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Sample records for e-mimetics inhibit neurodegeneration

  1. Apolipoprotein E-mimetics inhibit neurodegeneration and restore cognitive functions in a transgenic Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease.

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    Svetlana Sarantseva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations of the amyloid precursor protein gene (APP are found in familial forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD and some lead to the elevated production of amyloid-beta-protein (Abeta. While Abeta has been implicated in the causation of AD, the exact role played by Abeta and its APP precursor are still unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our study, Drosophila melanogaster transgenics were established as a model to analyze AD-like pathology caused by APP overexpression. We demonstrated that age related changes in the levels and pattern of synaptic proteins accompanied progressive neurodegeneration and impairment of cognitive functions in APP transgenic flies, but that these changes may be independent from the generation of Abeta. Using novel peptide mimetics of Apolipoprotein-E, COG112 or COG133 proved to be neuroprotective and significantly improved the learning and memory of APP transgenic flies. CONCLUSIONS: The development of neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits was corrected by injections of COG112 or COG133, novel mimetics of apolipoprotein-E (apoE with neuroprotective activities.

  2. Age-Related Neurodegeneration Prevention Through mTOR Inhibition: Potential Mechanisms and Remaining Questions

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    Jahrling, Jordan B.; Laberge, Remi-Martin

    2016-01-01

    With the global aging population, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and mild cognition impairment are increasing in prevalence. The success of rapamycin as an agent to extend lifespan in various organisms, including mice, brings hope that chronic mTOR inhibition could also refrain age-related neurodegeneration. Here we review the evidence suggesting that mTOR inhibition - mainly with rapamycin - is a valid intervention to delay age-related neurodegeneration. We discuss the potential mechanisms by which rapamycin may facilitate neurodegeneration prevention or restoration of cognitive function. We also discuss the known side effects of rapamycin and provide evidence to alleviate exaggerated concerns regarding its wider clinical use. We explore the small molecule alternatives to rapamycin and propose future directions for their development, mainly by exploring the possibility of targeting the downstream effectors of mTOR: S6K1 and especially S6K2. Finally, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the models used to determine intervention efficacy for neurodegeneration. We address the difficulties of interpreting data using the common way of investigating the efficacy of interventions to delay/prevent neurodegeneration by observing animal behavior while these animals are under treatment. We propose an experimental design that should isolate the variable of aging in the experimental design and resolve the ambiguity present in recent literature. PMID:26059360

  3. Calpain inhibition prevents amyloid-beta-induced neurodegeneration and associated behavioral dysfunction in rats

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    Granic, Ivica; Nyakas, Csaba; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.; Halmy, Laszlo G.; Gross, Gerhard; Schoemaker, Hans; Moeller, Achim; Nimmrich, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (A beta) is toxic to neurons and such toxicity is - at least in part - mediated via the NMDA receptor. Calpain, a calcium dependent cystein protease, is part of the NMDA receptor-induced neurodegeneration pathway, and we previously reported that inhibition of calpain prevents excitotoxi

  4. Tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition ameliorates neurodegeneration by modulation of kynurenine pathway metabolites

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    Breda, Carlo; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V.; Sograte Idrissi, Shama; Notarangelo, Francesca M.; Estranero, Jasper G.; Moore, Gareth G. L.; Green, Edward W.; Kyriacou, Charalambos P.; Schwarcz, Robert; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan (TRP) degradation have been closely linked to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders. Recent work has highlighted the therapeutic potential of inhibiting two critical regulatory enzymes in this pathway—kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) and tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Much evidence indicates that the efficacy of KMO inhibition arises from normalizing an imbalance between neurotoxic [3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK); quinolinic acid (QUIN)] and neuroprotective [kynurenic acid (KYNA)] KP metabolites. However, it is not clear if TDO inhibition is protective via a similar mechanism or if this is instead due to increased levels of TRP—the substrate of TDO. Here, we find that increased levels of KYNA relative to 3-HK are likely central to the protection conferred by TDO inhibition in a fruit fly model of Huntington’s disease and that TRP treatment strongly reduces neurodegeneration by shifting KP flux toward KYNA synthesis. In fly models of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, we provide genetic evidence that inhibition of TDO or KMO improves locomotor performance and ameliorates shortened life span, as well as reducing neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's model flies. Critically, we find that treatment with a chemical TDO inhibitor is robustly protective in these models. Consequently, our work strongly supports targeting of the KP as a potential treatment strategy for several major neurodegenerative disorders and suggests that alterations in the levels of neuroactive KP metabolites could underlie several therapeutic benefits. PMID:27114543

  5. Selective Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Protects against Neurodegeneration in Experimental Multiple Sclerosis*

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    Warne, Justin; Pryce, Gareth; Hill, Julia M.; Shi, Xiao; Lennerås, Felicia; Puentes, Fabiola; Kip, Maarten; Hilditch, Laura; Walker, Paul; Simone, Michela I.; Chan, A. W. Edith; Towers, Greg J.; Coker, Alun R.; Duchen, Michael R.; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Baker, David; Selwood, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore is a recognized drug target for neurodegenerative conditions such as multiple sclerosis and for ischemia-reperfusion injury in the brain and heart. The peptidylprolyl isomerase, cyclophilin D (CypD, PPIF), is a positive regulator of the pore, and genetic down-regulation or knock-out improves outcomes in disease models. Current inhibitors of peptidylprolyl isomerases show no selectivity between the tightly conserved cyclophilin paralogs and exhibit significant off-target effects, immunosuppression, and toxicity. We therefore designed and synthesized a new mitochondrially targeted CypD inhibitor, JW47, using a quinolinium cation tethered to cyclosporine. X-ray analysis was used to validate the design concept, and biological evaluation revealed selective cellular inhibition of CypD and the permeability transition pore with reduced cellular toxicity compared with cyclosporine. In an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis disease model of neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis, JW47 demonstrated significant protection of axons and improved motor assessments with minimal immunosuppression. These findings suggest that selective CypD inhibition may represent a viable therapeutic strategy for MS and identify quinolinium as a mitochondrial targeting group for in vivo use. PMID:26679998

  6. Selective Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Protects against Neurodegeneration in Experimental Multiple Sclerosis.

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    Warne, Justin; Pryce, Gareth; Hill, Julia M; Shi, Xiao; Lennerås, Felicia; Puentes, Fabiola; Kip, Maarten; Hilditch, Laura; Walker, Paul; Simone, Michela I; Chan, A W Edith; Towers, Greg J; Coker, Alun R; Duchen, Michael R; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Baker, David; Selwood, David L

    2016-02-26

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore is a recognized drug target for neurodegenerative conditions such as multiple sclerosis and for ischemia-reperfusion injury in the brain and heart. The peptidylprolyl isomerase, cyclophilin D (CypD, PPIF), is a positive regulator of the pore, and genetic down-regulation or knock-out improves outcomes in disease models. Current inhibitors of peptidylprolyl isomerases show no selectivity between the tightly conserved cyclophilin paralogs and exhibit significant off-target effects, immunosuppression, and toxicity. We therefore designed and synthesized a new mitochondrially targeted CypD inhibitor, JW47, using a quinolinium cation tethered to cyclosporine. X-ray analysis was used to validate the design concept, and biological evaluation revealed selective cellular inhibition of CypD and the permeability transition pore with reduced cellular toxicity compared with cyclosporine. In an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis disease model of neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis, JW47 demonstrated significant protection of axons and improved motor assessments with minimal immunosuppression. These findings suggest that selective CypD inhibition may represent a viable therapeutic strategy for MS and identify quinolinium as a mitochondrial targeting group for in vivo use.

  7. ACE Inhibition with Captopril Retards the Development of Signs of Neurodegeneration in an Animal Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

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    AbdAlla, Said; Langer, Andreas; Fu, Xuebin; Quitterer, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a significant pathological feature in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Experimental evidence indicates that inhibition of brain ROS could be beneficial in slowing the neurodegenerative process triggered by amyloid-beta (Abeta) aggregates. The angiotensin II AT1 receptor is a significant source of brain ROS, and AD patients have an increased brain angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) level, which could account for an excessive angiotensin-dependent AT1-induced ROS generation. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of ACE inhibition on signs of neurodegeneration of aged Tg2576 mice as a transgenic animal model of AD. Whole genome microarray gene expression profiling and biochemical analyses demonstrated that the centrally active ACE inhibitor captopril normalized the excessive hippocampal ACE activity of AD mice. Concomitantly, the development of signs of neurodegeneration was retarded by six months of captopril treatment. The neuroprotective profile triggered by captopril was accompanied by reduced amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and decreased hippocampal ROS, which is known to enhance Abeta generation by increased activation of beta- and gamma-secretases. Taken together, our data present strong evidence that ACE inhibition with a widely used cardiovascular drug could interfere with Abeta-dependent neurodegeneration. PMID:23959119

  8. ACE Inhibition with Captopril Retards the Development of Signs of Neurodegeneration in an Animal Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Ursula Quitterer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS is a significant pathological feature in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Experimental evidence indicates that inhibition of brain ROS could be beneficial in slowing the neurodegenerative process triggered by amyloid-beta (Abeta aggregates. The angiotensin II AT1 receptor is a significant source of brain ROS, and AD patients have an increased brain angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE level, which could account for an excessive angiotensin-dependent AT1-induced ROS generation. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of ACE inhibition on signs of neurodegeneration of aged Tg2576 mice as a transgenic animal model of AD. Whole genome microarray gene expression profiling and biochemical analyses demonstrated that the centrally active ACE inhibitor captopril normalized the excessive hippocampal ACE activity of AD mice. Concomitantly, the development of signs of neurodegeneration was retarded by six months of captopril treatment. The neuroprotective profile triggered by captopril was accompanied by reduced amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP, and decreased hippocampal ROS, which is known to enhance Abeta generation by increased activation of beta- and gamma-secretases. Taken together, our data present strong evidence that ACE inhibition with a widely used cardiovascular drug could interfere with Abeta-dependent neurodegeneration.

  9. Calcineurin inhibition at the clinical phase of prion disease reduces neurodegeneration, improves behavioral alterations and increases animal survival.

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    Abhisek Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by a long pre-symptomatic phase followed by rapid and progressive clinical phase. Although rare in humans, the unconventional infectious nature of the disease raises the potential for an epidemic. Unfortunately, no treatment is currently available. The hallmark event in prion diseases is the accumulation of a misfolded and infectious form of the prion protein (PrP(Sc. Previous reports have shown that PrP(Sc induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes in calcium homeostasis in the brain of affected individuals. In this study we show that the calcium-dependent phosphatase Calcineurin (CaN is hyperactivated both in vitro and in vivo as a result of PrP(Sc formation. CaN activation mediates prion-induced neurodegeneration, suggesting that inhibition of this phosphatase could be a target for therapy. To test this hypothesis, prion infected wild type mice were treated intra-peritoneally with the CaN inhibitor FK506 at the clinical phase of the disease. Treated animals exhibited reduced severity of the clinical abnormalities and increased survival time compared to vehicle treated controls. Treatment also led to a significant increase in the brain levels of the CaN downstream targets pCREB and pBAD, which paralleled the decrease of CaN activity. Importantly, we observed a lower degree of neurodegeneration in animals treated with the drug as revealed by a higher number of neurons and a lower quantity of degenerating nerve cells. These changes were not dependent on PrP(Sc formation, since the protein accumulated in the brain to the same levels as in the untreated mice. Our findings contribute to an understanding of the mechanism of neurodegeneration in prion diseases and more importantly may provide a novel strategy for therapy that is beneficial at the clinical phase of the disease.

  10. Sphingomyelin-induced inhibition of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase causes neurodegeneration in type A Niemann-Pick disease.

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    Pérez-Cañamás, A; Benvegnù, S; Rueda, C B; Rábano, A; Satrústegui, J; Ledesma, M D

    2017-05-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type A (NPA) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neurological alterations that leads to death in childhood. Loss-of-function mutations in the acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) gene cause NPA, and result in the accumulation of sphingomyelin (SM) in lysosomes and plasma membrane of neurons. Using ASM knockout (ASMko) mice as a NPA disease model, we investigated how high SM levels contribute to neural pathology in NPA. We found high levels of oxidative stress both in neurons from these mice and a NPA patient. Impaired activity of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) increases intracellular calcium. SM induces PMCA decreased activity, which causes oxidative stress. Incubating ASMko-cultured neurons in the histone deacetylase inhibitor, SAHA, restores PMCA activity and calcium homeostasis and, consequently, reduces the increased levels of oxidative stress. No recovery occurs when PMCA activity is pharmacologically impaired or genetically inhibited in vitro. Oral administration of SAHA prevents oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, and improves behavioral performance in ASMko mice. These results demonstrate a critical role for plasma membrane SM in neuronal calcium regulation. Thus, we identify changes in PMCA-triggered calcium homeostasis as an upstream mediator for NPA pathology. These findings can stimulate new approaches for pharmacological remediation in a disease with no current clinical treatments.

  11. Small molecule, non-peptide p75 ligands inhibit Abeta-induced neurodegeneration and synaptic impairment.

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    Tao Yang

    Full Text Available The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR is expressed by neurons particularly vulnerable in Alzheimer's disease (AD. We tested the hypothesis that non-peptide, small molecule p75(NTR ligands found to promote survival signaling might prevent Abeta-induced degeneration and synaptic dysfunction. These ligands inhibited Abeta-induced neuritic dystrophy, death of cultured neurons and Abeta-induced death of pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slice cultures. Moreover, ligands inhibited Abeta-induced activation of molecules involved in AD pathology including calpain/cdk5, GSK3beta and c-Jun, and tau phosphorylation, and prevented Abeta-induced inactivation of AKT and CREB. Finally, a p75(NTR ligand blocked Abeta-induced hippocampal LTP impairment. These studies support an extensive intersection between p75(NTR signaling and Abeta pathogenic mechanisms, and introduce a class of specific small molecule ligands with the unique ability to block multiple fundamental AD-related signaling pathways, reverse synaptic impairment and inhibit Abeta-induced neuronal dystrophy and death.

  12. Transglutaminase inhibition:A therapy to protect cells from death in neurodegeneration?

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    Martina; Iannaccone; Alessandro; Stefanile; Giulia; De; Vivo; Antonio; Martin; Enrica; Serretiello; Vittorio; Gentile

    2012-01-01

    Transglutaminases(TGs;E.C.2.3.2.13)are ubiquitous enzymes which catalyze post-translational modifications of proteins.TGs and TG-catalyzed post-translational modifications of proteins have been shown to be involved in the molecular mechanisms responsible for several human diseases.In particular,TG activity has been hypothesized to also be involved also in the molecular mechanisms responsible for human neurodegenerative diseases.In support of this hypothesis,Basso et al recently demonstrated that the TG inhibition protects against oxidative stress-induced neuronal death,suggesting that multiple TG isoforms participate in oxidative stress-induced cell death and that nonselective TG isoform inhibitors will be most effective in fighting oxidative death in neurological disorders.In this commentary,we discuss the possible molecular mechanisms by which TG activity could be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases,with particular reference to neurodegenerative diseases,and the possible involvement of multiple TG isoforms expressed simultaneously in the nervous system in these diseases.Moreover,therapeutic strategies based on the use of selective or nonselective TG inhibitors for the amelioration of thesymptoms of patients with neurological diseases,characterized by aberrant TG activity,are also discussed.

  13. The tissue plasminogen activator-plasminogen proteolytic cascade accelerates amyloid-beta (Abeta) degradation and inhibits Abeta-induced neurodegeneration.

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    Melchor, Jerry P; Pawlak, Robert; Strickland, Sidney

    2003-10-01

    Accumulation of the amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide depends on both its generation and clearance. To better define clearance pathways, we have evaluated the role of the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-plasmin system in Abeta degradation in vivo. In two different mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, chronically elevated Abeta peptide in the brain correlates with the upregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and inhibition of the tPA-plasmin system. In addition, Abeta injected into the hippocampus of mice lacking either tPA or plasminogen persists, inducing PAI-1 expression and causing activation of microglial cells and neuronal damage. Conversely, Abeta injected into wild-type mice is rapidly cleared and does not cause neuronal degeneration. Thus, the tPA-plasmin proteolytic cascade aids in the clearance of Abeta, and reduced activity of this system may contribute to the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. The putative multidrug resistance protein MRP-7 inhibits methylmercury-associated animal toxicity and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    VanDuyn, Natalia; Nass, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative motor disorder worldwide, and results in the progressive loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Gene-environment interactions are believed to play a significant role in the vast majority of PD cases, yet the toxicants and the associated genes involved in the neuropathology are largely ill-defined. Recent epidemiological and biochemical evidence suggests that methylmercury (MeHg) may be an environmental toxicant that contributes to the development of PD. Here, we report that a gene coding for the putative multidrug resistance protein MRP-7 in Caenorhabditis elegans modulates whole animal and DA neuron sensitivity to MeHg. In this study, we demonstrate that genetic knockdown of MRP-7 results in a twofold increase in Hg levels and a dramatic increase in stress response proteins associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, golgi apparatus, and mitochondria, as well as an increase in MeHg-associated animal death. Chronic exposure to low concentrations of MeHg induces MRP-7 gene expression, while exposures in MRP-7 genetic knockdown animals results in a loss of DA neuron integrity without affecting whole animal viability. Furthermore, transgenic animals expressing a fluorescent reporter behind the endogenous MRP-7 promoter indicate that the transporter is expressed in DA neurons. These studies show for the first time that a multidrug resistance protein is expressed in DA neurons, and its expression inhibits MeHg-associated DA neuron pathology.

  15. Neurodegeneration in accelerated aging.

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    Scheibye-Knudsen, Moren

    2016-11-01

    The growing proportion of elderly people represents an increasing economic burden, not least because of age-associated diseases that pose a significant cost to the health service. Finding possible interventions to age-associated disorders therefore have wide ranging implications. A number of genetically defined accelerated aging diseases have been characterized that can aid in our understanding of aging. Interestingly, all these diseases are associated with defects in the maintenance of our genome. A subset of these disorders, Cockayne syndrome, Xeroderma pigmentosum group A and ataxia-telangiectasia, show neurological involvement reminiscent of what is seen in primary human mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondria are the power plants of the cells converting energy stored in oxygen, sugar, fat, and protein into ATP, the energetic currency of our body. Emerging evidence has linked this organelle to aging and finding mitochondrial dysfunction in accelerated aging disorders thereby strengthens the mitochondrial theory of aging. This theory states that an accumulation of damage to the mitochondria may underlie the process of aging. Indeed, it appears that some accelerated aging disorders that show neurodegeneration also have mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial alterations may be secondary to defects in nuclear DNA repair. Indeed, nuclear DNA damage may lead to increased energy consumption, alterations in mitochondrial ATP production and defects in mitochondrial recycling, a term called mitophagy. These changes may be caused by activation of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase 1 (PARP1), an enzyme that responds to DNA damage. Upon activation PARP1 utilizes key metabolites that attenuate pathways that are normally protective for the cell. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of PARP1 or reconstitution of the metabolites rescues the changes caused by PARP1 hyperactivation and in many cases reverse the phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. This implies that modulation

  16. Interleukin-1 and inflammatory neurodegeneration.

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    Simi, A; Tsakiri, N; Wang, P; Rothwell, N J

    2007-11-01

    Inflammation occurs rapidly in response to acute brain insults such as stroke, haemorrhage or trauma, and can be sustained for long periods of time, for example in Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases and multiple sclerosis. Experimental evidence indicates that inflammation plays a major role in neurodegeneration under these conditions, and that the cytokine IL-1 (interleukin-1) is a pivotal mediator. IL-1 is expressed rapidly in response to neuronal injury, predominantly by microglia, and elevated levels of endogenous or exogenous IL-1 markedly exacerbate injury. The naturally occurring IL-1RA (IL-1 receptor antagonist) markedly inhibits ischaemic, excitotoxic and traumatic brain injury in rodents, and has shown promise in a Phase II clinical trial in stroke patients. The mechanisms of IL-1 expression, release and action in neurodegeneration are not fully elucidated and appear multiple. Systemic IL-1 markedly enhances ischaemic brain injury via release of neutrophils into circulation, neutrophil adhesion to injured cerebrovasculature and CNS (central nervous system) invasion, and cell death via activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9. IL-1 also influences the release of toxins from glial and endothelial cells. Neuronal responses to excitotoxins and physiological factors may have an impact on neuronal survival. IL-1RA, delivered peripherally, can enter the CNS in animals and humans and has no adverse effects in stroke or subarachnoid haemorrhage patients, but shows potential benefit in acute stroke patients.

  17. Neuroprotective strategies against calpain-mediated neurodegeneration

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    Yildiz-Unal A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aysegul Yildiz-Unal,1 Sirin Korulu,2 Arzu Karabay3 1Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Science, Mugla Sitki Koçman University, Kötekli, Mugla, Turkey; 2Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Istanbul Arel University, Istanbul Turkey; 3Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Science and Letters, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract: Calpains are calcium-dependent proteolytic enzymes that have deleterious effects on neurons upon their pathological over-activation. According to the results of numerous studies to date, there is no doubt that abnormal calpain activation triggers activation and progression of apoptotic processes in neurodegeneration, leading to neuronal death. Thus, it is very crucial to unravel all the aspects of calpain-mediated neurodegeneration in order to protect neurons through eliminating or at least minimizing its lethal effects. Protecting neurons against calpain-activated apoptosis basically requires developing effective, reliable, and most importantly, therapeutically applicable approaches to succeed. From this aspect, the most significant studies focusing on preventing calpain-mediated neurodegeneration include blocking the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA-type glutamate receptor activities, which are closely related to calpain activation; directly inhibiting calpain itself via intrinsic or synthetic calpain inhibitors, or inhibiting its downstream processes; and utilizing the neuroprotectant steroid hormone estrogen and its receptors. In this review, the most remarkable neuroprotective strategies for calpain-mediated neurodegeneration are categorized and summarized with respect to their advantages and disadvantages over one another, in terms of their efficiency and applicability as a therapeutic regimen in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Keywords: calpain, neurodegeneration, neuroprotection, calpain inhibitors, NMDAR, Speedy/RINGO

  18. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

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    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  19. Neuroinflammation Induces Neurodegeneration

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    Kempuraj, D; Thangavel, R; Natteru, PA; Selvakumar, GP; Saeed, D; Zahoor, H; Zaheer, S; Iyer, SS; Zaheer, A

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are characterized by neuronal degeneration and neuronal death in specific regions of the central nervous system (CNS). In AD, neurons of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex are the first to degenerate, whereas in PD, dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra degenerate. MS patients show destruction of the myelin sheath. Once the CNS neurons are damaged, they are unable to regenerate unlike any other tissue in the body. Neurodegeneration is mediated by inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators such as interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, IL-33, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL5, matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), glia maturation factor (GMF), substance P, reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS), mast cells-mediated histamine and proteases, protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), CD40, CD40L, CD88, intracellular Ca+ elevation, and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kB). Activated microglia, astrocytes, neurons, T-cells and mast cells release these inflammatory mediators and mediate neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in a vicious manner. Further, immune and inflammatory cells and inflammatory mediators from the periphery cross the defective blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and augment neuroinflammation. Though inflammation is crucial in the onset and the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, anti-inflammatory drugs do not provide significant therapeutic effects in these patients till date, as the disease pathogenesis is not yet clearly understood. In this review, we discuss the possible factors involved in neuroinflammation-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:28127589

  20. Calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

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    Dreses-Werringloer Ute

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is a key signaling ion involved in many different intracellular and extracellular processes ranging from synaptic activity to cell-cell communication and adhesion. The exact definition at the molecular level of the versatility of this ion has made overwhelming progress in the past several years and has been extensively reviewed. In the brain, calcium is fundamental in the control of synaptic activity and memory formation, a process that leads to the activation of specific calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways and implicates key protein effectors, such as CaMKs, MAPK/ERKs, and CREB. Properly controlled homeostasis of calcium signaling not only supports normal brain physiology but also maintains neuronal integrity and long-term cell survival. Emerging knowledge indicates that calcium homeostasis is not only critical for cell physiology and health, but also, when deregulated, can lead to neurodegeneration via complex and diverse mechanisms involved in selective neuronal impairments and death. The identification of several modulators of calcium homeostasis, such as presenilins and CALHM1, as potential factors involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, provides strong support for a role of calcium in neurodegeneration. These observations represent an important step towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of calcium signaling disturbances observed in different brain diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases.

  1. Metals and Neurodegeneration.

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    Chen, Pan; Miah, Mahfuzur Rahman; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metals play important roles in the human body, maintaining cell structure and regulating gene expression, neurotransmission, and antioxidant response, to name a few. However, excessive metal accumulation in the nervous system may be toxic, inducing oxidative stress, disrupting mitochondrial function, and impairing the activity of numerous enzymes. Damage caused by metal accumulation may result in permanent injuries, including severe neurological disorders. Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown a strong correlation between aberrant metal exposure and a number of neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, autism spectrum disorders, Guillain-Barré disease, Gulf War syndrome, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and Wilson's disease. Here, we briefly survey the literature relating to the role of metals in neurodegeneration.

  2. Peroxiredoxins and Neurodegeneration

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    S.H. Lee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxins (Prxs are a family of novel antioxidant proteins that are found in a variety of species and participate in a number of vital biological processes such as proliferation, differentiation, response to oxidative stress and intracellular signaling. It has been proposed that they might participate in these cellular processes by playing a role in eliminating or regulating the intracellular concentration of peroxides produced during metabolism as well as in the signaling cascades of growth factors and cytokines. Mammalian cells express six isoforms of Prx (Prx I to VI, which are classified into three subgroups (typical 2-Cys, atypical 2-Cys and 1-Cys based on the number and position of cysteine (Cys residues that participate in catalysis and on amino acid sequences and the immunological reactivity. Members of the typical 2-Cys subgroup include Prx I through Prx IV and contain an additional conserved cysteine in the carboxyl-terminal region, whereas Prx V and Prx VI, members of the atypical 2-Cys and 1-Cys subgroups, respectively, do not contain this second conserved Cys. On the other hand, Prxs activity can be regulated by phosphorylation and proteolysis processes in addition to overoxidation. Taken together, this study suggest that the generation of the oxidative stress which caused neurodegeneration may couple with produced Prxs and the reverse is true. However, this argument is still unclear on account of the difficulties of the direct observation of the reactive oxygen species due to their biological lifetime is short. Thus, experiments will be required to solve these problems and to comprehend the actual role of Prxs in neurodegeneration.

  3. Neurodegeneration in schizophrenia.

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    Archer, Trevor

    2010-07-01

    The neurodegenerative aspect of schizophrenia presupposes gene-environmental interactions involving chromosomal abnormalities and obstetric/perinatal complications that culminate in predispositions that impart a particular vulnerability for drastic and unpredictable precipitating factors, such as stress or chemical agents. The notion of a neurodevelopmental progression to the disease state implies that early developmental insults, with neurodegenerative proclivities, evolve into structural brain abnormalities involving specific regional circuits and neurohumoral agents. This neurophysiological orchestration is expressed in the dysfunctionality observed in premorbid signs and symptoms arising in the eventual diagnosis, as well as the neurobehavioral deficits reported from animal models of the disorder. The relative contributions of perinatal insults, neonatal ventral hippocampus lesion, prenatal methylazoxymethanol acetate and early traumatic experience, as well as epigenetic contributions, are discussed from a neurodegenerative view of the essential neuropathology. It is implied that these considerations of factors that exert disruptive influences upon brain development, or normal aging, operationalize the central hub of developmental neuropathology around which the disease process may gain momentum. Nonetheless, the status of neurodegeneration in schizophrenia is somewhat tenuous and it is possible that brain imaging studies on animal models of the disorder, which may describe progressive alterations to cortical, limbic and ventricular structures similar to those of schizophrenic patients, are necessary to resolve the issue.

  4. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    : homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage......Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...

  5. Neurodegeneration med jernakkumulation i hjernen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Maria; Hansen, Lars Kjærsgaard

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a heterogeneous group of syndromes. Whereas NBIA1 (panto-thenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration) has been known since 1922, some of the other diseases in the NBIA group have just been known for a few years. We present the case of a 16-......-year-old man who recently was diagnosed with NBIA4. He had had neurodegenerative symptoms since he was eight years old. The typical MRI findings in the basal ganglia were important in diagnosing NBIA. Furthermore gait analysis and specific genetic testing were performed....

  6. Neurodegeneration in the diabetic eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simó, Rafael; Hernández, Cristina; Bandello, F;

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), one of the leading causes of preventable blindness, has been considered a microcirculatory disease of the retina. However, there is emerging evidence to suggest that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of DR, which participates in the develop......Diabetic retinopathy (DR), one of the leading causes of preventable blindness, has been considered a microcirculatory disease of the retina. However, there is emerging evidence to suggest that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of DR, which participates...

  7. Ageing, neurodegeneration and brain rejuvenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Although systemic diseases take the biggest toll on human health and well-being, increasingly, a failing brain is the arbiter of a death preceded by a gradual loss of the essence of being. Ageing, which is fundamental to neurodegeneration and dementia, affects every organ in the body and seems to be encoded partly in a blood-based signature. Indeed, factors in the circulation have been shown to modulate ageing and to rejuvenate numerous organs, including the brain. The discovery of such factors, the identification of their origins and a deeper understanding of their functions is ushering in a new era in ageing and dementia research. PMID:27830812

  8. The innate immune response transcription factor relish is necessary for neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of ataxia-telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Andrew J; Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Wassarman, David A

    2013-05-01

    Neurodegeneration is a hallmark of the human disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) that is caused by mutation of the A-T mutated (ATM) gene. We have analyzed Drosophila melanogaster ATM mutants to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in A-T. Previously, we found that ATM mutants upregulate the expression of innate immune response (IIR) genes and undergo neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. Here, we present evidence that activation of the IIR is a cause of neurodegeneration in ATM mutants. Three lines of evidence indicate that ATM mutations cause neurodegeneration by activating the Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factor Relish, a key regulator of the Immune deficiency (Imd) IIR signaling pathway. First, the level of upregulation of IIR genes, including Relish target genes, was directly correlated with the level of neurodegeneration in ATM mutants. Second, Relish mutations inhibited upregulation of IIR genes and neurodegeneration in ATM mutants. Third, overexpression of constitutively active Relish in glial cells activated the IIR and caused neurodegeneration. In contrast, we found that Imd and Dif mutations did not affect neurodegeneration in ATM mutants. Imd encodes an activator of Relish in the response to gram-negative bacteria, and Dif encodes an immune responsive NF-κB transcription factor in the Toll signaling pathway. These data indicate that the signal that causes neurodegeneration in ATM mutants activates a specific NF-κB protein and does so through an unknown activator. In summary, these findings suggest that neurodegeneration in human A-T is caused by activation of a specific NF-κB protein in glial cells.

  9. MicroRNAs in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushati, Natascha; Cohen, Stephen M

    2008-06-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in diverse cellular and developmental processes. Many miRNAs are expressed specifically in the central nervous system, where they have roles in differentiation, neuronal survival, and potentially also in plasticity and learning. The absence of miRNAs in a variety of specific postmitotic neurons can lead to progressive loss of these neurons and behavioral defects reminiscent of the phenotypes seen in the pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review recent studies which provide a link between miRNA function and neurodegeneration. We also discuss evidence which might suggest involvement of miRNAs in the emergence or progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. NEURODEGENERATION WITH IRON ACCUMULATION TYPE1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikhande D Y

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration with iron accumulation type 1 is a rare degenerative disorder presenting with dementia and progressive extrapyramidal dysfunction. A 10 yrs old girl reported with complaints of difficulty in speech and involuntary movements. MRI Brain showed ‘eye of tiger appearance’ which is suggestive of neurodegeneration with iron accumulation type 1. Treatment is symptomatic and chelating agents have no effect. The disease is progressivelyfatal

  11. Impaired Glutathione Synthesis in Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Koji; Nakaki, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) was discovered in yeast cells in 1888. Studies of GSH in mammalian cells before the 1980s focused exclusively on its function for the detoxication of xenobiotics or for drug metabolism in the liver, in which GSH is present at its highest concentration in the body. Increasing evidence has demonstrated other important roles of GSH in the brain, not only for the detoxication of xenobiotics but also for antioxidant defense and the regulation of intracellular redox homeostasis. GSH also regulates cell signaling, protein function, gene expression, and cell differentiation/proliferation in the brain. Clinically, inborn errors in GSH-related enzymes are very rare, but disorders of GSH metabolism are common in major neurodegenerative diseases showing GSH depletion and increased levels of oxidative stress in the brain. GSH depletion would precipitate oxidative damage in the brain, leading to neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the significance of GSH function, the synthesis of GSH and its metabolism, and clinical disorders of GSH metabolism. A potential approach to increase brain GSH levels against neurodegeneration is also discussed. PMID:24145751

  12. Impaired glutathione synthesis in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Koji; Nakaki, Toshio

    2013-10-18

    Glutathione (GSH) was discovered in yeast cells in 1888. Studies of GSH in mammalian cells before the 1980s focused exclusively on its function for the detoxication of xenobiotics or for drug metabolism in the liver, in which GSH is present at its highest concentration in the body. Increasing evidence has demonstrated other important roles of GSH in the brain, not only for the detoxication of xenobiotics but also for antioxidant defense and the regulation of intracellular redox homeostasis. GSH also regulates cell signaling, protein function, gene expression, and cell differentiation/proliferation in the brain. Clinically, inborn errors in GSH-related enzymes are very rare, but disorders of GSH metabolism are common in major neurodegenerative diseases showing GSH depletion and increased levels of oxidative stress in the brain. GSH depletion would precipitate oxidative damage in the brain, leading to neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the significance of GSH function, the synthesis of GSH and its metabolism, and clinical disorders of GSH metabolism. A potential approach to increase brain GSH levels against neurodegeneration is also discussed.

  13. Impaired Glutathione Synthesis in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Nakaki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (GSH was discovered in yeast cells in 1888. Studies of GSH in mammalian cells before the 1980s focused exclusively on its function for the detoxication of xenobiotics or for drug metabolism in the liver, in which GSH is present at its highest concentration in the body. Increasing evidence has demonstrated other important roles of GSH in the brain, not only for the detoxication of xenobiotics but also for antioxidant defense and the regulation of intracellular redox homeostasis. GSH also regulates cell signaling, protein function, gene expression, and cell differentiation/proliferation in the brain. Clinically, inborn errors in GSH-related enzymes are very rare, but disorders of GSH metabolism are common in major neurodegenerative diseases showing GSH depletion and increased levels of oxidative stress in the brain. GSH depletion would precipitate oxidative damage in the brain, leading to neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the significance of GSH function, the synthesis of GSH and its metabolism, and clinical disorders of GSH metabolism. A potential approach to increase brain GSH levels against neurodegeneration is also discussed.

  14. Molecular neurodegeneration: basic biology and disease pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassar, Robert; Zheng, Hui

    2014-09-23

    The field of neurodegeneration research has been advancing rapidly over the past few years, and has provided intriguing new insights into the normal physiological functions and pathogenic roles of a wide range of molecules associated with several devastating neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, Huntington's disease, and Down syndrome. Recent developments have also facilitated initial efforts to translate preclinical discoveries toward novel therapeutic approaches and clinical trials in humans. These recent developments are reviewed in the current Review Series on "Molecular Neurodegeneration: Basic Biology and Disease Pathways" in a number of state-of-the-art manuscripts that cover themes presented at the Third International Conference on Molecular Neurodegeneration: "Basic biology and disease pathways" held in Cannes, France, September, 2013.

  15. Epigenetic mechanisms governing the process of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    Studies elucidating how and why neurodegeneration unfolds suggest that a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors is responsible for disease pathogenesis. Recent breakthroughs in the field of epigenetics promise to advance our understanding of these mechanisms and to promote the development of useful and effective pre-clinical risk stratification strategies, molecular diagnostic and prognostic methods, and disease-modifying treatments.

  16. NMDA receptor subunit composition determines beta-amyloid-induced neurodegeneration and synaptic loss

    OpenAIRE

    Tackenberg, C; Grinschgl, S; Trutzel, A; Santuccione, A C; Frey, M C; Konietzko, U; Grimm, J.; Brandt, R.; Nitsch, R M

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) leading to neurodegeneration and synaptic loss. While increasing evidence suggests that inhibition of N-methyl--aspartate receptors (NMDARs) may mitigate certain aspects of AD neuropathology, the precise role of different NMDAR subtypes for Aβ- and tau-mediated toxicity remains to be elucidated. Using mouse organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from arcAβ transgenic mice combined with Sindbis virus-mediated ex...

  17. Molecular neurodegeneration: basic biology and disease pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The field of neurodegeneration research has been advancing rapidly over the past few years, and has provided intriguing new insights into the normal physiological functions and pathogenic roles of a wide range of molecules associated with several devastating neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, Huntington’s disease, and Down syndrome. Recent developments have also facilitated initial efforts to...

  18. Oral microbiome link to neurodegeneration in glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Astafurov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glaucoma is a progressive optic nerve degenerative disease that often leads to blindness. Local inflammatory responses are implicated in the pathology of glaucoma. Although inflammatory episodes outside the CNS, such as those due to acute systemic infections, have been linked to central neurodegeneration, they do not appear to be relevant to glaucoma. Based on clinical observations, we hypothesized that chronic subclinical peripheral inflammation contributes to neurodegeneration in glaucoma. METHODS: Mouthwash specimens from patients with glaucoma and control subjects were analyzed for the amount of bacteria. To determine a possible pathogenic mechanism, low-dose subcutaneous lipopolysaccharide (LPS was administered in two separate animal models of glaucoma. Glaucomatous neurodegeneration was assessed in the retina and optic nerve two months later. Changes in gene expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 signaling pathway and complement as well as changes in microglial numbers and morphology were analyzed in the retina and optic nerve. The effect of pharmacologic blockade of TLR4 with naloxone was determined. FINDINGS: Patients with glaucoma had higher bacterial oral counts compared to control subjects (p<0.017. Low-dose LPS administration in glaucoma animal models resulted in enhancement of axonal degeneration and neuronal loss. Microglial activation in the optic nerve and retina as well as upregulation of TLR4 signaling and complement system were observed. Pharmacologic blockade of TLR4 partially ameliorated the enhanced damage. CONCLUSIONS: The above findings suggest that the oral microbiome contributes to glaucoma pathophysiology. A plausible mechanism by which increased bacterial loads can lead to neurodegeneration is provided by experiments in animal models of the disease and involves activation of microglia in the retina and optic nerve, mediated through TLR4 signaling and complement upregulation. The finding that commensal

  19. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan TONEKABONI*

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Tonekaboni SH, Mollamohammadi M. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation: An Overview. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Autumn;8(4: 1-8.AbstractObjectiveNeurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA is a group of neurodegenerative disorder with deposition of iron in the brain (mainly Basal Ganglia leading to a progressive Parkinsonism, spasticity, dystonia, retinal degeneration, optic atrophy often accompanied by psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline. 8 of the 10 genetically defined NBIA types are inherited as autosomal recessive and the remaining two by autosomal dominant and X-linked dominant manner. Brain MRI findings are almost specific and show abnormal brain iron deposition in basal ganglia some other related anatomicallocations. In some types of NBIA cerebellar atrophy is the major finding in MRI.ReferencesShevel M. Racial hygiene, activeeuthanasia, and Julius Hallervorden. Neurology 1992;42:2214-2219.HayflickSJ. Neurodegeneration with brain Iron accumulation: from genes to pathogenesis.Semin Pediatr Neurol 2006;13:182-185.Zhou B, Westawy SK, Levinson B, et al. A novel pantothenate kinase gene(PANK2 is defective in Hallervorden-Spatzsyndrome. Nat Genet 2001;28:345- 349.www.ncbi.nlm.nihgov/NBK111Y/university of Washington, seattle. Allison Gregory and Susan Hayflick.Paisan-Ruiz C, Li A, Schneider SA, et al. Widesread Levy body and tau accumulation in childhood and adult onset dystonia-parkinsonism cases with PLA2G6 mutations. Neurobiol Aging 2012;33:814-823.Dick KJ, Eckhardt M, Paison-Ruiz C, et al. Mutation of FA2H underlies a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia(SPG 35. Hum Mutat 31: E1251-E1260.Edvardson S, Hama H, Shaag A, et al. Mutation in the fatty acid 2-Hydroxylase gene are associated with leukodystrophy with spastic paraparesis and dystonia. Am I Hum Genet 2008;83:647-648.Schneider SA, Aggarwal A, Bhatt m, et al. Severe tongue protrusion dystonia: clinical syndromes

  20. Loss of tau rescues inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eMaphis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation is one of the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD and related tauopathies. Activated microglia spatially coexist with microtubule-associated protein tau (Mapt or tau-burdened neurons in the brains of human AD and non-AD tauopathies. Numerous studies have suggested that neuroinflammation precedes tau pathology and that induction or blockage of neuroinflammation via lipopolysaccharide (LPS or anti-inflammatory compounds (such as FK506 accelerate or block tau pathology, respectively in several animal models of tauopathy. We have previously demonstrated that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation via deficiency of the microglia-specific chemokine (fractalkine receptor, CX3CR1, promotes tau pathology and neurodegeneration in a mouse model of LPS-induced systemic inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that tau mediates the neurotoxic effects of LPS in Cx3cr1-/- mice. First, Mapt+/+ neurons displayed elevated levels of Annexin V (A5 and TUNEL (markers of neurodegeneration when co-cultured with LPS-treated Cx3cr1-/-microglia, which is rescued in Mapt-/- neurons. Second, a neuronal population positive for phospho-S199 (AT8 tau in the dentate gyrus is also positive for activated or cleaved caspase (CC3 in the LPS-treated Cx3cr1-/- mice. Third, genetic deficiency for tau in Cx3cr1-/- mice resulted in reduced microglial activation, altered expression of inflammatory genes and a significant reduction in the number of neurons positive for CC3 compared to Cx3cr1-/- mice. Finally, Cx3cr1-/- mice exposed to LPS displayed a lack of inhibition in an open field exploratory behavioral test, which is rescued by tau deficiency. Taken together, our results suggest that pathological alterations in tau mediate inflammation-induced neurotoxicity and that deficiency of Mapt is neuroprotective. Thus, therapeutic approaches towards either reducing tau levels or blocking neuroinflammatory pathways may serve as a potential strategy in treating

  1. Toll-like receptors in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor

    2009-01-01

    Innate pattern recognition receptors are implicated in first-line defense against pathogens but also participate in maintenance of tissue homeostasis and response to injury. This chapter reviews the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in neuronal and glial responses that are associated with neurod...... of TLR signaling in the nervous system with capability for neurotoxocity and gliotoxicity....... with neurodegeneration. Accompanying roles for infection and inflammation, involvement in clinical neurodegenerative disorders, and heterogeneity of glial response are discussed. A "strength of signal" hypothesis is advanced in an attempt to reconcile evolutionarily selected and therefore likely beneficial effects...

  2. Berberine and neurodegeneration: A review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Touqeer; Gilani, Anwar-Ul-Hassan; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    The excessive production of reactive oxygen species in nervous tissues is considered one of the major risk factors of neurodegenerative diseases. During the last two decades, much attention has been paid to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of natural products and compounds isolated from natural products which are often characterized by high efficacy and low adverse effects. Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid, widely present in different medicinal herbs, especially in the genus Berberis. It is mainly used as antidiarrhoeal, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiprotozoal agent. However, current research has focused on its beneficial role in neurodegenerative diseases, mainly due to its powerful antioxidant effect. The therapeutic potential of Berberine in different neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson and Huntington disease has been brought to evidence by numerous studies. However, a limited number of reviews focus on the beneficial role of Berberine against neurodegeneration. The main objective of this review is to discuss the role of oxidative stress in neurodegeneration and the potential role of antioxidant compounds, in particular Berberine which is analyzed in its chemical structure, source, bioavailability, therapeutic potential, with special attention to its mechanism of action at a molecular level.

  3. Nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, aminoguanidine reduces intracerebroventricular colchicine induced neurodegeneration, memory impairments and changes of systemic immune responses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Susmita; Ghosh, Tusharkanti; Ghosh, Rupsa; Gupta, Pritha

    2017-02-15

    Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of colchicine induces neurodegeneration, memory impairments and changes of some systemic immune responses in rats. Though the role of cox 2 in these colchicine induced changes have been evaluated, the influence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) remains to be studied. The present study was designed to assess the role of NOS on the i.c.v. colchicine induced neurodegeneration, memory impairments and changes of some systemic immune responses by inhibiting its activity with aminoguanidine. In the present study the impairments of working and reference memories, neurodegeneration (chromatolysis and plaque formation) and changes of neuroinflammatory markers in the hippocampus (increased TNF α, IL 1β, ROS and nitrite) along with changes of serum inflammatory markers (TNF α, IL 1β, ROS and nitrite) and alteration of systemic immune responses (higher phagocytic activity of blood WBC and splenic PMN, higher cytotoxicity and lower leukocyte adhesion inhibition index of splenic MNC) were measured in the intracerebroventricular colchicine injected rats (ICIR). Administration of aminoguanidine (p.o. 30/50mg/kg body weight) to ICIR resulted in recovery of neuroinflammation and partial prevention of neurodegeneration which could be corroborated with the partial recovery of memory impairments in this model. The recovery of serum inflammatory markers and the systemic immune responses in ICIR was also observed after administration of aminoguanidine. Therefore, the present study shows that aminoguanidine can protect the colchicine induced neurodegeneration, memory impairments, and changes of systemic immune systemic responses in ICIR by inhibiting the iNOS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Somatic mutations in aging, cancer and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Scott R; Loeb, Lawrence A; Herr, Alan J

    2012-04-01

    The somatic mutation theory of aging posits that the accumulation of mutations in the genetic material of somatic cells as a function of time results in a decrease in cellular function. In particular, the accumulation of random mutations may inactivate genes that are important for the functioning of the somatic cells of various organ systems of the adult, result in a decrease in organ function. When the organ function decreases below a critical level, death occurs. A significant amount of research has shown that somatic mutations play an important role in aging and a number of age related pathologies. In this review, we explore evidence for increases in somatic nuclear mutation burden with age and the consequences for aging, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We then review evidence for increases in mitochondrial mutation burden and the consequences for dysfunction in the disease processes.

  5. Near-critical GLUT1 and Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, L Felipe; San Martín, Alejandro; Ruminot, Ivan; Sandoval, Pamela Y; Fernández-Moncada, Ignacio; Baeza-Lehnert, Felipe; Arce-Molina, Robinson; Contreras-Baeza, Yasna; Cortés-Molina, Francisca; Galaz, Alex; Alegría, Karin

    2017-02-02

    Recent articles have drawn renewed attention to the housekeeping glucose transporter GLUT1 and its possible involvement in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we provide an updated analysis of brain glucose transport and the cellular mechanisms involved in its acute modulation during synaptic activity. We discuss how the architecture of the blood-brain barrier and the low concentration of glucose within neurons combine to make endothelial/glial GLUT1 the master controller of neuronal glucose utilization, while the regulatory role of the neuronal glucose transporter GLUT3 emerges as secondary. The near-critical condition of glucose dynamics in the brain suggests that subtle deficits in GLUT1 function or its activity-dependent control by neurons may contribute to neurodegeneration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Biology and genetics of prions causing neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusiner, Stanley B

    2013-01-01

    Prions are proteins that acquire alternative conformations that become self-propagating. Transformation of proteins into prions is generally accompanied by an increase in β-sheet structure and a propensity to aggregate into oligomers. Some prions are beneficial and perform cellular functions, whereas others cause neurodegeneration. In mammals, more than a dozen proteins that become prions have been identified, and a similar number has been found in fungi. In both mammals and fungi, variations in the prion conformation encipher the biological properties of distinct prion strains. Increasing evidence argues that prions cause many neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, and Lou Gehrig's diseases, as well as the tauopathies. The majority of NDs are sporadic, and 10% to 20% are inherited. The late onset of heritable NDs, like their sporadic counterparts, may reflect the stochastic nature of prion formation; the pathogenesis of such illnesses seems to require prion accumulation to exceed some critical threshold before neurological dysfunction manifests.

  7. Insights into Mechanisms of Chronic Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail B. Diack

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and prion diseases are characterised by the accumulation of abnormal conformers of a host encoded protein in the central nervous system. The process leading to neurodegeneration is still poorly defined and thus development of early intervention strategies is challenging. Unique amongst these diseases are Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases, which have the ability to transmit between individuals. The infectious nature of these diseases has permitted in vivo and in vitro modelling of the time course of the disease process in a highly reproducible manner, thus early events can be defined. Recent evidence has demonstrated that the cell-to-cell spread of protein aggregates by a “prion-like mechanism” is common among the protein misfolding diseases. Thus, the TSE models may provide insights into disease mechanisms and testable hypotheses for disease intervention, applicable to a number of these chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Myeloperoxidase: Bridging the gap in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R S; Katyal, Anju

    2016-09-01

    Neurodegenerative conditions present a group of complex disease pathologies mostly due to unknown aetiology resulting in neuronal death and permanent neurological disability. Any undesirable stress to the brain, disrupts homeostatic balance, through a remarkable convergence of pathophysiological changes and immune dysregulation. The crosstalk between inflammatory and oxidative mechanisms results in the release of neurotoxic mediators apparently spearheaded by myeloperoxidase derived from activated microglia, astrocytes, neurons as well as peripheral inflammatory cells. These isolated entities combinedly have the potential to flare up and contribute significantly to neuropathology and disease progression. Recent, clinicopathological evidence support the association of myeloperoxidase and its cytotoxic product, hypochlorous acid in a plethora of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Multiple sclerosis, Stroke, Epilepsy etc. But the biochemical and mechanistic insights into myeloperoxidase mediated neuroinflammation and neuronal death is still an uncharted territory. The current review outlines the emerging recognition of myeloperoxidase in neurodegeneration, which may offer novel therapeutic and diagnostic targets for neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Interconnection between brain and retinal neurodegenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    The eye is a special sensory organ, which is basically an extension of the brain. Both are derived from neural tube and consist of neurons. Therefore, diseases of both the brain and eye should have some similarity. Neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia in the world. Amyloid deposition in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal region is the basic pathology in AD. But along with it, there are various changes that take place in the eye, i.e., abnormal pupillary reaction, decreased vision, decreased contrast sensitivity, visual field changes, loss of retinal ganglionic cells and retinal fiber layer, peripapillary atrophy, increased cup-disk ratio, retinal thinning, tortuosity of blood vessels, and deposition of Aβ-like substance in the retina. And these changes are present in the early part of the disease when only mild cognitive impairment is there. As the brain is covered by a hard bony skull which makes it difficult to directly visualize the changes occurring in the brain at molecular levels, finer details of disease progression are not available with us. But the eye is the window of the brain; with advanced modern techniques, we can directly visualize the changes in the retina at a very fine level. Therefore, by depicting neurodegenerative changes in the eye, we can diagnose and manage AD at very early stages. Along with it, retinal neurodegenerations like glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) are the major cause of loss of vision, and still, there are no effective treatment modalities for these blinding conditions. So if we can understand its pathogenesis and progression by correlating with brain neurodegenerations, we can come up with a better therapy for glaucoma and ARMD.

  10. LINGO-1 and Neurodegeneration: Pathophysiologic Clues for Essential Tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-Dong; Sathiyamoorthy, Sushmitha; Tan, Eng-King

    2012-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET), one of the most common adult-onset movement disorders, has been associated with cerebellar Purkinje cell degeneration and formation of brainstem Lewy bodies. Recent findings suggest that genetic variants of the leucine-rich repeat and Ig domain containing 1 (LINGO-1) gene could be risk factors for ET. The LINGO-1 protein contains both leucine-rich repeat (LRR) and immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains in its extracellular region, as well as a transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic tail. LINGO-1 can form a ternary complex with Nogo-66 receptor (NgR1) and p75. Binding of LINGO-1 with NgR1 can activate the NgR1 signaling pathway, leading to inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the central nervous system. LINGO-1 has also been found to bind with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and induce downregulation of the activity of EGFR-PI3K-Akt signaling, which might decrease Purkinje cell survival. Therefore, it is possible that genetic variants of LINGO-1, either alone or in combination with other genetic or environmental factors, act to increase LINGO-1 expression levels in Purkinje cells and confer a risk to Purkinje cell survival in the cerebellum.Here, we provide a concise summary of the link between LINGO-1 and neurodegeneration and discuss various hypotheses as to how this could be potentially relevant to ET pathogenesis.

  11. Common features at the start of the neurodegeneration cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Hervás

    Full Text Available Amyloidogenic neurodegenerative diseases are incurable conditions with high social impact that are typically caused by specific, largely disordered proteins. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive to established techniques. A favored hypothesis postulates that a critical conformational change in the monomer (an ideal therapeutic target in these "neurotoxic proteins" triggers the pathogenic cascade. We use force spectroscopy and a novel methodology for unequivocal single-molecule identification to demonstrate a rich conformational polymorphism in the monomer of four representative neurotoxic proteins. This polymorphism strongly correlates with amyloidogenesis and neurotoxicity: it is absent in a fibrillization-incompetent mutant, favored by familial-disease mutations and diminished by a surprisingly promiscuous inhibitor of the critical monomeric β-conformational change, neurotoxicity, and neurodegeneration. Hence, we postulate that specific mechanostable conformers are the cause of these diseases, representing important new early-diagnostic and therapeutic targets. The demonstrated ability to inhibit the conformational heterogeneity of these proteins by a single pharmacological agent reveals common features in the monomer and suggests a common pathway to diagnose, prevent, halt, or reverse multiple neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Oligodendroglia and neurotrophic factors in neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew N.Bankston; Mariana D.Mandler; Yue Feng

    2013-01-01

    Myelination by oligodendroglial cells (OLs) enables the propagation of action potentials along neuronal axons,which is essential for rapid information flow in the central nervous system.Besides saltatory conduction,the myelin sheath also protects axons against inflammatory and oxidative insults.Loss of myelin results in axonal damage and ultimately neuronal loss in demyelinating disorders.However,accumulating evidence indicates that OLs also provide support to neurons via mechanisms beyond the insulating function of myelin.More importantly,an increasing volume of reports indicates defects of OLs in numerous neurodegenerative diseases,sometimes even preceding neuronal loss in pre-symptomatic episodes,suggesting that OL pathology may be an important mechanism contributing to the initiation and/or progression of neurodegeneration.This review focuses on the emerging picture of neuronal support by OLs in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders through diverse molecular and cellular mechanisms,including direct neuron-myelin interaction,metabolic support by OLs,and neurotrophic factors produced by and/or acting on OLs.

  13. Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2017-01-01

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span. PMID:26385091

  14. Role of neuroinflammation in neurodegeneration: new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Róisín M; Heneka, Michael T

    2017-03-04

    Previously, the contribution of peripheral infection to cognitive decline was largely overlooked however, the past 15 years have established a key role for infectious pathogens in the progression of age-related neurodegeneration. It is now accepted that the immune privilege of the brain is not absolute, and that cells of the central nervous system are sensitive to both the inflammatory events occurring in the periphery and to the infiltration of peripheral immune cells. This is particularly relevant for the progression of Alzheimer's disease, in which it has been demonstrated that patients are more vulnerable to infection-related cognitive changes. This can occur from typical infectious challenges such as respiratory tract infections, although a number of specific viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens have also been associated with the development of the disease. To date, it is not clear whether these microorganisms are directly related to Alzheimer's disease progression or if they are opportune pathogens that easily colonize those with dementia and exacerbate the ongoing inflammation observed in these individuals. This review will discuss the impact of each of these challenges, and examine the changes known to occur with age in the peripheral immune system, which may contribute to the age-related vulnerability to infection-induced cognitive decline.

  15. Nucleotide Salvage Deficiencies, DNA Damage and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fasullo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide balance is critically important not only in replicating cells but also in quiescent cells. This is especially true in the nervous system, where there is a high demand for adenosine triphosphate (ATP produced from mitochondria. Mitochondria are particularly prone to oxidative stress-associated DNA damage because nucleotide imbalance can lead to mitochondrial depletion due to low replication fidelity. Failure to maintain nucleotide balance due to genetic defects can result in infantile death; however there is great variability in clinical presentation for particular diseases. This review compares genetic diseases that result from defects in specific nucleotide salvage enzymes and a signaling kinase that activates nucleotide salvage after DNA damage exposure. These diseases include Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndromes, and ataxia telangiectasia. Although treatment options are available to palliate symptoms of these diseases, there is no cure. The conclusions drawn from this review include the critical role of guanine nucleotides in preventing neurodegeneration, the limitations of animals as disease models, and the need to further understand nucleotide imbalances in treatment regimens. Such knowledge will hopefully guide future studies into clinical therapies for genetic diseases.

  16. Propagation of Tau Aggregates and Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedert, Michel; Eisenberg, David S; Crowther, R Anthony

    2017-07-25

    A pathway from the natively unfolded microtubule-associated protein Tau to a highly structured amyloid fibril underlies human Tauopathies. This ordered assembly causes disease and represents the gain of toxic function. In recent years, evidence has accumulated to suggest that Tau inclusions form first in a small number of brain cells, from where they propagate to other regions, resulting in neurodegeneration and disease. Propagation of pathology is often called prion-like, which refers to the capacity of an assembled protein to induce the same abnormal conformation in a protein of the same kind, initiating a self-amplifying cascade. In addition, prion-like encompasses the release of protein aggregates from brain cells and their uptake by neighboring cells. In mice, the intracerebral injection of Tau inclusions induces the ordered assembly of monomeric Tau, followed by its spreading to distant brain regions. Conformational differences between Tau aggregates from transgenic mouse brain and in vitro assembled recombinant protein account for the greater seeding potency of brain aggregates. Short fibrils constitute the major species of seed-competent Tau in the brains of transgenic mice. The existence of multiple human Tauopathies with distinct fibril morphologies has led to the suggestion that different molecular conformers (or strains) of aggregated Tau exist.

  17. Effects of hypothalamic neurodegeneration on energy balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Wanting Xu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal aging in humans and rodents is accompanied by a progressive increase in adiposity. To investigate the role of hypothalamic neuronal circuits in this process, we used a Cre-lox strategy to create mice with specific and progressive degeneration of hypothalamic neurons that express agouti-related protein (Agrp or proopiomelanocortin (Pomc, neuropeptides that promote positive or negative energy balance, respectively, through their opposing effects on melanocortin receptor signaling. In previous studies, Pomc mutant mice became obese, but Agrp mutant mice were surprisingly normal, suggesting potential compensation by neuronal circuits or genetic redundancy. Here we find that Pomc-ablation mice develop obesity similar to that described for Pomc knockout mice, but also exhibit defects in compensatory hyperphagia similar to what occurs during normal aging. Agrp-ablation female mice exhibit reduced adiposity with normal compensatory hyperphagia, while animals ablated for both Pomc and Agrp neurons exhibit an additive interaction phenotype. These findings provide new insight into the roles of hypothalamic neurons in energy balance regulation, and provide a model for understanding defects in human energy balance associated with neurodegeneration and aging.

  18. Post-translational modifications in neurodegeneration

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    Federico Benetti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications increase proteome functionality for managing all aspects of normal cell biology. They are based on the covalent attachment of functional groups, leading to phosphorylation, acetylation, glycosylation, acylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation and oxidation of protein targets. Post-translational modifications occur at any step of protein life cycle, modulating in time and space protein folding, subcellular localization and activity. Aberrant post-translational modifications of one or more culprit proteins may lead to neurodegeneration, as shown in paradigmatic neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and prion diseases. In this review, we report the most important post-translational modifications found in neurodegenerative disorders, illustrating the pathophysiological mechanisms in which they are involved. This work highlights the lack of a global framework of post-translational modifications in terms of complexity and regulation. Therefore, in the next future many efforts are required to describe the interplay existing between post-translational modifications and their combinatorial patterns on protein targets.

  19. Regulated protein aggregation: stress granules and neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolozin Benjamin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The protein aggregation that occurs in neurodegenerative diseases is classically thought to occur as an undesirable, nonfunctional byproduct of protein misfolding. This model contrasts with the biology of RNA binding proteins, many of which are linked to neurodegenerative diseases. RNA binding proteins use protein aggregation as part of a normal regulated, physiological mechanism controlling protein synthesis. The process of regulated protein aggregation is most evident in formation of stress granules. Stress granules assemble when RNA binding proteins aggregate through their glycine rich domains. Stress granules function to sequester, silence and/or degrade RNA transcripts as part of a mechanism that adapts patterns of local RNA translation to facilitate the stress response. Aggregation of RNA binding proteins is reversible and is tightly regulated through pathways, such as phosphorylation of elongation initiation factor 2α. Microtubule associated protein tau also appears to regulate stress granule formation. Conversely, stress granule formation stimulates pathological changes associated with tau. In this review, I propose that the aggregation of many pathological, intracellular proteins, including TDP-43, FUS or tau, proceeds through the stress granule pathway. Mutations in genes coding for stress granule associated proteins or prolonged physiological stress, lead to enhanced stress granule formation, which accelerates the pathophysiology of protein aggregation in neurodegenerative diseases. Over-active stress granule formation could act to sequester functional RNA binding proteins and/or interfere with mRNA transport and translation, each of which might potentiate neurodegeneration. The reversibility of the stress granule pathway also offers novel opportunities to stimulate endogenous biochemical pathways to disaggregate these pathological stress granules, and perhaps delay the progression of disease.

  20. Molecular pathways underpinning ethanol-induced neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eGoldowitz*

    2014-07-01

    -induced neurodegeneration.

  1. Tetraspanin (TSP-17 protects dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Masoudi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, is linked to the gradual loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Disease loci causing hereditary forms of PD are known, but most cases are attributable to a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. Increased incidence of PD is associated with rural living and pesticide exposure, and dopaminergic neurodegeneration can be triggered by neurotoxins such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. In C. elegans, this drug is taken up by the presynaptic dopamine reuptake transporter (DAT-1 and causes selective death of the eight dopaminergic neurons of the adult hermaphrodite. Using a forward genetic approach to find genes that protect against 6-OHDA-mediated neurodegeneration, we identified tsp-17, which encodes a member of the tetraspanin family of membrane proteins. We show that TSP-17 is expressed in dopaminergic neurons and provide genetic, pharmacological and biochemical evidence that it inhibits DAT-1, thus leading to increased 6-OHDA uptake in tsp-17 loss-of-function mutants. TSP-17 also protects against toxicity conferred by excessive intracellular dopamine. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that TSP-17 acts partly via the DOP-2 dopamine receptor to negatively regulate DAT-1. tsp-17 mutants also have subtle behavioral phenotypes, some of which are conferred by aberrant dopamine signaling. Incubating mutant worms in liquid medium leads to swimming-induced paralysis. In the L1 larval stage, this phenotype is linked to lethality and cannot be rescued by a dop-3 null mutant. In contrast, mild paralysis occurring in the L4 larval stage is suppressed by dop-3, suggesting defects in dopaminergic signaling. In summary, we show that TSP-17 protects against neurodegeneration and has a role in modulating behaviors linked to dopamine signaling.

  2. Molecular basis of neurodegeneration and neurodevelopmental defects in Menkes disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatic, Stephanie; Comstra, Heather Skye; Gokhale, Avanti; Petris, Michael J; Faundez, Victor

    2015-09-01

    ATP7A mutations impair copper metabolism resulting in three distinct genetic disorders in humans. These diseases are characterized by neurological phenotypes ranging from intellectual disability to neurodegeneration. Severe ATP7A loss-of-function alleles trigger Menkes disease, a copper deficiency condition where systemic and neurodegenerative phenotypes dominate clinical outcomes. The pathogenesis of these manifestations has been attributed to the hypoactivity of a limited number of copper-dependent enzymes, a hypothesis that we refer as the oligoenzymatic pathogenic hypothesis. This hypothesis, which has dominated the field for 25 years, only explains some systemic Menkes phenotypes. However, we argue that this hypothesis does not fully account for the Menkes neurodegeneration or neurodevelopmental phenotypes. Here, we propose revisions of the oligoenzymatic hypothesis that could illuminate the pathogenesis of Menkes neurodegeneration and neurodevelopmental defects through unsuspected overlap with other neurological conditions including Parkinson's, intellectual disability, and schizophrenia.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurodegeneration in chronic neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumani, Hayrettin; Teunissen, Charlotte; Süssmuth, Sigurd; Otto, Markus; Ludolph, Albert C; Brettschneider, Johannes

    2008-07-01

    Chronic neurological diseases (CND) like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), dementia or multiple sclerosis (MS) share a chronic progressive course of disease that frequently leads to the common pathological pathway of neurodegeneration, including neuroaxonal damage, apoptosis and gliosis. There is an ongoing search for biomarkers that could support early diagnosis of CND and help to identify responders to interventions in therapeutic treatment trials. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a promising source of biomarkers in CND, since the CSF compartment is in close anatomical contact with the brain interstitial fluid, where biochemical changes related to CND are reflected. We review recent advances in CSF biomarkers research in CND and thereby focus on markers associated with neurodegeneration.

  4. Vascular Changes and Neurodegeneration in the Early Stages of Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Karoline Boegeberg; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Grauslund, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Neurodegeneration is an early component of diabetic retinopathy (DR). It is unclear whether neurodegeneration is an independent factor or a consequence of damaged retinal vasculature. The aims of this study were to review the literature concerning neurodegeneration in diabetic...... patients without or with early DR, and to examine whether neurodegeneration precedes visible vasculopathy in the pathogenesis of DR. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed to identify studies which used optical coherence tomography (OCT) or multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) to detect...

  5. Eugenia jambolana Lam. Increases lifespan and ameliorates experimentally induced neurodegeneration in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Bezerra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, dyslipidemia (DL and inflammation (IF are associated with reduced lifespan (LS and increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases (NDG. Dysregulation in insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 (IIS signaling, forkhead box O transcription factor (FOXO and Silent Information Regulators or Sirtuins (SIRT may be responsible. We investigated the effect of spray dried Jambolan (Eugenia jambolana Lam. fruit in Caenorhabditis elegans model for lifespan, amyloid b1-42 (Ab1-42 aggregation induced paralysis and MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium induced neurodegeneration. Effect on modulating critical genes involved signaling pathways important in IIS, LS and NDG were also studied in C. elegans. Results show suggest statistically significant increase in lifespan (9-22.7% coupled with a delay in Ab1-42 induced paralysis (11.5% and MPP+ induced paralysis (38-43%. Gene expression studies indicated a significant upregulation in expression of  C. elegans homologs of foxo, sirt1, dopamine D1 receptor and suggested a non-FOXO mediated mechanism of action.Industrial relevance. Jambolan is a bioactive-rich tropical fruit with high colorant potential. Despite this fact, its perishability has hampered its market and industrial use beyond the countries where it is cultivated. Considering that drying is a popular technique able to extend fruits shelf life and concentrate their natural bioactive compounds, this research investigates the health relevance of spray dried jambolan. Here we addressed the potential of dried Jambolan fruit to extend lifespan and inhibit the progression of experimentally induced neurodegeneration using the C. elegans model. We demonstrated that this convenient fruit product was able to increase the lifespan of C. elegans. The jambolan extracts also influenced some critical genes of signaling pathways relevant to metabolic diseases, aging and neurodegeneration. Based on our results, some insight about

  6. Moderate exercise prevents neurodegeneration in D-galactose-induced aging mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Meng Xu; Bo Shen; Man Li; Qian Gao; Shou-gang Wei

    2016-01-01

    D-galactose has been widely used in aging research because of its efifcacy in inducing senescence and accelerating aging in animal models. The present study investigated the beneifts of exercise for preventing neurodegeneration, such as synaptic plasticity, spatial learning and memory abilities, in mouse models of aging. D-galactose-induced aging mice were administered daily subcutaneous injections of D-ga-lactose at the base of the neck for 10 consecutive weeks. Then, the mice were subjected to exercise training by running on a treadmill for 6 days a week. Shortened escape latency in a Morris water maze test indicated that exercise improved learning and memory in aging mice. The ameliorative changes were likely induced by an upregulation of Bcl-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, the repression of apop-tosis factors such as Fas and Bax, and an increase in the activity of glucose transporters-1 and 4. The data suggest moderate exercise may retard or inhibit neurodegeneration in D-galactose-induced aging mice.

