínez, Gabriel; Vernooij, Robin Wm; Fuentes Padilla, Paulina; Zamora, Javier; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier; Flicker, Leon

      2017-11-22

      18 F-florbetapir uptake by brain tissue measured by positron emission tomography (PET) is accepted by regulatory agencies like the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicine Agencies (EMA) for assessing amyloid load in people with dementia. Its added value is mainly demonstrated by excluding Alzheimer's pathology in an established dementia diagnosis. However, the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) revised the diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease and confidence in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer's disease may be increased when using amyloid biomarkers tests like 18 F-florbetapir. These tests, added to the MCI core clinical criteria, might increase the diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) of a testing strategy. However, the DTA of 18 F-florbetapir to predict the progression from MCI to Alzheimer's disease dementia (ADD) or other dementias has not yet been systematically evaluated. To determine the DTA of the 18 F-florbetapir PET scan for detecting people with MCI at time of performing the test who will clinically progress to ADD, other forms of dementia (non-ADD), or any form of dementia at follow-up. This review is current to May 2017. We searched MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP), BIOSIS Citation Index (Thomson Reuters Web of Science), Web of Science Core Collection, including the Science Citation Index (Thomson Reuters Web of Science) and the Conference Proceedings Citation Index (Thomson Reuters Web of Science), LILACS (BIREME), CINAHL (EBSCOhost), ClinicalTrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) (http://www.who.int/ictrp/search/en/). We also searched ALOIS, the Cochrane Dementia & Cognitive Improvement Group's specialised register of dementia studies (http://www.medicine.ox.ac.uk/alois/). We checked the reference lists of any relevant studies and systematic reviews, and

    8. Alzheimer's Disease: Aging, Insomnia and Epigenetics

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Tzong Yuan Wu

      2010-12-01

      Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of dementia. Severe memory loss, confusion, and impaired cognitive abilities characterize AD. It was only a century after Alzheimer's discovery that scientists were able to shed light on the mystery of its cause, but AD has also become a globally important health issue and the treatment of AD is a challenge for modern medicine. At present, there are five drugs approved in the United States for the treatment of AD, namely, donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, and tacrine (which are all cholinesterase inhibitors; and memantine (which is a glutamate receptor antagonist. However, these drugs show only modest effects on AD patients. Thus, new investigations are necessary for pharmacological development in AD. This brief review focuses on new studies that demonstrate the link between epigenetics and AD, and explores the possibility that insomnia may be one factor that effects AD.

    9. A disease state fingerprint for evaluation of Alzheimer's disease

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Mattila, Jussi; Koikkalainen, Juha; Virkki, Arho

      2011-01-01

      Diagnostic processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are evolving. Knowledge about disease-specific biomarkers is constantly increasing and larger volumes of data are being measured from patients. To gain additional benefits from the collected data, a novel statistical modeling and data visualization...... interpretation of the information. To model the AD state from complex and heterogeneous patient data, a statistical Disease State Index (DSI) method underlying the DSF has been developed. Using baseline data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), the ability of the DSI to model disease......'s degree of similarity to previously diagnosed disease population. A summary of patient data and results of the computation are displayed in a succinct Disease State Fingerprint (DSF) visualization. The visualization clearly discloses how patient data contributes to the AD state, facilitating rapid...

    10. The relationship between stress and Alzheimer's disease

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Nicholas J. Justice

      2018-02-01

      Full Text Available Stress is critically involved in the development and progression of disease. From the stress of undergoing treatments to facing your own mortality, the physiological processes that stress drives have a serious detrimental effect on the ability to heal, cope and maintain a positive quality of life. This is becoming increasingly clear in the case of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases involve the devastating loss of cognitive and motor function which is stressful in itself, but can also disrupt neural circuits that mediate stress responses. Disrupting these circuits produces aberrant emotional and aggressive behavior that causes long-term care to be especially difficult. In addition, added stress drives progression of the disease and can exacerbate symptoms. In this review, I describe how neural and endocrine pathways activated by stress interact with ongoing neurodegenerative disease from both a clinical and experimental perspective. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Stress, Cortisol, Corticosteroids, CRF, CRH

    11. Short-term memory binding deficits in Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Parra, Mario A; Abrahams, Sharon; Fabi, Katia; Logie, Robert; Luzzi, Simona; Della Sala, Sergio

