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Sample records for e2f2 suppresses myc-induced

  1. Epigenetic reader BRD4 inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to suppress E2F2-cell cycle regulation circuit in liver cancer

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    Choi, Sung Kyung; Shen, Qingyu; Choi, Wahn Soo; Han, Jeung-Whan; Nam, Suk Woo; You, Jueng Soo

    2016-01-01

    Deregulation of the epigenome component affects multiple pathways in the cancer phenotype since the epigenome acts at the pinnacle of the hierarchy of gene expression. Pioneering work over the past decades has highlighted that targeting enzymes or proteins involved in the epigenetic regulation is a valuable approach to cancer therapy. Very recent results demonstrated that inhibiting the epigenetic reader BRD4 has notable efficacy in diverse cancer types. We investigated the potential of BRD4 as a therapeutic target in liver malignancy. BRD4 was overexpressed in three different large cohort of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients as well as in liver cancer cell lines. BRD4 inhibition by JQ1 induced anti-tumorigenic effects including cell cycle arrest, cellular senescence, reduced wound healing capacity and soft agar colony formation in liver cancer cell lines. Notably, BRD4 inhibition caused MYC-independent large-scale gene expression changes in liver cancer cells. Serial gene expression analyses with SK-Hep1 liver cancer cells treated with JQ1 to delineate the key player of BRD4 inhibition identified E2F2 as the first line of downstream direct target of BRD4. Further experiments including chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay and loss of function study confirmed E2F2 as key player of BRD4 inhibition. Overexpressed E2F2 is a crucial center of cell cycle regulation and high expression of E2F2 is significantly associated with poor prognosis of HCC patients. Our findings reveal BRD4-E2F2-cell cycle regulation as a novel molecular circuit in liver cancer and provide a therapeutic strategy and innovative insights for liver cancer therapies. PMID:27081696

  2. Knockdown of E2F2 inhibits tumorigenicity, but preserves stemness of human embryonic stem cells.

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    Suzuki, Daniela Emi; Nakahata, Adriana Miti; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2014-06-01

    Tumorigenicity of human pluripotent stem cells is a major threat limiting their application in cell therapy protocols. It remains unclear, however, whether suppression of tumorigenic potential can be achieved without critically affecting pluripotency. A previous study has identified hyperexpressed genes in cancer stem cells, among which is E2F2, a gene involved in malignant transformation and stem cell self-renewal. Here we tested whether E2F2 knockdown would affect the proliferative capacity and tumorigenicity of human embryonic stem cells (hESC). Transient E2F2 silencing in hESC significantly inhibited expression of the proto-oncogenes BMI1 and HMGA1, in addition to proliferation of hESC, indicated by a higher proportion of cells in G1, fewer cells in G2/M phase, and a reduced capacity to generate hESC colonies in vitro. Nonetheless, E2F2-silenced cells kept expression of typical pluripotency markers and displayed differentiation capacity in vitro. More importantly, E2F2 knockdown in hESC significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo, which was considerably smaller than tumors generated from control hESC, although displaying typical teratoma traits, a major indicator of pluripotency retention in E2F2-silenced cells. These results suggest that E2F2 knockdown can inhibit hESC proliferation and tumorigenicity without significantly harming stemness, providing a rationale to future protocols aiming at minimizing risks related to therapeutic application of cells and/or products derived from human pluripotent cells.

  3. The identification of prostaglandins E2, F2α and A2 from rabbit kidney medulla

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    Lee, J. B.; Crowshaw, K.; Takman, B. H.; Attrep, Katherine A.; Gougoutas, J. Z.

    1967-01-01

    Rabbit kidney medulla (10kg.) was homogenized in 5mm-disodium hydrogen phosphate and deproteinized with ethanol, and the concentrated supernatant solution was extracted at pH8 with light petroleum and at pH2 with chloroform. The acidic lipids present in the chloroform phase were separated on silicic acid columns into three biologically active fractions. The first fraction contained only vasodepressor activity; the second fraction contained both vasodepressor and non-vascular-smooth-muscle-stimulating activity; the third fraction contained both vasopressor and non-vascular-smooth-muscle-stimulating activity. Purification of each fraction by reversed-phase partition and thick-layer chromatography yielded three pure acids. Thin-layer chromatographic, spectroscopic and mass-spectral analysis of the acids and their methyl esters established their structures as prostaglandins E2, F2α and A2. Evidence is presented demonstrating that part or all of the prostaglandin A2 is formed during the isolation procedures from endogenous prostaglandin E2. PMID:16742553

  4. Exploring Genetic Factors Involved in Huntington Disease Age of Onset: E2F2 as a New Potential Modifier Gene.

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    Leire Valcárcel-Ocete

    Full Text Available Age of onset (AO of Huntington disease (HD is mainly determined by the length of the CAG repeat expansion (CAGexp in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Additional genetic variation has been suggested to contribute to AO, although the mechanism by which it could affect AO is presently unknown. The aim of this study is to explore the contribution of candidate genetic factors to HD AO in order to gain insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disorder. For that purpose, two AO definitions were used: the earliest age with unequivocal signs of HD (earliest AO or eAO, and the first motor symptoms age (motor AO or mAO. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed between genetic variation within 20 candidate genes and eAO or mAO, using DNA and clinical information of 253 HD patients from REGISTRY project. Gene expression analyses were carried out by RT-qPCR with an independent sample of 35 HD patients from Basque Country Hospitals. We found suggestive association signals between HD eAO and/or mAO and genetic variation within the E2F2, ATF7IP, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, LINC01559, HIP1 and GRIK2 genes. Among them, the most significant was the association between eAO and rs2742976, mapping to the promoter region of E2F2 transcription factor. Furthermore, rs2742976 T allele patient carriers exhibited significantly lower lymphocyte E2F2 gene expression, suggesting a possible implication of E2F2-dependent transcriptional activity in HD pathogenesis. Thus, E2F2 emerges as a new potential HD AO modifier factor.

  5. Suppression of c-Myc induces apoptosis via an AMPK/mTOR-dependent pathway by 4-O-methyl-ascochlorin in leukemia cells.

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    Shin, Jae-Moon; Jeong, Yun-Jeong; Cho, Hyun-Ji; Magae, Junji; Bae, Young-Seuk; Chang, Young-Chae

    2016-05-01

    4-O-Methyl-ascochlorin (MAC) is a methylated derivative of the prenyl-phenol antibiotic ascochlorin, which was isolated from an incomplete fungus, Ascochyta viciae. Although the effects of MAC on apoptosis have been reported, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that MAC promoted apoptotic cell death and downregulated c-Myc expression in K562 human leukemia cells. The effect of MAC on apoptosis was similar to that of 10058-F4 (a c-Myc inhibitor) or c-Myc siRNA, suggesting that the downregulation of c-Myc expression plays a role in the apoptotic effect of MAC. Further investigation showed that MAC downregulated c-Myc by inhibiting protein synthesis. MAC promoted the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibited the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its target proteins, including p70S6 K and 4E-BP-1. Treatment of cells with AICAR (an AMPK activator), rapamycin (an mTOR inhibitor), or mTOR siRNA downregulated c-Myc expression and induced apoptosis to a similar extent to that of MAC. These results suggest that the effect of MAC on apoptosis induction in human leukemia cells is mediated by the suppression of c-Myc protein synthesis via an AMPK/mTOR-dependent mechanism.

  6. c-Myc-Induced Extrachromosomal Elements Carry Active Chromatin

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    Greg Smith

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Murine Pre-13 lymphocytes with experimentally activated MycER show both chromosomal and extrachromosomal gene amplification. In this report, we have elucidated the size, structure, functional components of c-Myc-induced extrachromosomal elements (EEs. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that EEs isolated from MycER-activated Pre-B+ cells are an average of 10 times larger than EEs isolated from non-MycER-activated control Pre-B- cells. We demonstrate that these large c-Myc-induced EEs are associated with histone proteins, whereas EEs of non-MycER-activated Pre B- cells are not. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses using pan -histone-specific, histone H3 phosphorylation-specific, histone H4 acetylation-specific antibodies indicate that a significant proportion of EEs analyzed from MycER-activated cells harbors transcriptionally competent and/or active chromatin. Moreover, these large, c-Myc-induced EEs carry genes. Whereas the total genetic make-up of these c-Myc-induced EEs is unknown, we found that 30.2% of them contain the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR gene, whereas cyclin C (CCNC was absent. In addition, 50% of these c-Myc-activated Pre-B+ EEs incorporated bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, identifying them as genetic structures that self-propagate. In contrast, EEs isolated from non-Myc-activated cells neither carry the DHFR gene nor incorporate BrdU, suggesting that c-Myc deregulation generates a new class of EEs.

  7. Oncogenic Myc Induces Expression of Glutamine Synthetase through Promoter Demethylation.

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    Bott, Alex J; Peng, I-Chen; Fan, Yongjun; Faubert, Brandon; Zhao, Lu; Li, Jinyu; Neidler, Sarah; Sun, Yu; Jaber, Nadia; Krokowski, Dawid; Lu, Wenyun; Pan, Ji-An; Powers, Scott; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Hatzoglou, Maria; Murphy, Daniel J; Jones, Russell; Wu, Song; Girnun, Geoffrey; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2015-12-01

    c-Myc is known to promote glutamine usage by upregulating glutaminase (GLS), which converts glutamine to glutamate that is catabolized in the TCA cycle. Here we report that in a number of human and murine cells and cancers, Myc induces elevated expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), also termed glutamine synthetase (GS), which catalyzes the de novo synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. This is through upregulation of a Myc transcriptional target thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG), which promotes active demethylation of the GS promoter and its increased expression. Elevated expression of GS promotes cell survival under glutamine limitation, while silencing of GS decreases cell proliferation and xenograft tumor growth. Upon GS overexpression, increased glutamine enhances nucleotide synthesis and amino acid transport. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of Myc in inducing glutamine synthesis and suggest a molecular connection between DNA demethylation and glutamine metabolism in Myc-driven cancers.

  8. Concentrations of prostaglandins E2, F2 alpha and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha in the utero-ovarian venous plasma of nonpregnant and early pregnant ewes.

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    Silvia, W J; Ottobre, J S; Inskeep, E K

    1984-05-01

    The effect of pregnancy on concentrations of prostaglandins E2, F2 alpha and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (PGE2, PGF2 alpha and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha) in utero-ovarian venous plasma was examined in ewes on Days 10 through 14 after estrus, an interval which includes the critical period for maternal recognition of pregnancy. The utero-ovarian vein ipsilateral to a corpus luteum was catheterized on Day 9 or 10 in 6 pregnant and 8 nonpregnant ewes. Five blood samples were collected at 30-min intervals for 2 h beginning at 0500 and 1700 h daily. Sampling began at 0500 h on the day after catheterization. The mean and variance within each 2-h collection period were calculated for each ewe. The natural logarithm of the variance in each collection period (ln variance) was used as an estimate of the fluctuations in secretory activity by the endometrial-conceptus complex. Patterns of the mean concentrations of PGE2 were different between pregnant and nonpregnant ewes (P less than 0.01); PGE2 being higher in the pregnant ewes beginning on Day 13. There was a trend for the patterns of ln variance in PGE2 to differ (P less than 0.1) with pregnancy status over the entire period; ln variance was greater in pregnant ewes beginning on Day 13. The patterns of the mean concentrations and ln variances for PGF2 alpha and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha did not differ between pregnant and nonpregnant ewes. There were significant increases in both of these prostaglandins over time, independent of pregnancy status (P less than 0.01). The association of higher concentrations of PGE2 in utero-ovarian venous plasma with early pregnancy is consistent with the hypothesis that PGE2, originating from the uterus and/or conceptus, is one factor involved in maintenance of the corpus luteum of pregnancy.

  9. "Picolog," a synthetically-available bryostatin analog, inhibits growth of MYC-induced lymphoma in vivo.

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    DeChristopher, Brian A; Fan, Alice C; Felsher, Dean W; Wender, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Bryostatin 1 is a naturally occurring complex macrolide with potent anti-neoplastic activity. However, its extremely low natural occurrence has impeded clinical advancement. We developed a strategy directed at the design of simplified and synthetically more accessible bryostatin analogs. Our lead analog, "picolog", can be step-economically produced. Picolog, compared to bryostatin, exhibited superior growth inhibition of MYC-induced lymphoma in vitro. A key mechanism of picolog's (and bryostatin's) activity is activation of PKC. A novel nano-immunoassay (NIA) revealed that picolog treatment increased phospho-MEK2 in the PKC pathway. Moreover, the inhibition of PKC abrogated picolog's activity. Finally, picolog was highly potent at 100 micrograms/kg and well tolerated at doses ranging from 100 micrograms/kg to 1 milligram/kg in vivo for the treatment of our aggressive model of MYC-induced lymphoma. We provide the first in vivo validation that the bryostatin analog, picolog, is a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancer and other diseases.

  10. c-MYC-Induced Sebaceous Gland Differentiation Is Controlled by an Androgen Receptor/p53 Axis

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    Denny L. Cottle

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the sebaceous gland (SG plays an important role in skin function, the mechanisms regulating SG differentiation and carcinoma formation are poorly understood. We previously reported that c-MYC overexpression stimulates SG differentiation. We now demonstrate roles for the androgen receptor (AR and p53. MYC-induced SG differentiation was reduced in mice lacking a functional AR. High levels of MYC triggered a p53-dependent DNA damage response, leading to accumulation of proliferative SG progenitors and inhibition of AR signaling. Conversely, testosterone treatment or p53 deletion activated AR signaling and restored MYC-induced differentiation. Poorly differentiated human sebaceous carcinomas exhibited high p53 and low AR expression. Thus, the consequences of overactivating MYC in the SG depend on whether AR or p53 is activated, as they form a regulatory axis controlling proliferation and differentiation.

  11. Cdk2 deficiency decreases ras/CDK4-dependent malignant progression, but not myc-induced tumorigenesis.

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    Macias, Everardo; Kim, Yongbaek; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Klein-Szanto, Andres; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2007-10-15

    We have previously shown that forced expression of CDK4 in mouse skin (K5CDK4 mice) results in increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development in a chemical carcinogenesis protocol. This protocol induces skin papilloma development, causing a selection of cells bearing activating Ha-ras mutations. We have also shown that myc-induced epidermal proliferation and oral tumorigenesis (K5Myc mice) depends on CDK4 expression. Biochemical analysis of K5CDK4 and K5Myc epidermis as well as skin tumors showed that keratinocyte proliferation is mediated by CDK4 sequestration of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and activation of CDK2. Here, we studied the role of CDK2 in epithelial tumorigenesis. In normal skin, loss of CDK2 rescues CDK4-induced, but not myc-induced epidermal hyperproliferation. Ablation of CDK2 in K5CDK4 mice results in decreased incidences and multiplicity of skin tumors as well as malignant progression to SCC. Histopathologic analysis showed that K5CDK4 tumors are drastically more aggressive than K5CDK4/CDK2-/- tumors. On the other hand, we show that CDK2 is dispensable for myc-induced tumorigenesis. In contrast to our previous report of K5Myc/CDK4-/-, K5Myc/CDK2-/- mice developed oral tumors with the same frequency as K5Myc mice. Overall, we have established that ras-induced tumors are more susceptible to CDK2 ablation than myc-induced tumors, suggesting that the efficacy of targeting CDK2 in tumor development and malignant progression is dependent on the oncogenic pathway involved.

  12. Dnmt3b is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene in Myc-induced lymphomagenesis.

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    Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Lepore, Janet B; Zegarek, Matthew H; Kocherginsky, Masha; Singh, Mahi; Davis, Elizabeth M; Link, Petra A; Anastasi, John; Le Beau, Michelle M; Karpf, Adam R; Godley, Lucy A

    2013-03-14

    The drivers of abnormal DNA methylation in human cancers include widespread aberrant splicing of the DNMT3B gene, producing abnormal transcripts that encode truncated proteins that may act as dominant negative isoforms. To test whether reduced Dnmt3b dosage can alter tumorigenesis, we bred Dnmt3b(+/-) mice to Eµ-Myc mice, a mouse model susceptible to B-cell lymphomas. Eµ-Myc/Dnmt3b(+/-) mice showed a dramatic acceleration of lymphomagenesis, greater even than that observed in Eµ-Myc mice that express a truncated DNMT3B isoform found in human tumors, DNMT3B7. This finding indicates that Dnmt3b can act as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene. Although reduction in both Dnmt3b dosage and expression of DNMT3B7 within the Eµ-Myc system had similar effects on tumorigenesis and DNA hypermethylation, different molecular mechanisms appear to underlie these changes. This study offers insight into how de novo DNA methyltransferases function as tumor suppressors and the sensitivity of Myc-induced lymphomas to DNA methylation.

  13. Critical B-lymphoid cell intrinsic role of endogenous MCL-1 in c-MYC-induced lymphomagenesis

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    Grabow, S; Kelly, G L; Delbridge, A R D; Kelly, P N; Bouillet, P; Adams, J M; Strasser, A.

    2016-01-01

    Evasion of apoptosis is critical for tumorigenesis, and sustained survival of nascent neoplastic cells may depend upon the endogenous levels of pro-survival BCL-2 family members. Indeed, previous studies using gene-targeted mice revealed that BCL-XL, but surprisingly not BCL-2, is critical for the development of c-MYC-induced pre-B/B lymphomas. However, it remains unclear whether another pro-survival BCL-2 relative contributes to their development. MCL-1 is an intriguing candidate, because it...

  14. AP-2α Inhibits c-MYC Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes

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    Lei Yu

    2009-01-01

    AP-2 may have a direct effect on the c-myc gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that AP-2 proteins bound to a cluster of AP-2 binding sites located within a 2 kb upstream regulatory region of c-myc These results suggest that the negative regulation of AP-2 on c-MYC activity was achieved through binding of AP-2 protein to the c-myc gene. The effects of AP-2 on c-MYC induced ROS accumulation and apoptosis in epidermal keratinocytes are likely to play an important role in cell growth, differentiation and carcinogenesis of the skin.

  15. “Picolog,” a Synthetically-Available Bryostatin Analog, Inhibits Growth of MYC-Induced Lymphoma In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsher, Dean W.; Wender, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Bryostatin 1 is a naturally occurring complex macrolide with potent anti-neoplastic activity. However, its extremely low natural occurrence has impeded clinical advancement. We developed a strategy directed at the design of simplified and synthetically more accessible bryostatin analogs. Our lead analog, “picolog”, can be step-economically produced. Picolog, compared to bryostatin, exhibited superior growth inhibition of MYC-induced lymphoma in vitro. A key mechanism of picolog's (and bryostatin's) activity is activation of PKC. A novel nano-immunoassay (NIA) revealed that picolog treatment increased phospho-MEK2 in the PKC pathway. Moreover, the inhibition of PKC abrogated picolog's activity. Finally, picolog was highly potent at 100 micrograms/kg and well tolerated at doses ranging from 100 micrograms/kg to 1 milligram/kg in vivo for the treatment of our aggressive model of MYC-induced lymphoma. We provide the first in vivo validation that the bryostatin analog, picolog, is a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. PMID:22308267

  16. Sensitivity to myc-induced apoptosis is retained in spontaneous and transplanted lymphomas of CD2-mycER mice.

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    Blyth, K; Stewart, M; Bell, M; James, C; Evan, G; Neil, J C; Cameron, E R

    2000-02-10

    To study the effects of the Myc oncoprotein in a regulatable in vivo system, we generated lines of transgenic mice in which a tamoxifen inducible Myc fusion protein (c-mycER) is expressed under the control of the CD2 locus control region. Activation of the Myc oncoprotein resulted in both proliferation and apoptosis in vivo. Lines with a high transgene copy number developed spontaneous lymphomas at low frequency, but the tumour incidence was significantly increased with tamoxifen treatment. Surprisingly, we found that cellular sensitivity to Myc-induced apoptosis was retained in tumours from these mice and in most lymphoma cell lines, even when null for p53. Resistance to Myc-induced apoptosis could be conferred on these cells by co-expression of Bcl-2. However, acquired resistance is clearly not an obligatory progression event as sensitivity to apoptosis was retained in transplanted tumours in athymic mice. In conclusion, lymphomas arising in CD2-mycER mice retain the capacity to undergo apoptosis in response to Myc activation and show no phenotypic evidence of the presence of an active dominant inhibitor.

  17. Methylation-independent repression of Dnmt3b contributes to oncogenic activity of Dnmt3a in mouse MYC-induced T-cell lymphomagenesis.

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    Haney, S L; Hlady, R A; Opavska, J; Klinkebiel, D; Pirruccello, S J; Dutta, S; Datta, K; Simpson, M A; Wu, L; Opavsky, R

    2015-10-01

    DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) catalyzes cytosine methylation of mammalian genomic DNA. In addition to myeloid malignancies, mutations in DNMT3A have been recently reported in T-cell lymphoma and leukemia, implying a possible involvement in the pathogenesis of human diseases. However, the role of Dnmt3a in T-cell transformation in vivo is poorly understood. Here we analyzed the functional consequences of Dnmt3a inactivation in a mouse model of MYC-induced T-cell lymphomagenesis (MTCL). Loss of Dnmt3a delayed tumorigenesis by suppressing cellular proliferation during disease progression. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis identified upregulation of 17 putative tumor suppressor genes, including DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3b, in Dnmt3a-deficient lymphomas as molecular events potentially responsible for the delayed lymphomagenesis in Dnmt3a(Δ/Δ) mice. Interestingly, promoter and gene body methylation of these genes was not substantially changed between control and Dnmt3a-deficient lymphomas, suggesting that Dnmt3a may inhibit their expression in a methylation-independent manner. Re-expression of both wild type and catalytically inactive Dnmt3a in Dnmt3a(Δ/Δ) lymphoma cells in vitro inhibited Dnmt3b expression, indicating that Dnmt3b upregulation may be directly repressed by Dnmt3a. Importantly, genetic inactivation of Dnmt3b accelerated lymphomagenesis in Dnmt3a(Δ/Δ) mice, demonstrating that upregulation of Dnmt3b is a relevant molecular change in Dnmt3a-deficient lymphomas that inhibits disease progression. Collectively, our data demonstrate an unexpected oncogenic role for Dnmt3a in MTCL through methylation-independent repression of Dnmt3b and possibly other tumor suppressor genes.

  18. TGFβ-dependent gene expression shows that senescence correlates with abortive differentiation along several lineages in Myc-induced lymphomas.

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    Müller, Judith; Samans, Birgit; van Riggelen, Jan; Fagà, Giovanni; Peh K N, Raquel; Wei, Chia-Lin; Müller, Heiko; Amati, Bruno; Felsher, Dean; Eilers, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Deregulated expression of Myc under the control of an immunoglobulin enhancer induces lymphoma formation in mice. The development of lymphomas is limited by TGFβ-dependent senescence and high levels of Myc expression are continuously required to antagonize senescence. The biological processes underlying senescence are not fully resolved. We report here a comprehensive analysis of TGFβ-dependent alterations in gene expression when the Myc transgene is switched off. Our data show that Myc-induced target genes are downregulated in a TGFβ-independent manner. In contrast, TGFβ is required to upregulate a broad spectrum of genes that are characteristic of different T-cell lineages when Myc is turned off. The analysis reveals a significant overlap between these Myc-repressed genes with genes that are targets of polycomb repressive complexes in embryonic stem cells. Therefore, TGFβ-dependent senescence is associated with gene expression patterns indicative of abortive cellular differentiation along several lineages.

  19. MINCR is a MYC-induced lncRNA able to modulate MYC's transcriptional network in Burkitt lymphoma cells.

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    Doose, Gero; Haake, Andrea; Bernhart, Stephan H; López, Cristina; Duggimpudi, Sujitha; Wojciech, Franziska; Bergmann, Anke K; Borkhardt, Arndt; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Dimitrova, Lora; Haas, Siegfried; Hoell, Jessica I; Hummel, Michael; Karsch, Dennis; Klapper, Wolfram; Kleo, Karsten; Kretzmer, Helene; Kreuz, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Lawerenz, Chris; Lenze, Dido; Loeffler, Markus; Mantovani-Löffler, Luisa; Möller, Peter; Ott, German; Richter, Julia; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schilhabel, Markus; Schneider, Markus; Scholz, Ingrid; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Weniger, Marc A; Hoffmann, Steve; Siebert, Reiner; Iaccarino, Ingram

    2015-09-22

    Despite the established role of the transcription factor MYC in cancer, little is known about the impact of a new class of transcriptional regulators, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), on MYC ability to influence the cellular transcriptome. Here, we have intersected RNA-sequencing data from two MYC-inducible cell lines and a cohort of 91 B-cell lymphomas with or without genetic variants resulting in MYC overexpression. We identified 13 lncRNAs differentially expressed in IG-MYC-positive Burkitt lymphoma and regulated in the same direction by MYC in the model cell lines. Among them, we focused on a lncRNA that we named MYC-induced long noncoding RNA (MINCR), showing a strong correlation with MYC expression in MYC-positive lymphomas. To understand its cellular role, we performed RNAi and found that MINCR knockdown is associated with an impairment in cell cycle progression. Differential gene expression analysis after RNAi showed a significant enrichment of cell cycle genes among the genes down-regulated after MINCR knockdown. Interestingly, these genes are enriched in MYC binding sites in their promoters, suggesting that MINCR acts as a modulator of the MYC transcriptional program. Accordingly, MINCR knockdown was associated with a reduction in MYC binding to the promoters of selected cell cycle genes. Finally, we show that down-regulation of Aurora kinases A and B and chromatin licensing and DNA replication factor 1 may explain the reduction in cellular proliferation observed on MINCR knockdown. We, therefore, suggest that MINCR is a newly identified player in the MYC transcriptional network able to control the expression of cell cycle genes.

  20. Three-dimensional imaging of the metabolic state of c-MYC-induced mammary tumor with the cryo-imager

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    Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Qian; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Min Z.; Blessington, Dana M.; Zhou, Lanlan; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Zheng, Gang; Chance, Britton

    2003-07-01

    This study imaged the metabolic state of a growing tumor and the relationship between energy metabolism and the ability of glucose uptake in whole tumor tissue with cryo-imaging at 77° K. A MTB/TOM mouse model, bearing c-MYC-induced mammary tumor, was very rapidly freeze-trapped 2 hrs post Pyro-2DG injection. The fluorescence signals of oxidized flavoprotein (Fp), reduced pyridine nucleotide (PN), pyro-2DG, and the reflection signal of deoxy-hemoglobin were imaged every 100 μm from the top surface to the bottom of the tumor sequentially, 9 sections in total. Each of the four signals was constructed into 3D images with Amira software. Both Fp and PN signals could be detected in the growing tumor regions, and a higher reduction state where was shown in the ratio images. The necrotic tumor regions displayed a very strong Fp signal and weak PN signal. In the bloody extravasation regions, Fp and PN signals were observably diminished. Therefore, the regions of high growth and necrosis in the tumor could be determined according to the Fp and PN signals. The content of deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) in the tumor was positively correlated with the reduced PN signal. Pyro-2DG signal was only evident in the growing condition region in the tumor. Normalized 3D cross-correlation showed that Pyro-2DG signal was similar to the redox ratio. The results indicated that glucose uptake in the tumor was consistent with the redox state of the tumor. And both Pyro-2DG and mitochondrial NADH fluorescence showed bimodal histograms suggesting that the two population of c-MYC induced mammary tumor, one of which could be controlled by c-MYC transgene.

  1. C-Myc induced compensated cardiac hypertrophy increases free fatty acid utilization for the citric acid cycle.

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    Olson, Aaron K; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam) injections. Isolated working hearts and (13)Carbon ((13)C)-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing (13)C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (Cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was assessed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contributions in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus Cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc versus Cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to Cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes for the citric acid cycle did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the

  2. C-Myc Induced Compensated Cardiac Hypertrophy Increases Free Fatty Acid Utilization for the Citric Acid Cycle

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    Olson, Aaron; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O' Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc-induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam). Isolated working hearts and 13Carbon (13C )-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was confirmed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contribution in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc vs cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the mechanisms whereby this change maintained

  3. Overexpression of c-myc induces epithelial mesenchymal transition in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyoung Bin; Cho, Min Kyong; Lee, Won Young; Kang, Keon Wook

    2010-07-28

    The c-myc gene is frequently overexpressed in human breast cancer and its target genes are involved in tumorigenesis. Epithelial mesenchymal transitions (EMT), where cells undergo a developmental switch from a polarized epithelial phenotype to a highly motile mesenchymal phenotype, are associated with invasion and motility of cancer cells. Basal E-cadherin expression was down-regulated in c-myc overexpressing MCF10A (c-myc-MCF10A) cells compared to GFP-overexpressing MCF10A (GFP-MCF10A) cells, while N-cadherin was distinctly increased in c-myc-MCF10A cells. Given that glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) and the snail axis have key roles in E-cadherin deregulation during EMT, we investigated the role of GSK-3beta/snail signaling pathways in the induction of EMT by c-myc overexpression. In contrast to GFP-MCF10A cells, both the transcriptional activity and the ubiquitination-dependent protein stability of snail were enhanced in c-myc-MCF10A cells, and this was reversed by GSK-3beta overexpression. We also found that c-myc overexpression inhibits GSK-3beta activity through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of ERK by dominant negative mutant transfection or chemical inhibitor significantly suppressed snail gene transcription. These results suggest that c-myc overexpression during transformation of mammary epithelial cells (MEC) is involved in EMTs via ERK-dependent GSK-3beta inactivation and subsequent snail activation.

  4. Impact of hydrodynamic injection and phiC31 integrase on tumor latency in a mouse model of MYC-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E Woodard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hydrodynamic injection is an effective method for DNA delivery in mouse liver and is being translated to larger animals for possible clinical use. Similarly, phiC31 integrase has proven effective in mediating long-term gene therapy in mice when delivered by hydrodynamic injection and is being considered for clinical gene therapy applications. However, chromosomal aberrations have been associated with phiC31 integrase expression in tissue culture, leading to questions about safety. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study whether hydrodynamic delivery alone, or in conjunction with delivery of phiC31 integrase for long-term transgene expression, could facilitate tumor formation, we used a transgenic mouse model in which sustained induction of the human C-MYC oncogene in the liver was followed by hydrodynamic injection. Without injection, mice had a median tumor latency of 154 days. With hydrodynamic injection of saline alone, the median tumor latency was significantly reduced, to 105 days. The median tumor latency was similar, 106 days, when a luciferase donor plasmid and backbone plasmid without integrase were administered. In contrast, when active or inactive phiC31 integrase and donor plasmid were supplied to the mouse liver, the median tumor latency was 153 days, similar to mice receiving no injection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that phiC31 integrase does not facilitate tumor formation in this C-MYC transgenic mouse model. However, in groups lacking phiC31 integrase, hydrodynamic injection appeared to contribute to C-MYC-induced hepatocellular carcinoma in adult mice. Although it remains to be seen to what extent these findings may be extrapolated to catheter-mediated hydrodynamic delivery in larger species, they suggest that caution should be used during translation of hydrodynamic injection to clinical applications.

  5. Hepatitis C virus core protein targets 4E-BP1 expression and phosphorylation and potentiates Myc-induced liver carcinogenesis in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Cosette; Lejamtel, Charlène; Benzoubir, Nassima; Battaglia, Serena; Sidahmed-Adrar, Nazha; Desterke, Christophe; Lemasson, Matthieu; Rosenberg, Arielle R; Samuel, Didier; Bréchot, Christian; Pflieger, Delphine; Le Naour, François; Bourgeade, Marie-Françoise

    2017-08-22

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of liver diseases including the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Particularly, core protein has been involved in HCV-related liver pathologies. However, the impact of HCV core on signaling pathways supporting the genesis of HCC remains largely elusive. To decipher the host cell signaling pathways involved in the oncogenic potential of HCV core, a global quantitative phosphoproteomic approach was carried out. This study shed light on novel differentially phosphorylated proteins, in particular several components involved in translation. Among the eukaryotic initiation factors that govern the translational machinery, 4E-BP1 represents a master regulator of protein synthesis that is associated with the development and progression of cancers due to its ability to increase protein expression of oncogenic pathways. Enhanced levels of 4E-BP1 in non-modified and phosphorylated forms were validated in human hepatoma cells and in mouse primary hepatocytes expressing HCV core, in the livers of HCV core transgenic mice as well as in HCV-infected human primary hepatocytes. The contribution of HCV core in carcinogenesis and the status of 4E-BP1 expression and phosphorylation were studied in HCV core/Myc double transgenic mice. HCV core increased the levels of 4E-BP1 expression and phosphorylation and significantly accelerated the onset of Myc-induced tumorigenesis in these double transgenic mice. These results reveal a novel function of HCV core in liver carcinogenesis potentiation. They position 4E-BP1 as a tumor-specific target of HCV core and support the involvement of the 4E-BP1/eIF4E axis in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  6. c-MYC-induced genomic instability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuzyk, Alexandra; Mai, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    ...% of all tumors have some form of c-MYC gene dysregulation, which affects gene regulation, microRNA expression profiles, large genomic amplifications, and the overall organization of the nucleus...

  7. c-MYC-induced genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyk, Alexandra; Mai, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    MYC dysregulation initiates a dynamic process of genomic instability that is linked to tumor initiation. Early studies using MYC-carrying retroviruses showed that these viruses were potent transforming agents. Cell culture models followed that addressed the role of MYC in transformation. With the advent of MYC transgenic mice, it became obvious that MYC deregulation alone was sufficient to initiate B-cell neoplasia in mice. More than 70% of all tumors have some form of c-MYC gene dysregulation, which affects gene regulation, microRNA expression profiles, large genomic amplifications, and the overall organization of the nucleus. These changes set the stage for the dynamic genomic rearrangements that are associated with cellular transformation.

  8. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  9. Quarkonium suppression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Petreczky

    2003-04-01

    I discuss quarkonium suppression in equilibrated strongly interacting matter. After a brief review of basic features of quarkonium production I discuss the application of recent lattice data on the heavy quark potential to the problem of quarkonium dissociation as well as the problem of direct lattice determination of quarkonium properties in finite temperature lattice QCD.

  10. Butyrate inhibits pro-proliferative miR-92a by diminishing c-Myc-induced miR-17-92a cluster transcription in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shien; Liu, Lan; Chang, Eugene B; Wang, Jian-Ying; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-13

    Compromised colonic butyrate production resulting from low dietary fiber or altered gut microbiota may promote colon neoplasia. Previous reports indicate these actions are mediated in part by altered levels of miRNAs, including suppressed expression of the oncogenic miR-17-92a cluster. Here, we sought to identify the mechanisms underlying these effects of butyrate in colon cancer. miR-92a levels were measured in archived human colon cancer and adjacent normal colon specimens by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR). The effects of butyrate and other histone deacetylase inhibitors (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and valproic acid) on primary (pri-miR17-92a), precursor and mature miR-92a were analyzed in HCT-116 and HT-29 human colon cancer cells using qPCR. The effects of butyrate, SAHA and valproic acid on protein levels of c-Myc, Drosha and p57 were measured in HCT-116 cells using immunoblotting. Regulation of C13orf25 promoter activity by butyrate was analyzed by luciferase reporter assay using modified pGL3 constructs containing a wild-type or mutated c-Myc binding site. Expression of c-Myc was modulated using siRNA or adenovirus vectors. p57 mRNA and protein were measured before and after transfection with miR-92a-mimic molecules. Following butyrate treatment and miR-92a-mimic transfection, apoptosis was analyzed by TUNEL staining and caspase-3 immunoblotting. Microarray, confirmed by qPCR, revealed a seven-fold increase in miR-92a levels in sporadic human colon cancer tissue compared to adjacent normal colon. Treating human colon cancer cells with butyrate reduced the levels of pri-miR17-92a, precursor and mature miR-92a, as well as c-Myc. SAHA and valproic acid had similar effects. Mutation of the c-Myc binding site diminished butyrate's inhibitory effects on C13orf25 promoter activity. Silencing c-Myc expression reduced miR-92a levels. c-Myc over-expression neutralized butyrate-induced attenuation of pri-miR17-92a. Exogenous miR-92a inhibited

  11. Analysis of Myc-induced histone modifications on target chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Martinato

    Full Text Available The c-myc proto-oncogene is induced by mitogens and is a central regulator of cell growth and differentiation. The c-myc product, Myc, is a transcription factor that binds a multitude of genomic sites, estimated to be over 10-15% of all promoter regions. Target promoters generally pre-exist in an active or poised chromatin state that is further modified by Myc, contributing to fine transcriptional regulation (activation or repression of the afferent gene. Among other mechanisms, Myc recruits histone acetyl-transferases to target chromatin and locally promotes hyper-acetylation of multiple lysines on histones H3 and H4, although the identity and combination of the modified lysines is unknown. Whether Myc dynamically regulates other histone modifications (or marks at its binding sites also remains to be addressed. Here, we used quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP to profile a total of 24 lysine-acetylation and -methylation marks modulated by Myc at target promoters in a human B-cell line with a regulatable c-myc transgene. Myc binding promoted acetylation of multiple lysines, primarily of H3K9, H3K14, H3K18, H4K5 and H4K12, but significantly also of H4K8, H4K91 and H2AK5. Dimethylation of H3K79 was also selectively induced at target promoters. A majority of target promoters showed co-induction of multiple marks - in various combinations - correlating with recruitment of the two HATs tested (Tip60 and HBO1, incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z and transcriptional activation. Based on this and previous findings, we surmise that Myc recruits the Tip60/p400 complex to achieve a coordinated histone acetylation/exchange reaction at activated promoters. Our data are also consistent with the additive and redundant role of multiple acetylation events in transcriptional activation.

  12. Silencing of E2F3 suppresses tumor growth of Her2+ breast cancer cells by restricting mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Miyoung; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Saavedra, Harold I

    2015-11-10

    The E2F transcriptional activators E2F1, E2F2 and E2F3a regulate many important cellular processes, including DNA replication, apoptosis and centrosome duplication. Previously, we demonstrated that silencing E2F1 or E2F3 suppresses centrosome amplification (CA) and chromosome instability (CIN) in Her2+ breast cancer cells without markedly altering proliferation. However, it is unknown whether and how silencing a single E2F activator, E2F3, affects malignancy of human breast cancer cells. Thus, we injected HCC1954 Her2+ breast cancer cells silenced for E2F3 into mammary fat pads of immunodeficient mice and demonstrated that loss of E2F3 retards tumor growth. Surprisingly, silencing of E2F3 led to significant reductions in mitotic indices relative to vector controls, while the percentage of cells undergoing S phase were not affected. Nek2 is a mitotic kinase commonly upregulated in breast cancers and a critical regulator of Cdk4- or E2F-mediated CA. In this report, we found that Nek2 overexpression rescued back the CA caused by silencing of shE2F3. However, the effects of Nek2 overexpression in affecting tumor growth rates of shE2F3 and shE2F3; GFP cells were inconclusive. Taken together, our results indicate that E2F3 silencing decreases mammary tumor growth by reducing percentage of cells undergoing mitosis.

  13. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production ...

  14. Dexamethasone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  15. Explosion suppression system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  16. Suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, Mohamed T; Murphy, David

    2011-01-01

    Comparing two RNA populations that differ from the effects of a single independent variable, such as a drug treatment or a specific genetic defect, can establish differences in the abundance of specific transcripts that vary in a population dependent manner. There are different methods for identifying differentially expressed genes. These methods include microarray, Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), and quantitative Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). Herein, the protocol describes an easy and cost-effective alternative that does not require prior knowledge of the transcriptomes under examination. It is specifically relevant when low levels of RNA starting material are available. This protocol describes the use of Switching Mechanism At RNA Termini Polymerase Chain Reaction (SMART-PCR) to amplify cDNA from small amounts of RNA. The amplified cDNA populations under comparison are then subjected to Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH-PCR). SSH-PCR is a technique that couples subtractive hybridization with suppression PCR to selectively amplify fragments of differentially expressed genes. The resulting products are cDNA populations enriched for significantly overrepresented transcripts in either of the two input RNAs. These cDNA populations can then be cloned to generate subtracted cDNA library. Microarrays made with clones from the subtracted forward and reverse cDNA libraries are then screened for differentially expressed genes using targets generated from tester and driver total RNAs.

  17. Accentuation-suppression and scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Alrik; Bundesen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    a scaling mechanism modulating the decision bias of the observer and also through an accentuation-suppression mechanism that modulates the degree of subjective relevance of objects, contracting attention around fewer, highly relevant objects while suppressing less relevant objects. These mechanisms may...

  18. Visual surround suppression in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Samuel Tibber

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgements of contrast - a manifestation of weaker surround suppression. To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with schizophrenia to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with schizophrenia demonstrated weaker surround suppression compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation surround suppression in schizophrenia may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies.

  19. CAML mediates survival of Myc-induced lymphoma cells independent of tail-anchored protein insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shing, Jennifer C; Lindquist, Lonn D; Borgese, Nica; Bram, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAML) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein that functions, along with WRB and TRC40, to mediate tail-anchored (TA) protein insertion into the ER membrane. Physiologic roles for CAML include endocytic trafficking, intracellular calcium signaling, and the survival and proliferation of specialized immune cells, recently attributed to its requirement for TA protein insertion. To identify a possible role for CAML in cancer cells, we generated Eμ-Myc transgenic mice that carry a tamoxifen-inducible deletion allele of Caml. In multiple B-cell lymphoma cell lines derived from these mice, homozygous loss of Caml activated apoptosis. Cell death was blocked by Bcl-2/Bcl-xL overexpression; however, rescue from apoptosis was insufficient to restore proliferation. Tumors established from an Eμ-Myc lymphoma cell line completely regressed after tamoxifen administration, suggesting that CAML is also required for these cancer cells to survive and grow in vivo. Cell cycle analyses of Caml-deleted lymphoma cells revealed an arrest in G2/M, accompanied by low expression of the mitotic marker, phospho-histone H3 (Ser10). Surprisingly, lymphoma cell viability did not depend on the domain of CAML required for its interaction with TRC40. Furthermore, a small protein fragment consisting of the C-terminal 111 amino acid residues of CAML, encompassing the WRB-binding domain, was sufficient to rescue growth and survival of Caml-deleted lymphoma cells. Critically, this minimal region of CAML did not restore TA protein insertion in knockout cells. Taken together, these data reveal an essential role for CAML in supporting survival and mitotic progression in Myc-driven lymphomas that is independent of its TA protein insertion function.

  20. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will explore and test the feasibility and effectiveness of using a cryogenic fluid (liquid nitrogen) to facilitate acoustic suppression in a...

  1. Simple suppression of radiation damping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khitrin, A K; Jerschow, Alexej

    2012-12-01

    Radiation damping is known to cause line-broadening and frequency shifts of strong resonances in NMR spectra. While several techniques exist for the suppression of these effects, many require specialized hardware, or are only compatible with the presence of few strong resonances. We describe a simple pulse sequence for radiation damping suppression in spectra with many strong resonances. The sequence can be used as-is to generate simple spectra or as a signal excitation part in more advanced experiments.

  2. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  3. Soft substrates suppress droplet splashing

    CERN Document Server

    Howland, Christopher J; Style, Robert W; Castrejón-Pita, A A

    2015-01-01

    Droplets splash when they impact dry, flat substrates above a critical velocity that depends on parameters such as droplet size, viscosity and air pressure. We show that substrate stiffness also impacts the splashing threshold by imaging ethanol drops impacting silicone gels of different stiffnesses. Splashing is significantly suppressed: droplets on the softest substrates need over 70% more kinetic energy to splash than they do on rigid substrates. We show that splash suppression is likely to be due to energy losses caused by deformations of soft substrates during the first few microseconds of impact. We find that solids with Youngs modulus $\\lesssim O(10^5)$Pa suppress splashing, in agreement with simple scaling arguments. Thus materials like soft gels and elastomers can be used as simple coatings for effective splash prevention.

  4. Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast – a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies. PMID:23450069

  5. Beyond viral suppression of HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V.; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Barton, Simon E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted a new Global Health Sector Strategy on HIV for 2016-2021. It establishes 15 ambitious targets, including the '90-90-90' target calling on health systems to reduce under-diagnosis of HIV, treat a greater number of those diagnosed......, and ensure that those being treated achieve viral suppression. DISCUSSION: The WHO strategy calls for person-centered chronic care for people living with HIV (PLHIV), implicitly acknowledging that viral suppression is not the ultimate goal of treatment. However, it stops short of providing an explicit target...... for health-related quality of life. It thus fails to take into account the needs of PLHIV who have achieved viral suppression but still must contend with other intense challenges such as serious non-communicable diseases, depression, anxiety, financial stress, and experiences of or apprehension about HIV...

  6. Vibration suppression using smart structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ephrahim; Inman, Daniel J.; Dosch, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    The control of structures for vibration suppression is discussed in the context of using smart materials and structures. Here the use of smart structures refers to using embedded piezoelectric devices as both control actuators and sensors. Using embedded sensors and actuators allows great improvements in performance over traditional structures (both passive and active) for vibration suppression. The application of smart structures to three experimental flexible structures is presented. The first is a flexible beam, the second is a flexible beam undergoing slewing motion, the third is a ribbed antenna. A simple model of a piezoelectric actuator/sensor is presented. The equations of motion for each structure is presented. The control issues considered as those associated with multi-input, multi-output control, PID control and LQR control implementation. A modern control analysis illustrates the usefulness of smart structures for vibration suppression.

  7. Intercropping leeks to suppress weeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumann, D.T.; Kropff, M.J.; Bastiaans, L.

    2000-01-01

    Many field vegetables such as leek are weak competitors against weeds, causing high costs for weed management practice. Using celery as a companion cash crop was suggested to improve the weed suppression of leek. Three field experiments were carried out to study the intra- and interspecific competit

  8. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants.

  9. Burst Suppression: A Review and New Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Dillon Kenny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression is a pattern of brain electrical activity characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude bursts and electrical silence. Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the results of our new study showing clear electrophysiological differences in burst suppression patterns induced by two common general anesthetics, sevoflurane and propofol. Our data suggest that the circuit mechanisms that generate burst suppression activity may differ between different general anesthetics.

  10. Suppression of stratified explosive interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeks, M.K.; Shamoun, B.I.; Bonazza, R.; Corradini, M.L. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

    1998-01-01

    Stratified Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) experiments with Refrigerant-134a and water were performed in a large-scale system. Air was uniformly injected into the coolant pool to establish a pre-existing void which could suppress the explosion. Two competing effects due to the variation of the air flow rate seem to influence the intensity of the explosion in this geometrical configuration. At low flow rates, although the injected air increases the void fraction, the concurrent agitation and mixing increases the intensity of the interaction. At higher flow rates, the increase in void fraction tends to attenuate the propagated pressure wave generated by the explosion. Experimental results show a complete suppression of the vapor explosion at high rates of air injection, corresponding to an average void fraction of larger than 30%. (author)

  11. EMP and HPM Suppression Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    power lines from external sources. Lightning is in the induced category. It is unlikely that any transient suppression device will survive or protect...from a direct lightning hit; however, direct hits are extremely rare. Most damage to electronic circuits caused by lightning is the result of the...tested by Littelfuse, Inc. in accordance with IEC 801-2 ESD test specifications. Taking into account the relative energies associated with ESD and

  12. Chk1 suppressed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meuth Mark

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of Chk1 in the cellular response to DNA replication stress is well established. However recent work indicates a novel role for Chk1 in the suppression of apoptosis following the disruption of DNA replication or DNA damage. This review will consider these findings in the context of known pathways of Chk1 signalling and potential applications of therapies that target Chk1.

  13. Jet Suppression Measured in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Zvi Hirsh; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions, a hot medium with a high density of unscreened color charges is produced, and jets propagating through this medium are known to suffer energy loss. This results in a lower yield of jets emerging from the medium than expected in the absence of medium effects, and thus modifications of the jet yield are directly sensitive to the energy loss mechanism. Furthermore, jets with different flavor content are expected to be affected by the medium in different ways. Parton showers initiated by quarks tend to have fewer fragments carrying a larger fraction of the total jet energy than those resulting from gluons. In this talk, the latest ATLAS results on single jet suppression will be presented. Measurements of the nuclear modification factor, RAA, for fully reconstructed jets are shown. The rapidity dependence of jet suppression is discussed, which is sensitive to the relative energy loss between quark and gluon jets. New measurements of single hadron suppression out to pT~150 GeV ...

  14. FLUTTER SUPPRESSION USING DISTRIBUTEDPIEZOELECTRIC ACTUATORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A piezoelectric actuator has the benefits of flexibility of its position, without time lag and wide bandpass characteristics. The early results of the wind tunnel flutter suppression test using the piezoeletric actuator were presented in Ref.[1]. A rigid rectangular wing model is constrained by a plunge spring and a pitch spring, and a pair of piezoelectric actuators is bonded on both sides of the plunge spring so as to carry out the active control. Refs.[2,3] reported two flutter suppression wind tunnel tests where the distributed piezoelectric actuators were used. In Ref.[2] low speed wind tunnel tests were conducted with aluminum and composite plate-like rectangular models fully covered by piezoelectric actuators. Flutter speed is increased by 11%. In Ref.[3] a composite plate-like swept back model with piezoceramic actuators bonded on the inboard surface was tested in a transonic wind tunnel and a 12% increment of flutter dynamic pressure was achieved.  In the present investigation, an aluminum plate-like rectangular model with inboard bonded piezoceramic actuators is adopted. Active flutter suppression control law has been designed. A series of analyses and ground tests and, finally, low-speed wind tunnel tests with the active control system opened and closed are conducted. Reasonable results have been obtained.

  15. Adaptive Filtering for Aeroservoelastic Response Suppression Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CSA Engineering proposes the design of an adaptive aeroelastic mode suppression for advanced fly-by-wire aircraft, which will partition the modal suppression...

  16. Menstrual suppression in special circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Yolanda A; Ornstein, Melanie P; Aggarwal, Anjali; McQuillan, Sarah; Allen, Lisa; Millar, Debra; Dalziel, Nancy; Gascon, Suzy; Hakim, Julie; Ryckman, Julie; Spitzer, Rachel; Van Eyk, Nancy

    2014-10-01

    Objectif : Offrir, aux fournisseurs de soins de santé, un document de consensus canadien comptant des recommandations pour ce qui est de la suppression menstruelle chez les patientes qui font face à des obstacles physiques et/ou cognitifs ou chez les patientes qui font l’objet d’un traitement contre le cancer et pour lesquelles les règles pourraient exercer un effet délétère sur la santé. Options : Le présent document analyse les options disponibles aux fins de la suppression menstruelle, les indications, les contre-indications et les effets indésirables (tant immédiats qu’à long terme) propres à cette dernière, et les explorations et le monitorage nécessaires tout au long de la suppression. Issues : Les cliniciens seront mieux renseignés au sujet des options et des indications propres à la suppression menstruelle chez les patientes qui présentent des déficiences cognitives et/ou physiques et chez les patientes qui font l’objet d’une chimiothérapie, d’une radiothérapie ou d’autres traitements contre le cancer. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans Medline, EMBASE, OVID et The Cochrane Library au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « heavy menstrual bleeding », « menstrual suppression », « chemotherapy/radiation », « cognitive disability », « physical disability », « learning disability »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés, aux études observationnelles et aux études pilotes. Aucune restriction n’a été imposée en matière de langue ou de date. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et du nouveau matériel a été intégré à la directive clinique jusqu’en septembre 2013. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d

  17. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues.