  7. MicroRNAs and deregulated gene expression networks in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Kai-Christian

    2010-06-18

    Neurodegeneration is characterized by the progressive loss of neuronal cell types in the nervous system. Although the main cause of cell dysfunction and death in many neurodegenerative diseases is not known, there is increasing evidence that their demise is a result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors which affect key signaling pathways in cell function. This view is supported by recent observations that disease-compromised cells in late-stage neurodegeneration exhibit profound dysregulation of gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) introduce a novel concept of regulatory control over gene expression and there is increasing evidence that they play a profound role in neuronal cell identity as well as multiple aspects of disease pathogenesis. Here, we review the molecular properties of brain cells derived from patients with neurodegenerative diseases, and discuss how deregulated miRNA/mRNA expression networks could be a mechanism in neurodegeneration. In addition, we emphasize that the dysfunction of these regulatory networks might overlap between different cell systems and suggest that miRNA functions might be common between neurodegeneration and other disease entities.

  8. Opiates May Have Neuroprotective Properties against Neurodegeneration and Premature Death

    OpenAIRE

    Alen J Salerian

    2015-01-01

    Endorphins and endorphin agonists play a crucial role in the neuromodulation of mood, anxiety, pain and addiction. Review of clinical studies seem to elucidate possible protective role of opiates against neurodegeneration and premature death. The historical, biological, experimental, clinical and neuroimaging data strongly support the potential properties of opiates as neuro protectors.

  9. Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha and its role in neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunte, H.

    2007-01-01

    Selective neuronal loss is a prominent feature in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, a link between neurodegeneration and a deficiency in the protein phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha (PI-TPalpha) has been demonstrated. In this context it is of importance that fibroblasts overexpressin

  10. Transgenic Drosophila model to study apolipoprotein E4-induced neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Mohammad; Nongthomba, Upendra; Jahromi, Samaneh Reiszadeh; Ramesh, S R

    2016-03-15

    The ε4 isoform of apolipoprotein E (ApoE4) that is involved in neuron-glial lipid metabolism has been demonstrated as the main genetic risk factor in late-onset of Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanism underlying ApoE4-mediated neurodegeneration remains unclear. We created a transgenic model of neurodegenerative disorder by expressing ε3 and ε4 isoforms of human ApoE in the Drosophila melanogaster. The genetic models exhibited progressive neurodegeneration, shortened lifespan and memory impairment. Genetic interaction studies between amyloid precursor protein and ApoE in axon pathology of the disease revealed that over expression of hApoE in Appl-expressing neurons of Drosophila brain causes neurodegeneration. Moreover, acute oxidative damage in the hApoE transgenic flies triggered a neuroprotective response of hApoE3 while chronic induction of oxidative damage accelerated the rate of neurodegeneration. This Drosophila model may facilitate analysis of the molecular and cellular events implicated in hApoE4 neurotoxicity.

  11. The Role of S-Nitrosylation and S-Glutathionylation of Protein Disulphide Isomerase in Protein Misfolding and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Halloran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases involve the progressive loss of neurons, and a pathological hallmark is the presence of abnormal inclusions containing misfolded proteins. Although the precise molecular mechanisms triggering neurodegeneration remain unclear, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, elevated oxidative and nitrosative stress, and protein misfolding are important features in pathogenesis. Protein disulphide isomerase (PDI is the prototype of a family of molecular chaperones and foldases upregulated during ER stress that are increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. PDI catalyzes the rearrangement and formation of disulphide bonds, thus facilitating protein folding, and in neurodegeneration may act to ameliorate the burden of protein misfolding. However, an aberrant posttranslational modification of PDI, S-nitrosylation, inhibits its protective function in these conditions. S-nitrosylation is a redox-mediated modification that regulates protein function by covalent addition of nitric oxide- (NO- containing groups to cysteine residues. Here, we discuss the evidence for abnormal S-nitrosylation of PDI (SNO-PDI in neurodegeneration and how this may be linked to another aberrant modification of PDI, S-glutathionylation. Understanding the role of aberrant S-nitrosylation/S-glutathionylation of PDI in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases may provide insights into novel therapeutic interventions in the future.

  12. Adenosine A3 receptor activation is neuroprotective against retinal neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvao, Joana; Elvas, Filipe; Martins, Tiago; Cordeiro, M Francesca; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Death of retinal neural cells, namely retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), is a characteristic of several retinal neurodegenerative diseases. Although the role of adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) in neuroprotection is controversial, A3R activation has been reported to afford protection against several brain insults, with few studies in the retina. In vitro models (retinal neural and organotypic cultures) and animal models [ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) and partial optic nerve transection (pONT)] were used to study the neuroprotective properties of A3R activation against retinal neurodegeneration. The A3R selective agonist (2-Cl-IB-MECA, 1 μM) prevented apoptosis (TUNEL(+)-cells) induced by kainate and cyclothiazide (KA + CTZ) in retinal neural cultures (86.5 ± 7.4 and 37.2 ± 6.1 TUNEL(+)-cells/field, in KA + CTZ and KA + CTZ + 2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively). In retinal organotypic cultures, 2-Cl-IB-MECA attenuated NMDA-induced cell death, assessed by TUNEL (17.3 ± 2.3 and 8.3 ± 1.2 TUNEL(+)-cells/mm(2) in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) and PI incorporation (ratio DIV4/DIV2 3.3 ± 0.3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) assays. Intravitreal 2-Cl-IB-MECA administration afforded protection against I-R injury decreasing the number of TUNEL(+) cells by 72%, and increased RGC survival by 57%. Also, intravitreal administration of 2-Cl-IB-MECA inhibited apoptosis (from 449.4 ± 37.8 to 207.6 ± 48.9 annexin-V(+)-cells) and RGC loss (from 1.2 ± 0.6 to 8.1 ± 1.7 cells/mm) induced by pONT. This study demonstrates that 2-Cl-IB-MECA is neuroprotective to the retina, both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of A3R may have great potential in the management of retinal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by RGC death, as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, and ischemic diseases.

  13. Correlated Inflammatory Responses and Neurodegeneration in Peptide-Injected Animal Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. McLarnon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD which emphasize activation of microglia may have particular utility in correlating proinflammatory activity with neurodegeneration. This paper reviews injection of amyloid-β (Aβ into rat brain as an alternative AD animal model to the use of transgenic animals. In particular, intrahippocampal injection of Aβ1-42 peptide demonstrates prominent microglial mobilization and activation accompanied by a significant loss of granule cell neurons. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory reactivity is demonstrated by a broad spectrum of drugs with a common endpoint in conferring neuroprotection in peptide-injected animals. Peptide-injection models provide a focus on glial cell responses to direct peptide injection in rat brain and offer advantages in the study of the mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation in AD brain.

  14. 载脂蛋白E模拟肽ApoE23对细菌性脓毒血症小鼠血浆脂多糖浓度的影响及机制研究%The effect and mechanism of an apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide ApoE23 on plasma lipopolysaccharide levels in the septic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷丽军; 王传清; 杨昌生; 付盼; 王爱敏

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide (ApoE23) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels in plasma and the regulatory role of ApoE23 on low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) on liver cells in the septic mice.Methods An ApoE mimetic peptide was designed and referred terminologically as ApoE23 in abbreviation.ApoE23 was synthesized by using solid phase synthesis assay and were refined by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).The peptide was identified and confirmed by using electron spray ionization mass spectrometry and amino acid composition analysis.The C57BL mice infected with Salmonella typhimurium group B were treated with apoE23 injected into tail vein.The plasma LPS levels were measured by using immunoturbidimetry.The LDLR expression and level on liver cells were measured by real time PCR and western blot respectively.Results The plasma LPS levels significantly increased and the liver LDLR expression decreased in the septic mice.ApoE23 treatment markedly reduced the plasma LPS levels and redressed the LDLR down-expressions on liver cells both in mRNA and protein levels compared to the septic mice without ApoE23 treatment.Conclusions The reduction of LPS level after ApoE23 treatment may be associated with the modulation role of ApoE23 in LDLR expression on liver cells,and ApoE23 may be a potential agent against bacterial sepsis as well.One of possible mechanisms was most likely associated with effect of ApoE23 on LDLR expression.%目的 观察载脂蛋白E (ApoE)模拟肽ApoE23对细菌性脓毒血症小鼠血浆脂多糖(LPS)质量浓度变化的影响及其对肝脏低密度脂蛋白受体(LDLR)表达的调节作用.方法 设计ApoE模拟肽(ApoE23)并采用固相合成法进行合成,高效液相色谱(HPLC)技术对合成物进行纯化,电离子质谱对合成物进行鉴定并对合成物进行氨基酸组成分析;B组鼠伤寒沙门氏菌诱导C57BL细菌性脓毒血症模型并对感

  15. The relation between inflammation and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frischer, J.M.; Bramow, S.; Dal-Bianco, A.

    2009-01-01

    disease or brain lesions. We found that pronounced inflammation in the brain is not only present in acute and relapsing multiple sclerosis but also in the secondary and primary progressive disease. T- and B-cell infiltrates correlated with the activity of demyelinating lesions, while plasma cell...... infiltrates were most pronounced in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) and primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) and even persisted, when T- and B-cell infiltrates declined to levels seen in age matched controls. A highly significant association between inflammation......Some recent studies suggest that in progressive multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration may occur independently from inflammation. The aim of our study was to analyse the interdependence of inflammation, neurodegeneration and disease progression in various multiple sclerosis stages in relation...

  16. Brain diabetic neurodegeneration segregates with low intrinsic aerobic capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Joungil; Chandrasekaran, Krish; Demarest, Tyler G.; Kristian, Tibor; Xu, Su; Vijaykumar, Kadambari; Dsouza, Kevin Geoffrey; Qi, Nathan R; Yarowsky, Paul J.; Gallipoli, Rao; Koch, Lauren G.; Fiskum, Gary M.; Steven L Britton; Russell, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Diabetes leads to cognitive impairment and is associated with age-related neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus, understanding diabetes-induced alterations in brain function is important for developing early interventions for neurodegeneration. Low-capacity runner (LCR) rats are obese and manifest metabolic risk factors resembling human “impaired glucose tolerance” or metabolic syndrome. We examined hippocampal function in aged LCR rats compared to the...

  17. Molecular Basis of Neurodegeneration and Neurodevelopmental Defects in Menkes Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zlatic, Stephanie; Comstra, Heather Skye; Gokhale, Avanti; Petris, Michael J.; Faundez, Victor

    2015-01-01

    ATP7A mutations impair copper metabolism resulting in three distinct genetic disorders in humans. These diseases are characterized by neurological phenotypes ranging from intellectual disability to neurodegeneration. Severe ATP7A loss-of function alleles trigger Menkes disease, a copper deficiency condition where systemic and neurodegenerative phenotypes dominate clinical outcomes. The pathogenesis of these manifestations has been attributed to hypoactivity of a limited number of copper-depen...

  18. Astrocytic Pathological Calcium Homeostasis and Impaired Vesicle Trafficking in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Vardjan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the central nervous system (CNS consists of highly heterogeneous populations of neurones and glial cells, clustered into diverse anatomical regions with specific functions, there are some conditions, including alertness, awareness and attention that require simultaneous, coordinated and spatially homogeneous activity within a large area of the brain. During such events, the brain, representing only about two percent of body mass, but consuming one fifth of body glucose at rest, needs additional energy to be produced. How simultaneous energy procurement in a relatively extended area of the brain takes place is poorly understood. This mechanism is likely to be impaired in neurodegeneration, for example in Alzheimer’s disease, the hallmark of which is brain hypometabolism. Astrocytes, the main neural cell type producing and storing glycogen, a form of energy in the brain, also hold the key to metabolic and homeostatic support in the central nervous system and are impaired in neurodegeneration, contributing to the slow decline of excitation-energy coupling in the brain. Many mechanisms are affected, including cell-to-cell signalling. An important question is how changes in cellular signalling, a process taking place in a rather short time domain, contribute to the neurodegeneration that develops over decades. In this review we focus initially on the slow dynamics of Alzheimer’s disease, and on the activity of locus coeruleus, a brainstem nucleus involved in arousal. Subsequently, we overview much faster processes of vesicle traffic and cytosolic calcium dynamics, both of which shape the signalling landscape of astrocyte-neurone communication in health and neurodegeneration.

  19. Astrocytic Pathological Calcium Homeostasis and Impaired Vesicle Trafficking in Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardjan, Nina; Verkhratsky, Alexej; Zorec, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Although the central nervous system (CNS) consists of highly heterogeneous populations of neurones and glial cells, clustered into diverse anatomical regions with specific functions, there are some conditions, including alertness, awareness and attention that require simultaneous, coordinated and spatially homogeneous activity within a large area of the brain. During such events, the brain, representing only about two percent of body mass, but consuming one fifth of body glucose at rest, needs additional energy to be produced. How simultaneous energy procurement in a relatively extended area of the brain takes place is poorly understood. This mechanism is likely to be impaired in neurodegeneration, for example in Alzheimer’s disease, the hallmark of which is brain hypometabolism. Astrocytes, the main neural cell type producing and storing glycogen, a form of energy in the brain, also hold the key to metabolic and homeostatic support in the central nervous system and are impaired in neurodegeneration, contributing to the slow decline of excitation-energy coupling in the brain. Many mechanisms are affected, including cell-to-cell signalling. An important question is how changes in cellular signalling, a process taking place in a rather short time domain, contribute to the neurodegeneration that develops over decades. In this review we focus initially on the slow dynamics of Alzheimer’s disease, and on the activity of locus coeruleus, a brainstem nucleus involved in arousal. Subsequently, we overview much faster processes of vesicle traffic and cytosolic calcium dynamics, both of which shape the signalling landscape of astrocyte-neurone communication in health and neurodegeneration. PMID:28208745

  20. Consensus paper: pathological mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilla-Dueñas, A; Ashizawa, T; Brice, A; Magri, S; McFarland, K N; Pandolfo, M; Pulst, S M; Riess, O; Rubinsztein, D C; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, T; Scoles, D R; Stevanin, G; Taroni, F; Underwood, B R; Sánchez, I

    2014-04-01

    Intensive scientific research devoted in the recent years to understand the molecular mechanisms or neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are identifying new pathways and targets providing new insights and a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis in these diseases. In this consensus manuscript, the authors discuss their current views on the identified molecular processes causing or modulating the neurodegenerative phenotype in spinocerebellar ataxias with the common opinion of translating the new knowledge acquired into candidate targets for therapy. The following topics are discussed: transcription dysregulation, protein aggregation, autophagy, ion channels, the role of mitochondria, RNA toxicity, modulators of neurodegeneration and current therapeutic approaches. Overall point of consensus includes the common vision of neurodegeneration in SCAs as a multifactorial, progressive and reversible process, at least in early stages. Specific points of consensus include the role of the dysregulation of protein folding, transcription, bioenergetics, calcium handling and eventual cell death with apoptotic features of neurons during SCA disease progression. Unresolved questions include how the dysregulation of these pathways triggers the onset of symptoms and mediates disease progression since this understanding may allow effective treatments of SCAs within the window of reversibility to prevent early neuronal damage. Common opinions also include the need for clinical detection of early neuronal dysfunction, for more basic research to decipher the early neurodegenerative process in SCAs in order to give rise to new concepts for treatment strategies and for the translation of the results to preclinical studies and, thereafter, in clinical practice.

  1. Exacerbation of CNS inflammation and neurodegeneration by systemic LPS treatment is independent of circulating IL-1 beta and IL-6

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Carol L

    2011-05-17

    Abstract Background Chronic neurodegeneration comprises an inflammatory response but its contribution to the progression of disease remains unclear. We have previously shown that microglial cells are primed by chronic neurodegeneration, induced by the ME7 strain of prion disease, to synthesize limited pro-inflammatory cytokines but to produce exaggerated responses to subsequent systemic inflammatory insults. The consequences of this primed response include exaggerated hypothermic and sickness behavioural responses, acute neuronal death and accelerated progression of disease. Here we investigated whether inhibition of systemic cytokine synthesis using the anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone-21-phosphate was sufficient to block any or all of these responses. Methods ME7 animals, at 18-19 weeks post-inoculation, were challenged with LPS (500 μg\\/kg) in the presence or absence of dexamethasone-21-phosphate (2 mg\\/kg) and effects on core-body temperature and systemic and CNS cytokine production and apoptosis were examined. Results LPS induced hypothermia and decreased exploratory activity. Dexamethasone-21-phosphate prevented this hypothermia, markedly suppressed systemic IL-1β and IL-6 secretion but did not prevent decreased exploration. Furthermore, robust transcription of cytokine mRNA occurred in the hippocampus of both ME7 and NBH (normal brain homogenate) control animals despite the effective blocking of systemic cytokine synthesis. Microglia primed by neurodegeneration were not blocked from the robust synthesis of IL-1β protein and endothelial COX-2 was also robustly synthesized. We injected biotinylated LPS at 100 μg\\/kg and even at this lower dose this could be detected in blood plasma. Apoptosis was acutely induced by LPS, despite the inhibition of the systemic cytokine response. Conclusions These data suggest that LPS can directly activate the brain endothelium even at relatively low doses, obviating the need for systemic cytokine stimulation to

  2. Exacerbation of CNS inflammation and neurodegeneration by systemic LPS treatment is independent of circulating IL-1β and IL-6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham Colm

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neurodegeneration comprises an inflammatory response but its contribution to the progression of disease remains unclear. We have previously shown that microglial cells are primed by chronic neurodegeneration, induced by the ME7 strain of prion disease, to synthesize limited pro-inflammatory cytokines but to produce exaggerated responses to subsequent systemic inflammatory insults. The consequences of this primed response include exaggerated hypothermic and sickness behavioural responses, acute neuronal death and accelerated progression of disease. Here we investigated whether inhibition of systemic cytokine synthesis using the anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone-21-phosphate was sufficient to block any or all of these responses. Methods ME7 animals, at 18-19 weeks post-inoculation, were challenged with LPS (500 μg/kg in the presence or absence of dexamethasone-21-phosphate (2 mg/kg and effects on core-body temperature and systemic and CNS cytokine production and apoptosis were examined. Results LPS induced hypothermia and decreased exploratory activity. Dexamethasone-21-phosphate prevented this hypothermia, markedly suppressed systemic IL-1β and IL-6 secretion but did not prevent decreased exploration. Furthermore, robust transcription of cytokine mRNA occurred in the hippocampus of both ME7 and NBH (normal brain homogenate control animals despite the effective blocking of systemic cytokine synthesis. Microglia primed by neurodegeneration were not blocked from the robust synthesis of IL-1β protein and endothelial COX-2 was also robustly synthesized. We injected biotinylated LPS at 100 μg/kg and even at this lower dose this could be detected in blood plasma. Apoptosis was acutely induced by LPS, despite the inhibition of the systemic cytokine response. Conclusions These data suggest that LPS can directly activate the brain endothelium even at relatively low doses, obviating the need for systemic cytokine

  3. ApolipoproteinE mimetic peptides improve outcome after focal ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haichen; Anderson, Lauren G; Lascola, Christopher D; James, Michael L; Venkatraman, Talaignair N; Bennett, Ellen R; Acheson, Shawn K; Vitek, Michael P; Laskowitz, Daniel T

    2013-03-01

    Growing clinical evidence implicates isoform-specific effects of apolipoprotein E (apoE) in reducing neuroinflammation and mediating adaptive responses following ischemic and traumatic brain injury. However, the intact apoE holoprotein does not cross the blood-brain barrier and thus has limited therapeutic potential. We have created a small peptide, COG1410 (acetyl-AS-Aib-LRKL-Aib-KRLL-amide), derived from the apoE receptor-binding region. COG1410 retains the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective biological properties of the intact holoprotein and penetrates the blood-brain barrier. In the current study, we utilized a murine model of transient focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion to demonstrate that intravenous (IV) administration of COG1410 reduces infarct volume and radiographic progression of infarct, and improves functional outcome as assessed by rotarod when delivered up to 4h after ischemia onset. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Withanolide A Prevents Neurodegeneration by Modulating Hippocampal Glutathione Biosynthesis during Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baitharu, Iswar; Jain, Vishal; Deep, Satya Narayan; Shroff, Sabita; Sahu, Jayanta Kumar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera root extract has been used traditionally in ayurvedic system of medicine as a memory enhancer. Present study explores the ameliorative effect of withanolide A, a major component of withania root extract and its molecular mechanism against hypoxia induced memory impairment. Withanolide A was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats before a period of 21 days pre-exposure and during 07 days of exposure to a simulated altitude of 25,000 ft. Glutathione level and glutathione dependent free radicals scavenging enzyme system, ATP, NADPH level, γ-glutamylcysteinyl ligase (GCLC) activity and oxidative stress markers were assessed in the hippocampus. Expression of apoptotic marker caspase 3 in hippocampus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional alteration and expression of GCLC and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)–related factor 2 (Nrf2) were investigated by real time PCR and immunoblotting respectively. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) level and impaired reduced gluatathione dependent free radical scavenging system in hippocampus resulting in elevated oxidative stress. Supplementation of withanolide A during hypoxic exposure increased GSH level, augmented GSH dependent free radicals scavenging system and decreased the number of caspase and hoescht positive cells in hippocampus. While withanolide A reversed hypoxia mediated neurodegeneration, administration of buthionine sulfoximine along with withanolide A blunted its neuroprotective effects. Exogenous administration of corticosterone suppressed Nrf2 and GCLC expression whereas inhibition of corticosterone synthesis upregulated Nrf2 as well as GCLC. Thus present study infers that withanolide A reduces neurodegeneration by restoring hypoxia induced glutathione depletion in hippocampus. Further, Withanolide A increases glutathione biosynthesis in neuronal cells by upregulating GCLC level through Nrf2 pathway in a corticosterone dependenet manner

  5. Delayed mGluR5 activation limits neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrnes Kimberly R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury initiates biochemical processes that lead to secondary neurodegeneration. Imaging studies suggest that tissue loss may continue for months or years after traumatic brain injury in association with chronic microglial activation. Recently we found that metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 activation by (RS-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG decreases microglial activation and release of associated pro-inflammatory factors in vitro, which is mediated in part through inhibition of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase. Here we examined whether delayed CHPG administration reduces chronic neuroinflammation and associated neurodegeneration after experimental traumatic brain injury in mice. Methods One month after controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury, C57Bl/6 mice were randomly assigned to treatment with single dose intracerebroventricular CHPG, vehicle or CHPG plus a selective mGluR5 antagonist, 3-((2-Methyl-4-thiazolylethynylpyridine. Lesion volume, white matter tract integrity and neurological recovery were assessed over the following three months. Results Traumatic brain injury resulted in mGluR5 expression in reactive microglia of the cortex and hippocampus at one month post-injury. Delayed CHPG treatment reduced expression of reactive microglia expressing NADPH oxidase subunits; decreased hippocampal neuronal loss; limited lesion progression, as measured by repeated T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (at one, two and three months and white matter loss, as measured by high field ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging at four months; and significantly improved motor and cognitive recovery in comparison to the other treatment groups. Conclusion Markedly delayed, single dose treatment with CHPG significantly improves functional recovery and limits lesion progression after experimental traumatic brain injury, likely in part through actions at mGluR5 receptors

  6. Diabetes and overexpression of proNGF cause retinal neurodegeneration via activation of RhoA pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M H Al-Gayyar

    Full Text Available Our previous studies showed positive correlation between accumulation of proNGF, activation of RhoA and neuronal death in diabetic models. Here, we examined the neuroprotective effects of selective inhibition of RhoA kinase in the diabetic rat retina and in a model that stably overexpressed the cleavage-resistance proNGF plasmid in the retina. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were rendered diabetic using streptozotocin or stably express cleavage-resistant proNGF plasmid. The neuroprotective effects of the intravitreal injection of RhoA kinase inhibitor Y27632 were examined in vivo. Effects of proNGF were examined in freshly isolated primary retinal ganglion cell (RGC cultures and RGC-5 cell line. Retinal neurodegeneration was assessed by counting TUNEL-positive and Brn-3a positive retinal ganglion cells. Expression of proNGF, p75(NTR, cleaved-PARP, caspase-3 and p38MAPK/JNK were examined by Western-blot. Activation of RhoA was assessed by pull-down assay and G-LISA. Diabetes and overexpression of proNGF resulted in retinal neurodegeneration as indicated by 9- and 6-fold increase in TUNEL-positive cells, respectively. In vitro, proNGF induced 5-fold cell death in RGC-5 cell line, and it induced >10-fold cell death in primary RGC cultures. These effects were associated with significant upregulation of p75(NTR and activation of RhoA. While proNGF induced TNF-α expression in vivo, it selectively activated RhoA in primary RGC cultures and RGC-5 cell line. Inhibiting RhoA kinase with Y27632 significantly reduced diabetes- and proNGF-induced activation of proapoptotic p38MAPK/JNK, expression of cleaved-PARP and caspase-3 and prevented retinal neurodegeneration in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence for a causal role of proNGF in diabetes-induced retinal neurodegeneration through enhancing p75(NTR expression and direct activation of RhoA and p38MAPK/JNK apoptotic pathways.

  7. Diabetes and Overexpression of proNGF Cause Retinal Neurodegeneration via Activation of RhoA Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matragoon, Suraporn; Abdelsaid, Mohammed A.; El-Azab, Mona F.; Shanab, Ahmed Y.; Ha, Yonju; Smith, Sylvia B.; Bollinger, Kathryn E.; El-Remessy, Azza B.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies showed positive correlation between accumulation of proNGF, activation of RhoA and neuronal death in diabetic models. Here, we examined the neuroprotective effects of selective inhibition of RhoA kinase in the diabetic rat retina and in a model that stably overexpressed the cleavage-resistance proNGF plasmid in the retina. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were rendered diabetic using streptozotosin or stably express cleavage-resistant proNGF plasmid. The neuroprotective effects of the intravitreal injection of RhoA kinase inhibitor Y27632 were examined in vivo. Effects of proNGF were examined in freshly isolated primary retinal ganglion cell (RGC) cultures and RGC-5 cell line. Retinal neurodegeneration was assessed by counting TUNEL-positive and Brn-3a positive retinal ganglion cells. Expression of proNGF, p75NTR, cleaved-PARP, caspase-3 and p38MAPK/JNK were examined by Western-blot. Activation of RhoA was assessed by pull-down assay and G-LISA. Diabetes and overexpression of proNGF resulted in retinal neurodegeneration as indicated by 9- and 6-fold increase in TUNEL-positive cells, respectively. In vitro, proNGF induced 5-fold cell death in RGC-5 cell line, and it induced >10-fold cell death in primary RGC cultures. These effects were associated with significant upregulation of p75NTR and activation of RhoA. While proNGF induced TNF-α expression in vivo, it selectively activated RhoA in primary RGC cultures and RGC-5 cell line. Inhibiting RhoA kinase with Y27632 significantly reduced diabetes- and proNGF-induced activation of proapoptotic p38MAPK/JNK, expression of cleaved-PARP and caspase-3 and prevented retinal neurodegeneration in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence for a causal role of proNGF in diabetes-induced retinal neurodegeneration through enhancing p75NTR expression and direct activation of RhoA and p38MAPK/JNK apoptotic pathways. PMID:23365678

  8. Neurostereology Protocol for Unbiased Quantification of Neuronal Injury and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria M Golub

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal injury and neurodegeneration are the hallmark pathologies in a variety of neurological conditions such as epilepsy, stroke, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Quantification of absolute neuron and interneuron counts in various brain regions is essential to understand the impact of neurological insults or neurodegenerative disease progression in animal models. However, conventional qualitative scoring-based protocols are superficial and less reliable for use in studies of neuroprotection evaluations. Here we describe an optimized stereology protocol for quantification of neuronal injury and neurodegeneration by unbiased counting of neurons and interneurons. Every 20th section in each series of 20 sections was processed for NeuN(+ total neuron and parvalbumin(+ interneuron immunostaining. The sections that contain the hippocampus were then delineated into five reliably predefined subregions. Each region was separately analyzed with a microscope driven by the stereology software. Regional tissue volume was determined by using the Cavalieri estimator, and cell density and cell number were determined by using the optical disector and optical fractionator. This protocol yielded an estimate of 1.5 million total neurons and 0.05 million PV(+ interneurons within the rat hippocampus. The protocol has greater predictive power for absolute counts as it is based on 3D features rather than 2D images. The total neuron counts were consistent with literature values from sophisticated systems, which are more expensive than our stereology system. This unbiased stereology protocol allows for sensitive, medium-throughput counting of total neurons in any brain region, and thus provides a quantitative tool for studies of neuronal injury and neurodegeneration in a variety of acute brain injury and chronic neurological models.

  9. CRTC1 Function During Memory Encoding Is Disrupted in Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Damas, Arnaldo; Chen, Meng; Enriquez-Barreto, Lilian; Ortega, Laura; Acosta, Sara; Perna, Judith Camats; Fullana, M Neus; Aguilera, José; Rodríguez-Alvarez, José; Saura, Carlos A

    2017-01-15

    Associative memory impairment is an early clinical feature of dementia patients, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these deficits are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the functional regulation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) by associative learning in physiological and neurodegenerative conditions. We evaluated the activation of CRTC1 in the hippocampus of control mice and mice lacking the Alzheimer's disease-linked presenilin genes (presenilin conditional double knockout [PS cDKO]) after one-trial contextual fear conditioning by using biochemical, immunohistochemical, and gene expression analyses. PS cDKO mice display classical features of neurodegeneration occurring in Alzheimer's disease including age-dependent cortical atrophy, neuron loss, dendritic degeneration, and memory deficits. Context-associative learning, but not single context or unconditioned stimuli, induces rapid dephosphorylation (Ser151) and translocation of CRTC1 from the cytosol/dendrites to the nucleus of hippocampal neurons in the mouse brain. Accordingly, context-associative learning induces differential CRTC1-dependent transcription of c-fos and the nuclear receptor subfamily 4 (Nr4a) genes Nr4a1-3 in the hippocampus through a mechanism that involves CRTC1 recruitment to CRE promoters. Deregulation of CRTC1 dephosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and transcriptional function are associated with long-term contextual memory deficits in PS cDKO mice. Importantly, CRTC1 gene therapy in the hippocampus ameliorates context memory and transcriptional deficits and dendritic degeneration despite ongoing cortical degeneration in this neurodegeneration mouse model. These findings reveal a critical role of CRTC1 in the hippocampus during associative memory, and provide evidence that CRTC1 deregulation underlies memory deficits during neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016

  10. Huntingtin interacting proteins are genetic modifiers of neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S Kaltenbach

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by expansion of the polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin (Htt protein. Neuronal toxicity in HD is thought to be, at least in part, a consequence of protein interactions involving mutant Htt. We therefore hypothesized that genetic modifiers of HD neurodegeneration should be enriched among Htt protein interactors. To test this idea, we identified a comprehensive set of Htt interactors using two complementary approaches: high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screening and affinity pull down followed by mass spectrometry. This effort led to the identification of 234 high-confidence Htt-associated proteins, 104 of which were found with the yeast method and 130 with the pull downs. We then tested an arbitrary set of 60 genes encoding interacting proteins for their ability to behave as genetic modifiers of neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of HD. This high-content validation assay showed that 27 of 60 orthologs tested were high-confidence genetic modifiers, as modification was observed with more than one allele. The 45% hit rate for genetic modifiers seen among the interactors is an order of magnitude higher than the 1%-4% typically observed in unbiased genetic screens. Genetic modifiers were similarly represented among proteins discovered using yeast two-hybrid and pull-down/mass spectrometry methods, supporting the notion that these complementary technologies are equally useful in identifying biologically relevant proteins. Interacting proteins confirmed as modifiers of the neurodegeneration phenotype represent a diverse array of biological functions, including synaptic transmission, cytoskeletal organization, signal transduction, and transcription. Among the modifiers were 17 loss-of-function suppressors of neurodegeneration, which can be considered potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we show that seven interacting proteins from among 11 tested were able to

  11. Chromosome 13 dementia syndromes as models of neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghiso, J.; Revesz, T.; Holton, J.;

    2001-01-01

    Two hereditary conditions, familial British dementia (FBD) and familial Danish dementia (FDD), are associated with amyloid deposition in the central nervous system and neurodegeneration. The two amyloid proteins, ABri and ADan, are degradation products of the same precursor molecule BriPP bearing....... These issues argue for the primary importance of the amyloid deposits in the mechanism(s) of neuronal cell loss. We propose FBD and FDD, the chromosome 13 dementia syndromes, as models to study the molecular basis of neurofibrillary degeneration, cell death and amyloid formation in the brain....

  12. Sirtuin-2 Protects Neural Cells from Oxidative Stress and Is Elevated in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuins are highly conserved lysine deacetylases involved in ageing, energy production, and lifespan extension. The mammalian SIRT2 has been implicated in Parkinson’s disease (PD where studies suggest SIRT2 promotes neurodegeneration. We therefore evaluated the effects of SIRT2 manipulation in toxin treated SH-SY5Y cells and determined the expression and activity of SIRT2 in postmortem brain tissue from patients with PD. SH-SY5Y viability in response to oxidative stress induced by diquat or rotenone was measured following SIRT2 overexpression or inhibition of deacetylase activity, along with α-synuclein aggregation. SIRT2 in human tissues was evaluated using Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and fluorometric activity assays. In SH-SY5Y cells, elevated SIRT2 protected cells from rotenone or diquat induced cell death and enzymatic inhibition of SIRT2 enhanced cell death. SIRT2 protection was mediated, in part, through elevated SOD2 expression. SIRT2 reduced the formation of α-synuclein aggregates but showed minimal colocalisation with α-synuclein. In postmortem PD brain tissue, SIRT2 activity was elevated compared to controls but also elevated in other neurodegenerative disorders. Results from both in vitro work and brain tissue suggest that SIRT2 is necessary for protection against oxidative stress and higher SIRT2 activity in PD brain may be a compensatory mechanism to combat neuronal stress.

  13. Critical role of acetylation in tau-mediated neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sang-Won; Chen, Xu; Tracy, Tara E; Li, Yaqiao; Zhou, Yungui; Wang, Chao; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Minami, S Sakura; Defensor, Erwin; Mok, Sue Ann; Sohn, Peter Dongmin; Schilling, Birgit; Cong, Xin; Ellerby, Lisa; Gibson, Bradford W; Johnson, Jeffrey; Krogan, Nevan; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Gestwicki, Jason; Masliah, Eliezer; Verdin, Eric; Gan, Li

    2015-10-01

    Tauopathies, including frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), are neurodegenerative diseases in which tau fibrils accumulate. Recent evidence supports soluble tau species as the major toxic species. How soluble tau accumulates and causes neurodegeneration remains unclear. Here we identify tau acetylation at Lys174 (K174) as an early change in AD brains and a critical determinant in tau homeostasis and toxicity in mice. The acetyl-mimicking mutant K174Q slows tau turnover and induces cognitive deficits in vivo. Acetyltransferase p300-induced tau acetylation is inhibited by salsalate and salicylate, which enhance tau turnover and reduce tau levels. In the PS19 transgenic mouse model of FTD, administration of salsalate after disease onset inhibited p300 activity, lowered levels of total tau and tau acetylated at K174, rescued tau-induced memory deficits and prevented hippocampal atrophy. The tau-lowering and protective effects of salsalate were diminished in neurons expressing K174Q tau. Targeting tau acetylation could be a new therapeutic strategy against human tauopathies.

  14. All-you-can-eat: autophagy in neurodegeneration and neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeger Philipp A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autophagy is the major pathway involved in the degradation of proteins and organelles, cellular remodeling, and survival during nutrient starvation. Autophagosomal dysfunction has been implicated in an increasing number of diseases from cancer to bacterial and viral infections and more recently in neurodegeneration. While a decrease in autophagic activity appears to interfere with protein degradation and possibly organelle turnover, increased autophagy has been shown to facilitate the clearance of aggregation-prone proteins and promote neuronal survival in a number of disease models. On the other hand, too much autophagic activity can be detrimental as well and lead to cell death, suggesting the regulation of autophagy has an important role in cell fate decisions. An increasing number of model systems are now available to study the role of autophagy in the central nervous system and how it might be exploited to treat disease. We will review here the current knowledge of autophagy in the central nervous system and provide an overview of the various models that have been used to study acute and chronic neurodegeneration.

  15. Does a loss of TDP-43 function cause neurodegeneration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zuo-Shang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2006, TAR-DNA binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43 was discovered to be in the intracellular aggregates in the degenerating cells in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD, two fatal neurodegenerative diseases [1,2]. ALS causes motor neuron degeneration leading to paralysis [3,4]. FTLD causes neuronal degeneration in the frontal and temporal cortices leading to personality changes and a loss of executive function [5]. The discovery triggered a flurry of research activity that led to the discovery of TDP-43 mutations in ALS patients and the widespread presence of TDP-43 aggregates in numerous neurodegenerative diseases. A key question regarding the role of TDP-43 is whether it causes neurotoxicity by a gain of function or a loss of function. The gain-of-function hypothesis has received much attention primarily based on the striking neurodegenerative phenotypes in numerous TDP-43-overexpression models. In this review, I will draw attention to the loss-of-function hypothesis, which postulates that mutant TDP-43 causes neurodegeneration by a loss of function, and in addition, by exerting a dominant-negative effect on the wild-type TDP-43 allele. Furthermore, I will discuss how a loss of function can cause neurodegeneration in patients where TDP-43 is not mutated, review the literature in model systems to discuss how the current data support the loss-of-function mechanism and highlight some key questions for testing this hypothesis in the future.

  16. p53 prevents neurodegeneration by regulating synaptic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Paola; Frost, Bess; Peng, Shouyong; Yang, Yawei J; Park, Peter J; Feany, Mel

    2014-12-16

    DNA damage has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies, but the consequences of genotoxic stress to postmitotic neurons are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that p53, a key mediator of the DNA damage response, plays a neuroprotective role in a Drosophila model of tauopathy. Further, through a whole-genome ChIP-chip analysis, we identify genes controlled by p53 in postmitotic neurons. We genetically validate a specific pathway, synaptic function, in p53-mediated neuroprotection. We then demonstrate that the control of synaptic genes by p53 is conserved in mammals. Collectively, our results implicate synaptic function as a central target in p53-dependent protection from neurodegeneration.

  17. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eZorzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1 cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction.

  18. Metals and Neurodegeneration [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Metals play important roles in the human body, maintaining cell structure and regulating gene expression, neurotransmission, and antioxidant response, to name a few. However, excessive metal accumulation in the nervous system may be toxic, inducing oxidative stress, disrupting mitochondrial function, and impairing the activity of numerous enzymes. Damage caused by metal accumulation may result in permanent injuries, including severe neurological disorders. Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown a strong correlation between aberrant metal exposure and a number of neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, autism spectrum disorders, Guillain–Barré disease, Gulf War syndrome, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and Wilson’s disease. Here, we briefly survey the literature relating to the role of metals in neurodegeneration.

  19. Vitamin E. Neurochemistry and implications for neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatassery, G T

    1992-09-30

    Recently there has been a great deal of interest in the potential therapeutic use of supplemental vitamin E in amelioration of diseases of the nervous system. Even though many studies have provided encouraging results, the mechanism of any beneficial effect remains elusive. Experimental studies suggest that the presence of high levels of vitamin E in tissues prior to injury is essential for biological efficacy because administration of the vitamin after insult is often ineffective. The rationale for this phenomenon is unknown at present. Some of the remaining areas of investigation include the biochemical interaction of vitamin E with other biological antioxidant substances such as vitamin C and sulfhydryl compounds; the relative potencies of different molecular forms of tocopherols, such as trienols and various optical isomers; and the optimal dosage and mode of administration of the most potent tocopherol molecule. Future research on these and other topics will shed more light on the effective use of vitamin E in neurodegeneration.

  20. Diabetic retinopathy: recent advances towards understanding neurodegeneration and vision loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Alistair J

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common retinal diseases world-wide. It has a complex pathology that involves the vasculature of the inner retina and breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier. Extensive research has determined that DR is not only a vascular disease but also has a neurodegenerative component and that essentially all types of cells in the retina are affected, leading to chronic loss of visual function. A great deal of work using animal models of DR has established the loss of neurons and pathology of other cell types, including supporting glial cells. There has also been an increased emphasis on measuring retinal function in the models, as well as further validation and extension of the animal studies by clinical and translational research. This article will attempt to summarize the more recent developments in research towards understanding the complexities of retinal neurodegeneration and functional vision loss in DR.

  1. Tryptophan, Neurodegeneration and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas W.S. Davies

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an up-to-date assessment of the role of the tryptophan metabolic and catabolic pathways in neurodegenerative disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. The kynurenine pathway and the effects of each of its enzymes and products are reviewed. The differential expression of the kynurenine pathway in cells within the brain, including inflammatory cells, is explored given the increasing recognition of the importance of inflammation in neurodegenerative disease. An overview of common mechanisms of neurodegeneration is presented before a review and discussion of the evidence for a pathogenetic role of the kynurenine pathway in Alzheimer’s disease, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, Huntington’s disease, motor neurone disease, and Parkinson’s disease.

  2. Genetic research advance on neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-jun HUANG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by abnormal accumulation of iron in central nervous system. Common clinical symptoms in NBIA include different types of dyskinesia, pyramidal tract involvement, cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy, cognitive impairment and visual dysfunction. So far, 10 genes have been identified as the causative gene for NBIA subtypes, which are PANK2, COASY, PLA2G6, C19orf12, FA2H, WDR45, ATP13A2, FTL, CP and DCAF17. The pathogenesis of NBIA involves mitochondrial involvement, oxidative stress damage, lipid metabolism and autophagy. Furthermore, NBIA may share the same pathogenetic mechanism with some other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD, frontotemporal dementia (FTD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.07.004

  3. Age-Related Neurodegeneration and Memory Loss in Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P. Lockrow

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is a condition where a complete or segmental chromosome 21 trisomy causes variable intellectual disability, and progressive memory loss and neurodegeneration with age. Many research groups have examined development of the brain in DS individuals, but studies on age-related changes should also be considered, with the increased lifespan observed in DS. DS leads to pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD by 40 or 50 years of age. Progressive age-related memory deficits occurring in both AD and in DS have been connected to degeneration of several neuronal populations, but mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Inflammation and oxidative stress are early events in DS pathology, and focusing on these pathways may lead to development of successful intervention strategies for AD associated with DS. Here we discuss recent findings and potential treatment avenues regarding development of AD neuropathology and memory loss in DS.

  4. Disrupted iron homeostasis causes dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matak, Pavle; Matak, Andrija; Moustafa, Sarah; Aryal, Dipendra K; Benner, Eric J; Wetsel, William; Andrews, Nancy C

    2016-03-29

    Disrupted brain iron homeostasis is a common feature of neurodegenerative disease. To begin to understand how neuronal iron handling might be involved, we focused on dopaminergic neurons and asked how inactivation of transport proteins affected iron homeostasis in vivo in mice. Loss of the cellular iron exporter, ferroportin, had no apparent consequences. However, loss of transferrin receptor 1, involved in iron uptake, caused neuronal iron deficiency, age-progressive degeneration of a subset of dopaminergic neurons, and motor deficits. There was gradual depletion of dopaminergic projections in the striatum followed by death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Damaged mitochondria accumulated, and gene expression signatures indicated attempted axonal regeneration, a metabolic switch to glycolysis, oxidative stress, and the unfolded protein response. We demonstrate that loss of transferrin receptor 1, but not loss of ferroportin, can cause neurodegeneration in a subset of dopaminergic neurons in mice.

  5. Self-mutilation in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation

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    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA is the term applied to a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in iron deposition in the basal ganglia. Well-known phenotypic features are progressive regression with extra pyramidal involvement and a variable course. A 10-year-old child born to consanguineous parents presented with progressive generalized opisthotonic dystonia, retrocollis, oromandibular dyskinesias, apraxia for swallowing, optic atrophy and severe self-mutilation of lips. MR imaging showed brain iron accumulation. Other causes of self-mutilation were excluded. Early infantile onset, ophisthotonic dystonia with oromandibular dyskinesias and characteristic MR images are suggestive of NBIA. There is only one case reported in the literature of self-mutilation in this condition.

  6. Deep Brain Stimulation for Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration

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    Pedro J. Garcia-Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN is usually associated with dystonia, which is typically severe and progressive over time. Pallidal stimulation (GPi DBS has been carried out in selected cases of PKAN with drug-resistant dystonia with variable results. We report a 30-month follow-up study of a 30-year-old woman with PKAN-related dystonia treated with GPi DBS. Postoperatively, the benefit quickly became evident, as the patient exhibited a marked improvement in her dystonia, including her writing difficulty. This result has been maintained up to the present. GPi DBS should be considered in dystonic PKAN patients provided fixed contractures and/or pyramidal symptoms are not present.

  7. NADPH oxidase contributes to streptozotocin-induced neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelli, Katherine Garcia; Rosário, Barbara Dos Anjos; Vasconcelos, Andrea Rodrigues; Scavone, Cristoforo; Camarini, Rosana; Hernandes, Marina S; Britto, Luiz Roberto

    2017-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive loss of memory. The neurodegeneration induced by AD has been linked to oxidative damage. However, little is known about the involvement of NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2), a multisubunit enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species, in the pathogenesis of AD. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement of Nox2 in memory, in AD-related brain abnormalities, oxidative damage, inflammation and neuronal death in the hippocampus in the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced AD-like state by comparing the effects of that drug on mice lacking gp91(phox-/-) and wild-type (Wt) mice. Nox2 gene expression was found increased in Wt mice after STZ injection. In object recognition test, Wt mice injected with STZ presented impairment in short- and long-term memory, which was not observed following Nox2 deletion. STZ treatment induced increased phosphorylation of Tau and increased amyloid-β, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and astrocyte and microglial markers expression in Wt mice but not in gp91(phox-/-). STZ treatment increased oxidative damage and pro-inflammatory cytokines' release in Wt mice, which was not observed in gp91(phox-/-) mice. Nox2 deletion had a positive effect on the IL-10 baseline production, suggesting that this cytokine might contribute to the neuroprotection mechanism against STZ-induced neurodegeneration. In summary, our data suggest that the Nox2-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation contributes to the STZ-induced AD-like state. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microglial cell dysregulation in Brain Aging and Neurodegeneration.

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    Rommy eVon Bernhardi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the main risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. In aging, microglia undergo phenotypic changes compatible with their activation. Glial activation can lead to neuroinflammation, which is increasingly accepted as part of the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD. We hypothesize that in aging, aberrant microglia activation leads to a deleterious environment and neurodegeneration. In aged mice, microglia exhibit an increased expression of cytokines and an exacerbated inflammatory response to pathological changes. Whereas LPS increases nitric oxide secretion in microglia from young mice, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS predominates in older mice. Furthermore, there is accumulation of DNA oxidative damage in mitochondria of microglia during aging, and also an increased intracellular ROS production. Increased ROS activates the redox-sensitive nuclear factor kappa B, which promotes more neuroinflammation, and can be translated in functional deficits, such as cognitive impairment. Mitochondria-derived ROS and cathepsin B, are also necessary for the microglial cell production of interleukin-1β, a key inflammatory cytokine. Interestingly, whereas the regulatory cytokine TGFβ1 is also increased in the aged brain, neuroinflammation persists. Assessing this apparent contradiction, we have reported that TGFβ1 induction and activation of Smad3 signaling after inflammatory stimulation are reduced in adult mice. Other protective functions, such as phagocytosis, although observed in aged animals, become not inducible by inflammatory stimuli and TGFβ1. Here, we discuss data suggesting that mitochondrial and endolysosomal dysfunction could at least partially mediate age-associated microglial cell changes, and, together with the impairment of the TGFβ1-Smad3 pathway, could result in a reduction of protective activation and a facilitation of cytotoxic activation of microglia, resulting in the

  9. Folate deficiency induces neurodegeneration and brain dysfunction in mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Golo; Harms, Christoph; Sobol, Robert W; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Linhart, Heinz; Winter, Benjamin; Balkaya, Mustafa; Gertz, Karen; Gay, Shanna B; Cox, David; Eckart, Sarah; Ahmadi, Michael; Juckel, Georg; Kempermann, Gerd; Hellweg, Rainer; Sohr, Reinhard; Hörtnagl, Heide; Wilson, Samuel H; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Endres, Matthias

    2008-07-09

    Folate deficiency and resultant increased homocysteine levels have been linked experimentally and epidemiologically with neurodegenerative conditions like stroke and dementia. Moreover, folate deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, most notably depression. We hypothesized that the pathogenic mechanisms include uracil misincorporation and, therefore, analyzed the effects of folate deficiency in mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung-/-) versus wild-type controls. Folate depletion increased nuclear mutation rates in Ung-/- embryonic fibroblasts, and conferred death of cultured Ung-/- hippocampal neurons. Feeding animals a folate-deficient diet (FD) for 3 months induced degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons in Ung-/- but not Ung+/+ mice along with decreased hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein and decreased brain levels of antioxidant glutathione. Furthermore, FD induced cognitive deficits and mood alterations such as anxious and despair-like behaviors that were aggravated in Ung-/- mice. Independent of Ung genotype, FD increased plasma homocysteine levels, altered brain monoamine metabolism, and inhibited adult hippocampal neurogenesis. These results indicate that impaired uracil repair is involved in neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric dysfunction induced by experimental folate deficiency.

  10. The GluK4 kainate receptor subunit regulates memory, mood, and excitotoxic neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, E R; Kruyer, A; Norris, E H; Cederroth, C R; Strickland, S

    2013-04-01

    Though the GluK4 kainate receptor subunit shows limited homology and a restricted expression pattern relative to other kainate receptor subunits, its ablation results in distinct behavioral and molecular phenotypes. GluK4 knockout mice demonstrated impairments in memory acquisition and recall in a Morris water maze test, suggesting a previously unreported role for kainate receptors in spatial memory. GluK4 knockout mice also showed marked hyperactivity and impaired pre-pulse inhibition, thereby mirroring two of the hallmark endophenotypes of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Furthermore, we found that GluK4 is a key mediator of excitotoxic neurodegeneration: GluK4 knockout mice showed robust neuroprotection in the CA3 region of the hippocampus following intrahippocampal injection of kainate and widespread neuroprotection throughout the hippocampus following hypoxia-ischemia. Biochemical analysis of kainate- or sham-treated wild-type and GluK4 knockout hippocampal tissue suggests that GluK4 may act through the JNK pathway to regulate the molecular cascades that lead to excitotoxicity. Together, our findings suggest that GluK4 may be relevant to the understanding and treatment of human neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Activation of tyrosine kinase c-Abl contributes to α-synuclein–induced neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Hyun; Kim, Donghoon; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Kumar, Manoj; Mao, Xiaobo; Shin, Joo Ho; Lee, Yunjong; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Ko, Han Seok

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of α-synuclein contributes to the formation of Lewy bodies and neurites, the pathologic hallmarks of Parkinson disease (PD) and α-synucleinopathies. Although a number of human mutations have been identified in familial PD, the mechanisms that promote α-synuclein accumulation and toxicity are poorly understood. Here, we report that hyperactivity of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl critically regulates α-synuclein–induced neuropathology. In mice expressing a human α-synucleinopathy–associated mutation (hA53Tα-syn mice), deletion of the gene encoding c-Abl reduced α-synuclein aggregation, neuropathology, and neurobehavioral deficits. Conversely, overexpression of constitutively active c-Abl in hA53Tα-syn mice accelerated α-synuclein aggregation, neuropathology, and neurobehavioral deficits. Moreover, c-Abl activation led to an age-dependent increase in phosphotyrosine 39 α-synuclein. In human postmortem samples, there was an accumulation of phosphotyrosine 39 α-synuclein in brain tissues and Lewy bodies of PD patients compared with age-matched controls. Furthermore, in vitro studies show that c-Abl phosphorylation of α-synuclein at tyrosine 39 enhances α-synuclein aggregation. Taken together, this work establishes a critical role for c-Abl in α-synuclein–induced neurodegeneration and demonstrates that selective inhibition of c-Abl may be neuroprotective. This study further indicates that phosphotyrosine 39 α-synuclein is a potential disease indicator for PD and related α-synucleinopathies. PMID:27348587

  12. Protective effects of cholecystokinin-8 on methamphetamine-induced behavioral changes and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Hongyan; Wen, Di; Ma, Chunling; Li, Ming; Li, Yingmin; Zhang, Wenfang; Liu, Li; Cong, Bin

    2015-04-15

    We investigated whether pretreatment with the neuropeptide cholecystokinin-8 affected methamphetamine (METH)-induced behavioral changes and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in male C57/BL6 mice. CCK-8 pretreatment alone had no effect on locomotion and stereotypic behavior and could not induce behavioral sensitization; however, it attenuated, in a dose-dependent manner, hyperlocomotion and behavioral sensitization induced by a low dose of METH (1mg/kg). CCK-8 attenuated METH-induced stereotypic behavior at a dose of 3mg/kg but not at 10mg/kg. CCK-8 pretreatment attenuated METH (10mg/kg)-induced hyperthermia, the decrease of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) in the striatum, and TH in the substantia nigra. CCK-8 alone had no effect on rectal temperature, TH and DAT expression in the nigrostriatal region. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that pretreatment with CCK-8 inhibited changes typically induced by repeated exposure to METH, such as hyperlocomotion, behavioral sensitization, stereotypic behavior, and dopaminergic neurotoxicity. These findings make CCK-8 a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of multiple symptoms associated with METH abuse.

  13. Neuroinlfammation, neurodegeneration and regeneration in multiple sclerosis:intercorrelated manifestations of the immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatiana Koudriavtseva; Caterina Mainero

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated inlfammatory-demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, with a strong neurodegenerative component. The question whether neurodegeneration in MS is independent or related to neuroinlfammation has been long debated, but not yet fully clariifed. Furthermore, little is still known on how neuroinlfammation and neurodegeneration in MS are related to potential regenerative processes. In this perspective, we brielfy discuss main clinical, pathological and ex-perimental evidence on the relationship between neuroinlfammation and neurodegeneration in MS, and on their connection with regeneration. We discuss that these processes in MS might represent intercorrelated manifestations of the immune response, especially of the innate immunity.

  14. Neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and regeneration in multiple sclerosis: intercorrelated manifestations of the immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudriavtseva, Tatiana; Mainero, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory-demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, with a strong neurodegenerative component. The question whether neurodegeneration in MS is independent or related to neuroinflammation has been long debated, but not yet fully clarified. Furthermore, little is still known on how neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in MS are related to potential regenerative processes. In this perspective, we briefly discuss main clinical, pathological and experimental evidence on the relationship between neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in MS, and on their connection with regeneration. We discuss that these processes in MS might represent intercorrelated manifestations of the immune response, especially of the innate immunity. PMID:28123401

  15. Inhibiting Glycogen Synthesis Prevents Lafora Disease in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Bartholomew A.; Turnbull, Julie; Epp, Jonathan R.; Weaver, Staci A.; Zhao, Xiaochu; Pencea, Nela; Roach, Peter J.; Frankland, Paul; Ackerley, Cameron A.; Minassian, Berge A.

    2013-01-01

    Lafora disease (LD) is a fatal progressive myoclonus epilepsy characterized neuropathologically by aggregates of abnormally structured glycogen and proteins (Lafora bodies, LB), and neurodegeneration. Whether LB could be prevented by inhibiting glycogen synthesis and whether they are pathogenic remain uncertain. We genetically eliminated brain glycogen synthesis in LD mice. This resulted in long-term prevention of LB formation, neurodegeneration, and seizure susceptibility. This study establishes that glycogen synthesis is requisite for LB formation and that LB are pathogenic. It opens a therapeutic window for potential treatments in LD with known and future small molecule inhibitors of glycogen synthesis. PMID:23913475

  16. Complement C3-Deficiency Leads to Accelerated Aβ Plaque Deposition and Neurodegeneration, and Modulation of the Microglia/Macrophage Phenotype in APP Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Marcel; Peng, Ying; Jiang, Liying; Seabrook, Timothy J.; Carroll, Michael C.; Lemere, Cynthia A.

    2008-01-01

    Complement factor C3 is the central component of the complement system and a key inflammatory protein activated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of C3 by overexpression of sCrry in an AD mouse model led to reduced microgliosis, increased Aβ plaque burden and neurodegeneration. To further address the role of C3 in AD pathology, we generated a complement C3-deficient APP transgenic AD mouse model (APP;C3−/−). Brains were analyzed at 8, 12 and 17 months ...

  17. Brain, blood, and iron : Perspectives on the roles of erythrocytes and iron in neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prohaska, Rainer; Sibon, Ody C. M.; Rudnicki, Dobrila D.; Danek, Adrian; Hayflick, Susan J.; Verhaag, Esther M.; Vonk, Jan J.; Margolis, Russell L.; Walker, Ruth H.

    2012-01-01

    The terms "neuroacanthocytosis" (NA) and "neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation" (NBIA) both refer to groups of genetically heterogeneous disorders, classified together due to similarities of their phenotypic or pathological findings. Even collectively, the disorders that comprise these set

  18. Dystonia in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation : outcome of bilateral pallidal stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermann, L.; Pauls, K. A. M.; Wieland, K.; Jech, R.; Kurlemann, G.; Sharma, N.; Gill, S. S.; Haenggeli, C. A.; Hayflick, S. J.; Hogarth, P.; Leenders, K. L.; Limousin, P.; Malanga, C. J.; Moro, E.; Ostrem, J. L.; Revilla, F. J.; Santens, P.; Schnitzler, A.; Tisch, S.; Valldeoriola, F.; Vesper, J.; Volkmann, J.; Woitalla, D.; Peker, S.

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation encompasses a heterogeneous group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by iron accumulation in the brain. Severe generalized dystonia is frequently a prominent symptom and can be very disabling, causing gait impairment, difficulty

  19. The Impact of Mathematical Modeling in Understanding the Mechanisms Underlying Neurodegeneration: Evolving Dimensions and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret‐Villas, A; Varusai, TM; Juty, N; Laibe, C; Le NovÈre, N; Hermjakob, H

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by the progressive dysfunction and loss of neurons. Here, we distil and discuss the current state of modeling in the area of neurodegeneration, and objectively compare the gaps between existing clinical knowledge and the mechanistic understanding of the major pathological processes implicated in neurodegenerative disorders. We also discuss new directions in the field of neurodegeneration that hold potential for furthering therapeutic interventions and strategies. PMID:28063254

  20. Early limited nitrosamine exposures exacerbate high fat diet-mediated type 2 diabetes and neurodegeneration

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    Longato Lisa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and several types of neurodegeneration, including Alzheimer's, are linked to insulin-resistance, and chronic high dietary fat intake causes T2DM with mild neurodegeneration. Intra-cerebral Streptozotocin, a nitrosamine-related compound, causes neurodegeneration, whereas peripheral treatment causes DM. Hypothesis Limited early exposures to nitrosamines that are widely present in the environment, enhance the deleterious effects of high fat intake in promoting T2DM and neurodegeneration. Methods Long Evans rat pups were treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA by i.p. injection, and upon weaning, they were fed with high fat (60%; HFD or low fat (5%; LFD chow for 8 weeks. Cerebella were harvested to assess gene expression, and insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF deficiency and resistance in the context of neurodegeneration. Results HFD ± NDEA caused T2DM, neurodegeneration with impairments in brain insulin, insulin receptor, IGF-2 receptor, or insulin receptor substrate gene expression, and reduced expression of tau and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, which are regulated by insulin and IGF-1. In addition, increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine were measured in cerebella of HFD ± NDEA treated rats, and overall, NDEA+HFD treatment reduced brain levels of Tau, phospho-GSK-3β (reflecting increased GSK-3β activity, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and ChAT to greater degrees than either treatment alone. Finally, pro-ceramide genes, examined because ceramides cause insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and neurodegeneration, were significantly up-regulated by HFD and/or NDEA exposure, but the highest levels were generally present in brains of HFD+NDEA treated rats. Conclusions Early limited exposure to nitrosamines exacerbates the adverse effects of later chronic high dietary fat intake in promoting T2DM and neurodegeneration. The mechanism involves increased generation of

  1. The crustacean central nervous system in focus: subacute neurodegeneration induces a specific innate immune response.

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    Paula Grazielle Chaves da Silva

    Full Text Available To date nothing is known about the subacute phase of neurodegeneration following injury in invertebrates. Among few clues available are the results published by our group reporting hemocytes and activated glial cells at chronic and acute phases of the lesion. In vertebrates, glial activation and recruitment of immunological cells are crucial events during neurodegeneration. Here, we aimed to study the subacute stage of neurodegeneration in the crab Ucides cordatus, investigating the cellular/molecular strategy employed 48 hours following ablation of the protocerebral tract (PCT. We also explored the expression of nitric oxide (NO and histamine in the PCT during this phase of neurodegeneration. Three immune cellular features which seem to characterize the subacute phase of neurodegeneration were revealed by: 1 the recruitment of granulocytes and secondarily of hyalinocytes to the lesion site (inducible NO synthase- and histamine-positive cells; 2 the attraction of a larger number of cells than observed in the acute phase; 3 the presence of activated glial cells as shown by the round shaped nuclei and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein. We suggest that molecules released from granulocytes in the acute phase attract the hyalinocytes thus moving the degeneration process to the subacute phase. The importance of our study resides in the characterization of cellular and biochemical strategies peculiar to the subacute stage of the neurodegeneration in invertebrates. Such events are worth studying in crustaceans because in invertebrates this issue may be addressed with less interference from complex strategies resulting from the acquired immune system.

  2. Ethanol-Induced Neurodegeneration and Glial Activation in the Developing Brain

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    Mariko Saito

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol induces neurodegeneration in the developing brain, which may partially explain the long-lasting adverse effects of prenatal ethanol exposure in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD. While animal models of FASD show that ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is associated with glial activation, the relationship between glial activation and neurodegeneration has not been clarified. This review focuses on the roles of activated microglia and astrocytes in neurodegeneration triggered by ethanol in rodents during the early postnatal period (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy. Previous literature indicates that acute binge-like ethanol exposure in postnatal day 7 (P7 mice induces apoptotic neurodegeneration, transient activation of microglia resulting in phagocytosis of degenerating neurons, and a prolonged increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. In our present study, systemic administration of a moderate dose of lipopolysaccharides, which causes glial activation, attenuates ethanol-induced neurodegeneration. These studies suggest that activation of microglia and astrocytes by acute ethanol in the neonatal brain may provide neuroprotection. However, repeated or chronic ethanol can induce significant proinflammatory glial reaction and neurotoxicity. Further studies are necessary to elucidate whether acute or sustained glial activation caused by ethanol exposure in the developing brain can affect long-lasting cellular and behavioral abnormalities observed in the adult brain.

  3. Exosomes-associated neurodegeneration and progression of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Isabella; Bubacco, Luigi; Greggio, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates the role of exosomes in a variety of physiological pathways as conveyors of biological materials from cell-to-cell. However the molecular mechanism(s) of secretion and their interaction with receiving cells are yet unclear. Recently, it is emerging that exosomes are involved in pathological processes as potential carriers in the progression of neurodegenerative pathologies associated with misfolded proteins. In the current review we will discuss some recent findings on the key role of exosomes in the spreading of the aggregated products of α-synuclein from neuron-to-neuron and of inflammatory response propagation from immune cell-to-cell; we will highlight the implication of exosomes in the neurodegeneration and progression of the disease and the their potential interplay with genes related to Parkinson's disease. Increasing our knowledge on the cell-to-cell transmissions might provide new insights into mechanism of disease onset and progression and identify novel strategies for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention in Parkinson and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Application of medical cannabis in patients with the neurodegeneration disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Kotuła

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical cannabis is the dried flowers of the female Cannabis sativa L. plant. Cannabis contains a number of active elements, including dronabinol (THC and cannabidiol (CBD. Dronabinol is usually the main ingredient. The body’s own cannabinoid system has been identified. The discovery of this system, which comprises endocannabinoids and receptors, confirmed that cannabis has a positive effect on certain illnesses and conditions. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified: CB1 and CB2 receptors. The first type CB1 is mostly found in the central nervous system, modulate pain. It also has an anti-emetic effect, and has influence on the memory and the motor system. The second type of receptors CB2 is peripheral, and it is primarily found in immune system cells and it is responsible for the immunomodulatory effects of cannabinoids. Medical cannabis can help in cases of the neurodegeneration disorders, for example Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Patients generally tolerate medical cannabis well.

  5. Cystathionine γ-lyase deficiency mediates neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bindu D; Sbodio, Juan I; Xu, Risheng; Vandiver, M Scott; Cha, Jiyoung Y; Snowman, Adele M; Snyder, Solomon H

    2014-05-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant disease associated with a mutation in the gene encoding huntingtin (Htt) leading to expanded polyglutamine repeats of mutant Htt (mHtt) that elicit oxidative stress, neurotoxicity, and motor and behavioural changes. Huntington's disease is characterized by highly selective and profound damage to the corpus striatum, which regulates motor function. Striatal selectivity of Huntington's disease may reflect the striatally selective small G protein Rhes binding to mHtt and enhancing its neurotoxicity. Specific molecular mechanisms by which mHtt elicits neurodegeneration have been hard to determine. Here we show a major depletion of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), the biosynthetic enzyme for cysteine, in Huntington's disease tissues, which may mediate Huntington's disease pathophysiology. The defect occurs at the transcriptional level and seems to reflect influences of mHtt on specificity protein 1, a transcriptional activator for CSE. Consistent with the notion of loss of CSE as a pathogenic mechanism, supplementation with cysteine reverses abnormalities in cultures of Huntington's disease tissues and in intact mouse models of Huntington's disease, suggesting therapeutic potential.

  6. REM sleep behavior disorder: from dreams to neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postuma, Ronald B; Gagnon, Jean-Francois; Montplaisir, Jacques Y

    2012-06-01

    REM sleep behavior disorder is a unique parasomnia characterized by dream enactment behavior during REM sleep. Unless triggered by pharmacologic agents such as antidepressants, it is generally related to damage of pontomedullary brainstem structures. Idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a well-established risk factor for neurodegenerative disease. Prospective studies have estimated that at least 40-65% of patients with idiopathic RBD will eventually develop a defined neurodegenerative phenotype, almost always a 'synucleinopathy' (Parkinson's disease, Lewy Body dementia or multiple system atrophy). In most cases, patients appear to develop a syndrome with overlapping features of both Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia. The interval between RBD onset and disease onset averages 10-15 years, suggesting a promisingly large window for intervention into preclinical disease stages. The ability of RBD to predict disease has major implications for design and development of neuroprotective therapy, and testing of other predictive markers of synuclein-mediated neurodegeneration. Recent studies in idiopathic RBD patients have demonstrated that olfaction, color vision, severity of REM atonia loss, transcranial ultrasound of the substantia nigra, and dopaminergic neuroimaging can predict development of neurodegenerative disease.