      2009-04-01

      Alzheimer's disease impairs long term memories for related events (e.g. faces with names) more than for single events (e.g. list of faces or names). Whether or not this associative or 'binding' deficit is also found in short-term memory has not yet been explored. In two experiments we investigated binding deficits in verbal short-term memory in Alzheimer's disease. Experiment 1: 23 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 23 age and education matched healthy elderly were recruited. Participants studied visual arrays of objects (six for healthy elderly and four for Alzheimer's disease patients), colours (six for healthy elderly and four for Alzheimer's disease patients), unbound objects and colours (three for healthy elderly and two for Alzheimer's disease patients in each of the two categories), or objects bound with colours (three for healthy elderly and two for Alzheimer's disease patients). They were then asked to recall the items verbally. The memory of patients with Alzheimer's disease for objects bound with colours was significantly worse than for single or unbound features whereas healthy elderly's memory for bound and unbound features did not differ. Experiment 2: 21 Alzheimer's disease patients and 20 matched healthy elderly were recruited. Memory load was increased for the healthy elderly group to eight items in the conditions assessing memory for single or unbound features and to four items in the condition assessing memory for the binding of these features. For Alzheimer's disease patients the task remained the same. This manipulation permitted the performance to be equated across groups in the conditions assessing memory for single or unbound features. The impairment in Alzheimer's disease patients in recalling bound objects reported in Experiment 1 was replicated. The binding cost was greater than that observed in the healthy elderly group, who did not differ in their performance for bound and unbound features. Alzheimer's disease grossly impairs the

    12. A current view of Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hooli, Basavaraj V; Tanzi, Rudolph E

      2009-07-08

      Several genes that influence susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been known for over two decades. Recent advances have elucidated novel candidate genes and the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in AD. Here, we summarize what we have learned from studies of the known AD genes with regard to the causes of AD and emerging therapies. We also review key recent discoveries that have enhanced our understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of this devastating disease, based on new investigations into the genes and molecular mechanisms underlying AD.

    13. Sex differences in cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Li, Rena; Singh, Meharvan

      2014-08-01

      Studies have shown differences in specific cognitive ability domains and risk of Alzheimer's disease between the men and women at later age. However it is important to know that sex differences in cognitive function during adulthood may have their basis in both organizational effects, i.e., occurring as early as during the neuronal development period, as well as in activational effects, where the influence of the sex steroids influence brain function in adulthood. Further, the rate of cognitive decline with aging is also different between the sexes. Understanding the biology of sex differences in cognitive function will not only provide insight into Alzheimer's disease prevention, but also is integral to the development of personalized, gender-specific medicine. This review draws on epidemiological, translational, clinical, and basic science studies to assess the impact of sex differences in cognitive function from young to old, and examines the effects of sex hormone treatments on Alzheimer's disease in men and women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    14. Synaptic Plasticity, Dementia and Alzheimer Disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura; Zusso, Morena; Giusti, Pietro

      2017-01-01

      Neuroplasticity is not only shaped by learning and memory but is also a mediator of responses to neuron attrition and injury (compensatory plasticity). As an ongoing process it reacts to neuronal cell activity and injury, death, and genesis, which encompasses the modulation of structural and functional processes of axons, dendrites, and synapses. The range of structural elements that comprise plasticity includes long-term potentiation (a cellular correlate of learning and memory), synaptic efficacy and remodelling, synaptogenesis, axonal sprouting and dendritic remodelling, and neurogenesis and recruitment. Degenerative diseases of the human brain continue to pose one of biomedicine's most intractable problems. Research on human neurodegeneration is now moving from descriptive to mechanistic analyses. At the same time, it is increasing apparently that morphological lesions traditionally used by neuropathologists to confirm post-mortem clinical diagnosis might furnish us with an experimentally tractable handle to understand causative pathways. Consider the aging-dependent neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD) which is characterised at the neuropathological level by deposits of insoluble amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in extracellular plaques and aggregated tau protein, which is found largely in the intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. We now appreciate that mild cognitive impairment in early AD may be due to synaptic dysfunction caused by accumulation of non-fibrillar, oligomeric Aβ, occurring well in advance of evident widespread synaptic loss and neurodegeneration. Soluble Aβ oligomers can adversely affect synaptic structure and plasticity at extremely low concentrations, although the molecular substrates by which synaptic memory mechanisms are disrupted remain to be fully elucidated. The dendritic spine constitutes a primary locus of excitatory synaptic transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. These structures protruding from dendritic

    15. Modern approach in the therapy of Alzheimer's disease

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      D. I. Rodin

      2014-01-01

      Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a well-known neurodegenerative disorder. One of its main risk factors is age. Due to a worldwide increase of human longevity Alzheimer's disease became the most common form of dementia. The disease has been studied in different countries for many decades but still its etiology remains unclear. By now there is no cure for Alzheimer's, moreover there are no that can at least slow down the disease progression. In this review we made an attempt to summarize all current studies of the most advanced drugs for Alzheimer's.