  18. HTP Nutraceutical Screening for Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Effects of HDACis on Tumor-suppressing miRNAs by Trichostatin A and Grapeseed (Vitis vinifera) in HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAZZIO, ELIZABETH A.; SOLIMAN, KARAM F.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Aggressive tumor malignancies are a consequence of delayed diagnosis, epigenetic/phenotype changes and chemo-radiation resistance. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a major epigenetic regulator of transcriptional repression, which are highly overexpressed in advanced malignancy. While original chemotherapy drugs were modeled after phytochemicals elucidated by botanical screenings, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) such as apicidin, trichostatin A (TSA) and butyrate were discovered as products of fungus and microbes, in particular, gut microbiota. Therefore, a persistent question remains as to the inherent existence of HDACis in raw undigested dietary plant material. In this study, we conduct a high-throughput (HTP) screening of ~1,600 non-fermented commonly used nutraceuticals (spices, herbs, teas, vegetables, fruits, seeds, rinds etc.) at (HTP screening was then conducted, followed by a study comparing biological effects of HDACis in HeLa cells, including analysis of whole-transcriptome non-coding RNAs using Affymetrix miRNA 4.1-panel arrays. Results: The HTP screening results confirmed 44/1600 as potential HDACis to which 31 were further eliminated as false-positives. Methodological challenges/concerns are addressed regarding plant product false-positives that arise from the signal reduction of commercial lysine development reagents. Only 13 HDACis were found having an IC50 under tested on HeLa cells show 6,631 miRNAs expressed in resting cells, 35 significantly up-regulated (TSA) and 81 up-regulated (GSE), with several miRNAs overlapping in the upward direction by both GSE and TSA (e.g. hsa-miR-23b-5p, hsa-miR-27b-5p, hsa-miR-1180-3p, hsa-miR-6880-5p and hsa-mir-943). Using DIANA miRNA online tools, it was determined that GSE and TSA simultaneously cause overexpression of similar miRNAs predicted to destroy the following influential oncogenes: NFkB, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, MYC, TGFBR1, E2F1, E2F2, BCL21, CDKN1A, CDK6, HIF1a, and VEGFA. Conclusion: The data from

  19. How to suppress undesired synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzada, V H P; Araújo, N A M; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2012-01-01

    Examples of synchronization can be found in a wide range of phenomena such as neurons firing, lasers cascades, chemical reactions, and opinion formation. However, in many situations the formation of a coherent state is not pleasant and should be mitigated. For example, the onset of synchronization can be the root of epileptic seizures, traffic congestion in networks, and the collapse of constructions. Here we propose the use of contrarians to suppress undesired synchronization. We perform a comparative study of different strategies, either requiring local or total knowledge, and show that the most efficient one solely requires local information. Our results also reveal that, even when the distribution of neighboring interactions is narrow, significant improvement is observed when contrarians sit at the highly connected elements. The same qualitative results are obtained for artificially generated networks and two real ones, namely, the Routers of the Internet and a neuronal network.

  20. How to suppress undesired synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Louzada, V H P; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2012-01-01

    It is delightful to observe the emergence of synchronization in the blinking of fireflies to attract partners and preys. Other charming examples of synchronization can also be found in a wide range of phenomena such as, e.g., neurons firing, lasers cascades, chemical reactions, and opinion formation. However, in many situations the formation of a coherent state is not pleasant and should be mitigated. For example, the onset of synchronization can be the root of epileptic seizures, traffic congestion in communication networks, and the collapse of constructions. Here we propose the use of contrarians to suppress undesired synchronization. We perform a comparative study of different strategies, either requiring local or total knowledge of the system, and show that the most efficient one solely requires local information. Our results also reveal that, even when the distribution of neighboring interactions is narrow, significant improvement in mitigation is observed when contrarians sit at the highly connected ele...

  1. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Japan Community Health Care Organization Osaka Hospital, 4-2-78 Fukushima, Fukushima Ward, Osaka City, Osaka 553-0003 (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Higuchi, Chikahisa, E-mail: c-higuchi@umin.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  2. Tactile stimulation can suppress visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Masakazu; Hidaka, Souta

    2013-12-13

    An input (e.g., airplane takeoff sound) to a sensory modality can suppress the percept of another input (e.g., talking voices of neighbors) of the same modality. This perceptual suppression effect is evidence that neural responses to different inputs closely interact with each other in the brain. While recent studies suggest that close interactions also occur across sensory modalities, crossmodal perceptual suppression effect has not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that tactile stimulation can suppress the percept of visual stimuli: Visual orientation discrimination performance was degraded when a tactile vibration was applied to the observer's index finger of hands. We also demonstrated that this tactile suppression effect on visual perception occurred primarily when the tactile and visual information were spatially and temporally consistent. The current findings would indicate that neural signals could closely and directly interact with each other, sufficient to induce the perceptual suppression effect, even across sensory modalities.

  3. Tactile stimulation can suppress visual perception

    OpenAIRE

    Masakazu Ide; Souta Hidaka

    2013-01-01

    An input (e.g., airplane takeoff sound) to a sensory modality can suppress the percept of another input (e.g., talking voices of neighbors) of the same modality. This perceptual suppression effect is evidence that neural responses to different inputs closely interact with each other in the brain. While recent studies suggest that close interactions also occur across sensory modalities, crossmodal perceptual suppression effect has not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that tactile stimul...

  4. Shot noise suppression in avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Feng; Wang, Shuling; Campbell, Joe C

    2005-10-21

    We identify a new shot noise suppression mechanism in a thin (approximately 100 nm) heterostructure avalanche photodiode. In the low-gain regime the shot noise is suppressed due to temporal correlations within amplified current pulses. We demonstrate in a Monte Carlo simulation that the effective excess noise factors can be < 1, and reconcile the apparent conflict between theory and experiments. This shot noise suppression mechanism is independent of known mechanisms such as Coulomb interaction, or reflection at heterojunction interfaces.

  5. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hung Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression, the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression.

  6. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  7. NOVEL BIPHASE CODE -INTEGRATED SIDELOBE SUPPRESSION CODE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feixue; Ou Gang; Zhuang Zhaowen

    2004-01-01

    A kind of novel binary phase code named sidelobe suppression code is proposed in this paper. It is defined to be the code whose corresponding optimal sidelobe suppression filter outputs the minimum sidelobes. It is shown that there do exist sidelobe suppression codes better than the conventional optimal codes-Barker codes. For example, the sidelobe suppression code of length 11 with filter of length 39 has better sidelobe level up to 17dB than that of Barker code with the same code length and filter length.

  8. Attentional selection by distractor suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, G; Guerra, S

    1998-03-01

    Selective attention was studied in displays containing singletons popping out for their odd form or color. The target was defined as the form-singleton, the distractor as the color-singleton. The task was to discriminate the length of a longer line inside the target. Target-distractor similarity was controlled using a threshold measurement as dependent variable in experiments in which distractor presence vs absence, bottom-up vs top-down selection (through knowledge of target features), and target-distractor distance were manipulated. The results in the bottom-up condition showed that length threshold was elevated when a distractor was present and that this elevation progressively increased as the number of distractors was increased from one to two. This set-size effect was not accounted by the hypothesis that selective attention intervenes only at the stage of decision before response. Selective attention produced a suppressive surround in which discriminability of neighboring objects was strongly reduced, and a larger surround in which discriminability was reduced by an approximately constant amount. Different results were found in the top-down condition in which target discriminability was unaffected by distractor presence and no effect of target-distractor distance was found. On the other hand, response times in both bottom-up and top-down conditions were slower the shorter the target-distractor distance was. On the basis of the experimental results, selective attention is a parallel process of spatial filtering at an intermediate processing level operating after objects have been segmented. This filtering stage explores high level interactions between objects taking control on combinatorial explosion by operating over only a limited spatial extent: it picks out a selected object and inhibits the neighboring objects; then, non-selected objects are suppressed across the overall image. When no feature-based selection is available in the current behavior, this

  9. Suppressive soils: back on the radar screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppressive soils are those in which a pathogen does not establish or persist, establishes but causes little or no damage, or establishes and causes disease for a while but thereafter the disease is less important, although the pathogen may persist in the soil (Weller, 2002). ‘General suppression,’ ...

  10. Atomic clocks with suppressed blackbody radiation shift

    CERN Document Server

    Yudin, V I; Okhapkin, M V; Bagayev, S N; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E; Huntemann, N; Mehlstaubler, T E; Riehle, F

    2011-01-01

    We develop a nonstandard concept of atomic clocks where the blackbody radiation shift (BBRS) and its temperature fluctuations can be dramatically suppressed (by one to three orders of magnitude) independent of the environmental temperature. The suppression is based on the fact that in a system with two accessible clock transitions (with frequencies $\

  11. Anticipatory signatures of voluntary memory suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanslmayr, Simon; Leipold, Philipp; Pastötter, Bernhard; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz

    2009-03-04

    Voluntary memory suppression can keep unwanted memories from entering consciousness, inducing later forgetting of the information. In the present study, we searched for the existence of anticipatory processes, mediating such voluntary memory suppression. Using the think/no-think paradigm, subjects received a cue whether to prepare to think of a previously studied cue-target pair or whether to not let a previously studied cue-target pair enter consciousness. Examining event-related potentials, we identified two electrophysiological processes of voluntary memory suppression: (1) an early anticipatory process operating before the memory cue for a to-be-suppressed memory was provided, and (2) a later process operating after memory cue presentation. Both ERP effects were due to a decreased right frontal and left parietal positivity. They were positively related and predicted later forgetting. The results point to the existence of anticipatory processes, mediating voluntary memory suppression.

  12. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jinghong; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  13. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2016-02-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  14. Hydrogen suppresses UO 2 corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbol, Paul; Fors, Patrik; Gouder, Thomas; Spahiu, Kastriot

    2009-08-01

    Release of long-lived radionuclides such as plutonium and caesium from spent nuclear fuel in deep geological repositories will depend mainly on the dissolution rate of the UO 2 fuel matrix. This dissolution rate will, in turn, depend on the redox conditions at the fuel surface. Under oxidative conditions UO 2 will be oxidised to the 1000 times more soluble UO 2.67. This may occur in a repository as the reducing deep groundwater becomes locally oxidative at the fuel surface under the effect of α-radiolysis, the process by which α-particles emitted from the fuel split water molecules. On the other hand, the groundwater corrodes canister iron generating large amounts of hydrogen. The role of molecular hydrogen as reductant in a deep bedrock repository is questioned. Here we show evidence of a surface-catalysed reaction, taking place in the H 2-UO 2-H 2O system where molecular hydrogen is able to reduce oxidants originating from α-radiolysis. In our experiment the UO 2 surface remained stoichiometric proving that the expected oxidation of UO 2.00 to UO 2.67 due to radiolytic oxidants was absent. As a consequence, the dissolution of UO 2 stopped when equilibrium was reached between the solid phase and U 4+ species in the aqueous phase. The steady-state concentration of uranium in solution was determined to be 9 × 10 -12 M, about 30 times lower than previously reported for reducing conditions. Our findings show that fuel dissolution is suppressed by H 2. Consequently, radiotoxic nuclides in spent nuclear fuel will remain immobilised in the UO 2 matrix. A mechanism for the surface-catalysed reaction between molecular hydrogen and radiolytic oxidants is proposed.

  15. Psychopathology and thought suppression: a quantitative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Joshua C; Harden, K Paige; Teachman, Bethany A

    2012-04-01

    Recent theories of psychopathology have suggested that thought suppression intensifies the persistence of intrusive thoughts, and proposed that difficulty with thought suppression may differ between groups with and without psychopathology. The current meta-analytic review evaluates empirical evidence for difficulty with thought suppression as a function of the presence and specific type of psychopathology. Based on theoretical proposals from the psychopathology literature, diagnosed and analogue samples were expected to show greater recurrence of intrusive thoughts during thought suppression attempts than non-clinical samples. However, results showed no overall differences in the recurrence of thoughts due to thought suppression between groups with and without psychopathology. There was, nevertheless, variation in the recurrence of thoughts across different forms of psychopathology, including relatively less recurrence during thought suppression for samples with symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, compared to non-clinical samples. However, these differences were typically small and provided only mixed support for existing theories. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusive thoughts are discussed, including proposed mechanisms underlying thought suppression.

  16. Psychopathology and Thought Suppression: A Quantitative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Joshua C.; Harden, K. Paige; Teachman, Bethany A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent theories of psychopathology have suggested that thought suppression intensifies the persistence of intrusive thoughts, and proposed that difficulty with thought suppression may differ between groups with and without psychopathology. The current meta-analytic review evaluates empirical evidence for difficulty with thought suppression as a function of the presence and specific type of psychopathology. Based on theoretical proposals from the psychopathology literature, diagnosed and analogue samples were expected to show greater recurrence of intrusive thoughts during thought suppression attempts than non-clinical samples. However, results showed no overall differences in the recurrence of thoughts due to thought suppression between groups with and without psychopathology. There was, nevertheless, variation in the recurrence of thoughts across different forms of psychopathology, including relatively less recurrence during thought suppression for samples with symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, compared to non-clinical samples. However, these differences were typically small and provided only mixed support for existing theories. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusive thoughts are discussed, including proposed mechanisms underlying thought suppression. PMID:22388007

  17. Acinar-to-ductal metaplasia accompanies c-myc-induced exocrine pancreatic cancer progression in transgenic rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippo, Paul J; Sandgren, Eric P

    2012-09-01

    Several important characteristics of exocrine pancreatic tumor pathogenesis remain incompletely defined, including identification of the cell of origin. Most human pancreatic neoplasms are ductal adenocarcinomas. However, acinar cells have been proposed as the source of some ductal neoplasms through a process of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. The oncogenic transcription factor c-myc is associated with human pancreatic neoplasms. Transgenic mice overexpressing c-myc under control of acinar cell-specific elastase (Ela) gene regulatory elements not only develop acinar cell carcinomas but also mixed neoplasms that display both acinar-like neoplastic cells and duct-like neoplastic cells. In this report, we demonstrate that, first, c-myc is sufficient to induce acinar hyperplasia, though neoplastic lesions develop focally. Second, cell proliferation remains elevated in the neoplastic duct cell compartment of mixed neoplasms. Third, the proliferation/apoptosis ratio in cells from all lesion types remains constant, suggesting that differential regulation of these processes is not a feature of cancer progression in this model. Fourth, before the development of mixed neoplasms, there is transcriptional activation of the duct cell-specific cytokeratin-19 gene promoter in multicellular foci of amylase-positive acinar neoplasms. This observation provides direct evidence for metaplasia as the mechanism underlying development of ductal neoplastic cells within the context of an acinar neoplasm and suggests that the stimulus for this transformation acts over a multicellular domain or field within a neoplasm. Finally, focal ductal elements develop in some acinar cell carcinomas in Ela-c-myc transgenic rats, indicating that myc-associated acinar-to-ductal metaplasia is not restricted to the mouse.

  18. Effects of tic suppression: ability to suppress, rebound, negative reinforcement, and habituation to the premonitory urge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Matt W; Woods, Douglas W; Nicotra, Cassandra M; Kelly, Laura M; Ricketts, Emily J; Conelea, Christine A; Grados, Marco A; Ostrander, Rick S; Walkup, John T

    2013-01-01

    The comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics (CBIT) represents a safe, effective non-pharmacological treatment for Tourette's disorder that remains underutilized as a treatment option. Contributing factors include the perceived negative consequences of tic suppression and the lack of a means through which suppression results in symptom improvement. Participants (n = 12) included youth ages 10-17 years with moderate-to-marked tic severity and noticeable premonitory urges who met Tourette's or chronic tic disorder criteria. Tic frequency and urge rating data were collected during an alternating sequence of tic freely or reinforced tic suppression periods. Even without specific instructions regarding how to suppress tics, youth experienced a significant, robust (72%), stable reduction in tic frequency under extended periods (40 min) of contingently reinforced tic suppression in contrast to periods of time when tics were ignored. Following periods of prolonged suppression, tic frequency returned to pre-suppression levels. Urge ratings did not show the expected increase during the initial periods of tic suppression, nor a subsequent decline in urge ratings during prolonged, effective tic suppression. Results suggest that environments conducive to tic suppression result in reduced tic frequency without adverse consequences. Additionally, premonitory urges, underrepresented in the literature, may represent an important enduring etiological consideration in the development and maintenance of tic disorders.

  19. Nearly Complete Isobar Suppression by Photodetachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, P. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Lindahl, A. O. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Hanstorp, D. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Havener, Charles C [ORNL; Liu, Yun [ORNL; Liu, Yuan [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of selective suppression of negative ions by photodetachment in a gas-filled radio frequency quadrupole ion cooler was investigated with a new detection method. A neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser beam at 1064 nm was used to remove Co ions in the radio frequency quadrupole cooler and the remaining ions were then probed by photodetachment and neutral particle detection. More than 99.99% suppression of the Co ions was observed. Under identical conditions, only 20% of a Ni beam was suppressed. The results demonstrate that this isobar suppression technique can lead to nearly complete elimination of certain isobaric contaminants in negative ion beams, opening up new experimental possibilities in nuclear and atomic research and accelerator mass spectrometry.

  20. Quadratic dynamical decoupling with nonuniform error suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiroz, Gregory; Lidar, Daniel A. [Department of Physics and Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Departments of Electrical Engineering, Chemistry, and Physics, and Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We analyze numerically the performance of the near-optimal quadratic dynamical decoupling (QDD) single-qubit decoherence errors suppression method [J. West et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 130501 (2010)]. The QDD sequence is formed by nesting two optimal Uhrig dynamical decoupling sequences for two orthogonal axes, comprising N{sub 1} and N{sub 2} pulses, respectively. Varying these numbers, we study the decoherence suppression properties of QDD directly by isolating the errors associated with each system basis operator present in the system-bath interaction Hamiltonian. Each individual error scales with the lowest order of the Dyson series, therefore immediately yielding the order of decoherence suppression. We show that the error suppression properties of QDD are dependent upon the parities of N{sub 1} and N{sub 2}, and near-optimal performance is achieved for general single-qubit interactions when N{sub 1}=N{sub 2}.

  1. Suppression factors in diffractive photoproduction of dijets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Michael; Kramer, Gustav

    2010-11-01

    Now that new publications of H1 data for the diffractive photoproduction of dijets, which overlap with the earlier published H1 data and the recently published data of the ZEUS collaboration, have appeared, we have recalculated the cross sections for this process in next-to-leading order (NLO) of perturbative QCD to see whether they can be interpreted consistently. The results of these calculations are compared to the data of both collaborations. We find that the NLO cross sections disagree with the data, showing that factorization breaking occurs at that order. If direct and resolved contributions are both suppressed by the same amount, the global suppression factor depends on the transverse-energy cut. However, by suppressing only the resolved contribution, also reasonably good agreement with all the data is found with a suppression factor independent of the transverse-energy cut.

  2. Suppression factors in diffractive photoproduction of dijets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, Michael [Universite Joseph Fourier/CNRS-IN2P3/INPG, Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Grenoble (France); Kramer, Gustav [Universitaet Hamburg, II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Now that new publications of H1 data for the diffractive photoproduction of dijets, which overlap with the earlier published H1 data and the recently published data of the ZEUS collaboration, have appeared, we have recalculated the cross sections for this process in next-to-leading order (NLO) of perturbative QCD to see whether they can be interpreted consistently. The results of these calculations are compared to the data of both collaborations. We find that the NLO cross sections disagree with the data, showing that factorization breaking occurs at that order. If direct and resolved contributions are both suppressed by the same amount, the global suppression factor depends on the transverse-energy cut. However, by suppressing only the resolved contribution, also reasonably good agreement with all the data is found with a suppression factor independent of the transverse-energy cut. (orig.)

  3. Suppression factors in diffractive photoproduction of dijets

    CERN Document Server

    Klasen, M

    2010-01-01

    After new publications of H1 data for the diffractive photoproduction of dijets, which overlap with the earlier published H1 data and the recently published data of the ZEUS collaboration, have appeared, we have recalculated the cross sections for this process in next-to-leading order (NLO) of perturbative QCD to see whether they can be interpreted consistently. The results of these calculations are compared to the data of both collaborations. We find that the NLO cross sections disagree with the data, showing that factorization breaking occurs at that order. If direct and resolved contributions are both suppressed by the same amount, the global suppression factor depends on the transverse-energy cut. However, by suppressing only the resolved contribution, also reasonably good agreement with all the data is found with a suppression factor independent of the transverse-energy cut.

  4. Suppression factors in diffractive photoproduction of dijets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, Michael [Joseph Fourier Univ./CNRS-IN2P3/INPG, 38 - Grenoble (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie; Kramer, Gustav [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-06-15

    After new publications of H1 data for the diffractive photoproduction of dijets, which overlap with the earlier published H1 data and the recently published data of the ZEUS collaboration, have appeared, we have recalculated the cross sections for this process in next-to-leading order (NLO) of perturbative QCD to see whether they can be interpreted consistently. The results of these calculations are compared to the data of both collaborations. We find that the NLO cross sections disagree with the data, showing that factorization breaking occurs at that order. If direct and resolved contributions are both suppressed by the same amount, the global suppression factor depends on the transverse-energy cut. However, by suppressing only the resolved contribution, also reasonably good agreement with all the data is found with a suppression factor independent of the transverse-energy cut. (orig.)

  5. Strangeness suppression in the unquenched quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, Roelof; Santopinto, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the strangeness suppression in the proton in the framework of the unquenched quark model. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the values extracted from CERN and JLab experiments.

  6. Suppression as a stereotype control strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, M J; Sherman, J W; Devine, P G

    1998-01-01

    Recent research reveals that efforts to suppress stereotypic thoughts can backfire and produce a rebound effect, such that stereotypic thinking increases to a level that is even greater than if no attempt at stereotype control was initially exercised (e.g., Macrae, Bodenhausen, Milne, & Jetten, 1994). The primary goal of this article is to present an in-depth theoretical analysis of stereotype suppression that identifies numerous potential moderators of the effect of stereotype suppression on the likelihood of subsequent rebound. Our analysis of stereotype suppression focuses on two broad issues: the influence of level of prejudice and the influence of processing goals on the activation versus application of stereotypes. Although stereotype rebound occurs under some circumstances, we suggest that a complete understanding of this phenomenon requires consideration of the full array of possible moderating influences.

  7. TSH-Suppressive Therapy: A Thorny Issue

    OpenAIRE

    Itala Marina Baldini; Cristina Cocino; Sonia Seghezzi; Maria Domenica Cappellini

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)-suppressive therapy with levothyroxine is a cornerstone of thyroid carcinoma follow-up therapy, but the achievement of therapeutic goals must be balanced against L-T4 side effects. We describe the case of a 64-year-old cardiopathic patient with papillary thyroid carcinoma and autoimmune thyroiditis, whose cardiac condition worsened during TSH-suppressive therapy. TSH concentrations also fluctuated widely because of changing intestinal absorption due to coelia...

  8. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  9. Flame Suppression Agent, System and Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous droplets encapsulated in a flame retardant polymer are useful in suppressing combustion. Upon exposure to a flame, the encapsulated aqueous droplets rupture and vaporize, removing heat and displacing oxygen to retard the combustion process. The polymer encapsulant, through decomposition, may further add free radicals to the combustion atmosphere, thereby further retarding the combustion process. The encapsulated aqueous droplets may be used as a replacement to halon, water mist and dry powder flame suppression systems.

  10. Noise suppression in surface microseismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Davidson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform. We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform.

  11. CONDITIONS FOR CSR MICROBUNCHING GAIN SUPPRESSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Cheng Ying [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); di Mitri, Simone [Elettra–Sincrotrone Trieste, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste, Italy

    2016-05-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport arcs, may result in phase space degradation. On one hand, the CSR can perturb electron transverse motion in dispersive regions along the beamline, causing emittance growth. On the other hand, the CSR effect on the longitudinal beam dynamics could result in microbunching gain enhancement. For transport arcs, several schemes have been proposed* to suppress the CSR-induced emittance growth. Similarly, several scenarios have been introduced** to suppress CSR-induced microbunching gain, which however mostly aim for linac-based machines. In this paper we try to provide sufficient conditions for suppression of CSR-induced microbunching gain along a transport arc, analogous to*. Several example lattices are presented, with the relevant microbunching analyses carried out by our semi-analytical Vlasov solver***. The simulation results show that lattices satisfying the proposed conditions indeed have microbunching gain suppressed. We expect this analysis can shed light on lattice design approach that could suppress the CSR-induced microbunching gain.

  12. Interocular suppression in children with deprivation amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Lisa; Chen, Zidong; Li, Jinrong; Black, Joanna; Dai, Shuan; Yuan, Junpeng; Yu, Minbin; Thompson, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    In patients with anisometropic or strabismic amblyopia, interocular suppression can be minimized by presenting high contrast stimulus elements to the amblyopic eye and lower contrast elements to the fellow eye. This suggests a structurally intact binocular visual system that is functionally suppressed. We investigated whether suppression can also be overcome by contrast balancing in children with deprivation amblyopia due to childhood cataracts. To quantify interocular contrast balance, contrast interference thresholds were measured using an established dichoptic global motion technique for 21 children with deprivation amblyopia, 14 with anisometropic or mixed strabismic/anisometropic amblyopia and 10 visually normal children (mean age mean=9.9years, range 5-16years). We found that interocular suppression could be overcome by contrast balancing in most children with deprivation amblyopia, at least intermittently, and all children with anisometropic or mixed anisometropic/strabismic amblyopia. However, children with deprivation amblyopia due to early unilateral or bilateral cataracts could tolerate only very low contrast levels to the stronger eye indicating strong suppression. Our results suggest that treatment options reliant on contrast balanced dichoptic presentation could be attempted in a subset of children with deprivation amblyopia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tactical Checkpoint: Hail/Warn Suppress/Stop (Poster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    distractor , optical suppression , human behavior, checkpoint, ambient light, driver suppression , human experimentation, light, paintball, obscuration...HAIL/WARN AND - SUPPRESS /STOP Poster Presented at the 2010 Directed Energies Professional Society Meeting, 15-19 November 2010. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...warning to a driver that is approaching a checkpoint. The laser, MCNC light, and the windshield obscuration were evaluated for their suppression

  14. Microbial populations responsible for specific soil suppressiveness to plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weller, D.M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; McSpadden Gardener, B.B.; Thomashow, L.S.

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural soils suppressive to soilborne plant pathogens occur worldwide, and for several of these soils the biological basis of suppressiveness has been described. Two classical types of suppressiveness are known. General suppression owes its activity to the total microbial biomass in soil and i

  15. Orientation-tuned surround suppression in mouse visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Self, Matthew W; Lorteije, Jeannette A M; Vangeneugden, Joris; van Beest, Enny H; Grigore, Mihaela E; Levelt, Christiaan N; Heimel, J.A.; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2014-01-01

    The firing rates of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are suppressed by large stimuli, an effect known as surround suppression. In cats and monkeys, the strength of suppression is sensitive to orientation; responses to regions containing uniform orientations are more suppressed than those contai

  16. Weed suppression ability of spring barley varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend

    1995-01-01

    Three years of experiments with spring barley showed significant differences in weed suppression ability among varieties. Weed dry matter in the most suppressive variety, Ida, was 48% lower than the mean weed dry matter of all varieties, whereas it was 31% higher in the least suppressive variety......, Grit. Ranking varietal responses to weed competition in terms of grain yield loss corresponded well to ranking weed dry matter produced in crop weed mixtures. There was no correspondence between the varietal grain yields in pure stands and their competitiveness, suggesting that breeding to optimize...... interception model was developed to describe the light interception profiles of the varieties. A study of the estimated parameters showed significant correlation between weed dry matter, rate of canopy height development and the light interception profile. However, when estimates were standardized to eliminate...

  17. Suppression of fertility in adult cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra Kathrin; Wehrend, A.; Georgiev, P.

    2014-01-01

    Contents: Cats are animals with highly efficient reproduction, clearly pointing to a need for suppression of fertility. Although surgical contraception is highly effective, it is not always the method of choice. This is predominantly because it is cost-intensive, time-consuming and irreversible......, with the latter being of major importance for cat breeders. This article reviews the use of progestins, scleroting agents, immunocontraception, melatonin, GnRH antagonists and finally, GnRH agonists, in adult male and female cats in detail, according to the present state of the art. By now, various scientific...... and clinical options are available for the suppression of fertility in adult cats and the decision as to which should be chosen - independent of the legal registration of any state - depends on different facts: (i) feral or privately owned animal? (ii) temporary or permanent suppression of fertility wanted...

  18. Implicitly learned suppression of irrelevant spatial locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, Andrew B; Gwinn, Rachael E; Hong, Yoolim; O'Toole, Ryan J

    2016-12-01

    How do we ignore a salient, irrelevant stimulus whose location is predictable? A variety of studies using instructional manipulations have shown that participants possess the capacity to exert location-based suppression. However, for the visual search challenges we face in daily life, we are not often provided explicit instructions and are unlikely to consciously deliberate on what our best strategy might be. Instead, we might rely on our past experience-in the form of implicit learning-to exert strategic control. In this paper, we tested whether implicit learning could drive spatial suppression. In Experiment 1, participants searched displays in which one location contained a target, while another contained a salient distractor. An arrow cue pointed to the target location with 70 % validity. Also, unbeknownst to the participants, the same arrow cue predicted the distractor location with 70 % validity. Results showed facilitated RTs to the predicted target location, confirming target enhancement. Critically, distractor interference was reduced at the predicted distractor location, revealing that participants used spatial suppression. Further, we found that participants had no explicit knowledge of the cue-distractor contingencies, confirming that the learning was implicit. In Experiment 2, to seek further evidence for suppression, we modified the task to include occasional masked probes following the arrow cue; we found worse probe identification accuracy at the predicted distractor location than control locations, providing converging evidence that observers spatially suppressed the predicted distractor locations. These results reveal an ecologically desirable mechanism of suppression, which functions without the need for conscious knowledge or externally guided instructions.

  19. Immune suppressive mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, David H; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Effective immunotherapy, whether by checkpoint blockade or adoptive cell therapy, is limited in most patients by a key barrier: the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Suppression of tumor-specific T cells is orchestrated by the activity of a variety of stromal myeloid and lymphoid cells. These often display inducible suppressive mechanisms that are triggered by the same anti-tumor inflammatory response that the immunotherapy intends to create. Therefore, a more comprehensive understanding of how the immunosuppressive milieu develops and persists is critical in order to harness the full power of immunotherapy of cancer.

  20. FLUTTER SUPPRESSION USING DISTRIBUTED PIEZOELECTRIC ACTUATORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Flutter suppression using distributed piezoelectric actuators has been analyzed and tested. In constructing the finite element equation, effects of piezoelectric matrices are investigated. LQG method is used in designing the control law. In reducing the order of the control law, both balance realization and LK methods are used. For the rational approximation of the unsteady aerodynamic forces LS method is improved. In determining the piezoelectric constants d31 a new dynamic response method is developed. Laser vibrameter is used to pick up the model response and in ground resonance test the model is excited by piezoelectric actuators. Reasonable agreement of the wind tunnel flutter suppression test with calculated results is obtained.

  1. Suppression of photoionization by a static field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilary, Ido; Sajeev, Yesodharan; Ciappina, Marcelo F; Croy, Alexander; Goletz, Christoph M; Klaiman, Shachar; Sindelka, Milan; Winter, Martin; Wustmann, Waltraut; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2008-10-17

    The dc field Stark effect is studied theoretically for atoms in high intensity laser fields. We prove that the first-order perturbation corrections for the energy and photoionization rate vanish when the dc field strength serves as a perturbational strength parameter. Our calculations show that by applying a dc field in the same direction as the polarization direction of the ac field, the photoinduced ionization rate is almost entirely suppressed. This suppression is attributed to changes in the phase shift of the continuum atomic wave functions which can be controlled by the dc field.

  2. Suppression of crosstalk in coupled plasmonic waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, E V; Zyablovsky, A A; Vinogradov, A P; Lisyansky, A A

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the suppression of crosstalk between two dielectric nanowaveguides by placing an auxiliary linear waveguide between loaded waveguides spaced by one wavelength. The total cross-sectional dimension of the system containing two transmission lines is less than two microns that is hundred times smaller than a cross-section of a system made of dielectric fiber. The propagating modes in these waveguides are the sum and the difference of symmetric and antisymmetric modes of the coupled system. Crosstalk is suppressed by matching the wavenumbers of these modes. The analytically obtained results are confirmed by numerical simulation.

  3. Jet suppression measurement with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Slovak, Radim; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A hot medium with a high density of unscreened color charges is produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Jets are produced at the early stages of this collision and are known to become attenuated as they propagate through the hot matter. One manifestation of this energy loss is a lower yield of jets emerging from the medium than expected in the absence of medium effects. Another manifestation of the energy loss is the modification of the dijet balance and the modification of fragmentation functions. In these proceedings, the latest ATLAS results on single jet suppression, dijet suppression, and modification of the jet internal structure in \\PbPb~collisions are presented.

  4. Dynamic Optimization for Vortex Shedding Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonis Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flows around structures exhibiting vortex shedding induce vibrations that can potentially damage the structure. A way to avoid it is to suppress vortex shedding by controlling the wake. Wake control of laminar flow behind a rotating cylinder is formulated herein as a dynamic optimization problem. Angular cylinder speed is the manipulated variable that is adjusted to suppress vortex shedding by minimizing lift coefficient variation. The optimal angular speed is assumed to be periodic like wake formation. The control problem is solved for different time horizons tH. The impact of tH to control is evaluated and the need for feedback is assessed.

  5. Star formation suppression in compact group galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.;

    2015-01-01

    , bars, rings, tidal tails, and possibly nuclear outflows, though the molecular gas morphologies are more consistent with spirals and earlytype galaxies than mergers and interacting systems. Our CO-imaged HCG galaxies, when plotted on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, shows star formation (SF) suppression...... color space. This supports the idea that at least some galaxies in HCGs are transitioning objects, where a disruption of the existing molecular gas in the system suppresses SF by inhibiting the molecular gas from collapsing and forming stars efficiently. These observations, combined with recent work...

  6. Jet suppression measurement with the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, Radim; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    A hot medium with a high density of unscreened color charges is produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Jets are produced at the early stages of these collisions and are known to become attenuated as they propagate through the hot matter. One manifestation of this energy loss is a lower yield of jets emerging from the medium than expected in the absence of medium effects. Another manifestation of the energy loss is the modification of the dijet balance and the modification of fragmentation functions. In these proceedings, the latest ATLAS results on single jet suppression, dijet suppression, and modification of the jet internal structure in Pb+Pb collisions are presented.

  7. Research on the development of weed-suppressing rice varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaochuan ZHOU; Decheng LU; Hong LI; Daoqiang HUANG; Ruowei MIAO

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop weed-suppressing rice varieties in a weed-suppressing nursery by specific secondary metabolite markers of allelopathic potential. Weed-suppressing rice variety Feng-Hua-Zhan was screened out by a specific secondary metabolite marker of allelopathic potential. Weed-suppressing rice No. 1, a new rice line with good quality, was also developed using this method. The genetic backgrounds and research directions of weed-suppressing rice varieties are discussed in this paper.

  8. Reappraising suppression: subjective and physiological correlates of experiential suppression in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu eLemaire

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotion regulation strategies based on suppressing behavioural expressions of emotion have been considered maladaptive. However this may not apply to suppressing the emotional experience (experiential suppression. The aim of this study was to define the effect of experiential suppression on subjective and physiological emotional responses. Methods: Healthy adults (N=101 were characterized in terms of the temperament, personality, and hedonic capacity using the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, the Fawcett-Clark Pleasure Scale and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Participants were shown positive, negative and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System under two conditions, passive viewing and experiential suppression. During both conditions, subjective ratings of the intensity and duration of emotional responses and physiological measures of skin conductance (SC and cardiac inter-beat interval (IBI to each picture were recorded.Results: Negative pictures elicited the most intense physiological and emotional responses regardless of experimental condition. Ratings of emotional intensity were not affected by condition. In contrast, experiential suppression, compared to passive viewing, was associated with decreased duration of the emotional response, reduced maximum SC amplitude and longer IBIs independent of age, picture valence, personality traits, hedonic capacity and anxiety. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that experiential suppression may represent an adaptive emotion regulation mechanism associated with reduced arousal and cardiovascular activation.

  9. Contour detection by surround suppression of texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkov, Nicolai; Tavares, JMRS; Jorge, RMN

    2007-01-01

    Based on a keynote lecture at Complmage 2006, Coimbra, Oct. 20-21, 2006, an overview is given of our activities in modelling and using surround inhibition for contour detection. The effect of suppression of a line or edge stimulus by similar surrounding stimuli is known from visual perception studie

  10. Isobar suppression in AMS using laser photodetachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forstner, O. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Wien (Austria)], E-mail: Oliver.Forstner@univie.ac.at; Andersson, P. [Department of Physics, Goeteborg University, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Diehl, C. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Golser, R. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Hanstorp, D. [Department of Physics, Goeteborg University, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Kutschera, W. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Lindahl, A. [Department of Physics, Goeteborg University, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Wallner, A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

    2008-10-15

    We are investigating the possibility of using laser photodetachment of negative atomic and molecular ions as an additional isobaric selection filter in accelerator mass spectrometry. The aim of this study is to find a possibility to further improve the detection limit for long-lived heavy radionuclides at AMS facilities. We will focus on the astrophysical relevant radionuclide {sup 182}Hf, which is one of the isotopes measured with the 3 MV tandem AMS facility VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) at the University of Vienna. Laser-induced isobar suppression is also of importance for radioactive-beam facilities. The present detection limit for measuring the isotope ratio {sup 182}Hf/Hf at VERA is 1x10{sup -11}. The limiting factor is the strong background of the stable isobar {sup 182}W. Currently this background is suppressed using suitable molecular ions in the injection stage. Selective laser photodetachment of the negative ions at the injector can lead to an additional suppression of the interfering isobar. Test experiments have been carried out at the negative ion laser spectroscopy setup at Goeteborg University. In a small ion beam apparatus pulsed tunable laser radiation is used to measure the photodetachment cross-section of different atomic and molecular negative ions. We will present studies of the photodetachment process for various tungsten and hafnium molecules with the aim to find a selective isobaric suppression scheme using laser photodetachment spectroscopy in combination with AMS.

  11. Characterization of Immune Suppression Induced by Polyribonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    RD-0162 482 CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMUNE SUPPRESSION INDUCED Y v i POLYRIDONUCLEOTIDES(U) MINNESOTA UNIV DULUTH DEPT OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY AND...Polyribonucleotides by Marilyn J. Odean and Arthur G. Johnson Dept. of Medical Microbiology /Immunology University of Minnesota-Duluth 55812 DTICS ELECTE DEC 18

  12. UAV visual signature suppression via adaptive materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrett, R.; Melkert, J.

    2005-01-01

    Visual signature suppression (VSS) methods for several classes of aircraft from WWII on are examined and historically summarized. This study shows that for some classes of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs), primary mission threats do not stem from infrared or radar signatures, but from the amount t

  13. Magnetoelastic metastructures for passive broadband vibration suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobeck, Jared D.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical analysis of a novel metamaterial-inspired distributed vibration suppression system. The proposed research takes advantage of uniquely designed cantilevered zigzag structures that can have natural frequencies orders of magnitude lower than a simple cantilever of the same scale. A key advantage of the proposed vibration suppression system is that the dynamic response of each zigzag structure can be made highly nonlinear with the use of magnets. Arrays of these compact linear and nonlinear zigzag structures are integrated into a host structure to form what is referred to here as a metastructure. The proposed and experimentally validated analytical model employs a Rayleigh-Ritz formulation for a linear metastructure represented as a cantilever beam with a distributed array of attached single degree of freedom oscillators. These attached oscillators are lumped parameter representations of the zigzag structures. Experimental modal analysis results are shown comparing the response of the nonlinear metastructure to that of both the linear metastructure and also to the host structure with no vibration suppression. Results show that the linear system can reduce the maximum response of the host structure by 41.0% while the nonlinear system can achieve over twice that with a reduction of 84.5%. These promising preliminary results provide motivation for future work to be focused on developing nonlinear metastructures for vibration suppression.

  14. Active suppression after involuntary capture of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaki, Risa; Luck, Steven J

    2013-04-01

    After attention has been involuntarily captured by a distractor, how is it reoriented toward a target? One possibility is that attention to the distractor passively fades over time, allowing the target to become attended. Another possibility is that the captured location is actively suppressed so that attention can be directed toward the target location. The present study investigated this issue with event-related potentials (ERPs), focusing on the N2pc component (a neural measure of attentional deployment) and the Pd component (a neural measure of attentional suppression). Observers identified a color-defined target in a search array, which was preceded by a task-irrelevant cue array. When the cue array contained an item that matched the target color, this item captured attention (as measured both behaviorally and with the N2pc component). This capture of attention was followed by active suppression (indexed by the Pd component), and this was then followed by a reorienting of attention toward the target in the search array (indexed by the N2pc component). These findings indicate that the involuntary capture of attention by a distractor is followed by an active suppression process that presumably facilitates the subsequent voluntary orienting of attention to the target.

  15. Ion Suppression Study for Tetracyclines in Feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Chico

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion suppression in analysis of tetracyclines in feed was studied. The conventional analysis consists of a liquid extraction followed by a clean-up step using solid phase extraction (SPE technique and analysis of the tetracyclines by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometric detection. Various strategies for extraction and cleanup were tested in the present work, and the effectiveness to decrease the ion suppression on the MS/MS signals was evaluated. Four sample treatment methods were tested with five different feed samples. Extraction solvents tested were McIlvaine buffer and a mixture of McIlvaine buffer dichloromethane (3 : 1. SPE cartridges for cleanup were Oasis HLB, Oasis MCX, and Oasis MAX. The effectiveness of the methods was evaluated in terms of decreasing the ion suppression effect but also of decreasing the variability of ion suppression between samples. The method that provided the most satisfactory results involved a clean-up step based on SPE using mixed-mode cation exchange cartridges (Oasis MCX.

  16. Strong suppression of weak localization in graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morozov, S.V.; Novoselov, K.S.; Katsnelson, M.I.; Schedin, F.; Ponomarenko, L.A.; Jiang, D.; Geim, A.K.

    2006-01-01

    Low-field magnetoresistance is ubiquitous in low-dimensional metallic systems with high resistivity and well understood as arising due to quantum interference on self-intersecting diffusive trajectories. We have found that in graphene this weak-localization magnetoresistance is strongly suppressed a

  17. Radio Science Measurements with Suppressed Carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmar, Sami; Divsalar, Dariush; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early Solar missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. Type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for the suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that presented here. Some numerical results are provided for coded system.

  18. Emotions shape memory suppression in trait anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Tessa; Regina, Antonio; Righi, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    The question that motivated this study was to investigate the relation between trait anxiety, emotions and memory control. To this aim, memory suppression was explored in high and low trait anxiety individuals with the Think/No-think paradigm. After learning associations between neutral words and emotional scenes (negative, positive, and neutral), participants were shown a word and were requested either to think about the associated scene or to block it out from mind. Finally, in a test phase, participants were again shown each word and asked to recall the paired scene. The results show that memory control is influenced by high trait anxiety and emotions. Low trait anxiety individuals showed a memory suppression effect, whereas there was a lack of memory suppression in high trait anxious individuals, especially for emotionally negative scenes. Thus, we suggest that individuals with anxiety may have difficulty exerting cognitive control over memories with a negative valence. These findings provide evidence that memory suppression can be impaired by anxiety thus highlighting the crucial relation between cognitive control, emotions, and individual differences in regulating emotions.

  19. Suppressive competition: how sounds may cheat sight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Christoph; Remedios, Ryan

    2012-02-23

    In this issue of Neuron, Iurilli et al. (2012) demonstrate that auditory cortex activation directly engages local GABAergic circuits in V1 to induce sound-driven hyperpolarizations in layer 2/3 and layer 6 pyramidal neurons. Thereby, sounds can directly suppress V1 activity and visual driven behavior. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Emotions shape memory suppression in trait anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa eMarzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The question that motivated this study was to investigate the relation between trait anxiety, emotions and memory control. To this aim, memory suppression was explored in high and low trait anxiety individuals with the Think/No-think paradigm. After learning associations between neutral words and emotional scenes (negative, positive and neutral, participants were shown a word and were requested either to think about the associated scene or to block it out from mind. Finally, in a test phase, participants were again shown each word and asked to recall the paired scene. The results show that memory control is influenced by high trait anxiety and emotions. Low trait anxiety individuals showed a memory suppression effect, whereas there was a lack of memory suppression in high trait anxious individuals, especially for emotionally negative scenes. Thus, we suggest that individuals with anxiety may have difficulty exerting cognitive control over memories with a negative valence. These findings provide evidence that memory suppression can be impaired by anxiety thus highlighting the crucial relation between cognitive control, emotions and individual differences in regulating emotions.

  1. Emotions shape memory suppression in trait anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Tessa; Regina, Antonio; Righi, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    The question that motivated this study was to investigate the relation between trait anxiety, emotions and memory control. To this aim, memory suppression was explored in high and low trait anxiety individuals with the Think/No-think paradigm. After learning associations between neutral words and emotional scenes (negative, positive, and neutral), participants were shown a word and were requested either to think about the associated scene or to block it out from mind. Finally, in a test phase, participants were again shown each word and asked to recall the paired scene. The results show that memory control is influenced by high trait anxiety and emotions. Low trait anxiety individuals showed a memory suppression effect, whereas there was a lack of memory suppression in high trait anxious individuals, especially for emotionally negative scenes. Thus, we suggest that individuals with anxiety may have difficulty exerting cognitive control over memories with a negative valence. These findings provide evidence that memory suppression can be impaired by anxiety thus highlighting the crucial relation between cognitive control, emotions, and individual differences in regulating emotions. PMID:24427152

  2. Theoretical status of J/{psi} suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavin, S.

    1993-03-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions are expected to produce hadron densities far beyond the density in nuclei, {rho}{sub 0} = 0.16 fm{sup {minus}3}. Remarkably, no single measurement from the AGS and SPS light ion programs with projectiles A {le} 32 stands out as unambiguous evidence of these extreme densities. To separate the high density signals from the background effects that result, e.g. from scattering with primary nucleons, careful systematic studies of hadron-nucleus, hA, and nucleus-nucleus, AB, data are needed. In this talk the author surveys the ongoing systematic study of the most notorious case in point -- J/{psi} suppression. In principle, measurements of J/{psi} suppression provide a probe of the densities obtained in AB collisions that is also sensitive to quark gluon plasma production. The latest results from SPS experiment NA38 reported by A. Romana in these proceedings show that the ratio of cross sections in the dimuon channel B{sub {mu}{mu}}{sigma}{sub {psi}}/{sigma}{sub cont} is reduced by a factor 0.50 {plus_minus} 0.05 in central S+U compared to minimum bias pU collisions at 200 AGeV. This is precisely the sort of suppression that one expects if high densities are obtained. On the other hand, a target-mass dependence suggestive of this suppression is found in hA collisions where high densities are not expected. At 200 GeV, NA38 finds that B{sub {mu}{mu}}{sigma}{sub {psi}}/{sigma}{sub cont} falls to 0.84 {plus_minus} 0.08 in pU compared to pCu. The hA suppression in this kinematic regime is likely due to a combination of nuclear effects: nucleon absorption and shadowing.

  3. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  4. c-Myc Transforms Human Mammary Epithelial Cells through Repression of the Wnt Inhibitors DKK1 and SFRP1▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, Victoria H.; D'Cruz, Celina M.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    c-myc is frequently amplified in breast cancer; however, the mechanism of myc-induced mammary epithelial cell transformation has not been defined. We show that c-Myc induces a profound morphological transformation in human mammary epithelial cells and anchorage-independent growth. c-Myc suppresses the Wnt inhibitors DKK1 and SFRP1, and derepression of DKK1 or SFRP1 reduces Myc-dependent transforming activity. Myc-dependent repression of DKK1 and SFRP1 is accompanied by Wnt target gene activation and endogenous T-cell factor activity. Myc-induced mouse mammary tumors have repressed SFRP1 and increased expression of Wnt target genes. DKK1 and SFRP1 inhibit the transformed phenotype of breast cancer cell lines, and DKK1 inhibits tumor formation. We propose a positive feedback loop for activation of the c-myc and Wnt pathways in breast cancer. PMID:17485441

  5. Glucose Suppresses Biological Ferroelectricity in Aortic Elastin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanming; Wang, Yunjie; Chow, Ming-Jay; Chen, Nataly Q.; Ma, Feiyue; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-01-01

    Elastin is an intriguing extracellular matrix protein present in all connective tissues of vertebrates, rendering essential elasticity to connective tissues subjected to repeated physiological stresses. Using piezoresponse force microscopy, we show that the polarity of aortic elastin is switchable by an electrical field, which may be associated with the recently discovered biological ferroelectricity in the aorta. More interestingly, it is discovered that the switching in aortic elastin is largely suppressed by glucose treatment, which appears to freeze the internal asymmetric polar structures of elastin, making it much harder to switch, or suppressing the switching completely. Such loss of ferroelectricity could have important physiological and pathological implications from aging to arteriosclerosis that are closely related to glycation of elastin. PMID:23679639

  6. Managing for soil health can suppress pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Hodson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A “healthy” soil can be thought of as one that functions well, both agronomically and ecologically, and one in which soil biodiversity and crop management work in synergy to suppress pests and diseases. UC researchers have pioneered many ways of managing soil biology for pest management, including strategies such as soil solarization, steam treatment and anaerobic soil disinfestation, as well as improvements on traditional methods, such as reducing tillage, amending soil with organic materials, and cover cropping. As managing for soil health becomes more of an explicit focus due to restrictions on the use of soil fumigants, integrated soil health tests will be needed that are validated for use in California. Other research needs include breeding crops for disease resistance and pest suppressive microbial communities as well as knowledge of how beneficial organisms influence plant health.

  7. Speckle Suppression Method for SAR Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiming Guo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new speckle reduction method was proposed in terms of by Bidimensional Empirical Mode Decomposition (BEMD. In this method, the SAR image containing speckle noise was decomposed into a number of elementary components by using BEMD and then the extremal points are done the boundary equivalent extension after screening and the residual continue to be done the boundary equivalent extension until screening is completed, finally, the image was reconstructed, which reduced the speckle noise. Experimental results show that this method has good effect on suppressing speckle noise, compared to the average filter, median filter and gaussian filter and has advantages of sufficiently retaining edge and detail information while suppressing speckle noise.

  8. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  9. Immersion diuresis without expected suppression of vasopressin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, L. C.; Silver, J. E.; Wong, N.; Spaul, W. A.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Kravik, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    There is a shift of blood from the lower parts of the body to the thoracic circulation during bed rest, water immersion, and presumably during weightlessness. On earth, this central fluid shift is associated with a profound diuresis. However, the mechanism involved is not yet well understood. The present investigation is concerned with measurements regarding the plasma vasopressin, fluid, electrolyte, and plasma renin activity (PRA) responses in subjects with normal preimmersion plasma vasopressin (PVP) concentration. In the conducted experiments, PRA was suppressed significantly at 30 min of immersion and had declined by 74 percent by the end of the experiment. On the basis of previously obtained results, it appears that sodium excretion during immersion may be independent of aldosterone action. Experimental results indicate that PVP is not suppressed by water immersion in normally hydrated subjects and that other factors may be responsible for the diuresis.

  10. Quarkonium suppression: Gluonic dissociation vs. colour screening

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Binoy Krishna Patra; Dinesh Kumar Srivastava

    2003-05-01

    We evaluate the suppression of / production in an equilibrating quark gluon plasma for two competing mechanisms: Debye screening of colour interaction and dissociation due to energetic gluons. Results are obtained for S + S and Au + Au collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. At RHIC energies the gluonic dissociation of the charmonium is found to be equally important for both the systems while the screening of the interaction plays a significant role only for the larger systems. At LHC energies the Debye mechanism is found to dominate both the systems. While considering the suppression of directly produced $\\Upsilon$ at LHC energies, we find that only the gluonic dissociation mechanism comes into play for the initial conditions taken from the self screened parton cascade model in these studies.

  11. Glare suppression by coherence gated negation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Edward Haojiang; Brake, Joshua; Ruan, Haowen; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of a weak target hidden behind a scattering medium can be significantly confounded by glare. We report a method, termed coherence gated negation (CGN), that uses destructive optical interference to suppress glare and allow improved imaging of a weak target. As a demonstration, we show that by permuting through a set range of amplitude and phase values for a reference beam interfering with the optical field from the glare and target reflection, we can suppress glare by an order of magnitude, even when the optical wavefront is highly disordered. This strategy significantly departs from conventional coherence gating methods in that CGN actively 'gates out' the unwanted optical contributions while conventional methods 'gate in' the target optical signal. We further show that the CGN method can outperform conventional coherence gating image quality in certain scenarios by more effectively rejecting unwanted optical contributions.

  12. Suppression of Brazier Effect in Multilayered Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Shima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When a straight hollow tube having circular cross-section is bent uniformly into an arc, the cross-section tends to ovalize or flatten due to the in-plane stresses induced by bending; this ovalization phenomenon is called the Brazier effect. The present paper is aimed at theoretical formulation of the Brazier effect observed in multilayered cylinders, in which a set of thin hollow cylinders are stacked concentrically about the common axis. The results indicate that mechanical couplings between stacked cylinders are found to yield pronounced suppression of the cross-sectional ovalization. Numerical computations have been performed to measure the degree of suppression in a quantitative manner and to explore how it is affected by the variations in the bending curvature, the number of stacked cylinders, and the interlayer coupling strength.