  7. Neurodegeneration in ataxia-telangiectasia is caused by horror autotoxicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuljis, R O; Aguila, M C

    1999-05-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a pleiotropic, multi-system disorder with manifestations that include immune deficiency, sensitivity to ionizing radiation and neoplasms. Many of these manifestations are understood in principle since the identification in A-T patients of mutations in a gene encoding a protein kinase that plays a key role in signaling and repair of DNA damage. However, the cause of the neurodegeneration that afflicts patients with A-T for at least a decade before they succumb to overwhelming infections or malignancy remains mysterious. Based on our work in a mouse model of A-T and previous evidence of extra-neural autoimmune disorders in A-T, we postulate that the neurodegenerative process in A-T is not due to a function for A-T mutated (ATM) essential for the postnatal brain, but to an autoimmune process (hence 'horror autotoxicus', Paul Ehrlich's term for autoimmune disorder). This hypothetical mechanism may be analogous to that in the so-called 'paraneoplastic' neurodegenerative syndromes in patients with various malignancies. Thus, alterations in the balance between cellular and humoral immunity in A-T probably result in autoantibodies to cerebral epitopes shared with cells of the immune system. This hypothesis has important implications for the understanding and development of effective palliative and even preventative strategies for A-T, and probably for other so far relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Synaptopathic mechanisms of neurodegeneration and dementia: Insights from Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyebji, Shiraz; Hannan, Anthony J

    2017-06-01

    Dementia encapsulates a set of symptoms that include loss of mental abilities such as memory, problem solving or language, and reduces a person's ability to perform daily activities. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, however dementia can also occur in other neurological disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD). Many studies have demonstrated that loss of neuronal cell function manifests pre-symptomatically and thus is a relevant therapeutic target to alleviate symptoms. Synaptopathy, the physiological dysfunction of synapses, is now being approached as the target for many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including HD. HD is an autosomal dominant and progressive degenerative disorder, with clinical manifestations that encompass movement, cognition, mood and behaviour. HD is one of the most common tandem repeat disorders and is caused by a trinucleotide (CAG) repeat expansion, encoding an extended polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein. Animal models as well as human studies have provided detailed, although not exhaustive, evidence of synaptic dysfunction in HD. In this review, we discuss the neuropathology of HD and how the changes in synaptic signalling in the diseased brain lead to its symptoms, which include dementia. Here, we review and discuss the mechanisms by which the 'molecular orchestras' and their 'synaptic symphonies' are disrupted in neurodegeneration and dementia, focusing on HD as a model disease. We also explore the therapeutic strategies currently in pre-clinical and clinical testing that are targeted towards improving synaptic function in HD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Abnormal Copper Homeostasis: Mechanisms and Roles in Neurodegeneration

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    Mario Manto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As a cofactor of proteins and enzymes involved in critical molecular pathways in mammals and low eukaryotes, copper is a transition metal essential for life. The intra-cellular and extra-cellular metabolism of copper is under tight control, in order to maintain free copper concentrations at very low levels. Copper is a critical element for major neuronal functions, and the central nervous system is a major target of disorders of copper metabolism. Both the accumulation of copper and copper deficiency are associated with brain dysfunction. The redox capacities of free copper, its ability to trigger the production of reactive oxygen species and the close relationships with the regulation of iron and zinc are remarkable features. Major advances in our understanding of the relationships between copper, neuronal functions and neurodegeneration have occurred these last two decades. The metabolism of copper and the current knowledge on the consequences of copper dysregulation on brain disorders are reviewed, with a focus on neurodegenerative diseases, such as Wilson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. In vitro studies, in vivo experiments and evidence from clinical observations of the neurotoxic effects of copper provide the basis for future therapies targeting copper homeostasis.

  10. Aging and Neurodegeneration: A Tangle of Models and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sasanka; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P.

    2016-01-01

    The research on aging and age-related diseases, especially the neurodegenerative diseases, is on the fast track. However, the results have so far not been translated to actual benefit for the patients in terms of treatment or diagnosis of age-related degenerative diseases including those of the CNS. As far as the prevention of the cognitive decline during non-pathological aging is concerned, there is nothing much to offer other than calorie restriction and physical exercise. Needless to say, the benefits are not up to our expectations. However, over the years at the experimental level it has been possible to identify several cellular and molecular mechanisms that are intricately associated with aging in general and neurodegenerative diseases in particular. These include oxidative stress and altered redox-signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, proteotoxicity and altered gene expressions. These inter-dependent pathways mediate cellular senescence and often culminate in programmed cell death like apoptosis and autophagy, and in the context of brain these changes are manifested clinically as cognitive decline and pathologically as neurodegeneration. This special issue provides the readers with glimpses of this complex scenario from different angles primarily in the context of brain and also attempts to identify the potential drug targets against neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27114843

  11. Interactions between Calcium and Alpha-Synuclein in Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rcom-H’cheo-Gauthier, Alex; Goodwin, Jacob; Pountney, Dean L.

    2014-01-01

    In Parkinson’s disease and some atypical Parkinson’s syndromes, aggregation of the α-synuclein protein (α-syn) has been linked to neurodegeneration. Many triggers for pathological α-syn aggregation have been identified, including port-translational modifications, oxidative stress and raised metal ions, such as Ca2+. Recently, it has been found using cell culture models that transient increases of intracellular Ca2+ induce cytoplasmic α-syn aggregates. Ca2+-dependent α-syn aggregation could be blocked by the Ca2+ buffering agent, BAPTA-AM, or by the Ca2+ channel blocker, Trimethadione. Furthermore, a greater proportion of cells positive for aggregates occurred when both raised Ca2+ and oxidative stress were combined, indicating that Ca2+ and oxidative stress cooperatively promote α-syn aggregation. Current on-going work using a unilateral mouse lesion model of Parkinson’s disease shows a greater proportion of calbindin-positive neurons survive the lesion, with intracellular α-syn aggregates almost exclusively occurring in calbindin-negative neurons. These and other recent findings are reviewed in the context of neurodegenerative pathologies and suggest an association between raised Ca2+, α-syn aggregation and neurotoxicity. PMID:25256602

  12. Interactions between Calcium and Alpha-Synuclein in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Rcom-H'cheo-Gauthier

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson’s disease and some atypical Parkinson’s syndromes, aggregation of the α-synuclein protein (α-syn has been linked to neurodegeneration. Many triggers for pathological α-syn aggregation have been identified, including port-translational modifications, oxidative stress and raised metal ions, such as Ca2+. Recently, it has been found using cell culture models that transient increases of intracellular Ca2+ induce cytoplasmic α-syn aggregates. Ca2+-dependent α-syn aggregation could be blocked by the Ca2+ buffering agent, BAPTA-AM, or by the Ca2+ channel blocker, Trimethadione. Furthermore, a greater proportion of cells positive for aggregates occurred when both raised Ca2+ and oxidative stress were combined, indicating that Ca2+ and oxidative stress cooperatively promote α-syn aggregation. Current on-going work using a unilateral mouse lesion model of Parkinson’s disease shows a greater proportion of calbindin-positive neurons survive the lesion, with intracellular α-syn aggregates almost exclusively occurring in calbindin-negative neurons. These and other recent findings are reviewed in the context of neurodegenerative pathologies and suggest an association between raised Ca2+, α-syn aggregation and neurotoxicity.

  13. Total Lignans of Schisandra chinensis Ameliorates Aβ1-42-Induced Neurodegeneration with Cognitive Impairment in Mice and Primary Mouse Neuronal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu; Liu, Chunmei; Xu, Mengjie; Li, Xiaolong; Bi, Kaishun; Jia, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lignan compounds extracted from Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. have been reported to possess various biological activities, and have potential in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. This study was designed to investigate the effects of total lignans of Schisandra chinensis (TLS) on cognitive function and neurodegeneration in the model of AD induced by Aβ1-42 in vivo and in vitro. It was found that intragastric infusion with TLS (50 and 200 mg/kg) to Aβ1-42-induced mice significantly increased the number of avoidances in the shuttle-box test and swimming time in the target quadrant in the Morris water maze test. TLS at dose of 200 mg/kg significantly restored the activities of total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), as well as the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) both in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in mice. Results of histopathological examination indicated that TLS noticeably ameliorated the neurodegeneration in the hippocampus in mice. On the other hand, TLS (100 μM) could protect the Aβ1-42-induced primary mouse neuronal cells by blocking the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), change the expressions of Bcl-2 (important regulator in the mitochondria apoptosis pathway). Moreover, TLS also decreased the activity of β-secretase 1 (BACE1), crucial protease contributes to the hydrolysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP), and inhibited the expression of JKN/p38, which involved in the MAPKs signaling pathways in both mice and primary mouse neuronal cells. In summary, TLS might protect against cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration by releasing the damage of oxidative stress, inhibiting the expression of BACE1 and the MAPKs inflammatory signaling pathways.

  14. Total Lignans of Schisandra chinensis Ameliorates Aβ1-42-Induced Neurodegeneration with Cognitive Impairment in Mice and Primary Mouse Neuronal Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhao

    Full Text Available Lignan compounds extracted from Schisandra chinensis (Turcz. Baill. have been reported to possess various biological activities, and have potential in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. This study was designed to investigate the effects of total lignans of Schisandra chinensis (TLS on cognitive function and neurodegeneration in the model of AD induced by Aβ1-42 in vivo and in vitro. It was found that intragastric infusion with TLS (50 and 200 mg/kg to Aβ1-42-induced mice significantly increased the number of avoidances in the shuttle-box test and swimming time in the target quadrant in the Morris water maze test. TLS at dose of 200 mg/kg significantly restored the activities of total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC, as well as the level of malondialdehyde (MDA both in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in mice. Results of histopathological examination indicated that TLS noticeably ameliorated the neurodegeneration in the hippocampus in mice. On the other hand, TLS (100 μM could protect the Aβ1-42-induced primary mouse neuronal cells by blocking the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, change the expressions of Bcl-2 (important regulator in the mitochondria apoptosis pathway. Moreover, TLS also decreased the activity of β-secretase 1 (BACE1, crucial protease contributes to the hydrolysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP, and inhibited the expression of JKN/p38, which involved in the MAPKs signaling pathways in both mice and primary mouse neuronal cells. In summary, TLS might protect against cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration by releasing the damage of oxidative stress, inhibiting the expression of BACE1 and the MAPKs inflammatory signaling pathways.

  15. Post-Stroke Inhibition of Induced NADPH Oxidase Type 4 Prevents Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Grund, Henrike; Wingler, Kirstin; Armitage, Melanie E.; Jones, Emma; Mittal, Manish; Barit, David; Schwarz, Tobias; Geis, Christian; Kraft, Peter; Barthel, Konstanze; Schuhmann, Michael K.; Herrmann, Alexander M.; Meuth, Sven G.; Stoll, Guido; Meurer, Sabine; Schrewe, Anja; Becker, Lore; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; Klopstock, Thomas; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin; Shah, Ajay M.; Weissmann, Norbert; Schmidt, Harald H. H. W.

    2010-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Only one moderately effective therapy exists, albeit with contraindications that exclude 90% of the patients. This medical need contrasts with a high failure rate of more than 1,000 pre-clinical drug candidates for stroke therapies. Thus, there is a need for translatable mechanisms of neuroprotection and more rigid thresholds of relevance in pre-clinical stroke models. One such candidate mechanism is oxidative stress. However, antioxidant approaches have failed in clinical trials, and the significant sources of oxidative stress in stroke are unknown. We here identify NADPH oxidase type 4 (NOX4) as a major source of oxidative stress and an effective therapeutic target in acute stroke. Upon ischemia, NOX4 was induced in human and mouse brain. Mice deficient in NOX4 (Nox4 −/−) of either sex, but not those deficient for NOX1 or NOX2, were largely protected from oxidative stress, blood-brain-barrier leakage, and neuronal apoptosis, after both transient and permanent cerebral ischemia. This effect was independent of age, as elderly mice were equally protected. Restoration of oxidative stress reversed the stroke-protective phenotype in Nox4 −/− mice. Application of the only validated low-molecular-weight pharmacological NADPH oxidase inhibitor, VAS2870, several hours after ischemia was as protective as deleting NOX4. The extent of neuroprotection was exceptional, resulting in significantly improved long-term neurological functions and reduced mortality. NOX4 therefore represents a major source of oxidative stress and novel class of drug target for stroke therapy. PMID:20877715

  16. Neurodegeneration and chronic renal failure in methylmalonic aciduria--a pathophysiological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morath, M A; Okun, J G; Müller, I B; Sauer, S W; Hörster, F; Hoffmann, G F; Kölker, S

    2008-02-01

    In the last decades the survival of patients with methylmalonic aciduria has been improved. However, the overall outcome of affected patients remains disappointing. The disease course is often complicated by acute life-threatening metabolic crises, which can result in multiple organ failure or even death, resembling primary defects of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Biochemical abnormalities during metabolic derangement, such as metabolic acidosis, ketonaemia/ketonuria, lactic acidosis, hypoglycaemia and hyperammonaemia, suggest mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, long-term complications such as chronic renal failure and neurological disease are frequently found. Neuropathophysiological studies have focused on various effects caused by accumulation of putatively toxic organic acids, the so-called 'toxic metabolite' hypothesis. In previous studies, methylmalonate (MMA) has been considered as the major neurotoxin in methylmalonic aciduria, whereas more recent studies have highlighted a synergistic inhibition of mitochondrial energy metabolism (pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, tricarboxylic acid cycle, respiratory chain, mitochondrial salvage pathway of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP)) induced by propionyl-CoA, 2-methylcitrate and MMA as the key pathomechanism of inherited disorders of propionate metabolism. Intracerebral accumulation of toxic metabolites ('trapping' hypothesis') is considered a biochemical risk factor for neurodegeneration. Secondary effects of mitochondrial dysfunction, such as oxidative stress and impaired mtDNA homeostasis, contribute to pathogenesis of these disorders. The underlying pathomechanisms of chronic renal insufficiency in methylmalonic acidurias are not yet understood. We hypothesize that renal and cerebral pathomechanisms share some similarities, such as an involvement of dicarboxylic acid transport. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on recent pathomechanistic concepts for methylmalonic acidurias.

  17. Forever young: SIRT3 a shield against mitochondrial meltdown, aging, and neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad eKincaid

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction, fasting, and exercise have long been recognized for their neuroprotective and lifespan-extending properties; however, the underlying mechanisms of these phenomena remain elusive. Such extraordinary benefits might be linked to the activation of sirtuins. In mammals, the sirtuin family has seven members (SIRT1-7, which diverge in tissue distribution, subcellular localization, enzymatic activity and targets. SIRT1, SIRT2, and SIRT3 have deacetylase activity. Their dependence on NAD+ directly links their activity to the metabolic status of the cell. High NAD+ levels convey neuroprotective effects, possibly via activation of sirtuin family members. Mitochondrial sirtuin 3 (SIRT3 has received much attention for its role in metabolism and aging. Specific small nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in Sirt3 are linked to increased human lifespan. SIRT3 mediates the adaptation of increased energy demand during caloric restriction, fasting and exercise to increased production of energy equivalents. SIRT3 deacetylates and activates mitochondrial enzymes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation, amino acid metabolism, the electron transport chain, and antioxidant defenses. As a result, the mitochondrial energy metabolism increases. In addition, SIRT3 prevents apoptosis by lowering reactive oxygen species (ROS and inhibiting components of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Mitochondrial deficits associated with aging and neurodegeneration might therefore be slowed or even prevented by SIRT3 activation. In addition, upregulating SIRT3 activity by dietary supplementation of sirtuin activating compounds might promote the beneficial effects of this enzyme. The goal of this review is to summarize emerging data supporting a neuroprotective action of SIRT3 against Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntington’s disease (HD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS.

  18. Forever young: SIRT3 a shield against mitochondrial meltdown, aging, and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Brad; Bossy-Wetzel, Ella

    2013-09-06

    Caloric restriction (CR), fasting, and exercise have long been recognized for their neuroprotective and lifespan-extending properties; however, the underlying mechanisms of these phenomena remain elusive. Such extraordinary benefits might be linked to the activation of sirtuins. In mammals, the sirtuin family has seven members (SIRT1-7), which diverge in tissue distribution, subcellular localization, enzymatic activity, and targets. SIRT1, SIRT2, and SIRT3 have deacetylase activity. Their dependence on NAD(+) directly links their activity to the metabolic status of the cell. High NAD(+) levels convey neuroprotective effects, possibly via activation of sirtuin family members. Mitochondrial sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) has received much attention for its role in metabolism and aging. Specific small nucleotide polymorphisms in Sirt3 are linked to increased human lifespan. SIRT3 mediates the adaptation of increased energy demand during CR, fasting, and exercise to increased production of energy equivalents. SIRT3 deacetylates and activates mitochondrial enzymes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation, amino acid metabolism, the electron transport chain, and antioxidant defenses. As a result, the mitochondrial energy metabolism increases. In addition, SIRT3 prevents apoptosis by lowering reactive oxygen species and inhibiting components of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Mitochondrial deficits associated with aging and neurodegeneration might therefore be slowed or even prevented by SIRT3 activation. In addition, upregulating SIRT3 activity by dietary supplementation of sirtuin activating compounds might promote the beneficial effects of this enzyme. The goal of this review is to summarize emerging data supporting a neuroprotective action of SIRT3 against Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  19. How the Wnt signaling pathway protects from neurodegeneration: the mitochondrial scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrázola, Macarena S.; Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. One of the hallmarks of AD is the overproduction of amyloid-beta aggregates that range from the toxic soluble oligomer (Aβo) form to extracellular accumulations in the brain. Growing evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases and is observed at an early stage in the pathogenesis of AD. Reports indicate that mitochondrial structure and function are affected by Aβo and can trigger neuronal cell death. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles, and the balance between their fusion and fission processes is essential for neuronal function. Interestingly, in AD, the process known as “mitochondrial dynamics” is also impaired by Aβo. On the other hand, the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway has an essential role in synaptic maintenance and neuronal functions, and its deregulation has also been implicated in AD. We have demonstrated that canonical Wnt signaling, through the Wnt3a ligand, prevents the permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes through the inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), induced by Aβo. In addition, we showed that non-canonical Wnt signaling, through the Wnt5a ligand, protects mitochondria from fission-fusion alterations in AD. These results suggest new approaches by which different Wnt signaling pathways protect neurons in AD, and support the idea that mitochondria have become potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Here we discuss the neuroprotective role of the canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways in AD and their differential modulation of mitochondrial processes, associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration. PMID:25999816

  20. Military-related traumatic brain injury and neurodegeneration.

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    McKee, Ann C; Robinson, Meghan E

    2014-06-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) includes concussion, subconcussion, and most exposures to explosive blast from improvised explosive devices. mTBI is the most common traumatic brain injury affecting military personnel; however, it is the most difficult to diagnose and the least well understood. It is also recognized that some mTBIs have persistent, and sometimes progressive, long-term debilitating effects. Increasing evidence suggests that a single traumatic brain injury can produce long-term gray and white matter atrophy, precipitate or accelerate age-related neurodegeneration, and increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and motor neuron disease. In addition, repetitive mTBIs can provoke the development of a tauopathy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We found early changes of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in four young veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflict who were exposed to explosive blast and in another young veteran who was repetitively concussed. Four of the five veterans with early-stage chronic traumatic encephalopathy were also diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder. Advanced chronic traumatic encephalopathy has been found in veterans who experienced repetitive neurotrauma while in service and in others who were accomplished athletes. Clinically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory loss, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and progress slowly over decades. Pathologically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy produces atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, thalamus, and hypothalamus; septal abnormalities; and abnormal deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau as neurofibrillary tangles and disordered neurites throughout the brain. The incidence and prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the genetic risk factors critical to its development are currently unknown. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy has clinical and

  1. Clinical prodromes of neurodegeneration in Anderson-Fabry disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Derralynn; Milligan, Alan; Richfield, Linda; Reichmann, Heinz; Mehta, Atul; Schapira, Anthony H.V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of prodromal clinical features of neurodegeneration in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) in comparison to age-matched controls. Methods: This is a single-center, prospective, cross-sectional study in 167 participants (60 heterozygous females and 50 hemizygous males with genetically confirmed AFD, 57 age-matched controls) using a clinical screening program consisting of structured interview, quantitative tests of motor function, and assessments of cognition, depression, olfaction, orthostatic intolerance, pain, REM sleep behavior disorder, and daytime sleepiness. Results: In comparison to age-matched controls (mean age 48.3 years), patients with AFD (mean age 49.0 years) showed slower gait and transfer speed, poorer fine manual dexterity, and lower hand speed, which was independent of focal symptoms due to cerebrovascular disease. Patients with AFD were more severely affected by depression, pain, and daytime sleepiness and had a lower quality of life. These motor and nonmotor manifestations significantly correlated with clinical disease severity. However, patients with AFD did not reveal extrapyramidal motor features or signs of significant cognitive impairment, hyposmia, orthostatic intolerance, or REM sleep behavior disorder, which commonly precede later neurodegenerative disease. In our cohort, there were no differences in neurologic manifestations of AFD between heterozygous females and hemizygous males. Conclusions: Aside from cerebrovascular manifestations and small fiber neuropathy, AFD results in a distinct neurologic phenotype comprising poorer motor performance and specific nonmotor features. In contrast to functional loss of glucocerebrosidase in Gaucher disease, α-galactosidase deficiency in AFD is not associated with a typical cluster of clinical features prodromal for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease. PMID:25762709

  2. Brain diabetic neurodegeneration segregates with low intrinsic aerobic capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joungil; Chandrasekaran, Krish; Demarest, Tyler G; Kristian, Tibor; Xu, Su; Vijaykumar, Kadambari; Dsouza, Kevin Geoffrey; Qi, Nathan R; Yarowsky, Paul J; Gallipoli, Rao; Koch, Lauren G; Fiskum, Gary M; Britton, Steven L; Russell, James W

    2014-08-01

    Diabetes leads to cognitive impairment and is associated with age-related neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus, understanding diabetes-induced alterations in brain function is important for developing early interventions for neurodegeneration. Low-capacity runner (LCR) rats are obese and manifest metabolic risk factors resembling human "impaired glucose tolerance" or metabolic syndrome. We examined hippocampal function in aged LCR rats compared to their high-capacity runner (HCR) rat counterparts. Hippocampal function was examined using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging, unbiased stereology analysis, and a Y maze. Changes in the mitochondrial respiratory chain function and levels of hyperphosphorylated tau and mitochondrial transcriptional regulators were examined. The levels of glutamate, myo-inositol, taurine, and choline-containing compounds were significantly increased in the aged LCR rats. We observed a significant loss of hippocampal neurons and impaired cognitive function in aged LCR rats. Respiratory chain function and activity were significantly decreased in the aged LCR rats. Hyperphosphorylated tau was accumulated within mitochondria and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α, the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase sirtuin 1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A were downregulated in the aged LCR rat hippocampus. These data provide evidence of a neurodegenerative process in the hippocampus of aged LCR rats, consistent with those seen in aged-related dementing illnesses such as AD in humans. The metabolic and mitochondrial abnormalities observed in LCR rat hippocampus are similar to well-described mechanisms that lead to diabetic neuropathy and may provide an important link between cognitive and metabolic dysfunction.

  3. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation: update on pathogenic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eLevi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Perturbation of iron distribution is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, but the comprehension of the metal role in the development and progression of such disorders is still very limited. The combination of more powerful brain imaging techniques and faster genomic DNA sequencing procedures has allowed the description of a set of genetic disorders characterized by a constant and often early accumulation of iron in specific brain regions and the identification of the associated genes; these disorders are now collectively included in the category of Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA. So far 10 different genetic forms have been described but this number is likely to increase in short time. Two forms are linked to mutations in genes directly involved in iron metabolism: Neuroferritinopathy, associated to mutations in the FTL gene and Aceruloplasminaemia, where the ceruloplasmin gene product is defective. In the other forms the connection with iron metabolism is not evident at all and the genetic data let infer the involvement of other pathways: Pank2, COASY,Pla2G6, C19orf12, and FA2H genes seem to be related to lipid metabolism and to mitochondria functioning, WDR45 and ATP13A2 genes are implicated in lysosomal and autophagosome activity, while the C2orf37 gene encodes a nucleolar protein of unknown function. There is much hope in the scientific community that the study of the NBIA forms may provide important insight as to the link between brain iron metabolism and neurodegenerative mechanisms and eventually pave the way for new therapeutic avenues also for the more common neurodegenerative disorders. In this work we will review the most recent findings in the molecular mechanisms underlining the most common forms of NBIA and analyze their possible link with brain iron metabolism.

  4. Multiple sclerosis deep grey matter: the relation between demyelination, neurodegeneration, inflammation and iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Lukas; Simeonidou, Constantina; Steinberger, Günther; Hametner, Simon; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Deretzi, Georgia; Kovacs, Gabor G; Kutzelnigg, Alexandra; Lassmann, Hans; Frischer, Josa M

    2014-12-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), diffuse degenerative processes in the deep grey matter have been associated with clinical disabilities. We performed a systematic study in MS deep grey matter with a focus on the incidence and topographical distribution of lesions in relation to white matter and cortex in a total sample of 75 MS autopsy patients and 12 controls. In addition, detailed analyses of inflammation, acute axonal injury, iron deposition and oxidative stress were performed. MS deep grey matter was affected by two different processes: the formation of focal demyelinating lesions and diffuse neurodegeneration. Deep grey matter demyelination was most prominent in the caudate nucleus and hypothalamus and could already be seen in early MS stages. Lesions developed on the background of inflammation. Deep grey matter inflammation was intermediate between low inflammatory cortical lesions and active white matter lesions. Demyelination and neurodegeneration were associated with oxidative injury. Iron was stored primarily within oligodendrocytes and myelin fibres and released upon demyelination. In addition to focal demyelinated plaques, the MS deep grey matter also showed diffuse and global neurodegeneration. This was reflected by a global reduction of neuronal density, the presence of acutely injured axons, and the accumulation of oxidised phospholipids and DNA in neurons, oligodendrocytes and axons. Neurodegeneration was associated with T cell infiltration, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in microglia and profound accumulation of iron. Thus, both focal lesions as well as diffuse neurodegeneration in the deep grey matter appeared to contribute to the neurological disabilities of MS patients.

  5. Loss of presenilin function causes Alzheimer's disease-like neurodegeneration in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Nakajima, Akira; Choi, Se Hoon; Xiong, Xiaoli; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2008-05-15

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that gain-of-function in beta-amyloid production may be not the necessary mechanism for mutant presenilin-1 (PS1) or PS2 to cause familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present article, we show that conditional knockout of PS1 from the adult stage in the forebrain of mice with the PS2 null mutation triggers robust AD-like neurodegeneration including brain shrinkage, cortical and hippocampal atrophy,ventricular enlargement, severe neuronal loss, gliosis, tau hyperphosphorylation, neurofillament tangle-like structures, and intracellular filaments. Learning and memory functions in these mice are almost completely lost. Notably, there is no beta-amyloid deposition, indicating that presenilin dysfunction can directly cause neurodegeneration without the involvement of beta-amyloid. Furthermore, neurodegeneration occurs in a progressive manner following aging, suggesting that an accumulating effect of presenilin dysfunction over time might be a pathogenic mechanism for the involvement of mutant PS1/PS2 in causing AD. These results validate a mouse model characterized by the presence of many features of AD pathology. Furthermore, the demonstration of AD-like neurodegeneration in the absence of beta-amyloid deposition challenges the long-standing beta-amyloid cascade hypothesis and encourages an open debate on the role of beta-amyloid in causing AD. Most important, our results strongly suggest that to develop gamma-secretase inhibitors for the pharmacological treatment of AD may be not a reasonable strategy because antagonism of presenilin function may worsen neurodegeneration.

  6. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Lukas; Zrzavy, Tobias; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies.

  7. Inhibitors of LRRK2 kinase attenuate neurodegeneration and Parkinson-like phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila Parkinson's disease models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaohui; Hamamichi, Shusei; Dae Lee, Byoung; Yang, Dejun; Ray, Arpita; Caldwell, Guy A.; Caldwell, Kim A.; Dawson, Ted M.; Smith, Wanli W.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) have been identified as a genetic cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and have also been found in the more common sporadic form of PD, thus positioning LRRK2 as important in the pathogenesis of PD. Biochemical studies of the disease-causing mutants of LRRK2 implicates an enhancement of kinase activity as the basis of neuronal toxicity and thus possibly the pathogenesis of PD due to LRRK2 mutations. Previously, a chemical library screen identified inhibitors of LRRK2 kinase activity. Here, two of these inhibitors, GW5074 and sorafenib, are shown to protect against G2019S LRRK2-induced neurodegeneration in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans and in Drosophila. These findings indicate that increased kinase activity of LRRK2 is neurotoxic and that inhibition of LRRK2 activity can have a disease-modifying effect. This suggests that inhibition of LRRK2 holds promise as a treatment for PD. PMID:21768216

  8. Drug discovery from Chinese medicine against neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's and vascular dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Kwok-Fai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia are two major diseases associated with dementia, which is common among the elderly. While the etiology of dementia is multi-factorial and complex, neurodegeneration may be the major cause of these two diseases. Effective drugs for treating dementia are still to be discovered. Current western pharmacological approaches against neurodegeneration in dementia develop symptom-relieving and disease-modifying drugs. Current integrative and holistic approaches of Chinese medicine to discovering drugs for neurodegeneration in dementia include (1 single molecules from the herbs, (2 standardized extracts from a single herb, and (3 herbal formula with definite composition. This article not only reviews the concept of dementia in western medicine and Chinese medicine but also evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches.

  9. Cancer and neurodegeneration: between the devil and the deep blue sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Plun-Favreau

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer and neurodegeneration are often thought of as disease mechanisms at opposite ends of a spectrum; one due to enhanced resistance to cell death and the other due to premature cell death. There is now accumulating evidence to link these two disparate processes. An increasing number of genetic studies add weight to epidemiological evidence suggesting that sufferers of a neurodegenerative disorder have a reduced incidence for most cancers, but an increased risk for other cancers. Many of the genes associated with either cancer and/or neurodegeneration play a central role in cell cycle control, DNA repair, and kinase signalling. However, the links between these two families of diseases remain to be proven. In this review, we discuss recent and sometimes as yet incomplete genetic discoveries that highlight the overlap of molecular pathways implicated in cancer and neurodegeneration.

  10. Homeotic Gene teashirt (tsh has a neuroprotective function in amyloid-beta 42 mediated neurodegeneration.

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    Michael T Moran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a debilitating age related progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognition, and eventual death of the affected individual. One of the major causes of AD is the accumulation of Amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42 polypeptides formed by the improper cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP in the brain. These plaques disrupt normal cellular processes through oxidative stress and aberrant signaling resulting in the loss of synaptic activity and death of the neurons. However, the detailed genetic mechanism(s responsible for this neurodegeneration still remain elusive. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We have generated a transgenic Drosophila eye model where high levels of human Aβ42 is misexpressed in the differentiating photoreceptor neurons of the developing eye, which phenocopy Alzheimer's like neuropathology in the neural retina. We have utilized this model for a gain of function screen using members of various signaling pathways involved in the development of the fly eye to identify downstream targets or modifiers of Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. We have identified the homeotic gene teashirt (tsh as a suppressor of the Aβ42 mediated neurodegenerative phenotype. Targeted misexpression of tsh with Aβ42 in the differentiating retina can significantly rescue neurodegeneration by blocking cell death. We found that Tsh protein is absent/ downregulated in the neural retina at this stage. The structure function analysis revealed that the PLDLS domain of Tsh acts as an inhibitor of the neuroprotective function of tsh in the Drosophila eye model. Lastly, we found that the tsh paralog, tiptop (tio can also rescue Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified tsh and tio as new genetic modifiers of Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. Our studies demonstrate a novel neuroprotective function of tsh and its paralog tio in Aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration. The

  11. Striatal dopamine transporter binding correlates with serum BDNF levels in patients with striatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebell, Morten; Khalid, Usman; Klein, Anders B

    2012-01-01

    Compelling evidence has shown, that neurotrophins responsible for the regulation of neuronal growth, survival, and differentiation are involved in neurodegenerative diseases. Whereas lower serum levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been observed in patients with Parkinson......'s disease, no studies have directly related the degree of striatal neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons (DA) with serum BDNF levels. In this study we examined the relationship between striatal neurodegeneration as determined with (123)I-PE2I-single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) and serum...

  12. The Liver-Brain Axis of Alcohol-Mediated Neurodegeneration: Role of Toxic Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne M. de la Monte

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse causes progressive toxicity and degeneration in liver and brain due to insulin resistance, which exacerbates oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine activation. Alcohol-induced steatohepatitis promotes synthesis and accumulation of ceramides and other toxic lipids that cause insulin resistance. Ceramides can readily cross the blood-brain barrier, and ceramide exposure causes neurodegeneration with insulin resistance and oxidative stress, similar to the effects of alcohol. Therefore, in addition to its direct neurotoxic effects, alcohol misuse establishes a liver-brain axis of neurodegeneration mediated by toxic lipid trafficking across the blood-brain barrier, leading to progressive white matter degeneration and cognitive impairment.

  13. [Calpains and their endo- and exogenous regulators in various neurodegeneration models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, L A; Kantserova, N P; Rendakov, N L; Nemova, N N

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of experimental series with murine models there was obtained the evidence on calcium-dependent protease activity changes in rat brain at induced neurodegeneration. The properties of the proteolytic and regulatory components of calpain system under the effect of neurotoxic stimuli--amyloid beta-peptide or glutamate--were characterized; the basic endogenous regulatory mechanisms of calcium-dependent proteolysis modulation were determined as well. Neuroprotective properties of exogenous calpain regulators differing in the mechanisms of action (sex steroids, calcium regulators) were tested on studied neurodegeneration models.

  14. Partial BACE1 reduction in a Down syndrome mouse model blocks Alzheimer-related endosomal anomalies and cholinergic neurodegeneration: role of APP-CTF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Rigoglioso, Andrew; Peterhoff, Corrinne M; Pawlik, Monika; Sato, Yutaka; Bleiwas, Cynthia; Stavrides, Philip; Smiley, John F; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Mathews, Paul M; Levy, Efrat; Nixon, Ralph A

    2016-03-01

    β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) are strongly implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, although recent evidence has linked APP-βCTF generated by BACE1 (β-APP cleaving enzyme 1) to the development of endocytic abnormalities and cholinergic neurodegeneration in early AD. We show that partial BACE1 genetic reduction prevents these AD-related pathological features in the Ts2 mouse model of Down syndrome. Partially reducing BACE1 by deleting one BACE1 allele blocked development of age-related endosome enlargement in the medial septal nucleus, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus and loss of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive medial septal nucleus neurons. BACE1 reduction normalized APP-βCTF elevation but did not alter Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptide levels in brain, supporting a critical role in vivo for APP-βCTF in the development of these abnormalities. Although ameliorative effects of BACE1 inhibition on β-amyloidosis and synaptic proteins levels have been previously noted in AD mouse models, our results highlight the additional potential value of BACE1 modulation in therapeutic targeting of endocytic dysfunction and cholinergic neurodegeneration in Down syndrome and AD.

  15. The m-AAA Protease Associated with Neurodegeneration Limits MCU Activity in Mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konig, T.; Troder, S.E.; Bakka, K.; Korwitz, A.; Richter-Dennerlein, R.; Lampe, P.A.; Patron, M.; Muhlmeister, M.; Guerrero-Castillo, S.; Brandt, U.; Decker, T.; Lauria, I.; Paggio, A.; Rizzuto, R.; Rugarli, E.I.; Stefani, D. De; Langer, T.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in subunits of mitochondrial m-AAA proteases in the inner membrane cause neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA28) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP7). m-AAA proteases preserve mitochondrial proteostasis, mitochondrial morphology, and efficient OXPHOS activity, but the cause

  16. Selective CDK inhibitor limits neuroinflammation and progressive neurodegeneration after brain trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, Shruti V; Stoica, Bogdan A; Byrnes, Kimberly R; Hanscom, Marie; Loane, David J; Faden, Alan I

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces secondary injury mechanisms, including cell-cycle activation (CCA), which lead to neuronal cell death, microglial activation, and neurologic dysfunction. Here, we show progressive neurodegeneration associated with microglial activation after TBI induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI), and also show that delayed treatment with the selective cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine attenuates posttraumatic neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. CCI resulted in increased cyclin A and D1 expressions and fodrin cleavage in the injured cortex at 6 hours after injury and significant neurodegeneration by 24 hours after injury. Progressive neuronal loss occurred in the injured hippocampus through 21 days after injury and correlated with a decline in cognitive function. Microglial activation associated with a reactive microglial phenotype peaked at 7 days after injury with sustained increases at 21 days. Central administration of roscovitine at 3 hours after CCI reduced subsequent cyclin A and D1 expressions and fodrin cleavage, improved functional recovery, decreased lesion volume, and attenuated hippocampal and cortical neuronal cell loss and cortical microglial activation. Furthermore, delayed systemic administration of roscovitine improved motor recovery and attenuated microglial activation after CCI. These findings suggest that CCA contributes to progressive neurodegeneration and related neurologic dysfunction after TBI, likely in part related to its induction of microglial activation. PMID:21829212

  17. A ketogenic diet accelerates neurodegeneration in mice with induced mitochondrial DNA toxicity in the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Knut H.; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Regnell, Christine E.;

    2016-01-01

    , and regulators such as SIRT1 and FIS1, and appeared to downregulate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunits NR2A/B and upregulate γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor subunits α1. However, unexpectedly, the ketogenic diet aggravated neurodegeneration and mitochondrial deterioration. Electron...

  18. Systemic inflammation modulates Fc receptor expression on microglia during chronic neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunnon, Katie; Teeling, Jessica L; Tutt, Alison L; Cragg, Mark S; Glennie, Martin J; Perry, V Hugh

    2011-06-15

    Chronic neurodegeneration is a major worldwide health problem, and it has been suggested that systemic inflammation can accelerate the onset and progression of clinical symptoms. A possible explanation is that systemic inflammation "switches" the phenotype of microglia from a relatively benign to a highly aggressive and tissue-damaging phenotype. The current study investigated the molecular mechanism underlying this microglia phenotype "switching." We show in mice with chronic neurodegeneration (ME7 prion model) that there is increased expression of receptors that have a key role in macrophage activation and associated signaling pathways, including TREM-2, Siglec-F, CD200R, and FcγRs. Systemic inflammation induced by LPS further increased protein levels of the activating FcγRIII and FcγRIV, but not of other microglial receptors, including the inhibitory FcγRII. In addition to these changes in receptor expression, IgG levels in the brain parenchyma were increased during chronic neurodegeneration, and these IgG levels further increased after systemic inflammation. γ-Chain-deficient mice show modified proinflammatory cytokine expression in the brain after systemic inflammation. We conclude that systemic inflammation during chronic neurodegeneration increases the expression levels of activating FcγR on microglia and thereby lowers the signaling threshold for Ab-mediated cell activation. At the same time, IgG influx into the brain could provide a cross-linking ligand resulting in excessive microglia activation that is detrimental to neurons already under threat by misfolded protein.

  19. 3-NP-induced neurodegeneration studies in experimental models of Huntington's disease : apoptosis in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, Johanna Catharina

    2005-01-01

    This thesis investigates the possible role of apoptosis, or programmed cell death, in Huntington's disease (HD). HD is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin protein leading to specific neostriatal neurodegeneration. The sequence of events that leads to this sele

  20. Investigating dynamic structural and mechanical changes of neuroblastoma cells associated with glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuqiang; Iu, Catherine Y. Y.; Lui, Cathy N. P.; Zou, Yukai; Fung, Carmen K. M.; Li, Hung Wing; Xi, Ning; Yung, Ken K. L.; Lai, King W. C.

    2014-11-01

    Glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration resulting from excessive activation of glutamate receptors is recognized as one of the major causes of various neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms in the neurodegenerative process remain unidentified. Here, we investigate the real-time dynamic structural and mechanical changes associated with the neurodegeneration induced by the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (a subtype of glutamate receptors) at the nanoscale. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is employed to measure the three-dimensional (3-D) topography and mechanical properties of live SH-SY5Y cells under stimulus of NMDA receptors. A significant increase in surface roughness and stiffness of the cell is observed after NMDA treatment, which indicates the time-dependent neuronal cell behavior under NMDA-mediated neurodegeneration. The present AFM based study further advance our understanding of the neurodegenerative process to elucidate the pathways and mechanisms that govern NMDA induced neurodegeneration, so as to facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Clinical Heterogeneity of Atypical Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration in Koreans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyeok Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA represents a group of inherited movement disorders characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Recent advances have included the identification of new causative genes and highlighted the wide phenotypic variation between and within the specific NBIA subtypes. This study aimed to investigate the current status of NBIA in Korea. Methods We collected genetically confirmed NBIA patients from twelve nationwide referral hospitals and from a review of the literature. We conducted a study to describe the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Korean adults with atypical pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN. Results Four subtypes of NBIA including PKAN (n = 30, PLA2G6-related neurodegeneration (n = 2, beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (n = 1, and aceruloplasminemia (n = 1 have been identified in the Korean population. The clinical features of fifteen adults with atypical PKAN included early focal limb dystonia, parkinsonism-predominant feature, oromandibular dystonia, and isolated freezing of gait (FOG. Patients with a higher age of onset tended to present with parkinsonism and FOG. The p.R440P and p.D378G mutations are two major mutations that represent approximately 50% of the mutated alleles. Although there were no specific genotype-phenotype correlations, most patients carrying the p.D378G mutation had a late-onset, atypical form of PKAN. Conclusions We found considerable phenotypic heterogeneity in Korean adults with atypical PKAN. The age of onset may influence the presentation of extrapyramidal symptoms.

  2. SIRT2: in the crossroad of aging, neurodegeneration and autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Martinho, Renato Gomes da Silva, 1990-

    2013-01-01

    Tese de mestrado. Biologia (Biologia Molecular e Genética). Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2013 Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is the most abundant sirtuin in the brain and its relation with neurodegenerative diseases is now being intensively investigated (Maxwell et al., 2011). In particular, pharmacological inhibition of SIRT2 was shown to negatively modulate α-synuclein (aSyn) mediated toxicity (Outeiro et al., 2007). However, it is not clear how this is achieved. One possibility is ...

  3. S-nitrosation of proteins relevant to Alzheimer's disease during early stages of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Uthpala; Nott, Alexi; Bhat, Vadiraja B; Ravindra, Kodihalli C; Wishnok, John S; Tsai, Li-Huei; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2016-04-12

    Protein S-nitrosation (SNO-protein), the nitric oxide-mediated posttranslational modification of cysteine thiols, is an important regulatory mechanism of protein function in both physiological and pathological pathways. A key first step toward elucidating the mechanism by which S-nitrosation modulates a protein's function is identification of the targeted cysteine residues. Here, we present a strategy for the simultaneous identification of SNO-cysteine sites and their cognate proteins to profile the brain of the CK-p25-inducible mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like neurodegeneration. The approach-SNOTRAP (SNO trapping by triaryl phosphine)-is a direct tagging strategy that uses phosphine-based chemical probes, allowing enrichment of SNO-peptides and their identification by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. SNOTRAP identified 313 endogenous SNO-sites in 251 proteins in the mouse brain, of which 135 SNO-proteins were detected only during neurodegeneration. S-nitrosation in the brain shows regional differences and becomes elevated during early stages of neurodegeneration in the CK-p25 mouse. The SNO-proteome during early neurodegeneration identified increased S-nitrosation of proteins important for synapse function, metabolism, and Alzheimer's disease pathology. In the latter case, proteins related to amyloid precursor protein processing and secretion are S-nitrosated, correlating with increased amyloid formation. Sequence analysis of SNO-cysteine sites identified potential linear motifs that are altered under pathological conditions. Collectively, SNOTRAP is a direct tagging tool for global elucidation of the SNO-proteome, providing functional insights of endogenous SNO proteins in the brain and its dysregulation during neurodegeneration.

  4. Interaction between misfolded PrP and the ubiquitin-proteasome system in prion-mediated neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhu; Zhao, Deming; Yang, Lifeng

    2013-06-01

    Prion diseases are associated with the conformational conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to pathological β-sheet isoforms (PrP(Sc)), which is the infectious agent beyond comprehension. Increasing evidence indicated that an unknown toxic gain of function of PrP(sc) underlies neuronal death. Conversely, strong evidence indicated that cellular prion protein might be directly cytotoxic by mediating neurotoxic signaling of β-sheet-rich conformers independent of prion replication. Furthermore, the common properties of β-sheet-rich isoform such as PrP(Sc) and β amyloid protein become the lynchpin that interprets the general pathological mechanism of protein misfolding diseases. Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in various protein misfolding diseases. However, the mechanisms of this impairment remain unknown in many cases. In prion disease, prion-infected mouse brains have increased levels of ubiquitin conjugates, which correlate with decreased proteasome function. Both PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) accumulate in cells after proteasome inhibition, which leads to increased cell death. A direct interaction between 20S core particle and PrP isoforms was demonstrated. Here we review the ability of misfolded PrP and UPS to affect each other, which might contribute to the pathological features of prion-mediated neurodegeneration.

  5. Paeoniflorin attenuates neuroinflammation and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease by activation of adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Qing; Zhang, Wei-Yu; Luo, Xue-Ting; Ye, Yang; Zhu, Xing-Zu

    2006-06-01

    1. This study examined whether Paeoniflorin (PF), the major active components of Chinese herb Paeoniae alba Radix, has neuroprotective effect in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). 2. Subcutaneous administration of PF (2.5 and 5 mg kg(-1)) for 11 days could protect tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive substantia nigra neurons and striatal nerve fibers from death and bradykinesia induced by four-dose injection of MPTP (20 mg kg(-1)) on day 8. 3. When given at 1 h after the last dose of MPTP, and then administered once a day for the following 3 days, PF (2.5 and 5 mg kg(-1)) also significantly attenuated the dopaminergic neurodegeneration in a dose-dependent manner. Post-treatment with PF (5 mg kg(-1)) significantly attenuated MPTP-induced proinflammatory gene upregulation and microglial and astrocytic activation. 4. Pretreatment with 0.3 mg kg(-1) 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) antagonist, 15 min before each dose of PF, reversed the neuroprotective and antineuroinflammatory effects of PF. 5. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that PF could reduce the MPTP-induced toxicity by inhibition of neuroinflammation by activation of the A1AR, and suggested that PF might be a valuable neuroprotective agent for the treatment of PD.

  6. Interaction between misfolded PrP and the ubiquitin-proteasome system in prion-mediated neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Lin; Deming Zhao; Lifeng Yang

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are associated with the conformational conversion of cellular prion protein (PrPC) to pathological β-sheet isoforms (PrpSc),which is the infectious agent beyond comprehension.Increasing evidence indicated that an unknown toxic gain of function of PrPSc underlies neuronal death.Conversely,strong evidence indicated that cellular prion protein might be directly cytotoxic by mediating neurotoxic signaling of β-sheet-rich conformers independent of prion replication.Furthermore,the common properties of β-sheet-rich isoform such as PrPSc and β amyloid protein become the lynchpin that interprets the general pathological mechanism of protein misfolding diseases.Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in various protein misfolding diseases.However,the mechanisms of this impairment remain unknown in many cases.In prion disease,prioninfected mouse brains have increased levels of ubiquitin conjugates,which correlate with decreased proteasome function.Both PrPC and PrPsc accumulate in cells after proteasome inhibition,which leads to increased cell death.A direct interaction between 20S core particle and PrP isoforms was demonstrated.Here we review the ability of misfolded PrP and UPS to affect each other,which might contribute to the pathological features of prion-mediated neurodegeneration.

  7. BACE1 deficiency causes altered neuronal activity and neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiangyou; Zhou, Xiangdong; He, Wanxia; Yang, Jun; Xiong, Wenchen; Wong, Philip; Wilson, Christopher G.; Yan, Riqiang

    2010-01-01

    BACE1 is required for the release of β–amyloid (Aβ) in vivo, and inhibition of BACE1 activity is targeted for reducing Aβ generation in Alzheimer's patients. In order to further our understanding of the safe use of BACE1 inhibitors in human patients, we aimed to study the physiological functions of BACE1 by characterizing BACE1–null mice. Here we report the finding of spontaneous behavioral seizures in BACE1–null mice. Electroencephalographic recordings revealed abnormal spike-wave discharges...

  8. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of th...

  9. Landolphia owariensis Attenuates Alcohol-induced Cerebellar Neurodegeneration: Significance of Neurofilament Protein Alteration in the Purkinje Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyinbo Charles A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alcohol-induced cerebellar neurodegeneration is a neuroadaptation that is associated with chronic alcohol abuse. Conventional drugs have been largely unsatisfactory in preventing neurodegeneration. Yet, multimodal neuro-protective therapeutic agents have been hypothesised to have high therapeutic potential for the treatment of CNS conditions; there is yet a dilemma of how this would be achieved. Contrarily, medicinal botanicals are naturally multimodal in their mechanism of action.

  10. Sevoflurane exposure in 7-day-old rats affects neurogenesis,neurodegeneration and neurocognitive function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Fang; Zhanggang Xue; Jing Cang

    2012-01-01

    Objective Sevoflurane is widely used in pediatric anesthesia and former studies showed that it causes neurodegeneration in the developing brain.The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of sevoflurane on neurogenesis,neurodegeneration and behavior.Methods We administered 5-bromodeoxyuridine,an S-phase marker,before,during,and after 4 h of sevoflurane given to rats on postnatal day 7 to assess dentate gyrus progenitor proliferation and Fluoro-Jade staining for degeneration.Spatial reference memory was tested 2 and 6 weeks after anesthesia.Results Sevoflurane decreased progenitor proliferation and increased cell death until at least 4 days after anesthesia.Spatial reference memory was not affected at 2 weeks but was affected at 6 weeks after sevoflurane administration.Conclusion Sevoflurane reduces neurogenesis and increases the death of progenitor cells in developing brain.This might mediate the lateonset neurocognitive outcome after sevoflurane application.

  11. Identification of chemicals that mimic transcriptional changes associated with autism, brain aging and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Brandon L; Simon, Jeremy M; McCoy, Eric S; Salazar, Gabriela; Fragola, Giulia; Zylka, Mark J

    2016-03-31

    Environmental factors, including pesticides, have been linked to autism and neurodegeneration risk using retrospective epidemiological studies. Here we sought to prospectively identify chemicals that share transcriptomic signatures with neurological disorders, by exposing mouse cortical neuron-enriched cultures to hundreds of chemicals commonly found in the environment and on food. We find that rotenone, a pesticide associated with Parkinson's disease risk, and certain fungicides, including pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin, famoxadone and fenamidone, produce transcriptional changes in vitro that are similar to those seen in brain samples from humans with autism, advanced age and neurodegeneration (Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease). These chemicals stimulate free radical production and disrupt microtubules in neurons, effects that can be reduced by pretreating with a microtubule stabilizer, an antioxidant, or with sulforaphane. Our study provides an approach to prospectively identify environmental chemicals that transcriptionally mimic autism and other brain disorders.

  12. Resveratrol Attenuates Neurodegeneration and Improves Neurological Outcomes after Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Bonsack

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is a devastating type of stroke with a substantial public health impact. Currently, there is no effective treatment for ICH. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether the post-injury administration of Resveratrol confers neuroprotection in a pre-clinical model of ICH. To this end, ICH was induced in adult male CD1 mice by collagenase injection method. Resveratrol (10 mg/kg or vehicle was administered at 30 min post-induction of ICH and the neurobehavioral outcome, neurodegeneration, cerebral edema, hematoma resolution and neuroinflammation were assessed. The Resveratrol treatment significantly attenuated acute neurological deficits, neurodegeneration and cerebral edema after ICH in comparison to vehicle treated controls. Further, Resveratrol treated mice exhibited improved hematoma resolution with a concomitant reduction in the expression of proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β after ICH. Altogether, the data suggest the efficacy of post-injury administration of Resveratrol in improving acute neurological function after ICH.

  13. Pathogenesis of severe ataxia and tremor without the typical signs of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joshua J; Arancillo, Marife; King, Annesha; Lin, Tao; Miterko, Lauren N; Gebre, Samrawit A; Sillitoe, Roy V

    2016-02-01

    Neurological diseases are especially devastating when they involve neurodegeneration. Neuronal destruction is widespread in cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's and regionally localized in motor disorders such as Parkinson's, Huntington's, and ataxia. But, surprisingly, the onset and progression of these diseases can occur without neurodegeneration. To understand the origins of diseases that do not have an obvious neuropathology, we tested how loss of CAR8, a regulator of IP3R1-mediated Ca(2+)-signaling, influences cerebellar circuit formation and neural function as movement deteriorates. We found that faulty molecular patterning, which shapes functional circuits called zones, leads to alterations in cerebellar wiring and Purkinje cell activity, but not to degeneration. Rescuing Purkinje cell function improved movement and reducing their Ca(2+) influx eliminated ectopic zones. Our findings in Car8(wdl) mutant mice unveil a pathophysiological mechanism that may operate broadly to impact motor and non-motor conditions that do not involve degeneration.

  14. The diverse phenotype and genotype of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellecchia, M T; Valente, E M; Cif, L; Salvi, S; Albanese, A; Scarano, V; Bonuccelli, U; Bentivoglio, A R; D'Amico, A; Marelli, C; Di Giorgio, A; Coubes, P; Barone, P; Dallapiccola, B

    2005-05-24

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene. The authors report clinical and genetic findings of 16 patients with PKAN. The authors identified 12 mutations in the PANK2 gene, five of which were new. Only nine patients could be classified as classic or atypical PKAN, and intermediate phenotypes are described. Two patients presented with motor tics and obsessive-compulsive behavior suggestive of Tourette syndrome.

  15. Nutrient excess and altered mitochondrial proteome and function contribute to neurodegeneration in diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a major complication of diabetes that results in the progressive deterioration of the sensory nervous system. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the neurodegeneration observed in diabetic neuropathy. Our recent work has shown that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rodents. In neurons, the nutrient excess associated with prolonged...

  16. Kinetics of neurodegeneration based on a risk-related biomarker in animal model of glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Takuya; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Ose, Takayuki; Inokuchi, Yuta; Ito, Yasushi; Yamanaka, Hajime; Urayama, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Hara, Hideaki; Onoe, Hirotaka

    2013-01-01

    Background Neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases progress slowly and steadily over years or decades. They show significant between-subject variation in progress and clinical symptoms, which makes it difficult to predict the course of long-term disease progression with or without treatments. Recent technical advances in biomarkers have facilitated earlier, preclinical diagnoses of neurodegeneration by measuring or imaging molecules linked to pathogenesis. Ho...

  17. Anaesthetic management of a child with panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Sinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN (Hallervorden-Spatz disease is a rare autosomal recessive chromosomal disorder characterised by progressive neuroaxonal dystrophy. The characteristic features include involuntary movements, rigidity, mental retardation, seizures, emaciation. The anaesthetic concerns include difficult airway, aspiration pneumonia, dehydration, and post-operative respiratory, and renal insufficiency. We report successful anaesthetic management of a 9-year-old intellectually disabled male child with PKAN, scheduled for ophthalmic surgery under general anaesthesia.

  18. Neuroprotective Effects of Citicoline in in Vitro Models of Retinal Neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Matteucci; Monica Varano; Lucia Gaddini; Cinzia Mallozzi; Marika Villa; Flavia Pricci; Fiorella Malchiodi-Albedi

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, citicoline has been the object of remarkable interest as a possible neuroprotectant. The aim of this study was to investigate if citicoline affected cell survival in primary retinal cultures and if it exerted neuroprotective activity in conditions modeling retinal neurodegeneration. Primary retinal cultures, obtained from rat embryos, were first treated with increasing concentrations of citicoline (up to 1000 µM) and analyzed in terms of apoptosis and caspase activation and c...

  19. The appropriateness of the mouse model for ataxia-telangiectasia: neurological defects but no neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Martin F

    2013-08-01

    Patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) are characterised by genome instability, cancer predisposition and a progressive neurodegeneration. A number of model systems have been developed for A-T but none recapitulate all the phenotype. The majority of these models have been generated in mice. While Atm deficient mouse models exhibit much of the phenotype described in patients with A-T, the broad consensus is that they do not display the most debilitating aspect of A-T, i.e. neurodegeneration. Cerebellar atrophy is one of the neuronal characteristics of A-T patients due to defects in neuronal development and progressive loss of Purkinje and granule cells. This is not evident in Atm-deficient mutants but there are multiple reports on neurological abnormalities in these mice. The focus of this review is to evaluate the appropriateness of Atm mutant mouse models for A-T, particularly with reference to neurological abnormalities and how they might relate to neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear accumulation of HDAC4 in ATM deficiency promotes neurodegeneration in ataxia telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiali; Chen, Jianmin; Ricupero, Christopher L; Hart, Ronald P; Schwartz, Melanie S; Kusnecov, Alexander; Herrup, Karl

    2012-05-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a neurodegenerative disease caused by mutation of the Atm gene. Here we report that ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) deficiency causes nuclear accumulation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) in neurons and promotes neurodegeneration. Nuclear HDAC4 binds to chromatin, as well as to myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) and cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), leading to histone deacetylation and altered neuronal gene expression. Blocking either HDAC4 activity or its nuclear accumulation blunts these neurodegenerative changes and rescues several behavioral abnormalities of ATM-deficient mice. Full rescue of the neurodegeneration, however, also requires the presence of HDAC4 in the cytoplasm, suggesting that the ataxia telangiectasia phenotype results both from a loss of cytoplasmic HDAC4 as well as its nuclear accumulation. To remain cytoplasmic, HDAC4 must be phosphorylated. The activity of the HDAC4 phosphatase, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), is downregulated by ATM-mediated phosphorylation. In ATM deficiency, enhanced PP2A activity leads to HDAC4 dephosphorylation and the nuclear accumulation of HDAC4. Our results define a crucial role of the cellular localization of HDAC4 in the events leading to ataxia telangiectasia neurodegeneration.

  1. Using protein misfolding cyclic amplification generates a highly neurotoxic PrP dimer causing neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, XiuJin; Yang, LiFeng; Zhou, XiangMei; Khan, Sher Hayat; Wang, HuiNuan; Yin, XiaoMin; Yuan, Zhen; Song, ZhiQi; Wu, WenYu; Zhao, DeMing

    2013-11-01

    Under the "protein-only" hypothesis, prion-based diseases are proposed to result from an infectious agent that is an abnormal isoform of the prion protein in the scrapie form, PrP(Sc). However, since PrP(Sc) is highly insoluble and easily aggregates in vivo, this view appears to be overly simplistic, implying that the presence of PrP(Sc) may indirectly cause neurodegeneration through its intermediate soluble form. We generated a neurotoxic PrP dimer with partial pathogenic characteristics of PrP(Sc) by protein misfolding cyclic amplification in the presence of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylglycerol consisting of recombinant hamster PrP (23-231). After intracerebral injection of the PrP dimer, wild-type hamsters developed signs of neurodegeneration. Clinical symptoms, necropsy findings, and histopathological changes were very similar to those of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Additional investigation showed that the toxicity is primarily related to cellular apoptosis. All results suggested that we generated a new neurotoxic form of PrP, PrP dimer, which can cause neurodegeneration. Thus, our study introduces a useful model for investigating PrP-linked neurodegenerative mechanisms.

  2. Mitochondrial optic neuropathy: In vivo model of neurodegeneration and neuroprotective strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C Rojas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Julio C Rojas, Francisco Gonzalez-LimaDepartments of Psychology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USAAbstract: This review summarizes the characteristics of a rodent toxicologic model of optic neuropathy induced by the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone. This model has been developed to fulfill the demand for a drug-screening tool providing a sound mechanistic context to address the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. It features biochemical, structural, and functional retinal deficits that resemble those of patients with Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy, a mitochondrial disease characterized by selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells, and for which an environmental component is believed to play a major triggering role. The available data support the efficiency, sensitivity, and versatility of the model for providing insights into the mechanisms of neurodegeneration, including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. Screening work with this model has provided proof-of-principle that interventions targeting the electron transport chain, such as USP methylene blue and near-infrared light therapy, are effective at preventing neurodegeneration induced by mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo. Prospective developments of this model include the use of neuronal reporter genes for in vivo non-invasive assessment of retinal degeneration at different time points, and its combination with genetic approaches to elucidate the synergism of environmental and genetic factors in neurodegeneration.Keywords: animal model, neuroprotection, mitochondrial dysfunction, visual function, oxidative stress, cytochrome oxidase

  3. Metal and Microelement Biomarkers of Neurodegeneration in Early Life Permethrin-Treated Rats

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    Cinzia Nasuti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair is a non-invasive biological material useful in the biomonitoring of trace elements because it is a vehicle for substance excretion from the body, and it permits evaluating long-term metal exposure. Here, hair from an animal model of neurodegeneration, induced by early life permethrin treatment from the sixth to 21th day of life, has been analyzed with the aim to assess if metal and microelement content could be used as biomarkers. A hair trace element assay was performed by the ICP-MS technique in six- and 12-month-old rats. A significant increase of As, Mg, S and Zn was measured in the permethrin-treated group at 12 months compared to six months, while Si and Cu/Zn were decreased. K, Cu/Zn and S were increased in the treated group compared to age-matched controls at six and 12 months, respectively. Cr significantly decreased in the treated group at 12 months. PCA analysis showed both a best difference between treated and age-matched control groups at six months. The present findings support the evidence that the Cu/Zn ratio and K, measured at six months, are the best biomarkers for neurodegeneration. This study supports the use of hair analysis to identify biomarkers of neurodegeneration induced by early life permethrin pesticide exposure.

  4. Alteration of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venco, Paola; Dusi, Sabrina; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-08-01

    NBIA (neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation) comprises a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases having as a common denominator, iron overload in specific brain areas, mainly basal ganglia and globus pallidus. In the past decade a bunch of disease genes have been identified, but NBIA pathomechanisms are still not completely clear. PKAN (pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration), an autosomal recessive disorder with progressive impairment of movement, vision and cognition, is the most common form of NBIA. It is caused by mutations in the PANK2 (pantothenate kinase 2) gene, coding for a mitochondrial enzyme that phosphorylates vitamin B5 in the first reaction of the CoA (coenzyme A) biosynthetic pathway. A distinct form of NBIA, denominated CoPAN (CoA synthase protein-associated neurodegeneration), is caused by mutations in the CoASY (CoA synthase) gene coding for a bifunctional mitochondrial enzyme, which catalyses the final steps of CoA biosynthesis. These two inborn errors of CoA metabolism further support the concept that dysfunctions in CoA synthesis may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of NBIA.

  5. Topical Administration of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Prevents Retinal Neurodegeneration in Experimental Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Cristina; Bogdanov, Patricia; Corraliza, Lidia; García-Ramírez, Marta; Solà-Adell, Cristina; Arranz, José A; Arroba, Ana I; Valverde, Angela M; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Since glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) exerts neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system and the retina is ontogenically a brain-derived tissue, the aims of the current study were as follows: 1) to examine the expression and content of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in human and db/db mice retinas; 2) to determine the retinal neuroprotective effects of systemic and topical administration (eye drops) of GLP-1R agonists in db/db mice; and 3) to examine the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms. We have found abundant expression of GLP-1R in the human retina and retinas from db/db mice. Moreover, we have demonstrated that systemic administration of a GLP-1R agonist (liraglutide) prevents retinal neurodegeneration (glial activation, neural apoptosis, and electroretinographical abnormalities). This effect can be attributed to a significant reduction of extracellular glutamate and an increase of prosurvival signaling pathways. We have found a similar neuroprotective effect using topical administration of native GLP-1 and several GLP-1R agonists (liraglutide, lixisenatide, and exenatide). Notably, this neuroprotective action was observed without any reduction in blood glucose levels. These results suggest that GLP-1R activation itself prevents retinal neurodegeneration. Our results should open up a new approach in the treatment of the early stages of DR.

  6. B cells and antibodies in progressive multiple sclerosis: Contribution to neurodegeneration and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraussen, Judith; de Bock, Laura; Somers, Veerle

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by demyelination, axonal degeneration and gliosis. The progressive form of MS is an important research topic as not much is known about its underlying mechanisms and no therapy is available. Although progressive MS is traditionally considered to be driven by neurodegeneration, compartmentalized CNS inflammation is currently accepted as one of the driving processes behind neurodegeneration and progression. In this review, the involvement of B cells and antibodies in progressive MS is discussed. The identification of meningeal ectopic B cell follicles in secondary progressive MS (SPMS) patients and the successful use of B cell-depleting therapy in primary progressive MS (PPMS) patients have underlined the importance of B cells in progressive MS. Proof is also available for the role of antibodies in neurodegeneration and progression in MS. Here, oligoclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM) production and autoreactive antibodies are described, with a focus on antibodies directed against sperm-associated antigen 16 (SPAG16). Further research into the role of B cells and autoantibodies in MS progression can lead to novel prognostic and theranostic opportunities.

  7. Calcium influx and calpain activation mediate preclinical retinal neurodegeneration in autoimmune optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Dorit B; Williams, Sarah K; Bojcevski, Jovana; Müller, Andreas; Stadelmann, Christine; Naidoo, Vinogran; Bahr, Ben A; Diem, Ricarda; Fairless, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Optic neuritis is a common manifestation of multiple sclerosis, an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS. Recently, the neurodegenerative component of multiple sclerosis has come under focus particularly because permanent disability in patients correlates well with neurodegeneration; and observations in both humans and multiple sclerosis animal models highlight neurodegeneration of retinal ganglion cells as an early event. After myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein immunization of Brown Norway rats, significant retinal ganglion cell loss precedes the onset of pathologically defined autoimmune optic neuritis. To study the role calcium and calpain activation may play in mediating early degeneration, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor preclinical calcium elevations in the retina and optic nerve of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-immunized Brown Norway rats. Calcium elevation correlated with an increase in calpain activation during the induction phase of optic neuritis, as revealed by increased calpain-specific cleavage of spectrin. The relevance of early calpain activation to neurodegeneration during disease induction was addressed by performing treatment studies with the calpain inhibitor calpeptin. Treatment not only reduced calpain activity but also protected retinal ganglion cells from preclinical degeneration. These data indicate that elevation of retinal calcium levels and calpain activation are early events in autoimmune optic neuritis, providing a potential therapeutic target for neuroprotection.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of citicoline in in vitro models of retinal neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Andrea; Varano, Monica; Gaddini, Lucia; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Villa, Marika; Pricci, Flavia; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella

    2014-04-14

    In recent years, citicoline has been the object of remarkable interest as a possible neuroprotectant. The aim of this study was to investigate if citicoline affected cell survival in primary retinal cultures and if it exerted neuroprotective activity in conditions modeling retinal neurodegeneration. Primary retinal cultures, obtained from rat embryos, were first treated with increasing concentrations of citicoline (up to 1000 µM) and analyzed in terms of apoptosis and caspase activation and characterized by immunocytochemistry to identify neuronal and glial cells. Subsequently, excitotoxic concentration of glutamate or High Glucose-containing cell culture medium (HG) was administered as well-known conditions modeling neurodegeneration. Glutamate or HG treatments were performed in the presence or not of citicoline. Neuronal degeneration was evaluated in terms of apoptosis and loss of synapses. The results showed that citicoline did not cause any damage to the retinal neuroglial population up to 1000 µM. At the concentration of 100 µM, it was able to counteract neuronal cell damage both in glutamate- and HG-treated retinal cultures by decreasing proapoptotic effects and contrasting synapse loss. These data confirm that citicoline can efficiently exert a neuroprotective activity. In addition, the results suggest that primary retinal cultures, under conditions inducing neurodegeneration, may represent a useful system to investigate citicoline neuroprotective mechanisms.