    16. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and multiple infarct dementia by tomographic imaging of iodine-123 IMP

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Cohen, M.B.; Graham, L.S.; Lake, R.

      1986-01-01

      Tomographic imaging of the brain was performed using a rotating slant hole collimator and [ 123 I]N-isopropyl p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) in normal subjects (n = 6) and patients with either Alzheimer's disease (n = 5) or multiple infarct dementia (n = 3). Four blinded observers were asked to make a diagnosis from the images. Normal subjects and patients with multiple infarct dementia were correctly identified. Alzheimer's disease was diagnosed in three of the five patients with this disease. One patient with early Alzheimer's disease was classified as normal by two of the four observers. Another patient with Alzheimer's disease had an asymmetric distribution of IMP and was incorrectly diagnosed as multiple infarct dementia by all four observers. Limited angle tomography of the cerebral distribution of 123 I appears to be a useful technique for the evaluation of demented patients

    17. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges

      OpenAIRE

      Kim, Dana; Kim, Young-Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang-Shin; Kang, Ju-Hee

      2016-01-01

      No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested bio...

    18. Neuroinflammation and Alzheimer disease: clinical and therapeutic implications

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Eikelenboom, P.; Rozemuller, A. J.; Hoozemans, J. J.; Veerhuis, R.; van Gool, W. A.

      2000-01-01

      In Alzheimer disease brains, the amyloid plaques are closely associated with a locally induced, nonimmune-mediated, chronic inflammatory response without any apparent influx of leukocytes from the blood. The present findings indicate that in cerebral A beta diseases (Alzheimer disease, Down

    19. [Nutritional approaches to modulate oxidative stress that induce Alzheimer's disease. Nutritional approaches to prevent Alzheimer's disease].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lara, Humberto Herman; Alanís-Garza, Eduardo Javier; Estrada Puente, María Fernanda; Mureyko, Lucía Liliana; Alarcón Torres, David Alejandro; Ixtepan Turrent, Liliana

      2015-01-01

      Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the world; symptoms first appear after age 65 and have a progressive evolution. Expecting an increase on its incidence and knowing there is currently no cure for Alzheimer's disease, it is a necessity to prevent progression. The change in diet due to globalization may explain the growth of the incidence in places such as Japan and Mediterranean countries, which used to have fewer incidences. There is a direct correlation between disease progression and the increased intake of alcohol, saturated fats, and red meat. Therefore, we find obesity and higher serum levels in cholesterol due to saturated fat as a result. A way to decrease the progression of Alzheimer's is through a diet rich in polipheno/es (potent antioxidants), unsaturated fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated), fish, vegetable fa t, fruits with low glycemic index, and a moderate consumption of red wine. Through this potent antioxidant diet we accomplish the prevention of dementia and the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This article emphasizes the food and other components that have been demonstrated to decrease the oxidative stress related to these progressive diseases.

    20. Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog): Normative Data for the Portuguese Population.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Nogueira, Joana; Freitas, Sandra; Duro, Diana; Tábuas-Pereira, Miguel; Guerreiro, Manuela; Almeida, Jorge; Santana, Isabel

      2018-02-28

      The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale is a brief battery developed to assess cognitive functioning in Alzheimer's disease that encompasses the core characteristics of cognitive decline (e.g. memory, language, praxis, constructive ability and orientation). The early detection, as well as the monitoring of cognitive decline along disease progression, is extremely important in clinical care and interventional research. The main goals of the present study were to analyze the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale, and to establish normative values for the Portuguese population. The Portuguese version of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale was administered to 223 cognitively healthy participants according to a standard assessment protocol consisting of the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and the Adults and Older Adults Functional Assessment Inventory. Normal performance on the assessment protocol was the inclusion criteria for the study. The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale revealed good psychometric properties when used in the Portuguese population. Age was the main predictor of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale total score (R2 = 0.123), whereas the influence of education level was lower (R2 = 0.027). These two variables explained 14.4% of the variance on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale scores and were used to stratify the normative values for the Portuguese population presented here. On the total sample, the average total score in the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale was 6 points. The normative data were determined according to age and educational level as these were the sociodemographic variables that significantly contributed to the prediction of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale

    1. Epigenetic Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Johannes eGräff

      2015-12-01

      Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the major cause of dementia in Western societies. It progresses asymptomatically during decades before being belatedly diagnosed when therapeutic strategies have become unviable. Although several genetic alterations have been associated with AD, the vast majority of AD cases do not show strong genetic underpinnings and are thus considered a consequence of non-genetic factors. Epigenetic mechanisms allow for the integration of long-lasting non-genetic inputs on specific genetic backgrounds, and recently, a growing number of epigenetic alterations in AD have been described. For instance, an accumulation of dysregulated epigenetic mechanisms in aging, the predominant risk factor of AD, might facilitate the onset of the disease. Likewise, mutations in several enzymes of the epigenetic machinery have been associated with neurodegenerative processes that are altered in AD such as impaired learning and memory formation. Genome-wide and locus-specific epigenetic alterations have also been reported, and several epigenetically dysregulated genes validated by independent groups. From these studies, a picture emerges of AD as being associated with DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation, suggesting a general repressed chromatin state and epigenetically reduced plasticity in AD. Here we review these recent findings and discuss several technical and methodological considerations that are imperative for their correct interpretation. We also pay particular focus on potential implementations and theoretical frameworks that we expect will help to better direct future studies aimed to unravel the epigenetic participation in AD.

    2. Therapeutics of Neurotransmitters in Alzheimer's Disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kandimalla, Ramesh; Reddy, P Hemachandra

      2017-01-01

      Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, characterized by the loss of memory, multiple cognitive impairments and changes in the personality and behavior. Several decades of intense research have revealed that multiple cellular changes are involved in disease process, including synaptic damage, mitochondrial abnormalities and inflammatory responses, in addition to formation and accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and phosphorylated tau. Although tremendous progress has been made in understanding the impact of neurotransmitters in the progression and pathogenesis of AD, we still do not have a drug molecule associated with neurotransmitter(s) that can delay disease process in elderly individuals and/or restore cognitive functions in AD patients. The purpose of our article is to assess the latest developments in neurotransmitters research using cell and mouse models of AD. We also updated the current status of clinical trials using neurotransmitters' agonists/antagonists in AD.

    3. Developing novel blood-based biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Snyder, Heather M; Carrillo, Maria C; Grodstein, Francine

      2014-01-01

      Alzheimer's disease is the public health crisis of the 21st century. There is a clear need for a widely available, inexpensive and reliable method to diagnosis Alzheimer's disease in the earliest stages, track disease progression, and accelerate clinical development of new therapeutics. One avenue...... of research being explored is blood based biomarkers. In April 2012, the Alzheimer's Association and the Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation convened top scientists from around the world to discuss the state of blood based biomarker development. This manuscript summarizes the meeting and the resultant...

    4. Dysfunctional Sensory Modalities, Locus Coeruleus, and Basal Forebrain: Early Determinants that Promote Neuropathogenesis of Cognitive and Memory Decline and Alzheimer's Disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Daulatzai, Mak Adam

      2016-10-01

      Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. It is essential to unravel its etiology and pathogenesis. This should enable us to study the presymptomatic stages of the disease and to analyze and reverse the antemortem behavioral, memory, and cognitive dysfunction. Prima facie, an ongoing chronic vulnerability involving neural insult may lead normal elderly to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and then to AD. Development of effective preventive and therapeutic strategies to thwart the disease pathology obviously requires a thorough delineation of underlying disruptive neuropathological processes. Our sensory capacity for touch, smell, taste, hearing, and vision declines with advancing age. Declines in different sensory attributes are considered here to be the primary "first-tier pathologies." Olfactory loss is among the first clinical signs of neurodegenerative diseases including AD and Parkinson's disease (PD). Sensory dysfunction in the aged promotes pathological disturbances in the locus coeruleus, basal forebrain, entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and several key areas of neocortex and brainstem. Hence, sensory dysfunction is the pivotal factor that may upregulate cognitive and memory dysfunction. The age-related constellation of comorbid pathological factors may include apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, alcohol abuse, head trauma, and obstructive sleep apnea. The concepts and trajectories delineated here are the dynamic pillars of the current hypothesis presented-it postulates that the sensory decline, in conjunction with the above pathologies, is crucial in triggering neurodegeneration and promoting cognitive/memory dysfunction in aging and AD. The application of this thesis can be important in formulating new multifactorial preventive and treatment strategies (suggested here) in order to attenuate cognitive and memory decline and ameliorate pathological dysfunction in aging, MCI, and AD.