  13. Glucose Suppresses Biological Ferroelectricity in Aortic Elastin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanming; Wang, Yunjie; Chow, Ming-Jay; Chen, Nataly Q.; Ma, Feiyue; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-04-01

    Elastin is an intriguing extracellular matrix protein present in all connective tissues of vertebrates, rendering essential elasticity to connective tissues subjected to repeated physiological stresses. Using piezoresponse force microscopy, we show that the polarity of aortic elastin is switchable by an electrical field, which may be associated with the recently discovered biological ferroelectricity in the aorta. More interestingly, it is discovered that the switching in aortic elastin is largely suppressed by glucose treatment, which appears to freeze the internal asymmetric polar structures of elastin, making it much harder to switch, or suppressing the switching completely. Such loss of ferroelectricity could have important physiological and pathological implications from aging to arteriosclerosis that are closely related to glycation of elastin.

  14. Currently available cough suppressants for chronic cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2008-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom but only a fraction of patients seek medical attention. Addressing the causes of chronic cough may lead to control of cough; however, this approach is not always successful since there is a certain degree of failure even when the cause(s) of cough are adequately treated; in idiopathic cough, there is no cause to treat. Persistent cough may be associated with deterioration of quality of life, and treatment with cough suppressants is indicated. Currently available cough suppressants include the centrally acting opioids such as morphine, codeine, and dextromethorphan. Peripherally acting antitussives include moguisteine and levodropropizine. Early studies report success in reducing cough in patients with chronic bronchitis or COPD; however, a carefully conducted study showed no effect of codeine on cough of COPD. Success with these cough suppressants can be achieved at high doses that are associated with side effects. Slow-release morphine has been reported to be useful in controlling intractable cough with good tolerance to constipation and drowsiness. There have been case reports of the success of centrally acting drugs such as amitryptiline, paroxetine, gabapentin, and carbamezepine in chronic cough. New opioids such as nociceptin or antagonists of TRPV1 may turn out to be more effective. Efficacy of cough suppressants must be tested in double-blind randomised trials using validated measures of cough in patients with chronic cough not responding to specific treatments. Patients with chronic cough are in desperate need of effective antitussives that can be used either on demand or on a long-term basis.

  15. Noiseless loss suppression in quantum optical communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mičuda, M; Straka, I; Miková, M; Dušek, M; Cerf, N J; Fiurášek, J; Ježek, M

    2012-11-02

    We propose a protocol for conditional suppression of losses in direct quantum state transmission over a lossy quantum channel. The method works by noiselessly attenuating the input state prior to transmission through a lossy channel followed by noiseless amplification of the output state. The procedure does not add any noise; hence, it keeps quantum coherence. We experimentally demonstrate it in the subspace spanned by vacuum and single-photon states, and consider its general applicability.

  16. A Mathematical Model for Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) is frequently used to unearth differentially expressed genes on a whole-genome scale. Its versatility is based on combining cDNA library subtraction and normalization, which allows the isolation of sequences of varying degrees of abundance and differential expression. SSH is a complex process with many adjustable parameters that affect the outcome of gene isolation.We present a mathematical model of SSH based on DNA hybridization kinetics for assess...

  17. FGF Suppresses Poldip2 Expression in Osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumura, Sakie; Izu, Yayoi; Yamada, Takayuki; Griendling, Kathy; Harada, Kiyoshi; Noda, Masaki; Ezura, Yoichi

    2016-12-05

    Osteoporosis is one of the most prevalent ageing-associated diseases that are soaring in the modern world. Although various aspects of the disease have been investigated to understand the bases of osteoporosis, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying bone loss is still incompletely understood. Poldip2 is a molecule that has been shown to be involved in cell migration of vascular cells and angiogenesis. However, expression of Poldip2 and its regulation in bone cells were not known. Therefore, we examined the Poldip2 mRNA expression and the effects of bone regulators on the Poldip2 expression in osteoblasts. We found that Poldip2 mRNA is expressed in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. As FGF controls osteoblasts and angiogenesis, FGF regulation was investigated in these cells. FGF suppressed the expression of Poldip2 in MC3T3-E1 cells in a time dependent manner. Protein synthesis inhibitor but not transcription inhibitor reduced the FGF effects on Poldip2 gene expression in MC3T3-E1 cells. As for bone-related hormones, dexamethasone was found to enhance the expression of Poldip2 in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells whereas FGF still suppressed such dexamethasone effects. With respect to function, knockdown of Poldip2 by siRNA suppressed the migration of MC3T3-E1 cells. Poldip2 was also expressed in the primary cultures of osteoblast-enriched cells and FGF also suppressed its expression. Finally, Poldip2 was expressed in femoral bone in vivo and its levels were increased in aged mice compared to young adult mice. These data indicate that Poldip2 is expressed in osteoblastic cells and is one of the targets of FGF. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-8, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Maritime Piracy, its Suppression and Punishment

    OpenAIRE

    Štemberg, Milan

    2011-01-01

    The text Maritime Piracy, Its Suppression and Punishment, analyses piracy as a classical threat to international maritime traffic, which has reappeared after being considered obsolete in a majority of the world for several decades. The text first discusses general questions connected with piracy - a definition of piracy according to public international law is presented. Consequently, the factual side of piracy is presented, since piracy still is a topic not very well-known in the Western wor...

  19. Reversing Breast Cancer-Induced Immune Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    GCL (Glutamate-Cysteine Ligase), and cystine transport genes xCT and 4F2 [19, 23] Cystine transport and Nrf2 may contribute to MDSC survival. We... cystine (via the xC - cystine /glutamate antiporter) and its reduction to cysteine are rate-limiting for the synthesis of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH...Nr2 regulates tumor-bearer survival and MDSC suppressive activity. Aim 3: Determine if blocking cystine transport into MDSC while providing T cells

  20. Suppressing bullfrog larvae with carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jackson A.; Ray, Andrew; Sepulveda, Adam J.; Watten, Barnaby J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Layhee, Megan J.; Mark Abbey-Lambert,; ,

    2014-01-01

    Current management strategies for the control and suppression of the American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus = Rana catesbeiana Shaw) and other invasive amphibians have had minimal effect on their abundance and distribution. This study evaluates the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) on pre- and prometamorphic Bullfrog larvae. Bullfrogs are a model organism for evaluating potential suppression agents because they are a successful invader worldwide. From experimental trials we estimated that the 24-h 50% and 99% lethal concentration (LC50 and LC99) values for Bullfrog larvae were 371 and 549 mg CO2/L, respectively. Overall, larvae that succumbed to experimental conditions had a lower body condition index than those that survived. We also documented sublethal changes in blood chemistry during prolonged exposure to elevated CO2. Specifically, blood pH decreased by more than 0.5 pH units after 9 h of exposure and both blood partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and blood glucose increased. These findings suggest that CO2 treatments can be lethal to Bullfrog larvae under controlled laboratory conditions. We believe this work represents the necessary foundation for further consideration of CO2 as a potential suppression agent for one of the most harmful invaders to freshwater ecosystems.

  1. Neural Networks for Mindfulness and Emotion Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroki; Katsunuma, Ruri; Oba, Kentaro; Terasawa, Yuri; Motomura, Yuki; Mishima, Kazuo; Moriguchi, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness, an attentive non-judgmental focus on "here and now" experiences, has been incorporated into various cognitive behavioral therapy approaches and beneficial effects have been demonstrated. Recently, mindfulness has also been identified as a potentially effective emotion regulation strategy. On the other hand, emotion suppression, which refers to trying to avoid or escape from experiencing and being aware of one's own emotions, has been identified as a potentially maladaptive strategy. Previous studies suggest that both strategies can decrease affective responses to emotional stimuli. They would, however, be expected to provide regulation through different top-down modulation systems. The present study was aimed at elucidating the different neural systems underlying emotion regulation via mindfulness and emotion suppression approaches. Twenty-one healthy participants used the two types of strategy in response to emotional visual stimuli while functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted. Both strategies attenuated amygdala responses to emotional triggers, but the pathways to regulation differed across the two. A mindful approach appears to regulate amygdala functioning via functional connectivity from the medial prefrontal cortex, while suppression uses connectivity with other regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Thus, the two types of emotion regulation recruit different top-down modulation processes localized at prefrontal areas. These different pathways are discussed.

  2. Suppression of Ostwald Ripening by Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable and coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Ostwald ripening must thus be suppressed to stabilize emulsions, e.g. to control the properties of pharmaceuticals, food, or cosmetics. Suppression of Ostwald ripening is also important in biological cells, which contain stable liquid-like compartments, e.g. germ granules, Cajal-bodies, and centrosomes. Such systems are often driven away from equilibrium by chemical reactions and can thus be called active emulsions. Here, we show that non-equilibrium chemical reactions can suppress Ostwald Ripening, leading to stable, monodisperse emulsions. We derive analytical approximations of the typical droplet size, droplet count, and time scale of the dynamics from a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics. We also compare these results to numerical simulations of the continuous concentration fields. Generally, we thus show how chemical reactions can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties in technology and nature.

  3. Suppressing Super-Horizon Curvature Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Sloth, M S

    2006-01-01

    We consider the possibility of suppressing superhorizon curvature perturbations after the end of the ordinary slow-roll inflationary stage. This is the opposite of the curvaton limit. We assume that large curvature perturbations are created by the inflaton and investigate to which extent they can be diluted or suppressed by a second very homogeneous field which starts to dominate the energy density of the universe shortly after the end of inflation. The suppression is non-trivial to achieve, but we demonstrate two examples where it works. The mechanism is shown to work if the decay rate of the second field has a certain time-dependence leading to an intrinsic non-adiabatic energy transfer or if the second field is an axion field with a very non-linear periodic potential leading to a non-vanishing intrinsic non-adiabatic pressure perturbation. This opens the possibility of having much larger inflaton perturbations created during inflation than normally allowed by the COBE bound. It relaxes the upper bound on t...

  4. Conditionals, Context, and the Suppression Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariani, Fabrizio; Rips, Lance J

    2016-02-01

    Modus ponens is the argument from premises of the form If A, then B and A to the conclusion B (e.g., from If it rained, Alicia got wet and It rained to Alicia got wet). Nearly all participants agree that the modus ponens conclusion logically follows when the argument appears in this Basic form. However, adding a further premise (e.g., If she forgot her umbrella, Alicia got wet) can lower participants' rate of agreement-an effect called suppression. We propose a theory of suppression that draws on contemporary ideas about conditional sentences in linguistics and philosophy. Semantically, the theory assumes that people interpret an indicative conditional as a context-sensitive strict conditional: true if and only if its consequent is true in each of a contextually determined set of situations in which its antecedent is true. Pragmatically, the theory claims that context changes in response to new assertions, including new conditional premises. Thus, the conclusion of a modus ponens argument may no longer be accepted in the changed context. Psychologically, the theory describes people as capable of reasoning about broad classes of possible situations, ordered by typicality, without having to reason about individual possible worlds. The theory accounts for the main suppression phenomena, and it generates some novel predictions that new experiments confirm.

  5. Cough suppression therapy: does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Sarah; Garrod, Rachel; Birring, Surinder S

    2013-10-01

    Cough suppression therapy (CST), also known as cough suppression physiotherapy and speech pathology management is a promising non-pharmacological therapeutic option for patients with refractory chronic cough. CST may consist of education, improving laryngeal hygiene and hydration, cough suppression techniques, breathing exercises and counselling. It is an out-patient therapy delivered in 2-4 sessions. There is evidence to support the efficacy of CST: a randomised controlled trial reported a significant reduction in cough symptoms and other studies have reported improved cough related quality of life, reduced cough reflex hypersensitivity and cough frequency. The mechanism of action of CST is not clear, but it has been shown to reduce cough reflex sensitivity, paradoxical vocal fold movement (PVFM) and extrathoracic hyperresponsiveness. Further research is needed to determine the optimal components of CST, the characteristics of patients in whom it is most effective and to increase the understanding of its mechanisms of action. The effectiveness of CST in other respiratory conditions such as asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and sarcoidosis should also be investigated.

  6. Progress in helicopter infrared signature suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jingzhou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to their low-attitude and relatively low-speed fight profiles, helicopters are subjected to serious threats from radio, infrared (IR, visual, and aural detection and tracking. Among these threats, infrared detection and tracking are regarded as more crucial for the survivability of helicopters. In order to meet the requirements of infrared stealth, several different types of infrared suppressor (IRS for helicopters have been developed. This paper reviews contemporary developments in this discipline, with particular emphasis on infrared signature suppression, advances in mixer-ejectors and prediction for helicopters. In addition, several remaining challenges, such as advanced IRS, emissivity optimization technique, helicopter infrared characterization, etc., are proposed, as an initial guide and stimulation for future research. In the future, the comprehensive infrared suppression in the 3–5 μm and 8–14 μm bands will doubtfully become the emphasis of helicopter stealth. Multidisciplinary optimization of a complete infrared suppression system deserves further investigation.

  7. Neural Networks for Mindfulness and Emotion Suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Murakami

    Full Text Available Mindfulness, an attentive non-judgmental focus on "here and now" experiences, has been incorporated into various cognitive behavioral therapy approaches and beneficial effects have been demonstrated. Recently, mindfulness has also been identified as a potentially effective emotion regulation strategy. On the other hand, emotion suppression, which refers to trying to avoid or escape from experiencing and being aware of one's own emotions, has been identified as a potentially maladaptive strategy. Previous studies suggest that both strategies can decrease affective responses to emotional stimuli. They would, however, be expected to provide regulation through different top-down modulation systems. The present study was aimed at elucidating the different neural systems underlying emotion regulation via mindfulness and emotion suppression approaches. Twenty-one healthy participants used the two types of strategy in response to emotional visual stimuli while functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted. Both strategies attenuated amygdala responses to emotional triggers, but the pathways to regulation differed across the two. A mindful approach appears to regulate amygdala functioning via functional connectivity from the medial prefrontal cortex, while suppression uses connectivity with other regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Thus, the two types of emotion regulation recruit different top-down modulation processes localized at prefrontal areas. These different pathways are discussed.

  8. Coating Thermoelectric Devices To Suppress Sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Caillat, Thierry; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    A technique for suppressing sublimation of key elements from skutterudite compounds in advanced thermoelectric devices has been demonstrated. The essence of the technique is to cover what would otherwise be the exposed skutterudite surface of such a device with a thin, continuous film of a chemically and physically compatible metal. Although similar to other sublimation-suppression techniques, this technique has been specifically tailored for application to skutterudite antimonides. The primary cause of deterioration of most thermoelectric materials is thermal decomposition or sublimation - one or more elements sublime from the hot side of a thermoelectric couple, changing the stoichiometry of the device. Examples of elements that sublime from their respective thermoelectric materials are Ge from SiGe, Te from Pb/Te, and now Sb from skutterudite antimonides. The skutterudite antimonides of primary interest are CoSb3 [electron-donor (n) type] and CeFe(3-x)Co(x)Sb12 [electron-acceptor (p) type]. When these compounds are subjected to typical operating conditions [temperature of 700 C and pressure sublimes from their surfaces, with the result that Sb depletion layers form and advance toward their interiors. As the depletion layer advances in a given device, the change in stoichiometry diminishes the thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of the device. The problem, then, is to prevent sublimation, or at least reduce it to an acceptably low level. In preparation for an experiment on suppression of sublimation, a specimen of CoSb3 was tightly wrapped in a foil of niobium, which was selected for its chemical stability. In the experiment, the wrapped specimen was heated to a temperature of 700 C in a vacuum of residual pressure sublimation of antimony at 700 C. This was a considerable improvement, considering that uncoated CoSb3 had been found to decompose to form the lowest antimonide at the surface at only 600 C. Evidently, because the mean free path of Sb at the

  9. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  10. Compost made of organic wastes suppresses fusariosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuryntseva, Polina; Galitskaya, Polina; Biktasheva, Liliya; Selivanovkaya, Svetlana

    2017-04-01

    Fungal plant diseases cause dramatic yield losses worldwide. Usually, pesticides are used for soil sanitation, and it results in practically pest-free soils, although pesticides cause a biological vacuum, which present many horticultural disadvantages. Suppressive composts, which possess both fertilizing properties for plants and inhibiting properties for plant pathogens, represent an effective and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional pesticides. In this study, composts obtained from agricultural organic wastes were applied to suppress Fusarium oxysporum of tomato plants in model experiments. Composts were made of mixtures of the widespread organic wastes sampled in Tatarstan (Russia): straw (SW), corn wastes (CW), chicken manure (ChM), cattle manure (CM) and swine manure (SM). 11 two- and three-component mixtures were prepared to obtain the optimal carbon-nitrogen, moisture and pH balances, and composted for 210 days. It was found that the thermophilic phase of composting in all the mixtures lasted from 2 to 35 days, and was characterized by significant fluctuations in temperature, i.e. from 27°C to 59°C. In the initial mixtures, the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content was between 10 and 62 mg kg-1; it fell significantly on day 13, and then continuously decreased up to day 102, and subsequently remained low. For all the mixtures, maximal respiration activity was observed in the beginning of composting (231.9 mg CO2-C g-1 day-1). After 23 days, this parameter decreased significantly, and fluctuations subsided. The phytotoxicity of the initial compost mixtures varied from 18% (SW+SM) to 100% (CW+ChM+SM, CW+ChM); however, the trends in the dynamics were similar. After 120 days of composting, 5 of 11 samples were not phytotoxic. After 120 days of composting, each mixture was divided into two parts; one was inoculated with a biopreparation consisting of four microbial strains (Trichoderma asperellum, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens and

  11. Suppression of B-cell lymphomagenesis by the BH3-only proteins Bmf and Bad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Anna; Labi, Verena; Chmelewskij, Waldemar; Ploner, Christian; Geley, Stephan; Fiegl, Heidelinde; Tzankov, Alexandar; Villunger, Andreas

    2010-02-04

    Oncogenic c-Myc is known to balance excessive proliferation by apoptosis that can be triggered by p53-dependent and p53-independent signaling networks. Here, we provide evidence that the BH3-only proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members Bcl-2 modifying factor (Bmf) and Bcl-2 antagonist of cell death (Bad) are potent antagonists of c-Myc-driven B-cell lymphomagenesis. Tumor formation was preceded by the accumulation of preneoplastic pre-B and immature immunoglobulin M-positive (IgM(+)) B cells in hematopoietic organs of Emu-myc/bmf(-/-) mice, whereas Emu-myc/bad(-/-) mice showed an increase of pre-B cells limited to the spleen. Although the loss of Bad had no impact on the tumor immunophenotype, Bmf deficiency favored the development of IgM(+) B cell over pre-B cell tumors. This phenomenon was caused by a strong protection of immature IgM(+) B cells from oncogene-driven apoptosis caused by loss of bmf and c-Myc-induced repression of Bmf expression in premalignant pre-B cells. Steady-state levels of B-cell apoptosis also were reduced in the absence of Bad, in support of its role as a sentinel for trophic factor-deprivation. Loss of Bmf reduced the pressure to inactivate p53, whereas Bad deficiency did not, identifying Bmf as a novel component of the p53-independent tumor suppressor pathway triggered by c-Myc.

  12. Genotoxic Changes to Rodent Cells Exposed in Vitro to Tungsten, Nickel, Cobalt and Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-10

    Myc-induced apoptosis. It is also implicated in progression of certain types of prostate cancers, and possibly implicated in tumor suppression [39...fire” cohort. J. Occup . Environ. Med. 2001, 43, 991–1000. 12. McDiarmid, M.A.; Hooper, F.J.; Squibb, K.; McPhaul, K.; Engelhardt, S.M.; Kane, R

  13. Microbial enrichment to enhance the disease suppressive activity of compost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, J.; Montenari, M.; Boogert, van den P.H.J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Compost amended soil has been found to be suppressive against plant diseases in various cropping systems. The level and reproducibility of disease suppressive properties of compost might be increased by the addition of antagonists. In the present study, the establishment and suppressive activity of

  14. Venture capital: States suffer as suppression expenses climb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krista Gebert

    2008-01-01

    The high cost of suppressing wildfires is taking a toll on federal and state agencies alike. Large wildland fires are complex, costly events influenced by a vast array of physical, climatic, and social factors. During five of the last eight years, the Forest Services' wildfire suppression expenditures have topped $1 billion, and total federal wildland suppression...

  15. Noise Suppression of a single Frequency Fiber Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Kui; CUI Shu-Zhen; ZHANG Hai-Long; ZHANG Jun-Xiang; GAO Jiang-Rui

    2011-01-01

    We present an experimental demonstration of fiber laser noise suppression by the mode cleaner.The intensity noise of a single frequency fiber laser is suppressed near the shot noise limit after a sideband frequency of 3 MHz.Two series mode cleaners are used to improve the noise suppression.The noise reduction is over 27 dB at 3 MHz.

  16. One-tone suppression in the frog auditory nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Jørgensen, M B

    1996-01-01

    Sixty-seven fibers of a sample of 401 in the auditory nerve of grassfrogs (Rana temporaria) showed one-tone suppression, i.e., their spontaneous activity was suppressed by tones. All fibers were afferents from the amphibian papilla with best frequencies between 100 and 400 Hz. Best suppression...

  17. Repetition suppression and expectation suppression are dissociable in time in early auditory evoked fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Ana; de Lange, Floris P

    2012-09-26

    Repetition of a stimulus, as well as valid expectation that a stimulus will occur, both attenuate the neural response to it. These effects, repetition suppression and expectation suppression, are typically confounded in paradigms in which the nonrepeated stimulus is also relatively rare (e.g., in oddball blocks of mismatch negativity paradigms, or in repetition suppression paradigms with multiple repetitions before an alternation). However, recent hierarchical models of sensory processing inspire the hypothesis that the two might be separable in time, with repetition suppression occurring earlier, as a consequence of local transition probabilities, and suppression by expectation occurring later, as a consequence of learnt statistical regularities. Here we test this hypothesis in an auditory experiment by orthogonally manipulating stimulus repetition and stimulus expectation and, using magnetoencephalography, measuring the neural response over time in human subjects. We found that stimulus repetition (but not stimulus expectation) attenuates the early auditory response (40-60 ms), while stimulus expectation (but not stimulus repetition) attenuates the subsequent, intermediate stage of auditory processing (100-200 ms). These findings are well in line with hierarchical predictive coding models, which posit sequential stages of prediction error resolution, contingent on the level at which the hypothesis is generated.

  18. Unsuppressible Repetition Suppression and exemplar-specific Expectation Suppression in the Fusiform Face Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajani, Auréliane; Kouider, Sid; Roux, Paul; de Gardelle, Vincent

    2017-12-01

    Recent work casts Repetition Suppression (RS), i.e. the reduced neural response to repeated stimuli, as the consequence of reduced surprise for repeated inputs. This research, along with other studies documenting Expectation Suppression, i.e. reduced responses to expected stimuli, emphasizes the role of expectations and predictive codes in perception. Here, we use fMRI to further characterize the nature of predictive signals in the human brain. Prior to scanning, participants were implicitly exposed to associations within face pairs. Critically, we found that this resulted in exemplar-specific Expectation Suppression in the fusiform face-sensitive area (FFA): individual faces that could be predicted from the associations elicited reduced FFA responses, as compared to unpredictable faces. Thus, predictive signals in the FFA are specific to face exemplars, and not only generic to the category of face stimuli. In addition, we show that under such circumstances, the occurrence of surprising repetitions did not trigger enhanced brain responses, as had been recently hypothesized, but still suppressed responses, suggesting that repetition suppression might be partly 'unsuppressible'. Repetition effects cannot be fully modulated by expectations, which supports the recent view that expectation and repetition effects rest on partially independent mechanisms. Altogether, our study sheds light on the nature of expectation signals along the perceptual system.

  19. HTP Nutraceutical Screening for Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Effects of HDACis on Tumor-suppressing miRNAs by Trichostatin A and Grapeseed (Vitis vinifera) in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A; Soliman, Karam F A

    2017-01-02

    effects of TSA vs. GSE at sub-lethal concentrations tested on HeLa cells show 6,631 miRNAs expressed in resting cells, 35 significantly up-regulated (TSA) and 81 up-regulated (GSE), with several miRNAs overlapping in the upward direction by both GSE and TSA (e.g. hsa-miR-23b-5p, hsa-miR-27b-5p, hsa-miR-1180-3p, hsa-miR-6880-5p and hsa-mir-943). Using DIANA miRNA online tools, it was determined that GSE and TSA simultaneously cause overexpression of similar miRNAs predicted to destroy the following influential oncogenes: NFkB, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, MYC, TGFBR1, E2F1, E2F2, BCL21, CDKN1A, CDK6, HIF1a, and VEGFA. The data from this study show that plant- based HDACis are relatively rare, and can elicit a similar pattern to TSA in up-regulating miRNAs involved with tumor suppression of HeLa cervical carcinoma. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  20. Why expressive suppression does not pay? Cognitive costs of negative emotion suppression: The mediating role of subjective tense-arousal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczygieł Dorota

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to contribute to a broader understanding of the cognitive consequences of expressive suppression. Specifically, we examined whether the deteriorating effect of expressive suppression on cognitive functioning is caused by tense arousal enhanced by suppression. Two experiments were performed in order to test this prediction. In both studies we tested the effect of expressive suppression on working memory, as measured with a backwards digit-span task (Study 1, N = 43 and anagram problem-solving task (Study 2, N = 60. In addition, in Study 2 we tested whether expressive suppression degrades memory of the events that emerged during the period of expressive suppression. Both studies were conducted in a similar design: Participants watched a film clip which evoked negative emotions (i.e. disgust in Study 1 and a combination of sadness and anxiety in Study 2 under the instruction to suppress those negative emotions or (in the control condition to simply watch the film. The results of these experiments lead to three conclusions. First, the results reveal that expressive suppression degrades memory of the events that emerged during the period of expressive suppression and leads to poorer performance on working memory tasks, as measured with a backwards digit-span task and anagram problem-solving task. Second, the results indicate that expressive suppression leads to a significant increase in subjective tense arousal. Third, the results support our prediction that expressive suppression decreases cognitive performance through its effects on subjective tense arousal. The results of the Study 1 show that tense arousal activated during expressive suppression of disgust fully mediates the negative effect of suppression on working memory as measured with a backwards digit-span task. The results of Study 2 reveal that subjective tense arousal elicited while suppressing sadness and anxiety mediates both the effect of suppression on

  1. Individual Differences in Spontaneous Expressive Suppression Predict Amygdala Responses to Fearful Stimuli: The Role of Suppression Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shengdong; Deng, Zhongyan; Xu, Yin; Long, Quanshan; Yang, Jiemin; Yuan, Jiajin

    2017-01-01

    Though the spontaneous emotion regulation has received long discussions, few studies have explored the regulatory effects of spontaneous expressive suppression in neural activations, especially in collectivistic cultural context. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study aimed to examine whether individual differences in the tendency to use suppression are correlated with amygdala responses to negative situations when individuals are unconsciously primed with expressive suppression. Twenty-three healthy Chinese undergraduates completed an fMRI paradigm involving fear processing, and a synonym matching task was added to prime participants with the unconscious (automatic) expressive suppression goal. Participants completed measures of typical emotion regulation use (reappraisal and suppression), trait anxiety, and neuroticism. Results indicated that only in emotion suppression prime condition, greater use of suppression in everyday life was related to decreased amygdala activity. These associations were not attributable to variation in trait anxiety, neuroticism, or the habitual use of reappraisal. These findings suggest that in collectivistic cultural settings, individual differences in expressive suppression do not alter fear-related neural activation during suppression-irrelevant context. However, unconscious suppression priming facilitates the manifestation of individual differences in the neural consequence of expressive suppression, as reflected by the priming-specific decrease of emotional subcortical activations with more use of expressive suppression. PMID:28197108

  2. Chaos suppression in gas-solid fluidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Deborah V.; Beasley, Donald E.

    1998-06-01

    Fluidization in granular materials occurs primarily as a result of a dynamic balance between gravitational forces and forces resulting from the flow of a fluid through a bed of discrete particles. For systems where the fluidizing medium and the particles have significantly different densities, density wave instabilities create local pockets of very high void fraction termed bubbles. The fluidization regime is termed the bubbling regime. Such a system is appropriately termed a self-excited nonlinear system. The present study examines chaos suppression resulting from an opposing oscillatory flow in gas-solid fluidization. Time series data representing local, instantaneous pressure were acquired at the surface of a horizontal cylinder submerged in a bubbling fluidized bed. The particles had a weight mean diameter of 345 &mgr;m and a narrow size distribution. The state of fluidization corresponded to the bubbling regime and total air flow rates employed in the present study ranged from 10% to 40% greater than that required for minimum fluidization. The behavior of time-varying local pressure in fluidized beds in the absence of a secondary flow is consistent with deterministic chaos. Kolmogorov entropy estimates from local, instantaneous pressure suggest that the degree of chaotic behavior can be substantially suppressed by the presence of an opposing, oscillatory secondary flow. Pressure signals clearly show a "phase-locking" phenomenon coincident with the imposed frequency. In the present study, the greatest degree of suppression occurred for operating conditions with low primary and secondary flow rates, and a secondary flow oscillation frequency of 15 Hz. (c) 1998 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Cough Suppressant and Pharmacologic Protussive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolser, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cough-suppressant therapy, previously termed nonspecific antitussive therapy, incorporates the use of pharmacologic agents with mucolytic effects and/or inhibitory effects on the cough reflex itself. The intent of this type of therapy is to reduce the frequency and/or intensity of coughing on a short-term basis. Methods Data for this review were obtained from several National Library of Medicine (PubMed) searches (from 1960 to 2004), which were performed between May and September 2004, of the literature published in the English language, limited to human studies, using combinations of the search terms “cough,” “double-blind placebo-controlled,” “antitussive,” “mucolytic,” “cough clearance,” “common cold,” “protussive,” “guaifenesin,” “glycerol,” and “zinc.” Results Mucolytic agents are not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Peripheral and central antitussive agents can be useful in patients with chronic bronchitis, but can have little efficacy in patients with cough due to upper respiratory infection. Some protussive agents are effective in increasing cough clearance, but their long-term effectiveness has not been established. DNase is not effective as a protussive agent in patients with cystic fibrosis. Inhaled mannitol is acutely effective in this patient population, but its therapeutic potential must be investigated further. Conclusions These findings suggest that suppressant therapy is most effective when used for the short-term reduction of coughing. Relatively few drugs are effective as cough suppressants. PMID:16428717

  4. Leuprolide acetate suppresses pedophilic urges and arousability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Justine M; Kuhn, Phyllis J; Kovacs, Paul G; Earle, James H; Byrne, Peter M; Fries, Ruth A

    2005-12-01

    Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy was compared with cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy augmented by leuprolide acetate (LA) for suppression of pedophilic behavior. Five male pedophiles (M age, 50 years; range, 36-58) were administered LA by Depo injection for 12 months, followed by saline placebo for 12 months. Testosterone levels, sexual interest preference by visual reaction time (Abel Assessment), penile tumescence (Monarch Penile Plethysmography, PPG), as well as strong sexual urges toward children and masturbatory frequency involving thoughts of children (polygraph), were measured every 3 months. On LA, testosterone decreased to castrate levels. Penile tumescence was significantly suppressed compared with baseline, but sufficient response remained to detect pedophilic interest. Pedophilic interest was also detected by visual reaction times. When asked about having pedophilic urges and masturbating to thoughts of children, all subjects self-reported a decrease. Polygraph responses indicated subjects were not deceptive. On placebo, testosterone and physiologic arousal eventually rose to baseline. As noted by polygraph, at baseline and on placebo, subjects were deceptive regarding increased pedophilic urges and masturbatory frequency. Interest preference, as measured by Abel Assessment and Monarch PPG, was generally unchanged throughout the study. Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy augmented with LA significantly reduced pedophilic fantasies, urges, and masturbation; however, pedophilic interest did not change during 1 year of therapy. Deceptive responses by polygraph suggested that self-report was unreliable. Follow-up utilizing objective measures is essential for monitoring efficacy of treatment in pedophilia. Our study supports the premise that suppression of pedophilic behavior is possible. LA may augment cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and help break the sequence leading to a re-offense.

  5. Suppression of Aspergillus by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    Objectives: Cystic fibrosis patients are commonly infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but Aspergilli are also frequently isolated. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different Aspergillus. Methods: A suspension of 106 fungal spores/ml was streaked onto WATM...... suppressed growth of A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, A. terreus and E. nidulans. HPLC and LC-DAD-MS results showed an increase in phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide production by P. aeruginosa in the contact area of Aspergillus. Different quinolones were also identified...

  6. Applications of zero-suppressed decision diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Sasao, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    A zero-suppressed decision diagram (ZDD) is a data structure to represent objects that typically contain many zeros. Applications include combinatorial problems, such as graphs, circuits, faults, and data mining. This book consists of four chapters on the applications of ZDDs. The first chapter by Alan Mishchenko introduces the ZDD. It compares ZDDs to BDDs, showing why a more compact representation is usually achieved in a ZDD. The focus is on sets of subsets and on sum-of-products (SOP) expressions. Methods to generate all the prime implicants (PIs), and to generate irredundant SOPs are show

  7. Overvoltage Suppression for UHV Transmission Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yongli; LIU Taihua; LI Zhongqing; JING Lei; LONG Ying; FAN Jianzhong

    2008-01-01

    The overvoltage phenomena of ultra high voltage (UHV) transmission lines are analyzed and verified by EMTDC/PSCAD simulation. Referring to the theoretical analyses and operating experiences of extra high voltage (EHV) transmission lines in China and UHV transmission lines in Russia and Japan, the methods to suppress the internal overvoltage in UHV transmission lines by protection and control strategies are discussed. Through the cooperation among the recloser, shunt reactor, tripping and closing resistance, and metal oxide varistor (MOV), the overvoltage can be restrained within an acceptable level.

  8. New Respirable Dust Suppression Systems for Coal Mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yao-she; FAN Gao-xian; DAI Jun-wei; SONG Xiao-bo

    2007-01-01

    Dust suppression in coal mines is a worldwide problem which has not been solved effectively. The application of negative pressure secondary dust removal (NPSDR) is a breakthrough in the coal mine safety field. In this paper, NPSDR technology and ultrasonic dust suppression systems are introduced. High pressure water is supplied to the NPSDR device which is mounted on the shearer. A negative pressure field is formed in the device. At the same time, the dusty air around the shearer drum will be sucked into, and purged from, the NPSDR device by the negative pressure field. An ultrasonic dust suppression system uses water and compressed air to produce micron sized droplets which suppress respirable coal dust effectively. The NPSDR technology can be used for shearer dust suppression while ultrasonic dust suppression can be applied in areas such as the transportation positions. These dust suppression methods have the following advantages: high efficiency, wide applicability, simple structure, high reliability and low cost.

  9. Jet noise suppression by porous plug nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A. B.; Kibens, V.; Wlezien, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Jet noise suppression data presented earlier by Maestrello for porous plug nozzles were supplemented by the testing of a family of nozzles having an equivalent throat diameter of 11.77 cm. Two circular reference nozzles and eight plug nozzles having radius ratios of either 0.53 or 0.80 were tested at total pressure ratios of 1.60 to 4.00. Data were taken both with and without a forward motion or coannular flow jet, and some tests were made with a heated jet. Jet thrust was measured. The data were analyzed to show the effects of suppressor geometry on nozzle propulsive efficiency and jet noise. Aerodynamic testing of the nozzles was carried out in order to study the physical features that lead to the noise suppression. The aerodynamic flow phenomena were examined by the use of high speed shadowgraph cinematography, still shadowgraphs, extensive static pressure probe measurements, and two component laser Doppler velocimeter studies. The different measurement techniques correlated well with each other and demonstrated that the porous plug changes the shock cell structure of a standard nozzle into a series of smaller, periodic cell structures without strong shock waves. These structures become smaller in dimension and have reduced pressure variations as either the plug diameter or the porosity is increased, changes that also reduce the jet noise and decrease thrust efficiency.

  10. Suppression of glioma progression by Egln3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki A Sciorra

    Full Text Available Grade IV astrocytoma or glioblastoma has a poor clinical outcome that can be linked to hypoxia, invasiveness and active vascular remodeling. It has recently been suggested that hypoxia-inducible factors, Hifs, increase glioma growth and aggressiveness [1], [2], [3]. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Egl 9 homolog 3 (Egln3, a prolyl-hydroxylase that promotes Hif degradation, suppresses tumor progression of human and rodent glioma models. Through intracranial tumorigenesis and in vitro assays, we demonstrate for the first time that Egln3 was sufficient to decrease the kinetics of tumor progression and increase survival. We also find that Klf5, a transcription factor important to vascular remodeling, was regulated by hypoxia in glioma. An analysis of the tumor vasculature revealed that elevated Egln3 normalized glioma capillary architecture, consistent with a role for Egln3 in eliciting decreases in the production of Hif-regulated, angiogenic factors. We also find that the hydroxylase-deficient mutant, Egln3(H196A partially maintained tumor suppressive activity. These results highlight a bifurcation of Egln3 signaling and suggest that Egln3 has a non-hydroxylase-dependent function in glioma. We conclude that Egln3 is a critical determinant of glioma formation and tumor vascular functionality.

  11. Tagging and suppression of pileup jets

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The suppression of pileup jets has been a crucial component of many physics analyses using 2012 LHC proton-proton collisions. In ATLAS, tracking information has been used to calculate a variable called the jet-vertex-fraction, which is the fraction of the total mo- mentum of tracks in the jet which is associated to the primary vertex. Imposing a minimum on this variable rejects the majority of pileup jets, but leads to hard-scatter jet efficiencies that depend on the number of reconstructed primary vertices in the event ($N_{Vtx}$). In this note, new track-based variables to suppress pileup jets are developed in such a way that the resulting hard-scatter jet efficiency is stable as a function of $N_{Vtx}$. A multivariate combina- tion of two such variables called the jet-vertex-tagger is constructed. In addition, it is shown that jet-vertex association can be applied to large-R jets, providing a track-based grooming technique that is as powerful as calorimeter-based trimming but based on complementary trackin...

  12. Reinstatement of Conditioned Suppression in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinette Dirikx

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Return of fear after successful exposure therapy calls for a better understanding of the mechanisms of relapse. Classical conditioning research provides a useful framework for conceptualising the acquisition, extinction and reappearance of fear. The present paper focuses on reinstatement, the return of extinguished conditioned responses due to the experience of one or more unconditioned stimuli (USs after extinction. This phenomenon illustrates that unpredictable USs can lead to a return of fear after successful exposure. The data we present is one of the first demonstrations that conditioned suppression of instrumental behaviour can be used as an index of classical conditioning in laboratory mice. The procedure proves to be a promising instrument for assessing fear in mice, both in the context of research aimed at unravelling the functional characteristics of learning and memory in healthy mice and in the context of research aimed at unravelling the neurobiological substrate of psychiatric disorders, e.g., in studies with transgenic and knockout mice. Using this procedure, we report the first observation of reinstatement of conditioned suppression in this species.

  13. Suppression of fertility in adult dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maenhoudt, C; Santos, N R; Fontbonne, A

    2014-06-01

    Unfortunately, the overpopulation of dogs is still a problem in the majority of countries and even though surgical methods of sterilization, the most traditional and commonly used technique, have been intensively performed, the impact on the dog population is negligible. The neutering of companion animals as ovariohysterectomy (spaying) or orchidectomy (castration) has its limitations because of the cost, the need of a surgical environment and the risk of surgical and/or anaesthetical complications (ACCD 2009). In fact, surgical castration has been banished in some northern European countries and has limited acceptance in other countries. In a survey performed in Sao Paulo, Brazil, 56.5% of the owners of adopted shelter dogs were against the surgical procedure for different reasons (Soto et al. 2005). Currently, the options for contraception, defined as suppression of fertility are based on hormonal treatment. The treatments can be divided into analogues of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), progestins and androgens. Other possibilities of contraception are via the immunological system with vaccinations against GnRH, the luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor and the zona pellucida proteins. Finally, there is also the intra-epididymal or intratesticular injection of sclerosing substances in dogs. Mechanical devices to disrupt fertility are not used anymore due to the side effects. Suppression of fertility in adult dogs will be reviewed in order of use and possible impact on the dog population. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses hepatic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Maribel; Shang, Na; Ding, Xianzhong; Yong, Sherri; Cotler, Scott J; Denning, Mitchell F; Shimamura, Takashi; Breslin, Peter; Lüscher, Bernhard; Qiu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Liver fibrosis can progress to cirrhosis and result in serious complications of liver disease. The pathogenesis of liver fibrosis involves the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the underlying mechanisms of which are not fully known. Emerging evidence suggests that the classic histone deacetylases play a role in liver fibrosis, but the role of another subfamily of histone deacetylases, the sirtuins, in the development of hepatic fibrosis remains unknown. In this study, we found that blocking the activity of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) by using inhibitors or shRNAs significantly suppressed fibrogenic gene expression in HSCs. We further demonstrated that inhibition of SIRT2 results in the degradation of c-MYC, which is important for HSC activation. In addition, we discovered that inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses the phosphorylation of ERK, which is critical for the stabilization of c-MYC. Moreover, we found that Sirt2 deficiency attenuates the hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and thioacetamide (TAA). Furthermore, we showed that SIRT2, p-ERK, and c-MYC proteins are all overexpressed in human hepatic fibrotic tissues. These data suggest a critical role for the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis in promoting hepatic fibrogenesis. Inhibition of the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis represents a novel strategy to prevent and to potentially treat liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

  15. Phase noise suppression through parametric filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassella, Cristian; Strachan, Scott; Shaw, Steven W.; Piazza, Gianluca

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we introduce and experimentally demonstrate a parametric phase noise suppression technique, which we call "parametric phase noise filtering." This technique is based on the use of a solid-state parametric amplifier operating in its instability region and included in a non-autonomous feedback loop connected at the output of a noisy oscillator. We demonstrate that such a system behaves as a parametrically driven Duffing resonator and can operate at special points where it becomes largely immune to the phase fluctuations that affect the oscillator output signal. A prototype of a parametric phase noise filter (PFIL) was designed and fabricated to operate in the very-high-frequency range. The PFIL prototype allowed us to significantly reduce the phase noise at the output of a commercial signal generator operating around 220 MHz. Noise reduction of 16 dB (40×) and 13 dB (20×) were obtained, respectively, at 1 and 10 kHz offsets from the carrier frequency. The demonstration of this phase noise suppression technique opens up scenarios in the development of passive and low-cost phase noise cancellation circuits for any application demanding high quality frequency generation.

  16. Selective suppression of judged sweetness by ziziphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, V V; Halpern, B P

    1983-06-01

    The effects of ziziphins and of control treatments upon judgments by human adults of the sweetness, sourness, bitterness, and saltiness of American apple cider or apple juice were measured with a category estimation method during repeated trials before, during (90 sec treatment duration only), and after, treatment. Sweetness was reduced after either a 10 sec or a 90 sec whole mouth treatment with ziziphins, but not after quinine sulfate or apple juice control treatment. No differences in after-treatment sourness, bitterness, or saltiness occurred between treatments. The reduction in sweetness was weak with 10 sec 3.5% W/V ziziphins treatment, but strong after 90 sec 0.88% W/V ziziphins treatment; duration of suppression was ca. 70 sec. The mechanism was identified as taste modification since adaptation, cross-adaptation, and mixture suppression were eliminated by control treatments and by post-treatment rests and rinse. Comparisons with known gymnemic acids effects suggest that net dissociation of ziziphins from taste receptor membranes and/or inactivation in the membrane may be much faster than with gymnemic acids.

  17. Electroproduction of Baryon Resonances and Strangeness Suppression

    CERN Document Server

    Santopinto, E; Tecocoatzi, H Garcia

    2016-01-01

    We describe the electroproduction ratios of baryon-meson states from nucleon using an extension of the quark model that takes into account the sea. As a result we provide, with no adjustable parameters, the predictions of ratios of exclusive meson-baryon final states: Lambda K , Sigma K, p pion, and n pion. These predictions are in agreement with the new Jlab experimental data showing that sea quarks play an important role in the electroproduction. We also predicted further ratios of exclusive reactions that can be measured and tested in future experiments. In particular, we suggested new experiments on deuterium and tritium. Such measurements can provide crucial test of different predictions concerning the structure of nucleon and its sea quarks helping to solve an outstanding problem. Finally, we computed the so called strangeness suppression factor, lambda s, that is the suppression of strange quark-antiquarks compared to nonstrange pairs, and we found that our finding with this simple extension of the qua...

  18. Inhibition of saccades elicits attentional suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Saurabh; Deubel, Heiner; Jonikaitis, Donatas

    2013-05-17

    Visuospatial attention has been shown to have a central role in planning and generation of saccades but what role, if any, it plays in inhibition of saccades remains unclear. In this study, we used an oculomotor delayed match- or nonmatch-to-sample task in which a cued location has to be encoded and memorized for one of two very different goals-to plan a saccade to it or to avoid making a saccade to it. We measured the spatial allocation of attention during the delay and found that while marking a location as a future saccade target resulted in an attentional benefit at that location, marking it as forbidden to saccades led to an attentional cost. Additionally, saccade trajectories were found to deviate away more from the "don't look" location than from a saccade-irrelevant distractor confirming greater inhibition of an actively forbidden location in oculomotor programming. Our finding that attention is suppressed at locations forbidden to saccades confirms and complements the claim of a selective and obligatory coupling between saccades and attention-saccades at the memorized location could neither be planned nor suppressed independent of a corresponding effect on attentional performance.

  19. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties.

  20. Using biologically soft surfactants for dust suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkachenko, N.G.; Kolodiichak, V.K.; Motrii, A.E.; Severin, V.D.

    1982-07-01

    This article discusses environmental aspects of using surfactants in coal mines for dust suppression. Surfactants for underground black coal mines in the USSR are divided into three classes: so-called soft surfactants with a decomposition period from 1 to 3 days, hard surfactants with decomposition exceeding a month and an intermediary group. The decomposition process is analyzed; the role played by fermentation is stressed. Environmental effects of surfactant decomposition are evaluated. Selected surfactants tested in Soviet laboratories are described. The results of experimental use of diethanolamide as a surfactant for water injection in coal seams are evaluated. Wetting time amounts to 1 s when a 0.2% concentration is used. When surfactant concentration in water is reduced to 0.05% wetting time does not change; when concentration decreases to 0.025% wetting time increases to 3 s. Surfactant efficiency is investigated under operational conditions in a Donbass mine. Specifications of the working face, mining system and air pollution caused by a shearer loader are discussed. When diethanolamide is used dust suppression efficiency ranges from 86.4 to 90.4%. During the tests diethanolamide concentration in water was 0.05%.

  1. Suppressing drift chamber diffusion without magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Martoff, C J; Ohnuki, T; Spooner, N J C; Lehner, M

    2000-01-01

    The spatial resolution in drift chamber detectors for ionizing radiation is limited by diffusion of the primary electrons. A strong magnetic field along the drift direction is often applied (Fancher et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 161 (1979) 383) because it suppresses the transverse diffusion, improving the resolution but at considerable increase in cost and complexity. Here we show that transverse track diffusion can be strongly suppressed without any magnetic field. This is achieved by using a gas additive which reversibly captures primary ionization electrons, forming negative ions. The ions drift with thermal energies even at very high drift fields and low pressures (E/P=28.5 V/cm torr), and the diffusion decreases with increasing drift field. Upon arrival at the avalanche region of the chamber the negative ions are efficiently stripped and ordinary avalanche gain is obtained. Using this technique, r.m.s. transverse diffusion less than 200 mu m has been achieved over a 15 cm drift path at 40 torr with ze...

  2. Suppression pheromone and cockroach rank formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Rong; Chang, Huan-Wen; Chen, Shu-Chun; Ho, Hsiao-Yung

    2009-06-01

    Although agonistic behaviors in the male lobster cockroach ( Nauphoeta cinerea) are well known, the formation of an unstable hierarchy has long been a puzzle. In this study, we investigate how the unstable dominance hierarchy in N. cinerea is maintained via a pheromone signaling system. In agonistic interactions, aggressive posture (AP) is an important behavioral index of aggression. This study showed that, during the formation of a governing hierarchy, thousands of nanograms of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (3H-2B) were released by the AP-adopting dominant in the first encounter fight, then during the early domination period and that this release of 3H-2B was related to rank maintenance, but not to rank establishment. For rank maintenance, 3H-2B functioned as a suppression pheromone, which suppressed the fighting capability of rivals and kept them in a submissive state. During the period of rank maintenance, as the dominant male gradually decreased his 3H-2B release, the fighting ability of the subordinate gradually developed, as shown by the increasing odds of a subordinate adopting an AP (OSAP). The OSAP was negatively correlated with the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant and positively correlated with the number of domination days. The same OSAP could be achieved earlier by reducing the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant indicates that whether the subordinate adopts an offensive strategy depends on what the dominant is doing.

  3. Suppressed epidemics in multi-relational networks

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Elvis H W; Xu, C; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P M

    2014-01-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1-p, respectively. The fraction of infected nodes rho(p) shows a non-monotonic behavior, with rho drops with p for small p and increases for large p. For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, rho(p) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range p_L =p_R. A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clu...

  4. Suppression of Coronavirus Replication by Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sasaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication.

  5. Wireless Inductive Power Device Suppresses Blade Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Min, James B.; Stefko, George L.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Fougers, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration in turbomachinery can cause blade failures and leads to the use of heavier, thicker blades that result in lower aerodynamic efficiency and increased noise. Metal and/or composite fatigue in the blades of jet engines has resulted in blade destruction and loss of lives. Techniques for suppressing low-frequency blade vibration, such as gtuned circuit resistive dissipation of vibratory energy, h or simply "passive damping," can require electronics incorporating coils of unwieldy dimensions and adding unwanted weight to the rotor. Other approaches, using vibration-dampening devices or damping material, could add undesirable weight to the blades or hub, making them less efficient. A wireless inductive power device (WIPD) was designed, fabricated, and developed for use in the NASA Glenn's "Dynamic Spin Rig" (DSR) facility. The DSR is used to simulate the functionality of turbomachinery. The relatively small and lightweight device [10 lb (approx.=4.5 kg)] replaces the existing venerable and bulky slip-ring. The goal is the eventual integration of this technology into actual turbomachinery such as jet engines or electric power generators, wherein the device will facilitate the suppression of potentially destructive vibrations in fan blades. This technology obviates slip rings, which require cooling and can prove unreliable or be problematic over time. The WIPD consists of two parts: a remote element, which is positioned on the rotor and provides up to 100 W of electrical power to thin, lightweight piezoelectric patches strategically placed on/in fan blades; and a stationary base unit that wirelessly communicates with the remote unit. The base unit supplies inductive power, and also acts as an input and output corridor for wireless measurement, and active control command to the remote unit. Efficient engine operation necessitates minimal disturbance to the gas flow across the turbine blades in any effort to moderate blade vibration. This innovation makes it

  6. Molecular mechanisms of Treg-mediated T cell suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eSchmidt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs can suppress other immune cells and, thus, are critical mediators of peripheral self-tolerance. On the one hand, Tregs prevent autoimmune disease and allergies. On the other hand, Tregs can avert immune reactions against tumors and pathogens. Despite the importance of Tregs, the molecular mechanisms of suppression remain incompletely understood and controversial. Proliferation and cytokine production of CD4+CD25− conventional T cells (Tcons can be inhibited directly by Tregs. In addition, Tregs can indirectly suppress Tcon activation via inhibition of the stimulatory capacity of antigen presenting cells (APCs. Direct suppression of Tcons by Tregs can involve immunosuppressive soluble factors or cell contact. Different mechanisms of suppression have been described, so far with no consensus on one universal mechanism. Controversies might be explained by the fact that different mechanisms may operate depending on the site of the immune reaction and on the type and activation state of the suppressed target cell. Further, inhibition of T cell effector function can occur independently of suppression of proliferation. In this review, we summarize the described molecular mechanisms of suppression with a particular focus on suppression of Tcons and rapid suppression of T cell receptor (TCR-induced calcium (Ca2+, NFAT and NF-κB signaling in Tcons by Tregs.

  7. Desferrioxamine suppresses Plasmodium falciparum in Aotus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S; Rossan, R N; Davidson, D E; Escajadillo, A

    1987-02-01

    Clinical observation has suggested that iron deficiency may be protective in malaria, and we have found that desferrioxamine (DF), an iron-specific chelating agent, inhibited Plasmodium falciparum growth in vitro. It was difficult to be confident that DF would be effective in an intact animal, however, because continuous exposure to DF was required in vitro and, in vivo, DF is rapidly excreted. Also, the in vitro effect of DF was overcome by addition of iron to the culture and in vivo there are potentially high local iron concentrations when iron is absorbed from the diet or released from reticuloendothelial cells. We now show that DF given by constant subcutaneous infusion does suppress parasitemia in P. falciparum-infected Aotus monkeys.