  9. Neuroprotective Effects of Citicoline in in Vitro Models of Retinal Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Matteucci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, citicoline has been the object of remarkable interest as a possible neuroprotectant. The aim of this study was to investigate if citicoline affected cell survival in primary retinal cultures and if it exerted neuroprotective activity in conditions modeling retinal neurodegeneration. Primary retinal cultures, obtained from rat embryos, were first treated with increasing concentrations of citicoline (up to 1000 µM and analyzed in terms of apoptosis and caspase activation and characterized by immunocytochemistry to identify neuronal and glial cells. Subsequently, excitotoxic concentration of glutamate or High Glucose-containing cell culture medium (HG was administered as well-known conditions modeling neurodegeneration. Glutamate or HG treatments were performed in the presence or not of citicoline. Neuronal degeneration was evaluated in terms of apoptosis and loss of synapses. The results showed that citicoline did not cause any damage to the retinal neuroglial population up to 1000 µM. At the concentration of 100 µM, it was able to counteract neuronal cell damage both in glutamate- and HG-treated retinal cultures by decreasing proapoptotic effects and contrasting synapse loss. These data confirm that citicoline can efficiently exert a neuroprotective activity. In addition, the results suggest that primary retinal cultures, under conditions inducing neurodegeneration, may represent a useful system to investigate citicoline neuroprotective mechanisms.

  10. Role of melatonin in Alzheimer-like neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-zhi WANG; Ze-fen WANG

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD), an age-related neurodegenerative disorder with progressive loss of memory and deterioration of comprehensive cognition, is characterized by extracellular senile plaques of aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ), and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles that contain hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Recent studies showed that melatonin, an indoleamine secreted by the pineal gland, may play an important role in aging and AD as an antioxidant and neuroprotector.Melatonin decreases during aging and patients with AD have a more profound reduction in this hormone. Data from clinical trials indicate that melatonin supplementation improves sleep, ameliorates sundowning, and slows down the progression of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's patients. Melatonin efficiently protects neuronal cells from Aβ-mediated toxicity via antioxidant and anti-amyloid properties: it not only inhibits Aβ generation, but also arrests the formation of amyloid fibrils by a structure-dependent interaction with Aβ. Our recent studies have demonstrated that melatonin efficiently attenuates Alzheimer-like tau hyperphosphorylation. Although the exact mechanism is still not fully understood,a direct regulatory influence of melatonin on the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases is proposed. Additionally, melatonin also plays a role in protecting cholinergic neurons and in anti-inflammation. Here, the neuroprotective effects of melatonin and the underlying mechanisms by which it exerts its effects are reviewed. The capacity of melatonin to prevent or ameliorate tau and Aβ pathology further enhances its potential in the prevention or treatment of AD.

  11. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid Inhibition by HET0016 Offers Neuroprotection, Decreases Edema, and Increases Cortical Cerebral Blood Flow in a Pediatric Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest Model in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Jafar Sadik B; Poloyac, Samuel M; Kochanek, Patrick M; Alexander, Henry; Tudorascu, Dana L; Clark, Robert Sb; Manole, Mioara D

    2015-11-01

    Vasoconstrictive and vasodilatory eicosanoids generated after cardiac arrest (CA) may contribute to cerebral vasomotor disturbances and neurodegeneration. We evaluated the balance of vasodilator/vasoconstrictor eicosanoids produced by cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism, and determined their role on cortical perfusion, functional outcome, and neurodegeneration after pediatric asphyxial CA. Cardiac arrest of 9 and 12 minutes was induced in 16- to 18-day-old rats. At 5 and 120 minutes after CA, we quantified the concentration of CYP eicosanoids in the cortex and subcortical areas. In separate rats, we inhibited 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthesis after CA and assessed cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF), neurologic deficit score, neurodegeneration, and edema. After 9 minutes of CA, vasodilator eicosanoids markedly increased versus sham. Conversely, after 12 minutes of CA, vasoconstrictor eicosanoid 20-HETE increased versus sham, without compensatory increases in vasodilator eicosanoids. Inhibition of 20-HETE synthesis after 12 minutes of CA decreased cortical 20-HETE levels, increased CBF, reduced neurologic deficits at 3 hours, and reduced neurodegeneration and edema at 48 hours versus vehicle-treated rats. In conclusion, cerebral vasoconstrictor eicosanoids increased after a pediatric CA of 12 minutes. Inhibition of 20-HETE synthesis improved cortical perfusion and short-term neurologic outcome. These results suggest that alterations in CYP eicosanoids have a role in cerebral hypoperfusion and neurodegeneration after CA and may represent important therapeutic targets.

  12. Inhibition of Calpain Prevents N-Methyl-D-aspartate-Induced Degeneration of the Nucleus Basalis and Associated Behavioral Dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nimmrich, Volker; Szabo, Robert; Nyakas, Csaba; Granic, Ivica; Reymann, Klaus G.; Schroeder, Ulrich H.; Gross, Gerhard; Schoemaker, Hans; Wicke, Karsten; Moeller, Achim; Luiten, Paul

    2008-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate( NMDA) receptor-mediated excitotoxicity is thought to underlie a variety of neurological disorders, and inhibition of either the NMDA receptor itself, or molecules of the intracellular cascade, may attenuate neurodegeneration in these diseases. Calpain, a calcium-dependent cyste

  13. Cerebrolysin protects against rotenone-induced oxidative stress and neurodegeneration

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    Abdel-Salam OME

    2014-05-01

    rotenone decreased lipid peroxidation, increased GSH, and inhibited the elevation of nitric oxide induced by rotenone. Cerebrolysin also decreased the rotenone-induced decline in the PON1 and AChE activities and the rotenone-mediated changes in the striatal Bcl-2 and MCP-1 levels. The drug reduced iNOs, TNF-α, and caspase 3 expressions and increased the tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum. Cerebrolysin markedly prevented the development of neuronal damage in the cortex and striatum. These data suggest that cerebrolysin may have potential therapeutic effect in Parkinson’s disease.Keywords: brain oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, apoptosis, nigrostriatal damage

  14. Does Retinal Neurodegeneration Seen in Diabetic Patients Begin in the Insulin Resistance Stage?

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    Sedat Arıkan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate whether retinal neurodegeneration and impairment in contrast sensitivity (CS, which have been demonstrated to begin in diabetic patients before the presence of signs of diabetic retinal vasculopathy, also occur in the stage of insulin resistance. Materials and Methods: The average, minimum and sectoral (inferior, superior, inferonasal, superonasal, inferotemporal and superotemporal thicknesses of ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL measured using optical coherence tomography were compared between an insulin-resistant group and control group in order to evaluate the presence of retinal neurodegeneration. The CS of the two groups was also compared according to the logarithmic values measured at spatial frequencies of 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 18 cycles per degree in photopic light using functional acuity contrast test (FACT. Results: Twenty-five eyes of 25 patients with insulin resistance (insulin resistant group and 25 eyes of 25 healthy subjects (control group were included in this study. There were no statistically significant differences between two groups in any of the spatial frequencies in the FACT. The mean average GCIPL thickness and mean GCIPL thickness in the inferotemporal sector were significantly less in the insulin-resistant group when compared with the control group (mean average GCIPL thicknesses in the insulin-resistant and control groups were 83.6±4.7 µm and 86.7±3.7 µm respectively, p=0.01; mean inferotemporal GCIPL thicknesses in the insulin-resistant and control groups were 83±6.0 µm and 86.7±4.6 µm respectively, p=0.02. Conclusion: Although it may not lead to functional impairment in vision such as CS loss, the retinal neurodegeneration seen in diabetic patients may also occur in the insulin resistance stage.

  15. Neurodegeneration Alters Metabolic Profile and Sirt 1 Signaling in High-Fat-Induced Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Leandro Ceotto Freitas; Saliba, Soraya Wilke; Andrade, João Marcus Oliveira; Cunha, Maria Luisa; Cassini-Vieira, Puebla; Feltenberger, John David; Barcelos, Lucíola Silva; Guimarães, André Luiz Sena; de-Paula, Alfredo Mauricio Batista; de Oliveira, Antônio Carlos Pinheiro; Santos, Sérgio Henrique Sousa

    2016-05-16

    Different factors may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Among them, metabolic syndrome (MS), which has reached epidemic proportions, has emerged as a potential element that may be involved in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, studies have shown the importance of the sirtuin family in neuronal survival and MS, which opens the possibility of new pharmacological targets. This study investigates the influence of sirtuin metabolic pathways by examining the functional capacities of glucose-induced obesity in an excitotoxic state induced by a quinolinic acid (QA) animal model. Mice were divided into two groups that received different diets for 8 weeks: one group received a regular diet, and the other group received a high-fat diet (HF) to induce MS. The animals were submitted to a stereotaxic surgery and subdivided into four groups: Standard (ST), Standard-QA (ST-QA), HF and HF-QA. The QA groups were given a 250 nL quinolinic acid injection in the right striatum and PBS was injected in the other groups. Obese mice presented with a weight gain of 40 % more than the ST group beyond acquiring an insulin resistance. QA induced motor impairment and neurodegeneration in both ST-QA and HF-QA, although no difference was observed between these groups. The HF-QA group showed a reduction in adiposity when compared with the groups that received PBS. Therefore, the HF-QA group demonstrated a commitment-dependent metabolic pathway. The results suggest that an obesogenic diet does not aggravate the neurodegeneration induced by QA. However, the excitotoxicity induced by QA promotes a sirtuin pathway impairment that contributes to metabolic changes.

  16. Complement is dispensable for neurodegeneration in Niemann-Pick disease type C

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    Lopez Manuel E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immune system has been implicated in neurodegeneration during development and disease. In various studies, the absence of complement (that is, C1q deficiency impeded the elimination of apoptotic neurons, allowing survival. In the genetic lysosomal storage disease Niemann-Pick C (NPC, caused by loss of NPC1 function, the expression of complement system components, C1q especially, is elevated in degenerating brain regions of Npc1-/- mice. Here we test whether complement is mediating neurodegeneration in NPC disease. Findings In normal mature mice, C1q mRNA was found in neurons, particularly cerebellar Purkinje neurons (PNs. In Npc1-/- mice, C1q mRNA was additionally found in activated microglia, which accumulate during disease progression and PN loss. Interestingly, C1q was not enriched on or near degenerating neurons. Instead, C1q was concentrated in other brain regions, where it partially co-localized with a potential C1q inhibitor, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG. Genetic deletion of C1q, or of the downstream complement pathway component C3, did not significantly alter patterned neuron loss or disease progression. Deletion of other immune response factors, a Toll-like receptor, a matrix metalloprotease, or the apoptosis facilitator BIM, also failed to alter neuron loss. Conclusion We conclude that complement is not involved in the death and clearance of neurons in NPC disease. This study supports a view of neuroinflammation as a secondary response with non-causal relationship to neuron injury in the disease. This disease model may prove useful for understanding the conditions in which complement and immunity do contribute to neurodegeneration in other disorders.

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Neurodegeneration Are Decreased or Normal in Narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgen Jennum, Poul; Østergaard Pedersen, Lars; Czarna Bahl, Justyna Maria; Modvig, Signe; Fog, Karina; Holm, Anja; Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of neurodegeneration are altered in narcolepsy in order to evaluate whether the hypocretin deficiency and abnormal sleep-wake pattern in narcolepsy leads to neurodegeneration. Twenty-one patients with central hypersomnia (10 type 1 narcolepsy, 5 type 2 narcolepsy, and 6 idiopathic hypersomnia cases), aged 33 years on average and with a disease duration of 2-29 years, and 12 healthy controls underwent CSF analyses of the levels of β-amyloid, total tau protein (T-tau), phosphorylated tau protein (P-tau181), α-synuclein, neurofilament light chain (NF-L), and chitinase 3-like protein-1 (CHI3L1). Levels of β-amyloid were lower in patients with type 1 narcolepsy (375.4 ± 143.5 pg/mL) and type 2 narcolepsy (455.9 ± 65.0 pg/mL) compared to controls (697.9 ± 167.3 pg/mL, p narcolepsy, levels of T-tau (79.0 ± 27.5 pg/mL) and P-tau181 (19.1 ± 4.3 pg/mL) were lower than in controls (162.2 ± 49.9 pg/mL and 33.8 ± 9.2 pg/mL, p narcolepsy patients were similar to those of healthy individuals. Six CSF biomarkers of neurodegeneration were decreased or normal in narcolepsy indicating that taupathy, synucleinopathy, and immunopathy are not prevalent in narcolepsy patients with a disease duration of 2-29 years. Lower CSF levels of β-amyloid, T-tau protein, and P-tau181 in narcolepsy may indicate that hypocretin deficiency and an abnormal sleep-wake pattern alter the turnover of these proteins in the central nervous system.

  18. Investigating bacterial sources of toxicity as an environmental contributor to dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim A Caldwell

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD involves progressive neurodegeneration, including loss of dopamine (DA neurons from the substantia nigra. Select genes associated with rare familial forms of PD function in cellular pathways, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS, involved in protein degradation. The misfolding and accumulation of proteins, such as alpha-synuclein, into inclusions termed Lewy Bodies represents a clinical hallmark of PD. Given the predominance of sporadic PD among patient populations, environmental toxins may induce the disease, although their nature is largely unknown. Thus, an unmet challenge surrounds the discovery of causal or contributory neurotoxic factors that could account for the prevalence of sporadic PD. Bacteria within the order Actinomycetales are renowned for their robust production of secondary metabolites and might represent unidentified sources of environmental exposures. Among these, the aerobic genera, Streptomyces, produce natural proteasome inhibitors that block protein degradation and may potentially damage DA neurons. Here we demonstrate that a metabolite produced by a common soil bacterium, S. venezuelae, caused DA neurodegeneration in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, which increased as animals aged. This metabolite, which disrupts UPS function, caused gradual degeneration of all neuronal classes examined, however DA neurons were particularly vulnerable to exposure. The presence of DA exacerbated toxicity because neurodegeneration was attenuated in mutant nematodes depleted for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in DA production. Strikingly, this factor caused dose-dependent death of human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, a dopaminergic line. Efforts to purify the toxic activity revealed that it is a highly stable, lipophilic, and chemically unique small molecule. Evidence of a robust neurotoxic factor that selectively impacts neuronal survival in a progressive yet moderate manner is consistent

  19. Anticholinergics boost the pathological process of neurodegeneration with increased inflammation in a tauopathy mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Kojima, Ayako; Itoh, Kimiko; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Arai, Kimihito

    2012-01-01

    Anticholinergics, and drugs with anticholinergic properties, are widely and frequently prescribed, especially to the elderly. It is well known that these drugs decrease cognitive function and increase the risk of dementia. Although the mechanism of anticholinergic drug-induced cognitive impairment has been assumed to be functionally reduced acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmission, some data have indicated that anticholinergics might enhance the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we investigated the pathological effects of anticholinergics on neurodegeneration. We chronically administered two anticholinergics, trihexyphenidyl (TP) and propiverine (PP) (the latter with less central anticholinergic action), to neurodegenerative tauopathy model mice 2 to 10 months old. Furthermore, because the ACh nervous system regulates both central and peripheral inflammation, we administered TP or PP to PS19 mice in which we had artificially induced inflammation by lipopolysaccharide injection. Tau pathology, synaptic loss, and neurodegeneration in the hippocampal region, as well as tau insolubility and phosphorylation, were markedly increased in TP-treated mice and mildly increased in PP-treated mice. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed microglial proliferation and activation. Moreover, anticholinergics increased interleukin-1β expression in both the spleen and brain of the tauopathy model mice intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide to induce systemic inflammation. Interestingly, these alterations were more strongly observed in TP-treated mice than in PP-treated mice, consistent with the level of central anticholinergic action. Anticholinergic drugs not only impair cognitive function by decreased ACh neurotransmission, but also accelerate neurodegeneration by suppressing an ACh-dependent anti-inflammatory system. Anticholinergics should be less readily prescribed to reduce the risk of dementia.

  20. New targets for the development of PET tracers for imaging neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Robert H

    2014-08-01

    The field of molecular imaging has experienced significant advances in the area of Alzheimer disease (AD), the most significant being the development of PET radiotracers for imaging β-amyloid burden in the brain of individuals at risk for or in the early stages of AD. More recent advances include the development of PET radiotracers for imaging aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein in neurofibrillary tangles, a process that occurs late in the disease process. This article highlights advances in the neurobiology of AD and describes how PET can be used to study the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in AD. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  1. Evidence for early neurodegeneration in the cervical cord of patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Khaled; Schneider, Torben; Solanky, Bhavana S; Yiannakas, Marios C; Altmann, Dan R; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Peters, Amy L; Day, Brian L; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-06-01

    Spinal neurodegeneration is an important determinant of disability progression in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Advanced imaging techniques, such as single-voxel (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and q-space imaging, have increased pathological specificity for neurodegeneration, but are challenging to implement in the spinal cord and have yet to be applied in early primary progressive multiple sclerosis. By combining these imaging techniques with new clinical measures, which reflect spinal cord pathology more closely than conventional clinical tests, we explored the potential for spinal magnetic resonance spectroscopy and q-space imaging to detect early spinal neurodegeneration that may be responsible for clinical disability. Data from 21 patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis within 6 years of disease onset, and 24 control subjects were analysed. Patients were clinically assessed on grip strength, vibration perception thresholds and postural stability, in addition to the Expanded Disability Status Scale, Nine Hole Peg Test, Timed 25-Foot Walk Test, Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12, and Modified Ashworth Scale. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance spectroscopy and q-space imaging of the cervical cord and conventional brain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T. Multivariate analyses and multiple regression models were used to assess the differences in imaging measures between groups and the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging measures and clinical scores, correcting for age, gender, spinal cord cross-sectional area, brain T2 lesion volume, and brain white matter and grey matter volume fractions. Although patients did not show significant cord atrophy when compared with healthy controls, they had significantly lower total N-acetyl-aspartate (mean 4.01 versus 5.31 mmol/l, P = 0.020) and glutamate-glutamine (mean 4.65 versus 5.93 mmol/l, P = 0.043) than controls. Patients showed an increase in q

  2. Late Onset Neurodegeneration with Brain-Iron Accumulation Presenting as Parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fekete

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration with brain-iron accumulation (NBIA encompasses a family of neurodegenerative disorders connected by evidence of abnormal brain iron deposition. Advances in imaging and genetic testing expanded the clinical spectrum of these disorders. Here, a case of parkinsonism and dystonia with orofacial stereotypies is presented. While the patient was initially diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and placed on levodopa therapy, dopamine transporter imaging via (123I-FP-CIT SPECT (DaTSCAN was normal. MRI brain showed “eye of the tiger” sign on T2 weighted imaging. NBIA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of atypical parkinsonism.

  3. May “Mitochondrial Eve” and Mitochondrial Haplogroups Play a Role in Neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's Disease?

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    Elena Caldarazzo Ienco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, play a critical role in several metabolic processes and apoptotic pathways. Multiple evidences suggest that mitochondria may be crucial in ageing-related neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, mitochondrial haplogroups have been linked to multiple area of medicine, from normal ageing to diseases, including neurodegeneration. Polymorphisms within the mitochondrial genome might lead to impaired energy generation and to increased amount of reactive oxygen species, having either susceptibility or protective role in several diseases. Here, we highlight the role of the mitochondrial haplogroups in the pathogenetic cascade leading to diseases, with special attention to Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Chronic Hypertension Leads to Neurodegeneration in the TgSwDI Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruyer, Anna; Soplop, Nadine; Strickland, Sidney; Norris, Erin H

    2015-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies link vascular disorders, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and stroke, with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hypertension, specifically, is an important modifiable risk factor for late-onset AD. To examine the link between midlife hypertension and the onset of AD later in life, we chemically induced chronic hypertension in the TgSwDI mouse model of AD in early adulthood. Hypertension accelerated cognitive deficits in the Barnes maze test (Phypertension induced hippocampal neurodegeneration at an early age in this mouse line (43% reduction in the dorsal subiculum; P<0.05), establishing this as a useful research model of AD with mixed vascular and amyloid pathologies.

  5. Induction of cell stress in neurons from transgenic mice expressing yellow fluorescent protein: implications for neurodegeneration research.

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    Laura H Comley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice expressing fluorescent proteins in neurons are one of the most powerful tools in modern neuroscience research and are increasingly being used for in vivo studies of neurodegeneration. However, these mice are often used under the assumption that the fluorescent proteins present are biologically inert. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that thy1-driven expression of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP in neurons triggers multiple cell stress responses at both the mRNA and protein levels in vivo. The presence of YFP in neurons also subtly altered neuronal morphology and modified the time-course of dying-back neurodegeneration in experimental axonopathy, but not in Wallerian degeneration triggered by nerve injury. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that fluorescent protein expressed in thy1-YFP mice is not biologically inert, modifies molecular and cellular characteristics of neurons in vivo, and has diverse and unpredictable effects on neurodegeneration pathways.

  6. EZH2-mediated H3K27 trimethylation mediates neurodegeneration in ataxia-telangiectasia.

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    Li, Jiali; Hart, Ronald P; Mallimo, Elyse M; Swerdel, Mavis R; Kusnecov, Alexander W; Herrup, Karl

    2013-12-01

    The symptoms of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) include a progressive neurodegeneration caused by ATM protein deficiency. We previously found that nuclear accumulation of histone deacetylase-4, HDAC4, contributes to this degeneration; we now report that increased trimethylation of histone H3 on Lys27 (H3K27me3) mediated by polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is also important in the A-T phenotype. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), a core catalytic component of PRC2, is a new ATM kinase target, and ATM-mediated phosphorylation of EZH2 on Ser734 reduces protein stability. Thus, PRC2 formation is elevated along with H3K27me3 in ATM deficiency. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing showed an increase in H3K27me3 'marks' and a dramatic shift in their location. The change of H3K27me3 chromatin-binding pattern is directly related to cell cycle reentry and cell death of ATM-deficient neurons. Lentiviral knockdown of EZH2 rescued Purkinje cell degeneration and behavioral abnormalities in Atm(-/-) mice, demonstrating that EZH2 hyperactivity is another key factor in A-T neurodegeneration.

  7. The P66Shc/Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Pathway Determines Neurodegeneration

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    Costanza Savino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial-mediated oxidative stress and apoptosis play a crucial role in neurodegenerative disease and aging. Both mitochondrial permeability transition (PT and swelling of mitochondria have been involved in neurodegeneration. Indeed, knockout mice for cyclophilin-D (Cyc-D, a key regulatory component of the PT pore (PTP that triggers mitochondrial swelling, resulted to be protected in preclinical models of multiple sclerosis (MS, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. However, how neuronal stress is transduced into mitochondrial oxidative stress and swelling is unclear. Recently, the aging determinant p66Shc that generates H2O2 reacting with cytochrome c and induces oxidation of PTP and mitochondrial swelling was found to be involved in MS and ALS. To investigate the role of p66Shc/PTP pathway in neurodegeneration, we performed experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE experiments in p66Shc knockout mice (p66Shc−/−, knock out mice for cyclophilin-D (Cyc-D−/−, and p66Shc Cyc-D double knock out (p66Shc/Cyc-D−/− mice. Results confirm that deletion of p66Shc protects from EAE without affecting immune response, whereas it is not epistatic to the Cyc-D mutation. These findings demonstrate that p66Shc contributes to EAE induced neuronal damage most likely through the opening of PTP suggesting that p66Shc/PTP pathway transduces neurodegenerative stresses.

  8. Glial activation precedes seizures and hippocampal neurodegeneration in measles virus-infected mice.

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    Lehrmann, Elin; Guidetti, Paolo; Löve, Arthur; Williamson, John; Bertram, Edward H; Schwarcz, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Intracerebral injection of hamster neurotropic (HNT) measles virus in weanling Balb/C mice leads to an encephalitis, which is characterized by glial activation, behavioral seizures, selective neurodegeneration, and, after approximately 7 days, death. To provide a better understanding of the underlying molecular pathology, we studied seizure evolution by continuously monitoring electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, examined neuroglia and neurons histologically, and measured the brain content of glia-derived neuroactive metabolites of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation. Microglia and astrocytes were activated as early as postinoculation day (PID) 1, with reactive microglia lining the extent of the alveus. This was followed by a more extensive microglial activation that specifically outlined hippocampal pyramidal neurons in areas CA1-CA3 and by increases in the hippocampal levels of the neurotoxins 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and quinolinic acid (QUIN). These changes preceded the onset of EEG seizures, which had a mean onset of 108 h after inoculation. Prominent hippocampal cell loss, demonstrated by Nissl- and silver staining, was apparent by PID 5. Thus, we speculate that early glial reactions to HNT inoculation result in the excess formation of 3-HK and QUIN, which in turn causes subclinical seizure activity, behavioral seizures, and, eventually, neurodegeneration. In addition to its conceptual implications, our study indicates that timely interventions modulating glial activation or 3-HK/QUIN synthesis may be of benefit in preventing or arresting seizure-induced neuronal damage.

  9. Association of Plasma Neurofilament Light With Neurodegeneration in Patients With Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Andreasson, Ulf; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj

    2017-05-01

    Existing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or imaging (tau positron emission tomography) biomarkers for Alzheimer disease (AD) are invasive or expensive. Biomarkers based on standard blood test results would be useful in research, drug development, and clinical practice. Plasma neurofilament light (NFL) has recently been proposed as a blood-based biomarker for neurodegeneration in dementias. To test whether plasma NFL concentrations are increased in AD and associated with cognitive decline, other AD biomarkers, and imaging evidence of neurodegeneration. In this prospective case-control study, an ultrasensitive assay was used to measure plasma NFL concentration in 193 cognitively healthy controls, 197 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 180 patients with AD dementia from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. The study dates were September 7, 2005, to February 13, 2012. The plasma NFL analysis was performed in September 2016. Associations were tested between plasma NFL and diagnosis, Aβ pathologic features, CSF biomarkers of neuronal injury, cognition, brain structure, and metabolism. Among 193 cognitively healthy controls, 197 patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 180 patients with AD with dementia, plasma NFL correlated with CSF NFL (Spearman ρ = 0.59, P disease. This finding implies a potential usefulness for plasma NFL as a noninvasive biomarker in AD.

  10. Neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease: interactions of oxidative stress, tryptophan catabolites and depression with mitochondria and sirtuins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George; Maes, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The biological underpinnings to the etiology and course of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease are an area of extensive research that has yet to produce an early biological marker or disease-slowing or preventative treatment. Recent conceptualizations of Parkinson's disease have integrated immuno-inflammation and oxidative and nitrosative stress occurring in depression, somatization and peripheral inflammation into the course of Parkinson's disease. We review the data showing the importance of immuno-inflammatory processes and oxidative and nitrosative stress in such classically conceived 'comorbidities', suggesting that lifetime, prodromal and concurrent depression and somatization may be intricately involved in the etiology and course of Parkinson's disease, rather than psychiatric comorbidities. This produces a longer term developmental perspective of Parkinson's disease, which incorporates tryptophan catabolites (TRYCATs), lipid peroxidation, sirtuins, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, aryl hydrocarbon receptor, and circadian genes. This integrates wider bodies of data pertaining to neuronal loss in Parkinson's disease, emphasizing how these interact with susceptibility genes to drive changes in mitochondria, blood-brain barrier permeability and intercellular signalling. We review this data here in the context of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease and to the future directions indicated for slowing disease progression.

  11. Insulin and Insulin-Sensitizing Drugs in Neurodegeneration: Mitochondria as Therapeutic Targets

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    Paula I. Moreira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin, besides its glucose lowering effects, is involved in the modulation of lifespan, aging and memory and learning processes. As the population ages, neurodegenerative disorders become epidemic and a connection between insulin signaling dysregulation, cognitive decline and dementia has been established. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that despite playing a critical role in cellular metabolism are also one of the major sources of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, hallmarks of neurodegeneration, can result from impaired insulin signaling. Insulin-sensitizing drugs such as the thiazolidinediones are a new class of synthetic compounds that potentiate insulin action in the target tissues and act as specific agonists of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ. Recently, several PPAR agonists have been proposed as novel and possible therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, the literature shows that these agents are able to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, inflammation and apoptosis. This review discusses the role of mitochondria and insulin signaling in normal brain function and in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, the potential protective role of insulin and insulin sensitizers in Alzheimer´s, Parkinson´s and Huntington´s diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be also discussed.

  12. A functional misexpression screen uncovers a role for enabled in progressive neurodegeneration.

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    Carolina Rezával

    Full Text Available Drosophila is a well-established model to study the molecular basis of neurodegenerative diseases. We carried out a misexpression screen to identify genes involved in neurodegeneration examining locomotor behavior in young and aged flies. We hypothesized that a progressive loss of rhythmic activity could reveal novel genes involved in neurodegenerative mechanisms. One of the interesting candidates showing progressive arrhythmicity has reduced enabled (ena levels. ena down-regulation gave rise to progressive vacuolization in specific regions of the adult brain. Abnormal staining of pre-synaptic markers such as cystein string protein (CSP suggest that axonal transport could underlie the neurodegeneration observed in the mutant. Reduced ena levels correlated with increased apoptosis, which could be rescued in the presence of p35, a general Caspase inhibitor. Thus, this mutant recapitulates two important features of human neurodegenerative diseases, i.e., vulnerability of certain neuronal populations and progressive degeneration, offering a unique scenario in which to unravel the specific mechanisms in an easily tractable organism.

  13. Network Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s Disease via MRI based Shape Diffeomorphometry and High Field Atlasing

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    Michael I Miller

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines MRI analysis of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD in a network of structures within the medial temporal lobe using diffeomorphometry methods coupled with high-field atlasing in which the entorhinal cortex is partitioned into nine subareas. The morphometry markers for three groups of subjects (controls, preclinical AD and symptomatic AD are indexed to template coordinates measured with respect to these nine subareas. The location and timing of changes are examined within the subareas as it pertains to the classic Braak and Braak staging by comparing the three groups. We demonstrate that the earliest preclinical changes in the population occur in the lateral most sulcal extent in the entorhinal cortex (alluded to as trans entorhinal cortex by Braak and Braak, and then proceeds medially which is consistent with the Braak and Braak staging. We use high field 11T atlasing to demonstrate that the network changes are occurring at the junctures of the substructures in this medial temporal lobe network. Temporal progression of the disease through the network is also examined via changepoint analysis demonstrating earliest changes in entorhinal cortex. The differential expression of rate of atrophy with progression signaling the changepoint time across the network is demonstrated to be signaling in the intermediate caudal subarea of the entorhinal cortex, which has been noted to be proximal to the hippocampus. This coupled to the findings of the nearby basolateral involvement in amygdala demonstrates the selectivity of neurodegeneration in early AD.

  14. [Pentylenetetrazole kindling in rats: whether neurodegeneration is associated with manifestations of seizure activity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, T V; Iakovleva, A A; Stepanichev, M Iu; Guliaeva, N V

    2005-07-01

    Structural changes in neurons and oxidative stress in hippocampus were studied in rats "tolerant" (TR) and susceptible (SR) to tonic and clonic seizures in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling. The number of normal neurons was significantly decreased in CA1 subfield of TR hippocampus after 11 injections of PTZ, while in SR neuronal cell loss was evident in CA1 and fascia dentata. In both groups, neuronal cell loss was accompanied by increase in damaged neuron number in CA4 subfield. After 21 injections of PTZ, the decrease in normal neuron number was revealed in CA1 subfield of both TR and SR, while the number of damaged neurons was above the control level in hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA4 in TR only. Glutathione level was decreased in hippocampus of both TR and SR as compared with control rats. Thus, rats tolerant to PTZ-induced convulsions demonstrated oxidative stress and neurodegeneration in hippocampus. The results suggest that, in PTZ kindling model, oxidative damage of neurons resulting in neurodegeneration in hippocampus is not directly related to the convulsive activity.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurodegeneration are decreased or normal in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Pedersen, Lars Østergaard; Bahl, Justyna Maria Czarna;

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of neurodegeneration are altered in narcolepsy in order to evaluate whether the hypocretin deficiency and abnormal sleep-wake pattern in narcolepsy leads to neurodegeneration. METHODS: Twenty-one patients with central...... hypersomnia (10 type 1 narcolepsy, 5 type 2 narcolepsy, and 6 idiopathic hypersomnia cases) aged 33 years on average, and with a disease duration of 2-29 years, and 12 healthy controls underwent CSF analyses of levels of β-amyloid, total tau protein (T-tau), phosphorylated tau protein (P-tau181), α......-synuclein, neurofilament light chain (NF-L), and chitinase 3-like protein-1 (CHI3L1). RESULTS: Levels of β-amyloid were lower in patients with type 1 narcolepsy (375.4 ±143.5 pg/ml) and type 2 narcolepsy (455.9 ± 65.0 pg/ml) compared with controls (697.9 ± 167.3 pg/ml, p

  16. Ribosomal protein s15 phosphorylation mediates LRRK2 neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ian; Kim, Jungwoo Wren; Lee, Byoung Dae; Kang, Ho Chul; Xu, Jin-Chong; Jia, Hao; Stankowski, Jeannette; Kim, Min-Sik; Zhong, Jun; Kumar, Manoj; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Xiong, Yulan; Dickson, Dennis W.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are a common cause of familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). Elevated LRRK2 kinase activity and neurodegeneration are linked, but the phosphosubstrate that connects LRRK2 kinase activity to neurodegeneration is not known. Here, we show that ribosomal protein s15 is a key pathogenic LRRK2 substrate in Drosophila and human neuron PD models. Phospho-deficient s15 carrying a threonine 136 to alanine substitution rescues dopamine neuron degeneration and age-related locomotor deficits in G2019S LRRK2 transgenic Drosophila and substantially reduces G2019S LRRK2-mediated neurite loss and cell death in human dopamine and cortical neurons. Remarkably, pathogenic LRRK2 stimulates both cap-dependent and cap-independent mRNA translation, and induces a bulk increase in protein synthesis in Drosophila, which can be prevented by phospho-deficient T136A s15. These results reveal a novel mechanism of PD pathogenesis linked to elevated LRRK2 kinase activity and aberrant protein synthesis in vivo. PMID:24725412

  17. A functional misexpression screen uncovers a role for enabled in progressive neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezával, Carolina; Berni, Jimena; Gorostiza, Ezequiel Axel; Werbajh, Santiago; Fagilde, María Marta; Fernández, María Paz; Beckwith, Esteban J; Aranovich, Ezequiel J; Sabio y García, Carmen A; Ceriani, María Fernanda

    2008-10-08

    Drosophila is a well-established model to study the molecular basis of neurodegenerative diseases. We carried out a misexpression screen to identify genes involved in neurodegeneration examining locomotor behavior in young and aged flies. We hypothesized that a progressive loss of rhythmic activity could reveal novel genes involved in neurodegenerative mechanisms. One of the interesting candidates showing progressive arrhythmicity has reduced enabled (ena) levels. ena down-regulation gave rise to progressive vacuolization in specific regions of the adult brain. Abnormal staining of pre-synaptic markers such as cystein string protein (CSP) suggest that axonal transport could underlie the neurodegeneration observed in the mutant. Reduced ena levels correlated with increased apoptosis, which could be rescued in the presence of p35, a general Caspase inhibitor. Thus, this mutant recapitulates two important features of human neurodegenerative diseases, i.e., vulnerability of certain neuronal populations and progressive degeneration, offering a unique scenario in which to unravel the specific mechanisms in an easily tractable organism.

  18. A deficiency of ceramide biosynthesis causes cerebellar purkinje cell neurodegeneration and lipofuscin accumulation.

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    Lihong Zhao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids, lipids with a common sphingoid base (also termed long chain base backbone, play essential cellular structural and signaling functions. Alterations of sphingolipid levels have been implicated in many diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains largely unclear whether sphingolipid changes in these diseases are pathological events or homeostatic responses. Furthermore, how changes in sphingolipid homeostasis shape the progression of aging and neurodegeneration remains to be clarified. We identified two mouse strains, flincher (fln and toppler (to, with spontaneous recessive mutations that cause cerebellar ataxia and Purkinje cell degeneration. Positional cloning demonstrated that these mutations reside in the Lass1 gene. Lass1 encodes (dihydroceramide synthase 1 (CerS1, which is highly expressed in neurons. Both fln and to mutations caused complete loss of CerS1 catalytic activity, which resulted in a reduction in sphingolipid biosynthesis in the brain and dramatic changes in steady-state levels of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases. In addition to Purkinje cell death, deficiency of CerS1 function also induced accumulation of lipofuscin with ubiquitylated proteins in many brain regions. Our results demonstrate clearly that ceramide biosynthesis deficiency can cause neurodegeneration and suggest a novel mechanism of lipofuscin formation, a common phenomenon that occurs during normal aging and in some neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Systemic Escherichia coli infection does not influence clinical symptoms and neurodegeneration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prateek; Friebe, Katharina; Schallhorn, Rieka; Moinfar, Zahra; Nau, Roland; Bähr, Mathias; Schütze, Sandra; Hein, Katharina

    2015-06-19

    Systemic infections can influence the course of multiple sclerosis (MS), especially by driving recurrent acute episodes. The question whether the infection enhances tissue damage is of great clinical importance and cannot easily be assessed in clinical trials. Here, we investigated the effects of a systemic infection with Escherichia coli, a Gram-negative bacterium frequently causing urinary tract infections, on the clinical course as well as on neurodegeneration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Rats were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG1-125) and challenged intraperitoneally with live E. coli K1 in the preclinical or in the clinical phase of the disease. To ensure the survival of animals, antibiotic treatment with ceftriaxone was initiated 36 h after the infection and continued for 3 consecutive days. Systemic infection with E. coli did not influence the onset of clinical EAE symptoms or disease severity. Analysis of the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells revealed no significant changes in the extent of inflammatory infiltrates, demyelination and neurodegeneration after E. coli infection. We could not confirm the detrimental effect of lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation, a model frequently used to mimic the bacterial infection, previously observed in animal models of MS. Our results indicate that the effect of an acute E. coli infection on the course of MS is less pronounced than suspected and underline the need for adequate models to test the role of systemic infections in the pathogenesis of MS.

  20. Chronic Progressive Neurodegeneration in a transgenic mouse model of Prion disease

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    Nina Fainstein

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases present pathologically with progressive structural destruction of neurons and accumulation of mis-folded proteins specific for each condition leading to brain atrophy and functional disability. Many animal models exert deposition of pathogenic protein without accompanying neurodegeneration pattern. The lack of a comprehensive model hinders the efforts to develop treatment. We performed longitudinal quantification of cellular, neuronal and synaptic density, as well as of neurogenesis in brains of mice, mimicking for genetic Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease as compared to age matched wild type mice. Mice exhibited a neurodegenerative process indicated by progressive reduction in cortical neurons and synapses, starting at age of 4-6 months, in accordance with neurologic disability. This was accompanied by significant decrease in subventricular/subependymal zone neurogenesis. Although increased hippocampal neurogenesis was detected in mice, a neurodegenerative process of CA1 and CA3 regions associated with impaired hippocampal-dependent memory function was observed. In conclusion, mice exhibit pathological neurodegeneration concomitant with progressive neurological disease, indicating these mice can serve as a model for neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. ApoE mimetic peptide decreases Aβ production in vitro and in vivo

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    Pak Daniel TS

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein E (apoE is postulated to affect brain Aβ levels through multiple mechanisms--by altering amyloid precursor protein (APP processing, Aβ degradation, and Aβ clearance. We previously showed that an apoE-derived peptide containing a double repeat of the receptor-binding region was similarly effective in increasing APP processing in vivo. Here, we further examined whether peptides containing tandem repeats of the apoE receptor-binding region (amino acids 141-149 affected APP trafficking, APP processing, and Aβ production. Results We found that peptides containing a double or triple tandem repeat of the apoE receptor-binding region, LRKLRKRLL, increased cell surface APP and decreased Aβ levels in PS1-overexpressing PS70 cells and in primary neurons. This effect was potentiated by a sequential increase in the number of apoE receptor-binding domain repeats (trimer > dimer > monomer. We previously showed that the apoE dimer increased APP CTF in vivo; to determine whether the dimer also affected secreted APP or Aβ levels, we performed a single hippocampal injection of the apoE dimer in wild-type mice and analyzed its effect on APP processing. We found increased sAPPα and decreased Aβ levels at 24 hrs after treatment, suggesting that the apoE dimer may increase α-secretase cleavage. Conclusions These data suggest that small peptides consisting of tandem repeats of the apoE receptor-binding region are sufficient to alter APP trafficking and processing. The potency of these peptides increased with increasing repeats of the receptor binding domain of apoE. In addition, in vivo administration of the apoE peptide (dimer increased sAPPα and decreased Aβ levels in wild-type mice. Overall, these findings contribute to our understanding of the effects of apoE on APP processing and Aβ production both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. The SHH/Gli pathway is reactivated in reactive glia and drives proliferation in response to neurodegeneration-induced lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitter, Kenneth L; Tamagno, Ilaria; Feng, Xi; Ghosal, Kaushik; Amankulor, Nduka; Holland, Eric C; Hambardzumyan, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    In response to neurodegeneration, the adult mammalian brain activates a cellular cascade that results in reactive astrogliosis and microgliosis. The mechanism through which astrocytes become reactive and the physiological consequences of their activation in response to neurodegeneration is complex. While the activation and proliferation of astrocytes has been shown to occur during massive neuronal cell death, the functional relationship between these two events has not been clearly elucidated. Here we show that in response to kainic acid- (KA) induced neurodegeneration, the mitogen sonic hedgehog (SHH) is upregulated in reactive astrocytes. SHH activity peaks at 7 days and is accompanied by increased Gli activity and elevated proliferation in several cell types. To determine the functional role of SHH-Gli signaling following KA lesions, we used a pharmacological approach to show that SHH secreted by astrocytes drives the activation and proliferation of astrocytes and microglia. The consequences of SHH-Gli signaling in KA-induced lesions appear to be independent of the severity of neurodegeneration.

  3. Longevity Pathways (mTOR, SIRT, Insulin/IGF-1) as Key Modulatory Targets on Aging and Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazucanti, Caio Henrique; Cabral-Costa, João Victor; Vasconcelos, Andrea Rodrigues; Andreotti, Diana Zukas; Scavone, Cristoforo; Kawamoto, Elisa Mitiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent data from epidemiologic studies have shown that the majority of the public health costs are related to age-related disorders, and most of these diseases can lead to neuronal death. The specific signaling mechanisms underpinning neurodegeneration and aging are incompletely understood. Much work has been directed to the search for the etiology of neurodegeneration and aging and to new therapeutic strategies, including not only drugs but also non-pharmacological approaches, such as physical exercise and low-calorie dietary intake. The most important processes in aging-associated conditions, including neurodegeneration, include the mammalian (or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, sirtuin (SIRT and insulin/insulin growth factor 1 signaling (IIS pathways. These longevity pathways are involved in an array of different processes, including metabolism, cognition, stress response and brain plasticity. In this review we focus on the current advances involving the mTOR, SIRT and IIS longevity pathways during the course of healthy aging processes and neurodegenerative diseases, bringing new insights in the form of a better understanding of the signaling mechanisms underpinning neurodegeneration and how these differ from physiological normal aging processes. This also provides new targets for the therapeutic management and/or prevention of these devastating age-related disorders.

  4. Metallothionein reduces central nervous system inflammation, neurodegeneration, and cell death following kainic acid-induced epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Florit, Sergi; Giralt, Mercedes

    2005-01-01

    , such as oxidative stress (formation of nitrotyrosine, malondialdehyde, and 8-oxoguanine), neurodegeneration (neuronal accumulation of abnormal proteins), and apoptotic cell death (judged by TUNEL and activated caspase-3). This reduced bystander damage in TgMT mice could be due to antiinflammatory and antioxidant...

  5. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) : Thalamic neurodegeneration occurs independently from thalamic ataxin-3 immunopositive neuronal intranuclear inclusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, Udo; de Vos, Rob A. I.; Brunt, Ewout R.; Sebesteny, Tamas; Schoels, Ludger; Auburger, Georg; Bohl, Juergen; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Gierga, Kristin; Seidel, Kay; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Heinsen, Helmut; Paulson, Henry; Deller, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In the last years progress has been made regarding the involvement of the thalamus during the course of the currently known polyglutamine diseases. Although recent studies have shown that the thalamus consistently undergoes neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease (HD) and spinocerebellar ataxia ty

  6. Transdermal delivery of cannabidiol attenuates binge alcohol-induced neurodegeneration in a rodent model of an alcohol use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liput, Daniel J; Hammell, Dana C; Stinchcomb, Audra L; Nixon, Kimberly

    2013-10-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption, characteristic of alcohol use disorders, results in neurodegeneration and behavioral and cognitive impairments that are hypothesized to contribute to the chronic and relapsing nature of alcoholism. Therefore, the current study aimed to advance the preclinical development of transdermal delivery of cannabidiol (CBD) for the treatment of alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. In Experiment 1, 1.0%, 2.5% and 5.0% CBD gels were evaluated for neuroprotection. The 5.0% CBD gel resulted in a 48.8% reduction in neurodegeneration in the entorhinal cortex assessed by Fluoro-Jade B (FJB), which trended to statistical significance (p=0.069). Treatment with the 5.0% CBD gel resulted in day 3 CBD plasma concentrations of ~100.0 ng/mL so this level was used as a target concentration for development of an optimized gel formulation. Experiment 2 tested a next generation 2.5% CBD gel formulation, which was compared to CBD administration by intraperitoneal injection (IP; 40.0 mg/kg/day). This experiment found similar magnitudes of neuroprotection following both routes of administration; transdermal CBD decreased FJB+ cells in the entorhinal cortex by 56.1% (p<0.05), while IP CBD resulted in a 50.6% (p<0.05) reduction in FJB+ cells. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using CBD transdermal delivery systems for the treatment of alcohol-induced neurodegeneration.

  7. In vivo protection against NMDA-induced neurodegeneration by MK-801 and nimodipine : Combined therapy and temporal course of protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, BT; Douma, BRK; Bakker, R; Nyakas, C; Luiten, PGM

    1996-01-01

    Neuroprotection against excitotoxicity by a combined therapy with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK-801 and the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nimodipine was examined using an in vivo rat model of NMDA-induced neurodegeneration. Attention was focused on the neuroprotective potentia

  8. Impaired Coenzyme A metabolism affects histone and tubulin acetylation in Drosophila and human cell models of pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siudeja, Katarzyna; Srinivasan, Balaji; Xu, Lanjun; Rana, Anil; de Jong, Jannie; Nollen, Ellen A. A.; Jackowski, Suzanne; Sanford, Lynn; Hayflick, Susan; Sibon, Ody C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN is a neurodegenerative disease with unresolved pathophysiology. Previously, we observed reduced Coenzyme A levels in a Drosophila model for PKAN. Coenzyme A is required for acetyl-Coenzyme A synthesis and acyl groups from the latter are

  9. Alzheimer Disease Signature Neurodegeneration and APOE Genotype in Mild Cognitive Impairment With Suspected Non-Alzheimer Disease Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Stefanie; Schreiber, Frank; Lockhart, Samuel N; Horng, Andy; Bejanin, Alexandre; Landau, Susan M; Jagust, William J

    2017-06-01

    There are conflicting results claiming that Alzheimer disease signature neurodegeneration may be more, less, or similarly advanced in individuals with β-amyloid peptide (Aβ)-negative (Aβ-) suspected non-Alzheimer disease pathophysiology (SNAP) than in Aβ-positive (Aβ+) counterparts. To examine patterns of neurodegeneration in individuals with SNAP compared with their Aβ+ counterparts. A longitudinal cohort study was conducted among individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and cognitively normal individuals receiving care at Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative sites in the United States and Canada for a mean follow-up period of 30.5 months from August 1, 2005, to June 30, 2015. Several neurodegeneration biomarkers and longitudinal cognitive function were compared between patients with distinct SNAP (Aβ- and neurodegeneration-positive [Aβ-N+]) subtypes and their Aβ+N+ counterparts. Participants were classified according to the results of their florbetapir F-18 (Aβ) positron emission tomography and their Alzheimer disease-associated neurodegeneration status (temporoparietal glucose metabolism determined by fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 [FDG]-labeled positron emission tomography and/or hippocampal volume [HV] determined by magnetic resonance imaging: participants with subthreshold HV values were regarded as exhibiting hippocampal volume atrophy [HV+], while subthreshold mean FDG values were considered as FDG hypometabolism [FDG+]). The study comprised 265 cognitively normal individuals (135 women and 130 men; mean [SD] age, 75.5 [6.7] years) and 522 patients with MCI (225 women and 297 men; mean [SD] age, 72.6 [7.8] years). A total of 469 individuals with MCI had data on neurodegeneration biomarkers; of these patients, 107 were Aβ-N+ (22.8%; 63 FDG+, 82 HV+, and 38 FDG+HV+) and 187 were Aβ+N+ (39.9%; 135 FDG+, 147 HV+, and 95 FDG+HV+ cases). A total of 209 cognitively normal participants had data on neurodegeneration biomarkers; of these, 52 were

  10. Neuroprotective effect of a new DJ-1-binding compound against neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease and stroke model rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD and cerebral ischemia are chronic and acute neurodegenerative diseases, respectively, and onsets of these diseases are thought to be induced at least by oxidative stress. PD is caused by decreased dopamine levels in the substantia nigra and striatum, and cerebral ischemia occurs as a result of local reduction or arrest of blood supply. Although a precursor of dopamine and inhibitors of dopamine degradation have been used for PD therapy and an anti-oxidant have been used for cerebral ischemia therapy, cell death progresses during treatment. Reagents that prevent oxidative stress-induced cell death are therefore necessary for fundamental therapies for PD and cerebral ischemia. DJ-1, a causative gene product of a familial form of PD, PARK7, plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress, and loss of its function is thought to result in the onset of PD. Superfluous oxidation of cysteine at amino acid 106 (C106 of DJ-1 renders DJ-1 inactive, and such oxidized DJ-1 has been observed in patients with the sporadic form of PD. Results In this study, a compound, comp-23, that binds to DJ-1 was isolated by virtual screening. Comp-23 prevented oxidative stress-induced death of SH-SY5Y cells and primary neuronal cells of the ventral mesencephalon but not that of DJ-1-knockdown SH-SY5Y cells, indicating that the effect of the compound is specific to DJ-1. Comp-23 inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS induced by oxidative stress and prevented excess oxidation of DJ-1. Furthermore, comp-23 prevented dopaminergic cell death in the substantia nigra and restored movement abnormality in 6-hydroxyldopamine-injected and rotenone-treated PD model rats and mice. Comp-23 also reduced infarct size of cerebral ischemia in rats that had been induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Protective activity of comp-23 seemed to be stronger than that of previously identified compound B

  11. Microglial activation is not equivalent to neuroinflammation in alcohol-induced neurodegeneration: The importance of microglia phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, S Alex; McClain, Justin A; Kelso, Matthew L; Hopkins, Deann M; Pauly, James R; Nixon, Kimberly

    2013-06-01

    Excessive alcohol intake, a defining characteristic of an alcohol use disorder (AUD), results in neurodegeneration in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex that has been linked to a variety of cognitive deficits. Neuroinflammation is thought to be a factor in alcohol-induced neurodegeneration, and microglia activation is a key but not sole component of an inflammatory response. These experiments investigate the effects of ethanol exposure in a well-accepted model of an AUD on both microglial activation and blood brain barrier disruption (BBB) in order to understand their relationship to classical definitions of inflammation and alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. Following a four-day binge ethanol paradigm, rat hippocampal and entorhinal cortex tissue was examined using three distinct approaches to determine microglia phenotype and BBB disruption: immunohistochemistry, autoradiography, and ELISA. After ethanol exposure, there was an increase in [(3)H]-PK-11195 binding and OX-42 immunoreactivity indicative of microglial activation; however, microglia were not fully activated since both OX-6 and ED-1 immunoreactive microglia were absent. This data was supported by functional evidence as there was no increase in the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 or TNF-α, but a 26% increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, and a 38% increase in the growth factor, TGF-β, seven days after exposure. Furthermore, there was no evidence of a disruption of the BBB. These data suggest that the four-day binge model of an AUD, which produces neurodegeneration in corticolimbic regions, does not elicit classical neuroinflammation but instead produces partially activated microglia. Partial activation of microglia following binge ethanol exposure suggest that microglia in this model have beneficial or homeostatic roles rather than directly contributing to neurodegeneration and are a consequence of alcohol-induced-damage instead of the source of damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  12. Neurodegeneration in drop-dead mutant drosophila melanogaster is associated with the respiratory system but not with Hypoxia.

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    Christine Lynn Sansone

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene drop-dead (drd cause diverse phenotypes in adult Drosophila melanogaster including early lethality, neurodegeneration, tracheal defects, gut dysfunction, reduced body mass, and female sterility. Despite the identification of the drd gene itself, the causes of early lethality and neurodegeneration in the mutant flies remain unknown. To determine the pattern of drd expression associated with the neurodegenerative phenotype, knockdown of drd with various Gal4 drivers was performed. Early adult lethality and neurodegeneration were observed upon knockdown of drd in the tracheal system with two independent insertions of the breathless-Gal4 driver and upon knockdown in the tracheal system and elsewhere with the DJ717-Gal4 driver. Surprisingly, rescue of drd expression exclusively in the tracheae in otherwise mutant flies rescued the neurodegenerative phenotype but not adult lethality. Gut dysfunction, as measured by defecation rate, was not rescued in these flies, and gut function appeared normal upon tracheal-specific knockdown of drd. Finally, the hypothesis that tracheal dysfunction in drd mutants results in hypoxia was tested. Hypoxia-sensitive reporter transgenes (LDH-Gal4 and LDH-LacZ were placed on a drd mutant background, but enhanced expression of these reporters was not observed. In addition, manipulation of drd expression in the tracheae did not affect expression of the hypoxia-induced genes LDH, tango, and similar. Overall, these results indicate that there are at least two causes of adult lethality in drd mutants, that gut dysfunction and neurodegeneration are independent phenotypes, and that neurodegeneration is associated with tracheal expression of drd but not with hypoxia.

  13. Brain network alterations and vulnerability to simulated neurodegeneration in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Shelli R; Watson, Christa L; Blayney, Douglas W

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer and its treatments are associated with mild cognitive impairment and brain changes that could indicate an altered or accelerated brain aging process. We applied diffusion tensor imaging and graph theory to measure white matter organization and connectivity in 34 breast cancer survivors compared with 36 matched healthy female controls. We also investigated how brain networks (connectomes) in each group responded to simulated neurodegeneration based on network attack analysis. Compared with controls, the breast cancer group demonstrated significantly lower fractional anisotropy, altered small-world connectome properties, lower brain network tolerance to systematic region (node), and connection (edge) attacks and significant cognitive impairment. Lower tolerance to network attack was associated with cognitive impairment in the breast cancer group. These findings provide further evidence of diffuse white matter pathology after breast cancer and extend the literature in this area with unique data demonstrating increased vulnerability of the post-breast cancer brain network to future neurodegenerative processes.

  14. Exosomes of BV-2 cells induced by alpha-synuclein: important mediator of neurodegeneration in PD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chongwang; Lang, Hongjuan; Geng, Ning; Wang, Jing; Li, Nan; Wang, Xuelian

    2013-08-26

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Alpha-synuclein aggregation, which can activate microglia to enhance its dopaminergic neurotoxicity, plays a central role in the progression of PD. However the mechanism is still unclear. To investigate how alpha-synuclein affects the neuron, exosomes were derived from alpha-synuclein treated mouse microglia cell line BV-2 cells by differential centrifugation and ultracentrifugation. We found that alpha-synuclein can induce an increase of exosomal secretion by microglia. These activated exosomes expressed a high level of MHC class II molecules and membrane TNF-α. In addition, the activated exosomes cause increased apoptosis. Exosomes secreted from activated microglias might be important mediator of alpha-synuclein-induced neurodegeneration in PD.

  15. Transthyretin knockout mice display decreased susceptibility to AMPA-induced neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Ana Filipa; Montero, Maria; Franquinho, Filipa;

    2009-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) has been regarded as a neuroprotective protein given that TTR knockout (KO) mice display increased susceptibility for amyloid beta deposition and memory deficits during aging. In parallel, TTR KO mice have increased levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY), which promotes neuroprotection...... and neuroproliferation. In this work, we aimed at evaluating TTR neuroprotective effect against an excitotoxic insult that is known to be prevented by NPY action. We show that despite a putative neuroprotective role of TTR, hippocampal slice cultures from TTR KO mice display a decreased susceptibility to AMPA......-induced neurodegeneration. We also suggest that increased NPY levels in TTR KO mice are not associated with increased cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus or subventricular zone. In summary, the alleged neuroprotective role of TTR in the nervous system should be regarded with caution and should not be generalized to all...

  16. Obesity and the Ageing Brain: Could Leptin Play a Role in Neurodegeneration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. Doherty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and ageing are both characteristics of the human population that are on the increase across the globe. It has long been established that ageing is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, and it is becoming increasingly evident that obesity is another such factor. Leptin resistance or insensitivity has been uncovered as a cause of obesity, and in addition the leptin signalling system is less potent in the elderly. Taken together, these findings reveal that this molecule may be a link between neurodegeneration and obesity or ageing. It is now known that leptin has beneficial effects on both the survival and neurophysiology of the neurons that are lost in Alzheimer's disease suggesting that it may be an important research target in the quest for strategies to prevent, halt, or cure this condition.

  17. Protective Action of Neurotrophic Factors and Estrogen against Oxidative Stress-Mediated Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Numakawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. Low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS are important for maintenance of neuronal function, though elevated levels lead to neuronal cell death. A complex series of events including excitotoxicity, Ca2+ overload, and mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to oxidative stress-mediated neurodegeneration. As expected, many antioxidants like phytochemicals and vitamins are known to reduce oxidative toxicity. Additionally, growing evidence indicates that neurotrophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and estrogens significantly prevent neuronal damage caused by oxidative stress. Here, we review and discuss recent studies addressing the protective mechanisms of neurotrophic factors and estrogen within this system.

  18. Nutrient excess and altered mitochondrial proteome and function contribute to neurodegeneration in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subir K Roy; Dobrowsky, Rick T; Fernyhough, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a major complication of diabetes that results in the progressive deterioration of the sensory nervous system. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the neurodegeneration observed in diabetic neuropathy. Our recent work has shown that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rodents. In neurons, the nutrient excess associated with prolonged diabetes may trigger a switching off of AMP kinase (AMPK) and/or silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) signaling leading to impaired peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1α) expression/activity and diminished mitochondrial activity. This review briefly summarizes the alterations of mitochondrial function and proteome in sensory neurons of STZ-diabetic rodents. We also discuss the possible involvement of AMPK/SIRT/PGC-1α pathway in other diabetic models and different tissues affected by diabetes.

  19. Metallothionein prevents neurodegeneration and central nervous system cell death after treatment with gliotoxin 6-aminonicotinamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Quintana, Albert; Carrasco, Javier

    2004-01-01

    cell death. We hereby show that the primary injury caused by 6-AN was comparable in wild-type and GFAP-IL6 mice, but MT-I overexpression could significantly protect the brain tissue. As expected, GFAP-IL6 mice showed increased CNS inflammation with more gliosis, macrophages, and lymphocytes, including......Transgenic expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the CNS under the control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene promoter (GFAP-IL6 mice) induces significant inflammation and neurodegeneration but also affords neuroprotection against acute traumatic brain injury. This neuroprotection......-I+II expression was significantly higher in GFAP-IL6 mice than in wild types, which may contribute to the IL-6-induced neuroprotection. In support of this, overexpression of MT-I in GFAP-IL6 x TgMT as well as TgMT mice protected the brainstem tissue significantly from 6-AN-induced toxicity and secondary brain...

  20. Mitochondria in Alzheimer's Disease and Diabetes-Associated Neurodegeneration: License to Heal!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Susana M; Correia, Sónia C; Carvalho, Cristina; Moreira, Paula I

    2017-03-02

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a difficult puzzle to solve, in part because the etiology of this devastating neurodegenerative disorder remains murky. However, diabetes has been pinpointed as a major risk factor for the sporadic forms of AD. Several overlapping neurodegenerative mechanisms have been identified between AD and diabetes, including mitochondrial malfunction. This is not surprising taking into account that neurons are cells with a complex morphology, long lifespan, and high energetic requirements which make them particularly reliant on a properly organized and dynamic mitochondrial network to sustain neuronal function and integrity. In this sense, this chapter provides an overview on the role of mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics to the neurodegenerative events that occur in AD and diabetes, and how these organelles may represent a mechanistic link between these two pathologies. From a therapeutic perspective, it will be discussed how mitochondria can be targeted in order to efficaciously counteract neurodegeneration associated with AD and diabetes.

  1. Intraneuronal protein aggregation as a trigger for inflammation and neurodegeneration in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currais, Antonio; Fischer, Wolfgang; Maher, Pamela; Schubert, David

    2017-01-01

    Age is, by far, the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), yet few AD drug candidates have been generated that target pathways specifically associated with the aging process itself. Two ubiquitous features of the aging brain are the intracellular accumulation of aggregated proteins and inflammation. As intraneuronal amyloid protein is detected before markers of inflammation, we argue that old, age-associated, aggregated proteins in neurons can induce inflammation, resulting in multiple forms of brain toxicities. The consequence is the increased risk of old, age-associated, neurodegenerative diseases. As most of these diseases are associated with the accumulation of aggregated proteins, it is possible that any therapeutic that reduces intracellular protein aggregation will benefit all.-Currais, A., Fischer, W., Maher, P., Schubert, D. Intraneuronal protein aggregation as a trigger for inflammation and neurodegeneration in the aging brain.

  2. Neuroprotective effect of lignans extracted from Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. on glaucoma-related neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao-Peng; Qiu, Gui-Zhen; Liu, Ban; Chen, Jin-Long; Fu, Hai-Tao

    2016-05-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, characterized by retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and axon degeneration. The development of neuroprotective drug is required for improving the efficiency of glaucoma treatment. Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. has been used as a source of traditional medicine and as a beneficial health food. Lignans is one of the main bioactive components of Eucommia ulmoides. Here, we show that lignans protects RGCs against oxidative stress-induced injury in vitro. Moreover, lignans exerts neuroprotective effect on glaucoma-associated optic neuropathy in glaucomatous rats. Lignans treatment could improve oxidative stress response in RGCs and retinas of glaucomatous rats. Lignans plays an anti-oxidative stress role via the activation of AMPK signaling. This study provides evidence that lignans possesses protective effect on glaucoma-associated optic neuropathy. Lignans might be an alternative for the prevention and treatment of glaucomatous neurodegeneration.

  3. The microRNA miR-34 modulates ageing and neurodegeneration in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan; Landreh, Michael; Cao, Kajia; Abe, Masashi; Hendriks, Gert-Jan; Kennerdell, Jason R; Zhu, Yongqing; Wang, Li-San; Bonini, Nancy M

    2012-02-15

    Human neurodegenerative diseases have the temporal hallmark of afflicting the elderly population. Ageing is one of the most prominent factors to influence disease onset and progression, yet little is known about the molecular pathways that connect these processes. To understand this connection it is necessary to identify the pathways that functionally integrate ageing, chronic maintenance of the brain and modulation of neurodegenerative disease. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are emerging as critical factors in gene regulation during development; however, their role in adult-onset, age-associated processes is only beginning to be revealed. Here we report that the conserved miRNA miR-34 regulates age-associated events and long-term brain integrity in Drosophila, providing a molecular link between ageing and neurodegeneration. Fly mir-34 expression exhibits adult-onset, brain-enriched and age-modulated characteristics. Whereas mir-34 loss triggers a gene profile of accelerated brain ageing, late-onset brain degeneration and a catastrophic decline in survival, mir-34 upregulation extends median lifespan and mitigates neurodegeneration induced by human pathogenic polyglutamine disease protein. Some of the age-associated effects of miR-34 require adult-onset translational repression of Eip74EF, an essential ETS domain transcription factor involved in steroid hormone pathways. Our studies indicate that miRNA-dependent pathways may have an impact on adult-onset, age-associated events by silencing developmental genes that later have a deleterious influence on adult life cycle and disease, and highlight fly miR-34 as a key miRNA with a role in this process.

  4. TSPO in a murine model of Sandhoff disease: presymptomatic marker of neurodegeneration and disease pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Meredith K; Choi, Judy; McGlothan, Jennifer L; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Pomper, Martin G; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2016-01-01

    Translocator protein (18 kDa), formerly known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), has been extensively used as a biomarker of active brain disease and neuroinflammation. TSPO expression increases dramatically in glial cells, particularly in microglia and astrocytes, as a result of brain injury, and this phenomenon is a component of the hallmark response of the brain to injury. In this study, we used a mouse model of Sandhoff disease (SD) to assess the longitudinal expression of TSPO as a function of disease progression and its relationship to behavioral and neuropathological endpoints. Focusing on the presymptomatic period of the disease, we used ex vivo [(3)H]DPA-713 quantitative autoradiography and in vivo [(125)I]IodoDPA-713 small animal SPECT imaging to show that brain TSPO levels markedly increase prior to physical and behavioral manifestation of disease. We further show that TSPO upregulation coincides with early neuronal GM2 ganglioside aggregation and is associated with ongoing neurodegeneration and activation of both microglia and astrocytes. In brain regions with increased TSPO levels, there is a differential pattern of glial cell activation with astrocytes being activated earlier than microglia during the progression of disease. Immunofluorescent confocal imaging confirmed that TSPO colocalizes with both microglia and astrocyte markers, but the glial source of the TSPO response differs by brain region and age in SD mice. Notably, TSPO colocalization with the astrocyte marker GFAP was greater than with the microglia marker, Mac-1. Taken together, our findings have significant implications for understanding TSPO glial cell biology and for detecting neurodegeneration prior to clinical expression of disease.

  5. The Effects of Meditation on Grey Matter Atrophy and Neurodegeneration: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Nicole; Tufts, Emily; Auger, Leslie E

    2017-01-01

    The present systematic review is based on the premise that a variety of neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by grey matter atrophy in the brain and meditation may impact this. Given that age is a major risk factor for many of these progressive and neurodegenerative diseases and that the percentage of the population over the age of 65 is quickly increasing, there is an obvious need for prompt treatment and prevention advances in research. As there is currently no cure for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, many are seeking non-pharmacological treatment options in attempts to offset the disease-related cognitive and functional declines. On the basis of a growing body of research suggesting that meditation is effective in increasing grey matter volume in healthy participants, this paper systematically reviewed the literature regarding the effects of meditation on restoring grey matter volume in healthy individuals and those affected by neurodegeneration. This review searched PubMed, CINAHL, and APA PsycNET to identify original studies that included MRI imaging to measure grey matter volume in meditators and post-mindfulness-based intervention participants compared to controls. Thirteen studies were considered eligible for review and involved a wide variety of meditation techniques and included participants with and without cognitive impairment. All studies reported significant increases in grey matter volume in the meditators/intervention group, albeit in assorted regions of the brain. Limited research exists on the mechanisms through which meditation affects disease-related neurodegeneration, but preliminary evidence suggests that it may offset grey matter atrophy.

  6. Increased RhoA prenylation in the loechrig (loe mutant leads to progressive neurodegeneration.

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    Mandy Cook

    Full Text Available The Drosophila mutant loechrig (loe shows age-dependent degeneration of the nervous system and is caused by the loss of a neuronal isoform of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK γ-subunit (also known as SNF4Aγ. The trimeric AMPK complex is activated by low energy levels and metabolic insults and regulates multiple important signal pathways that control cell metabolism. A well-known downstream target of AMPK is hydroxyl-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR, a key enzyme in isoprenoid synthesis, and we have previously shown that HMGR genetically interacts with loe and affects the severity of the degenerative phenotype. Prenylation of proteins like small G-proteins is an important posttranslational modification providing lipid moieties that allow the association of these proteins with membranes, thereby facilitating their subsequent activation. Rho proteins have been extensively studied in neuronal outgrowth, however, much less is known about their function in neuronal maintenance. Here we show that the loe mutation interferes with isoprenoid synthesis, leading to increased prenylation of the small GTPase Rho1, the fly orthologue of vertebrate RhoA. We also demonstrate that increased prenylation and Rho1 activity causes neurodegeneration and aggravates the behavioral and degenerative phenotypes of loe. Because we cannot detect defects in the development of the central nervous system in loe, this suggests that loe only interferes with the function of the RhoA pathway in maintaining neuronal integrity during adulthood. In addition, our results show that alterations in isoprenoids can result in progressive neurodegeneration, supporting findings in vertebrates that prenylation may play a role in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's Disease.