    5. Alzheimer's disease camouflaged by histrionic personality disorder.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hellwig, Sabine; Dykierek, Petra; Hellwig, Bernhard; Zwernemann, Stefan; Meyer, Philipp T

      2012-02-01

      A common condition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is unawareness of deficits. Different concepts try to elucidate the nature of this symptom. An essential question relates to the interaction of organic and psychogenic factors. Here we present a patient who displayed her cognitive deficits as attention-seeking behaviour. There was a history of histrionic personality disorder according to ICD-10 criteria. Unexpectedly, the final diagnosis after extensive diagnostic work-up was AD. The unusual coincidence of AD and a histrionic personality disorder hampered the clinical process of diagnosing dementia. We discuss unawareness as a complex concept incorporating neuroanatomical, psychiatric, and psychosocial aspects.

    6. Therapeutic role of rifampicin in Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Yulug, Burak; Hanoglu, Lütfü; Ozansoy, Mehmet; Isık, Dogan; Kilic, Ulkan; Kilic, Ertugrul; Schabitz, Wolf Rüdiger

      2018-03-01

      Rifampicin exerts significant brain protective functions in multiple experimental models. Here we summarize the underlying mechanisms of the neuroprotective and pro-cognitive effects of rifampicin that are mediated by its anti-inflammatory, anti-tau, anti-amyloid, and cholinergic effects. Beyond suggesting that rifampicin shows strong brain protective effects in preclinical models of Alzheimer's disease, we also provide substantial clinical evidence for the neuroprotective and pro-cognitive effects of rifampicin. Future neuroimaging studies combined with clinical assessment scores are the following steps to be taken in this field of research. © 2018 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2018 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

    7. Exploring Symmetry to Assist Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

      Science.gov (United States)

      Illán, I. A.; Górriz, J. M.; Ramírez, J.; Salas-Gonzalez, D.; López, M.; Padilla, P.; Chaves, R.; Segovia, F.; Puntonet, C. G.

      Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder first affecting memory functions and then gradually affecting all cognitive functions with behavioral impairments and eventually causing death. Functional brain imaging as Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is commonly used to guide the clinician's diagnosis. The essential left-right symmetry of human brains is shown to play a key role in coding and recognition. In the present work we explore the implications of this symmetry in AD diagnosis, showing that recognition may be enhanced when considering this latent symmetry.

    8. Florbetaben PET in the Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease: A Discrete Event Simulation to Explore Its Potential Value and Key Data Gaps

      Science.gov (United States)

      Guo, Shien; Getsios, Denis; Hernandez, Luis; Cho, Kelly; Lawler, Elizabeth; Altincatal, Arman; Lanes, Stephan; Blankenburg, Michael

      2012-01-01

      The growing understanding of the use of biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD) may enable physicians to make more accurate and timely diagnoses. Florbetaben, a beta-amyloid tracer used with positron emission tomography (PET), is one of these diagnostic biomarkers. This analysis was undertaken to explore the potential value of florbetaben PET in the diagnosis of AD among patients with suspected dementia and to identify key data that are needed to further substantiate its value. A discrete event simulation was developed to conduct exploratory analyses from both US payer and societal perspectives. The model simulates the lifetime course of disease progression for individuals, evaluating the impact of their patient management from initial diagnostic work-up to final diagnosis. Model inputs were obtained from specific analyses of a large longitudinal dataset from the New England Veterans Healthcare System and supplemented with data from public data sources and assumptions. The analyses indicate that florbetaben PET has the potential to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs under certain scenarios. Key data on the use of florbetaben PET, such as its influence on time to confirmation of final diagnosis, treatment uptake, and treatment persistency, are unavailable and would be required to confirm its value. PMID:23326754

    9. Florbetaben PET in the Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease: A Discrete Event Simulation to Explore Its Potential Value and Key Data Gaps

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Shien Guo

      2012-01-01

      Full Text Available The growing understanding of the use of biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD may enable physicians to make more accurate and timely diagnoses. Florbetaben, a beta-amyloid tracer used with positron emission tomography (PET, is one of these diagnostic biomarkers. This analysis was undertaken to explore the potential value of florbetaben PET in the diagnosis of AD among patients with suspected dementia and to identify key data that are needed to further substantiate its value. A discrete event simulation was developed to conduct exploratory analyses from both US payer and societal perspectives. The model simulates the lifetime course of disease progression for individuals, evaluating the impact of their patient management from initial diagnostic work-up to final diagnosis. Model inputs were obtained from specific analyses of a large longitudinal dataset from the New England Veterans Healthcare System and supplemented with data from public data sources and assumptions. The analyses indicate that florbetaben PET has the potential to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs under certain scenarios. Key data on the use of florbetaben PET, such as its influence on time to confirmation of final diagnosis, treatment uptake, and treatment persistency, are unavailable and would be required to confirm its value.