  8. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; George, E.V.; Miller, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1993-11-09

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  9. Gel fire suppressants for controlling underground heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Sheng-gen; XUE Sheng

    2011-01-01

    One of the major safety issues in coal mining is heatings and the resultant spontaneous combustion in underground coal mines.CSIRO researchers have developed a number of polymer gels suitable for controlling heatings in coal mines.These gels were developed to meet strict selection criteria including easy preparation,no or low toxicity,controllable gelation time,adaptable to mine water chemistry,adjustable viscosity,relatively long gel life,thermally and chemically stable and low cost.The HPAM-Aluminum Citrate gel system was identified to be the most favourable gel system for fire suppression in underground coal mines.These gels can be applied to the areas undergoing coal heating or gas leakage at a controllable gelation time and impermeable gel barriers can be formed in the areas to block ingress of air.

  10. In-Beam Background Suppression Shield

    CERN Document Server

    Santoro, V; DiJulio, D D; Ansell, S; Bentley, P M

    2015-01-01

    The long (3ms) proton pulse of the European Spallation Source (ESS) gives rise to unique and potentially high backgrounds for the instrument suite. In such a source an instrument capabilities will be limited by it's Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. The instruments with a direct view of the moderator, which do not use a bender to help mitigate the fast neutron background, are the most challenging. For these beam lines we propose the innovative shielding of placing blocks of material directly into the guide system, which allow a minimum attenuation of the cold and thermal fluxes relative to the background suppression. This shielding configuration has been worked into a beam line model using Geant4. We study particularly the advantages of single crystal sapphire and silicon blocks .

  11. Fever: suppress or let it ride?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Juliet J; Schulman, Carl I

    2015-12-01

    While our ability to detect and manage fever has evolved since its conceptualization in the 5(th) century BC, controversy remains over the best evidence-based practices regarding if and when to treat this physiologic derangement in the critically ill. There are two basic fields of thought: (I) fever should be suppressed because its metabolic costs outweigh its potential physiologic benefit in an already stressed host; vs. (II) fever is a protective adaptive response that should be allowed to run its course under most circumstances. The latter approach, sometime referred to as the "let it ride" philosophy, has been supported by several recent randomized controlled trials like that of Young et al. [2015], which are challenging earlier observational studies and may be pushing the pendulum away from the Pavlovian treatment response.

  12. Are Patents used to Suppress Useful Technology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the evidence behind claims that innovation is hindered or blocked (termed technology suppression) by corporations' use of patents. In other words, are there ways in which the exploitation of the exclusive development right of the patent can be shown to retard the process...... of innovation, other than in the trivial sense of excluding third parties from the right to develop the technology covered by the patent? There are many references to this possibility in the management, economic and legal literatures, but two highly-cited papers stand out for grounding their claims of corporate...... and the difference between economic monopoly and an exclusive right. It is argued here that what is at issue in this work is the proper function of the patent institution. It is shown early in this paper that the understanding of the patent institution as a system of development prospects makes better sense...

  13. Axionic suppression of plasma wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, D. A.; Noble, A.; Walton, T. J.

    2016-09-01

    Contemporary attempts to explain the existence of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using plasma-based wakefield acceleration deliberately avoid non-standard model particle physics. However, such proposals exploit some of the most extreme environments in the Universe and it is conceivable that hypothetical particles outside the standard model have significant implications for the effectiveness of the acceleration process. Axions solve the strong CP problem and provide one of the most important candidates for cold dark matter, and their potential significance in the present context should not be overlooked. Our analysis of the field equations describing a plasma augmented with axions uncovers a dramatic axion-induced suppression of the energy gained by a test particle in the wakefield driven by a particle bunch, or an intense pulse of electromagnetic radiation, propagating at ultra-relativistic speeds within the strongest magnetic fields in the Universe.

  14. Probe suppression in conformal phased array

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Hema; Neethu, P S

    2017-01-01

    This book considers a cylindrical phased array with microstrip patch antenna elements and half-wavelength dipole antenna elements. The effect of platform and mutual coupling effect is included in the analysis. The non-planar geometry is tackled by using Euler's transformation towards the calculation of array manifold. Results are presented for both conducting and dielectric cylinder. The optimal weights obtained are used to generate adapted pattern according to a given signal scenario. It is shown that array along with adaptive algorithm is able to cater to an arbitrary signal environment even when the platform effect and mutual coupling is taken into account. This book provides a step-by-step approach for analyzing the probe suppression in non-planar geometry. Its detailed illustrations and analysis will be a useful text for graduate and research students, scientists and engineers working in the area of phased arrays, low-observables and stealth technology.

  15. Personalized Recommendation via Suppressing Excessive Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilin Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient recommendation algorithms are fundamental to solve the problem of information overload in modern society. In physical dynamics, mass diffusion is a powerful tool to alleviate the long-standing problems of recommendation systems. However, popularity bias and redundant similarity have not been adequately studied in the literature, which are essentially caused by excessive diffusion and will lead to similarity estimation deviation and recommendation performance degradation. In this paper, we penalize the popular objects by appropriately dividing the popularity of objects and then leverage the second-order similarity to suppress excessive diffusion. Evaluation on three real benchmark datasets (MovieLens, Amazon, and RYM by 10-fold cross-validation demonstrates that our method outperforms the mainstream baselines in accuracy, diversity, and novelty.

  16. Suppressing photochemical reactions with quantized light fields

    CERN Document Server

    Galego, Javier; Feist, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Photoisomerization, i.e., a change of molecular structure after absorption of a photon, is one of the most fundamental photochemical processes. It can perform desirable functionality, e.g., as the primary photochemical event in human vision, where it stores electronic energy in the molecular structure, or for possible applications in solar energy storage and as memories, switches, and actuators; but it can also have detrimental effects, for example as an important damage pathway under solar irradiation of DNA, or as a limiting factor for the efficiency of organic solar cells. While photoisomerization can be avoided by shielding the system from light, this is of course not a viable pathway for approaches that rely on the interaction with external light (such as solar cells or solar energy storage). Here, we show that strong coupling of organic molecules to a confined light mode can be used to strongly suppress photoisomerization, and thus convert molecules that normally show fast photodegradation into photosta...

  17. Suppression of decoherence by bath ordering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Jun; Ma Hong-Ru

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of two coupled spins-1/2 coupled to a spin-bath is studied as an extended model of the TessieriWilkie Hamiltonian. The pair of spins served as an open subsystem is prepared in one of the Bell states and the bath consisting of some spins-1/2 is in a thermal equilibrium state from the very beginning. It is found that with increasing coupling strength of the bath spins, the bath forms a resonant antiferromagnetic order. The polarization correlation between the two spins of the subsystem and the concurrence of it are recovered to some extent in the isolated subsystem. This suppression of the subsystem decoherence may be used to control the quantum devices in practical applications.

  18. Interpretations of J/$\\psi$ suppression

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto-Pérez, Nestor

    1997-01-01

    We review the two main interpretations of $J/\\psi$ suppression proposed in the literature. The phase transition (or deconfining) scenario assumes that below some critical value of the local energy density (or of some other geometrical quantity which depends both on the colliding systems and on the centrality of the collision), there is only nuclear absorption. Above this critical value the absorptive cross-section is taken to be infinite, i.e. no $J/\\psi$ can survive in this hot region. In the hadronic scenario the $J/\\psi$ dissociates due both to nuclear absorption and to its interactions with co-moving hadrons produced in the collision. No discontinuity exists in physical observables. We show that an equally good description of the present data is possible in either scenario.

  19. Ion suppression from blood collection devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselstrøm, Jørgen Bo; Sejr Gothelf, Aase

    The aim of the study was to examine the variation in ion suppression in ultra high pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS-MS) methods when using different blood collection devices. Three different methods measuring 18 antidepressants and antipsychotics in total were...... studied. The blood collection devices were all designed to activate clot formation. They were made of glass with or without silicone coating or plastic containing silicate particles, thrombin or polystyrene particles coated with kaolin. The blood collection devises Venoject and Venosafe were supplied from...... Terumo, S-monovette from Sarstedt, Vacuette from Greiner Bio-One and three BD Vacutainer serum tubes from BD. These seven different blood collection devices were used to withdraw blood from five healthy drug free donors (n=35) in random order. The samples were centrifuged and serum from each sample...

  20. Suppressing Electron Cloud in Future Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Pivi, M T F; Le Pimpec, Frederic; Raubenheimer, Tor O

    2005-01-01

    Any accelerator circulating positively charged beams can suffer from a build-up of an electron cloud in the beam pipe. The cloud develops through ionization of residual gases, synchrotron radiation and secondary electron emission and, when severe, can cause instability, emittance blow-up or loss of the circulating beam. The electron cloud is potentially a limiting effect for both the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the ILC positron damping ring, the development of the electron cloud must be suppressed. This paper presents the various effects of the electron cloud and evaluates their significance. It also discusses the state-of-the-art of the ongoing international R&D program to study potential remedies to reduce the secondary electron yield to acceptably low levels.

  1. Suppression of Instability in Rotatory Hydromagnetic Convection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joginder S Dhiman

    2000-08-01

    Recently discovered hydrodynamic instability [1], in a simple Bénard configuration in the parameter regime 02 > 1 under the action of a nonadverse temperature gradient, is shown to be suppressed by the simultaneous action of a uniform rotation and a uniform magnetic field both acting parallel to gravity for oscillatory perturbations whenever $(\\mathscr{Q}_1/^2+\\mathscr{J}/^4) > 1$ and the effective Rayleigh number $\\mathcal{R}$(1-02) is dominated by either 274(1 + 1/1)/4 or 274/2 according as 1 ≥ 1 or 1 ≤ 1 respectively. Here 0 is the temperature of the lower boundary while 2 is the coefficient of specific heat at constant volume due to temperature variation and 1, $\\mathcal{R}, \\mathscr{Q}$ and $\\mathscr{T}$ respectively denote the magnetic Prandtl number, the Rayleigh number, the Chandrasekhar number and the Taylor number.

  2. Breaking Magic: Foreign Language Suppresses Superstition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjichristidis, Constantinos; Geipel, Janet; Surian, Luca

    2017-08-24

    In three studies we found that reading information in a foreign language can suppress common superstitious beliefs. Participants read scenarios either in their native or a foreign language. In each scenario, participants were asked to imagine performing an action (e.g., submitting a job application) under a superstitious circumstance (e.g., broken mirror; four-leaf clover) and to rate how they would feel. Overall, foreign language prompted less negative feelings towards bad-luck scenarios, less positive feelings towards good-luck scenarios, while it exerted no influence on non-superstitious, control scenarios. We attribute these findings to language-dependent memory. Superstitious beliefs are typically acquired and used in contexts involving the native language. As a result, the native language evokes them more forcefully than a foreign language.

  3. Infinite volume suppression versus quantum fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Kartavtsev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    It is routinely argued that tunneling of the Higgs field along the minimum of the Mexican hat potential is suppressed by the infinite space volume. In the path integral formalism this conclusion is drawn from the analysis of paths on which the field is homogeneous in the whole infinite space. Here we demonstrate that this approach fails to reproduce vacuum properties of even the simplest systems like free real scalar field. On the other hand, adding also the contributions of inhomogeneous field configurations we obtain for the free field the established results. This casts some doubt on the conclusions drawn for the Higgs field using the `homogeneous paths' approach and might call for a careful reanalysis of the mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking in quantum field theory.

  4. Latest results on $J/$ anomalous suppression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sérgio Ramos; NA50 Collaboration; B Allessandro; C Alexa; R Arnaldi; M Atayan; C Baglin; A Baldit; M Bedjidian; S Beolè; V Boldea; P Bordalo; S R Borenstein; G Borges; A Bussière; L Capelli; C Castanier; J Castor; B Chaurand; B Cheynis; E Chiavassa; C Cicalo; T Claudino; M P Comets; S Constantinescu; P Cortese; J Cruz; A DeFalco; N DeMarco; G Dellacasa; A Devaux; S Dita; O Drapier; B Espagnon; J Fargeix; P Force; M Gallio; Y K Gavrilov; C Gerschel; P Giubellino; M B Golubeva; M Gonin; A A Grigorian; S Grigorian; J Y Grossiord; F F Guber; A Guichard; H Gulkanyan; R Hakobyan; R Haroutunian; M Idzik; D Jouan; T L Karavitcheva; L Kluberg; A B Kurepin; Y Le Bornée; C Lourenço; P Macciotta; M Mac Cormick; A Marzari-Chiesa; M Masera; A Masoni; M Monteno; A Musso; P Petiau; A Piccotti; J R Pizzi; W L Prado da Silva; F Prino; G Puddu; C Quintans; L Ramello; S Ramos; P Rato Mendes; L Riccati; A Romana; H Santos; P Saturnini; E Scalas; E Scomparin; S Serci; R Shahoyan; F Sigaudo; M Sitta; P Sonderegger; X Tarrago; N S Topilskaya; G L Usai; E Vercellin; L Villatte; N Willis; T Wu

    2004-03-01

    The NA50 experiment deals with Pb–Pb collisions at 158 GeV/nucleon at the CERN SPS accelerator. The $J/$ production is studied through the muon decay channel, using the Drell–Yan dimuons as a reference. New results based on recent analyses, from data taken with improved experimental conditions and using different centrality estimators, are presented and compared to an update of those already obtained from previous data samples. The stepwise pattern of the anomalous $J/$ suppression as a function of centrality, already present in these previous results, is confirmed. This observation could be a fingerprint of the theoretically predicted melting of charmonia resonances in a deconfined quark–gluon plasma.

  5. Eigenspace design techniques for active flutter suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrard, W. L.; Liebst, B. S.

    1984-01-01

    The application of eigenspace design techniques to an active flutter suppression system for the DAST ARW-2 research drone is examined. Eigenspace design techniques allow the control system designer to determine feedback gains which place controllable eigenvalues in specified configurations and which shape eigenvectors to achieve desired dynamic response. Eigenspace techniques were applied to the control of lateral and longitudinal dynamic response of aircraft. However, little was published on the application of eigenspace techniques to aeroelastic control problems. This discussion will focus primarily on methodology for design of full-state and limited-state (output) feedback controllers. Most of the states in aeroelastic control problems are not directly measurable, and some type of dynamic compensator is necessary to convert sensor outputs to control inputs. Compensator design are accomplished by use of a Kalman filter modified if necessary by the Doyle-Stein procedure for full-state loop transfer function recovery, by some other type of observer, or by transfer function matching.

  6. Suppressing Redundancy in Wireless Sensor Network Traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Rey; Honiden, Shinichi

    Redundancy suppression is a network traffic compression technique that, by caching recurring transmission contents at receiving nodes, avoids repeatedly sending duplicate data. Existing implementations require abundant memory both to analyze recent traffic for redundancy and to maintain the cache. Wireless sensor nodes at the same time cannot provide such resources due to hardware constraints. The diversity of protocols and traffic patterns in sensor networks furthermore makes the frequencies and proportions of redundancy in traffic unpredictable. The common practice of narrowing down search parameters based on characteristics of representative packet traces when dissecting data for redundancy thus becomes inappropriate. Such difficulties made us devise a novel protocol that conducts a probabilistic traffic analysis to identify and cache only the subset of redundant transfers that yields most traffic savings. We verified this approach to perform close enough to a solution built on exhaustive analysis and unconstrained caching to be practicable.

  7. Obtuse triangle suppression in anisotropic meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Feng

    2011-12-01

    Anisotropic triangle meshes are used for efficient approximation of surfaces and flow data in finite element analysis, and in these applications it is desirable to have as few obtuse triangles as possible to reduce the discretization error. We present a variational approach to suppressing obtuse triangles in anisotropic meshes. Specifically, we introduce a hexagonal Minkowski metric, which is sensitive to triangle orientation, to give a new formulation of the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) method. Furthermore, we prove several relevant properties of the CVT method with the newly introduced metric. Experiments show that our algorithm produces anisotropic meshes with much fewer obtuse triangles than using existing methods while maintaining mesh anisotropy. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Upsilon suppression in the QGP at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolschin, Georg

    2016-12-01

    The suppression of ϒ-mesons in the hot quark-gluon medium in PbPb collisions is accounted for in a model that encompasses gluodissociation, collisional damping, screening, and reduced feed-down. Theoretical results for centrality-dependent suppression factors of the ϒ (1 S) and ϒ (2 S) states are compared with CMS data. The measured ground state suppression is well represented, but discrepancies between data and model persist for peripheral ϒ (2 S)-events that require additional suppression mechanisms. The pT-dependence of the suppression is discussed and a prediction for the centrality-dependent ϒ (1 S) suppression in 5.02 TeV PbPb is made.

  9. Mechanisms of suppression: The wiring of genetic resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Jolanda; Pons, Carles; Boone, Charles; Andrews, Brenda J

    2017-07-01

    Recent analysis of genome sequences has identified individuals that are healthy despite carrying severe disease-associated mutations. A possible explanation is that these individuals carry a second genomic perturbation that can compensate for the detrimental effects of the disease allele, a phenomenon referred to as suppression. In model organisms, suppression interactions are generally divided into two classes: genomic suppressors which are secondary mutations in the genome that bypass a mutant phenotype, and dosage suppression interactions in which overexpression of a suppressor gene rescues a mutant phenotype. Here, we describe the general properties of genomic and dosage suppression, with an emphasis on the budding yeast. We propose that suppression interactions between genetic variants are likely relevant for determining the penetrance of human traits. Consequently, an understanding of suppression mechanisms may guide the discovery of protective variants in healthy individuals that carry disease alleles, which could direct the rational design of new therapeutics. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Probiotic Diversity Enhances Rhizosphere Microbiome Function and Plant Disease Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jie; Wei, Zhong; Friman, Ville Petri; Gu, Shao-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Eisenhauer, Nico; Yang, Tian-jie; Ma, Jing; Shen, Qi-Rong; Xu, Yang-chun; Jousset, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial communities associated with plant roots play an important role in the suppression of soil-borne pathogens, and multispecies probiotic consortia may enhance disease suppression efficacy. Here we introduced defined Pseudomonas species consortia into naturally complex microbial communities and measured the importance of Pseudomonas community diversity for their survival and the suppression of the bacterial plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in the tomato rhizosphere microbiome. The ...

  11. Methods for suppressing isomerization of olefin metathesis products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firth, Bruce E.; Kirk, Sharon E.; Gavaskar, Vasudeo S.

    2015-09-22

    A method for suppressing isomerization of an olefin metathesis product produced in a metathesis reaction includes adding an isomerization suppression agent to a mixture that includes the olefin metathesis product and residual metathesis catalyst from the metathesis reaction under conditions that are sufficient to passivate at least a portion of the residual metathesis catalyst. The isomerization suppression agent is phosphorous acid, a phosphorous acid ester, phosphinic acid, a phosphinic acid ester or combinations thereof. Methods of refining natural oils are described.

  12. The ups and downs of J/psi suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R.

    2000-10-17

    An overview of the present status of J/psi suppression in pA and nucleus-nucleus interactions is presented. In both cases, model predictions are summarized and compared to the data. The ''anomalous'' J/psi suppression in Pb+Pb collisions is discussed in some detail. Predictions are also shown for quarkonium suppression at collider energies.

  13. Chatter Suppression with Ultrasonic Elliptical Vibration Based on Energy Principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chun-xiang; E Shamoto; T Moriwaki

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed to suppress chatter, in which the ultrasonic elliptical vibration is added on the cutting tool edge. It results in the fact that the rake face of tool is separated from the chip and the direction of the frictional force between the rake face and the chip is reversed in each cycle of elliptical vibration cutting. The experimental investigations show that the chatter can be suppressed effectively by adding ultrasonic elliptical vibration on the cutting tool edge. In order to make clear the reason of chatter suppression, the mechanism of chatter suppression is analyzed theoretically from the viewpoint of energy.

  14. Breaking continuous flash suppression: A new measure of unconscious processing during interocular suppression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo eStein

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, it has been thought that under interocular suppression high-level visual processing is strongly inhibited if not abolished. With the development of continuous flash suppression (CFS, a variant of binocular rivalry, this notion has now been challenged by a number of reports showing that even high-level aspects of visual stimuli, such as familiarity, affect the time stimuli need to overcome CFS and emerge into awareness. In this breaking CFS (b-CFS paradigm, differential unconscious processing during suppression is inferred when (a speeded detection responses to initially invisible stimuli differ, and (b no comparable differences are found in non-rivalrous control conditions supposed to measure general threshold differences between stimuli. To critically evaluate these assumptions was the aim of the present study. In six experiments we compared the time upright and inverted faces needed to be detected. We found that not only under CFS, but also in control conditions upright faces were detected faster and more accurately than inverted faces, although the effect was larger during CFS. However, reaction time (RT distributions indicated critical differences between the CFS and the control condition. When RT distributions were matched, similar effect sizes were obtained in both conditions. Moreover, subjective ratings revealed that CFS and control conditions are not perceptually comparable. These findings cast doubt on the usefulness of non-rivalrous control conditions to rule out mere detection threshold differences as a cause of shorter detection latencies during CFS. In conclusion, we acknowledge that the b-CFS paradigm can be fruitfully applied as a highly sensitive device to probe differences between stimuli in their potency to gain access to awareness. However, our current findings suggest that such differences can not unequivocally be attributed to differential unconscious processing under interocular suppression.

  15. Black-tea polyphenols suppress postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia by suppressing lymphatic transport of dietary fat in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Ichitani, Masaki; Suzuki, Yuko; Unno, Tomonori; Sugawara, Takashi; Yamahira, Takashi; Kato, Masaki; Takihara, Takanobu; Sagesaka, Yuko; Kakuda, Takami; Ikeda, Ikuo

    2009-08-12

    Administration of black-tea polyphenols (BTP) at 100 and 200 mg/kg of body weight in rats suppressed postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of BTP also suppressed lymphatic recovery of (14)C-trioleoylglycerol in rats that were cannulated in the thoracic duct. BTP dose-dependently inhibited the activity of pancreatic lipase in vitro with an IC50 of 0.254 mg/mL. When purified theaflavins, which are components of BTP, were used, theaflavins with galloyl moieties, but not those without galloyl moiety, inhibited the activity of pancreatic lipase. Theaflavin-3,3'-digallate (TFDG) was more effective in inhibiting the activity of pancreatic lipase than epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), epicatechin gallate (ECG), and a mixture of EGCG and ECG. BTP and TFDG had a similar effect in inhibiting the activity of pancreatic lipase when the total polyphenol amount was adjusted to the same. BTP had no effect on micellar solubility of hydrolysis products of triacylglycerol. These results suggest that BTP suppressed postprandial hypertriacylglycerolemia by reducing triacylglycerol absorption via the inhibition of pancreatic lipase activity.

  16. Social Hierarchy and Depression: The Role of Emotion Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Carrie A.; Epel, Elissa; Matthews, Karen; Moskowitz, Judith T.; Adler, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Position in the social hierarchy is a major determinant of health outcomes. We examined the associations between aspects of social hierarchy and depressive symptoms with a specific focus on one potential psychological mechanism: emotion suppression. Suppressing negative emotion has mental health costs, but individuals with low social power and low social status may use these strategies to avoid conflict. Study 1 assessed perceived social power, tendency to suppress negative emotion, and depressive symptoms in a community sample of women. Low social power was related to greater depressive symptoms, and this relationship was partially mediated by emotion suppression. Study 2 examined education as a proxy for social hierarchy position, anger suppression, and depressive symptoms in a national, longitudinal cohort study (The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study). Similar to Study 1, low education levels were correlated with greater depressive symptoms, and this relationship was partially mediated by anger suppression. Further, suppression mediated the relationship between low education and subsequent depression up to 15 years later. These findings support the theory that social hierarchy affects mental health in part through a process of emotion suppression. PMID:22808688

  17. Socioeconomic Inequality and Giftedness: Suppression and Distortion of High Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Don

    2013-01-01

    Severe socioeconomic inequality strongly suppresses and distorts the discovery of aspirations and the concomitant development of talents among the gifted. More comprehensive understanding of this suppression and distortion is available through a wide-ranging interdisciplinary search for research findings and theories that illuminate economic,…

  18. Eye Contact Facilitates Awareness of Faces during Interocular Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Timo; Senju, Atsushi; Peelen, Marius V.; Sterzer, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Eye contact captures attention and receives prioritized visual processing. Here we asked whether eye contact might be processed outside conscious awareness. Faces with direct and averted gaze were rendered invisible using interocular suppression. In two experiments we found that faces with direct gaze overcame such suppression more rapidly than…

  19. Burst-Suppression Ratio on Electrocorticography Depends on Interelectrode Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Calin, Alexandru; Kumaraswamy, Vishakhadatta M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: With deepening of anesthesia-induced comatose states, the EEG becomes fragmented by increasing periods of suppression. When measured from conventional EEG recordings, the binary burst-suppression signal (BS) appears similar across the scalp. As such, the BS ratio (BSR), quantifying...

  20. Microbial populations responsible for specific soil suppressiveness to plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, David M; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Gardener, Brian B McSpadden; Thomashow, Linda S

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural soils suppressive to soilborne plant pathogens occur worldwide, and for several of these soils the biological basis of suppressiveness has been described. Two classical types of suppressiveness are known. General suppression owes its activity to the total microbial biomass in soil and is not transferable between soils. Specific suppression owes its activity to the effects of individual or select groups of microorganisms and is transferable. The microbial basis of specific suppression to four diseases, Fusarium wilts, potato scab, apple replant disease, and take-all, is discussed. One of the best-described examples occurs in take-all decline soils. In Washington State, take-all decline results from the buildup of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. that produce the antifungal metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol. Producers of this metabolite may have a broader role in disease-suppressive soils worldwide. By coupling molecular technologies with traditional approaches used in plant pathology and microbiology, it is possible to dissect the microbial composition and complex interactions in suppressive soils.

  1. Delivering the barebones for designing more weed suppressive crop rotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaans, L.; Berghuijs, H.N.C.

    2011-01-01

    Even though crop rotation is often regarded as an important component of weed management, tools for optimising the weed-suppressive character of crop rotations are lacking. The long-term character of this strategy and the variety of weed-promoting and weed-suppressing conditions and events that are

  2. Chronic Juvenile Delinquency and the "Suppression Effect": An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Mark; Norman, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Notes that fear of apprehension and punishment have been reported to suppress juvenile crime. Discusses suppression effect in regard to the correlates of chronic juvenile delinquency and exploratory evidence that youth who commit large volume of crime do not fear sanctions imposed by juvenile court any more than youth who commit only one offense…

  3. Regularized Adaptive Notch Filters for Acoustic Howling Suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil-Cacho, Pepe; van Waterschoot, Toon; Moonen, Marc;

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a method for the suppression of acoustic howling is developed, based on adaptive notch filters (ANF) with regularization (RANF). The method features three RANFs working in parallel to achieve frequency tracking, howling detection and suppression. The ANF-based approach to howling...

  4. Heavy quarkonium suppression in a fireball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobedo, Miguel Ángel [Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching, Germany Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-01-22

    The dissociation of heavy quarkonium seen in heavy-ion collisions is a phenomena that allows to extract information of the produced thermal medium. This was believed to be due to the screening of the static potential but recently perturbative computations and some lattice studies have pointed out the possibility of having an imaginary part of the potential that would also contribute to dissociation. In recent years a program to study heavy quarkonium with the use of non-relativistic effective field theories (EFTs) has been started, this allows to make the computations in a more systematic way by defining a more suitable power counting and making it more difficult to miss necessary resummations. However until now these studies have been done assuming thermal equilibrium. In this work we will discuss what happens in the EFT formalism when heavy quarkonium is in a medium that is not in thermal equilibrium and what is the expected suppression when a medium with a time dependent effective temperature that follows Bjorken evolution is considered. This will be done adapting previous results from different temperature regimes.

  5. The SSM with Suppressed SUSY Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Dixon

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Suppressed SUSY Charge, introduced in a recent Letter, is used here to assemble a new version of the SSM. This new SSM has no need for Squarks or Sleptons. It does not need spontaneous breaking of SUSY, so that the cosmological constant problem does not arise (at least at tree level. It mimics the usual non-supersymmetric Standard Model very well, and the absence of large flavour changing neutral currents is natural. There is no need for a hidden sector, or a messenger sector, or explicit ‘soft’ breaking of SUSY. Spontaneous Gauge Symmetry Breaking from SU(3×SU(2×U(1 to SU(3×U(1 in the model assembled here implies the existence of two new very heavy Higgs Bosons with mass 13.4 TeV, slightly smaller than the energy of the LHC at 14 TeV. There is also a curious set of Gauginos and Higgsinos which have exactly the same masses as the Higgs and Gauge Bosons. These do not couple to the Quarks and Leptons, except through the Higgs and Gauge Bosons. As it stands, this model probably gives rise to too many W+ decays to be consistent with experiment. The Feynman loop expansion of this theory also needs further examination.

  6. The SSM with Suppressed SUSY Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, John A.

    2016-10-01

    The concept of Suppressed SUSY Charge, introduced in a recent Letter, is used here to assemble a new version of the SSM. This new SSM has no need for Squarks or Sleptons. It does not need spontaneous breaking of SUSY, so that the cosmological constant problem does not arise (at least at tree level). It mimics the usual non-supersymmetric Standard Model very well, and the absence of large flavour changing neutral currents is natural. There is no need for a hidden sector, or a messenger sector, or explicit 'soft' breaking of SUSY. Spontaneous Gauge Symmetry Breaking from SU (3) × SU (2) × U (1) to SU (3) × U (1) in the model assembled here implies the existence of two new very heavy Higgs Bosons with mass 13.4 TeV, slightly smaller than the energy of the LHC at 14 TeV. There is also a curious set of Gauginos and Higgsinos which have exactly the same masses as the Higgs and Gauge Bosons. These do not couple to the Quarks and Leptons, except through the Higgs and Gauge Bosons. As it stands, this model probably gives rise to too many W+ decays to be consistent with experiment. The Feynman loop expansion of this theory also needs further examination.

  7. Rotator cuff injury: fat suppression MR image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Yoon; Suh, Jin Suck; Park, Chang Yun; Lee, Yeon Hee [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Soo [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    We performed the study prospectively to evaluate the advantage of fat suppression MR in the diagnosis of rotator cuff injury. Ten symptomatic patients were studied with both conventional T2WI and FST2WI using chemical shift technique. Each image was analyzed for the assessment of injuries, conspicuity of the lesion, the presence of effusion in subacromical bursae and joint space, and presence of humeral head injury. Arthroscopy was done in 4 patients following MRI. We could made presumptive diagnoses on FSMR as identical as on conventional MR in six cases(1 normal, 2 tendinitis, 2 partial thickness tear, 1 full thickness tear), two of them were confirmed by arthroscopic procedures. Two cases of partial thickness tear proved by arthroscopy were detected on FST2WI, whereas they were considered tendinitis on conventional T2WI. There were another 2 cases who showed tendinitis on FSMR, but normal on conventional T2WI. They, however, were not confirmed by either arthroscopy or surgical procedure. We found the FSMR were superior to conventional T2WI in the conspicuity of lesions and detection of joint effusion and abnormalities on the humeral head. We think FSMR of the shoulder could have significant diagnostic advantages over the conventional spin-echo MR imaging.

  8. Mucins Suppress Virulence Traits of Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Nicole L.; Zhang, Angela Q.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans, causing a variety of diseases ranging from superficial mucosal infections to deep-seated systemic invasions. Mucus, the gel that coats all wet epithelial surfaces, accommodates C. albicans as part of the normal microbiota, where C. albicans resides asymptomatically in healthy humans. Through a series of in vitro experiments combined with gene expression analysis, we show that mucin biopolymers, the main gel-forming constituents of mucus, induce a new oval-shaped morphology in C. albicans in which a range of genes related to adhesion, filamentation, and biofilm formation are downregulated. We also show that corresponding traits are suppressed, rendering C. albicans impaired in forming biofilms on a range of different synthetic surfaces and human epithelial cells. Our data suggest that mucins can manipulate C. albicans physiology, and we hypothesize that they are key environmental signals for retaining C. albicans in the host-compatible, commensal state. PMID:25389175

  9. Ejector Noise Suppression with Auxiliary Jet Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Charles H.; Andersen, Otto P., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental program to reduce aircraft jet turbulence noise investigated the interaction of small auxiliary jets with a larger main jet. Significant reductions in the far field jet noise were obtained over a range of auxiliary jet pressures and flow rates when used in conjunction with an acoustically lined ejector. While the concept is similar to that of conventional ejector suppressors that use mechanical mixing devices, the present approach should improve thrust and lead to lower weight and less complex noise suppression systems since no hardware needs to be located in the main jet flow. A variety of auxiliary jet and ejector configurations and operating conditions were studied. The best conditions tested produced peak to peak noise reductions ranging from 11 to 16 dB, depending on measurement angle, for auxiliary jet mass flows that were 6.6% of the main jet flow with ejectors that were 8 times the main jet diameter in length. Much larger reductions in noise were found at the original peak frequencies of the unsuppressed jet over a range of far field measurement angles.

  10. A dual purpose Compton suppression spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Parus, J; Raab, W; Donohue, D

    2003-01-01

    A gamma-ray spectrometer with a passive and an active shield is described. It consists of a HPGe coaxial detector of 42% efficiency and 4 NaI(Tl) detectors. The energy output pulses of the Ge detector are delivered into the 3 spectrometry chains giving the normal, anti- and coincidence spectra. From the spectra of a number of sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co sources a Compton suppression factor, SF and a Compton reduction factor, RF, as the parameters characterizing the system performance, were calculated as a function of energy and source activity and compared with those given in literature. The natural background is reduced about 8 times in the anticoincidence mode of operation, compared to the normal spectrum which results in decreasing the detection limits for non-coincident gamma-rays up to a factor of 3. In the presence of other gamma-ray activities, in the range from 5 to 11 kBq, non- and coincident, the detection limits can be decreased for some nuclides by a factor of 3 to 5.7.

  11. Interference suppression in noise radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukanović, Slobodan; Daković, Miloš; Thayaparan, Thayananthan; Stanković, Ljubiša

    2011-06-01

    This paper addresses the issue of interference suppression in noise radars. The proposed methods can be divided into non-parametric and parametric ones. The considered non-parametric methods are based on linear time-frequency (TF) tools, namely the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and local polynomial Fourier transform (LPFT). The STFT is the simplest TF method, but, due to the resolution problem, it performs poorly with highly nonstationary interferences. The LPFT resolves the resolution problem, however at the cost of increased complexity. In parametric methods, the phase of interference is locally approximated by a polynomial, which is motivated by the Weierstrass's theorem. Using the phase approximation, the corrupted received signal is demodulated and successively filtered. Two methods for polynomial phase approximation are considered, the high-order ambiguity function (HAF) and product high-order ambiguity function (PHAF). The method based on the HAF is computationally efficient; however, it suffers from the identifiability problem when multicomponent signals are considered. The identifiability problem can be resolved using the PHAF.

  12. Probiotics-mediated suppression of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Stephanie S Y; Wan, Murphy L Y; El-Nezami, Hani

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics can be used as an adjuvant for cancer prevention or/and treatment through their abilities to modulate intestinal microbiota and host immune response. Although most of the recent reviews have focused on the potential role of probiotics against colon cancer, only few of them include the probiotic effect on extraintestinal cancers. The present review covers the most important findings from the literature published during the past 20 months (from January 2015 to August 2016) regarding the probiotics-mediated suppression of both gastrointestinal and extraintestinal cancers and the underlying mechanisms. A comprehensive literature search in Pubmed, Science direct and Google scholar databases was conducted to locate all relevant articles that investigated the effect of probiotics on prevention/treatment of both gastrointestinal and extraintestinal cancers. Different mechanisms for the beneficial effects of probiotics against cancer were also discussed, mainly via modulation of gut microbiota which thereby influences host metabolism and immunity. Despite laboratory-based studies having demonstrated encouraging outcomes that probiotics possess antitumor effects, the benefits should not be exaggerated before we get more results from human clinical trials. These are very important before the medical community can accept the use of probiotics as an alternative therapy for cancer control.

  13. 't Hooft suppression and holographic entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, William R; Marolf, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Recent works have related the bulk first law of black hole mechanics to the first law of entanglement in a dual CFT. These are first order relations, and receive corrections for finite changes. In particular, the latter is naively expected to be accurate only for small changes in the quantum state. But when Newton's constant is small relative to the AdS scale, the former holds to good approximation even for classical perturbations that contain many quanta. This suggests that -- for appropriate states -- corrections to the first law of entanglement are suppressed by powers of $N$ in CFTs whose correlators satisfy 't Hooft large-$N$ power counting. We take first steps toward verifying that this is so by studying the large-$N$ structure of the entropy of spatial regions for a class of CFT states motivated by those created from the vacuum by acting with real-time single-trace sources. We show that $1/N$ counting matches bulk predictions, though we require the effect of the source on the modular hamiltonian to be ...

  14. 't Hooft suppression and holographic entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William R.; Kuns, Kevin; Marolf, Donald

    2015-10-01

    Recent works have related the bulk first law of black hole mechanics to the first law of entanglement in a dual CFT. These are first order relations, and receive corrections for finite changes. In particular, the latter is naively expected to be accurate only for small changes in the quantum state. But when Newton's constant is small relative to the AdS scale, the former holds to good approximation even for classical perturbations that contain many quanta. This suggests that — for appropriate states — corrections to the first law of entanglement are suppressed by powers of N in CFTs whose correlators satisfy 't Hooft large- N power counting. We take first steps toward verifying that this is so by studying the large- N structure of the entropy of spatial regions for a class of CFT states motivate dby those created from the vacuum by acting with real-time single-trace sources. We show that 1 /N counting matches bulk predictions, though we require the effect of the source on the modular hamiltonian to be non-singular. The magnitude of our sources is ɛ N with ɛ fixed-but-small as N → ∞. Our results also provide a perturbative derivation — without relying on the replica trick — of the subleading Faulkner-Lewkowycz-Maldacena correction to the Ryu-Takayagi and Hubeny-Rangamani-Takayanagi conjectures at all orders in 1 /N.

  15. Cytokine treatment of macrophage suppression of T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Daniel; Bucknum, Amanda; Kozlowski, Megan; Matlack, Robin; Riggs, James

    2010-01-01

    High Mphi:T cell ratios suppress the immune response to the retroviral superantigen Mls by IFNgamma-triggered production of the arg- and trp-consuming enzymes iNOS and IDO. Attempts to reverse suppression by treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines revealed that IL-6 improved the T cell response to Mls and the pro-hematopoietic cyokines IL-3 and GM-CSF increased suppression. GM-CSF treatment increased Mphi expression of CD80, a ligand for the immune suppressive B7H1 and CTLA-4 receptors. These results illustrate potential strategies for reversing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity characteristic of the high Mphi:T cell ratios found in many tumors.

  16. Evolution of cancer suppression as revealed by mammalian comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollis, Marc; Schiffman, Joshua D; Boddy, Amy M

    2017-02-02

    Cancer suppression is an important feature in the evolution of large and long-lived animals. While some tumor suppression pathways are conserved among all multicellular organisms, others mechanisms of cancer resistance are uniquely lineage specific. Comparative genomics has become a powerful tool to discover these unique and shared molecular adaptations in respect to cancer suppression. These findings may one day be translated to human patients through evolutionary medicine. Here, we will review theory and methods of comparative cancer genomics and highlight major findings of cancer suppression across mammals. Our current knowledge of cancer genomics suggests that more efficient DNA repair and higher sensitivity to DNA damage may be the key to tumor suppression in large or long-lived mammals.

  17. An electrophysiological assessment of distractor suppression in visual search tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Veronica; Turatto, Massimo; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2009-07-01

    We investigated whether the N2pc is unequivocally linked to distractor-suppression mechanisms, as is commonly assumed. According to the distractor-suppression account of the N2pc, no suppression, and thus no N2pc, should occur when homogeneous distractors help in selecting the target, such as when the target feature is unpredictable. Participants performed a simple detection or a finer discrimination on a singleton target, which had either a variable or a constant color. Contrary to the distractor-suppression account, an N2pc was present for both the variable and the constant conditions, and for both tasks. Additionally, target feature consistency correlated with earlier N2pc onsets relative to variable blocks. Both results indicate that the N2pc is not unequivocally linked to distractor-suppression mechanisms, but may index mechanisms involved in identifying and localizing relevant stimuli through enhancement of their features.

  18. Surround suppression and sparse coding in visual and barrel cortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N S Sachdev

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available During natural vision the entire retina is stimulated. Likewise, during natural tactile behaviors, spatially extensive regions of the somatosensory surface are co-activated. The large spatial extent of naturalistic stimulation means that surround suppression, a phenomenon whose neural mechanisms remain a matter of debate, must arise during natural behavior. To identify common neural motifs that might instantiate surround suppression across modalities, we review models of surround suppression and compare the evidence supporting the competing ideas that surround suppression has either cortical or sub-cortical origins in visual and barrel cortex. In the visual system there is general agreement lateral inhibitory mechanisms contribute to surround suppression, but little direct experimental evidence that intracortical inhibition plays a major role. Two intracellular recording studies of V1, one using naturalistic stimuli (Haider et al., 2010, the other sinusoidal gratings (Ozeki et al., 2009, sought to identify the causes of reduced activity in V1 with increasing stimulus size, a hallmark of surround suppression. The former attributed this effect to increased inhibition, the latter to largely balanced withdrawal of excitation and inhibition. In rodent primary somatosensory barrel cortex, multi-whisker responses are generally weaker than single whisker responses, suggesting multi-whisker stimulation engages similar surround suppressive mechanisms. The origins of suppression in S1 remain elusive: studies have implicated brainstem lateral/internuclear interactions and both thalamic and cortical inhibition. Although the anatomical organization and instantiation of surround suppression in the visual and somatosensory systems differ, we consider the idea that one common function of surround suppression, in both modalities, is to remove the statistical redundancies associated with natural stimuli by increasing the sparseness or selectivity of sensory

  19. Genetic control of mosquitoes: population suppression strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, André Barretto Bruno; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, morbidity and mortality from malaria and dengue fever among other pathogens are an increasing Public Health problem. The increase in the geographic distribution of vectors is accompanied by the emergence of viruses and diseases in new areas. There are insufficient specific therapeutic drugs available and there are no reliable vaccines for malaria or dengue, although some progress has been achieved, there is still a long way between its development and actual field use. Most mosquito control measures have failed to achieve their goals, mostly because of the mosquito's great reproductive capacity and genomic flexibility. Chemical control is increasingly restricted due to potential human toxicity, mortality in no target organisms, insecticide resistance, and other environmental impacts. Other strategies for mosquito control are desperately needed. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is a species-specific and environmentally benign method for insect population suppression, it is based on mass rearing, radiation mediated sterilization, and release of a large number of male insects. Releasing of Insects carrying a dominant lethal gene (RIDL) offers a solution to many of the drawbacks of traditional SIT that have limited its application in mosquitoes while maintaining its environmentally friendly and species-specific utility. The self-limiting nature of sterile mosquitoes tends to make the issues related to field use of these somewhat less challenging than for self-spreading systems characteristic of population replacement strategies. They also are closer to field use, so might be appropriate to consider first. The prospect of genetic control methods against mosquito vectored human diseases is rapidly becoming a reality, many decisions will need to be made on a national, regional and international level regarding the biosafety, social, cultural and ethical aspects of the use and deployment of these vector control methods.

  20. Genetic Control of Mosquitoes: population suppression strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Barretto Bruno Wilke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, morbidity and mortality from malaria and dengue fever among other pathogens are an increasing Public Health problem. The increase in the geographic distribution of vectors is accompanied by the emergence of viruses and diseases in new areas. There are insufficient specific therapeutic drugs available and there are no reliable vaccines for malaria or dengue, although some progress has been achieved, there is still a long way between its development and actual field use. Most mosquito control measures have failed to achieve their goals, mostly because of the mosquito's great reproductive capacity and genomic flexibility. Chemical control is increasingly restricted due to potential human toxicity, mortality in no target organisms, insecticide resistance, and other environmental impacts. Other strategies for mosquito control are desperately needed. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT is a species-specific and environmentally benign method for insect population suppression, it is based on mass rearing, radiation mediated sterilization, and release of a large number of male insects. Releasing of Insects carrying a dominant lethal gene (RIDL offers a solution to many of the drawbacks of traditional SIT that have limited its application in mosquitoes while maintaining its environmentally friendly and species-specific utility. The self-limiting nature of sterile mosquitoes tends to make the issues related to field use of these somewhat less challenging than for self-spreading systems characteristic of population replacement strategies. They also are closer to field use, so might be appropriate to consider first. The prospect of genetic control methods against mosquito vectored human diseases is rapidly becoming a reality, many decisions will need to be made on a national, regional and international level regarding the biosafety, social, cultural and ethical aspects of the use and deployment of these vector control methods.

  1. Suitable level of suppression in Pinus sylvestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagner, Mats

    1999-10-01

    It is `well known` among Swedish foresters that pine trees need light and cannot grow suppressed. It is also `well known` that old trees that have grown slowly are unable to react with good growth. However, these facts can be questioned in the light of new research as it has been found that thinning reaction is not correlated with age. It is also well known that the commercial value of a pine is closely related to the growth at young age. If the first 20 annual rings close to pith are wide (>3 mm) the log cannot be accepted as first class. This is related to number and size of branches on the young tree and to the features of the juvenile wood. This is to say that a pine must not grow fast when it is small and if this has happened it cannot be cured by artificial debranching or by growing the tree slowly at higher age. Accordingly, young pines should be grown under bigger trees that in their young age were grown under big trees, and so on. Today, when clear cutting is the dominating forest management system, the only way to obtain high quality pine trees is to start the rotation age with stands of very high density. This is of course a very expensive way as dense planting, followed by intensive thinning requires a lot of input. However, if pine is a pioneer species and cannot be grown in multistoried stands, then the economic solution is not present. This was the reason why the annual increment of three pines was measured. They were selected because their different growth pattern showed that old `well known facts` should be revised Working papers 139. 3 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  2. fMRI repetition suppression: neuronal adaptation or stimulus expectation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Jonas; Smith, Andrew T

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of repetition suppression with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI adaptation) have been used widely to probe neuronal population response properties in human cerebral cortex. fMRI adaptation techniques assume that fMRI repetition suppression reflects neuronal adaptation, an assumption that has been challenged on the basis of evidence that repetition-related response changes may reflect unrelated factors, such as attention and stimulus expectation. Specifically, Summerfield et al. (Summerfield C, Trittschuh EH, Monti JM, Mesulam MM, Egner T. 2008. Neural repetition suppression reflects fulfilled perceptual expectations. Nat Neurosci. 11:1004-1006) reported that the relative frequency of stimulus repetitions and non-repetitions influenced the magnitude of repetition suppression in the fusiform face area, suggesting that stimulus expectation accounted for most of the effect of repetition. We confirm that stimulus expectation can significantly influence fMRI repetition suppression throughout visual cortex and show that it occurs with long as well as short adaptation durations. However, the effect was attention dependent: When attention was diverted away from the stimuli, the effects of stimulus expectation completely disappeared. Nonetheless, robust and significant repetition suppression was still evident. These results suggest that fMRI repetition suppression reflects a combination of neuronal adaptation and attention-dependent expectation effects that can be experimentally dissociated. This implies that with an appropriate experimental design, fMRI adaptation can provide valid measures of neuronal adaptation and hence response specificity.

  3. Modifying Antiretroviral Therapy in Virologically Suppressed HIV-1-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sean E; Grant, Philip M; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1-infected patients with suppressed plasma viral loads often require changes to their antiretroviral (ARV) therapy to manage drug toxicity and intolerance, to improve adherence, and to avoid drug interactions. In patients who have never experienced virologic failure while receiving ARV therapy and who have no evidence of drug resistance, switching to any of the acceptable US Department of Health and Human Services first-line therapies is expected to maintain virologic suppression. However, in virologically suppressed patients with a history of virologic failure or drug resistance, it can be more challenging to change therapy while still maintaining virologic suppression. In these patients, it may be difficult to know whether the discontinuation of one of the ARVs in a suppressive regimen constitutes the removal of a key regimen component that will not be adequately supplanted by one or more substituted ARVs. In this article, we review many of the clinical scenarios requiring ARV therapy modification in patients with stable virologic suppression and outline the strategies for modifying therapy while maintaining long-term virologic suppression.

  4. Suppression of Insulin Production and Secretion by a Decretin Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfa, Ronald W.; Park, Sangbin; Skelly, Kathleen-Rose; Poffenberger, Gregory; Jain, Nimit; Gu, Xueying; Kockel, Lutz; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yinghua; Powers, Alvin C.; Kim, Seung K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Decretins, hormones induced by fasting that suppress insulin production and secretion, have been postulated from classical human metabolic studies. From genetic screens, we identified Drosophila Limostatin (Lst), a peptide hormone that suppresses insulin secretion. Lst is induced by nutrient restriction in gut-associated endocrine cells. limostatin deficiency led to hyperinsulinemia, hypoglycemia and excess adiposity. A conserved 15-residue polypeptide encoded by limostatin suppressed secretion by insulin-producing cells. Targeted knockdown of CG9918, a Drosophila orthologue of Neuromedin U receptors (NMUR), in insulin-producing cells phenocopied limostatin deficiency, and attenuated insulin suppression by purified Lst, suggesting CG9918 encodes an Lst receptor. NMUR1 is expressed in islet β-cells, and purified NMU suppresses insulin secretion from human islets. A human mutant NMU variant that co-segregates with familial early-onset obesity and hyperinsulinemia fails to suppress insulin secretion. We propose Lst as an index member of an ancient hormone class called decretins, which suppress insulin output. PMID:25651184

  5. Enhancing Soil Quality and Plant Health Through Suppressive Organic Amendments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco M. Cazorla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The practice of adding organic amendments to crop soils is undergoing resurgence as an efficient way to restore soil organic matter content and to improve soil quality. The quantity and quality of the organic matter inputs affect soil physicochemical properties and soil microbiota, influencing different parameters such as microbial biomass and diversity, community structure and microbial activities or functions. The influence of organic amendments on soil quality has also effects on crop production and plant health. The enhancement of soil suppressiveness using organic amendments has been widely described, especially for soil-borne diseases. However, there is great variability in the effectiveness of suppression depending on the nature of the amendment, the crop, the pathogen, and the environmental conditions. Although the effects of organic amendments on soil properties have been widely studied, relationships between these properties and soil suppressiveness are not still well understood. Changes in soil physicochemical parameters may modulate the efficacy of suppression. However, the parameters more frequently associated to disease suppression appear to be related to soil microbiota, such as microbial biomass and activity, the abundance of specific microbial groups and some hydrolytic activities. This review focuses on the effect of organic amendments on soil microbial populations, diversity and activities; their ability to enhance plant health through disease suppression; and which of the parameters affected by the organic amendments are potentially involved in soil suppressiveness.

  6. Cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of TRPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, M-K; Wang, S

    2011-09-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppressed by cold, it is not known if cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of recombinant TRPV1. We demonstrate that cold strongly suppressed the activation of recombinant TRPV1 by multiple agonists and capsaicin-evoked currents in trigeminal ganglia neurons under normal and phosphorylated conditions. Cold-induced suppression was partially impaired in a TRPV1 mutant that lacked heat-mediated activation and potentiation. These results suggest that cold-induced suppression of TRPV1 may share a common molecular basis with heat-induced potentiation, and that allosteric inhibition may contribute, in part, to the cold-induced suppression. We also show that combination of cold and a specific antagonist of TRPV1 can produce an additive suppression. Our results provide a mechanistic basis for cold therapy and may enhance anti-nociceptive approaches that target TRPV1 for managing pain under inflammation and tissue injury, including that from tooth extraction.

  7. Dynamical Suppression of Decoherence in Two-Qubit Quantum Memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we have detailedly studied the dynamical suppression of the phase damping for the two-qubit quantum memory of Ising model by the quantum "bang-bang" technique. We find the sequence of periodic radiofrequency pulses repetitively to flip the state of the two-qubit system and quantitatively find that these pulses can be used to effectively suppress the phase damping decoherence of the quantum memory and freeze the system state into its initial state. The general sequence of periodic radio-frequency pulses to suppress the phase damping of multi-qubit of Ising model is also given.

  8. The Etiology and Outcome Analysis of Neonatal Burst Suppression EEG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lian; ZHOU Yanxia; XU Sanqing

    2007-01-01

    The neonatal burst suppression is a severe EEG pattern and always demonstrates serious damage of nerve system. But the outcome of these patients depends on the different etiology. A total of 256 cases of video EEG recordings were analyzed in order to summarize the etiology and outcome of burst suppression. The results showed that some patients in all 17 cases of burst suppression showed EEG improvement. The etiology was the dominant factor in long term outcome. It was sug-gested that effective video EEG monitoring is helpful for etiologic study and prognosis evaluation.