  7. Prodromal Huntington disease as a model for functional compensation of early neurodegeneration.

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    Kathrin Malejko

    Full Text Available Functional compensation demonstrated as mechanism to offset neuronal loss in early Alzheimer disease may also occur in other adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Huntington disease (HD with its genetic determination and gradual changes in structural integrity. In HD, neurodegeneration typically initiates in the dorsal striatum, successively affecting ventral striatal areas. Investigating carriers of the HD mutation with evident dorsal, but only minimal or no ventral striatal atrophy, we expected to find evidence for compensation of ventral striatal functioning. We investigated 14 pre- or early symptomatic carriers of the mutation leading to HD and 18 matched healthy controls. Participants underwent structural T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and functional MRI during a reward task that probes ventral striatal functioning. Motor functioning and attention were assessed with reaction time (RT tasks. Structural images confirmed a specific decrease of dorsal striatal but only marginal ventral striatal volume in HD relative to control subjects, paralleling prolonged RT in the motor response tasks. While behavioral performance in the reward task during fMRI scanning was unimpaired, reward-related fMRI signaling in the HD group was differentially enhanced in the bilateral ventral striatum and in bilateral orbitofrontal cortex/anterior insula, as another region sensitive to reward processing. We provide evidence for the concept of functional compensation in premanifest HD which may suggest a defense mechanism in neurodegeneration. Given the so far inevitable course of HD with its genetically determined endpoint, this disease may provide another model to study the different aspects of the concept of functional compensation.

  8. Late-Onset Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation with Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Syed Omar Shah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neuroferritinopathy is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that includes a movement disorder, cognitive decline, and characteristic findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI due to abnormal iron deposition. Here, we present a late-onset case, along with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Case Presentation: We report the case of a 74-year-old Caucasian female with no significant past medical history who presented for evaluation of orofacial dyskinesia, suspected to be edentulous dyskinesia given her history of ill-fitting dentures. She had also developed slowly progressive dysarthria, dysphagia, visual hallucinations as well as stereotypic movements of her hands and feet. Results: The eye-of-the-tiger sign was demonstrated on T2 MRI. Increased fractional anisotropy and T2 hypointensity were observed in the periphery of the globus pallidus, putamen, substantia nigra, and dentate nucleus. T2 hyperintensity was present in the medial dentate nucleus and central globus pallidus. Discussion: The pallidal MRI findings were more typical of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN, but given additional dentate and putamenal involvement, lack of retinopathy, and advanced age of onset, PKAN was less likely. Although the patient’s ferritin levels were within low normal range, her clinical and imaging features led to a diagnosis of neuroferritinopathy. Conclusion: Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA is a rare cause of orofacial dyskinesia. DTI MRI can confirm abnormal iron deposition. The location of abnormal iron deposits helps in differentiating NBIA subtypes. Degeneration of the dentate and globus pallidus may occur via an analogous process given their similar T2 and DTI MRI appearance.

  9. Quercetin attenuates neuronal death against aluminum-induced neurodegeneration in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, D R; Wani, W Y; Sunkaria, A; Kandimalla, R J; Sharma, R K; Verma, D; Bal, A; Gill, K D

    2016-06-02

    Aluminum is a light weight and toxic metal present ubiquitously on earth, which has gained considerable attention due to its neurotoxic effects. It also has been linked ecologically and epidemiologically to several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Guamanian-Parkinsonian complex and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The mechanism of aluminum neurotoxicity is poorly understood, but it is well documented that aluminum generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced ROS production leads to disruption of cellular antioxidant defense systems and release of cytochrome c (cyt-c) from mitochondria to cytosol resulting in apoptotic cell death. Quercetin (a natural flavonoid) protects it from oxidative damage and has been shown to decrease mitochondrial damage in various animal models of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that if oxidative damage to mitochondria does play a significant role in aluminum-induced neurodegeneration, and then quercetin should ameliorate neuronal apoptosis. Administration of quercetin (10 mg/kg body wt/day) reduced aluminum (10 mg/kg body wt/day)-induced oxidative stress (decreased ROS production, increased mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity). In addition, quercetin also prevents aluminum-induced translocation of cyt-c, and up-regulates Bcl-2, down-regulates Bax, p53, caspase-3 activation and reduces DNA fragmentation. Quercetin also obstructs aluminum-induced neurodegenerative changes in aluminum-treated rats as seen by Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining. Further electron microscopic studies revealed that quercetin attenuates aluminum-induced mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae and chromatin condensation. These results indicate that treatment with quercetin may represent a therapeutic strategy to attenuate the neuronal death against aluminum-induced neurodegeneration.

  10. Differential Roles of Environmental Enrichment in Alzheimer’s Type of Neurodegeneration and Physiological Aging

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    Vladimir V. Salmin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of hippocampal adult neurogenesis in aging or degenerating brain is a well-known phenomenon caused by the shortage of brain stem cell pool, alterations in the local microenvironment within the neurogenic niches, or deregulation of stem cell development. Environmental enrichment (EE has been proposed as a potent tool to restore brain functions, to prevent aging-associated neurodegeneration, and to cure neuronal deficits seen in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we report our data on the effects of environmental enrichment on hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo and neurosphere-forming capacity of hippocampal stem/progenitor cells in vitro. Two models – Alzheimer’s type of neurodegeneration and physiological brain aging – were chosen for the comparative analysis of EE effects. We found that environmental enrichment greatly affects the expression of markers specific for stem cells, progenitor cells and differentiated neurons (Pax6, Ngn2, NeuroD1, NeuN in the hippocampus of young adult rats or rats with Alzheimer’s disease (AD model but less efficiently in aged animals. Application of time-lag mathematical model for the analysis of impedance traces obtained in real-time monitoring of cell proliferation in vitro revealed that EE could restore neurosphere-forming capacity of hippocampal stem/progenitor cells more efficiently in young adult animals (fourfold greater in the control group comparing to the AD model group but not in the aged rats (no positive effect of environmental enrichment at all. In accordance with the results obtained in vivo, EE was almost ineffective in the recovery of hippocampal neurogenic reserve in vitro in aged, but not in amyloid-treated or young adult, rats. Therefore, EE-based neuroprotective strategies effective in Aβ-affected brain could not be directly extrapolated to aged brain.

  11. Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Impact Several Toxicological Endpoints and Cause Neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashock, Michael J; Zanon, Tyler; Kappell, Anthony D; Petrella, Lisa N; Andersen, Erik C; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2016-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are becoming increasingly incorporated into technology and consumer products. In 2014, over 300 tons of copper oxide nanoparticles were manufactured in the United States. The increased production of nanoparticles raises concerns regarding the potential introduction into the environment or human exposure. Copper oxide nanoparticles commonly release copper ions into solutions, which contribute to their toxicity. We quantified the inhibitory effects of both copper oxide nanoparticles and copper sulfate on C. elegans toxicological endpoints to elucidate their biological effects. Several toxicological endpoints were analyzed in C. elegans, including nematode reproduction, feeding behavior, and average body length. We examined three wild C. elegans isolates together with the Bristol N2 laboratory strain to explore the influence of different genotypic backgrounds on the physiological response to copper challenge. All strains exhibited greater sensitivity to copper oxide nanoparticles compared to copper sulfate, as indicated by reduction of average body length and feeding behavior. Reproduction was significantly reduced only at the highest copper dose, though still more pronounced with copper oxide nanoparticles compared to copper sulfate treatment. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper sulfate on neurons, cells with known vulnerability to heavy metal toxicity. Degeneration of dopaminergic neurons was observed in up to 10% of the population after copper oxide nanoparticle exposure. Additionally, mutants in the divalent-metal transporters, smf-1 or smf-2, showed increased tolerance to copper exposure, implicating both transporters in copper-induced neurodegeneration. These results highlight the complex nature of CuO nanoparticle toxicity, in which a nanoparticle-specific effect was observed in some traits (average body length, feeding behavior) and a copper ion specific effect was observed for other traits

  12. Neuroimaging standards for research into small vessel disease and its contribution to ageing and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; Smith, Eric E; Biessels, Geert J; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Fazekas, Franz; Frayne, Richard; Lindley, Richard I; O'Brien, John T; Barkhof, Frederik; Benavente, Oscar R; Black, Sandra E; Brayne, Carol; Breteler, Monique; Chabriat, Hugues; Decarli, Charles; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Doubal, Fergus; Duering, Marco; Fox, Nick C; Greenberg, Steven; Hachinski, Vladimir; Kilimann, Ingo; Mok, Vincent; Oostenbrugge, Robert van; Pantoni, Leonardo; Speck, Oliver; Stephan, Blossom C M; Teipel, Stefan; Viswanathan, Anand; Werring, David; Chen, Christopher; Smith, Colin; van Buchem, Mark; Norrving, Bo; Gorelick, Philip B; Dichgans, Martin

    2013-08-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common accompaniment of ageing. Features seen on neuroimaging include recent small subcortical infarcts, lacunes, white matter hyperintensities, perivascular spaces, microbleeds, and brain atrophy. SVD can present as a stroke or cognitive decline, or can have few or no symptoms. SVD frequently coexists with neurodegenerative disease, and can exacerbate cognitive deficits, physical disabilities, and other symptoms of neurodegeneration. Terminology and definitions for imaging the features of SVD vary widely, which is also true for protocols for image acquisition and image analysis. This lack of consistency hampers progress in identifying the contribution of SVD to the pathophysiology and clinical features of common neurodegenerative diseases. We are an international working group from the Centres of Excellence in Neurodegeneration. We completed a structured process to develop definitions and imaging standards for markers and consequences of SVD. We aimed to achieve the following: first, to provide a common advisory about terms and definitions for features visible on MRI; second, to suggest minimum standards for image acquisition and analysis; third, to agree on standards for scientific reporting of changes related to SVD on neuroimaging; and fourth, to review emerging imaging methods for detection and quantification of preclinical manifestations of SVD. Our findings and recommendations apply to research studies, and can be used in the clinical setting to standardise image interpretation, acquisition, and reporting. This Position Paper summarises the main outcomes of this international effort to provide the STandards for ReportIng Vascular changes on nEuroimaging (STRIVE). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Following activation of the amyloid cascade, apolipoprotein E4 drives the in vivo oligomerization of amyloid-β resulting in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinson, Haim; Kariv-Inbal, Zehavit; Kayed, Rakez; Masliah, Eliezer; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2010-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the accumulation of oligomerized amyloid-β (Aβ) is a primary event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The trigger of the amyloid cascade and of Aβ oligomerization in sporadic AD, the most prevalent form of the disease, remains elusive. Here, we examined the hypothesis that apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4), the most prevalent genetic risk factor for AD, triggers the accumulation of intraneuronal oligomerized Aβ following activation of the amyloid cascade. We investigated the intracellular organelles that are targeted by these processes and govern their pathological consequences. This revealed that activation of the amyloid cascade in vivo by inhibition of the Aβ degrading enzyme neprilysin specifically results in accumulation of Aβ and oligomerized Aβ and of ApoE4 in the CA1 neurons of ApoE4 mice. This was accompanied by lysosomal and mitochondrial pathology and the co-localization of Aβ, oligomerized Aβ, and ApoE4 with enlarged lysosomes and of Aβ and oligomerized Aβ with mitochondria. The time course of the lysosomal effects paralleled that of the loss of CA1 neurons, whereas the mitochondrial effects reached an earlier plateau. These findings suggest that ApoE4 potentiates the pathological effects of Aβ and the amyloid cascade by triggering the oligomerization of Aβ, which in turn, impairs intraneuronal mitochondria and lysosomes and drives neurodegeneration.

  14. Regulation of Microglial Phagocytosis by RhoA/ROCK-Inhibiting Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiblich, Hannah; Bicker, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    Inflammation within the central nervous system (CNS) is a major component of many neurodegenerative diseases. The underlying mechanisms of neuronal loss are not fully understood, but the activation of CNS resident phagocytic microglia seems to be a significant element contributing to neurodegeneration. At the onset of inflammation, high levels of microglial phagocytosis may serve as an essential prerequisite for creating a favorable environment for neuronal regeneration. However, the excessive and long-lasting activation of microglia and the augmented engulfment of neurons have been suggested to eventually govern widespread neurodegeneration. Here, we investigated in a functional assay of acute inflammation how the small GTPase RhoA and its main target the Rho kinase (ROCK) influence microglial phagocytosis of neuronal debris. Using BV-2 microglia and human NT2 model neurons, we demonstrate that the pain reliever Ibuprofen decreases RhoA activation and microglial phagocytosis of neuronal cell fragments. Inhibition of the downstream effector ROCK with the small-molecule agents Y-27632 and Fasudil reduces the engulfment of neuronal debris and attenuates the production of the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide during stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Our results support a therapeutic potential for RhoA/ROCK-inhibiting agents as an effective treatment of excessive inflammation and the resulting progression of microglia-mediated neurodegeneration in the CNS.

  15. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Giordano, Carla; Lamperti, Costanza; Morbin, Michela; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Marchet, Silvia; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Sibon, Ody; Moggio, Maurizio; d'Amati, Giulia; Tiranti, Valeria

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2,

  16. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Giordano, Carla; Lamperti, Costanza; Morbin, Michela; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Marchet, Silvia; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Sibon, Ody; Moggio, Maurizio; d'Amati, Giulia; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2,

  17. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Giordano, Carla; Lamperti, Costanza; Morbin, Michela; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Marchet, Silvia; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Sibon, Ody; Moggio, Maurizio; d'Amati, Giulia; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2,

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light chain as a biomarker of neurodegeneration in the Tg4510 and MitoPark mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clement, Amalie; Mitchelmore, Cathy; Andersson, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and tauopathies. We hypothesized that CSF neurofilament light (NF-L) can be used to track progression of neurodegeneration and potentially monitor the efficacy of novel therapeutic agents in preclinical development. To substantiate this, we...... examined whether changes in NF-L levels in brain, plasma, and CSF reflect the changing disease status of preclinical models of neurodegeneration. Using Western Blot and ELISA we characterized NF-L and disease-related proteins in brain, CSF and plasma samples from Tg4510 mice (tauopathy/AD), MitoPark mice...... (PD), and their age-matched control littermates. We found that CSF NF-L clearly discriminates Tg4510 from control littermates, which was not observed for the MitoPark model. However, both Tg4510 and MitoPark showed altered expression and solubilization of NFs compared to control littermates. We found...

  19. Cyclin F: A component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex with roles in neurodegeneration and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galper, Jasmin; Rayner, Stephanie L; Hogan, Alison L; Fifita, Jennifer A; Lee, Albert; Chung, Roger S; Blair, Ian P; Yang, Shu

    2017-08-01

    Cyclin F, encoded by CCNF, is the substrate recognition component of the Skp1-Cul1-F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, SCF(cyclin F). E3 ubiquitin ligases play a key role in ubiquitin-proteasome mediated protein degradation, an essential component of protein homeostatic mechanisms within the cell. By recognising and regulating the availability of several protein substrates, SCF(cyclin F) plays a role in regulating various cellular processes including replication and repair of DNA and cell cycle checkpoint control. Cyclin F dysfunction has been implicated in various forms of cancer and CCNF mutations were recently linked to familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, offering a new lead to understanding the pathogenic mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. In this review, we evaluate the current literature on the function of cyclin F with an emphasis on its roles in cancer and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dementia, preclinical studies in neurodegeneration and its potential for translational medicine in SouthAmerica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Patricia Cardona Gomez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Latin-American people with dementia will increase in a 368% in 2050, higher than USA and Europe. In addition, to sporadic dementia type Alzheimer and vascular dementia progression after Cerebrovascular disease, the statistics are increased in Colombia by specific populations affected with pure neurodegenerative and vascular dementias like autosomical dominant familial Alzheimer´s disease and CADASIL. In spite of the enormous human and economical effort and investment, neither sporadic nor genetic kinds of dementia progression have been prevented or blocked yet. Currently, exist several animal models that partially solve the understanding of the neurodegenerative etiopathogenesis and its treatment. However, when the potential therapies are translated to humans, those do not work or present a limited action. Main difficulties are the diverse comorbility associated to the cause and/or several affected brain regions, reducing the efficacy of some therapies which are limited to a tissue-specific action or modulating a kind of neurotransmission. Global investigation suggests that a general prevention could be achieved with the improvement in the quality of lifestyle, including healthy diet, physical and mental activity, and avoiding mechanical or chemical pro-inflammatory events in an early stage in the most of non-communicable diseases. In this review, we present some molecular targets and preclinical studies in animal models to propose strategies that could be useful in a future translation to prevent or block neurodegeneration: One is gene therapy silencing pathogenic genes in critical brain areas where excitotoxicity arise and spread. Another is to take advantage of the natural source and its wide biodiversity of natural products some of them identified by the blocking and prevention of neurodegeneration. On the other side, the casuistic of pure dementias in the Latin-American region give an exceptional opportunity to understand the pathogenesis

  1. The Role of Microglia in Retinal Neurodegeneration: Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson, and Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Ana I; de Hoz, Rosa; Salobrar-Garcia, Elena; Salazar, Juan J; Rojas, Blanca; Ajoy, Daniel; López-Cuenca, Inés; Rojas, Pilar; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M

    2017-01-01

    Microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the central nervous system (CNS), act as neuropathology sensors and are neuroprotective under physiological conditions. Microglia react to injury and degeneration with immune-phenotypic and morphological changes, proliferation, migration, and inflammatory cytokine production. An uncontrolled microglial response secondary to sustained CNS damage can put neuronal survival at risk due to excessive inflammation. A neuroinflammatory response is considered among the etiological factors of the major aged-related neurodegenerative diseases of the CNS, and microglial cells are key players in these neurodegenerative lesions. The retina is an extension of the brain and therefore the inflammatory response in the brain can occur in the retina. The brain and retina are affected in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and glaucoma. AD is an age-related neurodegeneration of the CNS characterized by neuronal and synaptic loss in the cerebral cortex, resulting in cognitive deficit and dementia. The extracellular deposits of beta-amyloid (Aβ) and intraneuronal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau protein (pTau) are the hallmarks of this disease. These deposits are also found in the retina and optic nerve. PD is a neurodegenerative locomotor disorder with the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This is accompanied by Lewy body inclusion composed of α-synuclein (α-syn) aggregates. PD also involves retinal dopaminergic cell degeneration. Glaucoma is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease of the optic nerve, characterized by retinal ganglion cell loss. In this pathology, deposition of Aβ, synuclein, and pTau has also been detected in retina. These neurodegenerative diseases share a common pathogenic mechanism, the neuroinflammation, in which microglia play an important role. Microglial activation has been reported in AD, PD, and glaucoma in

  2. Defining the Microglia Response during the Time Course of Chronic Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenti, James E; Murphy, Lita; Grabert, Kathleen; McColl, Barry W; Cancellotti, Enrico; Freeman, Tom C; Manson, Jean C

    2015-12-30

    Inflammation has been proposed as a major component of neurodegenerative diseases, although the precise role it plays has yet to be defined. We examined the role of key contributors to this inflammatory process, microglia, the major resident immune cell population of the brain, in a prion disease model of chronic neurodegeneration. Initially, we performed an extensive reanalysis of a large study of prion disease, where the transcriptome of mouse brains had been monitored throughout the time course of disease. Our analysis has provided a detailed classification of the disease-associated genes based on cell type of origin and gene function. This revealed that the genes upregulated during disease, regardless of the strain of mouse or prion protein, are expressed predominantly by activated microglia. In order to study the microglia contribution more specifically, we established a mouse model of prion disease in which the 79A murine prion strain was introduced by an intraperitoneal route into BALB/cJ(Fms-EGFP/-) mice, which express enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of the c-fms operon. Samples were taken at time points during disease progression, and histological analysis of the brain and transcriptional analysis of isolated microglia was carried out. The analysis of isolated microglia revealed a disease-specific, highly proinflammatory signature in addition to an upregulation of genes associated with metabolism and respiratory stress. This study strongly supports the growing recognition of the importance of microglia within the prion disease process and identifies the nature of the response through gene expression analysis of isolated microglia. Inflammation has been proposed as a major component of neurodegenerative diseases. We have examined the role of key contributors to this inflammatory process, microglia, the major resident immune cell population of the brain, in a murine prion disease model of chronic neurodegeneration. Our study demonstrates

  3. The Role of PP2A Methylation in Susceptibility and Resistance to TBI and AD-Induced Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    development and characterization in mice. J Neurotrauma 28, 2171-2183. Wood , G.W., Panzer, M.B., Yu, A.W., Rafaels, K.A., Matthews, K.A., Bass, C.R...INTRODUCTION: Neurodegeneration resulting from both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by aggregates of...we are staining paraffin embedded sections with H&E stain to examine general anatomical and cellular morphology, and performing

  4. Neuroprotective Effect of Fisetin Against Amyloid-Beta-Induced Cognitive/Synaptic Dysfunction, Neuroinflammation, and Neurodegeneration in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ali, Tahir; Park, Hyun Young; Badshah, Haroon; Rehman, Shafiq Ur; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2017-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating and progressive neurodegenerative disease and is characterized pathologically by the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) and the hyperphosphorylation of tau proteins in the brain. The deposition of Aβ aggregates triggers synaptic dysfunction, hyperphosphorylation of tau, and neurodegeneration, which lead to cognitive disorders. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of fisetin in the Aβ1-42 mouse model of AD. Single intracerebroventricular injections of Aβ1-42 (3 μl/5 min/mouse) markedly induced memory/synaptic deficits, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Intraperitoneal injections of fisetin at a dose of 20 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks starting 24 h after Aβ1-42 injection significantly decreased the Aβ1-42-induced accumulation of Aβ, BACE-1 expression, and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein at serine 413. Fisetin treatment also markedly reversed Aβ1-42-induced synaptic dysfunction by increasing the levels of both presynaptic (SYN and SNAP-25) and postsynaptic proteins (PSD-95, SNAP-23, p-GluR1 (Ser 845), p-CREB (Ser 133) and p-CAMKII (Thr 286) and ultimately improved mouse memory, as observed in the Morris water maze test. Fisetin significantly activated p-PI3K, p-Akt (Ser 473), and p-GSK3β (Ser 9) expression in Aβ1-42-treated mice. Moreover, fisetin prevented neuroinflammation by suppressing various activated neuroinflammatory mediators and gliosis; it also suppressed the apoptotic neurodegeneration triggered by Aβ1-42 injections in the mouse hippocampus. Fluorojade-B and immunohistochemical staining for caspase-3 revealed that fisetin prevented neurodegeneration in Aβ1-42-treated mice. Our results suggest that fisetin has a potent neuroprotective effect against Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity. These results demonstrate that polyphenolic flavonoids such as fisetin could be a beneficial, effective and safe neuroprotective agent for preventing neurological disorders such as AD.

  5. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure enhances neurodegeneration in the frontal cortex and hippocampus via NLRP-1 inflammasome activation in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen; Zhang, Yaodong; Wu, Wenning; Yin, Yanyan; Huang, Dake; Wang, Yuchan; Li, Weiping; Li, Weizu

    2016-02-01

    Neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and depression. Chronic glucocorticoids (GCs) exposure has deleterious effects on the structure and function of neurons and is associated with development and progression of AD. However, little is known about the proinflammatory effects of chronic GCs exposure on neurodegeneration in brain. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic dexamethasone (DEX) treatment (5mg/kg, s.c. for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days) on behavior, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammatory parameters of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor pyrin domain-containing 1 (NLRP-1) inflammasome in male mice. The results showed that DEX treatment for 21 and 28 days significantly reduced the spontaneous motor activity and exploratory behavior of the mice. In addition, these mice showed significant neurodegeneration and a decrease of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in the frontal cortex and hippocampus CA3. DEX treatment for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days significantly decreased the mRNA and protein expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Moreover, DEX treatment for 21 and 28 days significantly increased the proteins expression of NLRP-1, Caspase-1, Caspase-5, apoptosis associated speck-like protein (ASC), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p-NF-κB, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-18 and IL-6 in the frontal cortex and hippocampus brain tissue. DEX treatment for 28 days also significantly increased the mRNA expression levels of NLRP-1, Caspase-1, ASC and IL-1β. These results suggest that chronic GCs exposure may increase brain inflammation via NLRP-1 inflammasome activation and induce neurodegeneration.

  6. Increased CDK5 Expression in HIV Encephalitis Contributes to Neurodegeneration via Tau Phosphorylation and Is Reversed with Roscovitine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Christina; Crews, Leslie; Desplats, Paula; Dumaop, Wilmar; Rockenstein, Edward; Achim, Cristian L.; Everall, Ian P.; Masliah, Eliezer

    2011-01-01

    Recent treatments with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens have been shown to improve general clinical status in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; however, the prevalence of cognitive alterations and neurodegeneration has remained the same or has increased. These deficits are more pronounced in the subset of HIV patients with the inflammatory condition known as HIV encephalitis (HIVE). Activation of signaling pathways such as GSK3β and CDK5 has been implicated in the mechanisms of HIV neurotoxicity; however, the downstream mediators of these effects are unclear. The present study investigated the involvement of CDK5 and tau phosphorylation in the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in HIVE. In the frontal cortex of patients with HIVE, increased levels of CDK5 and p35 expression were associated with abnormal tau phosphorylation. Similarly, transgenic mice engineered to express the HIV protein gp120 exhibited increased brain levels of CDK5 and p35, alterations in tau phosphorylation, and dendritic degeneration. In contrast, genetic knockdown of CDK5 or treatment with the CDK5 inhibitor roscovitine improved behavioral performance in the water maze test and reduced neurodegeneration, abnormal tau phosphorylation, and astrogliosis in gp120 transgenic mice. These findings indicate that abnormal CDK5 activation contributes to the neurodegenerative process in HIVE via abnormal tau phosphorylation; thus, reducing CDK5 might ameliorate the cognitive impairments associated with HIVE. PMID:21435449

  7. In vitro detection of oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced neurodegeneration and pharmacological neuroprotection based on hippocampal stratum pyramidale width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Pınar; Saybaşılı, Hale

    2017-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the most prominent risk factors of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The effects of oxygen and glucose depletion in hippocampal tissue due to ischemia can be mimicked in vitro using the oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) model. In this study, we applied OGD on acute rat hippocampal slices in order to design an elementary yet quantitative histological technique that compares the neuroprotective effects of (l)-carnitine to known neuroprotectors, such as the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist memantine and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-B receptor agonist baclofen. The level of neurodegeneration and the efficiency of pharmacological applications were estimated via stratum pyramidale width measurements in CA1 and CA3 regions of Nissl-stained 200-μm thick hippocampal slices. We demonstrated that (l)-carnitine is an effective pharmacological target against the neurodegeneration induced by in vitro ischemia in a narrow range of concentrations. Even though the effect of chemical neuroprotection was significant, full recovery was not achieved in the dose interval of 5-100μM. In addition to chemical applications, hypothermia was used as a physical neuroprotection against ischemia-related neurodegeneration. Our results showed that incubation of slices for 60min at 4°C provided the same level of neuroprotection as the most effective doses of memantine, baclofen, and (l)-carnitine.

  8. Aluminum induces neurodegeneration and its toxicity arises from increased iron accumulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhihao; Du, Yumei; Xue, Hua; Wu, Yongsheng; Zhou, Bing

    2012-01-01

    The neurotoxicity of aluminum (Al) - the most abundant metal element on earth - has been known for years. However, the mechanism of Al-induced neurodegeneration and its relationship to Alzheimer's disease are still controversial. In particular, in vivo functional data are lacking. In a Drosophila model with chronic dietary Al overloading, general neurodegeneration and several behavioral changes were observed. Al-induced neurodegeneration is independent of β-amyloid or tau-associated toxicity, suggesting they act in different molecular pathways. Interestingly, Drosophila frataxin (dfh), which causes Friedreich's ataxia if mutated in humans, displayed an interacting effect with Al, suggesting Friedreich's ataxia patients might be more susceptible to Al toxicity. Al-treated flies accumulated large amount of iron and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and exhibited elevated SOD2 activity. Genetic and pharmacological efforts to reduce ROS or chelate excess Fe significantly mitigated Al toxicity. Our results indicate that Al toxicity is mediated through ROS production and iron accumulation and suggest a remedial route to reduce toxicity due to Al exposure.

  9. Activation of innate immunity in the CNS triggers neurodegeneration through a Toll-like receptor 4-dependent pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnardt, Seija; Massillon, Leon; Follett, Pamela; Jensen, Frances E.; Ratan, Rajiv; Rosenberg, Paul A.; Volpe, Joseph J.; Vartanian, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Innate immunity is an evolutionarily ancient system that provides organisms with immediately available defense mechanisms through recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. We show that in the CNS, specific activation of innate immunity through a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent pathway leads to neurodegeneration. We identify microglia as the major lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive cell in the CNS. TLR4 activation leads to extensive neuronal death in vitro that depends on the presence of microglia. LPS leads to dramatic neuronal loss in cultures prepared from wild-type mice but does not induce neuronal injury in CNS cultures derived from tlr4 mutant mice. In an in vivo model of neurodegeneration, stimulating the innate immune response with LPS converts a subthreshold hypoxic-ischemic insult from no discernable neuronal injury to severe axonal and neuronal loss. In contrast, animals bearing a loss-of-function mutation in the tlr4 gene are resistant to neuronal injury in the same model. The present study demonstrates a mechanistic link among innate immunity, TLRs, and neurodegeneration. PMID:12824464

  10. Depletion of TDP-43 decreases fibril and plaque β-amyloid and exacerbates neurodegeneration in an Alzheimer's mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaClair, Katherine D; Donde, Aneesh; Ling, Jonathan P; Jeong, Yun Ha; Chhabra, Resham; Martin, Lee J; Wong, Philip C

    2016-12-01

    TDP-43 proteinopathy, initially associated with ALS and FTD, is also found in 30-60% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases and correlates with worsened cognition and neurodegeneration. A major component of this proteinopathy is depletion of this RNA-binding protein from the nucleus, which compromises repression of non-conserved cryptic exons in neurodegenerative diseases. To test whether nuclear depletion of TDP-43 may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD cases with TDP-43 proteinopathy, we examined the impact of depletion of TDP-43 in populations of neurons vulnerable in AD, and on neurodegeneration in an AD-linked context. Here, we show that some populations of pyramidal neurons that are selectively vulnerable in AD are also vulnerable to TDP-43 depletion in mice, while other forebrain neurons appear spared. Moreover, TDP-43 depletion in forebrain neurons of an AD mouse model exacerbates neurodegeneration, and correlates with increased prefibrillar oligomeric Aβ and decreased Aβ plaque burden. These findings support a role for nuclear depletion of TDP-43 in the pathogenesis of AD and provide strong rationale for developing novel therapeutics to alleviate the depletion of TDP-43 and functional antemortem biomarkers associated with its nuclear loss.

  11. Retinal neurodegeneration may precede microvascular changes characteristic of diabetic retinopathy in diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Elliott H.; van Dijk, Hille W.; Jiao, Chunhua; Kok, Pauline H. B.; Jeong, Woojin; Demirkaya, Nazli; Garmager, Allison; Wit, Ferdinand; Kucukevcilioglu, Murat; van Velthoven, Mirjam E. J.; DeVries, J. Hans; Mullins, Robert F.; Kuehn, Markus H.; Schlingemann, Reinier Otto; Sonka, Milan; Verbraak, Frank D.; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) has long been recognized as a microvasculopathy, but retinal diabetic neuropathy (RDN), characterized by inner retinal neurodegeneration, also occurs in people with diabetes mellitus (DM). We report that in 45 people with DM and no to minimal DR there was significant, progressive loss of the nerve fiber layer (NFL) (0.25 μm/y) and the ganglion cell (GC)/inner plexiform layer (0.29 μm/y) on optical coherence tomography analysis (OCT) over a 4-y period, independent of glycated hemoglobin, age, and sex. The NFL was significantly thinner (17.3 μm) in the eyes of six donors with DM than in the eyes of six similarly aged control donors (30.4 μm), although retinal capillary density did not differ in the two groups. We confirmed significant, progressive inner retinal thinning in streptozotocin-induced “type 1” and B6.BKS(D)-Leprdb/J “type 2” diabetic mouse models on OCT; immunohistochemistry in type 1 mice showed GC loss but no difference in pericyte density or acellular capillaries. The results suggest that RDN may precede the established clinical and morphometric vascular changes caused by DM and represent a paradigm shift in our understanding of ocular diabetic complications. PMID:27114552

  12. Moringa oleifera Mitigates Memory Impairment and Neurodegeneration in Animal Model of Age-Related Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatchada Sutalangka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the preventive strategy against dementia is still essential due to the rapid growth of its prevalence and the limited therapeutic efficacy. Based on the crucial role of oxidative stress in age-related dementia and the antioxidant and nootropic activities of Moringa oleifera, the enhancement of spatial memory and neuroprotection of M. oleifera leaves extract in animal model of age-related dementia was determined. The possible underlying mechanism was also investigated. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180–220 g, were orally given M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg at a period of 7 days before and 7 days after the intracerebroventricular administration of AF64A bilaterally. Then, they were assessed memory, neuron density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GSH-Px, and AChE in hippocampus. The results showed that the extract improved spatial memory and neurodegeneration in CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus of hippocampus together with the decreased MDA level and AChE activity but increased SOD and CAT activities. Therefore, our data suggest that M. oleifera leaves extract is the potential cognitive enhancer and neuroprotectant. The possible mechanism might occur partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the enhanced cholinergic function. However, further explorations concerning active ingredient(s are still required.

  13. Exosomes-associated neurodegeneration and progression of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Isabella; Bubacco, Luigi; Greggio, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates the role of exosomes in a variety of physiological pathways as conveyors of biological materials from cell-to-cell. However the molecular mechanism(s) of secretion and their interaction with receiving cells are yet unclear. Recently, it is emerging that exosomes are involved in pathological processes as potential carriers in the progression of neurodegenerative pathologies associated with misfolded proteins. In the current review we will discuss some recent findings on the key role of exosomes in the spreading of the aggregated products of α-synuclein from neuron-to-neuron and of inflammatory response propagation from immune cell-to-cell; we will highlight the implication of exosomes in the neurodegeneration and progression of the disease and the their potential interplay with genes related to Parkinson’s disease. Increasing our knowledge on the cell-to-cell transmissions might provide new insights into mechanism of disease onset and progression and identify novel strategies for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention in Parkinson and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23383394

  14. KCa2 and KCa3 channels in learning and memory processes, and neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els F. E. Kuiper

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-activated potassium (KCa channels are present throughout the central nervous system as well as many peripheral tissues. Activation of KCa channels is essential for maintenance of the neuronal membrane potential and was shown to underlie the afterhyperpolarization (AHP that regulates action potential firing and limits the firing frequency of repetitive action potentials. Different subtypes of KCa channels were anticipated on the basis of their physiological and pharmacological profiles, and cloning revealed two well defined but phylogenetic distantly related groups of channels. The group subject of this review includes both the small-conductance KCa2 channels (KCa2.1, KCa2.2, and KCa2.3 and the intermediate-conductance (KCa3.1 channel. These channels are activated by submicromolar intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and are voltage independent. Of all KCa channels only the KCa2 channels can be potently but differentially blocked by the bee-venom apamin. In the past few years modulation of KCa channel activation revealed new roles for KCa2 channels in controlling dendritic excitability, synaptic functioning and synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, KCa2 channels appeared to be involved in neurodegeneration, and learning and memory processes. In this review, we focus on the role of KCa2 and KCa3 channels in these latter mechanisms with emphasis on learning and memory, Alzheimer’s disease and on the interplay between neuroinflammation and different neurotransmitters/neuromodulators, their signalling components and KCa channel activation.

  15. Mitochondrial deficiency: a double-edged sword for ageing and neurodegeneration

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    Daniele eBano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available For decades, ageing was considered the inevitable result of the accumulation of damaged macromolecules due to environmental factors and intrinsic processes. Our current knowledge clearly supports that ageing is a complex biological process influenced by multiple evolutionary conserved molecular pathways. With the advanced age, loss of cellular homeostasis severely affects the structure and function of various tissues, especially those highly sensitive to stressful conditions like the central nervous system. In this regard, the age-related regression of neural circuits and the consequent poor neuronal plasticity have been associated with metabolic dysfunctions, in which the decline of mitochondrial activity significantly contributes. Interestingly, while mitochondrial lesions promote the onset of degenerative disorders, mild mitochondrial manipulations delay some of the age-related phenotypes and, more importantly, increase the lifespan of organisms ranging from invertebrates to mammals. Here, we survey the insulin/IGF-1 and the TOR signaling pathways and review how these two important longevity determinants regulate mitochondrial activity. Furthermore, we discuss the contribution of slight mitochondrial dysfunction in the engagement of pro-longevity processes and the opposite role of strong mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegeneration.

  16. Memory deficit associated with increased brain proinflammatory cytokine levels and neurodegeneration in acute ischemic stroke

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    Bruno Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate behavioral changes and neuroinflammatory process following left unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (UCCAO, a model of cerebral ischemia. Post-ischemic behavioral changes following 15 min UCCAO were recorded 24 hours after reperfusion. The novel object recognition task was used to assess learning and memory. After behavioral test, brains from sham and ischemic mice were removed and processed to evaluate central nervous system pathology by TTC and H&E techniques as well as inflammatory mediators by ELISA. UCCAO promoted long-term memory impairment after reperfusion. Infarct areas were observed in the cerebrum by TTC stain. Moreover, the histopathological analysis revealed cerebral necrotic cavities surrounded by ischemic neurons and hippocampal neurodegeneration. In parallel with memory dysfunction, brain levels of TNF-a, IL-1b and CXCL1 were increased post ischemia compared with sham-operated group. These findings suggest an involvement of central nervous system inflammatory mediators and brain damage in cognitive impairment following unilateral acute ischemia.

  17. Moringa oleifera mitigates memory impairment and neurodegeneration in animal model of age-related dementia.

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    Sutalangka, Chatchada; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Thukham-mee, Wipawee

    2013-01-01

    To date, the preventive strategy against dementia is still essential due to the rapid growth of its prevalence and the limited therapeutic efficacy. Based on the crucial role of oxidative stress in age-related dementia and the antioxidant and nootropic activities of Moringa oleifera, the enhancement of spatial memory and neuroprotection of M. oleifera leaves extract in animal model of age-related dementia was determined. The possible underlying mechanism was also investigated. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180-220 g, were orally given M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg at a period of 7 days before and 7 days after the intracerebroventricular administration of AF64A bilaterally. Then, they were assessed memory, neuron density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GSH-Px, and AChE in hippocampus. The results showed that the extract improved spatial memory and neurodegeneration in CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus of hippocampus together with the decreased MDA level and AChE activity but increased SOD and CAT activities. Therefore, our data suggest that M. oleifera leaves extract is the potential cognitive enhancer and neuroprotectant. The possible mechanism might occur partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the enhanced cholinergic function. However, further explorations concerning active ingredient(s) are still required.

  18. Association between a genetic variant of type-1 cannabinoid receptor and inflammatory neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis.

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    Silvia Rossi

    Full Text Available Genetic ablation of type-1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs exacerbates the neurodegenerative damage of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the rodent model of multiple sclerosis (MS. To address the role on CB1Rs in the pathophysiology of human MS, we first investigated the impact of AAT trinucleotide short tandem repeat polymorphism of CNR1 gene on CB1R cell expression, and secondly on the inflammatory neurodegeneration process responsible for irreversible disability in MS patients. We found that MS patients with long AAT repeats within the CNR1 gene (≥12 in both alleles had more pronounced neuronal degeneration in response to inflammatory white matter damage both in the optic nerve and in the cortex. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT, in fact, showed more severe alterations of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness and of the macular volume (MV after an episode of optic neuritis in MS patients carrying the long AAT genotype of CNR1. MS patients with long AAT repeats also had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI evidence of increased gray matter damage in response to inflammatory lesions of the white matter, especially in areas with a major role in cognition. In parallel, visual abilities evaluated at the low contrast acuity test, and cognitive performances were negatively influenced by the long AAT CNR1 genotype in our sample of MS patients. Our results demonstrate the biological relevance of the (AATn CNR1 repeats in the inflammatory neurodegenerative damage of MS.

  19. Bioengineered 3D Glial Cell Culture Systems and Applications for Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation.

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    Watson, P Marc D; Kavanagh, Edel; Allenby, Gary; Vassey, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation are key features in a range of chronic central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, as well as acute conditions like stroke and traumatic brain injury, for which there remains significant unmet clinical need. It is now well recognized that current cell culture methodologies are limited in their ability to recapitulate the cellular environment that is present in vivo, and there is a growing body of evidence to show that three-dimensional (3D) culture systems represent a more physiologically accurate model than traditional two-dimensional (2D) cultures. Given the complexity of the environment from which cells originate, and their various cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, it is important to develop models that can be controlled and reproducible for drug discovery. 3D cell models have now been developed for almost all CNS cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocyte cells. This review will highlight a number of current and emerging techniques for the culture of astrocytes and microglia, glial cell types with a critical role in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions. We describe recent advances in glial cell culture using electrospun polymers and hydrogel macromolecules, and highlight how these novel culture environments influence astrocyte and microglial phenotypes in vitro, as compared to traditional 2D systems. These models will be explored to illuminate current trends in the techniques used to create 3D environments for application in research and drug discovery focused on astrocytes and microglial cells.

  20. Use of Okadaic Acid to Identify Relevant Phosphoepitopes in Pathology: A Focus on Neurodegeneration

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    Jesús Avila

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation is involved in the regulation of a wide variety of physiological processes and is the result of a balance between protein kinase and phosphatase activities. Biologically active marine derived compounds have been shown to represent an interesting source of novel compounds that could modify that balance. Among them, the marine toxin and tumor promoter, okadaic acid (OA, has been shown as an inhibitor of two of the main cytosolic, broad-specificity protein phosphatases, PP1 and PP2A, thus providing an excellent cell-permeable probe for examining the role of protein phosphorylation, and PP1 and PP2A in particular, in any physiological or pathological process. In the present work, we review the use of okadaic acid to identify specific phosphoepitopes mainly in proteins relevant for neurodegeneration. We will specifically highlight those cases of highly dynamic phosphorylation-dephosphorylation events and the ability of OA to block the high turnover phosphorylation, thus allowing the detection of modified residues that could be otherwise difficult to identify. Finally, its effect on tau hyperhosphorylation and its relevance in neurodegenerative pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia will be discussed.

  1. Evaluation of neurodegeneration through visual evoked potentials in restless legs syndrome.

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    Kısabay, Ayşın; Sarı, Ummu Serpil; Korkmaz, Tuğba; Dinçhorasan, Gönül; Yılmaz, Hikmet; Selçuki, Deniz

    2016-12-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a disease characterized by some type of dysesthesia, an indescribable abnormal sensation in the extremities. Our objective was to determine whether the visual evoked potentials (VEP) can be used as a quantitative monitoring method to evaluate demyelination-remyelination and neurodegeneration in the patients with RLS. The present study was carried out prospectively. It was planned to determine normal or pathological conditions in the form of increased latency or decreased amplitude of VEP and to evaluate possible pathologies in the visual and retinal pathways at early stages and at months 3 and 6 of follow-up in the patients with RLS (with or without iron deficiency anemia), in those without RLS (at the time of diagnosis prior to any medical therapy) without any visual symptoms. It was observed that latency of VEP improved but didn't return to normal limits following treatment with dopamin agonists, iron, or combination of both and that there was no significant difference between the post-treatment data and those of the control group. These results in combination with the fact that the latencies and amplitudes didn't return to normal levels despite the 6-month-treatment but showed a progressive course with partial regeneration suggests that there was incomplete remyelination. It should be kept in mind that this syndrome is likely to be a part of neurodegenerative process.

  2. Neurogenesis and neuroprotection in postischemic brain neurodegeneration with Alzheimer phenotype: is there a role for curcumin?

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    Pluta, Ryszard; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Furmaga-Jabłońska, Wanda; Januszewski, Sławomir; Brzozowska, Judyta; Jabłoński, Mirosław; Kocki, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    For thousands of years, humankind has used plants for therapeutics. Nowadays, there is a renewed public interest in naturally occurring treatments with minimal toxicity and diets related to health. Alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis have been recognized as an integral part of brain ischemia. Neuronal stem/progenitor cells in the hippocampus are positively and negatively regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic agents. One positive regulator of neurogenesis in the hippocampus is curcumin in the diet. This review provides an assessment of the current state of the field in hippocampal neurogenesis and neuroprotection studies in brain ischemia and focuses on the role of curcumin in the diet. Data suggest that dietary intake of curcumin enhances neurogenesis. Recent studies performed in ischemic models have suggested that curcumin also has neuroprotective features. One potential mechanism to explain several of the general health benefits associated with curcumin is that it may prevent ageing-associated changes in cellular proteins that lead to protein insolubility and aggregation after ischemia such as β-amyloid peptide and tau protein. Here, we also review the evidence from ischemic models that curcumin improves cognition and health span by overexpression of life supporting genes and preventing or delaying the onset of neurodegenerative changes. Available data provide evidence that curcumin induces neurogenesis and neuroprotection and may provide a novel therapeutic agent for both regenerative medicine and for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as postischemic brain neurodegeneration with Alzheimer phenotype.

  3. Neuronal dark matter: The emerging role of microRNAs in neurodegeneration

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    Emily Frances Goodall

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, abundant RNA molecules that constitute part of the cell’s non-coding RNA dark matter. In recent years, the discovery of miRNAs has revolutionised the traditional view of gene expression and our understanding of miRNA biogenesis and function has expanded. Altered expression of miRNAs is increasingly recognised as a feature of many disease states, including neurodegeneration. Here, we review the emerging role for miRNA dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington’s disease pathogenesis. We emphasise the complex nature of gene regulatory networks and the need for systematic studies, with larger sample cohorts than have so far been reported, to reveal the most important miRNA regulators in disease. Finally, miRNA diversity and their potential to target multiple pathways, offers novel clinical applications for miRNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic agents in neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. The interactive roles of zinc and calcium in mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration.

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    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Stanika, Ruslan I; Kazanina, Galina; Villanueva, Idalis; Andrews, S Brian

    2014-02-01

    Zinc has been implicated in neurodegeneration following ischemia. In analogy with calcium, zinc has been proposed to induce toxicity via mitochondrial dysfunction, but the relative role of each cation in mitochondrial damage remains unclear. Here, we report that under conditions mimicking ischemia in hippocampal neurons - normal (2 mM) calcium plus elevated (> 100 μM) exogenous zinc - mitochondrial dysfunction evoked by glutamate, kainate or direct depolarization is, despite significant zinc uptake, primarily governed by calcium. Thus, robust mitochondrial ion accumulation, swelling, depolarization, and reactive oxygen species generation were only observed after toxic stimulation in calcium-containing media. This contrasts with the lack of any mitochondrial response in zinc-containing but calcium-free medium, even though zinc uptake and toxicity were strong under these conditions. Indeed, abnormally high, ionophore-induced zinc uptake was necessary to elicit any mitochondrial depolarization. In calcium- and zinc-containing media, depolarization-induced zinc uptake facilitated cell death and enhanced accumulation of mitochondrial calcium, which localized to characteristic matrix precipitates. Some of these contained detectable amounts of zinc. Together these data indicate that zinc uptake is generally insufficient to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction, so that mechanism(s) of zinc toxicity must be different from that of calcium. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Molecular signatures of neurodegeneration in the cortex of PS1/PS2 double knockout mice

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    Choi Se

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial Alzheimer's disease-linked variants of presenilin (PSEN1 and PSEN2 contribute to the pathophysiology of disease by both gain-of-function and loss-of-function mechanisms. Deletions of PSEN1 and PSEN2 in the mouse forebrain result in a strong and progressive neurodegenerative phenotype which is characterized by both anatomical and behavioral changes. Results To better understand the molecular changes associated with these morphological and behavioral phenotypes, we performed a DNA microarray transcriptome profiling of the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of the PSEN1/PSEN2 double knock-out mice and littermate controls at five different ages ranging from 2–8 months. Our data suggest that combined deficiencies of PSEN1 and PSEN2 results in a progressive, age-dependent transcriptome signature related to neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. While these events may progress differently in the hippocampus and frontal cortex, the most critical expression signatures are common across the two brain regions, and involve a strong upregulation of cathepsin and complement system transcripts. Conclusion The observed neuroinflammatory expression changes are likely to be causally linked to the neurodegenerative phenotype observed in mice with compound deletions of PSEN1 and PSEN2. Furthermore, our results suggest that the evaluation of inhibitors of PS/γ-secretase activity for treatment of Alzheimer's Disease must include close monitoring for signs of calpain-cathepsin system activation.

  6. Retinal neurodegeneration may precede microvascular changes characteristic of diabetic retinopathy in diabetes mellitus.

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    Sohn, Elliott H; van Dijk, Hille W; Jiao, Chunhua; Kok, Pauline H B; Jeong, Woojin; Demirkaya, Nazli; Garmager, Allison; Wit, Ferdinand; Kucukevcilioglu, Murat; van Velthoven, Mirjam E J; DeVries, J Hans; Mullins, Robert F; Kuehn, Markus H; Schlingemann, Reinier Otto; Sonka, Milan; Verbraak, Frank D; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-05-10

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) has long been recognized as a microvasculopathy, but retinal diabetic neuropathy (RDN), characterized by inner retinal neurodegeneration, also occurs in people with diabetes mellitus (DM). We report that in 45 people with DM and no to minimal DR there was significant, progressive loss of the nerve fiber layer (NFL) (0.25 μm/y) and the ganglion cell (GC)/inner plexiform layer (0.29 μm/y) on optical coherence tomography analysis (OCT) over a 4-y period, independent of glycated hemoglobin, age, and sex. The NFL was significantly thinner (17.3 μm) in the eyes of six donors with DM than in the eyes of six similarly aged control donors (30.4 μm), although retinal capillary density did not differ in the two groups. We confirmed significant, progressive inner retinal thinning in streptozotocin-induced "type 1" and B6.BKS(D)-Lepr(db)/J "type 2" diabetic mouse models on OCT; immunohistochemistry in type 1 mice showed GC loss but no difference in pericyte density or acellular capillaries. The results suggest that RDN may precede the established clinical and morphometric vascular changes caused by DM and represent a paradigm shift in our understanding of ocular diabetic complications.

  7. Mitochondria: A crossroads for lipid metabolism defect in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation diseases.

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    Aoun, Manar; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of brain iron deposition syndromes that lead to mixed extrapyramidal features and progressive dementia. Exact pathologic mechanism of iron deposition in NBIA remains unknown. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that many neurodegenerative diseases are hallmarked by metabolic dysfunction that often involves altered lipid profile. Among the identified disease genes, four encode for proteins localized in mitochondria, which are directly or indirectly implicated in lipid metabolism: PANK2, CoASY, PLA2G6 and C19orf12. Mutations in PANK2 and CoASY, both implicated in CoA biosynthesis that acts as a fatty acyl carrier, lead, respectively, to PKAN and CoPAN forms of NBIA. Mutations in PLA2G6, which plays a key role in the biosynthesis and remodeling of membrane phospholipids including cardiolipin, lead to PLAN. Mutations in C19orf12 lead to MPAN, a syndrome similar to that caused by mutations in PANK2 and PLA2G6. Although the function of C19orf12 is largely unknown, experimental data suggest its implication in mitochondrial homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Altogether, the identified mutated proteins localized in mitochondria and associated with different NBIA forms support the concept that dysfunctions in mitochondria and lipid metabolism play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of NBIA. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  8. Subjective cognitive concerns, amyloid-β, and neurodegeneration in clinically normal elderly

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    Mormino, Elizabeth C.; Pietras, Alison C.; Marshall, Gad A.; Vannini, Patrizia; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Rentz, Dorene M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether neuroimaging biomarkers of amyloid-β (Aβ) and neurodegeneration (ND) are associated with greater self-reported subjective cognitive concerns (SCC) in clinically normal older individuals. Methods: A total of 257 participants underwent Pittsburgh compound B PET, PET with fluorodeoxyglucose 18F, and structural MRI, as well as a battery of neuropsychological measures including several questionnaires regarding SCC. Individuals were classified into 4 biomarker groups: biomarker negative (Aβ−/ND−), amyloidosis alone (Aβ+/ND−), amyloidosis plus ND (Aβ+/ND+), and ND alone (Aβ−/ND+). Results: Both Aβ and ND were independently associated with greater SCC controlling for objective memory performance. By contrast, neither Aβ nor ND was associated with objective memory performance controlling for SCC. Further examination revealed greater SCC in individuals with Aβ or ND positivity compared to biomarker-negative individuals. In addition, greater SCC predicted Aβ positivity when controlling for ND status. Conclusions: When individuals were grouped by biomarker status, those who were positive on Aβ or ND had the highest report of SCC compared to biomarker-negative individuals. Findings were consistent when SCC was used to predict Aβ positivity. Taken together, results suggest that both Aβ and ND are associated with SCC, independent of objective memory performance. Enrichment of individuals with SCC may increase likelihood of Aβ and ND markers in potential participants for secondary prevention trials. PMID:26048028

  9. Oxidative Stress and Proteostasis Network: Culprit and Casualty of Alzheimer’s-Like Neurodegeneration

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    Fabio Di Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radical-mediated damage to proteins is particularly important in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, because in the majority of cases it is a non-reversible phenomenon that requires clearance systems for removal. Major consequences of protein oxidation are loss of protein function and the formation of large protein aggregates, which are often toxic to cells if allowed to accumulate. Deposition of aggregated, misfolded, and oxidized proteins may also result from the impairment of protein quality control (PQC system, including protein unfolded response, proteasome, and autophagy. Perturbations of such components of the proteostasis network that provides a critical protective role against stress conditions are emerging as relevant factor in triggering neuronal death. In this outlook paper, we discuss the role of protein oxidation as a major contributing factor for the impairment of the PQC regulating protein folding, surveillance, and degradation. Recent studies from our group and from others aim to better understand the link between Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease neuropathology. We propose oxidative stress and alteration of proteostasis network as a possible unifying mechanism triggering neurodegeneration.

  10. Puzzles in modern biology. IV. Neurodegeneration, localized origin and widespread decay [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Steven A. Frank

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The motor neuron disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS typically begins with localized muscle weakness. Progressive, widespread paralysis often follows over a few years. Does the disease begin with local changes in a small piece of neural tissue and then spread? Or does neural decay happen independently across diverse spatial locations? The distinction matters, because local initiation may arise by local changes in a tissue microenvironment, by somatic mutation, or by various epigenetic or regulatory fluctuations in a few cells. A local trigger must be coupled with a mechanism for spread. By contrast, independent decay across spatial locations cannot begin by a local change, but must depend on some global predisposition or spatially distributed change that leads to approximately synchronous decay. This article outlines the conceptual frame by which one contrasts local triggers and spread versus parallel spatially distributed decay. Various neurodegenerative diseases differ in their mechanistic details, but all can usefully be understood as falling along a continuum of interacting local and global processes. Cancer provides an example of disease progression by local triggers and spatial spread, setting a conceptual basis for clarifying puzzles in neurodegeneration. Heart disease also has crucial interactions between global processes, such as circulating lipid levels, and local processes in the development of atherosclerotic plaques. The distinction between local and global processes helps to understand these various age-related diseases.

  11. O-GlcNAcylation: A regulator of tau pathology and neurodegeneration.

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    Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid

    2016-10-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is the posttranslational modification of intracellular proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). The discovery of O-GlcNAc modification of tau and its impact on tau phosphorylation has attracted recent research interest in O-GlcNAc studies in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) field. Modification of proteins by O-GlcNAc occurs extensively in the brain. The expressions and activities of the enzymes catalyzing O-GlcNAc cycling are several-fold higher in the brain than in the peripheral tissues. The O-GlcNAcylation levels of brain proteins including tau are decreased in AD brain, probably due to decreased brain glucose metabolism. The reduction of brain O-GlcNAcylation appears to mediate the molecular mechanism by which decreased brain glucose metabolism contributes to neurodegeneration. Studies on mouse models of tauopathies suggest a neuroprotective role of pharmacological elevation of brain O-GlcNAc, which could potentially be a promising approach for treating AD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Genome-wide screen for modifiers of ataxin-3 neurodegeneration in Drosophila.

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    Julide Bilen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3 is among the most common dominantly inherited ataxias, and is one of nine devastating human neurodegenerative diseases caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat encoding glutamine within the gene. The polyglutamine domain confers toxicity on the protein Ataxin-3 leading to neuronal dysfunction and loss. Although modifiers of polyglutamine toxicity have been identified, little is known concerning how the modifiers function mechanistically to affect toxicity. To reveal insight into spinocerebellar ataxia type-3, we performed a genetic screen in Drosophila with pathogenic Ataxin-3-induced neurodegeneration and identified 25 modifiers defining 18 genes. Despite a variety of predicted molecular activities, biological analysis indicated that the modifiers affected protein misfolding. Detailed mechanistic studies revealed that some modifiers affected protein accumulation in a manner dependent on the proteasome, whereas others affected autophagy. Select modifiers of Ataxin-3 also affected tau, revealing common pathways between degeneration due to distinct human neurotoxic proteins. These findings provide new insight into molecular pathways of polyQ toxicity, defining novel targets for promoting neuronal survival in human neurodegenerative disease.

  13. Fluorescent light induces neurodegeneration in the rodent nigrostriatal system but near infrared LED light does not.

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    Romeo, Stefania; Vitale, Flora; Viaggi, Cristina; di Marco, Stefano; Aloisi, Gabriella; Fasciani, Irene; Pardini, Carla; Pietrantoni, Ilaria; Di Paolo, Mattia; Riccitelli, Serena; Maccarone, Rita; Mattei, Claudia; Capannolo, Marta; Rossi, Mario; Capozzo, Annamaria; Corsini, Giovanni U; Scarnati, Eugenio; Lozzi, Luca; Vaglini, Francesca; Maggio, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the effects of continuous artificial light exposure on the mouse substantia nigra (SN). A three month exposure of C57Bl/6J mice to white fluorescent light induced a 30% reduction in dopamine (DA) neurons in SN compared to controls, accompanied by a decrease of DA and its metabolites in the striatum. After six months of exposure, neurodegeneration progressed slightly, but the level of DA returned to the basal level, while the metabolites increased with respect to the control. Three month exposure to near infrared LED light (∼710nm) did not alter DA neurons in SN, nor did it decrease DA and its metabolites in the striatum. Furthermore mesencephalic cell viability, as tested by [(3)H]DA uptake, did not change. Finally, we observed that 710nm LED light, locally conveyed in the rat SN, could modulate the firing activity of extracellular-recorded DA neurons. These data suggest that light can be detrimental or beneficial to DA neurons in SN, depending on the source and wavelength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurodegeneration in Friedreich’s Ataxia: From Defective Frataxin to Oxidative Stress

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    Cláudio M. Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich’s ataxia is the most common inherited autosomal recessive ataxia and is characterized by progressive degeneration of the peripheral and central nervous systems and cardiomyopathy. This disease is caused by the silencing of the FXN gene and reduced levels of the encoded protein, frataxin. Frataxin is a mitochondrial protein that functions primarily in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis. This small protein with an α/β sandwich fold undergoes complex processing and imports into the mitochondria, generating isoforms with distinct N-terminal lengths which may underlie different functionalities, also in respect to oligomerization. Missense mutations in the FXN coding region, which compromise protein folding, stability, and function, are found in 4% of FRDA heterozygous patients and are useful to understand how loss of functional frataxin impacts on FRDA physiopathology. In cells, frataxin deficiency leads to pleiotropic phenotypes, including deregulation of iron homeostasis and increased oxidative stress. Increasing amount of data suggest that oxidative stress contributes to neurodegeneration in Friedreich’s ataxia.

  15. Calcium dysregulation contributes to neurodegeneration in FTLD patient iPSC-derived neurons

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    Imamura, Keiko; Sahara, Naruhiko; Kanaan, Nicholas M.; Tsukita, Kayoko; Kondo, Takayuki; Kutoku, Yumiko; Ohsawa, Yutaka; Sunada, Yoshihide; Kawakami, Koichi; Hotta, Akitsu; Yawata, Satoshi; Watanabe, Dai; Hasegawa, Masato; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Suhara, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Makoto; Inoue, Haruhisa

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene MAPT encoding tau, a microtubules-associated protein, cause a subtype of familial neurodegenerative disorder, known as frontotemporal lobar degeneration tauopathy (FTLD-Tau), which presents with dementia and is characterized by atrophy in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. Although induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has facilitated the investigation of phenotypes of FTLD-Tau patient neuronal cells in vitro, it remains unclear how FTLD-Tau patient neurons degenerate. Here, we established neuronal models of FTLD-Tau by Neurogenin2-induced direct neuronal differentiation from FTLD-Tau patient iPSCs. We found that FTLD-Tau neurons, either with an intronic MAPT mutation or with an exonic mutation, developed accumulation and extracellular release of misfolded tau followed by neuronal death, which we confirmed by correction of the intronic mutation with CRISPR/Cas9. FTLD-Tau neurons showed dysregulation of the augmentation of Ca2+ transients evoked by electrical stimulation. Chemogenetic or pharmacological control of neuronal activity-relevant Ca2+ influx by the introduction of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs) or by the treatment with glutamate receptor blockers attenuated misfolded tau accumulation and neuronal death. These data suggest that neuronal activity may regulate neurodegeneration in tauopathy. This FTLD-Tau model provides mechanistic insights into tauopathy pathogenesis and potential avenues for treatments. PMID:27721502

  16. Yeast proteinopathy models: a robust tool for deciphering the basis of neurodegeneration

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    Amit Shrestha

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein quality control or proteostasis is an essential determinant of basic cell health and aging. Eukaryotic cells have evolved a number of proteostatic mechanisms to ensure that proteins retain functional conformation, or are rapidly degraded when proteins misfold or self-aggregate. Disruption of proteostasis is now widely recognized as a key feature of aging related illness, specifically neurodegenerative disease. For example, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS each target and afflict distinct neuronal cell subtypes, yet this diverse array of human pathologies share the defining feature of aberrant protein aggregation within the affected cell population. Here, we review the use of budding yeast as a robust proxy to study the intersection between proteostasis and neurodegenerative disease. The humanized yeast model has proven to be an amenable platform to identify both, conserved proteostatic mechanisms across eukaryotic phyla and novel disease specific molecular dysfunction. Moreover, we discuss the intriguing concept that yeast specific proteins may be utilized as bona fide therapeutic agents, to correct proteostasis errors across various forms of neurodegeneration.

  17. Dysregulation of microRNA-219 promotes neurodegeneration through post-transcriptional regulation of tau

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    Santa-Maria, Ismael; Alaniz, Maria E.; Renwick, Neil; Cela, Carolina; Fulga, Tudor A.; Van Vactor, David; Tuschl, Thomas; Clark, Lorraine N.; Shelanski, Michael L.; McCabe, Brian D.; Crary, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Tau is a highly abundant and multifunctional brain protein that accumulates in neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and primary age-related tauopathy. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been linked to neurodegeneration; however, it is not clear whether miRNA dysregulation contributes to tau neurotoxicity. Here, we determined that the highly conserved brain miRNA miR-219 is downregulated in brain tissue taken at autopsy from patients with AD and from those with severe primary age-related tauopathy. In a Drosophila model that produces human tau, reduction of miR-219 exacerbated tau toxicity, while overexpression of miR-219 partially abrogated toxic effects. Moreover, we observed a bidirectional modulation of tau levels in the Drosophila model that was dependent on miR-219 expression or neutralization, demonstrating that miR-219 regulates tau in vivo. In mammalian cellular models, we found that miR-219 binds directly to the 3′-UTR of the tau mRNA and represses tau synthesis at the post-transcriptional level. Together, our data indicate that silencing of tau by miR-219 is an ancient regulatory mechanism that may become perturbed during neurofibrillary degeneration and suggest that this regulatory pathway may be useful for developing therapeutics for tauopathies. PMID:25574843

  18. Crosstalking noncoding RNAs contribute to cell-specific neurodegeneration in SCA7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jennifer Y.; Sirey, Tamara; Watson, Lauren M.; Curtis, Helen J.; Marinello, Martina; Alves, Sandro; Steinkraus, Bruno; Cooper, Sarah; Nesterova, Tatyana; Brockdorff, Neil; Fulga, Tudor; Brice, Alexis; Sittler, Annie; Oliver, Peter L.; Wood, Matthew J.; Ponting, Chris P.; Marques, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    What causes the tissue-specific pathology of diseases resulting from mutations in housekeeping genes? Specifically, in Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7), a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in ATXN7- an essential component of the mammalian transcription co-activation complex, STAGA- the factors underlying the characteristic progressive cerebellar and retinal degeneration observed in patients were unknown. We found that STAGA is required for the transcription initiation of miR-124, which in turn mediates the post-transcriptional crosstalk between lnc-SCA7, a conserved long noncoding RNA, and ATXN7. In SCA7, mutations in ATXN7 disrupt these regulatory interactions and result in a neuron-specific increase in ATXN7 abundance. Strikingly in mouse, this increase is most prominent in the SCA7 disease-relevant tissues, namely the retina and cerebellum. Our results illustrate how noncoding RNA-mediated feedback regulation of a ubiquitously expressed housekeeping gene may contribute to specific neurodegeneration. PMID:25306109

  19. Phosphatidylinositol-glycan-phospholipase D is involved in neurodegeneration in prion disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Kwang Jin

    Full Text Available PrPSc is formed from a normal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored prion protein (PrPC by a posttranslational modification. Most GPI-anchored proteins have been shown to be cleaved by GPI phospholipases. Recently, GPI-phospholipase D (GPI-PLD was shown to be a strictly specific enzyme for GPI anchors. To investigate the involvement of GPI-PLD in the processes of neurodegeneration in prion diseases, we examined the mRNA and protein expression levels of GPI-PLD in the brains of a prion animal model (scrapie, and in both the brains and cerebrospinal fluids (CSF of sporadic and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD patients. We found that compared with controls, the expression of GPI-PLD was dramatically down-regulated in the brains of scrapie-infected mice, especially in the caveolin-enriched membrane fractions. Interestingly, the observed decrease in GPI-PLD expression levels began at the same time that PrPSc began to accumulate in the infected brains and this decrease was also observed in both the brain and CSF of CJD patients; however, no differences in expression were observed in either the brains or CSF specimens from Alzheimer's disease patients. Taken together, these results suggest that the down-regulation of GPI-PLD protein may be involved in prion propagation in the brains of prion diseases.

  20. Intermediate filament transcription in astrocytes is repressed by proteasome inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middeldorp, Jinte; Kamphuis, Willem; Sluijs, Jacqueline A.; Achoui, Dalila; Leenaars, Cathalijn H. C.; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.; van Tijn, Paula; Fischer, David F.; Berkers, Celia; Ovaa, Huib; Quinlan, Roy A.; Hol, Elly M.