    10. Isobaric Quantification of Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Peptides in Alzheimer's Disease: C-Terminal Truncation Relates to Early Measures of Neurodegeneration.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Rogeberg, Magnus; Almdahl, Ina Selseth; Wettergreen, Marianne; Nilsson, Lars N G; Fladby, Tormod

      2015-11-06

      The amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide is the main constituent of the plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Measurement of Aβ1-42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a valuable marker in AD research, where low levels indicate AD. Although the use of immunoassays measuring Aβ1-38 and Aβ1-40 in addition to Aβ1-42 has increased, quantitative assays of other Aβ peptides remain rarely explored. We recently discovered novel Aβ peptides in CSF using antibodies recognizing the Aβ mid-domain region. Here we have developed a method using both Aβ N-terminal and mid-domain antibodies for immunoprecipitation in combination with isobaric labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for relative quantification of endogenous Aβ peptides in CSF. The developed method was used in a pilot study to produce Aβ peptide profiles from 38 CSF samples. Statistical comparison between CSF samples from 19 AD patients and 19 cognitively healthy controls revealed no significant differences at group level. A significant correlation was found between several larger C-terminally truncated Aβ peptides and protein biomarkers for neuronal damage, particularly prominent in the control group. Comparison of the isobaric quantification with immunoassays measuring Aβ1-38 or Aβ1-40 showed good correlation (r(2) = 0.84 and 0.85, respectively) between the two analysis methods. The developed method could be used to assess disease-modifying therapies directed at Aβ production or degradation.

    11. Influence of cerebrovascular disease on brain networks in prodromal and clinical Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Chong, Joanna Su Xian; Liu, Siwei; Loke, Yng Miin; Hilal, Saima; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Xu, Xin; Tan, Boon Yeow; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher Li-Hsian; Zhou, Juan

      2017-11-01

      Network-sensitive neuroimaging methods have been used to characterize large-scale brain network degeneration in Alzheimer's disease and its prodrome. However, few studies have investigated the combined effect of Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular disease on brain network degeneration. Our study sought to examine the intrinsic functional connectivity and structural covariance network changes in 235 prodromal and clinical Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease. We focused particularly on two higher-order cognitive networks-the default mode network and the executive control network. We found divergent functional connectivity and structural covariance patterns in Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease. Alzheimer's disease patients without cerebrovascular disease, but not Alzheimer's disease patients with cerebrovascular disease, showed reductions in posterior default mode network functional connectivity. By comparison, while both groups exhibited parietal reductions in executive control network functional connectivity, only Alzheimer's disease patients with cerebrovascular disease showed increases in frontal executive control network connectivity. Importantly, these distinct executive control network changes were recapitulated in prodromal Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease. Across Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease, higher default mode network functional connectivity z-scores correlated with greater hippocampal volumes while higher executive control network functional connectivity z-scores correlated with greater white matter changes. In parallel, only Alzheimer's disease patients without cerebrovascular disease showed increased default mode network structural covariance, while only Alzheimer's disease patients with cerebrovascular disease showed increased executive control network structural covariance compared to controls. Our

    12. A conceptual framework and ethics analysis for prevention trials of Alzheimer Disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Peters, Kevin R; Lynn Beattie, B; Feldman, Howard H; Illes, Judy

      2013-11-01

      As our understanding of the neurobiology of Alzheimer Disease deepens, it has become evident that early intervention is critical to achieving successful therapeutic impact. The availability of diagnostic criteria for preclinical Alzheimer Disease adds momentum to research directed at this goal and even to prevention. The landscape of therapeutic research is thus poised to undergo a dramatic shift in the next 5-10 years, with clinical trials involving subjects at risk for Alzheimer Disease who have few or no symptoms. These trials will also likely rely heavily on genetics, biomarkers, and or risk factor stratification to identify individuals at risk for Alzheimer Disease. Here, we propose a conceptual framework to guide this next generation of pharmacological and non-pharmacological clinical pursuit, and discuss some of the foreseeable ethical considerations that may accompany them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    13. Alzheimer's or Depression: Could It Be Both?