  9. Inhibitors of Nucleotidyltransferase Superfamily Enzymes Suppress Herpes Simplex Virus Replication

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Herpesviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that cause serious human diseases. Herpesvirus DNA replication depends on multiple processes typically catalyzed by nucleotidyltransferase superfamily (NTS) enzymes. Therefore, we investigated whether inhibitors of NTS enzymes would suppress replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. Eight of 42 NTS inhibitors suppressed HSV-1 and/or HSV-2 replication by >10-fold at 5 μM, with suppression at 50 μM reaching ∼1 million-fold. Five...

  10. A simple configuration setup for compton suppression spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hai, N X; Dien, N N; Tan, V H; Hoa, N D

    2013-01-01

    The fast timing, standard timing and easy timing are popular timing configurations of compton suppression spectroscopy. Such spectroscopes always use a module of coincidence or time-to-amplitude converter (TAC). A compton suppression spectroscopy with semi-timing configuration is presented in this paper. The semi-timing configuration is relatively simple and easy system setup, especially this spectroscopy does not need to use module of coincidence or TAC. The performance of spectroscopy was tested and summarized. The count rate background, full peak efficiency and the ratios of area/background of peaks in suppressed and unsuppressed modes were comparative.

  11. Suppression of strike-slip fault systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curren, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    depth. Selected areas on Earth with anomalously undeveloped strike-slip faulting where plate models would predict otherwise were compared with results from the analog model experiments in this study. Physical similarities between this model and Brothers Fault Zone (BFZ), Walker Lane (WL) and the South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) imply that strike-slip faulting may be suppressed at the surface in these regions due to the presence of pre-existing structures. Filled circles show offset required for breakthrough faulting, empty circles denote lower limit of breakthrough. Triangles show clay offset as a fraction of box offset. Note that clays with pre-existing structures showed larger offsets although breakthrough did not occur.

  12. Attention-dependent early cortical suppression contributes to crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; He, Yingchen; Zhu, Ziyun; Zhou, Tiangang; Peng, Yujia; Zhang, Xilin; Fang, Fang

    2014-08-01

    Crowding, the identification difficulty for a target in the presence of nearby flankers, is ubiquitous in spatial vision and is considered a bottleneck of object recognition and visual awareness. Despite its significance, the neural mechanisms of crowding are still unclear. Here, we performed event-related potential and fMRI experiments to measure the cortical interaction between the target and flankers in human subjects. We found that the magnitude of the crowding effect was closely associated with an early suppressive cortical interaction. The cortical suppression was reflected in the earliest event-related potential component (C1), which originated in V1, and in the BOLD signal in V1, but not other higher cortical areas. Intriguingly, spatial attention played a critical role in the manifestation of the suppression. These findings provide direct and converging evidence that attention-dependent V1 suppression contributes to crowding at a very early stage of visual processing.

  13. Effect of curd suppression in a milk replacer on physiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to determine the effect of abomasal curd suppression on selected blood profiles. ... Fasting (0 h) plasma free essential amino acid (EAA) concentration tended to be ... Keywords: Blood profiles, calves, casein curd formation, milk replacers, ...

  14. Acute self-suppression of corticosteroidogenesis in isolated adrenocortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsia, R V; Malamed, S

    1979-10-01

    The relation between steroidogenesis induced by ACTH and that induced by exogenous concentrations of glucocorticoids was studied in isolated adrenocortical cells. Exogenous corticosterone and cortisol, in concentrations within the production capacity of the adrenal gland, suppressed steroidogenesis induced by ACTH in rat and beef cells, respectively. The precursors pregnenolone and progesterone enhanced steroidogenesis in both rat and beef cells. Aldosterone in rat cells and 17 beta-estradiol in rat and beef cells had little if any effect on steroidogenesis. Either suppression or stimulation by exogenous steroids was acute, that is, after 2-h incubation for rat cells and 1-h incubation for beef cells. A direct suppressive action of end product glucocorticoids is indicated. This observed self-suppression of adrenocortical cells suggests the existence of a mechanism for the find adjustment of steroidogenesis that operates in addition to the classical control exerted by the anterior pituitary.

  15. Central nervous system stimulants and drugs that suppress appetite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise

    2014-01-01

    of the January 2012 to June 2013 publications on central nervous system stimulants and drugs that suppress appetite covers amphetamines (including metamfetamine, paramethoxyamfetamine and paramethoxymetamfetamine), fenfluramine and benfluorex, atomoxetine, methylphenidate, modafinil and armodafinil...

  16. Critical suppression of spin Seebeck effect by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Takashi; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Daimon, Shunsuke; Qiu, Zhiyong; Shiomi, Yuki; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-08-01

    The longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE) in Pt /Y3Fe5O12(YIG ) junction systems has been investigated at various magnetic fields and temperatures. We found that the LSSE voltage in a Pt/YIG-slab system is suppressed by applying high magnetic fields and this suppression is critically enhanced at low temperatures. The field-induced suppression of the LSSE in the Pt/YIG-slab system is too large at around room temperature to be explained simply by considering the effect of the Zeeman gap in magnon excitation. This result requires us to introduce a magnon-frequency-dependent mechanism into the scenario of LSSE; low-frequency magnons dominantly contribute to the LSSE. The magnetic field dependence of the LSSE voltage was observed to change by changing the thickness of YIG, suggesting that the thermospin conversion by the low-frequency magnons is suppressed in thin YIG films due to the long characteristic lengths of such magnons.

  17. Withaferin A Suppresses Liver Tumor Growth in a Nude Mouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also suppressed formation of cytoskeletal protein actin projection involved in cell migration. ... Wang et al. Trop J Pharm Res, June 2015; 14(6): 1006 growth factor. (VEGF) and matrix ..... Gunatilaka AA, Zhan CG, Sun D. Withaferin A targets.

  18. Sidelobe Suppression with Null Steering by Independent Weight Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar-Ullah Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A uniform linear array of n antenna elements can steer up to n-1 nulls. In situations where less than n-1 nulls are required to be steered, the existing algorithms have no criterion to utilize the remaining weights for sidelobe suppression. This work combines sidelobe suppression capability with null steering by independent weight control. For this purpose, the array factor is transformed as the product of two polynomials. One of the polynomials is used for null steering by independent weight control, while the second one is for sidelobe suppression whose coefficients or weights are determined by using convex optimization. Finally, a new structure is proposed to incorporate the product of two polynomials such that sidelobe suppression weights are decoupled from those of null steering weights. Simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  19. Assessment of compost for suppression of Fusarium oxysporum and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-08-28

    Aug 28, 2012 ... disease suppression in compost-amended soil was associated with the reduction in soil pathogen ... aspects include nutrient levels, organic matter, moisture,. pH, and ..... caused by several plant pathogens such as Fusarium.

  20. Optical frequency tripling with improved suppression and sideband selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Manoj P; Medeiros, Maria C R; Laurêncio, Paula; Mitchell, John E

    2011-12-12

    A novel optical dispersion tolerant millimetre-wave radio-over-fibre system using optical frequency tripling technique with enhanced and selectable sideband suppression is demonstrated. The implementation utilises cascaded optical modulators to achieve either an optical single sideband (OSSB) or double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) signal with high sideband suppression. Our analysis and simulation results indicate that the achievable suppression ratio of this configuration is only limited by other system factors such as optical noise and drifting of the operational conditions. The OSSB transmission system performance is assessed experimentally by the transport of 4 WiMax channels modulating a 10 GHz optical upconverted RF carrier as well as for optical frequency doubling and tripling. The 10 GHz and tripled carrier at 30 GHz are dispersion tolerant resulting both in an average relative constellation error (RCE) of -28.7 dB after 40 km of fibre.

  1. Unnoticed intrusions: dissociations of meta-consciousness in thought suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Benjamin; Smallwood, Jonathan; Fishman, Daniel J F; Mrazek, Michael D; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2013-09-01

    The current research investigates the interaction between thought suppression and individuals' explicit awareness of their thoughts. Participants in three experiments attempted to suppress thoughts of a prior romantic relationship and their success at doing so was measured using a combination of self-catching and experience-sampling. In addition to thoughts that individuals spontaneously noticed, individuals were frequently caught engaging in thoughts of their previous partner at experience-sampling probes. Furthermore, probe-caught thoughts were: (i) associated with stronger decoupling of attention from the environment, (ii) more likely to occur under cognitive load, (iii) more frequent for individuals with a desire to reconcile, and (iv) associated with individual differences in the tendency to suppress thoughts. Together, these data suggest that individuals can lack meta-awareness that they have begun to think about a topic they are attempting to suppress, providing novel insight into the cognitive processes that are involved in attempting to control undesired mental states.

  2. Probiotic Diversity Enhances Rhizosphere Microbiome Function and Plant Disease Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Hu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial communities associated with plant roots play an important role in the suppression of soil-borne pathogens, and multispecies probiotic consortia may enhance disease suppression efficacy. Here we introduced defined Pseudomonas species consortia into naturally complex microbial communities and measured the importance of Pseudomonas community diversity for their survival and the suppression of the bacterial plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in the tomato rhizosphere microbiome. The survival of introduced Pseudomonas consortia increased with increasing diversity. Further, high Pseudomonas diversity reduced pathogen density in the rhizosphere and decreased the disease incidence due to both intensified resource competition and interference with the pathogen. These results provide novel mechanistic insights into elevated pathogen suppression by diverse probiotic consortia in naturally diverse plant rhizospheres. Ecologically based community assembly rules could thus play a key role in engineering functionally reliable microbiome applications.

  3. Exploring dielectric elastomers as actuators for hand tremor suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Christopher R.; Kauffman, Jeffrey L.

    2017-04-01

    Pathological tremor results in undesired motion of body parts, with the greatest effect typically occurring in the hands. Since common treatment methods are ineffective in some patients or have risks associated with surgery or side effects, researchers are investigating mechanical means of tremor suppression. This work explores the viability of dielectric elastomers as the actuators in a tremor suppression control system. Dielectric elastomers have many properties similar to human muscle, making them a natural fit for integration into the human biomechanical system. This investigation develops a model of the integrated wrist-actuator system to determine actuator parameters that produce the necessary control authority without significantly affecting voluntary motion. Furthermore, this paper develops a control law for the actuator voltage to increase the effective viscous damping of the system. Simulations show excellent theoretical tremor suppression, demonstrating the potential for dielectric elastomers to suppress tremor while maximizing compatibility between the actuator and the human body.

  4. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  5. Ambiguity functions and noise floor suppression in random noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Sune R. J.

    2006-09-01

    Noise radar can be used in a great number of applications including SAR. The non-periodic waveform suppresses the range ambiguity and reduces the probability of intercept and interference. Due to the randomness of the waveform, a noise floor limiting the possible side lobe suppression accompanies the correlation integral involved. In strong clutter scenes with dominant reflectors, the induced noise floor can be too high and further suppression is needed. In this paper, the ambiguity function of random noise waveforms is first analyzed, and an improved formulation is introduced to include the noise floor effect. The use of mismatched filtering for improved sidelobe suppression is then discussed. Finally, an iterative subtraction algorithm is analyzed for noise floor cancellation in the presence of dominating reflectors. This method is successfully tested on random step frequency radar data and noise sodar data.

  6. Application of phase coherent transform to cloud clutter suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, L.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    This paper describes a tracking algorithm using frame-to-frame correlation with frequency domain clutter suppression. Clutter suppression was mechanized via a `Phase Coherent Transform` (PCT) approach. This approach was applied to explore the feasibility of tracking a post-boost rocket from a low earth orbit satellite with real cloud background data. Simulation results show that the PCT/correlation tracking algorithm can perform satisfactorily at signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) as low as 5 or 7 dB.

  7. Epigenetic Suppression of T-DNA Insertion Mutants in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yangbin Gao; Yunde Zhao

    2013-01-01

    T-DNA insertion mutants have been widely used to define gene functions in Arabidopsis and in other plants.Here,we report an unexpected phenomenon of epigenetic suppression of T-DNA insertion mutants in Arabidopsis.When the two T-DNA insertion mutants,yucl-1 and ag-TD,were crossed together,the defects in all of the ag-TD plants in the F2 population were partially suppressed regardless of the presence of yucl-1.Conversion of ag-TD to the suppressed ag-TD (named as ag-TD*) did not follow the laws of Mendelian genetics.The ag-TD* could be stably transmitted for many generations without reverting to ag-TD,and ag-TD* had the capacity to convert ag-TD to ag-TD*.We show that epigenetic suppression of T-DNA mutants is not a rare event,but certain structural features in the T-DNA mutants are needed in order for the suppression to take place.The suppressed T-DNA mutants we observed were all intronic T-DNA mutants and the T-DNA fragments in both the trigger T-DNA as well as in the suppressed T-DNA shared stretches of identical sequences.We demonstrate that the suppression of intronic T-DNA mutants is mediated by trans-interactions between two ToDNA insertions.This work shows that caution is needed when intronic T-DNA mutants are used.

  8. Robust control design techniques for active flutter suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, Hitay; Bachmann, Glen R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, an active flutter suppression problem is studied for a thin airfoil in unsteady aerodynamics. The mathematical model of this system is infinite dimensional because of Theodorsen's function which is irrational. Several second order approximations of Theodorsen's function are compared. A finite dimensional model is obtained from such an approximation. We use H infinity control techniques to find a robustly stabilizing controller for active flutter suppression.

  9. An Artefact suppressing fast-recovery myoelectric amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    An amplifier for recording myoelectric signals using surface electrodes has been developed. The special features are suppression of stimulation artefacts and motion artefacts from electrodes. It is designed for recording of myoelectric signals from a muscle that is being stimulated with short impulses. The artifact suppression is achieved by using fast-recovery instrumentation amplifiers and having a nonlinear feedback loop for automatic compensation of changes in DC-offset

  10. Voluntary driven elbow orthosis with speed controlled tremor suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil eHerrnstadt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Robotic technology is gradually becoming commonplace in the medical sector and in the service of patients. Medical conditions that have benefited from significant technological development include stroke, for which rehabilitation with robotic devices is administered, and surgery assisted by robots. Robotic devices have also been proposed for assistance of movement disorders. Pathological tremor, among the most common movement disorders, is such one example. In practice, the dissemination and availability of tremor suppression robotic systems has been limited. Devices in the marketplace tend to either be non-ambulatory or to target specific functions such as eating and drinking.We have developed a one degree-of-freedom (DOF elbow orthosis that could be worn by an individual with tremor. A speed controlled voluntary driven suppression approach is implemented with the orthosis. Typically tremor suppression methods estimate the tremor component of the signal and produce a canceling counterpart signal. The suggested approach, instead estimates the voluntary component of the motion. A controller then actuates the orthosis based on the voluntary signal while simultaneously rejecting the tremorous motion.In this work, we tested the suppressive orthosis using a 1 DOF robotic system that simulates the human arm. The suggested suppression approach does not require a model of the human arm. Moreover, the human input along with the orthosis forearm gravitational forces, of nonlinear nature, are considered as part of the disturbance to the suppression system. Therefore, the suppression system can be modeled linearly. Nevertheless, the orthosis forearm gravitational forces can be compensated by the suppression system.The electromechanical design of the orthosis is presented, and data from an Essential Tremor patient is used as the human input. Velocity tracking results demonstrate an RMS error of 0.31 rad/s, and a power spectral density shows a reduction of

  11. Mode of ATM-dependent suppression of chromosome translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, Motohiro, E-mail: motoyama@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We addressed how ATM suppresses frequency of chromosome translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses translocation frequency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM and DNA-PKcs function in a common pathway to suppress translocation. -- Abstract: It is well documented that deficiency in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein leads to elevated frequency of chromosome translocation, however, it remains poorly understood how ATM suppresses translocation frequency. In the present study, we addressed the mechanism of ATM-dependent suppression of translocation frequency. To know frequency of translocation events in a whole genome at once, we performed centromere/telomere FISH and scored dicentric chromosomes, because dicentric and translocation occur with equal frequency and by identical mechanism. By centromere/telomere FISH analysis, we confirmed that chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of ATM causes 2 to 2.5-fold increase in dicentric frequency at first mitosis after 2 Gy of gamma-irradiation in G0/G1. The FISH analysis revealed that ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses dicentric frequency, since RNAi-mediated knockdown of p53 elevated dicentric frequency by 1.5-fold. We found ATM also suppresses dicentric occurrence independently of its checkpoint role, as ATM inhibitor showed additional effect on dicentric frequency in the context of p53 depletion and Chk1/2 inactivation. Epistasis analysis using chemical inhibitors revealed that ATM kinase functions in the same pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to suppress dicentric frequency. From the results in the present study, we conclude that ATM minimizes translocation frequency through its commitment to G1 checkpoint and DNA double-strand break repair pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-PKcs.

  12. Quasiperiodicity and suppression of multistability in nonlinear dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2017-06-01

    It has been known that noise can suppress multistability by dynamically connecting coexisting attractors in the system which are otherwise in separate basins of attraction. The purpose of this mini-review is to argue that quasiperiodic driving can play a similar role in suppressing multistability. A concrete physical example is provided where quasiperiodic driving was demonstrated to eliminate multistability completely to generate robust chaos in a semiconductor superlattice system.

  13. Signal Enhancement and Suppression During Visual-Spatial Selective Attention

    OpenAIRE

    Couperus, J. W.; Mangun, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    Selective attention involves the relative enhancement of relevant versus irrelevant stimuli. However, whether this relative enhancement involves primarily enhancement of attended stimuli, or suppression of irrelevant stimuli, remains controversial. Moreover, if both enhancement and suppression are involved, whether they result from a single mechanism or separate mechanisms during attentional control or selection is not known. In two experiments using a spatial cuing paradigm with task-relevan...

  14. Neural Correlates of Direct and Indirect Suppression of Autobiographical Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima eNoreen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that there are two possible mechanisms by which particular target memories can be intentionally forgotten. Direct suppression, which involves the suppression of the unwanted memory directly, and is dependent on a fronto-hippocampal modulatory process, and, memory substitution, which includes directing one's attention to an alternative memory in order to prevent the unwanted memory from coming to mind, and involves engaging the caudal prefrontal cortex (cPFC and the mid-ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC regions. Research to date, however, has investigated the neural basis of memory suppression of relatively simple information. The aim of the current study was to use fMRI to identify the neural mechanisms associated with the suppression of autobiographical memories. In the present study, 22 participants generated memories in response to a series of cue words. In a second session, participants learnt these cue-memory pairings, and were subsequently presented with a cue word and asked either to recall (think or to suppress (no-think the associated memory, or to think of an alternative memory in order to suppress the original memory (memory-substitution. Our findings demonstrated successful forgetting effects in the no-think and memory substitution conditions. Although we found no activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex there was reduced hippocampal activation during direct suppression. In the memory substitution condition, however, we failed to find increased activation in the cPFC and VLPFC regions. Our findings suggest that the suppression of autobiographical memories may rely on different neural mechanisms to those established for other types of material in memory.

  15. Methods for suppressing isomerization of olefin metathesis products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firth, Bruce E.; Kirk, Sharon E.

    2015-10-27

    A method for suppressing isomerization of an olefin metathesis product produced in a metathesis reaction includes adding an isomerization suppression agent that includes nitric acid to a mixture that includes the olefin metathesis product and residual metathesis catalyst from the metathesis reaction under conditions that are sufficient to passivate at least a portion of the residual metathesis catalyst. Methods of refining a natural oil are described.

  16. Predictors for partial suppression of spermatogenesis of hormonal male contraception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Wen Li; Yi-Qun Gu

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To analyze factors influencing the efficacy of hormonal suppression of spermatogenesis for male contraception. Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted, involving 43 subjects, who did not achieve azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia when given monthly injections of 500 mg testosterone undecanoate (TU), defined as partial suppressors compared with 855 subjects who had suppressed spermatogenesis (complete suppressors). Sperm density, serum testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations at the baseline and the suppression phase were compared between partial and complete suppressors. Polymorphisms of androgen receptor (AR) and three single nucleotide variants and their haplotypes of FSH receptor (FSHR) genes determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing technique were compared between 29 partial and 34 complete suppressors. Results: Baseline serum LH level was higher and serum LH as well as FSH level during the suppression phase was less suppressed in partial suppressors. Additionally, in a logistic regression analysis larger testis volume, higher serum FSH concentrations alone, or interaction of serum LH, FSH, testosterone and sperm concentrations were associated with degree of suppression. The distribution of polymorphisms of AR or FSH receptor genes did not differ between partial and complete suppressors. In cases with incomplete FSH suppression (FSH > 0.2 IU/L), the chances of reaching azoospermia were 1.5 times higher in the subjects with more than 22 CAG triplet repeats. Conclusion: Partial suppression of spermatogenesis induced by 500 mg TU monthly injections is weakly influenced by hormonal and clinical features but not polymorphism in AR and FSHR genes.

  17. Temporal suppression and augmentation of click-evoked otoacoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhulst, Sarah; Harte, James; Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates and models temporal suppression of click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs). This suppression-effect is created when a suppressor-click is presented close in time to a test-click. The analysis was carried out for short time-frames of short- and long-latency CEOAEs. The ...... phenomenologically using compression or expansion of the system output. This was obtained by shifting the operating-point on the input-output-characteristic in relation to the ICI....

  18. Immune Suppression by Dermal Application of JP-8 Jet Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-13

    transmitting the immunosuppressive signal from the skin to the immune system ( Limon -Flores, et al., Mast Cells mediate the Immune suppression Induced by...human and murine data. Nat Rev Immunol 7, 93-104. Byrne, S. N., Limon -Flores, A. Y. and Ullrich, S. E. (2008). Mast cell migration from the skin to...Ramos, G., Limon -Flores, A. Y. and Ullrich, S. E. (2007). Dermal exposure to jet fuel suppresses delayed-type hypersensitivity: a critical role

  19. A sidelobe suppression method with experiment for underwater acoustic imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,a sidelobe suppression method using nonuniformly spaced array with aperture apodization processing is proposed for underwater acoustic imaging in near field,which is studied both in theory and experiment.The focused beamforming based on spherical wave propagation theory is used in the method.Firstly,the nonuniform array with low sidelobe is designed for suppressing the sidelobe of one-way beam pattern by spacing perturbation.Then, applying the aperture apodization technique to underwater ac...

  20. Azimuth Phase Coding for Range Ambiguity Suppression in SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Kusk, Anders

    2004-01-01

    A novel ambiguity suppression technique is proposed. Range ambiguities in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images are eliminated with an azimuth filter after having applied an azimuth phase modulation to the transmitted pulses and a corresponding demodulation to the received pulses. The technique...... by the antenna elevation dimension. The fundamental antenna area constraint still applies, but the PRF can be chosen with more freedom. In addition to ambiguity suppression, potential applications include nadir return elimination and signal-to-noise ratio improvement....

  1. A Designated Harmonic Suppression Technology for Sampled SPWM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ping

    2005-01-01

    Sampled SPWM is an excellent VVVF method of motor speed control, meanwhile the harmonic components of the output wave impairs its applications in practice. A designated harmonic suppression technology is presented for sampled SPWM, which is an improved algorithm for the harmonic suppression in high voltage and high frequency spectrum. As the technology is applied in whole speed adjusting range, the voltage can be conveniently controlled and high frequency harmonic of SP WM is also improved.

  2. Social responses to expressive suppression: The role of personality judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackman, Allison M; Srivastava, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    Why do people who suppress their emotion-expressive behavior have difficulty forming close, supportive relationships? Previous studies have found that suppression disrupts the dynamics of social interactions and existing relationships. We evaluated a complementary hypothesis: that suppression functions as a behavioral cue leading others to form negative personality impressions of suppressors, even at zero-acquaintance. In 2 studies, participants reported personality judgments and other impressions of targets who either suppressed or expressed their emotion-expressive behavior in response to amusing or sad film clips. In findings replicated across studies, targets who suppressed either amusement or sadness were judged as less extraverted, less agreeable, and more interpersonally avoidant and anxious than targets who expressed emotions, and participants were less interested in affiliating with suppressors compared with expressers. Effects were amplified when targets suppressed amusement (compared with sadness) and when participants knew the emotional context (compared with when they did not) and, thus, could form expectations about what emotions targets should be showing. Extraversion and agreeableness judgments mediated the effect of suppression on participants' disinterest in affiliating. In Study 2, which extended Study 1 in several ways, effects were pronounced for the enthusiasm aspect of extraversion and the compassion aspect of agreeableness. We also found evidence that judgments of suppressors do not simply fall between neutral and fully expressing targets; rather, judgments of suppressors are qualitatively different. We discuss implications for understanding the social consequences of emotion regulation-in particular, how beyond disrupting relationships, suppression may prevent some relationships from even forming in the first place.

  3. C-MYC-induced upregulation of lncRNA SNHG12 regulates cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ouchen; Yang, Fan; Liu, Yehuan; Lv, Lin; Ma, Ruimin; Chen, Chuanzhi; Wang, Jiao; Tan, Qiufan; Cheng, Yue; Xia, Erjie; Chen, Yizuo; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one of the most aggressive subtypes of breast cancer, with a significantly higher recurrence and mortality rate. There is an urgent need to uncover the mechanism underlying TNBC and establish therapeutic targets. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a series of biological functions and provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism of cancer. Based on their expression specificity and large number, lncRNAs are likely to serve as the basis for clinical applications in oncology. In our previous study, we utilized RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to explore the lncRNAs expression profiles in TNBC and identified that small nucleolar RNA host gene 12 (SNHG12) was remarkably increased in TNBC. However, the role of SNHG12 in TNBC has not been clarified. Herein, we determine that SNHG12 is upregulated in TNBC, and its high expression is significantly correlated with tumor size and lymph node metastasis. Mechanistic investigations show that SNHG12 is a direct transcriptional target of c-MYC. Silencing SNHG12 expression inhibits TNBC cells proliferation and apoptosis promotion, whereas SNHG12 overexpression has the opposite effect. In addition, we reveal that SNHG12 may promote cells migration by regulating MMP13 expression. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report indicating that SNHG12 is involved in breast cancer. Taken together, our findings suggest that SNHG12 contributes to the oncogenic potential of TNBC and may be a promising therapeutic target.

  4. Brief inactivation of c-Myc is not sufficient for sustained regression of c-Myc-induced tumours of pancreatic islets and skin epidermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zervou Sevasti

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumour regression observed in many conditional mouse models following oncogene inactivation provides the impetus to develop, and a platform to preclinically evaluate, novel therapeutics to inactivate specific oncogenes. Inactivating single oncogenes, such as c-Myc, can reverse even advanced tumours. Intriguingly, transient c-Myc inactivation proved sufficient for sustained osteosarcoma regression; the resulting osteocyte differentiation potentially explaining loss of c-Myc's oncogenic properties. But would this apply to other tumours? Results We show that brief inactivation of c-Myc does not sustain tumour regression in two distinct tissue types; tumour cells in pancreatic islets and skin epidermis continue to avoid apoptosis after c-Myc reactivation, by virtue of Bcl-xL over-expression or a favourable microenvironment, respectively. Moreover, tumours progress despite reacquiring a differentiated phenotype and partial loss of vasculature during c-Myc inactivation. Interestingly, reactivating c-Myc in β-cell tumours appears to result not only in further growth of the tumour, but also re-expansion of the accompanying angiogenesis and more pronounced β-cell invasion (adenocarcinoma. Conclusions Given that transient c-Myc inactivation could under some circumstances produce sustained tumour regression, the possible application of this potentially less toxic strategy in treating other tumours has been suggested. We show that brief inactivation of c-Myc fails to sustain tumour regression in two distinct models of tumourigenesis: pancreatic islets and skin epidermis. These findings challenge the potential for cancer therapies aimed at transient oncogene inactivation, at least under those circumstances where tumour cell differentiation and alteration of epigenetic context fail to reinstate apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that treatment schedules will need to be informed by knowledge of the molecular basis and environmental context of any given cancer.

  5. Myc induced miR-144/451 contributes to the acquired imatinib resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Li, E-mail: liuli029@yahoo.cn [Department of Hematology, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Wang, Sitao; Chen, Renan; Wu, Yanlan; Zhang, Bei; Huang, Siyong; Zhang, Jingyi; Xiao, Fang; Wang, Meng; Liang, Yingmin [Department of Hematology, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased c-myc expression in imatinib resistant CML cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc contributes the imatinib resistance in CML cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc transcriptionally reduces the expression of miR-144/451 in K562R cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Restoration of miR-144/451 reverses the resistance of K562R cells to imatinib. -- Abstract: Imatinib resistance remains the big hurdle for CML therapy. Previous study reveals that c-myc is important for bcr-abl CML cell proliferation, while its role in imatinib resistance is largely unknown. In this study, we first found that c-myc expression is upregulated in imatinib resistant K562R cells, which in turn enhances the expression of miR-144/451. Knockdown of c-myc or restoration of miR-144/451 in the K562R cells sensitizes K562R cells to imatinib therapy. Our study here reveals an regulatory pathway between myc and miR-144/451 and highlights that targeting either myc or miR-144/451 might be valuable for eliminating the imatinib resistant CML cells.

  6. Mechanisms for c-myc Induced Mouse Mammary Gland Carcinogenesis and for the Synergistic Role of TGF(alpha) in the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    lymphomas, but not mammary RR, Lichtsteiner S, Chin L, Morin GB & DePinho RA 1999 carcinomas in transgenic mice. Oncogene 11 181-190. Telomerase...NSamprezS, ivire M & oua P 182 strgen Johnston LA, Prober DA, Edgar BA, Eisemnan RN & Gallant PHannouche N, Samperez 5, Riviere R & Jouan P 1982 Estrogen

  7. Proactive selective response suppression is implemented via the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, D S Adnan; Cai, Weidong; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Aron, Adam R

    2013-08-14

    In the welter of everyday life, people can stop particular response tendencies without affecting others. A key requirement for such selective suppression is that subjects know in advance which responses need stopping. We hypothesized that proactively setting up and implementing selective suppression relies on the basal ganglia and, specifically, regions consistent with the inhibitory indirect pathway for which there is scant functional evidence in humans. Consistent with this hypothesis, we show, first, that the degree of proactive motor suppression when preparing to stop selectively (indexed by transcranial magnetic stimulation) corresponds to striatal, pallidal, and frontal activation (indexed by functional MRI). Second, we demonstrate that greater striatal activation at the time of selective stopping correlates with greater behavioral selectivity. Third, we show that people with striatal and pallidal volume reductions (those with premanifest Huntington's disease) have both absent proactive motor suppression and impaired behavioral selectivity when stopping. Thus, stopping goals are used to proactively set up specific basal ganglia channels that may then be triggered to implement selective suppression. By linking this suppression to the striatum and pallidum, these results provide compelling functional evidence in humans of the basal ganglia's inhibitory indirect pathway.

  8. Chaos Suppression in a Sine Square Map through Nonlinear Coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eduardo L. Brugnago; Paulo C. Rech

    2011-01-01

    We study a pair of nonlinearly coupled identical chaotic sine square maps.More specifically,we investigate the chaos suppression associated with the variation of two parameters.Two-dimensional parameter-space regions where the chaotic dynamics of the individual chaotic sine square map is driven towards regular dynamics are delimited.Additionally,the dynamics of the coupled system is numerically characterized as the parameters are changed.In recent years,many efforts have been devoted to chaos suppression in a nonlinear dynamics field.Iglesias et al.[1] reported a chaos suppression method through numerical truncation and rounding errors,with applications in discrete-time systems.Hénon map[2] and the Burgers map[3] were used to illustrate the method.A method of feedback impulsive chaos suppression was introduced by Osipov et al.[4]It is an algorithm of suppressing chaos in continuoustime dissipative systems with an external impulsive force,whose necessary condition is a reduction of the continuous flow to a discrete-time one-dimensional map.%We study a pair of nonlinearly coupled identical chaotic sine square maps. More specifically, we investigate the chaos suppression associated with the variation of two parameters. Two-dimensional parameter-space regions where the chaotic dynamics of the individual chaotic sine square map is driven towards regular dynamics are delimited. Additionally, the dynamics of the coupled system is numerically characterized as the parameters are changed.

  9. Memory suppression is an active process that improves over childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M Paz-Alonso

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We all have memories that we prefer not to think about. The ability to suppress retrieval of unwanted memories has been documented in behavioral and neuroimaging research using the Think/No-Think (TNT paradigm with adults. Attempts to stop memory retrieval are associated with increased activation of lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC and concomitant reduced activation in medial temporal lobe (MTL structures. However, the extent to which children have the ability to actively suppress their memories is unknown. This study investigated memory suppression in middle childhood using the TNT paradigm. Forty children aged 8 to 12 and 30 young adults were instructed either to remember (Think or suppress (No-Think the memory of the second word of previously studied word-pairs, when presented with the first member as a reminder. They then performed two different cued recall tasks, testing their memory for the second word in each pair after the Think/No-Think phase using the same first studied word within the pair as a cue (intra-list cue and also an independent cue (extra-list cue. Children exhibited age-related improvements in memory suppression from age 8 to 12 in both memory tests, against a backdrop of overall improvements in declarative memory over this age range. These findings suggest that memory suppression is an active process that develops during late childhood, likely due to an age-related refinement in the ability to engage PFC to down-regulate activity in areas involved in episodic retrieval.

  10. Suppression of aggressive rorschach responses among violent offenders and nonoffenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjestorf, Sue TaVoularis; Viglione, Donald J; Lamb, Judy D; Giromini, Luciano

    2013-10-01

    This Rorschach study explored the suppression of aggression content when violent offenders and nonoffenders are asked to present themselves as not posing a threat of dangerousness in a court role-playing context. Aggressive content and complexity in this suppressive role-play context was compared to a neutral control condition. A total of 41 participants, approximately half violent offenders and half nonoffenders took the Rorschach under both conditions. Results indicate that both groups suppressed aggression content on the Rorschach without altering response complexity. This large effect size for testing condition may partly explain the inconsistencies across previous studies. It is possible that violent offenders have typically been tested in highly suppressive conditions whereas nonoffender or normative groups may have been tested in relatively low suppression conditions. If so, aggression score differences may be a reflection of the testing condition, not group differences. Both instructional sets produced similar levels of complexity, so that individuals do not simplify responses when they screen out aggressive attributions. Violent offenders did not differ from nonviolent offenders in terms of aggression content, but did produce more simplistic records. In addition, this study also undertook a semantic, textual analysis and found that individuals in the suppressive condition tended to eliminate many response elaborations, particularly those with negative of threatening connotations.

  11. Suppression of pool fires with HRC-125 in a simulated engine nacelle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyser, David R. (INS, Inc., Lexington Park, MD); Hewson, John C.

    2007-06-01

    CFD simulations are conducted to predict the distribution of fire suppressant in an engine nacelle and to predict the suppression of pool fires by the application of this suppressant. In the baseline configuration, which is based on an installed system, suppressant is injected through four nozzles at a rate fast enough to suppress all simulated pool fires. Variations that reduce the mass of the suppression system (reducing the impact of the suppression system on meeting mission needs) are considered, including a reduction in the rate of suppressant injection, a reduction in the mass of suppressant and a reduction in the number of nozzles. In general, these variations should work to reduce the effectiveness of the suppression system, but the CFD results point out certain changes that have negligible impact, at least for the range of phenomena considered here. The results are compared with measurements where available. Comparisons with suppressant measurements are reasonable. A series of twenty-three fire suppression tests were conducted to check the predictions. The pre-test predictions were generally successful in identifying the range of successful suppression tests. In two separate cases, each where one nozzle of the suppression system was capped, the simulation results did indicate a failure to suppress for a condition where the tests indicated successful suppression. When the test-suppressant discharge rate was reduced by roughly 25%, the tests were in agreement with the predictions. That is, the simulations predict a failure to suppress slightly before observed in these cases.

  12. Arsenite suppression of BMP signaling in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Marjorie A.; Qin, Qin [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States); Hu, Qin; Zhao, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Rice, Robert H., E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Arsenic, a human skin carcinogen, suppresses differentiation of cultured keratinocytes. Exploring the mechanism of this suppression revealed that BMP-6 greatly increased levels of mRNA for keratins 1 and 10, two of the earliest differentiation markers expressed, a process prevented by co-treatment with arsenite. BMP also stimulated, and arsenite suppressed, mRNA for FOXN1, an important transcription factor driving early keratinocyte differentiation. Keratin mRNAs increased slowly after BMP-6 addition, suggesting they are indirect transcriptional targets. Inhibition of Notch1 activation blocked BMP induction of keratins 1 and 10, while FOXN1 induction was largely unaffected. Supporting a requirement for Notch1 signaling in keratin induction, BMP increased levels of activated Notch1, which was blocked by arsenite. BMP also greatly decreased active ERK, while co-treatment with arsenite maintained active ERK. Inhibition of ERK signaling mimicked BMP by inducing keratin and FOXN1 mRNAs and by increasing active Notch1, effects blocked by arsenite. Of 6 dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) targeting ERK, two were induced by BMP unless prevented by simultaneous exposure to arsenite and EGF. Knockdown of DUSP2 or DUSP14 using shRNAs greatly reduced FOXN1 and keratins 1 and 10 mRNA levels and their induction by BMP. Knockdown also decreased activated Notch1, keratin 1 and keratin 10 protein levels, both in the presence and absence of BMP. Thus, one of the earliest effects of BMP is induction of DUSPs, which increases FOXN1 transcription factor and activates Notch1, both required for keratin gene expression. Arsenite prevents this cascade by maintaining ERK signaling, at least in part by suppressing DUSP expression. - Highlights: • BMP induces FOXN1 transcription. • BMP induces DUSP2 and DUSP14, suppressing ERK activation. • Arsenite suppresses levels of phosphorylated Smad1/5 and FOXN1 and DUSP mRNA. • These actions rationalize arsenite suppression of keratinocyte

  13. Tinnitus suppression by electric stimulation of the auditory nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Erica Chang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant (CI has been observed to suppress tinnitus, but parameters of an effective electric stimulus remain unexplored. Here we used CI research processors to systematically vary pulse rate, electrode place, and current amplitude of electric stimuli, and measure their effects on tinnitus loudness and stimulus loudness as a function of stimulus duration. Thirteen tinnitus subjects who used CIs were tested, with 9 (70% being Responders who achieved greater than 30% tinnitus loudness reduction in response to at least one stimulation condition and the remaining 4 (30% being Non-Responders who had less than 30% tinnitus loudness reduction in response to any stimulus condition tested. Despite large individual variability, several interesting observations were made between stimulation parameters, tinnitus characteristics, and tinnitus suppression. If a subject’s tinnitus was suppressed by one stimulus, then it was more likely to be suppressed by another stimulus. If the tinnitus contained a pulsating component, then it would be more likely suppressed by a given combination of stimulus parameters than tinnitus without these components. There was also a disassociation between the subjects’ clinical speech processor and our research processor in terms of their effectiveness in tinnitus suppression. Finally, an interesting dichotomy was observed between loudness adaptation to electric stimuli and their effects on tinnitus loudness, with the Responders exhibiting higher degrees of loudness adaptation than the Non-Responders. Although the mechanisms underlying these observations remain to be resolved, their clinical implications are clear. When using a CI to manage tinnitus, the clinical processor that is optimized for speech perception needs to be customized for optimal tinnitus suppression.

  14. A simplified model of decontamination by BWR steam suppression pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A.

    1997-05-01

    Phenomena that can decontaminate aerosol-laden gases sparging through steam suppression pools of boiling water reactors during reactor accidents are described. Uncertainties in aerosol properties, aerosol behavior within gas bubbles, and bubble behavior in plumes affect predictions of decontamination by steam suppression pools. Uncertainties in the boundary and initial conditions that are dictated by the progression of severe reactor accidents and that will affect predictions of decontamination by steam suppression pools are discussed. Ten parameters that characterize boundary and initial condition uncertainties, nine parameters that characterize aerosol property and behavior uncertainties, and eleven parameters that characterize uncertainties in the behavior of bubbles in steam suppression pools are identified. Ranges for the values of these parameters and subjective probability distributions for parametric values within the ranges are defined. These uncertain parameters are used in Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses to develop uncertainty distributions for the decontamination that can be achieved by steam suppression pools and the size distribution of aerosols that do emerge from such pools. A simplified model of decontamination by steam suppression pools is developed by correlating features of the uncertainty distributions for total decontamination factor, DF(total), mean size of emerging aerosol particles, d{sub p}, and the standard deviation of the emerging aerosol size distribution, {sigma}, with pool depth, H. Correlations of the median values of the uncertainty distributions are suggested as the best estimate of decontamination by suppression pools. Correlations of the 10 percentile and 90 percentile values of the uncertainty distributions characterize the uncertainty in the best estimates. 295 refs., 121 figs., 113 tabs.

  15. Suppressive effects of anthrax lethal toxin on megakaryopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Kong Chen

    Full Text Available Anthrax lethal toxin (LT is a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis. LT challenge suppresses platelet counts and platelet function in mice, however, the mechanism responsible for thrombocytopenia remains unclear. LT inhibits cellular mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, which are vital pathways responsible for cell survival, differentiation, and maturation. One of the MAPKs, the MEK1/2-extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway, is particularly important in megakaryopoiesis. This study evaluates the hypothesis that LT may suppress the progenitor cells of platelets, thereby inducing thrombocytopenic responses. Using cord blood-derived CD34(+ cells and mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells to perform in vitro differentiation, this work shows that LT suppresses megakaryopoiesis by reducing the survival of megakaryocytes. Thrombopoietin treatments can reduce thrombocytopenia, megakaryocytic suppression, and the quick onset of lethality in LT-challenged mice. These results suggest that megakaryocytic suppression is one of the mechanisms by which LT induces thrombocytopenia. These findings may provide new insights for developing feasible approaches against anthrax.

  16. EBF noise suppression and aerodynamic penalties. [Externally Blown Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinzie, L. J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic tests were conducted at model scale to determine the noise produced in the flyover and sideline planes at reduced separation distances between the nozzle exhaust plane and the flaps of an under-the-wing (UTW) externally blown flap (EBF) configuration in its approach attitude. Tests were also made to determine the noise suppression effectiveness of two types of passive devices which were located on the jet impingement surfaces of the configuration. In addition, static aerodynamic performance data were obtained to evaluate the penalties produced by these suppression devices. Broadband low frequency noise reductions were achieved by reducing the separation distance between the nozzle and flaps. However, mid and high frequency noise was produced which exceeded that of the reference configuration. Two passive noise suppression devices located on the flaps produced moderate to large noise reductions at reduced separation distances. Consideration of the static aerodynamic performance data obtained for the configurations tested suggests that specific broadband noise suppression characteristics may be obtained through a trade-off with aerodynamic performance penalties by the careful selection of suppression devices.

  17. Detection of burst suppression patterns in EEG using recurrence rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Ren, Yongshao; Li, Duan; Voss, Logan; Sleigh, Jamie; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is a unique electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern commonly seen in cases of severely reduced brain activity such as overdose of general anesthesia. It is important to detect burst suppression reliably during the administration of anesthetic or sedative agents, especially for cerebral-protective treatments in various neurosurgical diseases. This study investigates recurrent plot (RP) analysis for the detection of the burst suppression pattern (BSP) in EEG. The RP analysis is applied to EEG data containing BSPs collected from 14 patients. Firstly we obtain the best selection of parameters for RP analysis. Then, the recurrence rate (RR), determinism (DET), and entropy (ENTR) are calculated. Then RR was selected as the best BSP index one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple comparison tests. Finally, the performance of RR analysis is compared with spectral analysis, bispectral analysis, approximate entropy, and the nonlinear energy operator (NLEO). ANOVA and multiple comparison tests showed that the RR could detect BSP and that it was superior to other measures with the highest sensitivity of suppression detection (96.49%, P = 0.03). Tracking BSP patterns is essential for clinical monitoring in critically ill and anesthetized patients. The purposed RR may provide an effective burst suppression detector for developing new patient monitoring systems.

  18. Detection of Burst Suppression Patterns in EEG Using Recurrence Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhu Liang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression is a unique electroencephalogram (EEG pattern commonly seen in cases of severely reduced brain activity such as overdose of general anesthesia. It is important to detect burst suppression reliably during the administration of anesthetic or sedative agents, especially for cerebral-protective treatments in various neurosurgical diseases. This study investigates recurrent plot (RP analysis for the detection of the burst suppression pattern (BSP in EEG. The RP analysis is applied to EEG data containing BSPs collected from 14 patients. Firstly we obtain the best selection of parameters for RP analysis. Then, the recurrence rate (RR, determinism (DET, and entropy (ENTR are calculated. Then RR was selected as the best BSP index one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and multiple comparison tests. Finally, the performance of RR analysis is compared with spectral analysis, bispectral analysis, approximate entropy, and the nonlinear energy operator (NLEO. ANOVA and multiple comparison tests showed that the RR could detect BSP and that it was superior to other measures with the highest sensitivity of suppression detection (96.49%,  P=0.03. Tracking BSP patterns is essential for clinical monitoring in critically ill and anesthetized patients. The purposed RR may provide an effective burst suppression detector for developing new patient monitoring systems.

  19. Attention selection, distractor suppression and N2pc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Veronica; Turatto, Massimo; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    N2pc is generally interpreted as the electrocortical correlate of the distractor-suppression mechanisms through which attention selection takes place in humans. Here, we present data that challenge this common N2pc interpretation. In Experiment 1, multiple distractors induced greater N2pc amplitudes even when they facilitated target identification, despite the suppression account of the N2pc predicted the contrary; in Experiment 2, spatial proximity between target and distractors did not affect the N2pc amplitude, despite resulting in more interference in response times; in Experiment 3, heterogeneous distractors delayed response times but did not elicit a greater N2pc relative to homogeneous distractors again in contrast with what would have predicted the suppression hypothesis. These results do not support the notion that the N2pc unequivocally mirrors distractor-suppression processes. We propose that the N2pc indexes mechanisms involved in identifying and localizing relevant stimuli in the scene through enhancement of their features and not suppression of distractors.

  20. Central administration of neuromedin U suppresses food intake in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisoyama, Hiroshi; Honda, Kazuhisa; Saneyasu, Takaoki; Sugahara, Kunio; Hasegawa, Shin

    2007-06-08

    The appetite-suppressive action of brain-gut peptides is similar in both chickens and mammals. In mammals, the brain-gut peptide neuromedin U (NMU) suppresses food intake via hypothalamic neuropeptides, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), oxytocin, and arginine-vasopressin. In chickens, central administration of CRF, oxytocin, or arginine-vasotocin (AVT, a nonmammalian equivalent of arginine-vasopressin) suppresses food intake. However, the anorexigenic action of NMU in chickens has not yet been identified. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of the central administration of NMU on food intake and hypothalamic mRNA levels of CRF, AVT and mesotocin (a nonmammalian equivalent of oxytocin) in chicks. Intracerebroventricular administration of NMU in chicks significantly suppressed food intake and induced wing-flapping behavior. NMU also significantly upregulated mRNA expression of CRF and AVT, but did not influence mRNA expression of mesotocin in the hypothalamus. These results suggest that NMU functions as an appetite-suppressive peptide via CRF and AVT in the central nervous system in chicks.

  1. Leptin Suppresses Mouse Taste Cell Responses to Sweet Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Kenshi; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ichiro; Margolskee, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is known to selectively suppress neural and behavioral responses to sweet-tasting compounds. However, the molecular basis for the effect of leptin on sweet taste is not known. Here, we report that leptin suppresses sweet taste via leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) and KATP channels expressed selectively in sweet-sensitive taste cells. Ob-Rb was more often expressed in taste cells that expressed T1R3 (a sweet receptor component) than in those that expressed glutamate-aspartate transporter (a marker for Type I taste cells) or GAD67 (a marker for Type III taste cells). Systemically administered leptin suppressed taste cell responses to sweet but not to bitter or sour compounds. This effect was blocked by a leptin antagonist and was absent in leptin receptor–deficient db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity. Blocking the KATP channel subunit sulfonylurea receptor 1, which was frequently coexpressed with Ob-Rb in T1R3-expressing taste cells, eliminated the effect of leptin on sweet taste. In contrast, activating the KATP channel with diazoxide mimicked the sweet-suppressing effect of leptin. These results indicate that leptin acts via Ob-Rb and KATP channels that are present in T1R3-expressing taste cells to selectively suppress their responses to sweet compounds. PMID:26116698

  2. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis.

  3. Investigation of a hybrid structure gaseous detector for ion backflow suppression suppression

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, YuLian; Hu, BiTao

    2016-01-01

    A new concept for ion backflow suppression in future time projection chamber with Micropattern Gas Detectors readout is presented. It is a hybrid structure cascaded Gas Electron Multiplier with Micromegas with the goal to reduce ion backflow from the amplification region towards the drift volume. Gas Electron Multiplier also acting as a preamplifer and shares gas gain with Micromegas. In this way a lower voltage difference has to be applied to the Micromegas and risk of sparking is reduced. Feasibility tests for the hybrid detector is performed using an $^{55}$Fe X-ray source to evaluate the energy resolution, its gain properties and the ion backflow. %The properties of this novel structure in terms of gain and ion backflow are investigated. The energy resolution is better than 27$\\%$ FWHM for 5.9 keV X-rays. It is demonstrated that at a gain up to 6000, a backflow ratio less than 0.3$\\%$ is reachable in the hybrid readout structure.

  4. Stroop interference and negative priming (NP) suppression in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayas, J; Fuentes, L J; Ballesteros, S

    2012-01-01

    Age-related differences in the reduction of Stroop interference were explored by comparing the performance of 18 younger (of mean age: 30.0±3.9 years) and 18 older healthy adults (of mean age: 75±7.2 years) in a color-word Stroop task. The aim of this study was to determine whether a decrease in the efficiency of inhibitory mechanisms associated with aging could account for age-related differences in the ability to suppress a pre-potent response. Participants performed a Stroop task to assess Stroop interference and NP suppression concurrently. Results showed a greater Stroop interference in older than in young adults. On the other hand, the NP effect was only reliable in the younger group, the older group not showing NP suppression. These findings suggest that the slowing hypothesis alone cannot explain this pattern of results and that the age-related differences must also involve an inhibitory breakdown during aging.

  5. Suppression of Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection in Asymmetric Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Hesse, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we study the suppression of asymmetric reconnection in the limit where the diamagnetic drift speed >> Alfven speed and the magnetic shear angle is moderate. We demonstrate that the slippage between electrons and the magnetic flux mitigates the suppression and can even result in fast reconnection that lacks one of the outflow jets. Through comparing a case where the diamagnetic drift is supported by the temperature gradient with a companion case that has a density gradient instead, we identify a robust suppression mechanism. The drift of the x-line is slowed down locally by the asymmetric nature of the x-line, and then the x-line is run over and swallowed by the faster-moving following flux.

  6. Technology Assessment of Dust Suppression Techniques Applied During Structural Demolition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, J.F.; Ebadian, M.A.; Williams, P.T.; Dua, S.K.

    1998-10-20

    Hanford, Fernald, Savannah River, and other sites are currently reviewing technologies that can be implemented to demolish buildings in a cost-effective manner. In order to demolish a structure properly and, at the same time, minimize the amount of dust generated from a given technology, an evaluation must be conducted to choose the most appropriate dust suppression technology given site-specific conditions. Thus, the purpose of this research, which was carried out at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University, was to conduct an experimental study of dust aerosol abatement (dust suppression) methods as applied to nuclear D and D. This experimental study targeted the problem of dust suppression during the demolition of nuclear facilities. The resulting data were employed to assist in the development of mathematical correlations that can be applied to predict dust generation during structural demolition.

  7. Suppression of extraneous thermal noise in cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yi; Ni, Kang-Kuen; Kimble, H Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Extraneous thermal motion can limit displacement sensitivity and radiation pressure effects, such as optical cooling, in a cavity-optomechanical system. Here we present an active noise suppression scheme and its experimental implementation. The main challenge is to selectively sense and suppress extraneous thermal noise without affecting motion of the oscillator. Our solution is to monitor two modes of the optical cavity, each with different sensitivity to the oscillator's motion but similar sensitivity to the extraneous thermal motion. This information is used to imprint "anti-noise" onto the frequency of the incident laser field. In our system, based on a nano-mechanical membrane coupled to a Fabry-P\\'{e}rot cavity, simulation and experiment demonstrate that extraneous thermal noise can be selectively suppressed and that the associated limit on optical cooling can be reduced.

  8. Neomycin is more efficient than streptomycin in suppressing frameshift mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, P; Gravel, M; Herrington, M B; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1985-12-01

    The effects of streptomycin and neomycin on the phenotypic suppression of frameshift mutations in the lacZ gene of Escherichia coli and on the efficiency of suppression of amber mutations in T4 phage by the informational supE tRNA nonsense suppressor were compared. Neomycin stimulated much more efficiently than streptomycin the phenotypic suppression of frameshift mutations. Because neomycin favors mismatches of the central codon base whereas streptomycin favors mismatches of the first codon base, this result suggests that mismatching of the central codon base pair and shifting of the reading frame are two correlated phenomena. In contrast, both streptomycin and neomycin stimulated about equally the efficiency of the tRNA nonsense suppressor, an effect probably related to their interference with the proofreading control in tRNA selection.