    2009-01-01

    Increased expression of the astrocytic intermediate filament protein glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a characteristic of astrogliosis. This process occurs in the brain during aging and neurodegeneration and coincides with impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system. Inhibition of the proteasome impairs protein degradation; therefore, we hypothesized that the increase in GFAP may be the result of impaired proteasomal activity in astrocytes. We investigated the effect of proteasome inhibitors on GFAP expression and other intermediate filament proteins in human astrocytoma cells and in a rat brain model for astrogliosis. Extensive quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot analysis resulted unexpectedly in a strong decrease of GFAP mRNA to Hol, E. M. Intermediate filament transcription in astrocytes is repressed by proteasome inhibition. PMID:19332645

  1. The phosphodiesterase type 2 inhibitor BAY 60-7550 reverses functional impairments induced by brain ischemia by decreasing hippocampal neurodegeneration and enhancing hippocampal neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ligia Mendes; Meyer, Erika; Milani, Humberto; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Prickaerts, Jos; de Oliveira, Rúbia M Weffort

    2017-02-01

    Cognitive and affective impairments are the most characterized consequences following cerebral ischemia. BAY 60-7550, a selective phosphodiesterase type 2 inhibitor (PDE2-I), presents memory-enhancing and anxiolytic-like properties. The behavioral effects of BAY 60-7550 have been associated with its ability to prevent hydrolysis of both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) thereby interfering with neuronal plasticity. Here, we hypothesize that PDE2-I treatment could promote functional recovery after brain ischemia. Mice C57Bl/6 were submitted to bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO), an experimental model of transient brain ischemia, for 20 min. During 21 days after reperfusion, the animals were tested in a battery of behavioral tests including the elevated zero maze (EZM), object location task (OLT) and forced swim test (FST). The effects of BAY 60-7550 were evaluated on neuronal nuclei (NeuN), caspase-9, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus. BCCAO increased anxiety levels, impaired hippocampus-dependent cognitive function and induced despair-like behavior in mice. Hippocampal neurodegeneration was evidenced by a decrease in NeuN and increase incaspase-9 protein levels in BCCAO mice. Ischemic mice also showed low BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus. Repeated treatment with BAY 60-7550 attenuated the behavioral impairments induced by BCCAO in mice. Concomitantly, BAY 60-7550 enhanced expression of pCREB and BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus of ischemic mice. The present findings suggest that chronic inhibition of PDE2 provides functional recovery in BCCAO mice possibly by augmenting hippocampal neuronal plasticity.

  2. Complement C3 deficiency leads to accelerated amyloid beta plaque deposition and neurodegeneration and modulation of the microglia/macrophage phenotype in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Marcel; Peng, Ying; Jiang, Liying; Seabrook, Timothy J; Carroll, Michael C; Lemere, Cynthia A

    2008-06-18

    Complement factor C3 is the central component of the complement system and a key inflammatory protein activated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of C3 by overexpression of soluble complement receptor-related protein y in an AD mouse model led to reduced microgliosis, increased amyloid beta (Abeta) plaque burden, and neurodegeneration. To further address the role of C3 in AD pathology, we generated a complement C3-deficient amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic AD mouse model (APP;C3(-/-)). Brains were analyzed at 8, 12, and 17 months of age by immunohistochemical and biochemical methods and compared with age-matched APP transgenic mice. At younger ages (8-12 months), no significant neuropathological differences were observed between the two transgenic lines. In contrast, at 17 months of age, APP;C3(-/-) mice showed significant changes of up to twofold increased total Abeta and fibrillar amyloid plaque burden in midfrontal cortex and hippocampus, which correlated with (1) significantly increased Tris-buffered saline (TBS)-insoluble Abeta(42) levels and reduced TBS-soluble Abeta(42) and Abeta(40) levels in brain homogenates, (2) a trend for increased Abeta levels in the plasma, (3) a significant loss of neuronal-specific nuclear protein-positive neurons in the hippocampus, and (4) differential activation of microglia toward a more alternative phenotype (e.g., significantly increased CD45-positive microglia, increased brain levels of interleukins 4 and 10, and reduced levels of CD68, F4/80, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and tumor necrosis factor). Our results suggest a beneficial role for complement C3 in plaque clearance and neuronal health as well as in modulation of the microglia phenotype.

  3. Multivariate profiling of neurodegeneration-associated changes in a subcellular compartment of neurons via image processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasamy Saravana K

    2008-11-01

    differentiates all three bchs phenotypes (loss of function as well as overexpression from the wild type. Conclusion Our model demonstrates that neurodegeneration-associated endolysosomal defects can be detected, analyzed, and classified rapidly and accurately as a diagnostic imaging-based screening tool.

  4. Re-circulating Phagocytes Loaded with CNS Debris: A Potential Marker of Neurodegeneration in Parkinsons Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa J. White

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and monitoring of diseases by measurement of biochemical markers has most commonly been performed on samples of peripheral blood. However, no such markers are available for clinical use in the major diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. In Parkinson's disease circulating biomarkers would find clinical utility in early diagnosis and also monitoring of disease progression. Of particular interest is early diagnosis as this would create .a window of opportunity for treatment with neuroprotective drugs. We have developed a novel strategy for monitoring disease activity in the CNS based on the recognition that tissue injuries incite inflammation and recruitment of phagocytes that engulf debris. We postulated that some of these debris laden phagocytes may return to the peripheral blood and their cargo of CNS proteins could be measured. If CNS antigens can be measured in PBMCs it may be an indicator of active neurodegeneration as the debris engulfed by phagocytes is completely degraded within days. To make this approach more specific to Parkinson's disease we probed PBMC lysates for neuromelanin as a marker of degeneration within the substancia nigra. We performed a proof of principle study in ten subjects with early PD and ten age and sex matched controls. The biomarkers neuromelanin, Tau protein, UCH-L1 and HPCAL-1 were measured in PBMC lysates from these two groups. Neuromelanin and Tau protein mean levels were elevated in PD compared with controls and was extremely statistically significant in both cases. UCH-L1 and HPCAL-1 mean levels were elevated in PD over controls and were not quite significant in both cases. These results suggest that this is a promising new approach for diagnosis and monitoring of PD and potentially other CNS diseases.

  5. Functional and structural MRI biomarkers to detect pre-clinical neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Ronneberger, Olaf; Wolf, Robert Christian; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Saft, Carsten; Klöppel, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    The availability of an accurate genetic test to identify Huntington's Disease (HD) in the pre-symptomatic stage makes HD an important model to develop biomarkers for other neurodegenerative diseases, such as pre-clinical Alzheimer's Disease. We reasoned that functional changes, measured by functional MRI (fMRI), would precede gray matter changes and that performing a task specifically affected by the disease would carry the clearest signature. Separate cohorts of HD gene mutations carriers and controls performed four different fMRI tasks, probing functions either primarly affected by the disease (i.e. motor control), higher cognitive functions (i.e. working memory and irritability), or basic sensory functions (i.e. auditory system). With the aim to compare fMRI and structural MRI biomarkers, all subjects underwent an additional high-resolution T1-weighted MRI. Best classification performance was achived from fMRI-based activations with motor sequence tapping and task-induced irritation. Classification performance based on gray matter probability maps was also significantly above chance and similar to that of fMRI. Both were sufficiently informative to separate gene mutation carriers that were on average 17 years before predicted disease onset from controls with up to 80% accuracy. Further analyses showed that classification accuracy was best in regions of interest with low within-group heterogeneity in relation to disease specific changes. Our study indicates that structural and some functional markers can accurately detect pre-clinical neurodegeneration. However, the lower variability and easier processing of the strucutral MRI data make latter the more useful tool for disease detection in a clinical setting.

  6. Cloning of the neurodegeneration gene drop-dead and characterization of additional phenotypes of its mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Edward M

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the Drosophila gene drop-dead (drd) result in early adult lethality and neurodegeneration, but the molecular identity of the drd gene and its mechanism of action are not known. This paper describes the characterization of a new X-linked recessive adult-lethal mutation, originally called lot's wife (lwf(1)) but subsequently identified as an allele of drd (drd(lwf)); drd(lwf) mutants die within two weeks of eclosion. Through mapping and complementation, the drd gene has been identified as CG33968, which encodes a putative integral membrane protein of unknown function. The drd(lwf) allele is associated with a nonsense mutation that eliminates nearly 80% of the CG33968 gene product; mutations in the same gene were also found in two previously described drd alleles. Characterization of drd (lwf) flies revealed additional phenotypes of drd, most notably, defects in food processing by the digestive system and in oogenesis. Mutant flies store significantly more food in their crops and defecate less than wild-type flies, suggesting that normal transfer of ingested food from the crop into the midgut is dependent upon the DRD gene product. The defect in oogenesis results in the sterility of homozygous mutant females and is associated with a reduction in the number of vitellogenic egg chambers. The disruption in vitellogenesis is far more severe than that seen in starved flies and so is unlikely to be a secondary consequence of the digestive phenotype. This study demonstrates that mutation of the drd gene CG33968 results in a complex phenotype affecting multiple physiological systems within the fly.

  7. Influence of zinc on calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways during aluminium-induced neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Neha; Dhawan, D K

    2014-10-01

    Metals perform important functions in the normal physiological system, and alterations in their levels may lead to a number of diseases. Aluminium (Al) has been implicated as a major risk factor, which is linked to several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. On the other hand, zinc (Zn) is considered as a neuromodulator and an essential dietary element that regulates a number of biological activities in our body. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Zn supplementation, if any, in ameliorating the changes induced by Al on calcium signalling pathway. Male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 140-160 g were divided into four different groups viz.: normal control, aluminium treated (100 mg/kg b.wt./day via oral gavage), zinc treated (227 mg/l in drinking water) and combined aluminium and zinc treated. All the treatments were carried out for a total duration of 8 weeks. Al treatment decreased the Ca(2+) ATPase activity whereas increased the levels of 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, intracellular calcium and total calcium content in both the cerebrum and cerebellum, which, however, were modulated upon Zn supplementation. Al treatment exhibited a significant elevation in the protein expressions of phospholipase C, inositol triphosphate and protein kinase A but decreased the expression of protein kinase C, which, however, was reversed upon Zn co-treatment. Al treatment also revealed alterations in neurohistoarchitecture in the form of calcium deposits, which were improved upon zinc co-administration. The present study, therefore, suggests that zinc regulates the intracellular calcium signalling pathway during aluminium-induced neurodegeneration.

  8. Infantile and childhood onset PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration in a large North African cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, M; Kraoua, I; Micalizzi, A; Klaa, H; Benrhouma, H; Drissi, C; Turki, I; Castellana, S; Mazza, T; Valente, E M; Gouider-Khouja, N

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the PLA2G6 gene are causative of PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration (PLAN), a spectrum of neurodegenerative conditions including infantile, childhood and adult onset forms. Seventeen North African patients with a clinical suspicion of infantile-onset PLAN underwent clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging examinations, and PLA2G6 sequencing. Haplotype analysis was performed to date the identified founder mutation. All patients carried biallelic mutations in PLA2G6. Sixteen children had the commonest form of infantile-onset PLAN, with early onset of psychomotor regression, hypotonia, pyramidal and cerebellar signs, and abnormal ocular movements. The phenotype was highly homogeneous, with rapid development of severe spastic tetraparesis, cognitive impairment and optic atrophy. Neuroimaging showed cerebellar atrophy and claval hypertrophy to be the commonest and earliest signs, whilst cerebellar cortex hyperintensity and pallidal iron deposition were later findings. Motor or sensory-motor neuropathy and electroencephalogram fast rhythms were also frequent. Nine patients from six families shared the same founder mutation (p.V691del) which probably arose by the late seventeenth century. Only one patient fitted the diagnosis of the much rarer childhood-onset PLAN. Despite the early onset (18 months), clinical progression was slower, with behavioral disturbances and dystonia. Typical features of infantile-onset PLAN such as hypotonia, nystagmus/strabismus, optic atrophy, electroencephalogram fast rhythms and motor neuropathy were absent. Cerebellar atrophy, claval hypertrophy and pallidal hypointensity were evident at brain magnetic resonance imaging. This patient carried a missense variant predicted to be less deleterious. The PLAN-associated phenotypes and the challenges of diagnosing the childhood-onset form are delineated, and a common North African founder mutation is identifed. © 2014 EAN.

  9. Multiple sclerosis and fatigue: A review on the contribution of inflammation and immune-mediated neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patejdl, Robert; Penner, Iris K; Noack, Thomas K; Zettl, Uwe K

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune mediated disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and the leading cause of non-traumatic disability among young and middle-aged adults in the western world. One of its most prevalent and debilitating symptoms is fatigue. Despite the general acceptance of the idea of an immune pathogenesis of MS itself, the role of autoimmunity in the course of MS-fatigue is a matter of debate. Both immune-related processes (acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, immune-mediated neurodegeneration, immune-mediated alterations of endocrine functions related to fatigue) and presumably non-immune-mediated disturbances and factors (sleep disturbances, depression, cognitive alterations, chronic infections, adverse effects of medications) contribute to the clinical picture. Data from in vitro and animal experiments has provided evidence for a role of cytokines as IL-1 and TNF-alpha. This association could not be verified directly in blood samples from humans whereas whole blood stimulation protocols gave some indirect evidence for a role of cytokines in MS-fatigue. MRI being able to detect acute and chronic immune mediated damage to the CNS could depict that global atrophy of gray or white matter does not correlate with fatigue. Rather, distinctive clusters of lesions and atrophy at different locations, mostly bifrontal or in subcortical structures, correlate specifically with fatigue. Regardless of the difficulties in pinpointing the immunogenesis of MS-fatigue, an important role of autoimmunity is strongly supported by an indirect route: A growing amount of data shows that the highly effective immunotherapeutics which have been introduced to MS-treatment over the last years effectively and sustainably stabilize and ameliorate fatigue in parallel to their dampening effects on the neuroinflammatory process. This review summarizes the existing data on the relation between inflammation, patterns of CNS-lesions and the effects of immunotherapeutics

  10. Glucocerebrosidase Deficiency in Drosophila Results in α-Synuclein-Independent Protein Aggregation and Neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Y Davis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the glucosidase, beta, acid (GBA1 gene cause Gaucher's disease, and are the most common genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB excluding variants of low penetrance. Because α-synuclein-containing neuronal aggregates are a defining feature of PD and DLB, it is widely believed that mutations in GBA1 act by enhancing α-synuclein toxicity. To explore this hypothesis, we deleted the Drosophila GBA1 homolog, dGBA1b, and compared the phenotypes of dGBA1b mutants in the presence and absence of α-synuclein expression. Homozygous dGBA1b mutants exhibit shortened lifespan, locomotor and memory deficits, neurodegeneration, and dramatically increased accumulation of ubiquitinated protein aggregates that are normally degraded through an autophagic mechanism. Ectopic expression of human α-synuclein in dGBA1b mutants resulted in a mild enhancement of dopaminergic neuron loss and increased α-synuclein aggregation relative to controls. However, α-synuclein expression did not substantially enhance other dGBA1b mutant phenotypes. Our findings indicate that dGBA1b plays an important role in the metabolism of protein aggregates, but that the deleterious consequences of mutations in dGBA1b are largely independent of α-synuclein. Future work with dGBA1b mutants should reveal the mechanism by which mutations in dGBA1b lead to accumulation of protein aggregates, and the potential influence of this protein aggregation on neuronal integrity.

  11. A role for oxidized DNA precursors in Huntington's disease-like striatal neurodegeneration.

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    Gabriele De Luca

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Several human neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by the accumulation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxodG in the DNA of affected neurons. This can occur either through direct oxidation of DNA guanine or via incorporation of the oxidized nucleotide during replication. Hydrolases that degrade oxidized purine nucleoside triphosphates normally minimize this incorporation. hMTH1 is the major human hydrolase. It degrades both 8-oxodGTP and 8-oxoGTP to the corresponding monophosphates. To investigate whether the incorporation of oxidized nucleic acid precursors contributes to neurodegeneration, we constructed a transgenic mouse in which the human hMTH1 8-oxodGTPase is expressed. hMTH1 expression protected embryonic fibroblasts and mouse tissues against the effects of oxidants. Wild-type mice exposed to 3-nitropropionic acid develop neuropathological and behavioural symptoms that resemble those of Huntington's disease. hMTH1 transgene expression conferred a dramatic protection against these Huntington's disease-like symptoms, including weight loss, dystonia and gait abnormalities, striatal degeneration, and death. In a complementary approach, an in vitro genetic model for Huntington's disease was also used. hMTH1 expression protected progenitor striatal cells containing an expanded CAG repeat of the huntingtin gene from toxicity associated with expression of the mutant huntingtin. The findings implicate oxidized nucleic acid precursors in the neuropathological features of Huntington's disease and identify the utilization of oxidized nucleoside triphosphates by striatal cells as a significant contributor to the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  12. Characterizing the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor genetic variation in Alzheimer's disease neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn A Honea

    -related brain neurodegeneration.

  13. Intramitochondrial Zn2+ accumulation via the Ca2+ uniporter contributes to acute ischemic neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, Yuliya V; Weiss, John H

    2014-08-01

    Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) have both been implicated in the induction of acute ischemic neurodegeneration. We recently examined changes in intracellular Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) in CA1 pyramidal neurons subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD), and found that Zn(2+) rises precede and contribute to the onset of terminal Ca(2+) rises ("Ca(2+) deregulation"), which are causatively linked to a lethal loss of membrane integrity. The present study seeks to examine the specific role of intramitochondrial Zn(2+) accumulation in ischemic injury, using blockers of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), through which both Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) appear able to enter the mitochondrial matrix. In physiological extracellular Ca(2+), treatment with the MCU blocker, Ruthenium Red (RR), accelerated the Ca(2+) deregulation, most likely by disrupting mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering and thus accelerating the lethal cytosolic Ca(2+) overload. However, when intracellular Ca(2+) overload was slowed, either by adding blockers of major Ca(2+) entry channels or by lowering the concentration of Ca(2+) in the extracellular buffer, Ca(2+) deregulation was delayed, and under these conditions either Zn(2+) chelation or MCU blockade resulted in similar further delays of the Ca(2+) deregulation. In parallel studies using the reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicator, hydroethidine, lowering Ca(2+) surprisingly accelerated OGD induced ROS generation, and in these low Ca(2+) conditions, either Zn(2+) chelation or MCU block slowed the ROS generation. These studies suggest that, during acute ischemia, Zn(2+) entry into mitochondria via the MCU induces mitochondrial dysfunction (including ROS generation) that occurs upstream of, and contributes to the terminal Ca(2+) deregulation.

  14. Brain viral burden, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in HAART-treated HIV positive injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald B; Simmonds, Peter; Bell, Jeanne E

    2014-02-01

    The long-term impact of chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on brain status in injecting drug users (IDU) treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is unknown. Viral persistence in the brain with ongoing neuroinflammation may predispose to Alzheimer-like neurodegeneration. In this study, we investigated the brains of ten HAART-treated individuals (six IDU and four non-DU), compared with ten HIV negative controls (six IDU and four non-DU). HIV DNA levels in brain tissue were correlated with plasma and lymphoid tissue viral loads, cognitive status, microglial activation and Tau protein and amyloid deposition. Brain HIV proviral DNA levels were low in most cases but higher in HIV encephalitis (n = 2) and correlated significantly with levels in lymphoid tissue (p = 0.0075), but not with those in plasma. HIV positive subjects expressed more Tau protein and amyloid than HIV negative controls (highest in a 58 year old), as did IDU, but brain viral loads showed no relation to Tau and amyloid. Microglial activation linked significantly to HIV positivity (p = 0.001) and opiate abuse accentuated these microglial changes (p = 0.05). This study confirms that HIV DNA persists in brains despite HAART and that opiate abuse adds to the risk of brain damage in HIV positive subjects. Novel findings in this study show that (1) plasma levels are not a good surrogate indicator of brain status, (2) viral burden in brain and lymphoid tissues is related, and (3) while Tau and amyloid deposition is increased in HIV positive IDU, this is not specifically related to increased HIV burden within the brain.

  15. Glucocerebrosidase Deficiency in Drosophila Results in α-Synuclein-Independent Protein Aggregation and Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Marie Y; Trinh, Kien; Thomas, Ruth E; Yu, Selina; Germanos, Alexandre A; Whitley, Brittany N; Sardi, Sergio Pablo; Montine, Thomas J; Pallanck, Leo J

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in the glucosidase, beta, acid (GBA1) gene cause Gaucher's disease, and are the most common genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) excluding variants of low penetrance. Because α-synuclein-containing neuronal aggregates are a defining feature of PD and DLB, it is widely believed that mutations in GBA1 act by enhancing α-synuclein toxicity. To explore this hypothesis, we deleted the Drosophila GBA1 homolog, dGBA1b, and compared the phenotypes of dGBA1b mutants in the presence and absence of α-synuclein expression. Homozygous dGBA1b mutants exhibit shortened lifespan, locomotor and memory deficits, neurodegeneration, and dramatically increased accumulation of ubiquitinated protein aggregates that are normally degraded through an autophagic mechanism. Ectopic expression of human α-synuclein in dGBA1b mutants resulted in a mild enhancement of dopaminergic neuron loss and increased α-synuclein aggregation relative to controls. However, α-synuclein expression did not substantially enhance other dGBA1b mutant phenotypes. Our findings indicate that dGBA1b plays an important role in the metabolism of protein aggregates, but that the deleterious consequences of mutations in dGBA1b are largely independent of α-synuclein. Future work with dGBA1b mutants should reveal the mechanism by which mutations in dGBA1b lead to accumulation of protein aggregates, and the potential influence of this protein aggregation on neuronal integrity.

  16. Comparisons of neurodegeneration over time between healthy ageing and Alzheimer's disease cohorts via Bayesian inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengersen, Kerrie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives In recent years, large-scale longitudinal neuroimaging studies have improved our understanding of healthy ageing and pathologies including Alzheimer's disease (AD). A particular focus of these studies is group differences and identification of participants at risk of deteriorating to a worse diagnosis. For this, statistical analysis using linear mixed-effects (LME) models are used to account for correlated observations from individuals measured over time. A Bayesian framework for LME models in AD is introduced in this paper to provide additional insight often not found in current LME volumetric analyses. Setting and participants Longitudinal neuroimaging case study of ageing was analysed in this research on 260 participants diagnosed as either healthy controls (HC), mild cognitive impaired (MCI) or AD. Bayesian LME models for the ventricle and hippocampus regions were used to: (1) estimate how the volumes of these regions change over time by diagnosis, (2) identify high-risk non-AD individuals with AD like degeneration and (3) determine probabilistic trajectories of diagnosis groups over age. Results We observed (1) large differences in the average rate of change of volume for the ventricle and hippocampus regions between diagnosis groups, (2) high-risk individuals who had progressed from HC to MCI and displayed similar rates of deterioration as AD counterparts, and (3) critical time points which indicate where deterioration of regions begins to diverge between the diagnosis groups. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of Bayesian LME models to neuroimaging data which provides inference on a population and individual level in the AD field. The application of a Bayesian LME framework allows for additional information to be extracted from longitudinal studies. This provides health professionals with valuable information of neurodegeneration stages, and a potential to provide a better understanding of disease pathology

  17. Physiological disturbance may contribute to neurodegeneration induced by isoflurane or sevoflurane in 14 day old rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Volatile anesthetics are widely used in pediatric anesthesia but their potential neurotoxicity raise significant concerns regarding sequelae after anesthesia. However, whether physiological disturbance during anesthetic exposure contributes to such side effects remains unknown. The aim of the current study is to compare the neurotoxic effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane in 14 day old rat pups under spontaneous breathing or ventilated conditions. METHODS: Postnatal 14 day rats were assigned to one of five groups: 1 spontaneous breathing (SB + room air (control, n = 17; 2 SB + isoflurane (n = 35; 3 SB + sevoflurane (n = 37; 4 mechanical ventilation (MV + isoflurane (n = 29; 5 MV + sevoflurane (n = 32. Anesthetized animal received either 1.7% isoflurane or 2.4% seveoflurane for 4 hours. Arterial blood gases and blood pressure were monitored in the anesthetized groups. Neurodegeneration in the CA3 region of hippocampus was assessed with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated DNA nick-end labeling immediately after exposure. Spatial learning and memory were evaluated with the Morris water maze in other cohorts 14 days after experiments. RESULTS: Most rats in the SB groups developed physiological disturbance whereas ventilated rats did not but become hyperglycemic. Mortality from anesthesia in the SB groups was significantly higher than that in the MV groups. Cell death in the SB but not MV groups was significantly higher than controls. SB + anesthesia groups performed worse on the Morris water maze behavioral test, but no deficits were found in the MV group compared with the controls. CONCLUSIONS: These findings could suggest that physiological disturbance induced by isoflurane or sevoflurane anesthesia may also contribute to their neurotoxicity.

  18. Multivariate profiling of neurodegeneration-associated changes in a subcellular compartment of neurons via image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasamy, Saravana K; Wang, Yunshi; Viswanathan, Vignesh; Kraut, Rachel S

    2008-11-14

    function as well as overexpression) from the wild type. Our model demonstrates that neurodegeneration-associated endolysosomal defects can be detected, analyzed, and classified rapidly and accurately as a diagnostic imaging-based screening tool.

  19. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Giordano, Carla; Lamperti, Costanza; Morbin, Michela; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Marchet, Silvia; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Sibon, Ody; Moggio, Maurizio; d’Amati, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2, responsible for the phosphorylation of pantothenate or vitamin B5 in the biosynthesis of co-enzyme A. A Pank2 knockout (Pank2−/−) mouse model did not recapitulate the human disease but showed azoospermia and mitochondrial dysfunctions. We challenged this mouse model with a low glucose and high lipid content diet (ketogenic diet) to stimulate lipid use by mitochondrial beta-oxidation. In the presence of a shortage of co-enzyme A, this diet could evoke a general impairment of bioenergetic metabolism. Only Pank2−/− mice fed with a ketogenic diet developed a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration-like syndrome characterized by severe motor dysfunction, neurodegeneration and severely altered mitochondria in the central and peripheral nervous systems. These mice also showed structural alteration of muscle morphology, which was comparable with that observed in a patient with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. We here demonstrate that pantethine administration can prevent the onset of the neuromuscular phenotype in mice suggesting the possibility of experimental treatment in patients with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:24316510

  20. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model.

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    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Giordano, Carla; Lamperti, Costanza; Morbin, Michela; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Marchet, Silvia; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Sibon, Ody; Moggio, Maurizio; d'Amati, Giulia; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2, responsible for the phosphorylation of pantothenate or vitamin B5 in the biosynthesis of co-enzyme A. A Pank2 knockout (Pank2(-/-)) mouse model did not recapitulate the human disease but showed azoospermia and mitochondrial dysfunctions. We challenged this mouse model with a low glucose and high lipid content diet (ketogenic diet) to stimulate lipid use by mitochondrial beta-oxidation. In the presence of a shortage of co-enzyme A, this diet could evoke a general impairment of bioenergetic metabolism. Only Pank2(-/-) mice fed with a ketogenic diet developed a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration-like syndrome characterized by severe motor dysfunction, neurodegeneration and severely altered mitochondria in the central and peripheral nervous systems. These mice also showed structural alteration of muscle morphology, which was comparable with that observed in a patient with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. We here demonstrate that pantethine administration can prevent the onset of the neuromuscular phenotype in mice suggesting the possibility of experimental treatment in patients with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

  1. Genetic Screen Reveals Link between the Maternal Effect Sterile Gene mes-1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced Neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Wu, Qiuli; Cao, Xiou; Yan, Dong; Wang, Dayong; Aballay, Alejandro

    2015-12-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that immune responses to microbial infections may contribute to neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of Caenorhabditis elegans causes a number of neural changes that are hallmarks of neurodegeneration. Using an unbiased genetic screen to identify genes involved in the control of P. aeruginosa-induced neurodegeneration, we identified mes-1, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase-like protein that is required for unequal cell divisions in the early embryonic germ line. We showed that sterile but not fertile mes-1 animals were resistant to neurodegeneration induced by P. aeruginosa infection. Similar results were observed using animals carrying a mutation in the maternal effect gene pgl-1, which is required for postembryonic germ line development, and the germ line-deficient strains glp-1 and glp-4. Additional studies indicated that the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 is required for resistance to P. aeruginosa-induced neurodegeneration in germ line-deficient strains. Thus, our results demonstrate that P. aeruginosa infection results in neurodegeneration phenotypes in C. elegans that are controlled by the germ line in a cell-nonautonomous manner.

  2. Novel Food Supplement "CP1" Improves Motor Deficit, Cognitive Function, and Neurodegeneration in Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease.

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    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Sutalangka, Chatchada

    2016-08-01

    Based on pivotal roles of oxidative stress, dopaminergic and cholinergic systems on the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD), the searching for functional food for patients attacked with PD from Cyperus rotundus and Zingiber officinale, the substances possessing antioxidant activity, and the suppression effects on monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) have been considered. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of the combined extract of C. rotundus and Z. officinale (CP1) to improve motor and memory deficits, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and functions of both cholinergic and dopaminergic systems in the animal model of PD induced by 6-hydroxydopamine hydrochloride (6-OHDA). Male Wistar rats, weighing 180-220 g, were induced unilateral lesion at right substantia nigra by 6-OHDA and were orally given CP1 at doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg body weight for 14 days after 6-OHDA injection. The results showed that the 6-OHDA rats treated with CP1 increased spatial memory, but decreased neurodegeneration, malondialdehyde level, and AChE activity in hippocampus. The decreased motor disorder and neurodegeneration in substantia nigra together with the enhanced catalase activity, but decreased MAO-B activity in striatum, were also observed. The memory enhancing effect of CP1 might occur through the improved oxidative stress and the enhanced cholinergic function, whereas the effect to improve motor disorder of CP1 might occur through the enhanced dopaminergic function in striatum by decreasing the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the suppression of MAO-B. Therefore, CP1 is the potential functional food against PD. However, further researches in clinical trial and drug interactions are essential.

  3. Neurodegeneration in Autoimmune Optic Neuritis Is Associated with Altered APP Cleavage in Neurons and Up-Regulation of p53.

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    Sabine Herold

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Histopathological and radiological analysis revealed that neurodegeneration occurs early in the disease course. However, the pathological mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration are poorly understood. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in Brown Norway rats (BN-rats is a well-established animal model, especially of the neurodegenerative aspects of MS. Previous studies in this animal model indicated that loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, the neurons that form the axons of the optic nerve, occurs in the preclinical phase of the disease and is in part independent of overt histopathological changes of the optic nerve. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genes which are involved in neuronal cell loss at different disease stages of EAE. Furthermore, genes that are highly specific for autoimmune-driven neurodegeneration were compared to those regulated in RGCs after optic nerve axotomy at corresponding time points. Using laser capture micro dissection we isolated RNA from unfixed RGCs and performed global transcriptome analysis of retinal neurons. In total, we detected 582 genes sequentially expressed in the preclinical phase and 1150 genes in the clinical manifest EAE (P 1.5. Furthermore, using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA, we identified amyloid precursor protein (APP as a potential upstream regulator of changes in gene expression in the preclinical EAE but neither in clinical EAE, nor at any time point after optic nerve transection. Therefore, the gene pathway analysis lead to the hypothesis that altered cleavage of APP in neurons in the preclinical phase of EAE leads to the enhanced production of APP intracellular domain (AICD, which in turn acts as a transcriptional regulator and thereby initiates an apoptotic signaling cascade via up-regulation of the target gene p

  4. Attempted and successful compensation in preclinical and early manifest neurodegeneration – a review of task fMRI studies

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    Elisa eScheller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Several models of neural compensation in healthy aging have been suggested to explain brain activity that aids to sustain cognitive function. Applying recently suggested criteria of ‘attempted’ and ‘successful’ compensation, we reviewed existing literature on compensatory mechanisms in preclinical Huntington’s disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Both disorders constitute early stages of neurodegeneration ideal for examining compensatory mechanisms and developing targeted interventions. We strived to clarify whether compensation criteria derived from healthy aging populations can be applied to early neurodegeneration. To concentrate on the close coupling of cognitive performance and brain activity, we exclusively addressed task fMRI studies. First, we found evidence for parallels in compensatory mechanisms between healthy aging and neurodegenerative disease. Several studies fulfilled criteria of attempted compensation, while reports of successful compensation were largely absent, which made it difficult to conclude on. Second, comparing working memory studies in preclinical Huntington’s disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment, we identified similar compensatory patterns across neurodegenerative disorders in lateral and medial prefrontal cortex. Such patterns included an inverted U-shaped relationship of neurodegeneration and compensatory activity spanning from preclinical to manifest disease. Due to the lack of studies systematically targeting all criteria of compensation, we propose an exemplary study design, including the manipulation of compensating brain areas by brain stimulation. Furthermore, we delineate the benefits of targeted interventions by non-invasive brain stimulation, as well as of unspecific interventions such as physical activity or cognitive training. Unambiguously detecting compensation in early neurodegenerative disease will help tailor interventions aiming at sustained overall functioning and

  5. Caffeine prevents d-galactose-induced cognitive deficits, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the adult rat brain.

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    Ullah, Faheem; Ali, Tahir; Ullah, Najeeb; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-11-01

    d-galactose has been considered a senescent model for age-related neurodegenerative disease. It induces oxidative stress which triggers memory impairment, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Caffeine act as anti-oxidant and has been used in various model of neurodegenerative disease. Nevertheless, the effect of caffeine against d-galactose aging murine model of age-related neurodegenerative disease elucidated. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of caffeine against d-galactose. We observed that chronic treatment of caffeine (3 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally (i.p) for 60 days) improved memory impairment and synaptic markers (Synaptophysin and PSD95) in the d-galactose treated rats. Chronic caffeine treatment reduced the oxidative stress via the reduction of 8-oxoguanine through immunofluorescence in the d-galactose-treated rats. Consequently caffeine treatment suppressed stress kinases p-JNK. Additionally, caffeine treatment significantly reduced the d-galactose-induced neuroinflammation through alleviation of COX-2, NOS-2, TNFα and IL-1β. Furthermore we also analyzed that caffeine reduced cytochrome C, Bax/Bcl2 ratio, caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP-1 level. Moreover by evaluating the immunohistochemical results of Nissl and Fluro-Jade B staining showed that caffeine prevented the neurodegeneration in the d-galactose-treated rats. Our results showed that caffeine prevents the d-galactose-induced oxidative stress and consequently alleviated neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration; and synaptic dysfunction and memory impairment. Therefore, we could suggest that caffeine might be a dietary anti-oxidant agent and a good candidate for the age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Neurodegeneration severity can be predicted from early microglia alterations monitored in vivo in a mouse model of chronic glaucoma

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    Alejandra Bosco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microglia serve key homeostatic roles, and respond to neuronal perturbation and decline with a high spatiotemporal resolution. The course of all chronic CNS pathologies is thus paralleled by local microgliosis and microglia activation, which begin at early stages of the disease. However, the possibility of using live monitoring of microglia during early disease progression to predict the severity of neurodegeneration has not been explored. Because the retina allows live tracking of fluorescent microglia in their intact niche, here we investigated their early changes in relation to later optic nerve neurodegeneration. To achieve this, we used the DBA/2J mouse model of inherited glaucoma, which develops progressive retinal ganglion cell degeneration of variable severity during aging, and represents a useful model to study pathogenic mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell decline that are similar to those in human glaucoma. We imaged CX3CR1+/GFP microglial cells in vivo at ages ranging from 1 to 5 months by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO and quantified cell density and morphological activation. We detected early microgliosis at the optic nerve head (ONH, where axonopathy first manifests, and could track attenuation of this microgliosis induced by minocycline. We also observed heterogeneous and dynamic patterns of early microglia activation in the retina. When the same animals were aged and analyzed for the severity of optic nerve pathology at 10 months of age, we found a strong correlation with the levels of ONH microgliosis at 3 to 4 months. Our findings indicate that live imaging and monitoring the time course and levels of early retinal microgliosis and microglia activation in glaucoma could serve as indicators of future neurodegeneration severity.

  7. The mTOR Inhibitor Rapamycin Mitigates Perforant Pathway Neurodegeneration and Synapse Loss in a Mouse Model of Early-Stage Alzheimer-Type Tauopathy.

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    Robert Siman

    Full Text Available The perforant pathway projection from layer II of the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampal dentate gyrus is especially important for long-term memory formation, and is preferentially vulnerable to developing a degenerative tauopathy early in Alzheimer's disease (AD that may spread over time trans-synaptically. Despite the importance of the perforant pathway to the clinical onset and progression of AD, a therapeutic has not been identified yet that protects it from tau-mediated toxicity. Here, we used an adeno-associated viral vector-based mouse model of early-stage AD-type tauopathy to investigate effects of the mTOR inhibitor and autophagy stimulator rapamycin on the tau-driven loss of perforant pathway neurons and synapses. Focal expression of human tau carrying a P301L mutation but not eGFP as a control in layer II of the lateral entorhinal cortex triggered rapid degeneration of these neurons, loss of lateral perforant pathway synapses in the dentate gyrus outer molecular layer, and activation of neuroinflammatory microglia and astroglia in the two locations. Chronic systemic rapamycin treatment partially inhibited phosphorylation of a mechanistic target of rapamycin substrate in brain and stimulated LC3 cleavage, a marker of autophagic flux. Compared with vehicle-treated controls, rapamycin protected against the tau-induced neuronal loss, synaptotoxicity, reactive microgliosis and astrogliosis, and activation of innate neuroimmunity. It did not alter human tau mRNA or total protein levels. Finally, rapamycin inhibited trans-synaptic transfer of human tau expression to the dentate granule neuron targets for the perforant pathway, likely by preventing the synaptic spread of the AAV vector in response to pathway degeneration. These results identify systemic rapamycin as a treatment that protects the entorhinal cortex and perforant pathway projection from tau-mediated neurodegeneration, axonal and synapse loss, and neuroinflammatory reactive

  8. Synergistic Effect of β-Amyloid and Neurodegeneration on Cognitive Decline in Clinically Normal Individuals

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    Mormino, Elizabeth C.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Hedden, Trey; Schultz, Aaron P.; Amariglio, Rebecca E.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Assessing the ability of Alzheimer disease neuroimaging markers to predict short-term cognitive decline among clinically normal (CN) individuals is critical for upcoming secondary prevention trials using cognitive outcomes. OBJECTIVE To determine whether neuroimaging markers of β-amyloid (Aβ) and neurodegeneration (ND) are independently or synergistically associated with longitudinal cognitive decline in CN individuals. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Academic medical center longitudinal natural history study among 166 CN individuals (median age, 74 years; 92 women). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The Aβ status was determined with Pittsburgh Compound B–positron emission tomography, while ND was assessed using 2 a priori measures, hippocampus volume (magnetic resonance imaging) and glucose metabolism (positron emission tomography with fludeoxyglucose F 18), extracted from Alzheimer disease–vulnerable regions. Based on imaging markers, CN individuals were categorized into the following preclinical Alzheimer disease stages: stage 0 (Aβ−/ND−), stage 1 (Aβ+/ND−), stage 2 (Aβ+/ND+), and suspected non–Alzheimer disease pathology (Aβ−/ND+). Cognition was assessed with a composite of neuropsychological tests administered annually. RESULTS The Aβ+ CN individuals were more likely to be classified as ND+: 59.6% of Aβ+ CN individuals were ND+, whereas 31.9% of Aβ− CN individuals were ND+ (odds ratio, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.44–7.02; P = .004). In assessing longitudinal cognitive performance, practice effects were evident in CN individuals negative for both Aβ and ND, whereas diminished practice effects were observed in CN individuals positive for either Aβ or ND. Decline over time was observed only in CN individuals positive for both Aβ and ND, and decline in this group was significantly greater than that in all other groups (P < .001 for all). A significant interaction term between Aβ and ND confirmed that this decline was greater than the

  9. Relationship between cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration in acute optic neuritis.

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    Signe Modvig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Various inflammatory biomarkers show prognostic potential for multiple sclerosis (MS-risk after clinically isolated syndromes. However, biomarkers are often examined singly and their interrelation and precise aspects of their associated pathological processes remain unclear. Clarification of these relationships could aid the appropriate implementation of prognostic biomarkers in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the interrelation between biomarkers of inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration in acute optic neuritis and to assess their association to measures of MS risk. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective study at a tertiary referral centre from June 2011 to December 2012 of 56 patients with optic neuritis as a first demyelinating symptom and 27 healthy volunteers. Lumbar puncture was performed within 28 (median 16 days of onset. CSF levels of CXCL13, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, CXCL10, CCL-2, osteopontin and chitinase-3-like-1, myelin basic protein (MBP and neurofilament light-chain (NF-L were determined. MS-risk outcome measures were dissemination in space (DIS of white matter lesions on cerebral MRI, CSF oligoclonal bands and elevated IgG-index. RESULTS: IN THE INTERRELATION ANALYSIS THE BIOMARKERS SHOWED CLOSE CORRELATIONS WITHIN TWO DISTINCT GROUPS: Biomarkers of leukocyte infiltration (CXCL13, MMP-9 and CXCL10 were strongly associated (p<0.0001 for all. Osteopontin and chitinase-3-like-1 were also tightly associated (p<0.0001 and correlated strongly to tissue damage markers (NF-L and MBP. The biomarkers of leukocyte infiltration all associated strongly with MS-risk parameters, whereas CHI3L1 and MBP correlated with MRI DIS, but not with CSF MS-risk parameters and osteopontin and NF-L did not correlate with any MS-risk parameters. CONCLUSIONS: OUR FINDINGS SUGGEST TWO DISTINCT INFLAMMATORY PROCESSES: one of leukocyte infiltration, represented by CXCL13, CXCL10 and MMP-9, strongly associated with and

  10. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

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    Stefanie Krüger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1 identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2 assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3 connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities.We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses

  11. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  12. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  13. Dual Role of Vitamin C on the Neuroinflammation Mediated Neurodegeneration and Memory Impairments in Colchicine Induced Rat Model of Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Susmita; Ghosh, Tusharkanti; Gupta, Pritha; Ghosh, Rupsa; Kabir, Syed N; Roy, Avishek

    2016-12-01

    The neurodegeneration in colchicine induced AD rats (cAD) is mediated by cox-2 linked neuroinflammation. The importance of ROS in the inflammatory process in cAD has not been identified, which may be deciphered by blocking oxidative stress in this model by a well-known anti-oxidant vitamin C. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the role of vitamin C on colchicine induced oxidative stress linked neuroinflammation mediated neurodegeneration and memory impairments along with peripheral immune responses in cAD. The impairments of working and reference memory were associated with neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus of cAD. Administration of vitamin C (200 and 400 mg/kg BW) in cAD resulted in recovery of memory impairments, with prevention of neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation in the hippocampus. The neuroinflammation in the hippocampus also influenced the peripheral immune responses and inflammation in the serum of cAD and all of these parameters were also recovered at 200 and 400 mg dose of vitamin C. However, cAD treated with 600 mg dose did not recover but resulted in increase of memory impairments, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation in hippocampus along with alteration of peripheral immune responses in comparison to cAD of the present study. Therefore, the present study showed that ROS played an important role in the colchicine induced neuroinflammation linked neurodegeneration and memory impairments along with alteration of peripheral immune responses. It also appears from the results that vitamin C at lower doses showed anti-oxidant effect and at higher dose resulted in pro-oxidant effects in cAD.

  14. Resveratrol Treatment after Status Epilepticus Restrains Neurodegeneration and Abnormal Neurogenesis with Suppression of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vikas; Shuai, Bing; Kodali, Maheedhar; Shetty, Geetha A; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Rao, Xiaolan; Shetty, Ashok K

    2015-12-07

    Antiepileptic drug therapy, though beneficial for restraining seizures, cannot thwart status epilepticus (SE) induced neurodegeneration or down-stream detrimental changes. We investigated the efficacy of resveratrol (RESV) for preventing SE-induced neurodegeneration, abnormal neurogenesis, oxidative stress and inflammation in the hippocampus. We induced SE in young rats and treated with either vehicle or RESV, commencing an hour after SE induction and continuing every hour for three-hours on SE day and twice daily thereafter for 3 days. Seizures were terminated in both groups two-hours after SE with a diazepam injection. In contrast to the vehicle-treated group, the hippocampus of animals receiving RESV during and after SE presented no loss of glutamatergic neurons in hippocampal cell layers, diminished loss of inhibitory interneurons expressing parvalbumin, somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in the dentate gyrus, reduced aberrant neurogenesis with preservation of reelin + interneurons, lowered concentration of oxidative stress byproduct malondialdehyde and pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha, normalized expression of oxidative stress responsive genes and diminished numbers of activated microglia. Thus, 4 days of RESV treatment after SE is efficacious for thwarting glutamatergic neuron degeneration, alleviating interneuron loss and abnormal neurogenesis, and suppressing oxidative stress and inflammation. These results have implications for restraining SE-induced chronic temporal lobe epilepsy.

  15. Imaging Neurodegeneration: Steps Toward Brain Network-Based Pathophysiology and Its Potential for Multi-modal Imaging Diagnostics.

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    Sorg, C; Göttler, J; Zimmer, C

    2015-10-01

    Multi-modal brain imaging provides different in vivo windows into the human brain and thereby different ways to characterize brain disorders. Particularly, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging facilitates the study of macroscopic intrinsic brain networks, which are critical for development and spread of neurodegenerative processes in different neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the current study is to present and highlight some paradigmatic findings in intrinsic network-based pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and its potential for new network-based multimodal tools in imaging diagnostics. Qualitative review of selected multi-modal imaging studies in neurodegenerative diseases particularly in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Functional connectivity of intrinsic brain networks is selectively and progressively impaired in AD, with changes likely starting before the onset of symptoms in fronto-parietal key networks such as default mode or attention networks. Patterns of distribution and development of both amyloid-β plaques and atrophy are linked with network connectivity changes, suggesting that start and spread of pathology interacts with network connectivity. Qualitatively similar findings have been observed in other neurodegenerative disorders, suggesting shared mechanisms of network-based pathophysiology across diseases. Spread of neurodegeneration is intimately linked with the functional connectivity of intrinsic brain networks. These pathophysiological insights pave the way for new multi-modal network-based tools to detect and characterize neurodegeneration in individual patients.

  16. Cyclophilin D-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition is not involved in neurodegeneration in mnd2 mutant mice.

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    Ideguchi, Kan; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Okumura, Meinoshin; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide

    2010-03-05

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder. The motor neuron degeneration 2 mutant (mnd2) mouse exhibits loss of striatal neurons, muscle wasting, weight loss, and death within 40days of birth, and is considered to be a useful animal model of PD. mnd2 was identified as an autosomal recessive mutation in the HtrA2/Omi gene, which encodes a mitochondrial serine protease. Omi-deficient mitochondria are more sensitive to mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT), which raises the possibility that mPT plays a role in motor neurodegeneration in mnd2 mice. Given that cyclophilin D (CypD)-deficient mitochondria are resistant to mPT, we examined whether CypD-dependent mPT is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders in mnd2 mice by generating CypD-deficient mnd2 mice. Brain mitochondria isolated from CypD-deficient mnd2 mice were more resistant to Ca(2+)-induced mPT than those of mnd2 mice. However, both mnd2 mice and CypD-deficient mnd2 mice showed similar survival periods and phenotypes, including the lack of weight gain, muscle wasting, and resting tremor. Our data suggest that CypD-dependent mPT does not play a major role in neurodegeneration in mnd2 mice.

  17. Dopamine Burden Triggers Neurodegeneration via Production and Release of TNF-α from Astrocytes in Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Saidan; Wang, Weikan; Wang, Xuebao; Liang, Yong; Liu, Leping; Ye, Yiru; Yang, Jianjing; Gao, Hongchang; Zhuge, Qichuan

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine (DA)-induced learning and memory impairment is well documented in minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), but the contribution of DA to neurodegeneration and the involved underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, the effect of DA on neuronal apoptosis was initially detected. The results showed that MHE/DA (10 μg)-treated rats displayed neuronal apoptosis. However, we found that DA (10 μM) treatment did not induce evident apoptosis in primary cultured neurons (PCNs) but did produce TNF-α in primary cultured astrocytes (PCAs). Furthermore, co-cultures between PCAs and PCNs exposed to DA exhibited increased astrocytic TNF-α levels and neuronal apoptosis compared with co-cultures exposed to the vehicle, indicating the attribution of the neuronal apoptosis to astrocytic TNF-α. We also demonstrated that DA enhanced TNF-α production from astrocytes by activation of the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB pathway, and secreted astrocytic TNF-α-potentiated neuronal apoptosis through inactivation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Overall, the findings from this study suggest that DA stimulates substantial production and secretion of astrocytic TNF-α, consequently and indirectly triggering progressive neurodegeneration, resulting in cognitive decline and memory loss in MHE.

  18. Defective lipid metabolism in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) syndromes: not only a matter of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombelli, Cristina; Aoun, Manar; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a group of devastating and life threatening rare diseases. Adult and early-onset NBIA syndromes are inherited as X-chromosomal, autosomal dominant or recessive traits and several genes have been identified as responsible for these disorders. Among the identified disease genes, only two code for proteins directly involved in iron metabolism while the remaining NBIA genes encode proteins with a wide variety of functions ranging from fatty acid metabolism and autophagy to still unknown activities. It is becoming increasingly evident that many neurodegenerative diseases are associated with metabolic dysfunction that often involves altered lipid metabolism. This is not surprising since neurons have a peculiar and heterogeneous lipid composition critical for the development and correct functioning of the nervous system. This review will focus on specific NBIA forms, namely PKAN, CoPAN, PLAN, FAHN and MPAN, which display an interesting link between neurodegeneration and alteration of phospholipids and sphingolipids metabolism, mitochondrial morphology and membrane remodelling.

  19. Intranasal "painless" human Nerve Growth Factor [corrected] slows amyloid neurodegeneration and prevents memory deficits in App X PS1 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Capsoni

    Full Text Available Nerve Growth Factor (NGF is being considered as a therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer's disease (AD treatment but the clinical application is hindered by its potent pro-nociceptive activity. Thus, to reduce systemic exposure that would induce pain, in recent clinical studies NGF was administered through an invasive intracerebral gene-therapy approach. Our group demonstrated the feasibility of a non-invasive intranasal delivery of NGF in a mouse model of neurodegeneration. NGF therapeutic window could be further increased if its nociceptive effects could be avoided altogether. In this study we exploit forms of NGF, mutated at residue R100, inspired by the human genetic disease HSAN V (Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy Type V, which would allow increasing the dose of NGF without triggering pain. We show that "painless" hNGF displays full neurotrophic and anti-amyloidogenic activities in neuronal cultures, and a reduced nociceptive activity in vivo. When administered intranasally to APPxPS1 mice ( n = 8, hNGFP61S/R100E prevents the progress of neurodegeneration and of behavioral deficits. These results demonstrate the in vivo neuroprotective and anti-amyloidogenic properties of hNGFR100 mutants and provide a rational basis for the development of "painless" hNGF variants as a new generation of therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Genetic regulation of microglia activation, complement expression, and neurodegeneration in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

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    Bellander, Bo-Michael; Lidman, Olle; Ohlsson, Marcus; Meijer, Britt; Piehl, Fredrik; Svensson, Mikael

    2010-08-01

    Secondary brain damage following traumatic brain injury in part depends on neuroinflammation, a process where genetic factors may play an important role. We examined the response to a standardized cortical contusion in two different inbred rat strains, Dark Agouti (DA) and Piebald Virol Glaxo (PVG). Both are well characterized in models of autoimmune neuroinflammation, where DA is susceptible and PVG resistant. We found that infiltration of polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) at 3-day postinjury was more pronounced in PVG. DA was more infiltrated by T cells at 3-day postinjury, showed an enhanced glial activation at 7-day postinjury and higher expression of C3 complement at 7-day postinjury. Neurodegeneration, assessed by Fluoro-Jade, was also more pronounced in the DA strain at 30-day postinjury. These results demonstrate differences in the response to cortical contusion injury attributable to genetic influences and suggest a link between injury-induced inflammation and neurodegeneration. Genetic factors that regulate inflammation elicited by brain trauma may be important for the development of secondary brain damage.

  1. Neurodegeneration and unfolded-protein response in mice expressing a membrane-tethered flexible tail of PrP.

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    Paolo Dametto

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein (PrPC consists of a flexible N-terminal tail (FT, aa 23-128 hinged to a membrane-anchored globular domain (GD, aa 129-231. Ligation of the GD with antibodies induces rapid neurodegeneration, which is prevented by deletion or functional inactivation of the FT. Therefore, the FT is an allosteric effector of neurotoxicity. To explore its mechanism of action, we generated transgenic mice expressing the FT fused to a GPI anchor, but lacking the GD (PrPΔ141-225, or "FTgpi". Here we report that FTgpi mice develop a progressive, inexorably lethal neurodegeneration morphologically and biochemically similar to that triggered by anti-GD antibodies. FTgpi was mostly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it triggered a conspicuous unfolded protein response specifically activating the PERK pathway leading to phosphorylation of eIF2α and upregulation of CHOP ultimately leading to neurodegeration similar to what was observed in prion infection.

  2. Nucleolar disruption and cajal body disassembly are nuclear hallmarks of DNA damage-induced neurodegeneration in purkinje cells.

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    Baltanás, Fernando C; Casafont, Iñigo; Weruaga, Eduardo; Alonso, José R; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2011-07-01

    The Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration (pcd) phenotype results from mutation in nna1 gene and is associated with the degeneration and death of PCs during the postnatal life. Although the pcd mutation is a model of the ataxic mouse, it shares clinical and pathological characteristics of inherited human spinocerebellar ataxias. PC degeneration in pcd mice provides a useful neuronal system to study nuclear mechanisms involved in DNA damage-dependent neurodegeneration, particularly the contribution of nucleoli and Cajal bodies (CBs). Both nuclear structures are engaged in housekeeping functions for neuronal survival, the biogenesis of ribosomes and the maturation of snRNPs and snoRNPs required for pre-mRNA and pre-rRNA processing, respectively. In this study, we use ultrastructural analysis, in situ transcription assay and molecular markers for DNA damage, nucleoli and CB components to demonstrate that PC degeneration involves the progressive accumulation of nuclear DNA damage associated with disruption of nucleoli and CBs, disassembly of polyribosomes into monoribosomes, ribophagy and shut down of nucleolar and extranucleolar transcription. Microarray analysis reveals that four genes encoding repressors of nucleolar rRNA synthesis (p53, Rb, PTEN and SNF2) are upregulated in the cerebellum of pcd mice. Collectively, these data support that nucleolar and CB alterations are hallmarks of DNA damage-induced neurodegeneration.

  3. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model.

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    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Morbin, Michela; Uggetti, Andrea; Moda, Fabio; D'Amato, Ilaria; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Cozzi, Anna; Levi, Sonia; Hayflick, Susan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-12-15

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of this disorder is poorly understood and, although PANK2 is a mitochondrial protein, perturbations in mitochondrial bioenergetics have not been reported. A knock-out (KO) mouse model of PKAN exhibits retinal degeneration and azoospermia, but lacks any neurological phenotype. The absence of a clinical phenotype has partially been explained by the different cellular localization of the human and murine PANK2 proteins. Here we demonstrate that the mouse Pank2 protein localizes to mitochondria, similar to its human orthologue. Moreover, we show that Pank2-defective neurons derived from KO mice have an altered mitochondrial membrane potential, a defect further corroborated by the observations of swollen mitochondria at the ultra-structural level and by the presence of defective respiration.

  4. Clinical phenotype and genetic mutation of fatty acid hydroxylase - associated neurodegeneration: analysis of four cases

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    Xiao-jun HUANG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To report 4 cases of fatty acid hydroxylase - associated neurodegeneration (FAHN and to summarize the clinical and genetic characteristics of FAHN by literatures review.  Methods Four cases of FAHN patients' clinical and family data were collected in detail. The gDNA of patients and their parents were extracted from peripheral blood. FA2H gene was conducted and followed by Sanger sequencing.  Results Among the 4 cases, 3 cases (Case 2, Case 3, Case 4 presented typical manifestations of FAHN while the other (Case 1 was atypical. Genetic sequencing showed FA2H gene mutation in all affected patients. Compound heterozygous mutation c.461G > A (p.Arg154His and c.794T > G (p.Phe265Cys were seen in Case 1. In Case 2, only one documented heterozygous mutation c.703C > T (p.Arg235Cys was found, and dificit mutation was not found in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP chip test of the patient and her mother. Compound heterozygous mutation c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys and insertion mutation c.172_173insGGGCCAGGAC (p.Ile58ArgfsX47 were presented in Case 3. In Case 4, compound heterozygous mutation c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys, c.968C > A (p.Pro323Gln and c.976G > A (p. Gly326Asp were seen, while his father was the carrier of c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys mutation and his mother was the carrier of c.968C > A (p.Pro323Gln and c.976G > A (p.Gly326Asp mutation. According to the standard of American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG, c.461G > A (p.Arg154His and c.794T > G (p.Phe265Cys in Case 1, and c.703C > T (p.Arg235Cys in Case 2 were considered as "likely pathogenic", while FA2H gene compound heterozygous mutation c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys, insertion mutation c.172_173insGGGCCAGGAC (p.Ile58ArgfsX47 in Case 3 was as "pathogenic", and in Case 4, the FA2H gene mutation c.688G > A (p.Glu230Lys and c.968C > A (p.Pro323Gln were "pathogenic" and c.976G > A (p.Gly326Asp was "likely pathogenic".  Conclusions FAHN has highly clinical and genetic

  5. The Role of T1-Weighted Derived Measures of Neurodegeneration for Assessing Disability Progression in Multiple Sclerosis.

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    Rocca, Maria A; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterised by the accumulation of permanent neurological disability secondary to irreversible tissue loss (neurodegeneration) in the brain and spinal cord. MRI measures derived from T1-weighted image analysis (i.e., black holes and atrophy) are correlated with pathological measures of irreversible tissue loss. Quantifying the degree of neurodegeneration in vivo using MRI may offer a surrogate marker with which to predict disability progression and the effect of treatment. This review evaluates the literature examining the association between MRI measures of neurodegeneration derived from T1-weighted images and disability in MS patients. A systematic PubMed search was conducted in January 2017 to identify MRI studies in MS patients investigating the relationship between "black holes" and/or atrophy in the brain and spinal cord, and disability. Results were limited to human studies published in English in the previous 10 years. A large number of studies have evaluated the association between the previous MRI measures and disability. These vary considerably in terms of study design, duration of follow-up, size, and phenotype of the patient population. Most, although not all, have shown that there is a significant correlation between disability and black holes in the brain, as well as atrophy of the whole brain and grey matter. The results for brain white matter atrophy are less consistently positive, whereas studies evaluating spinal cord atrophy consistently showed a significant correlation with disability. Newer ways of measuring atrophy, thanks to the development of segmentation and voxel-wise methods, have allowed us to assess the involvement of strategic regions of the CNS (e.g., thalamus) and to map the regional distribution of damage. This has resulted in better correlations between MRI measures and disability and in the identification of the critical role played by some CNS structures for MS clinical manifestations. The

  6. Data on pharmacological applications and hypothermia protection against in vitro oxygen-glucose-deprivation-related neurodegeneration of adult rat CA1 region

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    Pınar Öz

    2017-02-01

    Here, the use CA1sp width measurements on Nissl-stained hippocampal slices is introduced as a valid and affordable method for detecting the level of neurodegeneration and neuroprotection on hippocampal slices. The protective effect of hypothermia was found to be more pronounced compared to other agents.

  7. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) from genesis to senescence: the influence of LCPUFA on neural development, aging, and neurodegeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, C.I.F.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Many clinical and animal studies demonstrate the importance of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) in neural development and neurodegeneration. This review will focus on involvement of LCPUFA from genesis to senescence. The LCPUFA docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid are important

  8. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) from genesis to senescence: the influence of LCPUFA on neural development, aging, and neurodegeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, C.I.F.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Many clinical and animal studies demonstrate the importance of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) in neural development and neurodegeneration. This review will focus on involvement of LCPUFA from genesis to senescence. The LCPUFA docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid are important c

  9. Nitrosamine exposure exacerbates high fat diet-mediated type 2 diabetes mellitus, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and neurodegeneration with cognitive impairment

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    de la Monte Suzanne M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current epidemics of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, and Alzheimer's disease (AD all represent insulin-resistance diseases. Previous studies linked insulin resistance diseases to high fat diets or exposure to streptozotocin, a nitrosamine-related compound that causes T2DM, NASH, and AD-type neurodegeneration. We hypothesize that low-level exposure to nitrosamines that are widely present in processed foods, amplifies the deleterious effects of high fat intake in promoting T2DM, NASH, and neurodegeneration. Methods Long Evans rat pups were treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA by i.p. Injection, and upon weaning, they were fed with high fat (60%; HFD or low fat (5%; LFD chow for 6 weeks. Rats were evaluated for cognitive impairment, insulin resistance, and neurodegeneration using behavioral, biochemical, molecular, and histological methods. Results NDEA and HFD ± NDEA caused T2DM, NASH, deficits in spatial learning, and neurodegeneration with hepatic and brain insulin and/or IGF resistance, and reductions in tau and choline acetyltransferase levels in the temporal lobe. In addition, pro-ceramide genes, which promote insulin resistance, were increased in livers and brains of rats exposed to NDEA, HFD, or both. In nearly all assays, the adverse effects of HFD+NDEA were worse than either treatment alone. Conclusions Environmental and food contaminant exposures to low, sub-mutagenic levels of nitrosamines, together with chronic HFD feeding, function synergistically to promote major insulin resistance diseases including T2DM, NASH, and AD-type neurodegeneration. Steps to minimize human exposure to nitrosamines and consumption of high-fat content foods are needed to quell these costly and devastating epidemics.

  10. S100b Counteracts Neurodegeneration of Rat Cholinergic Neurons in Brain Slices after Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation

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    Daniela Serbinek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a severe chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by beta-amyloid plaques, tau pathology, cerebrovascular damage, inflammation, reactive gliosis, and cell death of cholinergic neurons. The aim of the present study is to test whether the glia-derived molecule S100b can counteract neurodegeneration of cholinergic neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in organotypic brain slices of basal nucleus of Meynert. Our data showed that 3 days of OGD induced a marked decrease of cholinergic neurons (60% of control, which could be counteracted by 50 μg/mL recombinant S100b. The effect was dose and time dependent. Application of nerve growth factor or fibroblast growth factor-2 was less protective. C-fos-like immunoreactivity was enhanced 3 hours after OGD indicating metabolic stress. We conclude that S100b is a potent neuroprotective factor for cholinergic neurons during ischemic events.

  11. Loss of Dendritic Complexity Precedes Neurodegeneration in a Mouse Model with Disrupted Mitochondrial Distribution in Mature Dendrites

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    Guillermo López-Doménech

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Correct mitochondrial distribution is critical for satisfying local energy demands and calcium buffering requirements and supporting key cellular processes. The mitochondrially targeted proteins Miro1 and Miro2 are important components of the mitochondrial transport machinery, but their specific roles in neuronal development, maintenance, and survival remain poorly understood. Using mouse knockout strategies, we demonstrate that Miro1, as opposed to Miro2, is the primary regulator of mitochondrial transport in both axons and dendrites. Miro1 deletion leads to depletion of mitochondria from distal dendrites but not axons, accompanied by a marked reduction in dendritic complexity. Disrupting postnatal mitochondrial distribution in vivo by deleting Miro1 in mature neurons causes a progressive loss of distal dendrites and compromises neuronal survival. Thus, the local availability of mitochondrial mass is critical for generating and sustaining dendritic arbors, and disruption of mitochondrial distribution in mature neurons is associated with neurodegeneration.

  12. Absence of the Autophagy Adaptor SQSTM1/p62 Causes Childhood-Onset Neurodegeneration with Ataxia, Dystonia, and Gaze Palsy.

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    Haack, Tobias B; Ignatius, Erika; Calvo-Garrido, Javier; Iuso, Arcangela; Isohanni, Pirjo; Maffezzini, Camilla; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Suomalainen, Anu; Gorza, Matteo; Kremer, Laura S; Graf, Elisabeth; Hartig, Monika; Berutti, Riccardo; Paucar, Martin; Svenningsson, Per; Stranneheim, Henrik; Brandberg, Göran; Wedell, Anna; Kurian, Manju A; Hayflick, Susan A; Venco, Paola; Tiranti, Valeria; Strom, Tim M; Dichgans, Martin; Horvath, Rita; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Freyer, Christoph; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Senderek, Jan; Wredenberg, Anna; Carroll, Christopher J; Klopstock, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1; also known as p62) encodes a multidomain scaffolding protein involved in various key cellular processes, including the removal of damaged mitochondria by its function as a selective autophagy receptor. Heterozygous variants in SQSTM1 have been associated with Paget disease of the bone and might contribute to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Using exome sequencing, we identified three different biallelic loss-of-function variants in SQSTM1 in nine affected individuals from four families with a childhood- or adolescence-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by gait abnormalities, ataxia, dysarthria, dystonia, vertical gaze palsy, and cognitive decline. We confirmed absence of the SQSTM1/p62 protein in affected individuals' fibroblasts and found evidence of a defect in the early response to mitochondrial depolarization and autophagosome formation. Our findings expand the SQSTM1-associated phenotypic spectrum and lend further support to the concept of disturbed selective autophagy pathways in neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Exome sequence reveals mutations in CoA synthase as a cause of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation.

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    Dusi, Sabrina; Valletta, Lorella; Haack, Tobias B; Tsuchiya, Yugo; Venco, Paola; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Goffrini, Paola; Tigano, Marco; Demchenko, Nikita; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Invernizzi, Federica; Garavaglia, Barbara; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Hamada, Jeffrey; Bettencourt, Conceição; Houlden, Henry; Chiapparini, Luisa; Zorzi, Giovanna; Kurian, Manju A; Nardocci, Nardo; Prokisch, Holger; Hayflick, Susan; Gout, Ivan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-02

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders with progressive extrapyramidal signs and neurological deterioration, characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Exome sequencing revealed the presence of recessive missense mutations in COASY, encoding coenzyme A (CoA) synthase in one NBIA-affected subject. A second unrelated individual carrying mutations in COASY was identified by Sanger sequence analysis. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the final steps of CoA biosynthesis by coupling phosphopantetheine with ATP to form dephospho-CoA and its subsequent phosphorylation to generate CoA. We demonstrate alterations in RNA and protein expression levels of CoA synthase, as well as CoA amount, in fibroblasts derived from the two clinical cases and in yeast. This is the second inborn error of coenzyme A biosynthesis to be implicated in NBIA.

  14. Multimodal quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of thalamic development and aging across the human lifespan: implications to neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis.

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    Hasan, Khader M; Walimuni, Indika S; Abid, Humaira; Frye, Richard E; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2011-11-16

    The human brain thalami play essential roles in integrating cognitive, sensory, and motor functions. In multiple sclerosis (MS), quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) measurements of the thalami provide important biomarkers of disease progression, but late development and aging confound the interpretation of data collected from patients over a wide age range. Thalamic tissue volume loss due to natural aging and its interplay with lesion-driven pathology has not been investigated previously. In this work, we used standardized thalamic volumetry combined with diffusion tensor imaging, T2 relaxometry, and lesion mapping on large cohorts of controls (N = 255, age range = 6.2-69.1 years) and MS patients (N = 109, age range = 20.8-68.5 years) to demonstrate early age- and lesion-independent thalamic neurodegeneration.

  15. Nutri-epigenetics ameliorates blood-brain barrier damage and neurodegeneration in hyperhomocysteinemia: role of folic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, Anuradha; Kamat, Pradip K; Givvimani, Srikanth; Brown, Kasey; Metreveli, Naira; Tyagi, Suresh C; Tyagi, Neetu

    2014-02-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms underlying nutrition (nutrition epigenetics) are important in understanding human health. Nutritional supplements, for example folic acid, a cofactor in one-carbon metabolism, regulate epigenetic alterations and may play an important role in the maintenance of neuronal integrity. Folic acid also ameliorates hyperhomocysteinemia, which is a consequence of elevated levels of homocysteine. Hyperhomocysteinemia induces oxidative stress that may epigenetically mediate cerebrovascular remodeling and leads to neurodegeneration; however, the mechanisms behind such alterations remain unclear. Therefore, the present study was designed to observe the protective effects of folic acid against hyperhomocysteinemia-induced epigenetic and molecular alterations leading to neurotoxic cascades. To test this hypothesis, we employed 8-weeks-old male wild-type (WT) cystathionine-beta-synthase heterozygote knockout methionine-fed (CBS+/− + Met), WT, and CBS+/− + Met mice supplemented with folic acid (FA) [WT + FA and CBS+/− + Met + FA, respectively, 0.0057-μg g−1 day−1 dose in drinking water/4 weeks]. Hyperhomocysteinemia in CBS+/− + Met mouse brain was accompanied by a decrease in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and an increase in S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase expression, symptoms of oxidative stress, upregulation of DNA methyltransferases, rise in matrix metalloproteinases, a drop in the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, decreased expression of tight junction proteins, increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier, neurodegeneration, and synaptotoxicity. Supplementation of folic acid to CBS+/− + Met mouse brain led to a decrease in the homocysteine level and rescued pathogenic and epigenetic alterations, showing its protective efficacy against homocysteine-induced neurotoxicity.