      Science.gov (United States)

      Alzheimer's or depression: Could it be both? Alzheimer's and depression have some similar symptoms. Proper treatment improves quality of life. By Mayo Clinic Staff Early Alzheimer's disease and depression share many ...

    14. Level of understanding of Alzheimer disease among caregivers and the general population.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Jorge, C; Cetó, M; Arias, A; Blasco, E; Gil, M P; López, R; Dakterzada, F; Purroy, F; Piñol-Ripoll, G

      2018-05-11

      Understanding of Alzheimer disease is fundamental for early diagnosis and to reduce caregiver burden. The objective of this study is to evaluate the degree of understanding of Alzheimer disease among informal caregivers and different segments of the general population through the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale. We assessed the knowledge of caregivers in different follow-up periods (less than one year, between 1 and 5 years, and over 5 years since diagnosis) and individuals from the general population. Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale scores were grouped into different items: life impact, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, disease progression, and caregiving. A total of 419 people (215 caregivers and 204 individuals from the general population) were included in the study. No significant differences were found between groups for overall Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale score (19.1 vs. 18.8, P = .9). There is a scarce knowledge of disease risk factors (49.3%) or the care needed (51.2%), while symptoms (78.6%) and course of the disease (77.2%) were the best understood aspects. Older caregiver age was correlated with worse Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale scores overall and for life impact, symptoms, treatment, and disease progression (P < .05). Time since diagnosis improved caregivers' knowledge of Alzheimer disease symptoms (P = .00) and diagnosis (P = .05). Assessing the degree of understanding of Alzheimer disease is essential to the development of health education strategies both in the general population and among caregivers. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

    15. From here to epilepsy: the risk of seizure in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Nicastro, Nicolas; Assal, Frédéric; Seeck, Margitta

      2016-03-01

      To describe the association between Alzheimer's disease and seizures by reviewing epidemiological data from available literature and to assess the putative pathophysiological links between neurodegeneration and altered cortical excitability. We also discuss specific antiepileptic treatment strategies in patients with Alzheimer's disease, as well as transient epileptic amnesia as a possible crossroads between degeneration and epilepsy. Regarding epidemiology, we searched publications in Pubmed, Medline, Scopus and Web of Science (until September 2015) using the keywords "incidence", "prevalence" and "frequency", as well as "Alzheimer's disease" and "seizures". In addition, therapeutic aspects for seizures in Alzheimer's disease were searched using the key words "antiepileptic drugs", "seizure treatment" and "Alzheimer". The prevalence and incidence rates of seizures were found to be increased 2 to 6-fold in patients with Alzheimer's disease compared to age-adjusted control patients. Treatment strategies have mainly been extrapolated from elderly patients without dementia, except for one single randomised trial, in which levetiracetam, lamotrigine and phenobarbital efficacy and tolerance were investigated in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mouse models appear to show a major role of amyloid precursor protein and its cleavage products in the generation of cortical hyperexcitability. A link between Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy has long been described and recent cohort studies have more clearly delineated risk factors associated with the genesis of seizures, such as early onset and possibly severity of dementia. As genetic forms of Alzheimer's disease and experimental mouse models suggest, beta-amyloid may play a prominent role in the propagation of synchronised abnormal discharges, perhaps more via an excitatory mode than a direct neurodegenerative effect.

    16. Prevention of Alzheimer disease: The roles of nutrition and primary care.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bane, Tabitha J; Cole, Connie

      2015-05-15

      Risk factors for developing Alzheimer disease include hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes. Due to lack of effective treatments for Alzheimer disease, nutrition and primary prevention becomes important.