  9. Strong Phases and Factorization for Color Suppressed Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Mantry, S; Stewart, I W; Mantry, Sonny; Pirjol, Dan; Stewart, Iain W.

    2003-01-01

    We prove a factorization theorem in QCD for the color suppressed decays B0-> D0 M0 and B0-> D*0 M0 where M is a light meson. Both the color-suppressed and W-exchange/annihilation amplitudes contribute at lowest order in LambdaQCD/Q where Q={mb, mc, Epi}, so no power suppression of annihilation contributions is found. A new mechanism is given for generating non-perturbative strong phases in the factorization framework. Model independent predictions that follow from our results include the equality of the B0 -> D0 M0 and B^0 -> D*0 M0 rates, and equality of non-perturbative strong phases between isospin amplitudes, delta(DM) = delta(D*M). Relations between amplitudes and phases for M=pi,rho are also derived. These results do not follow from large Nc factorization with heavy quark symmetry.

  10. Suppression of puerperal lactation using jasmine flowers (Jasminum sambac).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastav, P; George, K; Balasubramaniam, N; Jasper, M P; Thomas, M; Kanagasabhapathy, A S

    1988-02-01

    The efficacy of jasmine flowers (Jasminum Sambac) applied to the breasts to suppress puerperal lactation was compared that of Bromocriptine. Effectiveness of both regimens was monitored by serum prolactin levels, clinical evaluation of the degree of breast engorgement and milk production and the analgesic intake. While both bromocriptine and jasmine flowers brought about a significant reduction in serum prolactin, the decrease was significantly greater with bromocriptine. However, clinical parameters such as breast engorgement, milk production and analgesic intake showed the 2 modes of therapy to be equally effective. The failure rates of the 2 regimens to suppress lactation were similar; however, rebound lactation occurred in a small proportion of women treated with bromocriptine. Jasmine flowers seem to be an effective and inexpensive method of suppressing puerperal lactation and can be used as an alternative in situations where cost and nonavailability restrict the use of bromocriptine.

  11. A model for explaining fusion suppression using classical trajectory method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phookan, C. K.; Kalita, K.

    2015-01-01

    We adopt a semi-classical approach for explanation of projectile breakup and above barrier fusion suppression for the reactions 6Li+152Sm and 6Li+144Sm. The cut-off impact parameter for fusion is determined by employing quantum mechanical ideas. Within this cut-off impact parameter for fusion, the fraction of projectiles undergoing breakup is determined using the method of classical trajectory in two-dimensions. For obtaining the initial conditions of the equations of motion, a simplified model of the 6Li nucleus has been proposed. We introduce a simple formula for explanation of fusion suppression. We find excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated fusion cross section. A slight modification of the above formula for fusion suppression is also proposed for a three-dimensional model.

  12. A model for explaining fusion suppression using classical trajectory method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phookan C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We adopt a semi-classical approach for explanation of projectile breakup and above barrier fusion suppression for the reactions 6Li+152Sm and 6Li+144Sm. The cut-off impact parameter for fusion is determined by employing quantum mechanical ideas. Within this cut-off impact parameter for fusion, the fraction of projectiles undergoing breakup is determined using the method of classical trajectory in two-dimensions. For obtaining the initial conditions of the equations of motion, a simplified model of the 6Li nucleus has been proposed. We introduce a simple formula for explanation of fusion suppression. We find excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated fusion cross section. A slight modification of the above formula for fusion suppression is also proposed for a three-dimensional model.

  13. Parton Rescatterings in Large-x Nuclear Suppression at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Nemchik, J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that strong suppression of the relative production rate (d+Au)/(p+p) of inclusive high-pT hadrons at forward rapidities observed at RHIC is due to parton multiple rescatterings in nuclear matter. The light-cone dipole approach-based calculations are in a good agreement with BRAHMS and STAR data. They also indicate a significant nuclear suppression at midrapidities with a weak onset of the coherence effects. This prediction is supported by the preliminary d+Au data from the PHENIX Collaboration. Moreover, since similar suppression pattern is also expected to show up at lower energies where effects of parton saturation are not expected, we are able to exclude from the interpretation of observed phenomena models based on the Color Glass Condensate.

  14. An analysis of dynamical suppression of spontaneous emission

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, P R

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown recently [see, for example, S.-Y. Zhu and M. O. Scully, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 76}, 388 (1996)] that a dynamical suppression of spontaneous emission can occur in a three-level system when an external field drives transitions between a metastable state and {\\em two} decaying states. What is unusual in the decay scheme is that the decaying states are coupled directly by the vacuum radiation field. It is shown that decay dynamics required for total suppression of spontaneous emission necessarily implies that the level scheme is isomorphic to a three-level lambda system, in which the lower two levels are {\\em both} metastable, and each is coupled to the decaying state. As such, the total suppression of spontaneous emission can be explained in terms of conventional dark states and coherent population trapping.

  15. Speckle Suppression with the Project 1640 Integral Field Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Crepp, Justin R; Brenner, Douglas; Oppenheimer, Ben R; Zimmerman, Neil; Hinkley, Sasha; Parry, Ian; King, David; Vasisht, Gautam; Beichman, Charles; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Dekany, Richard; Shao, Mike; Burruss, Rick; Roberts, Lewis C; Bouchez, Antonin; Roberts, Jenny; Soummer, Remi

    2010-01-01

    Project 1640 is a high-contrast imaging instrument recently commissioned at Palomar observatory. A combination of a coronagraph with an integral field spectrograph (IFS), Project 1640 is designed to detect and characterize extrasolar planets, brown dwarfs, and circumstellar material orbiting nearby stars. In this paper, we present our data processing techniques for improving upon instrument raw sensitivity via the removal of quasi-static speckles. Our approach utilizes the chromatic image diversity provided by the IFS in combination with the locally-optimized combination of images (LOCI) algorithm to suppress the intensity of residual contaminating light in close angular proximity to target stars. We describe the Project 1640 speckle suppression pipeline (PSSP) and demonstrate the ability to detect companions with brightness comparable to and below that of initial speckle intensities using on-sky commissioning data. Our preliminary results indicate that suppression factors of at least one order of magnitude a...

  16. Long-term health benefits of appetite suppressants remain unproven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Roma Paumgartten

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of the increasing prevalence of obesity, prevention and treatment of overweight has become a major public health concern. In addition to diet and exercise, drugs are needed for patients who failed to lose weight with behavioral treatment. The current article aimed to summarize recent concerns on the safety and efficacy of appetite suppressants. Several appetite suppressants have been banned for safety reasons. In 2010, sibutramine was withdrawn from the market because a long-term study showed it increased the risks of cardiovascular events. So far no study with a sufficiently large sample size has demonstrated that appetite suppressants can reduce morbidity and mortality associated with overweight. The withdrawal of sibutramine highlights that guidelines for the evaluation of weight control drugs must be more stringent, and studies on their long-term health benefits are needed prior to their marketing.

  17. AN APPROACH TO SUPPRESS SPECKLE NOISE AND ENHANCE EDGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Anisotropic diffusion has good effect on reducing noise and preserving edge, but it may lose some details due to the blocky effect and can not suppress speckle effectively. The Laplacian factor is used to process the observed image which is considered as a piecewise planar image, so the Fourth Order Anisotropic Diffusion (FOAD) can avoid the blocky effect. The edge is preserved and enhanced by the Line Edge Detector (LED) based on stick technique and hypothesis test optimizing method. An approach called the Fourth Order Anisotropic Diffusion and Edge Enhancing (FOADEE), where the LED is combined with the FOAD, is presented. For quantitative evaluation and comparison with the LED, the FOAD and the FOADEE, two parameters as measure of the noise suppression and edge preservation are introduced. It is proved that the novel method can not only suppress speckle prominently but also preserve even enhance edge and useful details effectively by applying it to the phantoms and tissue images.

  18. Suppression induction in vivo by a T helper clone?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crispe, I N; Owens, T

    1985-01-01

    We have previously described a helper T cell clone which augments in vivo cytotoxic T cell responses when injected at 10(4) cells per mouse, but not at 10(5) per mouse (Crispe, I. N. et al., Immunology 1984. 52:55). To test whether this dose-response relationship was due to the induction...... of suppression, naive syngeneic mice were injected with 10(5) cloned T helper cells, and their spleen cells were subsequently assayed for suppressive activity in adoptive transfer experiments. Lymphocytes from such mice indeed suppressed an antigen-specific cytotoxic response, but only in the presence...... of the same T helper cell clone freshly added at the time of adoptive transfer. On this basis we argue that the distinction between T helper cell activity and T suppressor-inducer activity corresponds to differences in cell numbers, rather than to two separate cell lineages....

  19. Investigation of chemical suppressants for inactivation of sulfide ores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the effective control method of spontaneous combustion in the mining of sulfide ore deposits, This paper presents the testing results of several selected chemicals (water glass, calcium chloride, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide and their composites) as oxidation suppressants for sulfide ores. A weight increment scaling method was used to measure suppressant performance, and this method proved to be accurate, simple and convenient. Based on a large number of experiments, the test results show that four types of chemical mixtures demonstrate a good performance in reducing the oxidation rate of seven active sulfide ore samples by up to 27% to 100% during an initial 76 d period. The mixtures of water glass mixed with calcium chloride and magnesium oxide mixed with calcium chloride can also act as fire suppressants when used with fire sprinkling systems.

  20. Desensitization of delayed-type hypersensitivity in mice: suppressive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Katsura

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The systemic injection of high doses of antigen into a preimmunized animal results in transient unresponsiveness of cell-mediated immune responses. This phenomenon is known as desensitization. Serum interleukin 2 (IL-2 activity was found transiently in desensitized mice at 3 h after the antigen challenge. These mice could not reveal antigen nonspecific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH 1 d after the challenge. Specific suppression of DTH was observed at later stages. Sera from 3 h desensitized mice showed suppressive effects on DTH in preo immunized mice. Administration of recombinant IL-2 into preimmunized mice led to the failure of development of DTH to antigens. These observations suggest that IL-2 plays an important role in the suppressive environment.

  1. Alpinetin targets glioma stem cells by suppressing Notch pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianpeng; Yan, Zhiyong; Liu, Xia; Che, Shusheng; Wang, Chao; Yao, Weicheng

    2016-07-01

    Glioma is among the most common human malignancies with poor prognosis. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are the culprit of glioma, suggesting that GSCs are potential therapeutic targets. Notch signaling pathway plays a pivotal role for the function of GSCs, implying that suppression of Notch pathway may be an effective strategy for GSC-targeting therapy. In this study, we found that alpinetin, a natural compound, can suppress the proliferation and invasiveness of GSCs and induce apoptosis in GSCs. Immunoblot analysis and luciferase assay revealed that Notch signaling was suppressed by alpinetin. Furthermore, restoration of Notch signaling activity rescued the effect of alpinetin on GSC's function. The anti-tumor activity of alpinetin was further confirmed in an animal model. Collectively, targeting of GSC by alpinetin is an effective strategy for glioma therapy.

  2. Functional imaging correlates of impaired distractor suppression following sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Danyang; Soon, Chun Siong; Chee, Michael W L

    2012-05-15

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has been shown to affect selective attention but it is not known how two of its component processes: target enhancement and distractor suppression, are affected. To investigate, young volunteers either attended to houses or were obliged to ignore them (when attending to faces) while viewing superimposed face-house pictures. MR signal enhancement and suppression in the parahippocampal place area (PPA) were determined relative to a passive viewing control condition. Sleep deprivation was associated with lower PPA activation across conditions. Critically SD specifically impaired distractor suppression in selective attention, leaving target enhancement relatively preserved. These findings parallel some observations in cognitive aging. Additionally, following SD, attended houses were not significantly better recognized than ignored houses in a post-experiment test of recognition memory contrasting with the finding of superior recognition of attended houses in the well-rested state. These results provide evidence for co-encoding of distracting information with targets into memory when one is sleep deprived.

  3. Suppression of autophagy exacerbates Mefloquine-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji Hyun; Park, So Jung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Eun Sung; Kang, Hee; Park, Ji-Ho; Lee, Eunjoo H; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2012-05-02

    Mefloquine is an effective treatment drug for malaria. However, it can cause several adverse side effects, and the precise mechanism associated with the adverse neurological effects of Mefloquine is not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Mefloquine on autophagy in neuroblastoma cells. Mefloquine treatment highly induced the formation of autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3I into LC3II. Moreover, Mefloquine-induced autophagy was efficiently suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor and by down regulation of ATG6. The autophagy was also completely blocked in ATG5 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Moreover, suppression of autophagy significantly intensified Mefloquine-mediated cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Our findings suggest that suppression of autophagy may exacerbate Mefloquine toxicity in neuroblastoma cells.

  4. Ion energy recovery experiment based on magnetic electro suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.; Stirling, W.L.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Barber, G.C.; Ponte, N.S.

    1980-05-01

    A proof-of-principle experiment on direct recovery of residual hydrogen ions based on a magnetic electron suppression scheme is described. Ions extracted from a source plasma a few kilovolts above the ground potential (approx. 20 A) are accelerated to 40 keV by a negative potential maintained on a neutralizer gas cell. As the residual ions exit the gas cell, they are deflected from the neutral beam by a magnetic field that also suppresses gas cell electrons and then recovered on a ground-potential surface. Under optimum conditions, a recovery efficiency (the ratio of the net recovered current to the available full-energy ion current) of 80% +- 20% has been obtained. Magnetic suppression of the beam plasma electrons was rather easily achieved; however, handling the fractional-energy ions originating from molecular species (H/sub 2//sup +/ and H/sub 3//sup +/) proved to be extremely important to recovery efficiency.

  5. Suppression of Dielectronic Recombination Due to Finite Density Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolić, D; Korista, K T; Ferland, G J; Badnell, N R

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a general model for determining density-dependent effective dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients in order to explore finite-density effects on the ionization balance of plasmas. Our model consists of multiplying by a suppression factor those highly-accurate total zero-density DR rate coefficients which have been produced from state-of-the-art theoretical calculations and which have been benchmarked by experiment. The suppression factor is based-upon earlier detailed collision-radiative calculations which were made for a wide range of ions at various densities and temperatures, but used a simplified treatment of DR. A general suppression formula is then developed as a function of isoelectronic sequence, charge, density, and temperature. These density-dependent effective DR rate coefficients are then used in the plasma simulation code Cloudy to compute ionization balance curves for both collisionally ionized and photoionized plasmas at very low (ne = 1 cm^-3) and finite (ne=10^10 ...

  6. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cucoanes, Andi; Cabrera, Anatael; Fallot, Muriel; Onillon, Anthony; Obolensky, Michel; Yermia, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications o...

  7. Suppression of glucocorticoid secretion enhances cholinergic transmission in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Shoji, Hirotaka; Ikeda, Ryuji; Tanaka, Yayoi; Maruyama, Wakako; Tabira, Takeshi

    2008-08-15

    We previously demonstrated that suppression of glucocorticoid secretion by adrenalectomy (ADX) impaired prefrontal cortex-sensitive working memory, but not reference memory. Since the cholinergic system in the hippocampus is also involved in these memories, we examined the effects of glucocorticoid suppression on cholinergic transmission in the rat hippocampus. A microdialysis study revealed that ADX did not affect the basal acetylcholine release, but enhanced the KCl-evoked response. This enhanced response was reversed by the corticosterone replacement treatment. The extracellular choline concentrations increased under both basal and KCl-stimulated conditions in the ADX rats, and these increases were also reversed by the corticosterone replacement. These results indicate that suppression of glucocorticoid secretion enhances cholinergic transmission in the hippocampus in response to stimuli. It is possible that this enhanced cholinergic transmission may not contribute to the ADX-induced working memory impairment, but it may be involved in maintenance of reference memory.

  8. Suppression of Rayleigh-scattering-induced noise in OEOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okusaga, Olukayode; Cahill, James P; Docherty, Andrew; Menyuk, Curtis R; Zhou, Weimin; Carter, Gary M

    2013-09-23

    Optoelectronic oscillators (OEOs) are hybrid RF-photonic devices that promise to be environmentally robust high-frequency RF sources with very low phase noise. Previously, we showed that Rayleigh-scattering-induced noise in optical fibers coupled with amplitude-to-phase noise conversion in photodetectors and amplifiers leads to fiber-length-dependent noise in OEOs. In this work, we report on two methods for the suppression of this fiber-length-dependent noise: altering the amplitude-dependent phase delay of the OEO loops and suppressing the Rayleigh-scattering-induced noise in optical fibers. We report a 20 dB reduction in the flicker phase noise of a 6 km OEO via these suppression techniques.

  9. Holographic Lifshitz fermions and exponentially suppressed spectral weight

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Youngshin

    2016-01-01

    One of the unusual features of Lifshitz holography is the presence of a tunneling barrier that arises from the bulk geometry for probes carrying large transverse momentum. This leads to a decoupling of the horizon from the boundary, and in particular gives rise to an exponential suppression of spectral weight in the large transverse momentum limit. We compute the spin-1/2 holographic Green's function and show that this suppression has the same origin as in the scalar case. We furthermore demonstrate that the suppression factor is universal in the $\\hat\\omega\\to0$ limit where $\\hat\\omega=\\omega/|\\vec k|^z$. In particular, it depends only on $\\hat\\omega$ and the critical exponent $z$, and is independent of scaling dimension and spin.

  10. A new solvent suppression method via radiation damping effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Xiao-Hong; Peng Ling; Zhang Zhen-Min; Cai Shu-Hui; Chen Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Radiation damping effects induced by the dominated solvent in a solution sample can be applied to suppress the solvent signal.The precession pathway and rate back to equilibrium state between solute and solvent spins are different under radiation damping.In this paper,a series of pulse sequences using radiation damping were designed for the solvent suppression in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.Compared to the WATERGATE method,the solute signals adjacent to the solvent would not be influenced by using the radiation damping method.The one-dimensional (1D) 1H NMR,two-dimensional (2D) gCOSY,and J-resolved experimental results show the practicability of solvent suppression via radiation damping effects in 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Mu suppression and human movement responses to the Rorschach test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Jaime A; Giromini, Luciano; Porcelli, Piero; Parolin, Laura; Viglione, Donald J

    2011-03-30

    Electroencephalographic μ wave suppression was investigated using all 10 static, ambiguous Rorschach stimuli. In an earlier study using four Rorschach stimuli, the two stimuli that elicited feelings of movement were associated with μ suppression. In this study, we replicated this relationship using all 10 Rorschach stimuli while overcoming a number of other earlier limitations. The results strongly support the hypothesis that internal representation of the feeling of movement is sufficient to suppress the μ rhythm even when minimal external cues are present. This outcome increases the generalizability and ecological validity of this approach and gives support to the traditional interpretation of the Rorschach human movement responses as being associated with cognitive functioning, empathy, and social cognition.

  12. Deconstructing p53 transcriptional networks in tumor suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieging, Kathryn T; Attardi, Laura D

    2012-02-01

    p53 is a pivotal tumor suppressor that induces apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest and senescence in response to stress signals. Although p53 transcriptional activation is important for these responses, the mechanisms underlying tumor suppression have been elusive. To date, no single or compound mouse knockout of specific p53 target genes has recapitulated the dramatic tumor predisposition that characterizes p53-null mice. Recently, however, analysis of knock-in mice expressing p53 transactivation domain mutants has revealed a group of primarily novel direct p53 target genes that may mediate tumor suppression in vivo. We present here an overview of well-known p53 target genes and the tumor phenotypes of the cognate knockout mice, and address the recent identification of new p53 transcriptional targets and how they enhance our understanding of p53 transcriptional networks central for tumor suppression.

  13. Binocular vision in amblyopia: structure, suppression and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Robert F; Thompson, Benjamin; Baker, Daniel H

    2014-03-01

    The amblyopic visual system was once considered to be structurally monocular. However, it now evident that the capacity for binocular vision is present in many observers with amblyopia. This has led to new techniques for quantifying suppression that have provided insights into the relationship between suppression and the monocular and binocular visual deficits experienced by amblyopes. Furthermore, new treatments are emerging that directly target suppressive interactions within the visual cortex and, on the basis of initial data, appear to improve both binocular and monocular visual function, even in adults with amblyopia. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of recent studies that have investigated the structure, measurement and treatment of binocular vision in observers with strabismic, anisometropic and mixed amblyopia.

  14. COMPARISON OF FILTERS DEDICATED TO SPECKLE SUPPRESSION IN SAR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kupidura

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research on the effectiveness of different filtering methods dedicated to speckle suppression in SAR images. The tests were performed on RadarSat-2 images and on an artificial image treated with simulated speckle noise. The research analysed the performance of particular filters related to the effectiveness of speckle suppression and to the ability to preserve image details and edges. Speckle is a phenomenon inherent to radar images – a deterministic noise connected with land cover type, but also causing significant changes in digital numbers of pixels. As a result, it may affect interpretation, classification and other processes concerning radar images. Speckle, resembling “salt and pepper” noise, has the form of a set of relatively small groups of pixels of values markedly different from values of other pixels representing the same type of land cover. Suppression of this noise may also cause suppression of small image details, therefore the ability to preserve the important parts of an image, was analysed as well. In the present study, selected filters were tested, and methods dedicated particularly to speckle noise suppression: Frost, Gamma-MAP, Lee, Lee-Sigma, Local Region, general filtering methods which might be effective in this respect: Mean, Median, in addition to morphological filters (alternate sequential filters with multiple structuring element and by reconstruction. The analysis presented in this paper compared the effectiveness of different filtering methods. It proved that some of the dedicated radar filters are efficient tools for speckle suppression, but also demonstrated a significant efficiency of the morphological approach, especially its ability to preserve image details.

  15. Studies onPaecilomyces marquandii from nematode suppressive chinampa soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marban-Mendoza, N; Garcia-E, R; Dicklow, M B; Zuckerman, B M

    1992-05-01

    Two applications of isolates ofPaecilomyces marquandii from suppressive chinampa soils or P. lilacinus from Peru, fungi that parasitize nematode eggs, generally gave better control of tomato root-knot due toMeloidogyne incognita than did a single application. The effects on root galling by each of thePaecilomyces isolates varied between experiments; however, the ovicidal potential of the three isolates did not differ significantly. Proteins specific for each of the isolates were demonstrated by SDS gel electrophoresis. The results indicate thatP. marquandii is one of the natural soil organisms that contribute to nematode suppression in the chinampa agricultural soils.

  16. Suppression of plant parasitic nematodes in the chinampa agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, B M; Dicklow, M B; Coles, G C; Garcia-E, R; Marban-Mendoza, N

    1989-06-01

    Soil from the chinampa agricultural system in the Valley of Mexico suppressed damage by plant-parasitic nematodes to tomatoes and beans in greenhouse and growth chamber trials. Sterilization of the chinampa soil resulted in a loss of the suppressive effect, thereby indicating that one or more biotic factors were responsible for the low incidence of nematode damage. Nine organisms were isolated from chinampa soil, which showed antinematodal properties in culture. Naturally occurring populations of plant-parasitic nematodes were of lower incidence in chinampa soil than in Chapingo soil.

  17. In Vivo Quantitation of Local Anesthetic Suppression of Leukocyte Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddon, D. B.; Lindhe, J.

    1972-01-01

    Using intravital microscopy, topically applied amide-type local anesthetics suppressed the adherence of leukocytes to the venular endothelium within surgical defects in the hamster cheek pouch. The response was reversible with physiologic saline and was localized to venules within the defect. Quantitation in terms of the percent of initially adhering leukocytes remaining in place on the venule wall at each minute following application of lidocaine and physiologic saline, respectively, revealed the suppression to be reliably related to the concentration, viz: 20.0 >10.0 >5.0 >0.0 mg ml of commercially available Xylocaine® (lidocaine) HCl. ImagesFig 1Fig 1 PMID:5049429

  18. Suppressing chaos via Lyapunov-Krasovskii's method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, J.L. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)] e-mail: kuangjinlu@hotmail.com; Meehan, P.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia)] e-mail: meehan@uq.edu.au; Leung, A.Y.T. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)] e-mail: bcaleung@cityu.edu.hk

    2006-03-01

    An algorithm for suppressing the chaotic oscillations in non-linear dynamical systems with singular Jacobian matrices is developed using a linear feedback control law based upon the Lyapunov-Krasovskii (LK) method. It appears that the LK method can serve effectively as a generalised method for the suppression of chaotic oscillations for a wide range of systems. Based on this method, the resulting conditions for undisturbed motions to be locally or globally stable are sufficient and conservative. The generalized Lorenz system and disturbed gyrostat equations are exemplified for the validation of the proposed feedback control rule.

  19. Suppressing the QCD axion abundance by hidden monopoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro [Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research; Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS; Takahashi, Fuminobu [Tokyo Univ., Miyagi (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS; Yamada, Masaki [Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research; Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS; DESY Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    We study the Witten effect of hidden monopoles on the QCD axion dynamics, and show that its abundance as well as isocurvature perturbations can be significantly suppressed if there is a sufficient amount of hidden monopoles. When the hidden monopoles make up a significant fraction of dark matter, the Witten effect suppresses the abundance of axion with the decay constant smaller than 10{sup 12} GeV. The cosmological domain wall problem of the QCD axion can also be avoided, relaxing the upper bound on the decay constant when the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is spontaneously broken after inflation.

  20. Suppressing the QCD axion abundance by hidden monopoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawasaki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the Witten effect of hidden monopoles on the QCD axion dynamics, and show that its abundance as well as isocurvature perturbations can be significantly suppressed if there is a sufficient amount of hidden monopoles. When the hidden monopoles make up a significant fraction of dark matter, the Witten effect suppresses the abundance of axion with the decay constant smaller than 1012GeV. The cosmological domain wall problem of the QCD axion can also be avoided, relaxing the upper bound on the decay constant when the Peccei–Quinn symmetry is spontaneously broken after inflation.

  1. Suppression of Beneficial Mutations in Dynamic Microbial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittihn, Philip; Hasty, Jeff; Tsimring, Lev S.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative predictions for the spread of mutations in bacterial populations are essential to interpret evolution experiments and to improve the stability of synthetic gene circuits. We derive analytical expressions for the suppression factor for beneficial mutations in populations that undergo periodic dilutions, covering arbitrary population sizes, dilution factors, and growth advantages in a single stochastic model. We find that the suppression factor grows with the dilution factor and depends nontrivially on the growth advantage, resulting in the preferential elimination of mutations with certain growth advantages. We confirm our results by extensive numerical simulations.

  2. Overnight Dexamethasone Suppression Test in the Diagnosis of Cushing's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Esfahanian

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Realizing the cause of Cushing's Syndrome (CS is one of the most challenging processes in clinical endocrinology. The long high dose dexamethasone suppression test (standard test is costly and need an extended inpatient stay. In this study we want to show the clinical utility of the overnight 8 mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST for differential diagnosis of CS in a referral center. Retrospectively from 2002-2005 we selected the patients of endocrinology ward in Imam hospital who were admitted with the diagnosis of Cushing syndrome and had 8 mg DST (modified test along with classic DST. In modified test a decrease in an 8 AM serum cortisol level of 50% or more is thought to indicate suppression and we compared the results of modified test with standard test. This test had been done on 42 patients: 10 male (23% and 32 female (76%. The mean age of patients was 31.39 (15-63, 32 with proven pituitary Cushing's disease, 7 with primary adrnal tumors and 3 with ectopic ACTH syndrome. The standard test according to 50% suppression of UFC had 90.62% sensitivity, and according to 90% suppression had 43.75% sensitivity. The sensitivity of this test was 71.85% for serum cortisol suppression. The modified test (8 mg overnight DST had 78% sensitivity. All of these tests had 100% specificity for the diagnosis of Cushing's disease. The positive predictive vale (PPV of all of these tests was 100%. The negative predictive value (NPV of modified test for the diagnosis of Cushing's disease was 58.82%. In standard test the NPV of serum cortisol was 52.6%, UFC 50% had 76.9% NPV and UFC 90% had 35.7% NPV. The results of serum cortisol suppression in modified test is better than standard test. Although 50% suppression of UFC in standard test had greater sensitivity than modified test, collecting of urine is difficult, time consuming and needing hospitalization, so we advice modified test that is much simpler and more convenient instead of standard test in the first

  3. Alumina Paste Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Thermoelectric Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Jong-Ah (Inventor); Caillat, Thierry (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Alumina as a sublimation suppression barrier for a Zintl thermoelectric material in a thermoelectric power generation device operating at high temperature, e.g. at or above 1000K, is disclosed. The Zintl thermoelectric material may comprise Yb.sub.14MnSb.sub.11. The alumina may be applied as an adhesive paste dried and cured on a substantially oxide free surface of the Zintl thermoelectric material and polished to a final thickness. The sublimation suppression barrier may be finalized by baking out the alumina layer on the Zintl thermoelectric material until it becomes substantially clogged with ytterbia.

  4. Viscoelastic Suppression of Gravity-Driven Counterflow Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Beiersdorfer, P; Layne, D; Magee, E W

    2010-01-01

    Attempts to achieve ``top kill'' of actively flowing oil wells by insertion of dense drilling ``muds'', i.e., slurries of dense minerals, from above will fail if the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the gravity-driven counterflow produces turbulence that breaks up the denser fluid into small droplets. Here we estimate the droplet size to be sub-mm for fast flows and suggest the addition of a shear-thickening polymer to suppress turbulence. Laboratory experiments show a progression from droplet formation to complete turbulence suppression at the relevant high velocities, illustrating rich new physics accessible by using a shear-thickening liquid in gravity driven counter-streaming flows.

  5. Beyond the Immune Suppression: The Immunotherapy in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Silvestri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second most common cancer in men. As well in many other human cancers, inflammation and immune suppression have an important role in their development. We briefly describe the host components that interact with the tumor to generate an immune suppressive environment involved in PCa promotion and progression. Different tools provide to overcome the mechanisms of immunosuppression including vaccines and immune checkpoint blockades. With regard to this, we report results of most recent clinical trials investigating immunotherapy in metastatic PCa (Sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, tasquinimod, Prostvac-VF, and GVAX and provide possible future perspectives combining the immunotherapy to the traditional therapies.

  6. Suppression of oscillations in mean-field diffusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neeraj Kumar Kamal; Pooja Rani Sharma; Manish Dev Shrimali

    2015-02-01

    We study the role of mean-field diffusive coupling on suppression of oscillations for systems of limit cycle oscillators. We show that this coupling scheme not only induces amplitude death (AD) but also oscillation death (OD) in coupled identical systems. The suppression of oscillations in the parameter space crucially depends on the value of mean-field diffusion parameter. It is also found that the transition from oscillatory solutions to OD in conjugate coupling case is different from the case when the coupling is through similar variable. We rationalize our study using linear stability analysis.

  7. Bifurcation suppression of nonlinear systems via dynamic output feedback and its applications to rotating stall control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengnian CHEN; Huashu QIN; Shengwei MEI

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the problems of bifurcation suppression and bifurcation suppression with stability of nonlinear systems. Necessary conditions and sufficient conditions for bifurcation suppression via dynamic output feedback are presented;Sufficient conditions for bifurcation suppression with stability via dynamic output feedback are obtained. As an application, a dynamic compensator, which guarantees that the bifurcation point of rotating stall in axial flow compressors is stably suppressed, is constructed.

  8. Simvastatin suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation induced by senescent cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Su; Uppal, Harpreet; Demaria, Marco; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by preventing the proliferation of damaged cells, but senescent cells can also promote cancer though the pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Simvastatin, an HMG-coA reductase inhibitor, is known to attenuate inflammation and preven

  9. Newspaper Suppression During the Mexican War, 1846-1848.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Tom

    A number of scholars have found that wartime conditions often bring about conflict between the press and the military. This study documents the various incidents between the United States Army and various Mexican and United States newspaper editors that led to at least ten cases of newspaper suppression, the occasional use of prior censorship, and…

  10. harmonics: generation and suppression in ac system networks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... HARMONICS: GENERATION AND SUPPRESSION IN AC. SYSTEM NETWORKS .... If Vs = 295V; Z = (8 + j6)Ω and δ = 2π/3, the output voltage, Vo and ... tor current assume the characteristics shown in figure. 8. The output ...

  11. Suppression of galactic outflows by cosmological infall and circumgalactic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Priyanka; Bagla, Jasjeet S; Nath, Biman B

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the relative importance of two galactic outflow suppression mechanisms : a) Cosmological infall of the intergalactic gas onto the galaxy, and b) the existence of a hot circumgalactic medium (CGM). Considering only radial motion, the infall reduces the speed of outflowing gas and even halts the outflow, depending on the mass and redshift of the galaxy. For star forming galaxies there exists an upper mass limit beyond which outflows are suppressed by the gravitational field of the galaxy. We find that infall can reduce this upper mass limit approximately by a factor of two (independent of the redshift). Massive galaxies ($\\gtrsim 10^{12} M_{\\odot}$) host large reservoir of hot, diffuse CGM around the central part of the galaxy. The CGM acts as a barrier between the infalling and outflowing gas and provides an additional source of outflow suppression. We find that at low redshifts ($z\\lesssim3.5$), the CGM is more effective than the infall in suppressing the outflows. Together, these two processes...

  12. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure Suppresses T-independent Antibody Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to  3.75mg/kg of perfluoroocatnoic acid (PFOA) for 15d suppresses T-dependent antibody responses (TDAR), suggesting that T helper cells and/or B cells/plasma cells may be impacted. This study evaluated effects of PFOA exposure on the T cell-independent antibody response...

  13. Using multiple perspectives to suppress information and complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)]|[New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (US). Computer Science Dept.; Webster, R.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Hartley, R.T. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (US). Computer Science Dept.

    1998-09-01

    Dissemination of battlespace information involves getting information to particular warfighters that is both useful and in a form that facilitates the tasks of those particular warfighters. There are two issues which motivate this problem of dissemination. The first issue deals with disseminating pertinent information to a particular warfighter. This can be thought of as information suppression. The second issue deals with facilitating the use of the information by tailoring the computer interface to the specific tasks of an individual warfighter. This can be thought of as interface complexity suppression. This paper presents a framework for suppressing information using an object-based knowledge representation methodology. This methodology has the ability to represent knowledge and information in multiple perspectives. Information can be suppressed by creating a perspective specific to an individual warfighter. In this way, only the information pertinent and useful to a warfighter is made available to that warfighter. Information is not removed, lost, or changed, but spread among multiple perspectives. Interface complexity is managed in a similar manner. Rather than have one generalized computer interface to access all information, the computer interface can be divided into interface elements. Interface elements can then be selected and arranged into a perspective-specific interface. This is done in a manner to facilitate completion of tasks contained in that perspective. A basic battlespace domain containing ground and air elements and associated warfighters is used to exercise the methodology.

  14. Mechanism of Tumor Metastasis Suppression by the KAI1 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    Genomics 41, 25–32. Dunon, D., Piali, L., Imhof , B.A., 1996. To stick or not to stick: the new leukocyte homing paradigm. Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 8, 714–723...Eur. J. Immunol. 26, 2657–2665. Ruiz, P., Dunon, D., Sonnenberg, A., Imhof , B.A., 1993. Suppression of mouse melanoma metastasis by EA-1, a

  15. Measles virus-induced suppression of immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Diane E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Measles is an important cause of child mortality that has a seemingly paradoxical interaction with the immune system. In most individuals, the immune response is successful in eventually clearing measles virus (MV) infection and in establishing life-long immunity. However, infection is also associated with persistence of viral RNA and several weeks of immune suppression, including loss of delayed type hypersensitivity responses and increased susceptibility to secondary infections. The initial T-cell response includes CD8+ and T-helper 1 CD4+ T cells important for control of infectious virus. As viral RNA persists, there is a shift to a T-helper 2 CD4+ T-cell response that likely promotes B-cell maturation and durable antibody responses but may suppress macrophage activation and T-helper 1 responses to new infections. Suppression of mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation can be induced by lymphocyte infection with MV or by lymphocyte exposure to a complex of the hemagglutinin and fusion surface glycoproteins without infection. Dendritic cells are susceptible to infection and can transmit infection to lymphocytes. MV-infected dendritic cells are unable to stimulate a mixed lymphocyte reaction and can induce lymphocyte unresponsiveness through expression of MV glycoproteins. Thus, multiple factors may contribute both to measles-induced immune suppression and to the establishment of durable protective immunity. PMID:20636817

  16. Enhance-Synergism and Suppression Effects in Multiple Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovetsky, Stan; Conklin, W. Michael

    2004-01-01

    Relations between pairwise correlations and the coefficient of multiple determination in regression analysis are considered. The conditions for the occurrence of enhance-synergism and suppression effects when multiple determination becomes bigger than the total of squared correlations of the dependent variable with the regressors are discussed. It…

  17. Weight Suppression Predicts Time to Remission from Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Michael R.; Berner, Laura A.; Swanson, Sonja A.; Clark, Vicki L.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Franko, Debra L.; Shaw, Jena A.; Ross, Stephanie; Herzog, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether, at study entry, (a) weight suppression (WS), the difference between highest past adult weight and current weight, prospectively predicts time to first full remission from bulimia nervosa (BN) over a follow-up period of 8 years, and (b) weight change over time mediates the relationship between WS and time to first…

  18. Suppression of Pest Lepidoptera by Releasing Partially Sterile Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipling. E. F.

    1970-01-01

    Uses population growth models to calculate the theoretical suppression of reproduction achieved by releasing irradiated male moths carrying genetic sterility factors. Shows that releasing partially sterile males should be more effective than releasing fully sterile males. Discusses the costs and advantages of applying this approach to the control…

  19. Cross-cultural differences in emotion suppression in everyday interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huwae, Sylvia; Schaafsma, Juliëtte

    2016-01-01

    Previous research suggests that in collectivistic cultures, people tend to suppress their emotions more than in individualistic cultures. Little research, however, has explored cross-cultural differences in emotion regulation in everyday interactions. Using a daily social interaction method, we exam

  20. Managing Abiotic Factors of Compost to Increase Soilborne Disease Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Deirdre E.

    2012-01-01

    Soilborne pathogens can devastate crops, causing economic losses for farmers due to reduced yields and expensive management practices. Fumigants and fungicides have harmful impacts on the surrounding environment and can be toxic to humans. Therefore, alternative methods of disease management are important. The disease suppressive abilities of…

  1. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Boram; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics National Research Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  2. Expectation Suppression in Early Visual Cortex Depends on Task Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John-Saaltink, Elexa; Utzerath, Christian; Kok, Peter; Lau, Hakwan C; de Lange, Floris P

    2015-01-01

    Stimulus expectation can modulate neural responses in early sensory cortical regions, with expected stimuli often leading to a reduced neural response. However, it is unclear whether this expectation suppression is an automatic phenomenon or is instead dependent on the type of task a subject is engaged in. To investigate this, human subjects were presented with visual grating stimuli in the periphery that were either predictable or non-predictable while they performed three tasks that differently engaged cognitive resources. In two of the tasks, the predictable stimulus was task-irrelevant and spatial attention was engaged at fixation, with a high load on either perceptual or working memory resources. In the third task, the predictable stimulus was task-relevant, and therefore spatially attended. We observed that expectation suppression is dependent on the cognitive resources engaged by a subjects' current task. When the grating was task-irrelevant, expectation suppression for predictable items was visible in retinotopically specific areas of early visual cortex (V1-V3) during the perceptual task, but it was abolished when working memory was loaded. When the grating was task-relevant and spatially attended, there was no significant effect of expectation in early visual cortex. These results suggest that expectation suppression is not an automatic phenomenon, but dependent on attentional state and type of available cognitive resources.

  3. Scientific Knowledge Suppresses but Does Not Supplant Earlier Intuitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtulman, Andrew; Valcarcel, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    When students learn scientific theories that conflict with their earlier, naive theories, what happens to the earlier theories? Are they overwritten or merely suppressed? We investigated this question by devising and implementing a novel speeded-reasoning task. Adults with many years of science education verified two types of statements as quickly…

  4. An Artefact suppressing fast-recovery myoelectric amplifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorsen, R.

    1999-01-01

    An amplifier for recording myoelectric signals using surface electrodes has been developed. The special features are suppression of stimulation artefacts and motion artefacts from electrodes. It is designed for recording of myoelectric signals from a muscle that is being stimulated with short impuls

  5. Suppressing the Morning Rise in Cortisol Impairs Free Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmele, Ulrike; Meier, Flurina; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Elevated glucocorticoid levels impair memory retrieval. We investigated whether retrieval under naturally elevated glucocorticoid levels, i.e., during the morning rise in cortisol can be improved by suppressing cortisol. In a crossover study 16 men retrieved emotional and neutral texts and pictures (learned 3 d earlier) 30 min after morning…

  6. Hemodilution, vasopressin suppression, and diuresis during water immersion in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Keil, L. C.; Shvartz, E.

    1981-01-01

    The possible role of hemodilution in the early stages of water immersion in the suppression of antidiuretic hormone (vasopressin) and subsequent diuresis in man is investigated. Parameters characterizing hemodilution as well as water balance and intercompartmental fluid levels were measured before, during and after the immersion of ten subjects in a semireclining position in tap water up to their necks at 34.6 C for 8 hr. Results indicate that hemodilution and the suppression of vasopressin and plasma renin activity were present by the second hour of immersion, with the early hemodilution due to a slight increase in plasma volume with no change in plasma sodium or osmotic contents, even though urine volume and osmotic excretion rates increased significantly. Hyponatremia, hyposmotemia and plasma renin activity suppression are observed to continue to the end of immersion, resulting in final decreases of 15.6% in plasma volume, 18.8% in extracellular volume, 19.6% in interstitial volume and 10.7% in red cell volume. Findings suggest the transfer of hypotonic fluid into the vascular system, which contributes to vasopressin suppression observed during immersion.

  7. Relativistic Symmetry Suppresses Quark Spin-Orbit Splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Page, P R; Ginocchio, J N; Page, Philip R.; Goldman, Terry; Ginocchio, Joseph. N.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental data indicate small spin-orbit splittings in hadrons. Forheavy-light mesons we identify a relativistic symmetry that suppresses thesesplittings. We suggest an experimental test in electron-positron annihilation.Furthermore, we argue that the dynamics necessary for this symmetry arepossible in QCD.

  8. Suppressing the Numerical Cherenkov Instability in FDTD PIC Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Godfrey, Brendan B

    2014-01-01

    A procedure for largely suppressing the numerical Cherenkov instability in finite difference time-domain (FDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of cold, relativistic beams is derived, and residual growth rates computed and compared with WARP code simulation results. Sample laser-plasma acceleration simulation output is provided to further validate the new procedure.

  9. Weed-Suppressing Effect and Mechanism of Allelopathic Rice Accessions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Fei; KONG Chui-hua; XU Xiao-hua; ZHANG Chao-xian; CHEN Xiong-hui

    2004-01-01

    Two allelopathic rice accessions, PI312777 and Allelopathyl, significantly suppressedthe growth of associated weeds in the field. Moreover, their weed-suppressing effectswere correlated with the cultivation patterns. The weed-suppressing effects of throwingand transplanting were more effective than that of direct seeding. Furthermore, theamounts of allelochemicals (resorcinols, flavones and hydroxamic acids) produced andreleased from two allelopathic rice accessions were much higher than that from a non-allelopathic rice variety Hua-Jing-Xian 1, and reached the maximum concentration at the6th leaf stage. Differences in the weed-suppressing effects of rice accessions appear toresult from the accessions producing and releasing different amounts of allelochemicalsin the field. Further research confirmed that in PI312777 plants, allelochemicals weresynthesized by the above-ground parts, and then secreted through the root tissues. Roottissues of PI312777 plants never produced the allelochemicals. Root exudates fromPI312777 could significantly inhibit the growth of E. crus-galli surrounding rice plantsin water culture. However, when activated carbon was added to the culture solution, whichcould absorb allelochemicals from root exudates, the growth of E. crus-galli was nolonger significantly inhibited. Weed-suppressing effects of rice accessions depended onallelopathy, cultivation patterns and other factors in rice fields, while allelopathywas one of important factors. Interestingly, the amounts of allelochemicals produced andreleased from allelopathic rice plants may be induced by the presence of E. crus-galli.This suggests that there is a possible chemical recognition between rice and E. crus-galli.

  10. International measures to prevent and suppress the financing of terrorism

    OpenAIRE

    Eden, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This chapter considers the range of international measures adopted both before and after September 11, 2001 to deny terrorists and their supporters access to the international financial system including the International Convention for the Suppression of Financing of Terrorism, the terrorist financing aspects of Security Council Resolution 1373 and the role played by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF).

  11. Suppression of thermal conduction in a mirror-unstable plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Komarov, S V; Kunz, M W; Schekochihin, A A

    2016-01-01

    The ICM plasma is subject to firehose and mirror instabilities at scales of order the ion Larmor radius. The mirror instability generates fluctuations of magnetic-field strength $\\delta B / B \\sim 1$. These fluctuations act as magnetic traps for the heat-conducting electrons, suppressing their transport. We calculate the effective parallel thermal conductivity in the ICM in the presence of the mirror fluctuations for different stages of the evolution of the instability. The mirror fluctuations are limited in amplitude by the maximum and minimum values of the field strength, with no large deviations from the mean value. This key property leads to a finite suppression of thermal conduction at large scales. We find suppression down to $\\approx 0.2$ of the Spitzer value for the secular phase of the perturbations' growth, and $\\approx 0.3$ for their saturated phase. The effect operates in addition to other suppression mechanisms and independently of them. Globally, fluctuations $\\delta B / B \\sim 1$ can be present...

  12. Expectation Suppression in Early Visual Cortex Depends on Task Set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    St. John-Saaltink, E.C.; Utzerath, C.; Kok, P.; Lau, H.C.; Lange, F.P. de

    2015-01-01

    Stimulus expectation can modulate neural responses in early sensory cortical regions, with expected stimuli often leading to a reduced neural response. However, it is unclear whether this expectation suppression is an automatic phenomenon or is instead dependent on the type of task a subject is enga

  13. Gaugino Condensation with a Doubly Suppressed Gravitino Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Lowen, Valeri; Zanzi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Supersymmetry breakdown via gaugino condensation in heterotic string theory can lead to models with a doubly suppressed gravitino mass. A TeV scale gravitino can emerge from a condensate as large as the grand unified scale. We analyze the properties of these models and discuss applications for particle physics and cosmology.

  14. Dynamical bottomonium-suppression in a realistic AA background

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Gossiaux Pol

    2016-01-01

    We refine our dynamical Schroedinger-Langevin scheme designed for dealing with the suppression of quarkonium states in URHIC in order to allow for feed-downs from higher states and present updated results for the $R_{AA}$ as a function of the centrality.

  15. Signal enhancement and suppression during visual-spatial selective attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couperus, J W; Mangun, G R

    2010-11-04

    Selective attention involves the relative enhancement of relevant versus irrelevant stimuli. However, whether this relative enhancement involves primarily enhancement of attended stimuli, or suppression of irrelevant stimuli, remains controversial. Moreover, if both enhancement and suppression are involved, whether they result from a single mechanism or separate mechanisms during attentional control or selection is not known. In two experiments using a spatial cuing paradigm with task-relevant targets and irrelevant distractors, target, and distractor processing was examined as a function of distractor expectancy. Additionally, in the second study the interaction of perceptual load and distractor expectancy was explored. In both experiments, distractors were either validly cued (70%) or invalidly cued (30%) in order to examine the effects of distractor expectancy on attentional control as well as target and distractor processing. The effects of distractor expectancy were assessed using event-related potentials recorded during the cue-to-target period (preparatory attention) and in response to the task-relevant target stimuli (selective stimulus processing). Analyses of distractor-present displays (anticipated versus unanticipated), showed modulations in brain activity during both the preparatory period and during target processing. The pattern of brain responses suggest both facilitation of attended targets and suppression of unattended distractors. These findings provide evidence for a two-process model of visual-spatial selective attention, where one mechanism (facilitation) influences relevant stimuli and another (suppression) acts to filter distracting stimuli.

  16. Heat transfer enhancement accompanying Leidenfrost state suppression at ultrahigh temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Arjang; Wurz, Jillian; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2014-10-14

    The well-known Leidenfrost effect is the formation of a vapor layer between a liquid and an underlying hot surface. This insulating vapor layer severely degrades heat transfer and results in surface dryout. We measure the heat transfer enhancement and dryout prevention benefits accompanying electrostatic suppression of the Leidenfrost state. Interfacial electric fields in the vapor layer can attract liquid toward the surface and promote wetting. This principle can suppress dryout even at ultrahigh temperatures exceeding 500 °C, which is more than 8 times the Leidenfrost superheat for organic solvents. Robust Leidenfrost state suppression is observed for a variety of liquids, ranging from low electrical conductivity organic solvents to electrically conducting salt solutions. Elimination of the vapor layer increases heat dissipation capacity by more than 1 order of magnitude. Heat removal capacities exceeding 500 W/cm(2) are measured, which is 5 times the critical heat flux (CHF) of water on common engineering surfaces. Furthermore, the heat transfer rate can be electrically controlled by the applied voltage. The underlying science is explained via a multiphysics analytical model which captures the coupled electrostatic-fluid-thermal transport phenomena underlying electrostatic Leidenfrost state suppression. Overall, this work uncovers the physics underlying dryout prevention and demonstrates electrically tunable boiling heat transfer with ultralow power consumption.

  17. Upsilon suppression in the Schrödinger-Langevin approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossiaux, P. B.; Katz, R.

    2016-12-01

    We treat the question of bottomonia suppression in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions (URHIC) as a dynamical open quantum problem, tackled for the first time using the Schrödinger-Langevin equation. Coupling this equation to the EPOS2 event generator, predictions are made for the nuclear modification factor of ϒ (1 S) and ϒ (2 S).

  18. Upsilon suppression in the Schr\\"odinger-Langevin approach

    CERN Document Server

    Gossiaux, Pol Bernard

    2016-01-01

    We treat the question of bottomonia suppression in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions (URHIC) as a dynamical open quantum problem, tackled for the first time using the Schr\\"odinger-Langevin equation. Coupling this equation to the EPOS2 event generator, predictions are made for the nuclear modification factor of $\\Upsilon (1S)$ and $\\Upsilon (2S)$.

  19. Stopping Speech Suppresses the Task-Irrelevant Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weidong; Oldenkamp, Caitlin L.; Aron, Adam R.

    2012-01-01

    Some situations require one to quickly stop an initiated response. Recent evidence suggests that rapid stopping engages a mechanism that has diffuse effects on the motor system. For example, stopping the hand dampens the excitability of the task-irrelevant leg. However, it is unclear whether this "global suppression" could apply across wider motor…

  20. Suppression of gravitropic response of primary roots by submergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, T; Kamisaka, S; Masuda, Y

    1996-05-01

    Primary roots of six plant species were placed horizontally either in humid air or under water, and their growth and gravitropic responses were examined. In air, all the roots showed a normal gravitropic curvature. Under water without aeration, roots of rice (Oryza sativa L.), oat (Avena sativa L.), azuki bean (Vigna angularis Ohwi et Ohashi), and cress (Lepidium sativum L.) curved downward at almost same rate as in air, whereas the curvature of roots of maize (Zea mays L.) and pea (Pisum sativum L.) was strongly suppressed. Submergence did not cause a decrease in growth rate of these roots. When roots of maize and pea were placed horizontally under water without aeration and then rotated in three dimensions on a clinostat in air, they showed a significant curvature, suggesting that the step suppressed by submergence is not graviperception but the subsequent signal transmission or differential growth process. Constant bubbling of air through the water partly restored the gravitropic curvature of maize roots and completely restored that of pea roots. The curvature of pea roots was also partly restored by the addition of an inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis, aminooxyacetic acid. In air, ethylene suppressed the gravitropic curvature of roots of maize and pea. Furthermore, the level of ethylene in the intercellular space of the roots was increased by submergence. These results suggest that the accumulation of ethylene in the tissue is at least partly involved in suppression of transmission of the gravity signal or of differential growth in maize and pea roots under conditions of submergence.

  1. Evaluating the Role of Contingency in Differentially Reinforced Tic Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himle, Michael B.; Woods, Douglas W.; Bunaciu, Liviu

    2008-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effects of tokens delivered on differential reinforcement of zero-rate behavior (DRO) schedules or noncontingently on tic suppression in 4 children with tics. Tic frequency was lower in 3 of 4 children when tokens were delivered contingent on the absence of tics than when tokens were delivered noncontingently.…

  2. Managing Abiotic Factors of Compost to Increase Soilborne Disease Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Deirdre E.