  16. Different susceptibility to neurodegeneration of dorsal and ventral hippocampal dentate gyrus: a study with transgenic mice overexpressing GSK3β.

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    Almudena Fuster-Matanzo

    Full Text Available Dorsal hippocampal regions are involved in memory and learning processes, while ventral areas are related to emotional and anxiety processes. Hippocampal dependent memory and behaviour alterations do not always come out in neurodegenerative diseases at the same time. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus (DG regions respond in a different manner to increased glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β levels in GSK3β transgenic mice, a genetic model of neurodegeneration. Reactive astrocytosis indicate tissue stress in dorsal DG, while ventral area does not show that marker. These changes occurred with a significant reduction of total cell number and with a significantly higher level of cell death in dorsal area than in ventral one as measured by fractin-positive cells. Biochemistry analysis showed higher levels of phosphorylated GSK3β in those residues that inactivate the enzyme in hippocampal ventral areas compared with dorsal area suggesting that the observed susceptibility is in part due to different GSK3 regulation. Previous studies carried out with this animal model had demonstrated impairment in Morris Water Maze and Object recognition tests point out to dorsal hippocampal atrophy. Here, we show that two tests used to evaluate emotional status, the light-dark box and the novelty suppressed feeding test, suggest that GSK3β mice do not show any anxiety-related disorder. Thus, our results demonstrate that in vivo overexpression of GSK3β results in dorsal but not ventral hippocampal DG neurodegeneration and suggest that both areas do not behave in a similar manner in neurodegenerative processes.

  17. Interleukin-4 Protects Dopaminergic Neurons In vitro but Is Dispensable for MPTP-Induced Neurodegeneration In vivo

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    Hühner, Laura; Rilka, Jennifer; Gilsbach, Ralf; Zhou, Xiaolai; Machado, Venissa; Spittau, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are involved in physiological as well as neuropathological processes in the central nervous system (CNS). Their functional states are often referred to as M1-like and M2-like activation, and are believed to contribute to neuroinflammation-mediated neurodegeneration or neuroprotection, respectively. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one the most common neurodegenerative disease and is characterized by the progressive loss of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons in the substantia nigra resulting in bradykinesia, tremor, and rigidity. Interleukin 4 (IL4)-mediated M2-like activation of microglia, which is characterized by upregulation of alternative markers Arginase 1 (Arg1) and Chitinase 3 like 3 (Ym1) has been well studied in vitro but the role of endogenous IL4 during CNS pathologies in vivo is not well understood. Interestingly, microglia activation by IL4 has been described to promote neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects, which might be important to slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we addressed the role of endogenous and exogenous IL4 during MPP+-induced degeneration of mDA neurons in vitro and further addressed the impact of IL4-deficiency on neurodegeneration in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD in vivo. Our results clearly demonstrate that exogenous IL4 is important to protect mDA neurons in vitro, but endogenous IL4 seems to be dispensable for development and maintenance of the nigrostriatal system as well as MPTP-induced loss of TH+ neurons in vivo. These results underline the importance of IL4 in promoting a neuroprotective microglia activation state and strengthen the therapeutic potential of exogenous IL4 for protection of mDA neurons in PD models. PMID:28337124

  18. A new in vivo model of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration reveals a surprising role for transcriptional regulation in pathogenesis.

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    Varun ePandey

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration (PKAN is a neurodegenerative disorder with a poorly understood molecular mechanism. It is caused by mutations in Pantothenate Kinase, the first enzyme in the Coenzyme A (CoA biosynthetic pathway. Here, we developed a Drosophila model of PKAN (tim-fbl flies that allows us to continuously monitor the modeled disease in the brain. In tim-fbl flies, downregulation of fumble, the Drosophila PanK homologue in the cells containing a circadian clock results in characteristic features of PKAN such as developmental lethality, hypersensitivity to oxidative stress, and diminished life span. Despite quasi-normal circadian transcriptional rhythms, tim-fbl flies display brain-specific aberrant circadian locomotor rhythms, and a unique transcriptional signature. Comparison with expression data from flies exposed to paraquat demonstrates that, as previously suggested, pathways others than oxidative stress are affected by PANK downregulation. Surprisingly we found a significant decrease in the expression of key components of the photoreceptor recycling pathways, which could lead to retinal degeneration, a hallmark of PKAN. Importantly, these defects are not accompanied by changes in structural components in eye genes suggesting that changes in gene expression in the eye precede and may cause the retinal degeneration. Indeed tim-fbl flies have diminished response to light transitions, and their altered day/night patterns of activity demonstrates defects in light perception. This suggest that retinal lesions are not solely due to oxidative stress and demonstrates a role for the transcriptional response to CoA deficiency underlying the defects observed in dPanK deficient flies. Moreover, in the present study we developed a new fly model that can be applied to other diseases and that allows the assessment of neurodegeneration in the brains of living flies.

  19. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 by Piroxicam confer neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia: an in silico evaluation of the hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Muhammed Khairujjaman; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Borah, Anupom

    2014-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are zinc-containing endopeptidases that are involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling cascade in many neurological disorders, including cerebral ischemia (CI). Remodeling of the ECM followed by disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major factors contributing to the ultimate neurodegeneration in CI. BBB disruption causes a cascade of pathophysiologies that trigger Anoikis-like cell death. While inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9 decreases the extent of neuronal damage in CI, MMP-2/9 knock-out mice have reduced infarct volume in experimental animal models of CI. Piroxicam, which is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has been demonstrated to be protective against aquaporin-4 and acid-sensing ion channel 1a--mediated neurodegeneration in CI. However, no report exists on the inhibitory action of Piroxicam on MMPs. We tested the hypothesis that Piroxicam, with its larger molecular size and more number of interacting pharmacophores, can inhibit MMP-2 and MMP-9. A comparative study on the inhibitory potential of Piroxicam with other reported MMP-inhibitors, viz., Aspirin, Melatonin and Doxycycline, has also been performed. Since the drug has already been reported to be neuroprotective through its inhibitory action in other pathways, it can be the drug of choice in the therapeutic management and prevention of neurodegeneration in CI.

  20. DRP1 inhibition rescues retinal ganglion cells and their axons by preserving mitochondrial integrity in a mouse model of glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K-Y; Perkins, G A; Shim, M S; Bushong, E; Alcasid, N; Ju, S; Ellisman, M H; Weinreb, R N; Ju, W-K

    2015-08-06

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness and is characterized by slow and progressive degeneration of the optic nerve head axons and retinal ganglion cell (RGC), leading to loss of visual function. Although oxidative stress and/or alteration of mitochondrial (mt) dynamics induced by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are associated with this neurodegenerative disease, the mechanisms that regulate mt dysfunction-mediated glaucomatous neurodegeneration are poorly understood. Using a mouse model of glaucoma, DBA/2J (D2), which spontaneously develops elevated IOP, as well as an in vitro RGC culture system, we show here that oxidative stress, as evidenced by increasing superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and mt transcription factor A (Tfam) protein expression, triggers mt fission and loss by increasing dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) in the retina of glaucomatous D2 mice as well as in cultured RGCs exposed to elevated hydrostatic pressure in vitro. DRP1 inhibition by overexpressing DRP1 K38A mutant blocks mt fission and triggers a subsequent reduction of oxidative stress, as evidenced by decreasing SOD2 and Tfam protein expression. DRP1 inhibition promotes RGC survival by increasing phosphorylation of Bad at serine 112 in the retina and preserves RGC axons by maintaining mt integrity in the glial lamina of glaucomatous D2 mice. These findings demonstrate an important vicious cycle involved in glaucomatous neurodegeneration that starts with elevated IOP producing oxidative stress; the oxidative stress then leads to mt fission and a specific form of mt dysfunction that generates further oxidative stress, thus perpetuating the cycle. Our findings suggest that DRP1 is a potential therapeutic target for ameliorating oxidative stress-mediated mt fission and dysfunction in RGC and its axons during glaucomatous neurodegeneration. Thus, DRP1 inhibition may provide a new therapeutic strategy for protecting both RGCs and their axons in glaucoma and other optic

  1. Piroxicam inhibits NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through allosteric inhibition of the GluN2B subunit: an in silico study elucidating a novel mechanism of action of the drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Muhammed Khairujjaman; Borah, Anupom

    2014-12-01

    Hyperactivation of GluN2B subunit containing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) significantly contributes to the development of several neurodegenerative diseases through a process called excitotoxicity. NMDARs are voltage-gated Ca2+ channels which when activated lead to excessive influx of Ca2+ into neurons thereby exacerbating several calcium-dependent pathways that cause oxidative stress and apoptosis. Several drugs are presently in use to counter the NMDAR-mediated excitotoxic events among which Ifenprodil and its derivatives are GluN2B selective allosteric antagonists. Certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have also been reported to inhibit NMDARs and the resultant pathologies. Meanwhile, Piroxicam, which is a NSAID, has been reported to be protective in cerebral ischemia-induced neurodegeneration through various pathways. Since Piroxicam has more number of interacting groups as compared to other NSAIDs and also has structural similarities with Ifenprodil, we thought it prudent that Piroxicam may inhibit NMDARs similar to Ifenprodil. By using molecular docking as a tool, we validated the hypothesis and hereby report for the first time that Piroxicam can inhibit GluN2B containing NMDARs through allosteric mode similar to the well known selective antagonist--Ifenprodil; and thus can be a therapeutic drug for the prevention of excitotoxic neurodegeneration.

  2. Early Golgi abnormalities and neurodegeneration upon loss of presynaptic proteins Munc18-1, syntaxin-1 or SNAP-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Tatiana C; Wierda, Keimpe; Broeke, Jurjen H; Toonen, Ruud F; Verhage, Matthijs

    2017-03-27

    The loss of presynaptic proteins Munc18-1, syntaxin-1 or SNAP-25 is known to produce cell death, but the underlying features have not been compared experimentally. Here, we investigated these features in cultured mouse CNS and dorsal root ganglion neurons. Side-by-side comparisons confirmed massive cell death, before synaptogenesis, within 1-4 days in vitro (DIV) upon loss of t-SNAREs (syntaxin-1, SNAP-25) or Munc18-1, but not v-SNAREs (synaptobrevins/VAMP1/2/3 using Tetanus Neurotoxin (TeNT), also in TI-VAMP/VAMP7 knock-out (KO) neurons). A condensed cis-Golgi was the first abnormality observed upon Munc18-1 or SNAP-25 loss within 3 DIV. This phenotype was distinct from the Golgi fragmentation observed in apoptosis. Cell death was too rapid after syntaxin-1 loss to study Golgi abnormalities. Syntaxin-1 and Munc18-1 depend on each other for normal cellular levels. We observed that endogenous syntaxin-1 accumulates at the Golgi of Munc18-1 KO neurons. However, expression of a non-neuronal Munc18 isoform that does not bind syntaxin-1, Munc18-3, in Munc18-1 KO neurons prevented cell death and restored normal cis-Golgi morphology, but not synaptic transmission or syntaxin-1 targeting. Finally, we observed that dorsal root ganglion neurons are the only Munc18-1 KO neurons that do not degenerate in vivo or in vitro In these neurons, cis-Golgi abnormalities were less severe, with no changes in Golgi shape. Together these data demonstrate that cell death upon Munc18-1, syntaxin-1 or SNAP-25 loss occurs via a degenerative pathway unrelated to the known synapse function of these proteins and involving early cis-Golgi abnormalities, distinct from apoptosis.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTThis study provides new insights in a neurodegeneration pathway triggered by the absence of specific proteins involved in synaptic transmission (syntaxin-1, Munc18-1, SNAP-25), while other proteins involved in the same molecular process (synaptobrevins, Munc13-1/2) do not cause degeneration. Massive

  3. BMAA Inhibits Nitrogen Fixation in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

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    Berntzon, Lotta; Erasmie, Sven; Celepli, Narin; Eriksson, Johan; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay), even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms. PMID:23966039

  4. BMAA Inhibits Nitrogen Fixation in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

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    Birgitta Bergman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA, proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay, even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms.

  5. Serotonin Depletion Does not Modify the Short-Term Brain Hypometabolism and Hippocampal Neurodegeneration Induced by the Lithium-Pilocarpine Model of Status Epilepticus in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Luis; Shiha, Ahmed Anis; Bascuñana, Pablo; de Cristóbal, Javier; Fernández de la Rosa, Rubén; Delgado, Mercedes; Pozo, Miguel A

    2016-05-01

    It has been reported that fluoxetine, a selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, has neuroprotective properties in the lithium-pilocarpine model of status epilepticus (SE) in rats. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of 5-HT depletion by short-term administration of p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), a specific tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, on the brain hypometabolism and neurodegeneration induced in the acute phase of this SE model. Our results show that 5-HT depletion did modify neither the brain basal metabolic activity nor the lithium-pilocarpine-induced hypometabolism when evaluated 3 days after the insult. In addition, hippocampal neurodegeneration and astrogliosis triggered by lithium-pilocarpine were not exacerbated by PCPA treatment. These findings point out that in the early latent phase of epileptogenesis, non-5-HT-mediated actions may contribute, at least in some extent, to the neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine in this model of SE.

  6. A Novel Deletion Mutation of Exon 2 of the C19orf12 Gene in an Omani Family with Mitochondrial Membrane Protein-Associated Neurodegeneration (MPAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Macki, Nabil; Al Rashdi, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the C19orf12 gene are known to cause mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration (MPAN), which is a neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) type 4 disorder. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically confirmed case of MPAN from Oman. A novel homozygous deletion of exon 2 of the C19orf12 gene was confirmed on the proband, a seven-year-old girl, who presented with gait instability. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed iron deposition on the basal ganglia. This report highlights the importance of genetic testing of such a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition among a population with a high consanguinity rate. To overcome the diagnostic difficulty, implementation of a cost-effective approach to perform cascade screening of carriers at risk is needed as well as programs to address risky consanguineous marriages. PMID:28042406

  7. The Roles of Lipid and Glucose Metabolism in Modulation of β-Amyloid, Tau, and Neurodegeneration in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease

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    Naoyuki eSato

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE and several genes related to AD have recently been identified by genome-wide association studies as being closely linked to lipid metabolism. Lipid metabolism and glucose-energy metabolism are closely related. Here, we review the emerging evidence regarding the roles of lipid and glucose metabolism in the modulation of β-amyloid, tau, and neurodegeneration during the pathogenesis of AD. Disruption of homeostasis of lipid and glucose metabolism affects production and clearance of β-amyloid and tau phosphorylation, and induces neurodegeneration. A more integrated understanding of the interactions among lipid, glucose, and protein metabolism is required to elucidate the pathogenesis of AD and to develop next-generation therapeutic options.

  8. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2, responsible for the phosphorylation of pantothenate or vitamin B5 in the biosynthesis of co-enzyme A. A Pank2 knockout (Pank2−/− ) mouse model did not recapitulate the human disease but showed azo...

  9. Electron Transport Disturbances and Neurodegeneration: From Albert Szent-Györgyi's Concept (Szeged) till Novel Approaches to Boost Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    OpenAIRE

    Levente Szalárdy; Dénes Zádori; Péter Klivényi; József Toldi; László Vécsei

    2015-01-01

    Impaired function of certain mitochondrial respiratory complexes has long been linked to the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. Furthermore, genetic alterations of mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes encoding proteins playing essential roles in maintaining proper mitochondrial function can lead to the development of severe systemic diseases associated with neurodegeneration and vacuolar myelinopathy. At present, all of these di...

  10. Inhibition of cathepsin X reduces the strength of microglial-mediated neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pišlar, Anja; Božić, Biljana; Zidar, Nace; Kos, Janko

    2017-03-01

    Inflammation plays a central role in the processes associated with neurodegeneration. The inflammatory response is mediated by activated microglia that release inflammatory mediators to the neuronal environment. Microglia-derived lysosomal cathepsins, including cathepsin X, are increasingly recognized as important mediators of the inflammation involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation. The current study was undertaken to investigate the role of cathepsin X and its molecular target, γ-enolase, in neuroinflammation and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. We determined that the exposure of activated BV2 and EOC 13.31 cells to LPS led to increased levels of cathepsin X protein and activity in the culture supernatants in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, LPS stimulation of these two cells reduced the release of active γ-enolase in a manner regulated by the cathepsin X activity. Cathepsin X inhibitor AMS36 significantly reduced LPS-induced production of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species and the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α from BV2 cells. Inhibition of cathepsin X suppressed microglial activation through the reduced caspase-3 activity, together with diminished microglial cell death and apoptosis, and also through inhibition of the activity of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Further, SH-SY5Y treatment with culture supernatants of activated microglial cells showed that cathepsin X inhibition reduces microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. These results indicate that up-regulated expression and increased release and activity of microglial cathepsin X leads to microglia activation-mediated neurodegeneration. Cathepsin X inhibitor caused neuroprotection via its inhibition of the activation of microglia. Cathepsin X could thus be a potential therapeutic target for neuroinflammatory disorders.

  11. Disruption of the MAP1B-related Protein FUTSCH Leads to Changes in the Neuronal Cytoskeleton, Axonal Transport Defects, and Progressive Neurodegeneration in DrosophilaD⃞V⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Alexandre Bettencourt; Schwärzel, Martin; Schulze, Sabine; Niyyati, Mahtab; Heisenberg, Martin; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2005-01-01

    The elaboration of neuronal axons and dendrites is dependent on a functional cytoskeleton. Cytoskeletal components have been shown to play a major role in the maintenance of the nervous system through adulthood, and changes in neurofilaments and microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) have been linked to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Here we show that Futsch, the fly homolog of MAP1B, is involved in progressive neurodegeneration. Although Futsch is widely expressed throughout the CNS, degeneration in futscholk primarily occurs in the olfactory system and mushroom bodies. Consistent with the predicted function of Futsch, we find abnormalities in the microtubule network and defects in axonal transport. Degeneration in the adult brain is preceded by learning deficits, revealing a neuronal dysfunction before detectable levels of cell death. Futsch is negatively regulated by the Drosophila Fragile X mental retardation gene, and a mutation in this gene delays the onset of neurodegeneration in futscholk. A similar effect is obtained by expression of either fly or bovine tau, suggesting a certain degree of functional redundancy of MAPs. The futscholk mutants exhibit several characteristics of human neurodegenerative diseases, providing an opportunity to study the role of MAPs in progressive neurodegeneration within an experimentally accessible, in vivo model system. PMID:15772149

  12. Disruption of the MAP1B-related protein FUTSCH leads to changes in the neuronal cytoskeleton, axonal transport defects, and progressive neurodegeneration in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt da Cruz, Alexandre; Schwärzel, Martin; Schulze, Sabine; Niyyati, Mahtab; Heisenberg, Martin; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2005-05-01

    The elaboration of neuronal axons and dendrites is dependent on a functional cytoskeleton. Cytoskeletal components have been shown to play a major role in the maintenance of the nervous system through adulthood, and changes in neurofilaments and microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) have been linked to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Here we show that Futsch, the fly homolog of MAP1B, is involved in progressive neurodegeneration. Although Futsch is widely expressed throughout the CNS, degeneration in futsch(olk) primarily occurs in the olfactory system and mushroom bodies. Consistent with the predicted function of Futsch, we find abnormalities in the microtubule network and defects in axonal transport. Degeneration in the adult brain is preceded by learning deficits, revealing a neuronal dysfunction before detectable levels of cell death. Futsch is negatively regulated by the Drosophila Fragile X mental retardation gene, and a mutation in this gene delays the onset of neurodegeneration in futsch(olk). A similar effect is obtained by expression of either fly or bovine tau, suggesting a certain degree of functional redundancy of MAPs. The futsch(olk) mutants exhibit several characteristics of human neurodegenerative diseases, providing an opportunity to study the role of MAPs in progressive neurodegeneration within an experimentally accessible, in vivo model system.

  13. Extracellular dopamine potentiates mn-induced oxidative stress, lifespan reduction, and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in a BLI-3-dependent manner in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Alexandre Benedetto

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD-mimicking drugs and pesticides, and more recently PD-associated gene mutations, have been studied in cell cultures and mammalian models to decipher the molecular basis of PD. Thus far, a dozen of genes have been identified that are responsible for inherited PD. However they only account for about 8% of PD cases, most of the cases likely involving environmental contributions. Environmental manganese (Mn exposure represents an established risk factor for PD occurrence, and both PD and Mn-intoxicated patients display a characteristic extrapyramidal syndrome primarily involving dopaminergic (DAergic neurodegeneration with shared common molecular mechanisms. To better understand the specificity of DAergic neurodegeneration, we studied Mn toxicity in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans. Combining genetics and biochemical assays, we established that extracellular, and not intracellular, dopamine (DA is responsible for Mn-induced DAergic neurodegeneration and that this process (1 requires functional DA-reuptake transporter (DAT-1 and (2 is associated with oxidative stress and lifespan reduction. Overexpression of the anti-oxidant transcription factor, SKN-1, affords protection against Mn toxicity, while the DA-dependency of Mn toxicity requires the NADPH dual-oxidase BLI-3. These results suggest that in vivo BLI-3 activity promotes the conversion of extracellular DA into toxic reactive species, which, in turn, can be taken up by DAT-1 in DAergic neurons, thus leading to oxidative stress and cell degeneration.

  14. Dopamine Induced Neurodegeneration in a PINK1 Model of Parkinson's Disease

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    Yao, Zhi; Duchen, Michael R.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Abramov, Andrey Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disease characterised by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons, leading to dopamine depletion in the striatum. Mutations in the PINK1 gene cause an autosomal recessive form of Parkinson's disease. Loss of PINK1 function causes mitochondrial dysfunction, increased reactive oxygen species production and calcium dysregulation, which increases susceptibility to neuronal death in Parkinson's disease. The basis of neuronal vulnerability to dopamine in Parkinson's disease is not well understood. Methodology We investigated the mechanism of dopamine induced cell death in transgenic PINK1 knockout mouse neurons. We show that dopamine results in mitochondrial depolarisation caused by mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. Dopamine-induced mPTP opening is dependent on a complex of reactive oxygen species production and calcium signalling. Dopamine-induced mPTP opening, and dopamine-induced cell death, could be prevented by inhibition of reactive oxygen species production, by provision of respiratory chain substrates, and by alteration in calcium signalling. Conclusions These data demonstrate the mechanism of dopamine toxicity in PINK1 deficient neurons, and suggest potential therapeutic strategies for neuroprotection in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22662171

  15. Abeta42-induced neurodegeneration via an age-dependent autophagic-lysosomal injury in Drosophila.

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    Daijun Ling

    Full Text Available The mechanism of widespread neuronal death occurring in Alzheimer's disease (AD remains enigmatic even after extensive investigation during the last two decades. Amyloid beta 42 peptide (Abeta(1-42 is believed to play a causative role in the development of AD. Here we expressed human Abeta(1-42 and amyloid beta 40 (Abeta(1-40 in Drosophila neurons. Abeta(1-42 but not Abeta(1-40 causes an extensive accumulation of autophagic vesicles that become increasingly dysfunctional with age. Abeta(1-42-induced impairment of the degradative function, as well as the structural integrity, of post-lysosomal autophagic vesicles triggers a neurodegenerative cascade that can be enhanced by autophagy activation or partially rescued by autophagy inhibition. Compromise and leakage from post-lysosomal vesicles result in cytosolic acidification, additional damage to membranes and organelles, and erosive destruction of cytoplasm leading to eventual neuron death. Neuronal autophagy initially appears to play a pro-survival role that changes in an age-dependent way to a pro-death role in the context of Abeta(1-42 expression. Our in vivo observations provide a mechanistic understanding for the differential neurotoxicity of Abeta(1-42 and Abeta(1-40, and reveal an Abeta(1-42-induced death execution pathway mediated by an age-dependent autophagic-lysosomal injury.

  16. PARP-1 cleavage fragments: signatures of cell-death proteases in neurodegeneration

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    Alexander Jonathan S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The normal function of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is the routine repair of DNA damage by adding poly (ADP ribose polymers in response to a variety of cellular stresses. Recently, it has become widely appreciated that PARP-1 also participates in diverse physiological and pathological functions from cell survival to several forms of cell death and has been implicated in gene transcription, immune responses, inflammation, learning, memory, synaptic functions, angiogenesis and aging. In the CNS, PARP inhibition attenuates injury in pathologies like cerebral ischemia, trauma and excitotoxicity demonstrating a central role of PARP-1 in these pathologies. PARP-1 is also a preferred substrate for several 'suicidal' proteases and the proteolytic action of suicidal proteases (caspases, calpains, cathepsins, granzymes and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs on PARP-1 produces several specific proteolytic cleavage fragments with different molecular weights. These PARP-1 signature fragments are recognized biomarkers for specific patterns of protease activity in unique cell death programs. This review focuses on specific suicidal proteases active towards PARP-1 to generate signature PARP-1 fragments that can identify key proteases and particular forms of cell death involved in pathophysiology. The roles played by some of the PARP-1 fragments and their associated binding partners in the control of different forms of cell death are also discussed.

  17. Metabolic Biomarkers and Neurodegeneration: A Pathway Enrichment Analysis of Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kori, Medi; Aydın, Busra; Unal, Semra; Arga, Kazim Yalcin; Kazan, Dilek

    2016-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) lack robust diagnostics and prognostic biomarkers. Metabolomics is a postgenomics field that offers fresh insights for biomarkers of common complex as well as rare diseases. Using data on metabolite-disease associations published in the previous decade (2006-2016) in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Web of Science, we identified 101 metabolites as putative biomarkers for these three neurodegenerative diseases. Notably, uric acid, choline, creatine, L-glutamine, alanine, creatinine, and N-acetyl-L-aspartate were the shared metabolite signatures among the three diseases. The disease-metabolite-pathway associations pointed out the importance of membrane transport (through ATP binding cassette transporters), particularly of arginine and proline amino acids in all three neurodegenerative diseases. When disease-specific and common metabolic pathways were queried by using the pathway enrichment analyses, we found that alanine, aspartate, glutamate, and purine metabolism might act as alternative pathways to overcome inadequate glucose supply and energy crisis in neurodegeneration. These observations underscore the importance of metabolite-based biomarker research in deciphering the elusive pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Future research investments in metabolomics of complex diseases might provide new insights on AD, PD, and ALS that continue to place a significant burden on global health.

  18. Proteolytic fragments of laminin promote excitotoxic neurodegeneration by up-regulation of the KA1 subunit of the kainate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zu-Lin; Yu, Huaxu; Yu, Wei-Ming; Pawlak, Robert; Strickland, Sidney

    2008-12-29

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein laminin contributes to excitotoxic cell death in the hippocampus, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. To study this process, we disrupted laminin gamma1 (lamgamma1) expression in the hippocampus. Lamgamma1 knockout (KO) and control mice had similar basal expression of kainate (KA) receptors, but the lamgamma1 KO mice were resistant to KA-induced neuronal death. After KA injection, KA1 subunit levels increased in control mice but were unchanged in lamgamma1 KO mice. KA1 levels in tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-KO mice were also unchanged after KA, indicating that both tPA and laminin were necessary for KA1 up-regulation after KA injection. Infusion of plasmin-digested laminin-1 into the hippocampus of lamgamma1 or tPA KO mice restored KA1 up-regulation and KA-induced neuronal degeneration. Interfering with KA1 function with a specific anti-KA1 antibody protected against KA-induced neuronal death both in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrate a novel pathway for neurodegeneration involving proteolysis of the ECM and KA1 KA receptor subunit up-regulation.

  19. Systemic Inflammation and the Brain: novel roles of genetic, molecular, and environmental cues as drivers of neurodegeneration.

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    Roman eSankowski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The nervous and immune systems have evolved in parallel from the early bilaterians, in which innate immunity and a central nervous system coexisted for the first time, to jawed vertebrates and the appearance of adaptive immunity. The central nervous system (CNS feeds from, and integrates efferent signals in response to, somatic and autonomic sensory information. The CNS receives input also from the periphery about inflammation and infection. Cytokines, chemokines, damage-associated soluble mediators of systemic inflammation can also gain access to the CNS via blood flow. In response to systemic inflammation, those soluble mediators can access directly through the circumventricular organs, as well as open the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The resulting translocation of inflammatory mediators can interfere with neuronal and glial well-being, leading to a break of balance in brain homeostasis. This in turn results in cognitive and behavioral manifestations commonly present during acute infections -including anorexia, malaise, depression, and decreased physical activity- collectively known as the sickness behavior (SB. While SB manifestations are transient and self-limited, under states of persistent systemic inflammatory response the cognitive and behavioral changes can become permanent. For example, cognitive decline is almost universal in sepsis survivors, and a common finding in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Here, we review recent genetic evidence suggesting an association between neurodegenerative disorders and persistent immune activation; clinical and experimental evidence indicating previously unidentified immune-mediated pathways of neurodegeneration; and novel immunomodulatory targets and their potential relevance for neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Caloric Restriction and the Nutrient-Sensing PGC-1α in Mitochondrial Homeostasis: New Perspectives in Neurodegeneration

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    Daniele Lettieri Barbato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial activity progressively declines during ageing and in many neurodegenerative diseases. Caloric restriction (CR has been suggested as a dietary intervention that is able to postpone the detrimental aspects of aging as it ameliorates mitochondrial performance. This effect is partially due to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. The nutrient-sensing PGC-1α is a transcriptional coactivator that promotes the expression of mitochondrial genes and is induced by CR. It is believed that many of the mitochondrial and metabolic benefits of CR are due to increased PGC-1α activity. The increase of PGC-1α is also positively linked to neuroprotection and its decrement has been involved in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. This paper aims to summarize the current knowledge about the role of PGC-1α in neuronal homeostasis and the beneficial effects of CR on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. We also discuss how PGC-1α-governed pathways could be used as target for nutritional intervention to prevent neurodegeneration.

  1. Drosophila CheB proteins involved in gustatory detection of pheromones are related to a human neurodegeneration factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikielny, Claudio W

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila CheBs proteins are expressed in a variety of sexually dimorphic subsets of taste hairs, some of which have been directly implicated in pheromone detection. Their remarkable collection of expression patterns suggests that CheBs have specialized roles in gustatory detection of pheromones. Indeed, mutations in the CheB42a gene specifically alter male response to female-specific cuticular hydrocarbons. Furthermore, CheBs belong to the large ML (MD-2-like) superfamily of lipid-binding proteins and share amino acids with an essential role in the function of human GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP), a protein whose absence results in neurodegeneration and death. As GM2-AP binds specifically to the GM2 ganglioside, we have proposed that CheB42a and other CheBs function by interacting directly with the lipid-like cuticular hydrocarbons of Drosophila melanogaster and modulating their detection by transmembrane receptors. Here I review the current knowledge of the CheB family and discuss possible models for their function.

  2. Dementia means number of things - the overlap of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) and Alzheimer changes: an autopsy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewulska, Dorota; Domitrz, Izabela; Domzał-Stryga, Anna

    2010-01-01

    In humans overlap between various neurodegenerative disorders is a well known phenomenon. We reported a case of a 77-year-old woman with parkinsonism, dystonia, psychiatric symptoms and progressing dementia misdiagnosed at the age of 51 years as Parkinson's disease. Histopathological examination of the patient's brain performed 26 years after the disease onset revealed numerous axonal spheroids and iron deposits in structures of the nigro-pallido-striatal system that enabled to diagnose neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) (former Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome), and changes characteristic for Alzheimer's disease (AD). NBIA is a group of rare clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases of the extrapyramidal system which common feature is abnormal iron storage in the basal ganglia. Disturbed iron metabolism is also one of the hypothetical patho-mechanisms of AD. A coexistence of morphological changes characteristic for AD and NBIA in our patient suggests that similar molecular mechanisms may be involved in pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative processes, especially in disorders with iron dyshomeostasis. This case contributes also to the increasing evidence of NBIA heterogeneity.

  3. Parkinson phenotype in aged PINK1-deficient mice is accompanied by progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in absence of neurodegeneration.

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    Suzana Gispert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is an adult-onset movement disorder of largely unknown etiology. We have previously shown that loss-of-function mutations of the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 (PTEN induced putative kinase 1 cause the recessive PARK6 variant of PD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Now we generated a PINK1 deficient mouse and observed several novel phenotypes: A progressive reduction of weight and of locomotor activity selectively for spontaneous movements occurred at old age. As in PD, abnormal dopamine levels in the aged nigrostriatal projection accompanied the reduced movements. Possibly in line with the PARK6 syndrome but in contrast to sporadic PD, a reduced lifespan, dysfunction of brainstem and sympathetic nerves, visible aggregates of alpha-synuclein within Lewy bodies or nigrostriatal neurodegeneration were not present in aged PINK1-deficient mice. However, we demonstrate PINK1 mutant mice to exhibit a progressive reduction in mitochondrial preprotein import correlating with defects of core mitochondrial functions like ATP-generation and respiration. In contrast to the strong effect of PINK1 on mitochondrial dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster and in spite of reduced expression of fission factor Mtp18, we show reduced fission and increased aggregation of mitochondria only under stress in PINK1-deficient mouse neurons. CONCLUSION: Thus, aging Pink1(-/- mice show increasing mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in impaired neural activity similar to PD, in absence of overt neuronal death.

  4. Mitochondrial iron and energetic dysfunction distinguish fibroblasts and induced neurons from pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santambrogio, Paolo; Dusi, Sabrina; Guaraldo, Michela; Rotundo, Luisa Ida; Broccoli, Vania; Garavaglia, Barbara; Tiranti, Valeria; Levi, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration is an early onset autosomal recessive movement disorder caused by mutation of the pantothenate kinase-2 gene, which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme involved in coenzyme A synthesis. The disorder is characterised by high iron levels in the brain, although the pathological mechanism leading to this accumulation is unknown. To address this question, we tested primary skin fibroblasts from three patients and three healthy subjects, as well as neurons induced by direct fibroblast reprogramming, for oxidative status, mitochondrial functionality and iron parameters. The patients' fibroblasts showed altered oxidative status, reduced antioxidant defence, and impaired cytosolic and mitochondrial aconitase activities compared to control cells. Mitochondrial iron homeostasis and functionality analysis of patient fibroblasts indicated increased labile iron pool content and reactive oxygen species development, altered mitochondrial shape, decreased membrane potential and reduced ATP levels. Furthermore, analysis of induced neurons, performed at a single cell level, confirmed some of the results obtained in fibroblasts, indicating an altered oxidative status and signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, possibly due to iron mishandling. Thus, for the first time, altered biological processes have been identified in vitro in live diseased neurons. Moreover, the obtained induced neurons can be considered a suitable human neuronal model for the identification of candidate therapeutic compounds for this disease.

  5. C19orf12 and FA2H mutations are rare in Italian patients with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteghini, Celeste; Zorzi, Giovanna; Venco, Paola; Dusi, Sabrina; Reale, Chiara; Brunetti, Dario; Chiapparini, Luisa; Zibordi, Federica; Siegel, Birgit; Siegel, Brigitte; Garavaglia, Barbara; Simonati, Alessandro; Bertini, Enrico; Nardocci, Nardo; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-06-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) defines a wide spectrum of clinical entities characterized by iron accumulation in specific regions of the brain, predominantly in the basal ganglia. We evaluated the presence of FA2H and C19orf12 mutations in a cohort of 46 Italian patients with early onset NBIA, which were negative for mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes. Follow-up molecular genetic and in vitro analyses were then performed. We did not find any mutations in the FA2H gene, although we identified 3 patients carrying novel mutations in the C19orf12 gene. The recent discovery of new genes responsible for NBIA extends the spectrum of the genetic investigation now available for these disorders and makes it possible to delineate a clearer clinical-genetic classification of different forms of this syndrome. A large fraction of patients still remain without a molecular genetics diagnosis, suggesting that additional NBIA genes are still to be discovered.

  6. Microglia and macrophages of the central nervous system: the contribution of microglia priming and systemic inflammation to chronic neurodegeneration.

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    Perry, V Hugh; Teeling, Jessica

    2013-09-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), play an important role in CNS homeostasis during development, adulthood and ageing. Their phenotype and function have been widely studied, but most studies have focused on their local interactions in the CNS. Microglia are derived from a particular developmental niche, are long-lived, locally replaced and form a significant part of the communication route between the peripheral immune system and the CNS; all these components of microglia biology contribute to maintaining homeostasis. Microglia function is tightly regulated by the CNS microenvironment, and increasing evidence suggests that disturbances, such as neurodegeneration and ageing, can have profound consequences for microglial phenotype and function. We describe the possible biological mechanisms underlying the altered threshold for microglial activation, also known as 'microglial priming', seen in CNS disease and ageing and consider how priming may contribute to turning immune-to-brain communication from a homeostatic pathway into a maladaptive response that contributes to symptoms and progression of diseases of the CNS.

  7. Identification of Novel Compound Mutations in PLA2G6-Associated Neurodegeneration Patient with Characteristic MRI Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sen; Yang, Liu; Liu, Huijie; Chen, Wei; Li, Jinchen; Yu, Ping; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Chen, Xiang; Du, Jie; Cai, Tao

    2016-07-09

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized clinically by progressive motor dysfunction. Accurate identification of de novo and rare inherited mutations is important for determining causative genes of undiagnosed neurological diseases. In the present study, we report a unique case with cerebellar ataxia symptoms and social communication difficulties in an intermarriage family. MRI showed a marked cerebellar atrophy and the "eye-of-the-tiger"-like sign in the medial globus pallidus. Potential genetic defects were screened by whole-exome sequencing (WES) for the patient and four additional family members. A previously undescribed de novo missense mutation (c.1634A>G, p.K545R) in the exon 12 of the PLA2G6 gene was identified. A second rare variant c.1077G>A at the end of exon 7 was also identified, which was inherited from the mother, and resulted in a frame-shift mutation (c.1074_1077del.GTCG) due to an alternative splicing. In conclusion, the identification of the "eye-of-the-tiger"-like sign in the globus pallidus of the patient expands the phenotypic spectrum of PLA2G6-associated disorders and reveals its value in differential diagnosis of PLA2G6-associated disorders.

  8. NP031112, a thiadiazolidinone compound, prevents inflammation and neurodegeneration under excitotoxic conditions: potential therapeutic role in brain disorders.

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    Luna-Medina, Rosario; Cortes-Canteli, Marta; Sanchez-Galiano, Susana; Morales-Garcia, Jose A; Martinez, Ana; Santos, Angel; Perez-Castillo, Ana

    2007-05-23

    Inflammation and neurodegeneration coexist in many acute damage and chronic CNS disorders (e.g., stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease). A well characterized animal model of brain damage involves administration of kainic acid, which causes limbic seizure activity and subsequent neuronal death, especially in the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons in the hilus of the hippocampus. Our previous work demonstrated a potent anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effect of two thiadiazolidinones compounds, NP00111 (2,4-dibenzyl-[1,2,4]thiadiazolidine-3,5-dione) and NP01138 (2-ethyl-4-phenyl-[1,2,4]thiadiazolidine-3,5-dione), in primary cultures of cortical neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Here, we show that injection of NP031112, a more potent thiadiazolidinone derivative, into the rat hippocampus dramatically reduces kainic acid-induced inflammation, as measured by edema formation using T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and glial activation and has a neuroprotective effect in the damaged areas of the hippocampus. Last, NP031112-induced neuroprotection, both in vitro and in vivo, was substantially attenuated by cotreatment with GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitrobenzanilide), a known antagonist of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, suggesting that the effects of NP031112 can be mediated through activation of this receptor. As such, these findings identify NP031112 as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Loss of K-Cl co-transporter KCC3 causes deafness, neurodegeneration and reduced seizure threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettger, Thomas; Rust, Marco B; Maier, Hannes; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Schweizer, Michaela; Keating, Damien J; Faulhaber, Jörg; Ehmke, Heimo; Pfeffer, Carsten; Scheel, Olaf; Lemcke, Beate; Horst, Jürgen; Leuwer, Rudolf; Pape, Hans-Christian; Völkl, Harald; Hübner, Christian A; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2003-10-15

    K-Cl co-transporters are encoded by four homologous genes and may have roles in transepithelial transport and in the regulation of cell volume and cytoplasmic chloride. KCC3, an isoform mutated in the human Anderman syndrome, is expressed in brain, epithelia and other tissues. To investigate the physiological functions of KCC3, we disrupted its gene in mice. This severely impaired cell volume regulation as assessed in renal tubules and neurons, and moderately raised intraneuronal Cl(-) concentration. Kcc3(-/-) mice showed severe motor abnormalities correlating with a progressive neurodegeneration in the peripheral and CNS. Although no spontaneous seizures were observed, Kcc3(-/-) mice displayed reduced seizure threshold and spike-wave complexes on electrocorticograms. These resembled EEG abnormalities in patients with Anderman syndrome. Kcc3(-/-) mice also displayed arterial hypertension and a slowly progressive deafness. KCC3 was expressed in many, but not all cells of the inner ear K(+) recycling pathway. These cells slowly degenerated, as did sensory hair cells. The present mouse model has revealed important cellular and systemic functions of KCC3 and is highly relevant for Anderman syndrome.

  10. Garcinia kola aqueous suspension prevents cerebellar neurodegeneration in long-term diabetic rat - a type 1 diabetes mellitus model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahna, Mohammed; Seke Etet, Paul F; Osman, Sayed Y; Yurt, Kıymet K; Amir, Naheed; Vecchio, Lorella; Aydin, Isınsu; Aldebasi, Yousef H; Sheikh, Azimullah; Chijuka, John C; Kaplan, Süleyman; Adem, Abdu

    2017-01-04

    The development of compounds able to improve metabolic syndrome and mitigate complications caused by inappropriate glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus is challenging. The medicinal plant with established hypoglycemic properties Garcinia kola Heckel might have the potential to mitigate diabetes mellitus metabolic syndrome and complications. We have investigated the neuroprotective properties of a suspension of G. kola seeds in long-term type 1 diabetes mellitus rat model. Wistar rats, made diabetic by single injection of streptozotocin were monitored for 8 months. Then, they were administered with distilled water or G. kola oral aqueous suspension daily for 30 days. Body weight and glycemia were determined before and after treatment. After sacrifice, cerebella were dissected out and processed for stereological quantification of Purkinje cells. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of markers of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration were performed. Purkinje cell counts were significantly increased, and histopathological signs of apoptosis and neuroinflammation decreased, in diabetic animals treated with G. kola compared to diabetic rats given distilled water. Glycemia was also markedly improved and body weight restored to non-diabetic control values, following G. kola treatment. These results suggest that G. kola treatment improved the general condition of long-term diabetic rats and protected Purkinje cells partly by improving the systemic glycemia and mitigating neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. NAD+ salvage pathway proteins suppress proteotoxicity in yeast models of neurodegeneration by promoting the clearance of misfolded/oligomerized proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Alejandro; Liu, Jingjing; Barrientos, Antoni

    2013-05-01

    Increased levels of nicotinamide/nicotinic acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT) act as a powerful suppressor of Wallerian degeneration and ataxin- and tau-induced neurodegeneration in flies and mice. However, the nature of the suppression mechanism/s remains controversial. Here, we show that in yeast models of proteinopathies, overexpression of the NMNAT yeast homologs, NMA1 and NMA2, suppresses polyglutamine (PolyQ) and α-synuclein-induced cytotoxicities. Unexpectedly, overexpression of other genes in the salvage pathway for NAD(+) biosynthesis, including QNS1, NPT1 and PNC1 also protected against proteotoxicity. Our data revealed that in all cases, this mechanism involves extensive clearance of the non-native protein. Importantly, we demonstrate that suppression by NMA1 does not require the presence of a functional salvage pathway for NAD(+) biosynthesis, SIR2 or an active mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Our results imply the existence of histone deacetylase- and OXPHOS-independent crosstalk between the proteins in the salvage pathway for NAD(+) biosynthesis and the proteasome that can be manipulated to achieve cellular protection against proteotoxic stress.

  12. Global Disruption of Alternative Splicing and Neurodegeneration Is Caused by Mutation of a U2 snRNA Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yichang; Mu, John C.; Ackerman, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Although uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (U-snRNAs) are essential for pre-mRNA splicing, little is known regarding their function in the regulation of alternative splicing or of the biological consequences of their dysfunction in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that mutation of Rnu2–8, one of the mouse multicopy U2 snRNA genes, causes ataxia and neurodegeneration. Coincident with the observed pathology, the level of mutant U2 RNAs was highest in the cerebellum and increased after granule neuron maturation. Furthermore, neuron loss was strongly dependent on the dosage of mutant and wild type snRNA genes. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis identified a group of alternative splicing events, including the splicing of small introns, which were disrupted in the mutant cerebellum. Our results suggest that the expression of mammalian U2 snRNA genes, previously presumed to be ubiquitious, is spatially and temporally regulated, and dysfunction of a single U2 snRNA causes neuron degeneration through distortion of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:22265417

  13. Mutation of a U2 snRNA gene causes global disruption of alternative splicing and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yichang; Mu, John C; Ackerman, Susan L

    2012-01-20

    Although uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (U-snRNAs) are essential for pre-mRNA splicing, little is known regarding their function in the regulation of alternative splicing or of the biological consequences of their dysfunction in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that mutation of Rnu2-8, one of the mouse multicopy U2 snRNA genes, causes ataxia and neurodegeneration. Coincident with the observed pathology, the level of mutant U2 RNAs was highest in the cerebellum and increased after granule neuron maturation. Furthermore, neuron loss was strongly dependent on the dosage of mutant and wild-type snRNA genes. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis identified a group of alternative splicing events, including the splicing of small introns, which were disrupted in the mutant cerebellum. Our results suggest that the expression of mammalian U2 snRNA genes, previously presumed to be ubiquitous, is spatially and temporally regulated, and dysfunction of a single U2 snRNA causes neuron degeneration through distortion of pre-mRNA splicing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ginseng Rb fraction protects glia, neurons and cognitive function in a rat model of neurodegeneration.

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    Kangning Xu

    Full Text Available The loss and injury of neurons play an important role in the onset of various neurodegenerative diseases, while both microgliosis and astrocyte loss or dysfunction are significant causes of neuronal degeneration. Previous studies have suggested that an extract enriched panaxadiol saponins from ginseng has more neuroprotective potential than the total saponins of ginseng. The present study investigated whether a fraction of highly purified panaxadiol saponins (termed as Rb fraction was protective for both glia and neurons, especially GABAergic interneurons, against kainic acid (KA-induced excitotoxicity in rats. Rats received Rb fraction at 30 mg/kg (i.p., 40 mg/kg (i.p. or saline followed 40 min later by an intracerebroventricular injection of KA. Acute hippocampal injury was determined at 48 h after KA, and impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory as well as delayed neuronal injury was determined 16 to 21 days later. KA injection produced significant acute hippocampal injuries, including GAD67-positive GABAergic interneuron loss in CA1, paralbumin (PV-positive GABAergic interneuron loss, pyramidal neuron degeneration and astrocyte damage accompanied with reactive microglia in both CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. There was also a delayed loss of GAD67-positive interneurons in CA1, CA3, hilus and dentate gyrus. Microgliosis also became more severe 21 days later. Accordingly, KA injection resulted in hippocampus-dependent spatial memory impairment. Interestingly, the pretreatment with Rb fraction at 30 or 40 mg/kg significantly protected the pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons against KA-induced acute excitotoxicity and delayed injury. Rb fraction also prevented memory impairments and protected astrocytes from KA-induced acute excitotoxicity. Additionally, microglial activation, especially the delayed microgliosis, was inhibited by Rb fraction. Overall, this study demonstrated that Rb fraction protected both

  15. Ginseng Rb fraction protects glia, neurons and cognitive function in a rat model of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kangning; Zhang, Yufen; Wang, Yan; Ling, Peng; Xie, Xin; Jiang, Chenyao; Zhang, Zhizhen; Lian, Xiao-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The loss and injury of neurons play an important role in the onset of various neurodegenerative diseases, while both microgliosis and astrocyte loss or dysfunction are significant causes of neuronal degeneration. Previous studies have suggested that an extract enriched panaxadiol saponins from ginseng has more neuroprotective potential than the total saponins of ginseng. The present study investigated whether a fraction of highly purified panaxadiol saponins (termed as Rb fraction) was protective for both glia and neurons, especially GABAergic interneurons, against kainic acid (KA)-induced excitotoxicity in rats. Rats received Rb fraction at 30 mg/kg (i.p.), 40 mg/kg (i.p. or saline followed 40 min later by an intracerebroventricular injection of KA. Acute hippocampal injury was determined at 48 h after KA, and impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory as well as delayed neuronal injury was determined 16 to 21 days later. KA injection produced significant acute hippocampal injuries, including GAD67-positive GABAergic interneuron loss in CA1, paralbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneuron loss, pyramidal neuron degeneration and astrocyte damage accompanied with reactive microglia in both CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. There was also a delayed loss of GAD67-positive interneurons in CA1, CA3, hilus and dentate gyrus. Microgliosis also became more severe 21 days later. Accordingly, KA injection resulted in hippocampus-dependent spatial memory impairment. Interestingly, the pretreatment with Rb fraction at 30 or 40 mg/kg significantly protected the pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons against KA-induced acute excitotoxicity and delayed injury. Rb fraction also prevented memory impairments and protected astrocytes from KA-induced acute excitotoxicity. Additionally, microglial activation, especially the delayed microgliosis, was inhibited by Rb fraction. Overall, this study demonstrated that Rb fraction protected both astrocytes and neurons

  16. Neuroprotection with metformin and thymoquinone against ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in prenatal rat cortical neurons

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    Ullah Ikram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to ethanol during early development triggers severe neuronal death by activating multiple stress pathways and causes neurological disorders, such as fetal alcohol effects or fetal alcohol syndrome. This study investigated the effect of ethanol on intracellular events that predispose developing neurons for apoptosis via calcium-mediated signaling. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms of ethanol neurotoxicity are not completely determined, mitochondrial dysfunction, altered calcium homeostasis and apoptosis-related proteins have been implicated in ethanol neurotoxicity. The present study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective mechanisms of metformin (Met and thymoquinone (TQ during ethanol toxicity in rat prenatal cortical neurons at gestational day (GD 17.5. Results We found that Met and TQ, separately and synergistically, increased cell viability after ethanol (100 mM exposure for 12 hours and attenuated the elevation of cytosolic free calcium [Ca2+]c. Furthermore, Met and TQ maintained normal physiological mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔψM, which is typically lowered by ethanol exposure. Increased cytosolic free [Ca2+]c and lowered mitochondrial transmembrane potential after ethanol exposure significantly decreased the expression of a key anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, increased expression of Bax, and stimulated the release of cytochrome-c from mitochondria. Met and TQ treatment inhibited the apoptotic cascade by increasing Bcl-2 expression. These compounds also repressed the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and reduced the cleavage of PARP-1. Morphological conformation of cell death was assessed by TUNEL, Fluoro-Jade-B, and PI staining. These staining methods demonstrated more cell death after ethanol treatment, while Met, TQ or Met plus TQ prevented ethanol-induced apoptotic cell death. Conclusion These findings suggested that Met and TQ are strong protective agents against ethanol

  17. The stress system in the human brain in depression and neurodegeneration.

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    Swaab, Dick F; Bao, Ai-Min; Lucassen, Paul J

    2005-05-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays a central role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis, i.e., the final common pathway in the stress response. The action of CRH on ACTH release is strongly potentiated by vasopressin, that is co-produced in increasing amounts when the hypothalamic paraventricular neurons are chronically activated. Whereas vasopressin stimulates ACTH release in humans, oxytocin inhibits it. ACTH release results in the release of corticosteroids from the adrenal that, subsequently, through mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors, exert negative feedback on, among other things, the hippocampus, the pituitary and the hypothalamus. The most important glucocorticoid in humans is cortisol, present in higher levels in women than in men. During aging, the activation of the CRH neurons is modest compared to the extra activation observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the even stronger increase in major depression. The HPA-axis is hyperactive in depression, due to genetic factors or due to aversive stimuli that may occur during early development or adult life. At least five interacting hypothalamic peptidergic systems are involved in the symptoms of major depression. Increased production of vasopressin in depression does not only occur in neurons that colocalize CRH, but also in neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), which may lead to increased plasma levels of vasopressin, that have been related to an enhanced suicide risk. The increased activity of oxytocin neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) may be related to the eating disorders in depression. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), i.e., the biological clock of the brain, shows lower vasopressin production and a smaller circadian amplitude in depression, which may explain the sleeping problems in this disorder and may contribute to the strong CRH activation. The hypothalamo-pituitary thyroid (HPT)-axis is inhibited in depression. These hypothalamic

  18. Establishment of an in vitro screening model for neurodegeneration induced by antimalarial drugs of the artemisinin-type..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuck, G; Haynes, R K

    2000-01-01

    The establishment of an in vitro screening model for neurodegeneration inducing antimalarial drugs was conducted in stepwise fashion. Firstly, the in vivo selective neurotoxic potency of artemisinin was tested in neuronal cells in vitro in relation to the cytotoxic potency in other organ cell cultures such as liver and kidney or versus glial cells. Secondly, a comparison between different parts of the brain (cortex vs. brain stem) was performed and in the last step, a fast and sensitive screening endpoint was identified. In summary, non-neuronal cell lines such as hepatocytes (HEP-G2), liver epithelial cells (IAR), proximal tubular cells (LLC-PK(1)) and glial cells from the rat (C6) and human (GO-G-IJKT) displayed only moderate sensitivity to artemisinin and its derivatives. The same was found in undifferentiated neuronal cell lines from the mouse (N-18) and from human (Kelly), whereas during differentiation, these cells became much more sensitive. Primary astrocytes from the rat also were not specifically involved. In the comparison of primary neuronal cell cultures from the cortex and brain stem of the rat, the brain stem was found to be more sensitive than the cortex. The neurotoxic potential was determined by cytoskeleton elements (neurofilaments), which were degradated in vitro by diverse neurodegenerative compounds. In comparison of dog and rat primary brain stem cultures, the dog cells were found to be more sensitive to artemisinin than the rat cells. In addition to the primary brain stem cell cultures it was shown that the sprouting assay, which determines persistent delayed neurotoxic effects, is also useful for screening antimalarial drugs. To other compounds, artemether and artesunate, showed that use of the sprouting assay followed by primary brain stem cultures of the rat will be a good strategy to select candidate compounds.

  19. Histone deacetylases suppress CGG repeat-induced neurodegeneration via transcriptional silencing in models of fragile X tremor ataxia syndrome.

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    Peter K Todd

    Full Text Available Fragile X Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS is a common inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of a CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5'UTR of the fragile X syndrome (FXS gene, FMR1. The expanded CGG repeat is thought to induce toxicity as RNA, and in FXTAS patients mRNA levels for FMR1 are markedly increased. Despite the critical role of FMR1 mRNA in disease pathogenesis, the basis for the increase in FMR1 mRNA expression is unknown. Here we show that overexpressing any of three histone deacetylases (HDACs 3, 6, or 11 suppresses CGG repeat-induced neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of FXTAS. This suppression results from selective transcriptional repression of the CGG repeat-containing transgene. These findings led us to evaluate the acetylation state of histones at the human FMR1 locus. In patient-derived lymphoblasts and fibroblasts, we determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation that there is increased acetylation of histones at the FMR1 locus in pre-mutation carriers compared to control or FXS derived cell lines. These epigenetic changes correlate with elevated FMR1 mRNA expression in pre-mutation cell lines. Consistent with this finding, histone acetyltransferase (HAT inhibitors repress FMR1 mRNA expression to control levels in pre-mutation carrier cell lines and extend lifespan in CGG repeat-expressing Drosophila. These findings support a disease model whereby the CGG repeat expansion in FXTAS promotes chromatin remodeling in cis, which in turn increases expression of the toxic FMR1 mRNA. Moreover, these results provide proof of principle that HAT inhibitors or HDAC activators might be used to selectively repress transcription at the FMR1 locus.

  20. NEW ROLES FOR FC RECEPTORS IN NEURODEGENERATION-THE IMPACT ON IMMUNOTHERAPY FOR ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

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    James P. Fuller

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There are an estimated 18 million Alzheimer’s disease (AD sufferers worldwide and with no disease modifying treatment currently available, development of new therapies represents an enormous unmet clinical need. AD is characterised by episodic memory loss followed by severe cognitive decline and is associated with many neuropathological changes. AD is characterised by deposits of amyloid beta (Aβ, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuroinflammation. Active immunisation or passive immunisation against Aβ leads to the clearance of deposits in transgenic mice expressing human Aβ. This clearance is associated with reversal of associated cognitive deficits, but these results have failed to translate to humans, with both active and passive immunotherapy failing to improve memory loss. One explanation for these observations is that certain anti-Aβ antibodies mediate damage to the cerebral vasculature limiting the top dose and potentially reducing efficacy. Fc gamma receptors (Fcγ are a family of immunoglobulin like receptors which bind to the Fc portion of IgG, and mediate the response of effector cells to immune complexes. Data from both mouse and human studies suggest that cross-linking Fc receptors by therapeutic antibodies and the subsequent pro-inflammatory response mediates the vascular side effects seen following immunotherapy. Increasing evidence is emerging that Fc receptor expression on CNS resident cells, including microglia and neurons, is increased during aging and functionally involved in the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative diseases. We propose that increased expression and ligation of Fc receptors in the CNS, either by endogenous IgG or therapeutic antibodies, has the potential to induce vascular damage and exacerbate neurodegeneration. To produce safe and effective immunotherapies for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases it will be vital to understand the role of Fc receptors in the healthy and diseased brain.

  1. Neuroinflammation and J2 prostaglandins: linking impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondria to neurodegeneration

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    Maria Emilia Figueiredo-Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune response of the CNS is a defense mechanism activated upon injury to initiate repair mechanisms while chronic over-activation of the CNS immune system (termed neuroinflammation may exacerbate injury. The latter is implicated in a variety of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, HIV dementia and prion diseases. Cyclooxygenases (COX -1 and COX-2, which are key enzymes in the conversion of arachidonic acid into bioactive prostanoids, play a central role in the inflammatory cascade. J2 prostaglandins are endogenous toxic products of cyclooxygenases, and because their levels are significantly increased upon brain injury, they are actively involved in neuronal dysfunction induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms by which J2 prostaglandins (1 exert their actions, (2 potentially contribute to the transition from acute to chronic inflammation and to the spreading of neuropathology, (3 disturb the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondrial function, and (4 contribute to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and demyelination in Krabbe disease. We conclude by discussing the therapeutic potential of targeting the J2 prostaglandin pathway to prevent/delay neurodegeneration associated with neuroinflammation. In this context, we suggest a shift from the traditional view that cyclooxygenases are the most appropriate targets to treat neuroinflammation, to the notion that J2 prostaglandin pathways and other neurotoxic prostaglandins downstream from cyclooxygenases, would offer significant benefits as more effective therapeutic targets to treat chronic neurodegenerative diseases, while minimizing adverse side effects.

  2. Unraveling 50-Year-Old Clues Linking Neurodegeneration and Cancer to Cycad Toxins: Are microRNAs Common Mediators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Peter; Fry, Rebecca C; Kisby, Glen E

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of overlapping molecular signaling activated by a chemical trigger of cancer and neurodegeneration is new, but the path to this discovery has been long and potholed. Six conferences (1962-1972) examined the puzzling neurotoxic and carcinogenic properties of a then-novel toxin [cycasin: methylazoxymethanol (MAM)-β-d-glucoside] in cycad plants used traditionally for food and medicine on Guam where a complex neurodegenerative disease plagued the indigenous population. Affected families showed combinations of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), parkinsonism (P), and/or a dementia (D) akin to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Modernization saw declining disease rates on Guam and remarkable changes in clinical phenotype (ALS was replaced by P-D and then by D) and in two genetically distinct ALS-PDC-affected populations (Kii-Japan, West Papua-Indonesia) that used cycad seed medicinally. MAM forms DNA lesions - repaired by O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) - that perturb mouse brain development and induce malignant tumors in peripheral organs. The brains of young adult MGMT-deficient mice given a single dose of MAM show DNA lesion-linked changes in cell-signaling pathways associated with miRNA-1, which is implicated in colon, liver, and prostate cancers, and in neurological disease, notably AD. MAM is metabolized to formaldehyde, a human carcinogen. Formaldehyde-responsive miRNAs predicted to modulate MAM-associated genes in the brains of MGMT-deficient mice include miR-17-5p and miR-18d, which regulate genes involved in tumor suppression, DNA repair, amyloid deposition, and neurotransmission. These findings marry cycad-associated ALS-PDC with colon, liver, and prostate cancer; they also add to evidence linking changes in microRNA status both to ALS, AD, and parkinsonism, and to cancer initiation and progression.

  3. Unraveling 50-year-old clues linking neurodegeneration and cancer to cycad toxins: are microRNAs a common mediator?

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    Peter eSpencer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of overlapping molecular signaling activated by a chemical trigger of cancer and neurodegeneration is new, but the path to this discovery has been long and potholed. Six conferences (1962-1972 examined the puzzling neurotoxic and carcinogenic properties of a then-novel toxin [cycasin: methylazoxymethanol (MAM-β-D-glucoside] in cycad plants used traditionally for food and medicine on Guam where a complex neurodegenerative disease plagued the indigenous population. Affected families showed combinations of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, parkinsonism (P and/or a dementia (D akin to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Modernization saw declining disease rates on Guam and remarkable changes in clinical phenotype (ALS was replaced by P-D and then by D and in two genetically distinct ALS-PDC-affected populations (Kii-Japan, West Papua-Indonesia that used cycad seed medicinally. MAM forms DNA lesions -- repaired by O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT -- that perturb mouse brain development and induce malignant tumors in peripheral organs. The brains of young adult MGMT-deficient mice given a single dose of MAM show DNA lesion-linked changes in cell signaling pathways associated with miRNA-1, which is implicated in colon, liver and prostate cancers, and in neurological disease, notably AD. MAM is metabolized to formaldehyde, a human carcinogen. Formaldehyde-responsive miRNAs predicted to modulate MAM-associated genes in the brains of MGMT-deficient mice include miR-17-5p and miR-18d, which regulate genes involved in tumor suppression, DNA repair, amyloid deposition, and neurotransmission. These findings marry cycad-associated ALS-PDC with colon, liver and prostate cancer; they also add to evidence linking changes in microRNA status both to ALS, AD, and parkinsonism, and to cancer initiation and progression.

  4. An evaluation of the protective role of Ficus racemosa Linn. in streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy with neurodegeneration

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    Nilay D Solanki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ficus racemosa (FR is one of the herbs mentioned in the scriptures of the Ayurveda as Udumbara with high medicinal value. The objective of this study was to estimate the protective effect of FR against streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic neuropathy with neurodegeneration (DNN. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats with STZ and were divided into six groups namely diabetic vehicle control, FR (four and glibenclamide (one treated rats; while one group was of normal control rats. After the 4th week of diabetes, induction treatment was started for further 28 days (5th to 8th week with FR aqueous extract (250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg and ethanolic extract (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg. Investigation of DNN was carried out through biochemical and behavioral parameter assessment in rats. Results: Study showed a significant fall in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and blood glucose level by the treatment of FR in diabetic rats. Antioxidant potential of FR showed a great rise in superoxide dismutase, catalase content and reduction observed in serum nitrite level; while significant fall in lipid peroxidation level and of C-reactive protein was observed in FR treated diabetic rats. Further FR treated diabetic rats also showed marked improvement in tail flick latency, pain threshold, the rise in locomotion and fall latency period. Conclusion: Treatment with FR shows protection in the multiple pathways of DNN by improving blood glucose, HbA1c, biochemical, and behavioral parameters, which suggest the protective role of FR in the reversal of DNN.

  5. dAtaxin-2 mediates expanded Ataxin-1-induced neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of SCA1.

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    Ismael Al-Ramahi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs are a genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders sharing atrophy of the cerebellum as a common feature. SCA1 and SCA2 are two ataxias caused by expansion of polyglutamine tracts in Ataxin-1 (ATXN1 and Ataxin-2 (ATXN2, respectively, two proteins that are otherwise unrelated. Here, we use a Drosophila model of SCA1 to unveil molecular mechanisms linking Ataxin-1 with Ataxin-2 during SCA1 pathogenesis. We show that wild-type Drosophila Ataxin-2 (dAtx2 is a major genetic modifier of human expanded Ataxin-1 (Ataxin-1[82Q] toxicity. Increased dAtx2 levels enhance, and more importantly, decreased dAtx2 levels suppress Ataxin-1[82Q]-induced neurodegeneration, thereby ruling out a pathogenic mechanism by depletion of dAtx2. Although Ataxin-2 is normally cytoplasmic and Ataxin-1 nuclear, we show that both dAtx2 and hAtaxin-2 physically interact with Ataxin-1. Furthermore, we show that expanded Ataxin-1 induces intranuclear accumulation of dAtx2/hAtaxin-2 in both Drosophila and SCA1 postmortem neurons. These observations suggest that nuclear accumulation of Ataxin-2 contributes to expanded Ataxin-1-induced toxicity. We tested this hypothesis engineering dAtx2 transgenes with nuclear localization signal (NLS and nuclear export signal (NES. We find that NLS-dAtx2, but not NES-dAtx2, mimics the neurodegenerative phenotypes caused by Ataxin-1[82Q], including repression of the proneural factor Senseless. Altogether, these findings reveal a previously unknown functional link between neurodegenerative disorders with common clinical features but different etiology.

  6. Transient activation of microglia following acute alcohol exposure in developing mouse neocortex is primarily driven by BAX-dependent neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlers, Katelin E; Karaçay, Bahri; Fuller, Leah; Bonthius, Daniel J; Dailey, Michael E

    2015-10-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure is the most common known cause of preventable mental retardation, yet we know little about how microglia respond to, or are affected by, alcohol in the developing brain in vivo. Using an acute (single day) model of moderate (3 g/kg) to severe (5 g/kg) alcohol exposure in postnatal day (P) 7 or P8 mice, we found that alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis in the neocortex is closely correlated in space and time with the appearance of activated microglia near dead cells. The timing and molecular pattern of microglial activation varied with the level of cell death. Although microglia rapidly mobilized to contact and engulf late-stage apoptotic neurons, apoptotic bodies temporarily accumulated in neocortex, suggesting that in severe cases of alcohol toxicity the neurodegeneration rate exceeds the clearance capacity of endogenous microglia. Nevertheless, most dead cells were cleared and microglia began to deactivate within 1-2 days of the initial insult. Coincident with microglial activation and deactivation, there was a transient increase in expression of pro-inflammatory factors, TNFα and IL-1β, after severe (5 g/kg) but not moderate (3 g/kg) EtOH levels. Alcohol-induced microglial activation and pro-inflammatory factor expression were largely abolished in BAX null mice lacking neuroapoptosis, indicating that microglial activation is primarily triggered by apoptosis rather than the alcohol. Therefore, acute alcohol exposure in the developing neocortex causes transient microglial activation and mobilization, promoting clearance of dead cells and tissue recovery. Moreover, cortical microglia show a remarkable capacity to rapidly deactivate following even severe neurodegenerative insults in the developing brain.