    17. Diffusion tensor metrics as biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Julio Acosta-Cabronero

      Full Text Available Although diffusion tensor imaging has been a major research focus for Alzheimer's disease in recent years, it remains unclear whether it has sufficient stability to have biomarker potential. To date, frequently inconsistent results have been reported, though lack of standardisation in acquisition and analysis make such discrepancies difficult to interpret. There is also, at present, little knowledge of how the biometric properties of diffusion tensor imaging might evolve in the course of Alzheimer's disease.The biomarker question was addressed in this study by adopting a standardised protocol both for the whole brain (tract-based spatial statistics, and for a region of interest: the midline corpus callosum. In order to study the evolution of tensor changes, cross-sectional data from very mild (N = 21 and mild (N = 22 Alzheimer's disease patients were examined as well as a longitudinal cohort (N = 16 that had been rescanned at 12 months.The results revealed that increased axial and mean diffusivity are the first abnormalities to occur and that the first region to develop such significant differences was mesial parietal/splenial white matter; these metrics, however, remained relatively static with advancing disease indicating they are suitable as 'state-specific' markers. In contrast, increased radial diffusivity, and therefore decreased fractional anisotropy-though less detectable early-became increasingly abnormal with disease progression, and, in the splenium of the corpus callosum, correlated significantly with dementia severity; these metrics therefore appear 'stage-specific' and would be ideal for monitoring disease progression. In addition, the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses showed that the progressive abnormalities in radial diffusivity and fractional anisotropy always occurred in areas that had first shown an increase in axial and mean diffusivity. Given that the former two metrics correlate with dementia severity

    18. Alzheimer's disease prevention: A way forward.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bermejo-Pareja, F; Llamas-Velasco, S; Villarejo-Galende, A

      2016-12-01

      This review proposes a more optimistic view of Alzheimer's disease (AD), in contrast to that contributed by the ageing of the population and the failure of potentially curative therapies (vaccines and others). Treatment failure is likely due to the fact that AD gestates in the brain for decades but manifests in old age. This review updates the concept of AD and presents the results of recent studies that show that primary prevention can reduce the incidence and delay the onset of the disease. Half of all cases of AD are potentially preventable through education, the control of cardiovascular risk factors, the promotion of healthy lifestyles and specific drug treatments. These approaches could substantially reduce the future incidence rate of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

    19. Characterizing Alzheimer's disease through metabolomics and investigating anti-Alzheimer's disease effects of natural products.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Yi, Lunzhao; Liu, Wenbin; Wang, Zhe; Ren, Dabing; Peng, Weijun

      2017-06-01

      Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly people and is among the greatest healthcare challenges of the 21st century. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of AD remain poorly understood, and no curative treatments are available to slow down or stop the degenerative effects of AD. As a high-throughput approach, metabolomics is gaining significant attention in AD research, because it has a powerful potential to discover novel biomarkers, unravel new therapeutic targets for AD, and identify perturbed metabolic pathways involved in AD progression. Here, we systematically review metabolomics with regard to its recent advances and applications in the identification of potential biomarkers for early AD diagnosis and pathogenesis research. In addition, we illustrate the developments in metabolomics as an effective tool for understanding the anti-AD mechanisms of natural products. We believe that the insights from these advances can narrow the gap between metabolomics research and clinical applications of laboratory findings. Moreover, we discuss some limitations and perspectives of biomarker identification in metabolomics. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

    20. The zinc dyshomeostasis hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Travis J A Craddock

      Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Hallmark AD neuropathology includes extracellular amyloid plaques composed largely of the amyloid-β protein (Aβ, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs composed of hyper-phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau (MAP-tau, and microtubule destabilization. Early-onset autosomal dominant AD genes are associated with excessive Aβ accumulation, however cognitive impairment best correlates with NFTs and disrupted microtubules. The mechanisms linking Aβ and NFT pathologies in AD are unknown. Here, we propose that sequestration of zinc by Aβ-amyloid deposits (Aβ oligomers and plaques not only drives Aβ aggregation, but also disrupts zinc homeostasis in zinc-enriched brain regions important for memory and vulnerable to AD pathology, resulting in intra-neuronal zinc levels, which are either too low, or excessively high. To evaluate this hypothesis, we 1 used molecular modeling of zinc binding to the microtubule component protein tubulin, identifying specific, high-affinity zinc binding sites that influence side-to-side tubulin interaction, the sensitive link in microtubule polymerization and stability. We also 2 performed kinetic modeling showing zinc distribution in extra-neuronal Aβ deposits can reduce intra-neuronal zinc binding to microtubules, destabilizing microtubules. Finally, we 3 used metallomic imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS to show anatomically-localized and age-dependent zinc dyshomeostasis in specific brain regions of Tg2576 transgenic, mice, a model for AD. We found excess zinc in brain regions associated with memory processing and NFT pathology. Overall, we present a theoretical framework and support for a new theory of AD linking extra-neuronal Aβ amyloid to intra-neuronal NFTs and cognitive dysfunction. The connection, we propose, is based on β-amyloid-induced alterations in zinc ion concentration inside neurons affecting stability of