    2012-01-01

    Soilborne pathogens can devastate crops, causing economic losses for farmers due to reduced yields and expensive management practices. Fumigants and fungicides have harmful impacts on the surrounding environment and can be toxic to humans. Therefore, alternative methods of disease management are important. The disease suppressive abilities of…

  3. Suppressing the Morning Rise in Cortisol Impairs Free Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmele, Ulrike; Meier, Flurina; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Elevated glucocorticoid levels impair memory retrieval. We investigated whether retrieval under naturally elevated glucocorticoid levels, i.e., during the morning rise in cortisol can be improved by suppressing cortisol. In a crossover study 16 men retrieved emotional and neutral texts and pictures (learned 3 d earlier) 30 min after morning…

  4. Charge Recombination Suppressed by Destructive Quantum Interference in Heterojunction Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tempelaar, Roel; Koster, L. Jan Anton; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Knoester, Jasper; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2016-01-01

    We show that charge recombination in ordered heterojunctions depends sensitively on the degree of coherent delocalization of charges at the donor acceptor interface. Depending on the relative sign of the electron and hole transfer integrals, such delocalization can dramatically suppress recombinatio

  5. Using multiple perspectives to suppress information and complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)]|[New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (US). Computer Science Dept.; Webster, R.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Hartley, R.T. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (US). Computer Science Dept.

    1998-09-01

    Dissemination of battlespace information involves getting information to particular warfighters that is both useful and in a form that facilitates the tasks of those particular warfighters. There are two issues which motivate this problem of dissemination. The first issue deals with disseminating pertinent information to a particular warfighter. This can be thought of as information suppression. The second issue deals with facilitating the use of the information by tailoring the computer interface to the specific tasks of an individual warfighter. This can be thought of as interface complexity suppression. This paper presents a framework for suppressing information using an object-based knowledge representation methodology. This methodology has the ability to represent knowledge and information in multiple perspectives. Information can be suppressed by creating a perspective specific to an individual warfighter. In this way, only the information pertinent and useful to a warfighter is made available to that warfighter. Information is not removed, lost, or changed, but spread among multiple perspectives. Interface complexity is managed in a similar manner. Rather than have one generalized computer interface to access all information, the computer interface can be divided into interface elements. Interface elements can then be selected and arranged into a perspective-specific interface. This is done in a manner to facilitate completion of tasks contained in that perspective. A basic battlespace domain containing ground and air elements and associated warfighters is used to exercise the methodology.

  6. Secondary Voltage Control for Harmonics Suppression in Islanded Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiongfei; Guerrero, Josep M.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a secondary voltage waveform control approach to suppress harmonics in islanded microgrids. Compared with the secondary control for traditional large power systems, the proposed control scheme can regulate the voltage waveform instead of voltage magnitude of sensitive buses in...

  7. Suppression of antibiotic resistance acquisition by combined use of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shingo; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the effect of combinatorial use of antibiotics with a trade-off relationship of resistance, i.e., resistance acquisition to one drug causes susceptibility to the other drug, and vice versa, on the evolution of antibiotic resistance. We demonstrated that this combinatorial use of antibiotics significantly suppressed the acquisition of resistance.

  8. Oligotrophic bacteria and root disease suppression in organically managed soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senechkin, I.V.

    2013-01-01

      The objective of this thesis was to obtain a better understanding of soil health in terms of microbial and chemical characteristics as well as suppression of soil borne plant pathogens. Organic soils were chosen as an appropriate model for studying soil health. Four different organic amendme

  9. Rosmarinus officinalis extract suppresses Propionibacterium acnes-induced inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Chuang, Lu-Te; Lien, Tsung-Jung; Liing, Yau-Rong; Chen, Wei-Yu; Tsai, Po-Jung

    2013-04-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a key pathogen involved in the progression of acne inflammation. The development of a new agent possessing antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity against P. acnes is therefore of interest. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract on P. acnes-induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that ethanolic rosemary extract (ERE) significantly suppressed the secretion and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in P. acnes-stimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. In an in vivo mouse model, concomitant intradermal injection of ERE attenuated the P. acnes-induced ear swelling and granulomatous inflammation. Since ERE suppressed the P. acnes-induced nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation and mRNA expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, the suppressive effect of ERE might be due, at least partially, to diminished NF-κB activation and TLR2-mediated signaling pathways. Furthermore, three major constituents of ERE, carnosol, carnosic acid, and rosmarinic acid, exerted different immumodulatory activities in vitro. In brief, rosmarinic acid significantly suppressed IL-8 production, while the other two compounds inhibited IL-1β production. Further study is needed to explore the role of bioactive compounds of rosemary in mitigation of P. acnes-induced inflammation.

  10. Global Enhancement but Local Suppression in Feature-based Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forschack, Norman; Andersen, Søren K; Müller, Matthias M

    2017-04-01

    A key property of feature-based attention is global facilitation of the attended feature throughout the visual field. Previously, we presented superimposed red and blue randomly moving dot kinematograms (RDKs) flickering at a different frequency each to elicit frequency-specific steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) that allowed us to analyze neural dynamics in early visual cortex when participants shifted attention to one of the two colors. Results showed amplification of the attended and suppression of the unattended color as measured by SSVEP amplitudes. Here, we tested whether the suppression of the unattended color also operates globally. To this end, we presented superimposed flickering red and blue RDKs in the center of a screen and a red and blue RDK in the left and right periphery, respectively, also flickering at different frequencies. Participants shifted attention to one color of the superimposed RDKs in the center to discriminate coherent motion events in the attended from the unattended color RDK, whereas the peripheral RDKs were task irrelevant. SSVEP amplitudes elicited by the centrally presented RDKs confirmed the previous findings of amplification and suppression. For peripherally located RDKs, we found the expected SSVEP amplitude increase, relative to precue baseline when color matched the one of the centrally attended RDK. We found no reduction in SSVEP amplitude relative to precue baseline, when the peripheral color matched the unattended one of the central RDK, indicating that, while facilitation in feature-based attention operates globally, suppression seems to be linked to the location of focused attention.

  11. Rudder gap cavitation: Fundamental understanding and its suppression devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Shin Hyung, E-mail: shr@snu.ac.k [Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Research Institute of Marine Systems Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanangno, Gwanak-ku, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Changmin; Lee, Hee Bum [Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jungkeun [Jungseok Research Institute of International Logistics and Trade, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    With the increasing size and speed of cargo ships, which results in high speed flow in propeller slipstream, cavitation is frequently observed on and around the rudder system. Among the various types of cavitation on the rudder system, the rudder gap cavitation is the most difficult one to control and suppress. For the development of rudder gap cavitation suppression devices, both experimental and numerical analyses of the physical phenomenon are warranted. In the present study, experiments of the incipient cavitation and pressure measurement were carried out for typical cargo ship rudder sections with and without the suppression devices, which were suggested by the author. The experiments were simulated using computational fluid dynamics tools and the results were compared in terms of the cavitation inception and surface pressure distribution. Fundamental understanding of the rudder gap cavitation inception was obtained along with its relevance to the surface pressure distribution. It is confirmed that the gap flow blocking devices effectively suppress the rudder gap cavitation and, at the same time, augment lift.

  12. Suppression cost forecasts in advance of wildfire seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey P. Prestemon; Karen Abt; Krista Gebert

    2008-01-01

    Approaches for forecasting wildfire suppression costs in advance of a wildfire season are demonstrated for two lead times: fall and spring of the current fiscal year (Oct. 1–Sept. 30). Model functional forms are derived from aggregate expressions of a least cost plus net value change model. Empirical estimates of these models are used to generate advance-of-season...

  13. Discovery and early development of non-suppressed ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, James S; Gjerde, Douglas T

    2010-08-01

    This year marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of Non-Suppressed Ion Chromatography, which is a method for the rapid separation of anions with on-line conductimetric detection. In this method, the separation column is connected directly to the conductimetric detector. This single-column method is a simpler technique than the original suppressed ion chromatography method, which requires a large suppressor column to reduce the background conductance. In the new method, the background signal is reduced to a manageable level simply by using an ion-exchange separation column of low exchange capacity that lowers the eluent concentration needed for separation. The eluent ion used for separation is chosen based on having large, bulky structure, which lowers the equivalent conductance and facilitates detection of the sample anions. This is a personal account of the initial discovery and early development of non-suppressed ion chromatography. The circumstances for the discovery are recounted by the two authors. Methods are described for determination of anions, cations with indirect detection, and techniques for increasing detection sensitivity. A fundamental equation for the prediction of ion chromatography detector response is given, and the development of several types of detection schemes for ion chromatography is discussed. Finally, the impact of non-suppressed ion chromatography is discussed together with comments on the discovery process.

  14. Disease suppressive soilless culture systems; characterisation of its microflora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, J.; Willemsen-de Klein, M.J.E.I.M.; Rattink, H.; Os, van E.A.

    2001-01-01

    The trend in glasshouse horticulture has always been to start culture systems as aseptic as possible. However, several root diseases still cause problems under these conditions. The present paper shows the importance of the microflora to suppress Pythium aphanidermatum, a fungal root pathogen which

  15. Discrete Element Model for Suppression of Coffee-Ring Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Lam, Miu Ling; Chen, Ting-Hsuan

    2017-02-01

    When a sessile droplet evaporates, coffee-ring effect drives the suspended particulate matters to the droplet edge, eventually forming a ring-shaped deposition. Because it causes a non-uniform distribution of solid contents, which is undesired in many applications, attempts have been made to eliminate the coffee-ring effect. Recent reports indicated that the coffee-ring effect can be suppressed by a mixture of spherical and non-spherical particles with enhanced particle-particle interaction at air-water interface. However, a model to comprehend the inter-particulate activities has been lacking. Here, we report a discrete element model (particle system) to investigate the phenomenon. The modeled dynamics included particle traveling following the capillary flow with Brownian motion, and its resultant 3D hexagonal close packing of particles along the contact line. For particles being adsorbed by air-water interface, we modeled cluster growth, cluster deformation, and cluster combination. We found that the suppression of coffee-ring effect does not require a circulatory flow driven by an inward Marangoni flow at air-water interface. Instead, the number of new cluster formation, which can be enhanced by increasing the ratio of non-spherical particles and the overall number of microspheres, is more dominant in the suppression process. Together, this model provides a useful platform elucidating insights for suppressing coffee-ring effect for practical applications in the future.

  16. Weight Suppression Predicts Time to Remission from Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Michael R.; Berner, Laura A.; Swanson, Sonja A.; Clark, Vicki L.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Franko, Debra L.; Shaw, Jena A.; Ross, Stephanie; Herzog, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether, at study entry, (a) weight suppression (WS), the difference between highest past adult weight and current weight, prospectively predicts time to first full remission from bulimia nervosa (BN) over a follow-up period of 8 years, and (b) weight change over time mediates the relationship between WS and time to first…

  17. Coping with Fear through Suppression and Avoidance of Threatening Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jesper; Shapiro, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    Fear appeal communications are widely used by social marketers in their efforts to persuade individuals to refrain from engaging in risky behaviors. The present research shows that exposure to a fear appeal can lead to the suppression of concepts semantically related to the threat and bias attentional resources away from threat-relevant…

  18. TGF-β Tumor Suppression through a Lethal EMT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David, Charles J; Huang, Yun-Han; Chen, Mo; Su, Jie; Zou, Yilong; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Massagué, Joan

    2016-01-01

    ... suppression ( Guasch et al., 2007 ) or induce an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) that promotes cancer cell invasion and metastasis ( Heldin et al., 2012 ) or promote cancer stem cell heterogeneity and drug resistance ( Oshimori et al., 2015 ). The mechanistic basis for this duality is a long-unsolved question. TGF-β is a major tu...

  19. Fission-suppressed hybrid reactor: the fusion breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Coops, M.S.

    1982-12-01

    Results of a conceptual design study of a /sup 233/U-producing fusion breeder are presented. The majority of the study was devoted to conceptual design and evaluation of a fission-suppressed blanket and to fuel cycle issues such as fuel reprocessing, fuel handling, and fuel management. Studies in the areas of fusion engineering, reactor safety, and economics were also performed.

  20. Maturation of cognitive control: delineating response inhibition and interference suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Brydges

    Full Text Available Cognitive control is integral to the ability to attend to a relevant task whilst suppressing distracting information or inhibiting prepotent responses. The current study examined the development of these two subprocesses by examining electrophysiological indices elicited during each process. Thirteen 18 year-old adults and thirteen children aged 8-11 years (mean=9.77 years completed a hybrid Go/Nogo flanker task while continuous EEG data were recorded. The N2 topography for both response inhibition and interference suppression changed with increasing age. The neural activation associated with response inhibition became increasingly frontally distributed with age, and showed decreases of both amplitude and peak latency from childhood to adulthood, possibly due to reduced cognitive demands and myelination respectively occurring during this period. Interestingly, a significant N2 effect was apparent in adults, but not observed in children during trials requiring interference suppression. This could be due to more diffuse activation in children, which would require smaller levels of activation over a larger region of the brain than is reported in adults. Overall, these results provide evidence of distinct maturational processes occurring throughout late childhood and adolescence, highlighting the separability of response inhibition and interference suppression.

  1. Uncovering growth-suppressive MicroRNAs in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xi; Sempere, Lorenzo F; Galimberti, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profiles improve classification, diagnosis, and prognostic information of malignancies, including lung cancer. This study uncovered unique growth-suppressive miRNAs in lung cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: miRNA arrays were done on normal lung tissues and adenocar...

  2. Rewriting and suppressing UMLS terms for improved biomedical term identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hettne Kristina M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of terms is essential for biomedical text mining.. We concentrate here on the use of vocabularies for term identification, specifically the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS. To make the UMLS more suitable for biomedical text mining we implemented and evaluated nine term rewrite and eight term suppression rules. The rules rely on UMLS properties that have been identified in previous work by others, together with an additional set of new properties discovered by our group during our work with the UMLS. Our work complements the earlier work in that we measure the impact on the number of terms identified by the different rules on a MEDLINE corpus. The number of uniquely identified terms and their frequency in MEDLINE were computed before and after applying the rules. The 50 most frequently found terms together with a sample of 100 randomly selected terms were evaluated for every rule. Results Five of the nine rewrite rules were found to generate additional synonyms and spelling variants that correctly corresponded to the meaning of the original terms and seven out of the eight suppression rules were found to suppress only undesired terms. Using the five rewrite rules that passed our evaluation, we were able to identify 1,117,772 new occurrences of 14,784 rewritten terms in MEDLINE. Without the rewriting, we recognized 651,268 terms belonging to 397,414 concepts; with rewriting, we recognized 666,053 terms belonging to 410,823 concepts, which is an increase of 2.8% in the number of terms and an increase of 3.4% in the number of concepts recognized. Using the seven suppression rules, a total of 257,118 undesired terms were suppressed in the UMLS, notably decreasing its size. 7,397 terms were suppressed in the corpus. Conclusions We recommend applying the five rewrite rules and seven suppression rules that passed our evaluation when the UMLS is to be used for biomedical term identification in MEDLINE. A software

  3. Migraine increases centre-surround suppression for drifting visual stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Battista

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pathophysiology of migraine is incompletely understood, but evidence points to hyper-responsivity of cortical neurons being a key feature. The basis of hyper-responsiveness is not clear, with an excitability imbalance potentially arising from either reduced inhibition or increased excitation. In this study, we measure centre-surround contrast suppression in people with migraine as a perceptual analogue of the interplay between inhibition and excitation in cortical areas responsible for vision. We predicted that reduced inhibitory function in migraine would reduce perceptual surround suppression. Recent models of neuronal surround suppression incorporate excitatory feedback that drives surround inhibition. Consequently, an increase in excitation predicts an increase in perceptual surround suppression. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Twenty-six people with migraine and twenty approximately age- and gender-matched non-headache controls participated. The perceived contrast of a central sinusoidal grating patch (4 c/deg stationary grating, or 2 c/deg drifting at 2 deg/sec, 40% contrast was measured in the presence and absence of a 95% contrast annular grating (same orientation, spatial frequency, and drift rate. For the static grating, similar surround suppression strength was present in control and migraine groups with the presence of the surround resulting in the central patch appearing to be 72% and 65% of its true contrast for control and migraine groups respectively (t(44 = 0.81, p = 0.42. For the drifting stimulus, the migraine group showed significantly increased surround suppression (t(44 = 2.86, p<0.01, with perceived contrast being on average 53% of actual contrast for the migraine group and 68% for non-headache controls. CONCLUSIONS: In between migraines, when asymptomatic, visual surround suppression for drifting stimuli is greater in individuals with migraine than in controls. The data provides evidence for a

  4. Materials Science Research Rack-1 Fire Suppressant Distribution Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, P. O.

    2002-01-01

    Fire suppressant distribution testing was performed on the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1), a furnace facility payload that will be installed in the U.S. Lab module of the International Space Station. Unlike racks that were tested previously, the MSRR-1 uses the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) to reduce vibration on experiments, so the effects of ARIS on fire suppressant distribution were unknown. Two tests were performed to map the distribution of CO2 fire suppressant throughout a mockup of the MSRR-1 designed to have the same component volumes and flowpath restrictions as the flight rack. For the first test, the average maximum CO2 concentration for the rack was 60 percent, achieved within 45 s of discharge initiation, meeting the requirement to reach 50 percent throughout the rack within 1 min. For the second test, one of the experiment mockups was removed to provide a worst-case configuration, and the average maximum CO2 concentration for the rack was 58 percent. Comparing the results of this testing with results from previous testing leads to several general conclusions that can be used to evaluate future racks. The MSRR-1 will meet the requirements for fire suppressant distribution. Primary factors that affect the ability to meet the CO2 distribution requirements are the free air volume in the rack and the total area and distribution of openings in the rack shell. The length of the suppressant flowpath and degree of tortuousness has little correlation with CO2 concentration. The total area of holes in the rack shell could be significantly increased. The free air volume could be significantly increased. To ensure the highest maximum CO2 concentration, the PFE nozzle should be inserted to the stop on the nozzle.

  5. Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Leslie Redpath

    2012-05-01

    This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

  6. Weed-Suppressing Effect and Mechanism of Allelopathic Rice Accessions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUFei; KONGChui-hua; XUXiao-hua; ZHANGChao-xian; CHENXiong-hui

    2004-01-01

    Two allelopathic rice accessions, PI312777 and Allelopathy i, significantly suppressed the growth of associated weeds in the field. Moreover, their weed-suppressing effects were correlated with the cultivation patterns. The weed-suppressing effects of throwing and transplanting were more effective than that of direct seeding. Furthermore, the amounts of allelochemicals (resorcinols, flavones and hydroxamic acids) produced and released from two allelopathic rice accessions were much higher than that from a nonallelopathic rice variety Hua-Jing-Xian i, and reached the maximum concentration at the 6th leaf stage. Differences in the weed-suppressing effects of rice accessions appear to result from the accessions producing and releasing different amounts of allelochemicals in the field. Further research confirmed that in PI312777 plants, allelochemicals were synthesized by the above-ground parts, and then secreted through the root tissues. Root tissues of PI312777 plants never produced the allelochemicals. Root exudates from PI312777 could significantly inhibit the growth of E. crus-galli surrounding rice plants in water culture. However, when activated carbon was added to the culture solution, which could absorb allelochemicals from root exudates, the growth of E. crus-galli was no longer significantly inhibited. Weed-suppressing effects of rice accessions depended on allelopathy, cultivation patterns and other factors in rice fields, while allelopathy was one of important factors. Interestingly, the amounts of allelochemicals produced and released from allelopathic rice plants may be induced by the presence of E. crus-galli.This suggests that there is a possible chemical recognition between rice and E. crus-galli.

  7. Mode of ATM-dependent suppression of chromosome translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-12-09

    It is well documented that deficiency in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein leads to elevated frequency of chromosome translocation, however, it remains poorly understood how ATM suppresses translocation frequency. In the present study, we addressed the mechanism of ATM-dependent suppression of translocation frequency. To know frequency of translocation events in a whole genome at once, we performed centromere/telomere FISH and scored dicentric chromosomes, because dicentric and translocation occur with equal frequency and by identical mechanism. By centromere/telomere FISH analysis, we confirmed that chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of ATM causes 2 to 2.5-fold increase in dicentric frequency at first mitosis after 2 Gy of gamma-irradiation in G0/G1. The FISH analysis revealed that ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses dicentric frequency, since RNAi-mediated knockdown of p53 elevated dicentric frequency by 1.5-fold. We found ATM also suppresses dicentric occurrence independently of its checkpoint role, as ATM inhibitor showed additional effect on dicentric frequency in the context of p53 depletion and Chk1/2 inactivation. Epistasis analysis using chemical inhibitors revealed that ATM kinase functions in the same pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to suppress dicentric frequency. From the results in the present study, we conclude that ATM minimizes translocation frequency through its commitment to G1 checkpoint and DNA double-strand break repair pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-PKcs.

  8. In vitro osteoclast-suppressing effect of sodium ibandronate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; YANG Da-long; WANG Yun-xia; WANG Hui-wang; ZHEN Zeng-jiang; ZHANG Ying-ze; SHEN Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates (BPs) have been reported to reduce local recurrence in giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone because of their osteoclast-suppressing effect; however,the optimal mode of delivery and the dose and duration of treatment of BPs remain to be established.To address these issues,it is first necessary to clarify the manner of action of BPs on osteoclasts.We herein evaluated the osteoclast-suppressing effect of sodium ibandronate in vitro.Methods Mouse osteoclasts (OCLs) were generated in vitro using mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells.First,various concentrations of sodium ibandronate and equal amounts of phosphate-buffered saline were added to cell culture media.The number of multinucleated cells (over three nuclei) was recorded in each group,OCL formation was compared,and the most effective concentration of sodium ibandronate was determined.Then,high concentrations of sodium ibandronate were added to the experimental cell culture media; no ibandronate was given in the control group.Comparisons were made between the two groups in terms of OCL adhesion,migration,and bone resorption.Results OCL formation was suppressed by sodium ibandronate in vitro; the most pronounced effect was observed at the concentration of 10-5 mol/L.OCL migration and bone resorption were significantly suppressed at this concentration,though there was no effect on OCL adhesion.Conclusions Sodium ibandronate was effective in suppressing OCLs and decreasing resorption in GCT.The strong anti-OCL effectiveness at a high concentration in vitro indicates a topical mode of application.

  9. Macrophage elastase suppresses white adipose tissue expansion with cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takao; Kelly, Neil J; Takahashi, Saeko; Leme, Adriana S; Houghton, A McGarry; Shapiro, Steven D

    2014-12-01

    Macrophage elastase (MMP12) is a key mediator of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced emphysema, yet its role in other smoking related pathologies remains unclear. The weight suppressing effects of smoking are a major hindrance to cessation efforts, and MMP12 is known to suppress the vascularization on which adipose tissue growth depends by catalyzing the formation of antiangiogenic peptides endostatin and angiostatin. The goal of this study was to determine the role of MMP12 in adipose tissue growth and smoking-related suppression of weight gain. Whole body weights and white adipose depots from wild-type and Mmp12-deficient mice were collected during early postnatal development and after chronic CS exposure. Adipose tissue specimens were analyzed for angiogenic and adipocytic markers and for content of the antiangiogenic peptides endostatin and angiostatin. Cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with adipose tissue homogenate to examine its effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and secretion. MMP12 content and activity were increased in the adipose tissue of wild-type mice at 2 weeks of age, leading to elevated endostatin production, inhibition of VEGF secretion, and decreased adipose tissue vascularity. By 8 weeks of age, adipose MMP12 levels subsided, and the protein was no longer detectable. However, chronic CS exposure led to macrophage accumulation and restored adipose MMP12 activity, thereby suppressing adipose tissue mass and vascularity. Our results reveal a novel systemic role for MMP12 in postnatal adipose tissue expansion and smoking-associated weight loss by suppressing vascularity within the white adipose tissue depots.

  10. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by ..cap alpha..-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S/sub 2/ episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system.

  11. A cortical locus for anisotropic overlay suppression of stimuli presented at fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bruce C; Richard, Bruno; Andres, Kristin; Johnson, Aaron P; Thompson, Benjamin; Essock, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    Human contrast sensitivity for narrowband Gabor targets is suppressed when superimposed on narrowband masks of the same spatial frequency and orientation (referred to as overlay suppression), with suppression being broadly tuned to orientation and spatial frequency. Numerous behavioral and neurophysiological experiments have suggested that overlay suppression originates from the initial lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) inputs to V1, which is consistent with the broad tuning typically reported for overlay suppression. However, recent reports have shown narrowly tuned anisotropic overlay suppression when narrowband targets are masked by broadband noise. Consequently, researchers have argued for an additional form of overlay suppression that involves cortical contrast gain control processes. The current study sought to further explore this notion behaviorally using narrowband and broadband masks, along with a computational neural simulation of the hypothesized underlying gain control processes in cortex. Additionally, we employed transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in order to test whether cortical processes are involved in driving narrowly tuned anisotropic suppression. The behavioral results yielded anisotropic overlay suppression for both broadband and narrowband masks and could be replicated with our computational neural simulation of anisotropic gain control. Further, the anisotropic form of overlay suppression could be directly modulated by tDCS, which would not be expected if the suppression was primarily subcortical in origin. Altogether, the results of the current study provide further evidence in support of an additional overlay suppression process that originates in cortex and show that this form of suppression is also observable with narrowband masks.

  12. The effect of essential oil formulations for potato sprout suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Moses S; Lajide, Labunmi; Oladimeji, Matthew O; Setzer, William N

    2010-04-01

    The concerns over safety and environmental impact of synthetic pesticides such as chlorpropham (CIPC) has stimulated interest in finding environmentally benign, natural sprout suppressants, including essential oils. The effects of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Lippia multiflora essential oils on sprout growth and decay of stored potatoes has been investigated. Formulations of essential oils with alumina, bentonite, or kaolin, both with and without Triton X-100 additive, were tested. These formulations have been compared to the pulverized plant materials themselves as well as wick-volatilized essential oils. The results showed that the tested oils possess compositions that make them suitable for application as sprout suppressants. Additionally, the formulation seems to be able to reduce the volatility of the essential oil and artificially extend dormancy of stored potatoes.

  13. Kalman filtering to suppress spurious signals in Adaptive Optics control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyneer, L; Veran, J P

    2010-03-29

    In many scenarios, an Adaptive Optics (AO) control system operates in the presence of temporally non-white noise. We use a Kalman filter with a state space formulation that allows suppression of this colored noise, hence improving residual error over the case where the noise is assumed to be white. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new filter in the case of the estimated Gemini Planet Imager tip-tilt environment, where there are both common-path and non-common path vibrations. We discuss how this same framework can also be used to suppress spatial aliasing during predictive wavefront control assuming frozen flow in a low-order AO system without a spatially filtered wavefront sensor, and present experimental measurements from Altair that clearly reveal these aliased components.

  14. Suppression of Electron Thermal Conduction in High $\\beta$ Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Roberg-Clark, G T; Reynolds, C S; Swisdak, M

    2016-01-01

    Electron heat conduction is explored with particle-in-cell simulations and analytic modeling in a high $\\beta$ system relevant to galaxy clusters. Linear wave theory reveals that whistler waves are driven unstable by electron heat flux even when the heat flux is weak. The resonant interaction of electrons with these waves plays a critical role in controlling the impact of the waves on the heat flux. In a 1D model only electrons moving opposite in direction to the heat flux resonate with the waves and electron heat flux is only modestly reduced. In a 2D system transverse whistlers also resonate with electrons propagating in the direction of the heat flux and resonant overlap leads to strong suppression of electron heat flux. The results suggest that electron heat conduction might be strongly suppressed in galaxy clusters.

  15. Global suppression of electrocortical activity in unilateral perinatal thalamic stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kharoshankaya, Liudmila

    2014-07-01

    We present an unusual case of persistent generalized electroencephalography (EEG) suppression and right-sided clonic seizures in a male infant born at 40(+2) weeks\\' gestation, birthweight 3240g, with an isolated unilateral thalamic stroke. The EEG at 13 hours after birth showed a generalized very low amplitude background pattern, which progressed to frequent electrographic seizures over the left hemisphere. The interictal background EEG pattern remained grossly abnormal over the next 48 hours, showing very low background amplitudes (<10μV). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an isolated acute left-sided thalamic infarction. This is the first description of severe global EEG suppression caused by an isolated unilateral thalamic stroke and supports the role of the thalamus as the control centre for cortical electrical activity.

  16. EEG Suppression Associated with Apneic Episodes in a Neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evonne Low

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the EEG findings from an ex-preterm neonate at term equivalent age who presented with intermittent but prolonged apneic episodes which were presumed to be seizures. A total of 8 apneic episodes were captured (duration 23–376 seconds during EEG monitoring. The baseline EEG activity was appropriate for corrected gestational age and no electrographic seizure activity was recorded. The average baseline heart rate was 168 beats per minute (bpm and the baseline oxygen saturation level was in the mid-nineties. Periods of complete EEG suppression lasting 68 and 179 seconds, respectively, were recorded during 2 of these 8 apneic episodes. Both episodes were accompanied by bradycardia less than 70 bpm and oxygen saturation levels of less than 20%. Short but severe episodes of apnea can cause complete EEG suppression in the neonate.

  17. Emergence and accumulation of novel pathogens suppress an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Kerry Bohl; Harmon, Philip F; Goss, Erica M; Clay, Keith; Luke Flory, S

    2016-04-01

    Emerging pathogens are a growing threat to human health, agriculture and the diversity of ecological communities but may also help control problematic species. Here we investigated the diversity, distribution and consequences of emerging fungal pathogens infecting an aggressive invasive grass that is rapidly colonising habitats throughout the eastern USA. We document the recent emergence and accumulation over time of diverse pathogens that are members of a single fungal genus and represent multiple, recently described or undescribed species. We also show that experimental suppression of these pathogens increased host performance in the field, demonstrating the negative effects of emerging pathogens on invasive plants. Our results suggest that invasive species can facilitate pathogen emergence and amplification, raising concerns about movement of pathogens among agricultural, horticultural, and wild grasses. However, one possible benefit of pathogen accumulation is suppression of aggressive invaders over the long term, potentially abating their negative impacts on native communities.

  18. Vibration suppression for laminated composite plates with arbitrary boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Narita, Y.

    2013-11-01

    An analysis of vibration suppression for laminated composite plates subject to active constrained layer damping under various boundary conditions is presented. Piezoelectric-fiber-reinforced composites (PFRCs) are used as active actuators, and the effect of PFRC patches on vibration control is reported here. An analytical approach is expanded to analyze the vibration of laminated composites with arbitrary boundary conditions. By using Hamilton's principle and the Rayleigh-Ritz method, the equation of motion for the resulting electromechanical coupling system is derived. A velocity feedback control rule is employed to obtain an effective active damping in the vibration control. The orientation effect of piezoelectric fibers in the PFRC patches on the suppression of forced vibrations is also investigated.

  19. Kalman filtering to suppress spurious signals in Adaptive Optics control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyneer, L; Veran, J P

    2010-03-29

    In many scenarios, an Adaptive Optics (AO) control system operates in the presence of temporally non-white noise. We use a Kalman filter with a state space formulation that allows suppression of this colored noise, hence improving residual error over the case where the noise is assumed to be white. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new filter in the case of the estimated Gemini Planet Imager tip-tilt environment, where there are both common-path and non-common path vibrations. We discuss how this same framework can also be used to suppress spatial aliasing during predictive wavefront control assuming frozen flow in a low-order AO system without a spatially filtered wavefront sensor, and present experimental measurements from Altair that clearly reveal these aliased components.

  20. Suppression of phonon transport in molecular Christmas trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Colin John; Famili, Marjan; Grace, Iain; Sadeghi, Hatef

    2017-02-27

    Minimising the phonon thermal conductance of self-assembled molecular films, whilst preserving their electrical properties, is highly desirable, both for thermal management at the nanoscale and for the design of high-efficiency thermoelectric materials. Here we highlight a new strategy for minimising the phonon thermal conductance of Christmas-tree-like molecules composed of a long trunk, along which phonons can propagate, attached to pendant molecular branches. We demonstrate that phonon transport along the trunk is suppressed by Fano resonances associated with internal vibrational modes of the branches and that thermal conductance is suppressed most-effectively in molecules with pendant branches of different lengths. As examples, we use density functional theory to demonstrate the reduction in phonon transport in tree-like molecules formed from alkane or acene trunks with various pendant branches.

  1. Suppression of radiation damping for high precision quantitative NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayle, Kevin; Julien, Maxime; Remaud, Gérald S; Akoka, Serge

    2015-10-01

    True quantitative analysis of concentrated samples by (1)H NMR is made very difficult by Radiation Damping. A novel NMR sequence (inspired by the WET NMR sequence and by Outer Volume Saturation methods) is therefore proposed to suppress this phenomenon by reducing the spatial area and consequently the number of spins contributing to the signal detected. The size of the detected volume can be easily chosen in a large range and line shape distortions are avoided thanks to a uniform signal suppression of the outer volume. Composition of a mixture can as a result be determined with very high accuracy (precision and trueness) at the per mille level whatever the concentrations and without hardware modification.

  2. Noise suppression for micromechanical resonator via intrinsic dynamic feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou IAN; Zhi-rui GONG; Chang-pu SUN

    2008-01-01

    We study a dynamic mechanism to passively suppress the thermal noise of a micromechanical resonator through an intrinsic self-feedback that is genuinely non-Markovian.We use two coupled resonators,one as the target resonator and the other as an ancillary resonator,to illustrate the mechanism and its noise reduction effect.The intrinsic feedback is realized through the dynamics of coupling between the two resonators:the motions of the target resonator and the ancillary resonator mutually influence each other in a cyclic fashion.Specifically,the states that the target resonator has attained earlier will affect the state it attains later due to the presence of the ancillary resonator.We show that the feedback mechanism will bring forth the effect of noise suppression in the spectrum of displacement,but not in the spectrum of momentum.

  3. Suppression and repression: A theoretical discussion illustrated by a movie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia de Souza Campos Paiva

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The first translations of Freud's work into Portuguese have presented problems because they were not translated from the German language. More than a hundred years after the beginning of Psychoanalysis, there are still many discussions on Freud's metapsychology and a considerable difficulty in obtaining a consensus on the translation of some concepts. This paper refers back to Freud's concepts of primal repression, repression and suppression. In order to discuss such concepts, we have made use of a film, co-produced by Germans and Argentineans, which is named "The Song in me" (Das Lied in mir, released to the public in 2011 and directed by Florian Micoud Cossen. Through this motion picture, the following of Freud's concepts are analyzed, and the differentiation between them is discussed: suppression and repression, as well as the importance of their precise translation.

  4. ATM promotes apoptosis and suppresses tumorigenesis in response to Myc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusapati, Raju V.; Rounbehler, Robert J.; Hong, Sungki; Powers, John T.; Yan, Mingshan; Kiguchi, Kaoru; McArthur, Mark J.; Wong, Paul K.; Johnson, David G.

    2006-01-01

    Overexpression of the c-myc oncogene contributes to the development of a significant number of human cancers. In response to deregulated Myc activity, the p53 tumor suppressor is activated to promote apoptosis and inhibit tumor formation. Here we demonstrate that p53 induction in response to Myc overexpression requires the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, a major regulator of the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks. In a transgenic mouse model overexpressing Myc in squamous epithelial tissues, inactivation of Atm suppresses apoptosis and accelerates tumorigenesis. Deregulated Myc expression induces DNA damage in primary transgenic keratinocytes and the formation of H2AX and phospho-SMC1 foci in transgenic tissue. These findings suggest that Myc overexpression causes DNA damage in vivo and that the ATM-dependent response to this damage is critical for p53 activation, apoptosis, and the suppression of tumor development. p53 | DNA damage

  5. Method of Suppressing Sublimation in Advanced Thermoelectric Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Caillat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of applying a physical barrier to suppress thermal decomposition near a surface of a thermoelectric material including applying a continuous metal foil to a predetermined portion of the surface of the thermoelectric material, physically binding the continuous metal foil to the surface of the thermoelectric material using a binding member, and heating in a predetermined atmosphere the applied and physically bound continuous metal foil and the thermoelectric material to a sufficient temperature in order to promote bonding between the continuous metal foil and the surface of the thermoelectric material. The continuous metal foil forms a physical barrier to enclose a predetermined portion of the surface. Thermal decomposition is suppressed at the surface of the thermoelectric material enclosed by the physical barrier when the thermoelectric element is in operation.

  6. A saponin-detoxifying enzyme mediates suppression of plant defences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouarab, K.; Melton, R.; Peart, J.; Baulcombe, D.; Osbourn, A.

    2002-08-01

    Plant disease resistance can be conferred by constitutive features such as structural barriers or preformed antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Additional defence mechanisms are activated in response to pathogen attack and include localized cell death (the hypersensitive response). Pathogens use different strategies to counter constitutive and induced plant defences, including degradation of preformed antimicrobial compounds and the production of molecules that suppress induced plant defences. Here we present evidence for a two-component process in which a fungal pathogen subverts the preformed antimicrobial compounds of its host and uses them to interfere with induced defence responses. Antimicrobial saponins are first hydrolysed by a fungal saponin-detoxifying enzyme. The degradation product of this hydrolysis then suppresses induced defence responses by interfering with fundamental signal transduction processes leading to disease resistance.

  7. Laser pumped (4)He magnetometer with light shift suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zaisheng; Wang, He; Peng, Xiang; Wu, Teng; Guo, Hong

    2016-11-01

    We report a laser-pumped (4)He atomic magnetometer with light shift suppression through the atomic sensor itself. A linearly polarized light is used to optically align the (4)He metastable atoms and we monitor the magneto-optical double resonance (MODR) signals produced by the left- and right-circularly orthogonal components. It is shown that light shift leads to the atomic alignment to orientation conversion effect, and thus, the difference between the two MODR signals. One of these two MODR signals is locked at the Larmor frequency and is used to measure the ambient magnetic field, while the differential signal is, simultaneously, fed back to suppress the light shift. The scheme could be of the advantage to the design of compact magnetometers by reducing the systematic errors due to light shift.

  8. Reviving the energy independent suppression of the solar neutrino flux

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, S; Gupta, N; Roy, D P; Choubey, Sandhya; Goswami, Srubabati; Gupta, Nayantara

    2001-01-01

    We explore the possibility of an energy independent suppression of the solar neutrino flux in the context of the recent SuperKamiokande data. From a global analysis of the rate and spectrum data, this scenario is allowed at only 14% probability with the observed Cl rate. If we allow for a 20% upward renormalisation of the Cl rate along with a downward renormalisation of the $B$ neutrino flux then the fit improves considerably to a probability of $\\sim 50%$. We compare the quality of these fits with those of the MSW solutions. These renormalisations are also found to improve the quality of the fits with MSW solutions and enlarge the allowed region of their validity in the parameter space substantially. Over much of this enlarged region the matter effects on the suppression of the solar neutrino flux are found to be very weak, so that the solutions become practically energy independent.

  9. Photonic crystal enhancement of auger-suppressed infrared photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurić, Zoran; Jakšić, Zoran; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Andreas; Matić, Milan; Popović, Mirjana

    2001-04-01

    We examine theoretically and experimentally the possibilities to reach room-temperature background-limited operation of narrow-bandgap compound semiconductor photodetectors in (3-14) micrometer infrared wavelength range. To this purpose we consider the combination of non-equilibrium Auger suppression with photonic crystal enhancement (PCE). This means that Auger generation-recombination processes are suppressed utilizing exclusion, extraction or magnetoconcentration effects or their combination. The residual radiative recombination is removed by immersing the detector active area into a photonic crystal and using the benefits of re-absorption (photon recycling) to effectively increase the radiative lifetime. In this manner the total generation-recombination noise is strongly quenched in sufficiently defect-free device materials. It is concluded that the operation of thus enhanced photonic detectors could even approach signal fluctuation limit.

  10. Strong-field-ionization suppression by light-field control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räsänen, Esa; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    In recent attempts to control strong-field phenomena such as molecular dissociation, undesired ionization sometimes seriously limited the outcome. In this work we examine the capability of quantum optimal control theory to suppress the ionization by rational pulse shaping. Using a simple model sy......, for the enhancement of the high-order-harmonic generation, although further developments in optimal control theory to find proper target functionals are required.......In recent attempts to control strong-field phenomena such as molecular dissociation, undesired ionization sometimes seriously limited the outcome. In this work we examine the capability of quantum optimal control theory to suppress the ionization by rational pulse shaping. Using a simple model...

  11. The suppression of apoptosis by α-herpesvirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu; Cheng, An-Chun; Wang, Ming-Shu; Jia, Ren-Yong; Sun, Kun-Feng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Liu, Ma-Feng; Zhao, Xin-Xin; Chen, Xiao-Yue

    2017-01-01

    Apoptosis, an important innate immune mechanism that eliminates pathogen-infected cells, is primarily triggered by two signalling pathways: the death receptor pathway and the mitochondria-mediated pathway. However, many viruses have evolved various strategies to suppress apoptosis by encoding anti-apoptotic factors or regulating apoptotic signalling pathways, which promote viral propagation and evasion of the host defence. During its life cycle, α-herpesvirus utilizes an elegant multifarious anti-apoptotic strategy to suppress programmed cell death. This progress article primarily focuses on the current understanding of the apoptosis-inhibition mechanisms of α-herpesvirus anti-apoptotic genes and their expression products and discusses future directions, including how the anti-apoptotic function of herpesvirus could be targeted therapeutically. PMID:28406478

  12. Analysis of shot noise suppression for electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ratner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Shot noise can affect the performance of free-electron lasers (FELs by driving instabilities (e.g., the microbunching instability or by competing with seeded density modulations. Recent papers have proposed suppressing shot noise to enhance FEL performance. In this paper we use a one-dimensional (1D model to calculate the noise amplification from an energy modulation (e.g., electron interactions from space charge or undulator radiation followed by a dispersive section. We show that, for a broad class of interactions, selecting the correct dispersive strength suppresses shot noise across a wide range of frequencies. The final noise level depends on the beam’s energy spread and the properties of the interaction potential. We confirm and illustrate our analytical results with 1D simulations.

  13. New insights into the role of PML in tumour suppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P Salomoni; BJ Ferguson; AH Wyllie; T Rich

    2008-01-01

    The PML gene is involved in the t(15;17) transiocation of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL),which generates the oncogenic fusion protein PML (promyelocytic ieukaemia protein)-retinoic acid receptor alpha.The PML protein Iocalises to a subnuclear structure called the PML nuclear domain (PML-ND),of which PML is the essential structural component.In APL,PML-NDs are disrupted,thus implicating these structures in the pathogenesis of this leukaemia.Unexpectedly,recent studies indicate that PML and the PML-ND play a tumour suppressive role in several different types of human neoplasms in addition to APL.Because of PML's extreme versatility and involvement in multiple cellular pathways,understanding the mechanisms underlying its function,and therefore role in tumour suppression,has been a challenging task.In this review,we attempt to critically appraise the more recent advances in this field and propose new avenues of investigation.

  14. Property Analysis and Suppression Method of Real Measured Sea Spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In case of high-resolution, low grazing angle, high sea state, and horizontal transmitting, horizontal receiving polarization, the radar returns are strengthened, resulting in sea spikes. The sea spikes have the characteristics of high amplitudes, nonstationary, and non-Gaussian, which have a strong impact on the radar detection of weak marine moving targets. This study proposes a method for sea clutter suppression. Firstly, based on the sea spikes identification and selection method, the amplitude, temporal correlation, Doppler spectrum, and fractional power spectrum properties of sea spikes are analyzed. Secondly, the data to be detected are chosen by selecting the background clutter with minimum mean power, which can also eliminate the sea spikes. Correspondingly, sea clutter is suppressed with improved Signal-to-Clutter Ratio (SCR. Finally, the results of experiment with real radar data verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoryev, Yurii N

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an in-depth systematic investigation of a dissipative effect which manifests itself as the growth of hydrodynamic stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows. The work describes the theoretical foundations of a new way to control stability and laminar turbulent transitions in aerodynamic flows. It develops hydrodynamic models for describing thermal nonequilibrium gas flows which allow the consideration of suppression of inviscid acoustic waves in 2D shear flows. Then, nonlinear evolution of large-scale vortices and Kelvin-Helmholtz waves in relaxing shear flows are studied. Critical Reynolds numbers in supersonic Couette flows are calculated analytically and numerically within the framework of both linear and nonlinear classical energy hydrodynamic stability theories. The calculations clearly show that the relaxation process can appreciably delay the laminar-turbulent transition. The aim of the book is to show the new dissipative effect, which can be used for flo...

  16. Amplitude suppression and chaos control in epileptic EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Kaushik; Myers, Mark H

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we have proposed a novel amplitude suppression algorithm for EEG signals collected during epileptic seizure. Then we have proposed a measure of chaoticity for a chaotic signal, which is somewhat similar to measuring sensitive dependence on initial conditions by measuring Lyapunov exponent in a chaotic dynamical system. We have shown that with respect to this measure the amplitude suppression algorithm reduces chaoticity in a chaotic signal (EEG signal is chaotic). We have compared our measure with the estimated largest Lyapunov exponent measure by the largelyap function, which is similar to Wolf's algorithm. They fit closely for all but one of the cases. How the algorithm can help to improve patient specific dosage titration during vagus nerve stimulation therapy has been outlined.

  17. Amplitude Suppression and Chaos Control in Epileptic EEG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Majumdar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have proposed a novel amplitude suppression algorithm for EEG signals collected during epileptic seizure. Then we have proposed a measure of chaoticity for a chaotic signal, which is somewhat similar to measuring sensitive dependence on initial conditions by measuring Lyapunov exponent in a chaotic dynamical system. We have shown that with respect to this measure the amplitude suppression algorithm reduces chaoticity in a chaotic signal (EEG signal is chaotic. We have compared our measure with the estimated largest Lyapunov exponent measure by the largelyap function, which is similar to Wolf's algorithm. They fit closely for all but one of the cases. How the algorithm can help to improve patient specific dosage titration during vagus nerve stimulation therapy has been outlined.

  18. Rotating Stall Suppression Using Oscillatory Blowing Actuation on Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting , Number 2009-1242, AIAA. Honors and Awards Received NONE AFRL Point of Contact Dr. Steven Puterbaugh and Dr. Todd...Rediniotis (2009, January). Internal plenum design and testing for an oscillatory blowing stall suppression system. In 47th AIAA Aerospace Sciences ...Meeting, Number 2009-1242. AIAA. Carter, C. J., S. A. Guillot, W. F. Ng, and W. W. Copenhaver (2001, July). Aerodynamic perfor- mace of a high-turning

  19. Repetition suppression and repetition priming are processing outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Gagan S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract There is considerable evidence that repetition suppression (RS) is a cortical signature of previous exposure to the environment. In many instances RS in specific brain regions is accompanied by improvements in specific behavioral measures; both observations are outcomes of repeated processing. In understanding the mechanism by which brain changes give rise to behavioral changes, it is important to consider what aspect of the environment a given brain area or set of areas processes, and how this might be expressed behaviorally.

  20. Stress, Metabolism and Cancer: Integrated Pathways Contributing to Immune Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Repasky, Elizabeth A.; Eng, Jason; Hylander, Bonnie L

    2015-01-01

    The potential for immune cells to control cancers has been recognized for many decades, but only recently has real excitement begun to spread through the oncology community following clear evidence that therapeutic blockade of specific immune-suppressive mechanisms is enough to make a real difference in survival for patients with several different advanced cancers. However, impressive and encouraging as these new clinical data are, it is clear that more effort should be devoted toward underst...

  1. Partial dynamical symmetry and the suppression of chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, N.; Alhassid, Y. (Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)); Leviatan, A. (Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel))

    1993-10-04

    Partial dynamical symmetry is a situation in which the Hamiltonian does not have a certain symmetry yet a subset of its eigenstates does. It is shown that partial dynamical symmetry may cause suppression of chaos even in cases where the fraction of states which has the symmetry vanishes in the classical limit. The average entropy associated with the symmetry is a sensitive quantum measure of the partial symmetry and its effect on the chaotic dynamics.

  2. Immune Suppression and Inflammation in the Progression of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Gabrilovich DI. Immature myeloid cells and cancer-associated immune suppression. Cancer Immunol Immunother 2002;51:293-8. 6. Serafini P, De Santo C...Immunol. Immunother. 51:293-298. 6. Serafini , P., C. De Santo, I. Marigo, S. Cingarlini, L. Dolcetti, G. Gallina, P. Zanovello, and V. Bronte. 2004...single mouse mammary tumor: heterogeneity in phenotypic stability. Invasion Metastasis 3:22-31. 17. Bronte, V., P. Serafini , E. Apolloni, and P

  3. Charmonia suppression in nucleus-nucleus interactions at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaldi, R; Alexa, C; Arnaldi, R; Atayan, M; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, M; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borenstein, S R; Borges, G; Bussière, A; Capelli, L; Castanier, C; Castor, J I; Chaurand, B; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Claudino, T; Comets, M P; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; Cruz, J; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gavrilov, Yu K; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grigorian, S; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Hakobyan, R S; Haroutunian, R; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavitcheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Macciotta, P; MacCormack, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prado da Silva, W L; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Scalas, E; Saturnini, P; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, E; Villatte, L; Willis, N; Wu, T

    2004-01-01

    The NA50 experiment at CERN SPS has studied charmonium production in Pb-Pb collisions at 158 GeV/c per nucleon. According to the theoretical predictions the observation of the suppression of the J/ psi production yield is expected to be an unambiguous probe for a phase transition from ordinary nuclear matter towards a state in which quarks and gluons are deconfined. (10 refs).

  4. MIMO-OC Scheme to Suppress Co-channel Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei Jiong; Zhou, Xi Lang; Jin, Rong Hong

    In this letter, we present a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) optimal combining (OC) scheme based on alternate iteration. With the channel state information (CSI) of co-channel interferers (CCIs), this algorithm can be used in flat fading and frequency selective channels to suppress CCIs. Compared with the optimal transceiver of MIMO maximal ratio combining (MRC) systems, results of simulation show that this scheme improves the uplink transmission performance significantly.

  5. Suppression of Superconductivity by Twin Boundaries in FeSe

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Jenny Eve; Song, Can-Li; Wang, Yi-Lin; Jiang, Ye-Ping; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2012-01-01

    Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are employed to investigate twin boundaries in stoichiometric FeSe films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Twin boundaries can be unambiguously identified by imaging the 90{\\deg} change in the orientation of local electronic dimers from Fe site impurities on either side. Twin boundaries run at approximately 45{\\deg} to the Fe-Fe bond directions, and noticeably suppress the superconducting gap, in contrast with the recent experiment...

  6. HIV Care Saves Lives: Viral Suppression is Key PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-25

    This 60 second Public Service Announcement is based on the December 2014 Vital Signs. For people living with HIV, Viral suppression is critical. By getting tested and taking HIV medicines, individuals living with HIV can achieve very low levels of HIV in the body.  Created: 11/25/2014 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 11/25/2014.

  7. Epigenetic suppression of neprilysin regulates breast cancer invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, H M; Khoury, R J; Majmudar, P R; Blaylock, T; Hawkins, K; Salama, M S; Scott, M D; Cosminsky, B; Utreja, N K; Britt, J; Conway, R E

    2016-01-01

    In women, invasive breast cancer is the second most common cancer and the second cause of cancer-related death. Therefore, identifying novel regulators of breast cancer invasion could lead to additional biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Neprilysin, a cell-surface enzyme that cleaves and inactivates a number of substrates including endothelin-1 (ET1), has been implicated in breast cancer, but whether neprilysin promotes or inhibits breast cancer cell progression and metastasis is unclear. Here, we asked whether neprilysin expression predicts and functionally regulates breast cancer cell invasion. RT–PCR and flow cytometry analysis of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines revealed decreased neprilysin expression compared with normal epithelial cells. Expression was also suppressed in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) compared with normal tissue. In addition, in vtro invasion assays demonstrated that neprilysin overexpression decreased breast cancer cell invasion, whereas neprilysin suppression augmented invasion. Furthermore, inhibiting neprilysin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells increased ET1 levels significantly, whereas overexpressing neprilysin decreased extracellular-signal related kinase (ERK) activation, indicating that neprilysin negatively regulates ET1-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. To determine whether neprilysin was epigenetically suppressed in breast cancer, we performed bisulfite conversion analysis of breast cancer cells and clinical tumor samples. We found that the neprilysin promoter was hypermethylated in breast cancer; chemical reversal of methylation in MDA-MB-231 cells reactivated neprilysin expression and inhibited cancer cell invasion. Analysis of cancer databases revealed that neprilysin methylation significantly associates with survival in stage I IDC and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer subtypes. These results demonstrate that neprilysin negatively regulates the ET axis in breast cancer

  8. P53 Suppression of Homologous Recombination and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    p53 tumor suppression. Cell 75: 817-825. 55. Hermeking H, Lengauer C, Polyak K, He TC, Zhang L, et al. (1997) 14-3-3 sigma is a p53- regulated...J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 286: L87–97. 25. Hermeking H, Lengauer C, Polyak K, He TC, Zhang L, et al. (1997) 14-3-3 sigma is a p53-regulated

  9. Strong-field-ionization suppression by light-field control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räsänen, Esa; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    In recent attempts to control strong-field phenomena such as molecular dissociation, undesired ionization sometimes seriously limited the outcome. In this work we examine the capability of quantum optimal control theory to suppress the ionization by rational pulse shaping. Using a simple model......, for the enhancement of the high-order-harmonic generation, although further developments in optimal control theory to find proper target functionals are required....

  10. Widening Disparity and its Suppression in a Stochastic Replicator Model

    CERN Document Server

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu

    2016-01-01

    Winner-take-all phenomena are observed in various competitive systems. We find similar phenomena in replicator models with randomly fluctuating growth rates. The disparity between winners and losers increases indefinitely, even if all elements are statistically equivalent. A lognormal distribution describes well the nonstationary time evolution. If a nonlinear load corresponding to progressive taxation is introduced, a stationary distribution is obtained and disparity widening is suppressed.

  11. Measles immune suppression: lessons from the macaque model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory D de Vries

    Full Text Available Measles remains a significant childhood disease, and is associated with a transient immune suppression. Paradoxically, measles virus (MV infection also induces robust MV-specific immune responses. Current hypotheses for the mechanism underlying measles immune suppression focus on functional impairment of lymphocytes or antigen-presenting cells, caused by infection with or exposure to MV. We have generated stable recombinant MVs that express enhanced green fluorescent protein, and remain virulent in non-human primates. By performing a comprehensive study of virological, immunological, hematological and histopathological observations made in animals euthanized at different time points after MV infection, we developed a model explaining measles immune suppression which fits with the "measles paradox". Here we show that MV preferentially infects CD45RA(- memory T-lymphocytes and follicular B-lymphocytes, resulting in high infection levels in these populations. After the peak of viremia MV-infected lymphocytes were cleared within days, followed by immune activation and lymph node enlargement. During this period tuberculin-specific T-lymphocyte responses disappeared, whilst strong MV-specific T-lymphocyte responses emerged. Histopathological analysis of lymphoid tissues showed lymphocyte depletion in the B- and T-cell areas in the absence of apoptotic cells, paralleled by infiltration of T-lymphocytes into B-cell follicles and reappearance of proliferating cells. Our findings indicate an immune-mediated clearance of MV-infected CD45RA(- memory T-lymphocytes and follicular B-lymphocytes, which causes temporary immunological amnesia. The rapid oligoclonal expansion of MV-specific lymphocytes and bystander cells masks this depletion, explaining the short duration of measles lymphopenia yet long duration of immune suppression.

  12. Valley-protected backscattering suppression in silicon photonic graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study valley degree of freedom in all dielectric silicon photonic graphene. Photonic band gap opening physics under inversion symmetry breaking is revisited by the viewpoint of nonzero valley Chern number. Bulk valley modes with opposite orbital angular momentum are unveiled by inspecting time-varying electric fields. Topological transition is well illustrated through photonic Dirac Hamiltonian. Valley dependent edge states and the associated valley-protected backscattering suppression around Z-shape bend waveguide have been demonstrated.

  13. Traumatic Brain Injury and Peripheral Immune Suppression: Primer and Prospectus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeldine, Jon; Lord, Janet M; Belli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are a common occurrence in patients following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are associated with an increased risk of mortality, longer length of hospital stay, and poor neurological outcome. Systemic immune suppression arising as a direct result of injury to the central nervous system (CNS) is considered to be primarily responsible for this increased incidence of infection, a view strengthened by recent studies that have reported novel changes in the composition and function of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system post-TBI. However, our knowledge of the mechanisms that underlie TBI-induced immune suppression is equivocal at best. Here, after summarizing our current understanding of the impact of TBI on peripheral immunity and discussing CNS-mediated regulation of immune function, we propose roles for a series of novel mechanisms in driving the immune suppression that is observed post-TBI. These mechanisms, which have never been considered before in the context of TBI-induced immune paresis, include the CNS-driven emergence into the circulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and suppressive neutrophil subsets, and the release from injured tissue of nuclear and mitochondria-derived damage associated molecular patterns. Moreover, in an effort to further our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie TBI-induced changes in immunity, we pose throughout the review a series of questions, which if answered would address a number of key issues, such as establishing whether manipulating peripheral immune function has potential as a future therapeutic strategy by which to treat and/or prevent infections in the hospitalized TBI patient.

  14. Maximal suppression of renin-angiotensin system in nonproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iodice, Carmela; Balletta, Mario M; Minutolo, Roberto; Giannattasio, Paolo; Tuccillo, Stefano; Bellizzi, Vincenzo; D'Amora, Maurizio; Rinaldi, Giorgio; Signoriello, Giuseppe; Conte, Giuseppe; De Nicola, Luca

    2003-06-01

    Elimination of residual proteinuria is the novel target in renoprotection; nevertheless, whether a greater suppression of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) effectively improves the antiproteinuric response in patients with moderate proteinuria remains ill-defined. We evaluated the effects of maximizing RAS suppression on quantitative and qualitative proteinuria in ten patients with stable nonnephrotic proteinuria (2.55 +/- 0.94 g/24 hours) due to primary nonproliferative glomerulonephritis (NPGN), and normal values of creatinine clearance (103 +/- 17 mL/min). The study was divided in three consecutive phases: (1) four subsequent 1-month periods of ramipril at the dose of 2.5, 5.0, 10, and 20 mg/day; (2) 2 months of ramipril 20 mg/day + irbesartan 300 mg/day; and (3) 2 months of irbesartan 300 mg/day alone. Maximizing RAS suppression was not coupled with any major effect on renal function and blood pressure; conversely, a significant decrement in hemoglobin levels, of 0.8 g/dL on average, was observed during up-titration of ramipril dose. The 2.5 mg dose of ramipril significantly decreased proteinuria by 29%. Similar changes were detected after irbesartan alone (-28%). The antiproteinuric effect was not improved either by the higher ramipril doses (-30% after the 20 mg dose) or after combined treatment (-33%). The reduction of proteinuria led to amelioration of the markers of tubular damage, as testified by the significant decrement of alpha 1 microglobulin (alpha 1m) excretion and of the tubular component of proteinuria at sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In nonnephrotic NPGN patients, standard doses of either ramipril or irbesartan lead to significant reduction of residual proteinuria and amelioration of the qualitative features suggestive of tubular damage. The enhancement of RAS suppression up to the maximal degree does not improve the antiproteinuric response and is coupled with a decrement of hemoglobin levels.

  15. An alternative model of jet suppression at RHIC energies

    OpenAIRE

    Lietava, Roman; Pisut, Jan; Pisutova, Neva; Tomasik, Boris

    2003-01-01

    We propose a simple Glauber-type mechanism for suppression of jet production up to transverse momenta of about 10 GeV/c at RHIC. For processes in this kinematic region, the formation time is smaller than the interval between two successive hard partonic collisions and the subsequent collision influences the jet production. Number of jets then roughly scales with the number of participants. Proportionality to the number of binary collisions is recovered for very high transverse momenta. The mo...

  16. The anticonvulsant retigabine suppresses neuronal Kv2-mediated currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stas, Jeroen I; Bocksteins, Elke; Jensen, Camilla S

    2016-01-01

    μM retigabine concentrations had 'off-target' effects on KV2.1 channels which have recently been implicated in apoptosis. Clinical retigabine concentrations (0.3-3 μM) inhibited KV2.1 channel function upon prolonged exposure. The suppression of the KV2.1 conductance was only partially reversible....... Our results identified KV2.1 as a new molecular target for retigabine, thus giving a potential explanation for retigabine's neuroprotective properties....

  17. Dynamic Resource Allocation in Disaster Response: Tradeoffs in Wildfire Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    Available: http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-fire-index,0,4857752.htmlstory. Accessed 2012 March, 10. 7. Gebert KM, Calkin DE, Yoder J (2007...Estimating suppression expenditures for individual large wildland fires. Western Journal of Applied Forestry 22: 188–196. 8. Calkin DE, Gebert KM, Jones...RC, Trethewey D, et al. (2011) A method for ensemble wildland fire simulation. Environmental Modeling and Assessment 16: 153–167. 52. Calkin DE

  18. Mechanism for the Suppression of Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.; Rubin, S G; Samarchenko, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    A model for the formation of supermassive primordial black holes in galactic nuclei with the simultaneous suppression of the formation of intermediate-mass black holes is presented. A bimodal mass function for black holes formed through phase transitions in a model with a "Mexican hat" potential has been found. The classical motion of the phase of a complex scalar field during inflation has been taken into account. Possible observational manifestations of primordial black holes in galaxies an...

  19. Successful suppression of magnetization precession after short field pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Martin; Lopusnik, Radek; Fassbender, Jürgen; Hillebrands, Burkard; Dötsch, H.

    2000-01-01

    For the next generation of high data rate magnetic recording above 1 Gbit/s, a better understanding of the switching processes for both recording heads and media will be required. In order to maximize the switch-ing speed for such devices, the magnetization precession after the magnetic field pulse termination needs to be suppressed to a maximum degree. It is demonstrated experimentally for ferrite films that the appropriate adjustment of the field pulse parameters and/or the static applied f...

  20. Cold Suppresses Agonist-induced Activation of TRPV1

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppress...

  1. Specific suppression of anti-DNA production in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebling, M.R.; Wong, C.; Radosevich, J.; Louie, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    To investigate the regulation of anti-DNA antibody production, we generated anti-DNA-specific suppressor cells by exposing normal human T cells and a small percentage of adherent cells to high concentrations of DNA. These cells suppressed the production of anti-DNA by both autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and allogeneic PBMC derived from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Anti-DNA production was suppressed significantly more than anti-RNA, antitetanus, or total immunoglobulin production. Specific suppression was enhanced by increasing the numbers of DNA-primed CD8+ cells and was obliterated by irradiation of the DNA-primed cells. In contrast to T cells from normal individuals, T cells obtained from two intensively studied SLE patients were unable to generate specific suppressor cells for anti-DNA production in both autologous and allogeneic test systems. Despite this defect, these patients were still capable of generating specific suppressor cells for antibody production directed against an exogenous antigen, tetanus toxoid.

  2. Suppression of dwarf galaxy formation by cosmic reionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyithe, J Stuart B; Loeb, Abraham

    2006-05-18

    A large number of faint galaxies, born less than a billion years after the Big Bang, have recently been discovered. Fluctuations in the distribution of these galaxies contributed to a scatter in the ionization fraction of cosmic hydrogen on scales of tens of megaparsecs, as observed along the lines of sight to the earliest known quasars. Theoretical simulations predict that the formation of dwarf galaxies should have been suppressed after cosmic hydrogen was reionized, leading to a drop in the cosmic star-formation rate. Here we report evidence for this suppression. We show that the post-reionization galaxies that produced most of the ionizing radiation at a redshift z approximately 5.5 must have had a mass in excess of approximately 10(10.9 +/- 0.5) solar masses (M(o)) or else the aforementioned scatter would have been smaller than observed. This limiting mass is two orders of magnitude larger than the galaxy mass that is thought to have dominated the reionization of cosmic hydrogen (approximately 10(8) M(o)). We predict that future surveys with space-based infrared telescopes will detect a population of smaller galaxies that reionized the Universe at an earlier time, before the epoch of dwarf galaxy suppression.

  3. Observation of sequential Upsilon suppression in PbPb collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The suppression of the individual Upsilon(nS) states in PbPb collisions with respect to their yields in pp data has been measured. The PbPb and pp datasets used in the analysis correspond to integrated luminosities of 150 inverse microbarns and 230 inverse nanobarns, respectively, collected in 2011 by the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 2.76 TeV. The Upsilon(nS) yields are measured from the dimuon invariant mass spectra. The suppression of the Upsilon(nS) yields in PbPb relative to the yields in pp scaled by the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions, R[AA], is measured as a function of the collision centrality. Integrated over centrality, the R[AA] values are 0.56 +/- 0.08 (stat.) +/- 0.07 (syst.), 0.12 +/- 0.04 (stat.) +/- 0.02 (syst.), and lower than 0.10 (at 95% confidence level), for the Upsilon(1S), Upsilon(2S), and Upsilon(3S) states, respectively. The results demonstrate the sequential suppression of the Upsilon(nS) states in PbPb collisions at LHC energies.

  4. Counterproductive effect of saccadic suppression during attention shifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Zénon

    Full Text Available During saccadic eye movements, the processing of visual information is transiently interrupted by a mechanism known as "saccadic suppression" [1] that is thought to ensure perceptual stability [2]. If, as proposed in the premotor theory of attention [3], covert shifts of attention rely on sub-threshold recruitment of oculomotor circuits, then saccadic suppression should also occur during covert shifts. In order to test this prediction, we designed two experiments in which participants had to orient towards a cued letter, with or without saccades. We analyzed the time course of letter identification score in an "attention" task performed without saccades, using the saccadic latencies measured in the "saccade" task as a marker of covert saccadic preparation. Visual conditions were identical in all tasks. In the "attention" task, we found a drop in perceptual performance around the predicted onset time of saccades that were never performed. Importantly, this decrease in letter identification score cannot be explained by any known mechanism aligned on cue onset such as inhibition of return, masking, or microsaccades. These results show that attentional allocation triggers the same suppression mechanisms as during saccades, which is relevant during eye movements but detrimental in the context of covert orienting.

  5. Viral degradasome hijacks mitochondria to suppress innate immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramansu Goswami; Tanmay Majumdar; Jayeeta Dhar; Saurabh Chattopadhyay; Sudip K Bandyopadhyay; Valentina Verbovetskaya; Ganes C Sen

    2013-01-01

    The balance between the innate immunity of the host and the ability of a pathogen to evade it strongly influences pathogenesis and virulence.The two nonstructural (NS) proteins,NS1 and NS2,of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are critically required for RSV virulence.Together,they strongly suppress the type Ⅰ interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immunity of the host cells by degrading or inhibiting multiple cellular factors required for either IFN induction or response pathways,including RIG-I,IRF3,IRF7,TBK1 and STAT2.Here,we provide evidence for the existence of a large and heterogeneous degradative complex assembled by the NS proteins,which we named "NS-degradasome" (NSD).The NSD is roughly ~300-750 kD in size,and its degradative activity was enhanced by the addition of purified mitochondria in vitro.Inside the cell,the majority of the NS proteins and the substrates of the NSD translocated to the mitochondria upon RSV infection.Genetic and pharmacological evidence shows that optimal suppression of innate immunity requires mitochondrial MAVS and mitochondrial motility.Together,we propose a novel paradigm in which the mitochondria,known to be importantfor the innate immune activation of the host,are also important for viral suppression of the innate immunity.

  6. Observation of Sequential Υ Suppression in PbPb Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.

    2012-11-01

    The suppression of the individual Υ(nS) states in PbPb collisions with respect to their yields in pp data has been measured. The PbPb and pp data sets used in the analysis correspond to integrated luminosities of 150μb-1 and 230nb-1, respectively, collected in 2011 by the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 2.76 TeV. The Υ(nS) yields are measured from the dimuon invariant mass spectra. The suppression of the Υ(nS) yields in PbPb relative to the yields in pp, scaled by the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions, RAA, is measured as a function of the collision centrality. Integrated over centrality, the RAA values are 0.56±0.08(stat)±0.07(syst), 0.12±0.04(stat)±0.02(syst), and lower than 0.10 (at 95% confidence level), for the Υ(1S), Υ(2S), and Υ(3S) states, respectively. The results demonstrate the sequential suppression of the Υ(nS) states in PbPb collisions at LHC energies.

  7. Short baseline neutrino oscillations: when entanglement suppresses coherence

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    For neutrino oscillations to take place the entangled quantum state of a neutrino and a charged lepton produced via charged current interactions must be disentangled. Implementing a non-perturbative Wigner-Weisskopf method we obtain the correct \\emph{entangled} quantum state of neutrinos and charged leptons from the (two-body) decay of a parent particle. The source lifetime and disentanglement length scale lead to a suppression of the oscillation probabilities in short-baseline experiments. The suppression is determined by $\\pi\\, L_d/L_{osc}$ where $L_d$ is the \\emph{smallest} of the decay length of the parent particle or the disentanglement length scale. For $L_d \\geq L_{osc}$ coherence and oscillations are suppressed. These effects are more prominent in \\emph{short base line experiments} and at low neutrino energy. We obtain the corrections to the appearance and disappearance probabilities modified by both the lifetime of the source and the disentanglement scale and discuss their implications for accelerato...

  8. Lenslet array to further suppress starlight for direct exoplanet detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qian; McElwain, Michael; Shiri, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Direct imaging plays a key role in the detection and characterization of exoplanets orbiting within its host star's habitable zone. Many innovative ideas for starlight suppression and wavefront control have been proposed and developed over the past decade. However, several technological challenges still lie ahead to achieve the required contrast, including controlling the observatory pointing performance, fabricating occulting masks with tight optical tolerances, developing wavefront control algorithms, controlling stray light, advancing single photon detecting detectors, and integrated system-level issues. This paper explores how a lenslet array and pinhole mask may be implemented to further suppress uncorrected starlight that leaks through the occulting mask. An external occulter, or star shade, is simulated to demonstrate this concept, although this approach can be implemented for internal coronagraphs as well. We describe how to use simple relay optics to control the scene near the inner working angle and the level of the suppression expected. Furthermore, if the lenslet array is the input to an integral field spectrograph, as planned for the WFIRST mission, the spectral content of the exoplanet atmospheres can be obtained to determine if the observed planet is habitable and ultimately, if it is inhabited.

  9. Endomorphin-suppressed nitric oxide release from mice peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Tihomir; Sarić, Ana; Sobocanec, Sandra; Kusić, Borka; Marotti, Tatjana

    2010-02-01

    Endomorphins are newly discovered mu-opioid receptor selective immunocompetent opioid peptides. Endomorphin 1 is predominantly distributed in brain, while endomorphin 2 is widely allocated in the spinal cord. Lately, endomorphins have been investigated as modulators of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Nitric oxide is short lived radical involved in various biological processes such as regulation of blood vessel contraction, inflammation, neurotransmission and apoptosis. The aim of this work was to investigate the in vivo effects of endomorphins on nitric oxide release and NOS 2 isoenzyme upregulation in mice peritoneal macrophages additionally challenged ex vivo with lipopolysaccharide. The results showed that endomorphin 1 or endomorphin 2 in vitro did not change NO release from peritoneal mouse macrophages during a 48 h incubation period. On the other hand in vivo endomorphins had suppressive effect on NO release as well as on NOS 2 and IL-1 protein concentration. The most of suppressive effect in vivo of both endomorphins was blocked with 30 min pretreatment with mu-receptor selective antagonist beta-FNA, which proved involvement of opioid receptor pathway in suppressive effects of endomorphins.

  10. Is Anti-Suppression the Quest for Visibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Hussey, OD

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vision science defines the fundamental action of the vision system to be the generation of visible percepts. Intermittent central suppression (ICS is an intermittent, usually alternating, loss of visual sensation, a repetitive loss of that visual percept. A review of the vision science literature on visibility, Troxler’s Perceptual Fading, and the consequences of loss of visibility suggests that loss of visual motion signal causes loss of visibility. The area of lost visibility is then filled in by a cortical computation mechanism. Fixation, binocular saccades, vergence, and sensory perception are all compromised in loss of visibility. Some of the characteristics of ICS, as well as suspected consequences of ICS, have been difficult to reconcile with the conventional wisdom on suppression. That conventional wisdom suggests that suppression is solely a function of cortical inhibition. Those ICS characteristics and consequences may be better explained if ICS is viewed as a loss of visibility from Troxler’s Fading. Fixation changes and perceptual changes with loss of visibility parallel findings in ICS and the vision-and-dyslexia literature. Research methods to reverse loss of visibility parallel treatment methods for ICS. These parallels suggest that loss of visibility may be diagnosed clinically as ICS, and ICS should be treated with a goal of ensuring bilateral visibility, that is, binocularity.

  11. Anger expression and suppression among patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Hamzeh; Mokhberi, Vahid; Mohammadpour, Reza Ali; Mehrabianfard, Mahsa; Lashak, Nasrin Bali

    2011-09-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is among the seven psychosomatic diseases for which mental etiologies were proposed in 1950s. The objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of anger suppression and expression in individuals with hypertension referred to the heart clinic of "Fatemeh Zahra" Hospital, Sari, Iran. 200 patients with primary hypertension were categorized as the case group. One hundred healthy individuals older than 30 years without previous history of arterial hypertension and severe mental disorders were considered as the control group. Both groups were matched in terms of age, gender and level of education. The Spielberger questionnaire was used to assess the trait anger, anger in and anger out. The data were analyzed using SPSS software with statistical tests such as t-test, chi-square and regression. The trait anger and anger suppression in patients with hypertension were significantly higher than the control group (P anger out was not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.984). Considering the fact that trait anger and anger suppression is more prevalent among people with hypertension than healthy individuals, it seems suitable to provide education concerning anger management and emotional expression for these patients with regard to the anger issue which is a psychosomatic aspect of the disease.

  12. Application of Composite Materials in the Fire Explosion Suppression System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Shah

    2012-01-01

    In order to lighten the weight of the special vehicles and improve their mobility and flexibility, the weight of all subsystems of the whole vehicle must be reduced in the general planning. A fire explosion suppression system is an important subsystem for the self-protection of vehicle, protection of crews and safety of a vehicle. The performances of the special vehicles determine their survival ability and combat capability. The composite bottle is made of aluminum alloy with externally wrapped carbon fiber ; it has been proven by a large number of tests that the new type explosion suppression fire distinguisher made of such composite materials applied in the special vehicle has reliable performance, each of its technical indexes is higher or equal to that of a steel distinguisher, and the composites can also optimize the assembly structure of the bottle, and improve the reliability and corrosion resistance. Most important is that the composite materials can effectively lighten the weight of the fire explosion suppression system to reach the target of weight reduction of the subsystem in general planning.

  13. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard; Zink, Erika M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Polyak, Steve

    2015-08-28

    Silymarin (SM), a natural product, is touted as a liver protectant and preventer of both chronic inflammation and diseases. To define how SM elicits these effects at a systems level, we performed transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies in human liver and T cell lines. Multiple pathways associated with cellular stress and metabolism were modulated by SM treatment within 0.5 to four hours: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed suppression of glycolytic, TCA cycle, and amino acid metabolism by SM treatment. Antiinflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e. 24 hours) SM exposure, with suppression of multiple proinflammatory mRNAs and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO) signaling. Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that SM inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, while SM inhibition of the mTOR pathway in part required DDIT4. Thus, SM activates stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Therefore, natural products like SM may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation.

  14. Model of ELM suppression by RMPs in DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, J. D.; Nazikian, R.; Ferraro, N. M.; Beidler, M. T.; Hegna, C. C.; La Haye, R. J.; Paz-Soldan, C.

    2016-10-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments explored effects of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) near the minimum applied n=2 RMP amplitude required for ELM suppression in ITER-relevant low collisionality pedestals. Comprehensive tokamak forced magnetic reconnection (FMR) theory is used to describe and quantify the many physical processes involved in stages of RMP effects and an ELM crash response that lead to bifurcation into an ELM-suppressed state: 1) in ELMing equilibrium, flow-screening is strong with little magnetic reconnection; 2) the RMP at q=8/2 penetrates via FMR induced by an ELM crash and locks toroidal flow to the lab frame (like error field mode locking); 3) the ELM crash provides a 8/2 seed island (like NTMs) governed by a modified Rutherford equation; 4) if the total 8/2 RMP is large enough the internal tearing response and flow bifurcate and grow; and 5) flutter transport reduces pedestal top gradients which stabilizes P-B modes and hence suppresses ELMs. This analysis is for discharge 158115 in DIII-D; its potential universality is yet to be determined. Work supported by OFES/DOE under DE-FG02-92ER54139, DE-FG02-86ER53218, DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  15. Statistical model of clutter suppression in tissue harmonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiang; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2011-01-01

    A statistical model is developed for the suppression of clutter in tissue harmonic imaging (THI). Tissue heterogeneity is modeled as a random phase screen that is characterized by its correlation length and variance. With the autocorrelation function taken to be Gaussian and for small variance, statistical solutions are derived for the mean intensities at the fundamental and second-harmonic frequencies in the field of a focused sound beam that propagates through the phase screen. The statistical solutions are verified by comparison with ensemble averaging of direct numerical simulations. The model demonstrates that THI reduces the aberration clutter appearing in the focal region regardless of the depth of the aberrating layer, with suppression of the clutter most effective when the layer is close to the source. The model is also applied to the reverberation clutter that is transmitted forward along the axis of the beam. As with aberration clutter, suppression of such reverberation clutter by THI is most pronounced when the tissue heterogeneity is located close to the source. PMID:21428483

  16. Apigenin blocks IKKα activation and suppresses prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sanjeev; Kanwal, Rajnee; Shankar, Eswar; Datt, Manish; Chance, Mark R; Fu, Pingfu; MacLennan, Gregory T; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-10-13

    IKKα has been implicated as a key regulator of oncogenesis and driver of the metastatic process; therefore is regarded as a promising therapeutic target in anticancer drug development. In spite of the progress made in the development of IKK inhibitors, no potent IKKα inhibitor(s) have been identified. Our multistep approach of molecular modeling and direct binding has led to the identification of plant flavone apigenin as a specific IKKα inhibitor. Here we report apigenin, in micro molar range, inhibits IKKα kinase activity, demonstrates anti-proliferative and anti-invasive activities in functional cell based assays and exhibits anticancer efficacy in experimental tumor model. We found that apigenin directly binds with IKKα, attenuates IKKα kinase activity and suppresses NF-ĸB/p65 activation in human prostate cancer PC-3 and 22Rv1 cells much more effectively than IKK inhibitor, PS1145. We also showed that apigenin caused cell cycle arrest similar to knockdown of IKKα in prostate cancer cells. Studies in xenograft mouse model indicate that apigenin feeding suppresses tumor growth, lowers proliferation and enhances apoptosis. These effects correlated with inhibition of p-IKKα, NF-ĸB/p65, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and increase in cleaved caspase 3 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, our results suggest that inhibition of cell proliferation, invasiveness and decrease in tumor growth by apigenin are mediated by its ability to suppress IKKα and downstream targets affecting NF-ĸB signaling pathways.

  17. RHIC and LHC jet suppression in non-central collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Djordjevic

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding properties of QCD matter created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions is a major goal of RHIC and LHC experiments. An excellent tool to study these properties is high-momentum hadron suppression of light and heavy flavor observables. Utilizing this tool requires accurate suppression predictions for different experiments, probes and experimental conditions, and their unbiased comparison with experimental data. With this goal, we here extend our dynamical energy loss formalism towards generating predictions for non-central collisions; the formalism takes into account both radiative and collisional energy loss, dynamical (as opposed to static scattering centers, finite magnetic mass, running coupling and uses no free parameters in comparison with experimental data. Specifically, we here generate predictions for all available centrality ranges, for both LHC and RHIC experiments, and for four different probes (charged hadrons, neutral pions, D mesons and non-prompt J/ψ. We obtain good agreement with all available non-central data, and also generate predictions for suppression measurements that will soon become available. Finally, we discuss implications of the obtained good agreement with experimental data with different medium models that are currently considered.

  18. Selenoprotein O deficiencies suppress chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jidong; Fei, Yao; Han, Yan; Lu, Shemin

    2016-10-01

    Selenoprotein O (Sel O) is a selenium-containing protein, but its function is still unclear. In the present study, we observed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of Sel O increased during chondrogenic induction of ATDC5 cells. The effects of Sel O on chondrocyte differentiation were then examined through shRNA-mediated gene silencing technique. The expression of Sel O was significantly suppressed at both mRNA and protein levels in a stable cell line transfected with a Sel O-specific target shRNA construct. Thereafter, we demonstrated that Sel O deficiencies suppress chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells. Sel O deficiencies inhibited expression of chondrogenic gene Sox9, Col II, and aggrecan. Sel O-deficient cells also accumulated a few cartilage glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and decreased the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). In addition, Sel O deficiencies inhibited chondrocyte proliferation through delayed cell cycle progression by suppression of cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, Sel O deficiencies induced chondrocyte death through cell apoptosis. In summary, we describe the expression patterns and the essential roles of Sel O in chondrocyte viability, proliferation, and chondrogenic differentiation. Additionally, Sel O deficiency-mediated impaired chondrogenesis may illustrate the mechanisms of Se deficiency in the pathophysiological process of the endemic osteoarthropathy.

  19. Analytical and experimental investigation of flutter suppression by piezoelectric actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeg, Jennifer

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research was to analytically and experimentally study the capabilities of piezoelectric plate actuators for suppressing flutter. Piezoelectric materials are characterized by their ability to produce voltage when subjected to a mechanical strain. The converse piezoelectric effect can be utilized to actuate a structure by applying a voltage. For this investigation, a two-degree-of-freedom wind tunnel model was designed, analyzed, and tested. The model consisted of a rigid wing and a flexible mount system that permitted a translational and a rotational degree of freedom. The model was designed such that flutter was encountered within the testing envelope of the wind tunnel. Actuators made of piezoelectric material were affixed to leaf springs of the mount system. Command signals, applied to the piezoelectric actuators, exerted control over the damping and stiffness properties. A mathematical aeroservoelastic model was constructed by using finite element methods, laminated plate theory, and aeroelastic analysis tools. Plant characteristics were determined from this model and verified by open loop experimental tests. A flutter suppression control law was designed and implemented on a digital control computer. Closed loop flutter testing was conducted. The experimental results represent the first time that adaptive materials have been used to actively suppress flutter. They demonstrate that small, carefully placed actuating plates can be used effectively to control aeroelastic response.

  20. Observation of sequential Υ suppression in PbPb collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Aguilo, E; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Staykova, Z; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Reis, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Garcia, G; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins, M; De Jesus Damiao, D; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá, W L; Carvalho, W; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Soares Jorge, L; Sznajder, A; Anjos, T S; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Avila, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Karjalainen, A; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Millischer, L; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Tsamalaidze, Z; Anagnostou, G; Beranek, S; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Caudron, J; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Magass, C; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Olschewski, M; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Weber, M; Bontenackels, M; Cherepanov, V; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B

    2012-11-30

    The suppression of the individual Υ(nS) states in PbPb collisions with respect to their yields in pp data has been measured. The PbPb and pp data sets used in the analysis correspond to integrated luminosities of 150 μb(-1) and 230 nb(-1), respectively, collected in 2011 by the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 2.76 TeV. The Υ(nS) yields are measured from the dimuon invariant mass spectra. The suppression of the Υ(nS) yields in PbPb relative to the yields in pp, scaled by the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions, R(AA), is measured as a function of the collision centrality. Integrated over centrality, the R(AA) values are 0.56±0.08(stat)±0.07(syst), 0.12±0.04(stat)±0.02(syst), and lower than 0.10 (at 95% confidence level), for the Υ(1S), Υ(2S), and Υ(3S) states, respectively. The results demonstrate the sequential suppression of the Υ(nS) states in PbPb collisions at LHC energies.

  1. The role of fivefold symmetry in suppressing crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taffs, Jade; Patrick Royall, C.

    2016-10-01

    Although long assumed to have an important role in the suppression of crystallization and the development of glassformers, the effect of local fivefold symmetry has never been directly tested. Here we consider whether such suppression of crystallization has a kinetic or thermodynamic nature and investigate its mechanism. We introduce a model in which the degree of fivefold symmetry can be tuned by favouring arrangements of particles in pentagonal bipyramids. We thus show that fivefold symmetry has both kinetic and thermodynamic effects on the mechanism of crystallization to a face-centred cubic crystal. Our results suggest that the mechanism of crystallization suppression is related to the surface tension between fluid and crystal. Interestingly, the degree of fivefold symmetry has little effect on crystal growth rate, suggesting that growth may be only weakly coupled to fluid structure in hard sphere like systems. Upon increasing the fivefold symmetry, we find a first-order transition to an alternative icosahedra-rich phase. At intermediate bias strengths we find a one-component glassformer.

  2. Event-related alpha suppression in response to facial motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girges, Christine; Wright, Michael J; Spencer, Janine V; O'Brien, Justin M D

    2014-01-01

    While biological motion refers to both face and body movements, little is known about the visual perception of facial motion. We therefore examined alpha wave suppression as a reduction in power is thought to reflect visual activity, in addition to attentional reorienting and memory processes. Nineteen neurologically healthy adults were tested on their ability to discriminate between successive facial motion captures. These animations exhibited both rigid and non-rigid facial motion, as well as speech expressions. The structural and surface appearance of these facial animations did not differ, thus participants decisions were based solely on differences in facial movements. Upright, orientation-inverted and luminance-inverted facial stimuli were compared. At occipital and parieto-occipital regions, upright facial motion evoked a transient increase in alpha which was then followed by a significant reduction. This finding is discussed in terms of neural efficiency, gating mechanisms and neural synchronization. Moreover, there was no difference in the amount of alpha suppression evoked by each facial stimulus at occipital regions, suggesting early visual processing remains unaffected by manipulation paradigms. However, upright facial motion evoked greater suppression at parieto-occipital sites, and did so in the shortest latency. Increased activity within this region may reflect higher attentional reorienting to natural facial motion but also involvement of areas associated with the visual control of body effectors.

  3. The role of articulatory suppression in immediate false recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macé, Anne-Laure; Caza, Nicole

    2011-11-01

    False memory for critical lures has been widely documented in long-term memory using the Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm. Recent evidence suggests that false memory effects can also be found in short-term memory (STM), supporting models that assume a strong relationship between short-term and long-term memory processes. However, no study has examined the role of articulatory suppression on immediate false memory, even though phono-articulatory factors are critically involved in STM performance and are an intrinsic part of all STM accounts. The current study proposes a novel paradigm to assess false memory effects in a STM task under both silent and articulatory suppression conditions. Using immediate serial recognition, in which participants had to judge whether two successive mixed lists of six associated and non-associated words were matched, we examined true recognition of matching lists and false recognition of mismatching lists comprising a critical lure or unrelated distractor in two experiments. Results from both experiments indicated reduced true recognition of matching lists and greater false serial recognition of mismatching lists comprising a critical lure under articulatory suppression relative to silence. These findings provide further support for some current models of verbal short-term memory, which posit a strong relationship between short-term and long-term memory processes.

  4. Enhancement and suppression in the visual field under perceptual load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Nathan A; Beck, Diane M; Kramer, Arthur F

    2013-01-01

    The perceptual load theory of attention proposes that the degree to which visual distractors are processed is a function of the attentional demands of a task-greater demands increase filtering of irrelevant distractors. The spatial configuration of such filtering is unknown. Here, we used steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) in conjunction with time-domain event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the distribution of load-induced distractor suppression and task-relevant enhancement in the visual field. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded while subjects performed a foveal go/no-go task that varied in perceptual load. Load-dependent distractor suppression was assessed by presenting a contrast reversing ring at one of three eccentricities (2, 6, or 11°) during performance of the go/no-go task. Rings contrast reversed at 8.3 Hz, allowing load-dependent changes in distractor processing to be tracked in the frequency-domain. ERPs were calculated to the onset of stimuli in the load task to examine load-dependent modulation of task-relevant processing. Results showed that the amplitude of the distractor SSVEP (8.3 Hz) was attenuated under high perceptual load (relative to low load) at the most proximal (2°) eccentricity but not at more eccentric locations (6 or 11°). Task-relevant ERPs revealed a significant increase in N1 amplitude under high load. These results are consistent with a center-surround configuration of load-induced enhancement and suppression in the visual field.

  5. EEG Characteristics of Successful Burst Suppression for Refractory Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Emily L; Martinez, Nirma Carballido; Ritzl, Eva K

    2016-12-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is often treated with continuous intravenous medications with the goal of EEG burst suppression. Standard advice is to titrate medications to at least 10-s interburst intervals; however, this has not been shown to improve outcome. We examined EEG characteristics in patients treated with IV anesthetic therapy (IVAT) for RSE to determine which EEG characteristics were associated with successful lifting of IVAT (i.e., without recurrence of status epilepticus). We screened the clinical continuous EEG database for adult patients treated with IVAT for RSE (excluding patients with anoxic injury). We measured the length of bursts and interburst intervals for each patient, calculated EEG burst suppression ratios, and graded bursts for the amount of epileptiform activity. We compared these characteristics in successful versus unsuccessful IVAT lifting attempts. We included 17 successful and 20 unsuccessful lifting attempts in 19 patients (5 used as a holdout validation set). The interburst intervals, burst suppression ratios, and length of bursts did not differentiate successful and unsuccessful lifting attempts; the amount of epileptiform activity in bursts correlated with success or failure to wean IVAT (p = 0.008). Maximum burst amplitude RSE in this small cohort. This may suggest that EEG characteristics, rather a strict interburst interval goal, could guide IVAT for RSE.

  6. Suppression of superconductivity in superconductor/ferromagnet multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, T. J.; Kim, D. H. [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Suppression of the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of NbN thin films in superconductor/ferromagnet multilayers has been investigated. Both superconducting NbN and ferromagnetic FeN layers were deposited on thermally oxidized Si substrate at room temperature by using reactive magnetron sputtering in an Ar-N2 gas mixture. The thickness of FeN films was fixed at 20 nm, while the thickness of NbN films was varied from 3 nm to 90 nm. Tc suppression was clearly observed in NbN layers up to 70 nm thickness when NbN layer was in proximity with FeN layer. For a given thickness of NbN layer, the magnitude of Tc suppression was increased in the order of Si/FeN/NbN, Si/NbN/FeN, and Si/FeN/NbN/FeN structure. This result can be used to design a spin switch whose operation is based on the proximity effect between superconducting and ferromagnetic layers.

  7. Artifact suppression and analysis of brain activities with electroencephalography signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md. Rashed-Al-Mahfuz; Md. Rabiul Islam; Keikichi Hirose; Md. Khademul Islam Molla

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interface is a communication system that connects the brain with computer (or other devices) but is not dependent on the normal output of the brain (i.e., peripheral nerve and muscle). Electro-oculogram is a dominant artifact which has a significant negative influence on further analysis of real electroencephalography data. This paper presented a data adaptive technique for artifact suppression and brain wave extraction from electroencephalography signals to detect regional brain activities. Empirical mode decomposition based adaptive thresholding approach was employed here to suppress the electro-oculogram artifact. Fractional Gaussian noise was used to determine the threshold level derived from the analysis data without any training. The purified electroencephalography signal was composed of the brain waves also called rhythmic components which represent the brain activities. The rhythmic components were extracted from each electroencephalography channel using adaptive wiener filter with the original scale. The regional brain activities were mapped on the basis of the spatial distribution of rhythmic components, and the results showed that different regions of the brain are activated in response to different stimuli. This research analyzed the activities of a single rhythmic component, alpha with respect to different motor imaginations. The experimental results showed that the proposed method is very efficient in artifact suppression and identifying individual motor imagery based on the activities of alpha component.

  8. Decoupled Hierarchical Structures for Suppression of Leidenfrost Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhnia, Nazanin; Sajadi, Seyed Mohammad; Irajizad, Peyman; Ghasemi, Hadi

    2017-03-14

    Thermal management of high temperature systems through cooling droplets is limited by the existence of the Leidenfrost point (LFP), at which the formation of a continuous vapor film between a hot solid and a cooling droplet diminishes the heat transfer rate. This limit results in a bottleneck for the advancement of the wide spectrum of systems including high-temperature power generation, electronics/photonics, reactors, and spacecraft. Despite a long time effort on development of surfaces for suppression of this phenomenon, this limit has only shifted to higher temperatures, but still exists. Here, we report a new multiscale decoupled hierarchical structure that suppress the Leidenfrost state and provide efficient heat dissipation at high temperatures. The architecture of these structures is composed of a nanomembrane assembled on top of a deep micropillar structure. This architecture allows to independently tune the involved forces and to suppress LFP. Once a cooling droplet contacts these surfaces, by rerouting the path of vapor flow, the cooling droplet remains attached to the hot solid substrates even at high temperatures (up to 570 °C) for heat dissipation with no existence of Leidenfrost phenomenon. These new surfaces offer unprecedented heat dissipation capacity at high temperatures (2 orders of magnitude higher than the other state-of-the-art surfaces). We envision that these surfaces open a new avenue in thermal management of high-temperature systems through spray cooling.

  9. Fatal attraction? Intraguild facilitation and suppression among predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivy, Kelly J.; Pozzanghera, Casey B.; Grace, James B.; Prugh, Laura R.

    2017-01-01

    Competition and suppression are recognized as dominant forces that structure predator communities. Facilitation via carrion provisioning, however, is a ubiquitous interaction among predators that could offset the strength of suppression. Understanding the relative importance of these positive and negative interactions is necessary to anticipate community-wide responses to apex predator declines and recoveries worldwide. Using state-sponsored wolf (Canis lupus) control in Alaska as a quasi experiment, we conducted snow track surveys of apex, meso-, and small predators to test for evidence of carnivore cascades (e.g., mesopredator release). We analyzed survey data using an integrative occupancy and structural equation modeling framework to quantify the strengths of hypothesized interaction pathways, and we evaluated fine-scale spatiotemporal responses of nonapex predators to wolf activity clusters identified from radio-collar data. Contrary to the carnivore cascade hypothesis, both meso- and small predator occupancy patterns indicated guild-wide, negative responses of nonapex predators to wolf abundance variations at the landscape scale. At the local scale, however, we observed a near guild-wide, positive response of nonapex predators to localized wolf activity. Local-scale association with apex predators due to scavenging could lead to landscape patterns of mesopredator suppression, suggesting a key link between occupancy patterns and the structure of predator communities at different spatial scales.

  10. Suppression of auger recombination in ""giant"" core/shell nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Santamaria, Florencio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schaller, Richard D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yongfen [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    Many potential applications of semiconductor nanocrystals are hindered by nonradiative Auger recombination wherein the electron-hole (exciton) recombination energy is transferred to a third charge carrier. This process severely limits the lifetime and bandwidth of optical gain, leads to large nonradiative losses in light emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells, and is believed to be responsible for intermittency ('blinking') of emission from single nanocrystals. The development of nanostructures in which Auger recombination is suppressed has been a longstanding goal in colloidal nanocrystal research. Here, we demonstrate that such suppression is possible using so-called 'giant' nanocrystals that consist of a small CdSe core and a thick CdS shell. These nanostructures exhibit a very long biexciton lifetime ({approx}10 ns) that is likely dominated by radiative decay instead of non-radiative Auger recombination. As a result of suppressed Auger recombination, even high-order multiexcitons exhibit high emission efficiencies, which allows us to demonstrate optical amplification with an extraordinarily large bandwidth (>500 me V) and record low excitation thresholds.

  11. Isoprene suppression of new particle formation in mixed deciduous forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Kanawade

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Production of new particles over forests is an important source of cloud condensation nuclei that can affect climate. While such particle formation events have been widely observed, their formation mechanisms over forests are poorly understood. Our observations made in a mixed deciduous Michigan forest with large isoprene emissions during the summer show surprisingly rare occurrence of new particle formation (NPF. No NPF events were observed during the 5 weeks of measurements, except two evening ultrafine particle events as opposed to the typically observed noontime NPF elsewhere. Sulfuric acid concentrations were in the 106 cm−3 ranges with very low preexisting aerosol particles, a favorable condition for NPF to occur even during the summer. The ratio of emitted isoprene carbon to monoterpene carbon at this site was similar to that in Amazon rainforests (ratio >10, where NPF is also very rare, compared with a ratio <0.5 in Finland boreal forests, where NPF events are frequent. Our results showed that large isoprene emissions can suppress NPF formation in forests although the underlying mechanism for the suppression is unclear and future studies are needed to reveal the likely mechanism. The two evening ultrafine particle events were associated with the transported anthropogenic sulfur plumes and the ultrafine particles likely formed via ion induced nucleation. Changes in landcover and environmental conditions could modify the isoprene suppression of NPF in some forest regions resulting in a radiative forcing that could influence climate.

  12. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-04-30

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a K(d) value of 2.6 µM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases.

  13. Physical and Chemical Aspects of Fire Suppression in Extraterrestrial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, F.; Linteris, G. T.; Katta, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    A fire, whether in a spacecraft or in occupied spaces on extraterrestrial bases, can lead to mission termination or loss of life. While the fire-safety record of US space missions has been excellent, the advent of longer duration missions to Mars, the moon, or aboard the International Space Station (ISS) increases the likelihood of fire events, with more limited mission termination options. The fire safety program of NASA's manned space flight program is based largely upon the principles of controlling the flammability of on-board materials and greatly eliminating sources of ignition. As a result, very little research has been conducted on fire suppression in the microgravity or reduced-gravity environment. The objectives of this study are: to obtain fundamental knowledge of physical and chemical processes of fire suppression, using gravity and oxygen concentration as independent variables to simulate various extraterrestrial environments, including spacecraft and surface bases in Mars and moon missions; to provide rigorous testing of analytical models, which include comprehensive descriptions of combustion and suppression chemistry; and to provide basic research results useful for technological advances in fire safety, including the development of new fire-extinguishing agents and approaches, in the microgravity environment associated with ISS and in the partial-gravity Martian and lunar environments.

  14. Bar-mode instability suppression in magnetized relativistic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Franci, Luca; Dionysopoulou, Kyriaki; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    We show that magnetic fields stronger than about $10^{15}$ G are able to suppress the development of the hydrodynamical bar-mode instability in relativistic stars. The suppression is due to a change in the rest-mass density and angular velocity profiles due to the formation and to the linear growth of a toroidal component that rapidly overcomes the original poloidal one, leading to an amplification of the total magnetic energy. The study is carried out performing three-dimensional ideal-magnetohydrodynamics simulations in full general relativity, superimposing to the initial (matter) equilibrium configurations a purely poloidal magnetic field in the range $10^{14}-10^{16}$ G. When the seed field is a few parts in $10^{15}$ G or above, all the evolved models show the formation of a low-density envelope surrounding the star. For much weaker fields, no effect on the matter evolution is observed, while magnetic fields which are just below the suppression threshold are observed to slow down the growth-rate of the ...

  15. Weed suppression by green manure in an agroecological system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Maria Garicoix Recalde

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Green manure promotes efficient suppression of weeds, but green manure species can exhibit distinct behaviors, depending on the environmental conditions. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of soil mulching and weed suppression by spring/summer green manure species grown in the spring/summer season, at different growth stages and after management (cut, for 90 days during the cassava crop cycle. The study was carried out in the 2010/2011 season, in a system managed under agroecological principles. The treatments consisted of different green manure species and arrangements: Crotalaria juncea, Cajanus cajan, Canavalia brasiliensis, Canavalia ensiformis, Pennisetum americanum, Crotalaria juncea and Pennisetum americanum intercropped; Mucuna aterrima, Sorghum bicolor, a mixture of all the green manures in study and a control plot under fallow. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with four replications. The evaluations of the soil cover either by the green manures or weeds were performed at 45, 90 and 105 days after the emergence of the green manures. The cassava crop was planted under reduced tillage system at 11 days after the cut of the green manures. The percentage of soil covered by weeds and the dry matter produced were evaluated at 30, 60 and 90 days after planting. The results showed that the green manures had a suppressive effect on weeds during their life cycle, as well as during the first months after its management (cut, composing the mulch.

  16. Optical suppression of drug-evoked phasic dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, James E; Cone, Jackson J; Sinon, Christopher G; Fortin, Samantha M; Kantak, Pranish A; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Stuber, Garret D; Roitman, Mitchell F

    2014-01-01

    Brief fluctuations in dopamine concentration (dopamine transients) play a key role in behavior towards rewards, including drugs of abuse. Drug-evoked dopamine transients may result from actions at both dopamine cell bodies and dopamine terminals. Inhibitory opsins can be targeted to dopamine neurons permitting their firing activity to be suppressed. However, as dopamine transients can become uncoupled from firing, it is unknown whether optogenetic hyperpolarization at the level of the soma is able to suppress dopamine transients. Here, we used in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to record transients evoked by cocaine and raclopride in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of urethane-anesthetized rats. We targeted halorhodopsin (NpHR) specifically to dopamine cells by injecting Cre-inducible virus into ventral tegmental area (VTA) of transgenic rats that expressed Cre recombinase under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-Cre(+) rats). Consistent with previous work, co-administration of cocaine and raclopride led to the generation of dopamine transients in NAc shell. Illumination of VTA with laser strongly suppressed the frequency of transients in NpHR-expressing rats, but not in control rats. Laser did not have any effect on amplitude of transients. Thus, optogenetics can effectively reduce the occurrence of drug-evoked transients and is therefore a suitable approach for studying the functional role of such transients in drug-associated behavior.

  17. Optical suppression of drug-evoked phasic dopamine release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Edgar Mccutcheon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brief fluctuations in dopamine concentration (dopamine transients play a key role in behavior towards rewards, including drugs of abuse. Drug-evoked dopamine transients may result from actions at both dopamine cell bodies and dopamine terminals. Inhibitory opsins can be targeted to dopamine neurons permitting their firing activity to be suppressed. However, as dopamine transients can become uncoupled from firing, it is unknown whether optogenetic hyperpolarization at the level of the soma is able to suppress dopamine transients. Here, we used in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to record transients evoked by cocaine and raclopride in nucleus accumbens (NAc of urethane-anesthetized rats. We targeted halorhodopsin (NpHR specifically to dopamine cells by injecting Cre-inducible virus into ventral tegmental area (VTA of transgenic rats that expressed Cre recombinase under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-Cre+ rats. Consistent with previous work, co-administration of cocaine and raclopride led to the generation of dopamine transients in NAc shell. Illumination of VTA with laser strongly suppressed the frequency of transients in NpHR-expressing rats, but not in control rats. Laser did not have any effect on amplitude of transients. Thus, optogenetics can effectively reduce the occurrence of drug-evoked transients and is therefore a suitable approach for studying the functional role of such transients in drug-associated behavior.

  18. Evolution of male-killer suppression in a natural population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A Hornett

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Male-killing bacteria are widespread in arthropods, and can profoundly alter the reproductive biology of their host species. Here we detail the first case of complete suppression of a male killer. The nymphalid butterfly Hypolimnas bolina is infected with a strain of the bacterium Wolbachia, wBol1, which kills male host embryos in Polynesian populations, but does not do so in many areas of Southeast Asia, where both males and female adults are naturally infected, and wBol1-infected females produce a 1:1 sex ratio. We demonstrate that absence of male killing by wBol1 is associated with dominant zygotic suppression of the action of the male killer. Simulations demonstrate host suppressors of male-killer action can spread very rapidly, and historical data indicating the presence of male killing in Southeast Asia in the very recent past suggests suppressor spread has been a very recent occurrence. Thus, male killer/host interactions are much more dynamic than previously recognised, with rapid and dramatic loss of the phenotype. Our results also indicate that suppression can render male killers completely quiescent, leading to the conclusion that some species that do not currently express a male killer may have done so in the past, and thus that more species have had their biology affected by these parasites than previously believed.

  19. Repetition suppression: a means to index neural representations using BOLD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Timothy E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the human brain gives rise to complex cognitive processes remains one of the biggest challenges of contemporary neuroscience. While invasive recording in animal models can provide insight into neural processes that are conserved across species, our understanding of cognition more broadly relies upon investigation of the human brain itself. There is therefore an imperative to establish non-invasive tools that allow human brain activity to be measured at high spatial and temporal resolution. In recent years, various attempts have been made to refine the coarse signal available in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), providing a means to investigate neural activity at the meso-scale, i.e. at the level of neural populations. The most widely used techniques include repetition suppression and multivariate pattern analysis. Human neuroscience can now use these techniques to investigate how representations are encoded across neural populations and transformed by relevant computations. Here, we review the physiological basis, applications and limitations of fMRI repetition suppression with a brief comparison to multivariate techniques. By doing so, we show how fMRI repetition suppression holds promise as a tool to reveal complex neural mechanisms that underlie human cognitive function. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574308

  20. Zero Suppression with Scalable Readout System (SRS) and APV25 FE Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Goentoro, Steven Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Zero suppression is a very useful algorithm in data acquisition and transfer. In this report, I would like to present the basic procedures of the application of Zero Suppression in the ordinary DAQ system that we have ( Date and Amore)