  7. Inhibition of transglutaminase 2 mitigates transcriptional dysregulation in models of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConoughey, Stephen J; Basso, Manuela; Niatsetskaya, Zoya V; Sleiman, Sama F; Smirnova, Natalia A; Langley, Brett C; Mahishi, Lata; Cooper, Arthur J L; Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Rick A; Li, Bo; Starkov, Anatoly; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Beal, M Flint; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Ryu, Hoon; Xia, Li; Iismaa, Siiri E; Pallos, Judit; Pasternack, Ralf; Hils, Martin; Fan, Jing; Raymond, Lynn A; Marsh, J Lawrence; Thompson, Leslie M; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2010-09-01

    Caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein, Huntington's disease leads to striatal degeneration via the transcriptional dysregulation of a number of genes, including those involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. Here we show that transglutaminase 2, which is upregulated in HD, exacerbates transcriptional dysregulation by acting as a selective corepressor of nuclear genes; transglutaminase 2 interacts directly with histone H3 in the nucleus. In a cellular model of HD, transglutaminase inhibition de-repressed two established regulators of mitochondrial function, PGC-1alpha and cytochrome c and reversed susceptibility of human HD cells to the mitochondrial toxin, 3-nitroproprionic acid; however, protection mediated by transglutaminase inhibition was not associated with improved mitochondrial bioenergetics. A gene microarray analysis indicated that transglutaminase inhibition normalized expression of not only mitochondrial genes but also 40% of genes that are dysregulated in HD striatal neurons, including chaperone and histone genes. Moreover, transglutaminase inhibition attenuated degeneration in a Drosophila model of HD and protected mouse HD striatal neurons from excitotoxicity. Altogether these findings demonstrate that selective TG inhibition broadly corrects transcriptional dysregulation in HD and defines a novel HDAC-independent epigenetic strategy for treating neurodegeneration.

  8. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP has a neuroprotective function in dopamine-based neurodegeneration in rat and snail parkinsonian models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Maasz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP rescues dopaminergic neurons from neurodegeneration and improves motor changes induced by 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA in rat parkinsonian models. Recently, we investigated the molecular background of the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in dopamine (DA-based neurodegeneration using rotenone-induced snail and 6-OHDA-induced rat models of Parkinson's disease. Behavioural activity, monoamine (DA and serotonin, metabolic enzyme (S-COMT, MB-COMT and MAO-B and PARK7 protein concentrations were measured before and after PACAP treatment in both models. Locomotion and feeding activity were decreased in rotenone-treated snails, which corresponded well to findings obtained in 6-OHDA-induced rat experiments. PACAP was able to prevent the behavioural malfunctions caused by the toxins. Monoamine levels decreased in both models and the decreased DA level induced by toxins was attenuated by ∼50% in the PACAP-treated animals. In contrast, PACAP had no effect on the decreased serotonin (5HT levels. S-COMT metabolic enzyme was also reduced but a protective effect of PACAP was not observed in either of the models. Following toxin treatment, a significant increase in MB-COMT was observed in both models and was restored to normal levels by PACAP. A decrease in PARK7 was also observed in both toxin-induced models; however, PACAP had a beneficial effect only on 6-OHDA-treated animals. The neuroprotective effect of PACAP in different animal models of Parkinson's disease is thus well correlated with neurotransmitter, enzyme and protein levels. The models successfully mimic several, but not all etiological properties of the disease, allowing us to study the mechanisms of neurodegeneration as well as testing new drugs. The rotenone and 6-OHDA rat and snail in vivo parkinsonian models offer an alternative method for investigation of the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotective agents, including PACAP.

  9. Induction of Neuron-Specific Degradation of Coenzyme A Models Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration by Reducing Motor Coordination in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A Shumar

    Full Text Available Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, PKAN, is an inherited disorder characterized by progressive impairment in motor coordination and caused by mutations in PANK2, a human gene that encodes one of four pantothenate kinase (PanK isoforms. PanK initiates the synthesis of coenzyme A (CoA, an essential cofactor that plays a key role in energy metabolism and lipid synthesis. Most of the mutations in PANK2 reduce or abolish the activity of the enzyme. This evidence has led to the hypothesis that lower CoA might be the underlying cause of the neurodegeneration in PKAN patients; however, no mouse model of the disease is currently available to investigate the connection between neuronal CoA levels and neurodegeneration. Indeed, genetic and/or dietary manipulations aimed at reducing whole-body CoA synthesis have not produced a desirable PKAN model, and this has greatly hindered the discovery of a treatment for the disease.Cellular CoA levels are tightly regulated by a balance between synthesis and degradation. CoA degradation is catalyzed by two peroxisomal nudix hydrolases, Nudt7 and Nudt19. In this study we sought to reduce neuronal CoA in mice through the alternative approach of increasing Nudt7-mediated CoA degradation. This was achieved by combining the use of an adeno-associated virus-based expression system with the synapsin (Syn promoter. We show that mice with neuronal overexpression of a cytosolic version of Nudt7 (scAAV9-Syn-Nudt7cyt exhibit a significant decrease in brain CoA levels in conjunction with a reduction in motor coordination. These results strongly support the existence of a link between CoA levels and neuronal function and show that scAAV9-Syn-Nudt7cyt mice can be used to model PKAN.

  10. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) has a neuroprotective function in dopamine-based neurodegeneration in rat and snail parkinsonian models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Tibor; Jungling, Adel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) rescues dopaminergic neurons from neurodegeneration and improves motor changes induced by 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA) in rat parkinsonian models. Recently, we investigated the molecular background of the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in dopamine (DA)-based neurodegeneration using rotenone-induced snail and 6-OHDA-induced rat models of Parkinson's disease. Behavioural activity, monoamine (DA and serotonin), metabolic enzyme (S-COMT, MB-COMT and MAO-B) and PARK7 protein concentrations were measured before and after PACAP treatment in both models. Locomotion and feeding activity were decreased in rotenone-treated snails, which corresponded well to findings obtained in 6-OHDA-induced rat experiments. PACAP was able to prevent the behavioural malfunctions caused by the toxins. Monoamine levels decreased in both models and the decreased DA level induced by toxins was attenuated by ∼50% in the PACAP-treated animals. In contrast, PACAP had no effect on the decreased serotonin (5HT) levels. S-COMT metabolic enzyme was also reduced but a protective effect of PACAP was not observed in either of the models. Following toxin treatment, a significant increase in MB-COMT was observed in both models and was restored to normal levels by PACAP. A decrease in PARK7 was also observed in both toxin-induced models; however, PACAP had a beneficial effect only on 6-OHDA-treated animals. The neuroprotective effect of PACAP in different animal models of Parkinson's disease is thus well correlated with neurotransmitter, enzyme and protein levels. The models successfully mimic several, but not all etiological properties of the disease, allowing us to study the mechanisms of neurodegeneration as well as testing new drugs. The rotenone and 6-OHDA rat and snail in vivo parkinsonian models offer an alternative method for investigation of the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotective agents, including PACAP. PMID:28067625

  11. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) has a neuroprotective function in dopamine-based neurodegeneration in rat and snail parkinsonian models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasz, Gabor; Zrinyi, Zita; Reglodi, Dora; Petrovics, Dora; Rivnyak, Adam; Kiss, Tibor; Jungling, Adel; Tamas, Andrea; Pirger, Zsolt

    2017-02-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) rescues dopaminergic neurons from neurodegeneration and improves motor changes induced by 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA) in rat parkinsonian models. Recently, we investigated the molecular background of the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in dopamine (DA)-based neurodegeneration using rotenone-induced snail and 6-OHDA-induced rat models of Parkinson's disease. Behavioural activity, monoamine (DA and serotonin), metabolic enzyme (S-COMT, MB-COMT and MAO-B) and PARK7 protein concentrations were measured before and after PACAP treatment in both models. Locomotion and feeding activity were decreased in rotenone-treated snails, which corresponded well to findings obtained in 6-OHDA-induced rat experiments. PACAP was able to prevent the behavioural malfunctions caused by the toxins. Monoamine levels decreased in both models and the decreased DA level induced by toxins was attenuated by ∼50% in the PACAP-treated animals. In contrast, PACAP had no effect on the decreased serotonin (5HT) levels. S-COMT metabolic enzyme was also reduced but a protective effect of PACAP was not observed in either of the models. Following toxin treatment, a significant increase in MB-COMT was observed in both models and was restored to normal levels by PACAP. A decrease in PARK7 was also observed in both toxin-induced models; however, PACAP had a beneficial effect only on 6-OHDA-treated animals. The neuroprotective effect of PACAP in different animal models of Parkinson's disease is thus well correlated with neurotransmitter, enzyme and protein levels. The models successfully mimic several, but not all etiological properties of the disease, allowing us to study the mechanisms of neurodegeneration as well as testing new drugs. The rotenone and 6-OHDA rat and snail in vivo parkinsonian models offer an alternative method for investigation of the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotective agents, including PACAP.

  12. Activation of endogenous antioxidants as a common therapeutic strategy against cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases: A lesson learnt from DJ-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H

    2015-12-01

    This review aims at presenting a new concept pertaining to the development of antioxidants, namely, to evolve from disease-oriented therapy to mechanism-oriented therapy. Using as our illustrative example is DJ-1, a homodimeric protein that is ubiquitously expressed in a variety of mammalian tissues, including the brain, and is found in the matrix and the intermembrane space of the mitochondria. DJ-1 is known to be an endogenous antioxidant against cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases, of which oxidative stress plays a causal role. Interestingly, the mechanistic targets of DJ-1 as an antioxidant, including Daxx, Nrf2, thioredoxin, glutathione, α-synuclein, PTEN/PI3K/Akt, and Pink/Parkin are also associated with those oxidative stress-related diseases. Furthermore, activators of DJ-1 are available in the form of mortalin, phenylbutyrate and quinone oxidoreductase 1. It follows that activation of DJ-1 as a common endogenous antioxidant provides a new strategy against cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases. Since clinical trials on exogenous application of the known antioxidants have basically failed, an alternative approach would logically be to activate the endogenous antioxidants that are already present in the appropriate cellular locale where elevated oxidative stress is the culprit for the disease. At the same time, since oxidative stress is a common denominator among cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases, development of antioxidant therapy should target the reduction in reactive oxygen species. Instead of focusing on disease-oriented therapy, pharmaceutical companies should concentrate on developing agents and dosing schemes for effective activation of the endogenous antioxidants that are associated with a multitude of oxidative stress-related diseases (mechanism-oriented therapy). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Opposing roles of p38 and JNK in a Drosophila model of TDP-43 proteinopathy reveal oxidative stress and innate immunity as pathogenic components of neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lihong; Xie, Qijing; Tibbetts, Randal S.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological aggregation and mutation of the 43-kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) are strongly implicated in the pathogenesis amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. TDP-43 neurotoxicity has been extensively modeled in mice, zebrafish, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila, where selective expression of TDP-43 in motoneurons led to paralysis and premature lethality. Through a genetic screen aimed to identify genetic modifiers of TDP-43, we found that the Drosophila dual leucine kinase Wallenda (Wnd) and its downstream kinases JNK and p38 influenced TDP-43 neurotoxicity. Reducing Wnd gene dosage or overexpressing its antagonist highwire partially rescued TDP-43-associated premature lethality. Downstream of Wnd, the JNK and p38 kinases played opposing roles in TDP-43-associated neurodegeneration. LOF alleles of the p38b gene as well as p38 inhibitors diminished TDP-43-associated premature lethality, whereas p38b GOF caused phenotypic worsening. In stark contrast, disruptive alleles of Basket (Bsk), the Drosophila homologue of JNK, exacerbated longevity shortening, whereas overexpression of Bsk extended lifespan. Among possible mechanisms, we found motoneuron-directed expression of TDP-43 elicited oxidative stress and innate immune gene activation that were exacerbated by p38 GOF and Bsk LOF, respectively. A key pathologic role for innate immunity in TDP-43-associated neurodegeneration was further supported by the finding that genetic suppression of the Toll/Dif and Imd/Relish inflammatory pathways dramatically extended lifespan of TDP-43 transgenic flies. We propose that oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are intrinsic components of TDP-43-associated neurodegeneration and that the balance between cytoprotective JNK and cytotoxic p38 signaling dictates phenotypic outcome to TDP-43 expression in Drosophila. PMID:25281658

  14. Correlation between Retinal Vessel Calibre and Neurodegeneration in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the European Consortium for the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy (EUROCONDOR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Soegaard Hansen, Rasmus; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the correlation between retinal vessel calibre and measurements of neurodegeneration in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and no or early diabetic retinopathy (DR). METHODS: Baseline data on 440 patients with T2D from the EUROCONDOR clinical trial were used. DR was graded...... according to the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) scale, and patients with ETDRS levels 10-35 were included. Retinal vessel diameters were measured by semi-automatic software. Calibres were summarized into central retinal artery and vein equivalents (CRAE and CRVE). RESULTS: Median age...

  15. Running exercise delays neurodegeneration in amygdala and hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease (APP/PS1) transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Wei; Shih, Yao-Hsiang; Chen, Shean-Jen; Lien, Chi-Hsiang; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Huang, Tung-Yi; Chen, Shun-Hua; Jen, Chauying J; Kuo, Yu-Min

    2015-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease. Post-mortem examination and brain imaging studies indicate that neurodegeneration is evident in the hippocampus and amygdala of very early stage AD patients. Exercise training is known to enhance hippocampus- and amygdala-associated neuronal function. Here, we investigated the effects of exercise (running) on the neuronal structure and function of the hippocampus and amygdala in APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg) mice. At 4-months-old, an age before amyloid deposition, the amygdala-associated, but not the hippocampus-associated, long-term memory was impaired in the Tg mice. The dendritic complexities of the amygdalar basolateral neurons, but not those in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 neurons, were reduced. Furthermore, the levels of BDNF/TrkB signaling molecules (i.e. p-TrkB, p-Akt and p-PKC) were reduced in the amygdala, but not in the hippocampus of the 4-month-old Tg mice. The concentrations of Aβ40 and Aβ42 in the amygdala were higher than those in the hippocampus. Ten weeks of treadmill training (from 1.5- to 4-month-old) increased the hippocampus-associated memory and dendritic arbor of the CA1 and CA3 neurons, and also restored the amygdala-associated memory and the dendritic arbor of amygdalar basolateral neurons in the Tg mice. Similarly, exercise training also increased the levels of p-TrkB, p-AKT and p-PKC in the hippocampus and amygdala. Furthermore, exercise training reduced the levels of soluble Aβ in the amygdala and hippocampus. Exercise training did not change the levels of APP or RAGE, but significantly increased the levels of LRP-1 in both brain regions of the Tg mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that tests of amygdala function should be incorporated into subject selection for early prevention trials. Long-term exercise protects neurons in the amygdala and hippocampus against AD-related degeneration, probably via enhancements of BDNF signaling pathways and Aβ clearance. Physical

  16. 17β-trenbolone, an anabolic–androgenic steroid as well as an environmental hormone, contributes to neurodegeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Fucui, E-mail: mafucui@hotmail.com [Wenzhou Institute of Biomaterials and Engineering, No. 16 Xinshan Road, Hi-tech Industry Park, Wenzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Resistance, College of Life Science, Shandong Normal University, 88 East Wenhua Road, Jinan 250014 (China); Liu, Daicheng, E-mail: liudch@sdnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Resistance, College of Life Science, Shandong Normal University, 88 East Wenhua Road, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to neurodegenerative disorders. In a large number of neurodegenerative diseases (for example, Alzheimer's disease (AD)), patients do not carry the mutant genes. Other risk factors, for example the environmental factors, should be evaluated. 17β-trenbolone is a kind of environmental hormone as well as an anabolic–androgenic steroid. 17β-trenbolone is used as a growth promoter for livestock in the USA. Also, a large portion of recreational exercisers inject 17β-trenbolone in large doses and for very long time to increase muscle and strength. 17β-trenbolone is stable in the environment after being excreted. In the present study, 17β-trenbolone was administered to adult and pregnant rats and the primary hippocampal neurons. 17β-trenbolone's distribution and its effects on serum hormone levels and Aβ42 accumulation in vivo and its effects on AD related parameters in vitro were assessed. 17β-trenbolone accumulated in adult rat brain, especially in the hippocampus, and in the fetus brain. It altered Aβ42 accumulation. 17β-trenbolone induced apoptosis of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro and resisted neuroprotective function of testosterone. Presenilin-1 protein expression was down-regulated while β-amyloid peptide 42 (Aβ42) production and caspase-3 activities were increased. Both androgen and estrogen receptors mediated the processes. 17β-trenbolone played critical roles in neurodegeneration. Exercisers who inject large doses of trenbolone and common people who are exposed to 17β-trenbolone by various ways are all influenced chronically and continually. Identification of such environmental risk factors will help us take early prevention measure to slow down the onset of neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights: • The widely used anabolic–androgenic steroid 17β-trenbolone has neurotoxicity. • 17β-trenbolone crosses the blood brain barrier and placental barrier. • Rat has high level of

  17. Pathological changes in hippocampal neuronal circuits underlie age-associated neurodegeneration and memory loss: positive clue toward SAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthi, P; Premkumar, P; Priyanka, R; Jayachandran, K S; Anusuyadevi, M

    2015-08-20

    defect in neuronal-circuits of hippocampus (DG-CA4-CA1-Sub) that were significantly damaged leading to memory impairment. Interestingly, RSV was observed to culminate pathological events in the hippocampal neuronal circuit during aging, proving them as potent therapeutic drug against age-associated neurodegeneration and memory loss. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibition of creatine kinase activity from rat cerebral cortex by D-2-hydroxyglutaric acid in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cleide G; Bueno, Ana Rúbia F; Schuck, Patrícia F; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Ribeiro, César A J; Rosa, Rafael B; Dutra Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Wajner, Moacir

    2004-01-01

    D-2-Hydroxyglutaric acid (DGA) is the biochemical hallmark of patients affected by the neurometabolic disorder known as D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (DHGA). Although this disease is predominantly characterized by severe neurological findings, the underlying mechanisms of brain injury are virtually unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DGA on total, cytosolic, and mitochondrial creatine kinase (CK) activities from cerebral cortex of 30-day-old Wistar rats. Total CK activity (tCK) was measured in whole cell homogenates, whereas cytosolic and mitochondrial activities were measured in the cytosolic and mitochondrial preparations from cerebral cortex. We verified that CK activities were significantly inhibited by DGA (11-34% inhibition) at concentrations as low as 0.25 mM, being the mitochondrial fraction the most affected activity. Kinetic studies revealed that the inhibitory effect of DGA was non-competitive in relation to phosphocreatine. We also observed that this inhibition was fully prevented by pre-incubation of the homogenates with reduced glutathione, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of DGA on tCK activity is possibly mediated by oxidation of essential thiol groups of the enzyme. Considering the importance of CK activity for brain metabolism homeostasis, our results suggest that inhibition of this enzyme by increased levels of DGA may be related to the neurodegeneration of patients affected by DHGA.

  19. AAV-tau mediates pyramidal neurodegeneration by cell-cycle re-entry without neurofibrillary tangle formation in wild-type mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Jaworski

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease tauopathy is considered secondary to amyloid, and the duality obscures their relation and the definition of their respective contributions.Transgenic mouse models do not resolve this problem conclusively, i.e. the relative hierarchy of amyloid and tau pathology depends on the actual model and the genes expressed or inactivated. Here, we approached the problem in non-transgenic models by intracerebral injection of adeno-associated viral vectors to express protein tau or amyloid precursor protein in the hippocampus in vivo. AAV-APP mutant caused neuronal accumulation of amyloid peptides, and eventually amyloid plaques at 6 months post-injection, but with only marginal hippocampal cell-death. In contrast, AAV-Tau, either wild-type or mutant P301L, provoked dramatic degeneration of pyramidal neurons in CA1/2 and cortex within weeks. Tau-mediated neurodegeneration proceeded without formation of large fibrillar tau-aggregates or tangles, but with increased expression of cell-cycle markers.We present novel AAV-based models, which demonstrate that protein tau mediates pyramidal neurodegeneration in vivo. The data firmly support the unifying hypothesis that post-mitotic neurons are forced to re-enter the cell-cycle in primary and secondary tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease.

  20. All- Trans-Retinoic Acid Augments the Histopathological Outcome of Neuroinflammation and Neurodegeneration in Lupus-Prone MRL/lpr Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theus, Michelle H; Sparks, Joshua B; Liao, Xiaofeng; Ren, Jingjing; Luo, Xin M

    2017-02-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that treatment with all- trans-retinoic acid (tRA) induced a paradoxical effect on immune activation during the development of autoimmune lupus. Here, we further describe its negative effects on mediating neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Female MRL/lpr mice were orally administered tRA or VARA (retinol mixed with 10% tRA) from 6 to 14 weeks of age. Both treatments had a significant effect on brain weight, which correlated with histopathological evidence of focal astrogliosis, meningitis, and ventriculitis. Infiltration of CD138- and Iba1-positve immune cells was observed in the third ventricle and meninges of treated mice that co-labeled with ICAM-1, indicating their inflammatory nature. Increased numbers of circulating plasma cells, autoantibodies, and total IgG were also apparent. IgG and C3 complement deposition in these brain regions were also prominent as was focal astrogliosis surrounding the ventricular lining and meninges. Using Fluoro-Jade staining, we further demonstrate that neuroinflammation was accompanied by neurodegeneration in the cortex of treated mice compared with vehicle controls. These findings indicate that vitamin A exposure exacerbates the immunogenic environment of the brain during the onset of systemic autoimmune disease. Vitamin A may therefore compromise the immuno-privileged nature of the central nervous system under a predisposed immunogenic environment.

  1. Harpagoside attenuates MPTP/MPP⁺ induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration and movement disorder via elevating glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyu; Xiong, Zhongkui; Zhang, Yongfang; Meng, Ya; Xu, Gang; Xia, Zhiming; Li, Jiamei; Zhang, Rui; Ke, Zunji; Xia, Zongqin; Hu, Yaer

    2012-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. New therapeutic approaches aiming at delaying or reversing the neurodegenerative process are under active investigations. In this work, we found that harpagoside, an iridoid purified from the Chinese medicinal herb Scrophularia ningpoensis, could not only prevent but also rescue the dopaminergic neurodegeneration in MPTP/MPP(+) intoxication with promising efficacy. Firstly, in cultured mesencephalic neurons, harpagoside significantly attenuated the loss of TH-positive neuron numbers and the shortening of axonal length. Secondly, in a chronic MPTP mouse model, harpagoside dose-dependently improved the loco-motor ability (rotarod test), increased the TH-positive neuron numbers in the substantia nigra pars compacta (unbiased stereological counting) and increased the striatal DAT density ((125) I-FP-CIT autoradiography). Thirdly, harpagoside markedly elevated the GDNF mRNA and GDNF protein levels in MPTP/MPP(+) lesioned models. However, the protecting effect of harpagoside on the dopaminergic degeneration disappeared when the intrinsic GDNF action was blocked by either the Ret inhibitor PP1 or the neutralizing anti-GDNF antibody. Taken together, we conclude that harpagoside attenuates the dopaminergic neurodegeneration and movement disorder mainly through elevating glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

  2. Value of determining the cerebrospinal fluid protein markers of amyloidosis and neurodegeneration in the diagnosis of vascular and neurodegenerative cognitive impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Yuryevich Lobzin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on different forms of moderate cognitive impairments (MCI and the specific features of their transformation to dementia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was investigated in 60 patients with the amnestic and neurodynamic types of MCI, in 15 patients with vascular dementia (VD, 50 patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and 23 patients with mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia (MVND. The specific features of β-amyloid and τ-protein concentrations were established in the preclinical stages of dementia, which reflects the main components of the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. In the amnestic form of MCI and AD, there was drastically decreased Aβ-42 and increased τ-protein levels in SCF. As cognitive impairments progressed, there was a rise in the concentration of τ-protein; its level correlated with the severity of dementia. In MND, the level of Aβ-42 was significantly reduced while the concentration of τ-protein was much increased; moreover, to a greater extent than in AD and VD. Cerebrovascular damage and neurodegeneration were related to each other and mutually worsened clinical and pathogenic effects.

  3. Absence of an orphan mitochondrial protein, c19orf12, causes a distinct clinical subtype of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, Monika B; Iuso, Arcangela; Haack, Tobias; Kmiec, Tomasz; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Heim, Katharina; Roeber, Sigrun; Tarabin, Victoria; Dusi, Sabrina; Krajewska-Walasek, Malgorzata; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Hempel, Maja; Winkelmann, Juliane; Elstner, Matthias; Oexle, Konrad; Klopstock, Thomas; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Gasser, Thomas; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Tiranti, Valeria; Kretzschmar, Hans; Schmitz, Gerd; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger

    2011-10-07

    The disease classification neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by brain iron deposits in the basal ganglia. For about half of the cases, the molecular basis is currently unknown. We used homozygosity mapping followed by candidate gene sequencing to identify a homozygous 11 bp deletion in the orphan gene C19orf12. Mutation screening of 23 ideopathic NBIA index cases revealed two mutated alleles in 18 of them, and one loss-of-function mutation is the most prevalent. We also identified compound heterozygous missense mutations in a case initially diagnosed with Parkinson disease at age 49. Psychiatric signs, optic atrophy, and motor axonal neuropathy were common findings. Compared to the most prevalent NBIA subtype, pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), individuals with two C19orf12 mutations were older at age of onset and the disease progressed more slowly. A polyclonal antibody against the predicted membrane spanning protein showed a mitochondrial localization. A histopathological examination in a single autopsy case detected Lewy bodies, tangles, spheroids, and tau pathology. The mitochondrial localization together with the immunohistopathological findings suggests a pathomechanistic overlap with common forms of neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Piperine, the main alkaloid of Thai black pepper, protects against neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment in animal model of cognitive deficit like condition of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn

    2010-03-01

    Recently, numerous medicinal plants possessing profound central nervous system effects and antioxidant activity have received much attention as food supplement to improve cognitive function against cognitive deficit condition including in Alzheimer's disease condition. Based on this information, the effect of piperine, a main active alkaloid in fruit of Piper nigrum, on memory performance and neurodegeneration in animal model of Alzheimer's disease have been investigated. Adult male Wistar rats (180-220 g) were orally given piperine at various doses ranging from 5, 10 and 20mg/kg BW at a period of 2 weeks before and 1 week after the intracerebroventricular administration of ethylcholine aziridinium ion (AF64A) bilaterally. The results showed that piperine at all dosage range used in this study significantly improved memory impairment and neurodegeneration in hippocampus. The possible underlying mechanisms might be partly associated with the decrease lipid peroxidation and acetylcholinesterase enzyme. Moreover, piperine also demonstrated the neurotrophic effect in hippocampus. However, further researches about the precise underlying mechanism are still required.

  5. Intranasal “painless” Human Nerve Growth Factors Slows Amyloid Neurodegeneration and Prevents Memory Deficits in App X PS1 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capsoni, Simona; Marinelli, Sara; Ceci, Marcello; Vignone, Domenico; Amato, Gianluca; Malerba, Francesca; Paoletti, Francesca; Meli, Giovanni; Viegi, Alessandro; Pavone, Flaminia; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is being considered as a therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment but the clinical application is hindered by its potent pro-nociceptive activity. Thus, to reduce systemic exposure that would induce pain, in recent clinical studies NGF was administered through an invasive intracerebral gene-therapy approach. Our group demonstrated the feasibility of a non-invasive intranasal delivery of NGF in a mouse model of neurodegeneration. NGF therapeutic window could be further increased if its nociceptive effects could be avoided altogether. In this study we exploit forms of NGF, mutated at residue R100, inspired by the human genetic disease HSAN V (Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy Type V), which would allow increasing the dose of NGF without triggering pain. We show that “painless” hNGF displays full neurotrophic and anti-amyloidogenic activities in neuronal cultures, and a reduced nociceptive activity in vivo. When administered intranasally to APPxPS1 mice ( n = 8), hNGFP61S/R100E prevents the progress of neurodegeneration and of behavioral deficits. These results demonstrate the in vivo neuroprotective and anti-amyloidogenic properties of hNGFR100 mutants and provide a rational basis for the development of “painless” hNGF variants as a new generation of therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22666365

  6. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) from genesis to senescence: the influence of LCPUFA on neural development, aging, and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Carola I F; Kiliaan, Amanda J

    2014-01-01

    Many clinical and animal studies demonstrate the importance of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) in neural development and neurodegeneration. This review will focus on involvement of LCPUFA from genesis to senescence. The LCPUFA docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid are important components of neuronal membranes, while eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and arachidonic acid also affect cardiovascular health and inflammation. In neural development, LCPUFA deficiency can lead to severe disorders like schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Perinatal LCPUFA supplementation demonstrated beneficial effects in neural development in humans and rodents resulting in improved cognition and sensorimotor integration. In normal aging, the effect of LCPUFA on prevention of cognitive impairment will be discussed. LCPUFA are important for neuronal membrane integrity and function, and also contribute in prevention of brain hypoperfusion. Cerebral perfusion can be compromised as result of obesity, cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, or diabetes mellitus type 2. Last, we will focus on the role of LCPUFA in most common neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. These disorders are characterized by impaired cognition and connectivity and both clinical and animal supplementation studies have shown the potential of LCPUFA to decrease neurodegeneration and inflammation. This review shows that LCPUFA are essential throughout life.

  7. Electron Transport Disturbances and Neurodegeneration: From Albert Szent-Györgyi’s Concept (Szeged till Novel Approaches to Boost Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levente Szalárdy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired function of certain mitochondrial respiratory complexes has long been linked to the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. Furthermore, genetic alterations of mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes encoding proteins playing essential roles in maintaining proper mitochondrial function can lead to the development of severe systemic diseases associated with neurodegeneration and vacuolar myelinopathy. At present, all of these diseases lack effective disease modifying therapy. Following a brief commemoration of Professor Albert Szent-Györgyi, a Nobel Prize laureate who pioneered in the field of cellular respiration, antioxidant processes, and the roles of free radicals in health and disease, the present paper overviews the current knowledge on the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in central nervous system diseases associated with neurodegeneration including Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease as well as mitochondrial encephalopathies. The review puts special focus on the involvement and the potential therapeutic relevance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α, a nuclear-encoded master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant responses in these disorders, the transcriptional activation of which may hold novel therapeutic value as a more system-based approach aiming to restore mitochondrial functions in neurodegenerative processes.

  8. Electron Transport Disturbances and Neurodegeneration: From Albert Szent-Györgyi's Concept (Szeged) till Novel Approaches to Boost Mitochondrial Bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalárdy, Levente; Zádori, Dénes; Klivényi, Péter; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2015-01-01

    Impaired function of certain mitochondrial respiratory complexes has long been linked to the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. Furthermore, genetic alterations of mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes encoding proteins playing essential roles in maintaining proper mitochondrial function can lead to the development of severe systemic diseases associated with neurodegeneration and vacuolar myelinopathy. At present, all of these diseases lack effective disease modifying therapy. Following a brief commemoration of Professor Albert Szent-Györgyi, a Nobel Prize laureate who pioneered in the field of cellular respiration, antioxidant processes, and the roles of free radicals in health and disease, the present paper overviews the current knowledge on the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in central nervous system diseases associated with neurodegeneration including Parkinson's and Huntington's disease as well as mitochondrial encephalopathies. The review puts special focus on the involvement and the potential therapeutic relevance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), a nuclear-encoded master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant responses in these disorders, the transcriptional activation of which may hold novel therapeutic value as a more system-based approach aiming to restore mitochondrial functions in neurodegenerative processes.

  9. Genetic Correction of SOD1 Mutant iPSCs Reveals ERK and JNK Activated AP1 as a Driver of Neurodegeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Bhinge

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although mutations in several genes with diverse functions have been known to cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, it is unknown to what extent causal mutations impinge on common pathways that drive motor neuron (MN-specific neurodegeneration. In this study, we combined induced pluripotent stem cells-based disease modeling with genome engineering and deep RNA sequencing to identify pathways dysregulated by mutant SOD1 in human MNs. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis followed by pharmacological screening identified activated ERK and JNK signaling as key drivers of neurodegeneration in mutant SOD1 MNs. The AP1 complex member JUN, an ERK/JNK downstream target, was observed to be highly expressed in MNs compared with non-MNs, providing a mechanistic insight into the specific degeneration of MNs. Importantly, investigations of mutant FUS MNs identified activated p38 and ERK, indicating that network perturbations induced by ALS-causing mutations converge partly on a few specific pathways that are drug responsive and provide immense therapeutic potential.

  10. Molecular biomarkers of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Kina; Salter, Hugh

    2013-11-01

    Neuronal dysfunction and degeneration are central events of a number of major diseases with significant unmet need. Neuronal dysfunction may not necessarily be the result of cell death, but may also be due to synaptic damage leading to impaired neuronal cell signaling or long-term potentiation. Once degeneration occurs, it is unclear whether axonal or synaptic loss comes first or whether this precedes neuronal cell death. In this review we summarize the pathophysiology of four major neurodegenerative diseases; Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) For each of these diseases, we describe how biochemical biomarkers are currently understood in relation to the pathophysiology and in terms of neuronal biology, and we discuss the clinical and diagnostic utility of these potential tools, which are at present limited. We discuss how markers may be used to drive drug development and clinical practice.

  11. Chronochemistry in neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa ePastore

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of distinguishing causes from effects is not a trivial one, as illustrated by the science fiction writer Isaac Asimov in novels dedicated to an imaginary compound with surprising ‘chronochemistry’ properties. The problem is particularly important when trying to establish the aetiology of diseases. Here, we discuss how the problem reflects on our understanding of disease using two specific examples: Alzheimer’s disease and Friedreich’s ataxia. We show how the fibrillar aggregates observed in Alzheimer’s disease were first denied any interest, then to assume a central focus, and to finally recess to be considered the dead-end point of the aggregation pathway. This current view is that the soluble aggregates formed along the aggregation pathway rather than the mature amyliod fibre are the causes of disease, Similarly, we illustrate how the identification of causes and effects have been important in the study of Friedreich’s ataxia. This disease has alternatively been considered as the consequence of oxidative stress, iron precipitation or reduction of iron-sulfur cluster protein context. We illustrate how new tools have been recently developed which allow us to follow the development of the disease. We hope that this review may inspire similar studies in other scientific disciplines.

  12. Chronochemistry in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Annalisa; Adinolfi, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    The problem of distinguishing causes from effects is not a trivial one, as illustrated by the science fiction writer Isaac Asimov in a novel dedicated to an imaginary compound with surprising "chronochemistry" properties. The problem is particularly important when trying to establish the etiology of diseases. Here, we discuss how the problem reflects on our understanding of disease using two specific examples: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA). We show how the fibrillar aggregates observed in AD were first denied any interest, then to assume a central focus, and to finally recess to be considered the dead-end point of the aggregation pathway. This current view is that the soluble aggregates formed along the aggregation pathway rather than the mature amyliod fiber are the causes of disease, Similarly, we illustrate how the identification of causes and and effects have been important in the study of FRDA. This disease has alternatively been considered as the consequence of oxidative stress, iron precipitation or reduction of iron-sulfur cluster protein context. We illustrate how new tools have recently been established which allow us to follow the development of the disease. We hope that this review may inspire similar studies in other scientific disciplines.

  13. Ageing, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Roberta J; Dexter, David T; Crichton, Robert R

    2015-06-01

    During ageing, different iron complexes accumulate in specific brain regions which are associated with motor and cognitive dysfunction. In neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, changes in local iron homoeostasis result in altered cellular iron distribution and accumulation, ultimately inducing neurotoxicity. The use of iron chelators which are able to penetrate the blood brain barrier and reduce excessive iron accumulation in specific brain regions have been shown to reduce disease progression in both Parkinson's disease and Friedreich's Ataxia. Neuroinflammation often occurs in neurodegenerative diseases, which is mainly sustained by activated microglia exhibiting the M1 phenotype. Such inflammation contributes to the disease progression. Therapeutic agents which reduce such inflammation, e.g. taurine compounds, may ameliorate the inflammatory process by switching the microglia from a M1 to a M2 phenotype.

  14. Neurodegeneration and sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gavin A; Castellani, Rudolph J; McCrory, Paul

    2015-06-01

    The recent interest in concussion in sport has resulted in significant media focus about chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), although a direct causative link(s) between concussion and CTE is not established. Typically, sport-related CTE occurs in a retired athlete with or without a history of concussion(s) who presents with a constellation of cognitive, mood, and/or behavioral symptoms and who has postmortem findings of tau deposition within the brain. There are many confounding variables, however, that can account for brain tau deposition, including genetic mutations, drugs, normal aging, environmental factors, postmortem brain processing, and toxins. To understand the roles of such factors in neurodegenerative diseases that may occur in athletes, this article reviews some neurodegenerative diseases that may present with similar findings in nonathletes. The article also reviews pathological changes identified with normal aging, and reviews the pathological findings of CTE in light of all these factors. While many of these athletes have a history of exposure to head impacts as a part of contact sport, there is insufficient evidence to establish causation between sports concussion and CTE. It is likely that many of the cases with neuropathological findings represent the normal aging process, the effects of opiate abuse, or a variant of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Whether particular genetic causes may place athletes at greater risk of neurodegenerative disease is yet to be determined.

  15. Inhibition of Src tyrosine kinase activity by squamosamide derivative FLZ attenuates neuroinflammation in both in vivo and in vitro Parkinson's disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Wenjiao; Ye, Xuan; Bao, Xiuqi; Zhao, Baozhong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Dan

    2013-12-01

    The participation of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has long been validated. Excessive activated microglia release a large number of pro-inflammatory factors, damage surrounding neurons and eventually induce neurodegeneration. Inhibition of microglial over-activation might be a promising strategy for PD treatment. FLZ (formulated as: N-(2-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-ethyl)-2-(2, 5-dimethoxy-phenyl)-3-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenyl)-acrylamide, the code name: FLZ), a natural squamosamide derivative from a Chinese herb, has been shown to inhibit over-activated microglia and protect dopaminergic neurons in previous studies, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we further investigated the mechanism in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced in vivo and in vitro PD models. FLZ treatment significantly improved the motor dysfunction of PD model rats induced by intra-nigral injection of LPS and this beneficial effect of FLZ attributed to the inhibition of microglial over-activation and the protection on dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). In vitro mechanistic study revealed that the inhibitive effect of FLZ on microglia was mediated by suppressing Src kinase related inflammatory signaling pathway activation and subsequent NF-κBp65 nuclear translocation, inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, decreasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activation. In conclusion, the present study supports that FLZ exerts neuroprotection against LPS-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration through its anti-inflammatory effect, which is mediated by suppressing Src tyrosine kinase and the downstream inflammatory signaling pathway. Furthermore, this study defines a critical role of Src tyrosine kinase in neuroinflammation, and suggests that particular tyrosine kinase inhibition may be a potential anti-inflammatory approach for PD treatment.

  16. Inhibition of microglial inflammation by the MLK inhibitor CEP-1347.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Søren; Porzgen, Peter; Mortensen, Anne Louise; Hasseldam, Henrik; Bozyczko-Coyne, Donna; Morath, Siegfried; Hartung, Thomas; Bianchi, Marina; Ghezzi, Pietro; Bsibsi, Malika; Dijkstra, Sipke; Leist, Marcel

    2005-03-01

    CEP-1347 is a potent inhibitor of the mixed lineage kinases (MLKs), a distinct family of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKK). It blocks the activation of the c-Jun/JNK apoptotic pathway in neurons exposed to various stressors and attenuates neurodegeneration in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD). Microglial activation may involve kinase pathways controlled by MLKs and might contribute to the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the possibility that CEP-1347 modulates the microglial inflammatory response [tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1)] was explored. Indeed, the MLK inhibitor CEP-1347 reduced cytokine production in primary cultures of human and murine microglia, and in monocyte/macrophage-derived cell lines, stimulated with various endotoxins or the plaque forming peptide Abeta1-40. Moreover, CEP-1347 inhibited brain TNF production induced by intracerebroventricular injection of lipopolysaccharide in mice. As expected from a MLK inhibitor, CEP-1347 acted upstream of p38 and c-Jun activation in microglia by dampening the activity of both pathways. These data imply MLKs as important, yet unrecognized, modulators of microglial inflammation, and demonstrate a novel anti-inflammatory potential of CEP-1347.

  17. Reciprocal inhibition in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, C

    1993-11-01

    Reciprocal inhibition is the automatic antagonist alpha motor neurone inhibition which is evoked by contraction of the agonist muscle. This so-called natural reciprocal inhibition is a ubiquitous and pronounced phenomenon in man and must be suspected of playing a major role in the control of voluntary movements. The spinal pathways underlying this inhibitory phenomenon were studied. The disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibitory pathway between the tibial anterior muscle and the soleus alpha motor neurones was identified and described in man. It was shown that the inhibition can be evoked in most healthy subjects at rest, but the degree of inhibition varies considerably from one subject to another. It was concluded that it corresponds to the disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibitory pathway which has been extensively described in animal experiments. The disynaptic reciprocal inhibition was shown to increase during the dynamic phase of a dorsiflexion movement of the foot, but not during the tonic phase. However, when the peripheral afferent feedback from the contracting muscle was blocked by ischaemia, an increase of the inhibition was revealed also during the tonic phase of the dorsiflexion. The concealment of this increase during unrestrained peripheral feedback from the muscle was thought to be due to the post-activation depression mechanism; a mechanism which was described further and which probably involves reduced transmitter release at Ia afferent terminals as a result of previous activation of these afferent fibers. Hence the hypothesis was supported that alpha motor neurones and the corresponding inhibitory interneurones, which project reciprocal inhibition to the antagonist motor neurones, are activated in parallel during voluntary contraction of agonist muscles. An additional reciprocal inhibitory mechanism, the long latency reciprocal inhibition, was described between the tibial anterior muscle and the soleus alpha motor neurones. It was shown to be evoked by group I

  18. Licochalcone A Prevents the Loss of Dopaminergic Neurons by Inhibiting Microglial Activation in Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Parkinson's Disease Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bingxu; Liu, Juxiong; Ju, Chen; Yang, Dongxue; Chen, Guangxin; Xu, Shiyao; Zeng, Yalong; Yan, Xuan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Dianfeng; Fu, Shoupeng

    2017-09-22

    The neuroprotective effects of Licochalcone A (Lico.A), a flavonoid isolated from the herb licorice, in Parkinson's disease (PD) have not been elucidated. The prominent pathological feature of PD is the loss of dopaminergic neurons. The crucial role of neuroinflammation induced by activated microglia in dopaminergic neurodegeneration has been validated. In this study, we explore the therapeutic effects of Lico.A in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PD models in vivo and in vitro. We find that Lico.A significantly inhibits LPS-stimulated production of pro-inflammatory mediators and microglial activation by blocking the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65 in BV-2 cells. In addition, through cultured primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cell experiments, we illustrate that Lico.A attenuates the decrease in [³H] dopamine (DA) uptake and the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) neurons in LPS-induced PD models in vitro. Furthermore, LPS intoxication in rats results in microglial activation, dopaminergic neurodegeneration and significant behavioral deficits in vivo. Lico.A treatment prevents microglial activation and reduction of dopaminergic neuron and ameliorates PD-like behavioral impairments. Thus, these results demonstrate for the first time that the neuroprotective effects of Lico.A are associated with microglia and anti-inflammatory effects in PD models.

  19. Melatonin inhibits maneb-induced aggregation of alpha-synuclein in rat pheochromocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishido, Masami

    2007-03-01

    Melatonin, a secretory product of the pineal gland, is involved in the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms, in oncostasis, and in inducing osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, melatonin is a scavenger of a number of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, the antioxidant nature of melatonin was shown to prevent cultured neural cells from apoptosis induced by endocrine-disrupting chemical, maneb. The neurotoxicity of the fungicide, maneb (1 microg/mL), on the PC12 cells was elicited through apoptotic cell death, concomitant with aggregation of alpha-synuclein, a feature of Parkinson's disease. Activation of caspase-3/7 was associated with this process. A fluorescence rationing technique using a mitochondrial dye revealed that maneb altered the mitochondrial membrane potential of the neural cells. However, melatonin (1 nm) largely prevented the neural cells from the neural toxicant by inhibition of both caspase-3/7 activation and disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, aggregation of alpha-synuclein by maneb was also inhibited by melatonin. Thus, melatonin prevents maneb-induced neurodegeneration at a nighttime physiological blood concentration, most likely by inhibiting the aggregation of alpha-synuclein as well as preventing mitochondrial dysfunction in PC 12 cells.

  20. Clavulanic acid inhibits MPP+-induced ROS generation and subsequent loss of dopaminergic cells☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Gina Chun; Selvaraj, Senthil; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Singh, Brij B.

    2013-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is a psychoactive compound that has been shown to modulate central nervous system activity. Importantly, in neurotoxin-induced animal models, clavulanic acid has been shown to improve motor function (Huh et al., 2010) suggesting that it can be neuroprotective; however, the mechanism as how clavulanic acid can induce neuroprotection is not known. We demonstrate here that clavulanic acid abrogates the effects of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) which mimics Parkinson’s disease (PD) by inducing neurodegeneration. To further establish the mechanism we identified that clavulanic acid inhibits neurotoxin-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production. Consistent with these results, neurotoxin-induced increase in Bax levels was also decreased in clavulanic acid treated cells. Importantly, neurotoxin-induced release of cytochrome c levels as well as caspase activation was also inhibited in clavulanic acid treated cells. In addition, Bcl-xl levels were also restored and the Bcl-xl/Bax ratio that is critical for inducing apoptosis was increased in clavulanic acid treated cells. Overall, these results suggest that clavulanic acid is intimately involved in inhibiting neurotoxin-induced loss of mitochondrial function and induction of apoptosis that contributes towards neuronal survival. PMID:22750587

  1. Clavulanic acid inhibits MPP⁺-induced ROS generation and subsequent loss of dopaminergic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Gina Chun; Selvaraj, Senthil; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Singh, Brij B

    2012-08-21

    Clavulanic acid is a psychoactive compound that has been shown to modulate central nervous system activity. Importantly, in neurotoxin-induced animal models, clavulanic acid has been shown to improve motor function (Huh et al., 2010) suggesting that it can be neuroprotective; however, the mechanism as how clavulanic acid can induce neuroprotection is not known. We demonstrate here that clavulanic acid abrogates the effects of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) which mimics Parkinson's disease (PD) by inducing neurodegeneration. To further establish the mechanism we identified that clavulanic acid inhibits neurotoxin-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production. Consistent with these results, neurotoxin-induced increase in Bax levels was also decreased in clavulanic acid treated cells. Importantly, neurotoxin-induced release of cytochrome c levels as well as caspase activation was also inhibited in clavulanic acid treated cells. In addition, Bcl-xl levels were also restored and the Bcl-xl/Bax ratio that is critical for inducing apoptosis was increased in clavulanic acid treated cells. Overall, these results suggest that clavulanic acid is intimately involved in inhibiting neurotoxin-induced loss of mitochondrial function and induction of apoptosis that contributes towards neuronal survival.

  2. Potentiation of latent inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Gabriel; Hall, Geoffrey

    2008-07-01

    Rats were given exposure either to an odor (almond) or a compound of odor plus taste (almond plus saline), prior to training in which the odor served as the conditioned stimulus. It was found, for both appetitive and aversive procedures, that conditioning was retarded by preexposure (a latent inhibition effect), and the extent of the retardation was greater in rats preexposed to the compound (i.e., latent inhibition to the odor was potentiated by the presence of the taste). In contrast, the presence of the taste during conditioning itself overshadowed learning about the odor. We argue that the presence of the salient taste in compound with the odor enhances the rate of associative learning, producing a rapid loss in the associability of the odor. This loss of associability will generate both overshadowing and the potentiation of latent inhibition that is observed after preexposure to the compound.

  3. Conditional Expression of Parkinson's Disease-Related R1441C LRRK2 in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons of Mice Causes Nuclear Abnormalities without Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsika, Elpida; Kannan, Meghna; Foo, Caroline Shi-Yan; Dikeman, Dustin; Glauser, Liliane; Gellhaar, Sandra; Galter, Dagmar; Knott, Graham W.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Moore, Darren J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). The clinical and neurochemical features of LRRK2-linked PD are similar to idiopathic disease although neuropathology is somewhat heterogeneous. Dominant mutations in LRRK2 precipitate neurodegeneration through a toxic gain-of-function mechanism which can be modeled in transgenic mice overexpressing human LRRK2 variants. A number of LRRK2 transgenic mouse models have been developed that display abnormalities in dopaminergic neurotransmission and alterations in tau metabolism yet without consistently inducing dopaminergic neurodegeneration. To directly explore the impact of mutant LRRK2 on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway, we developed conditional transgenic mice that selectively express human R1441C LRRK2 in dopaminergic neurons from the endogenous murine ROSA26 promoter. The expression of R1441C LRRK2 does not induce the degeneration of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons or striatal dopamine deficits in mice up to 2 years of age, and fails to precipitate abnormal protein inclusions containing alpha-synuclein, tau, ubiquitin or autophagy markers (LC3 and p62). Furthermore, mice expressing R1441C LRRK2 exhibit normal motor activity and olfactory function with increasing age. Intriguingly, the expression of R1441C LRRK2 induces age-dependent abnormalities of the nuclear envelope in nigral dopaminergic neurons including reduced nuclear circularity and increased invaginations of the nuclear envelope. In addition, R1441C LRRK2 mice display increased neurite complexity of cultured midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Collectively, these novel R1441C LRRK2 conditional transgenic mice reveal altered dopaminergic neuronal morphology with advancing age, and provide a useful tool for exploring the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the R1441C LRRK2 mutation in PD. PMID:25174890

  4. Rats with a missense mutation in Atm display neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration subsequent to accumulation of cytosolic DNA following unrepaired DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Hazel; Luff, John; Cheung, KaGeen; Kozlov, Sergei; Gatei, Magtouf; Lee, C Soon; Bellingham, Mark C; Noakes, Peter G; Lim, Yi Chieh; Barnett, Nigel L; Dingwall, Steven; Wolvetang, Ernst; Mashimo, Tomoji; Roberts, Tara L; Lavin, Martin F

    2016-11-28

    Mutations in the ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T)-mutated (ATM) gene give rise to the human genetic disorder A-T, characterized by immunodeficiency, cancer predisposition, and neurodegeneration. Whereas a series of animal models recapitulate much of the A-T phenotype, they fail to present with ataxia or neurodegeneration. We describe here the generation of an Atm missense mutant [amino acid change of leucine (L) to proline (P) at position 2262 (L2262P)] rat by intracytoplasmic injection (ICSI) of mutant sperm into oocytes. Atm-mutant rats (Atm(L2262P/L2262P)) expressed low levels of ATM protein, suggesting a destabilizing effect of the mutation, and had a significantly reduced lifespan compared with Atm(+/+) Whereas these rats did not show cerebellar atrophy, they succumbed to hind-limb paralysis (45%), and the remainder developed tumors. Closer examination revealed the presence of both dsDNA and ssDNA in the cytoplasm of cells in the hippocampus, cerebellum, and spinal cord of Atm(L2262P/L2262P) rats. Significantly increased levels of IFN-β and IL-1β in all 3 tissues were indicative of DNA damage induction of the type 1 IFN response. This was further supported by NF-κB activation, as evidenced by p65 phosphorylation (P65) and translocation to the nucleus in the spinal cord and parahippocampus. Other evidence of neuroinflammation in the brain and spinal cord was the loss of motor neurons and the presence of increased activation of microglia. These data provide support for a proinflammatory phenotype that is manifested in the Atm mutant rat as hind-limb paralysis. This mutant represents a useful model to investigate the importance of neuroinflammation in A-T .

  5. Neurodegeneration in an Animal Model of Chronic Amyloid-beta Oligomer Infusion Is Counteracted by Antibody Treatment Infused with Osmotic Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Ahmadali; Provost, Chloé; Pham, Brendon; Brouillette, Jonathan

    2016-08-14

    Decline in hippocampal-dependent explicit memory (memory for facts and events) is one of the earliest clinical symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is well established that synapse loss and ensuing neurodegeneration are the best predictors for memory impairments in AD. Latest studies have emphasized the neurotoxic role of soluble amyloid-beta oligomers (Aβo) that begin to accumulate in the human brain approximately 10 to 15 yr before the clinical symptoms become apparent. Many reports indicate that soluble Aβo correlate with memory deficits in AD models and humans. The Aβo-induced neurodegeneration observed in neuronal and brain slice cultures has been more challenging to reproduce in many animal models. The model of repeated Aβo infusions shown here overcome this issue and allow addressing two key domains for developing new disease modifying therapies: identify biological markers to diagnose early AD, and determine the molecular mechanisms underpinning Aβo-induced memory deficits at the onset of AD. Since soluble Aβo aggregate relatively fast into insoluble Aβ fibrils that correlate poorly with the clinical state of patients, soluble Aβo are prepared freshly and injected once per day during six days to produce marked cell death in the hippocampus. We used cannula specially design for simultaneous infusions of Aβo and continuous infusion of Aβo antibody (6E10) in the hippocampus using osmotic pumps. This innovative in vivo method can now be used in preclinical studies to validate the efficiency of new AD therapies that might prevent the deposition and neurotoxicity of Aβo in pre-dementia patients.

  6. The effect of various morphine weaning regimens on the sequelae of opioid tolerance involving physical dependency, anxiety and hippocampus cell neurodegeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Motaghinejad, Ozra; Shabab, Behnaz; Asadighaleni, Majid; Fatima, Sulail

    2015-06-01

    Chronic consumption of morphine induces physical dependency, anxiety, and neurodegeneration. In this study, morphine on its own has been used for the management of morphine-induced dependency, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Forty-eight male rats were randomly divided into six groups. Rats in groups 1-5 were made morphine dependent by an increasing manner of morphine for 7 days (15-45 mg/kg). For the next 14 days, morphine was administered using the following regimen: (i) once daily 45 mg/kg (positive controls), (ii) the same dose at additional intervals (6 h longer than the previous intervals each time), (iii) 45 mg/kg of morphine at irregular intervals like of 12, 24, 36 h, (iv) decreasing dose once daily (every time 2.5 mg/kg less than the former dosage). Group 5 received 45 mg/kg of morphine and 10 mg/kg of SOD mimetic agent (M40401) injection per day. Group 6 (negative control) received saline solution only. On day 22, all animals received naloxone (3 mg/kg) and their Total Withdrawal Index (TWI) and blood cortisol levels were measured. After drug treatment, hippocampus cells were isolated, and oxidative, antioxidative, and apoptotic factors were evaluated. Various regimens of morphine reduced TWI, cortisol levels, Bax activity, caspase-3, caspase-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β and lipid peroxidation. In all treatment groups, GSH level, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and Bcl-2 activity were significantly increased. Furthermore, SOD mimetic agent c diminished morphine effect on SOD activity. Thus, varying the dosage regimen of morphine can reduce the severity of morphine-induced dependency and neurodegeneration.

  7. Quorum sensing inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, T.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Nielsen, J.

    2005-01-01

    /receptor transcriptional regulator in some clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria. The present review contains all reported compound types that are currently known to inhibit the QS transcriptional regulator in Gram-negative bacteria. These compounds are sub-divided into two main groups, one comprising structural...

  8. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  9. Microglial cells are involved in the susceptibility of NADPH oxidase knockout mice to 6-hydroxy-dopamine-induced neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, Marina S; Santos, Graziella D R; Café-Mendes, Cecília C; Lima, Larissa S; Scavone, Cristoforo; Munhoz, Carolina D; Britto, Luiz R G

    2013-01-01

    We explored the impact of Nox-2 in modulating inflammatory-mediated microglial responses in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced Parkinson's disease (PD) model. Nox1 and Nox2 gene expression were found to increase in striatum, whereas a marked increase of Nox2 expression was observed in substantia nigra (SN) of wild-type (wt) mice after PD induction. Gp91(phox-/-) 6-OHDA-lesioned mice exhibited a significant reduction in the apomorphine-induced rotational behavior, when compared to wt mice. Immunolabeling assays indicated that striatal 6-OHDA injections reduced the number of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the SN of wt mice. In gp91(phox-/-) 6-OHDA-lesioned mice the DA degeneration was negligible, suggesting an involvement of Nox in 6-OHDA-mediated SN degeneration. Gp91(phox-/-) 6-OHDA-lesioned mice treated with minocycline, a tetracycline derivative that exerts multiple anti-inflammatory effects, including microglial inhibition, exhibited increased apomorphine-induced rotational behavior and degeneration of DA neurons after 6-OHDA injections. The same treatment also increased TNF-α release and potentiated NF-κB activation in the SN of gp91(phox-/-)-lesioned mice. Our results demonstrate for the first time that inhibition of microglial cells increases the susceptibility of gp91(phox-/-) 6-OHDA lesioned mice to develop PD. Blockade of microglia leads to NF-κB activation and TNF-α release into the SN of gp91(phox-/-) 6-OHDA lesioned mice, a likely mechanism whereby gp91(phox-/-) 6-OHDA lesioned mice may be more susceptible to develop PD after microglial cell inhibition. Nox2 adds an essential level of regulation to signaling pathways underlying the inflammatory response after PD induction.

  10. Inhibition of ATF-3 expression by B-Raf mediates the neuroprotective action of GW5074.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Mei; Wang, Lulu; D'Mello, Santosh R

    2008-05-01

    GW5074 a brain-permeable 3' substituted indolone, protects neurons from death in culture and in an in vivo paradigm of neurodegeneration. Using low potassium (LK) induced apoptosis of cerebellar granule neurons, we report here that the protective action of GW5074 is mediated through the activation of B-Raf. Over-expression of a kinase-dead form of B-Raf blocks the ability of GW5074 to neuroprotect, whereas over-expression of active forms of B-Raf protect even in the absence of GW5074. Although mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) are activated by GW5074, pharmacological inhibition of MEK-ERK signaling by U0126 or PD98059 does not reduce neuroprotection suggesting that B-Raf signals through a non-canonical signaling pathway. GeneChip microarray analyses identified activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) as a gene whose expression is induced by LK but that is negatively regulated by GW5074. Forced inhibition of ATF-3 expression using siRNA protects neurons against LK-induced apoptosis, whereas the over-expression of ATF-3 blocks GW5074-mediated neuroprotection. Not unexpectedly, expression of active B-Raf inhibits the apoptosis-associated increase in ATF-3 expression. We extended our work to include three other 3' substituted indolones - a commercially available inhibitor of RNA-dependent protein kinase and two novel compounds designated as SK4 and SK6. Like GW5074, RNA-dependent protein kinase inhibitor, SK4, and SK6 all inhibited c-Raf in vitro but activated B-Raf in neuronal cultures. All four compounds also inhibited ATF-3 expression. Taken together our results indicate that all four indolones mediate neuroprotection by a common mechanism which involves B-Raf activation, and that a downstream target of B-Raf is ATF-3.

  11. Plastics for corrosion inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Goldade, Victor A; Makarevich, Anna V; Kestelman, Vladimir N

    2005-01-01

    The development of polymer composites containing inhibitors of metal corrosion is an important endeavour in modern materials science and technology. Corrosion inhibitors can be located in a polymer matrix in the solid, liquid or gaseous phase. This book details the thermodynamic principles for selecting these components, their compatibility and their effectiveness. The various mechanisms of metal protection – barrier, inhibiting and electromechanical – are considered, as are the conflicting requirements placed on the structure of the combined material. Two main classes of inhibited materials (structural and films/coatings) are described in detail. Examples are given of structural plastics used in friction units subjected to mechano-chemical wear and of polymer films/coatings for protecting metal objects against corrosion.

  12. Inhibition and Brain Work

    OpenAIRE

    Buzsáki, György; Kaila, Kai; Raichle, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    The major part of the brain’s energy budget (~60%–80%) is devoted to its communication activities. While inhibition is critical to brain function, relatively little attention has been paid to its metabolic costs. Understanding how inhibitory interneurons contribute to brain energy consumption (brain work) is not only of interest in understanding a fundamental aspect of brain function but also in understanding functional brain imaging techniques which rely on measurements related to blood flow...

  13. Dual beneficial effects of (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate on levodopa methylation and hippocampal neurodegeneration: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Sung Kang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A combination of levodopa (L-DOPA and carbidopa is the most commonly-used treatment for symptom management in Parkinson's disease. Studies have shown that concomitant use of a COMT inhibitor is highly beneficial in controlling the wearing-off phenomenon by improving L-DOPA bioavailability as well as brain entry. The present study sought to determine whether (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, a common tea polyphenol, can serve as a naturally-occurring COMT inhibitor that also possesses neuroprotective actions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using both in vitro and in vivo models, we investigated the modulating effects of EGCG on L-DOPA methylation as well as on chemically induced oxidative neuronal damage and degeneration. EGCG strongly inhibited human liver COMT-mediated O-methylation of L-DOPA in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro, with an average IC50 of 0.36 microM. Oral administration of EGCG moderately lowered the accumulation of 3-O-methyldopa in the plasma and striatum of rats treated with L-DOPA+carbidopa. In addition, EGCG also reduced glutamate-induced oxidative cytotoxicity in cultured HT22 mouse hippocampal neuronal cells through inactivation of the nuclear factor kappaB-signaling pathway. Under in vivo conditions, administration of EGCG exerted a strong protective effect against kainic acid-induced oxidative neuronal death in the hippocampus of rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that oral administration of EGCG may have significant beneficial effects in Parkinson's patients treated with L-DOPA and carbidopa by exerting a modest inhibition of L-DOPA methylation plus a strong neuroprotection against oxidative damage and degeneration.

  14. Inhibition of the Motor Protein Eg5/Kinesin-5 in Amyloid β-Mediated Impairment of Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation and Dendritic Spine Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Ronald K; Gibson, Emily S; Potter, Huntington; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid plaques, and neurodegeneration. However, this pathology is preceded by increased soluble amyloid beta (Aβ) 1-42 oligomers that interfere with the glutamatergic synaptic plasticity required for learning and memory, includingN-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP). In particular, soluble Aβ(1-42) acutely inhibits LTP and chronically causes synapse loss. Many mechanisms have been proposed for Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction, but we recently found that Aβ(1-42) inhibits the microtubule motor protein Eg5/kinesin-5. Here we compared the impacts of Aβ(1-42) and monastrol, a small-molecule Eg5 inhibitor, on LTP in hippocampal slices and synapse loss in neuronal cultures. Acute (20-minute) treatment with monastrol, like Aβ, completely inhibited LTP at doses >100 nM. In addition, 1 nM Aβ(1-42) or 50 nM monastrol inhibited LTP #x223c;50%, and when applied together caused complete LTP inhibition. At concentrations that impaired LTP, neither Aβ(1-42) nor monastrol inhibited NMDAR synaptic responses until #x223c;60 minutes, when only #x223c;25% inhibition was seen for monastrol, indicating that NMDAR inhibition was not responsible for LTP inhibition by either agent when applied for only 20 minutes. Finally, 48 hours of treatment with either 0.5-1.0μM Aβ(1-42) or 1-5μM monastrol reduced the dendritic spine/synapse density in hippocampal cultures up to a maximum of #x223c;40%, and when applied together at maximal concentrations, no additional spine loss resulted. Thus, monastrol can mimic and in some cases occlude the impact of Aβon LTP and synapse loss, suggesting that Aβinduces acute and chronic synaptic dysfunction in part through inhibiting Eg5.

  15. Th17 cell-mediated neuroinflammation is involved in neurodegeneration of aβ1-42-induced Alzheimer's disease model rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation, especially innate immunocyte-mediated neuroinflammation, has been reported to participate in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the involvement of adaptive immune cells, such as CD4(+ T lymphocytes, in pathogenesis of AD is not well clarified. Herein, we focus on T helper 17 (Th17 cells, a subpopulation of CD4(+ T cells with high proinflammation, and show the implication of the cells in neurodegeneration of AD. Amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42 was bilaterally injected into hippocampus of rats to induce AD. On days 7 and 14 following the Aβ1-42 administration, escape latency of the rats in Morris water maze was increased, expression of amyloid precursor protein was upregulated, but expression of protein phosphatase 2A was downregulated in the hippocampus, and Nissl stain showed neuronal loss and gliosis in CA1 region. Infusion of FITC-linked albumin in blood circulation and combination with immunostaining of hippocampal sections for RORγ, a specific transcriptional factor of Th17 cells, demonstrated blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption and Th17 cells' infiltration into brain parenchyma of AD rats. Expression of Th17 proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL-17 and IL-22, was increased in the hippocampus, and concentrations of the two cytokines were elevated in both the cerebrospinal fluid and the serum in AD occurrence and development. Compared with intact or saline-treated control rats, AD animals indicated an upregulated expression of Fas and FasL in the hippocampus. Further, the immunofluorescent histochemistry on AD hippocampal sections with NeuN, RORγ, Fas and FasL displayed that Fas was principally expressed by neurons and FasL was predominantly expressed by Th17 cells, and that neuronal apoptosis shown by TUNEL and NeuN double-labeled cells increased. These results suggest that Th17 cells, which were infiltrated into AD brain parenchyma, participate in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration of AD by release of

  16. Th17 cell-mediated neuroinflammation is involved in neurodegeneration of aβ1-42-induced Alzheimer's disease model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Ke, Kai-Fu; Liu, Zhan; Qiu, Yi-Hua; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation, especially innate immunocyte-mediated neuroinflammation, has been reported to participate in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the involvement of adaptive immune cells, such as CD4(+) T lymphocytes, in pathogenesis of AD is not well clarified. Herein, we focus on T helper 17 (Th17) cells, a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells with high proinflammation, and show the implication of the cells in neurodegeneration of AD. Amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42) was bilaterally injected into hippocampus of rats to induce AD. On days 7 and 14 following the Aβ1-42 administration, escape latency of the rats in Morris water maze was increased, expression of amyloid precursor protein was upregulated, but expression of protein phosphatase 2A was downregulated in the hippocampus, and Nissl stain showed neuronal loss and gliosis in CA1 region. Infusion of FITC-linked albumin in blood circulation and combination with immunostaining of hippocampal sections for RORγ, a specific transcriptional factor of Th17 cells, demonstrated blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and Th17 cells' infiltration into brain parenchyma of AD rats. Expression of Th17 proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-22, was increased in the hippocampus, and concentrations of the two cytokines were elevated in both the cerebrospinal fluid and the serum in AD occurrence and development. Compared with intact or saline-treated control rats, AD animals indicated an upregulated expression of Fas and FasL in the hippocampus. Further, the immunofluorescent histochemistry on AD hippocampal sections with NeuN, RORγ, Fas and FasL displayed that Fas was principally expressed by neurons and FasL was predominantly expressed by Th17 cells, and that neuronal apoptosis shown by TUNEL and NeuN double-labeled cells increased. These results suggest that Th17 cells, which were infiltrated into AD brain parenchyma, participate in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration of AD by release of

  17. Inhibition of fast axonal transport by pathogenic SOD1 involves activation of p38 MAP kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo A Morfini

    Full Text Available Dying-back degeneration of motor neuron axons represents an established feature of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS associated with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 mutations, but axon-autonomous effects of pathogenic SOD1 remained undefined. Characteristics of motor neurons affected in FALS include abnormal kinase activation, aberrant neurofilament phosphorylation, and fast axonal transport (FAT deficits, but functional relationships among these pathogenic events were unclear. Experiments in isolated squid axoplasm reveal that FALS-related SOD1 mutant polypeptides inhibit FAT through a mechanism involving a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Mutant SOD1 activated neuronal p38 in mouse spinal cord, neuroblastoma cells and squid axoplasm. Active p38 MAP kinase phosphorylated kinesin-1, and this phosphorylation event inhibited kinesin-1. Finally, vesicle motility assays revealed previously unrecognized, isoform-specific effects of p38 on FAT. Axon-autonomous activation of the p38 pathway represents a novel gain of toxic function for FALS-linked SOD1 proteins consistent with the dying-back pattern of neurodegeneration characteristic of ALS.

  18. Effects of copper toxicity on response inhibition processes: a study in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Reuner, Ulrike; Gohil, Krutika; Beste, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a rare genetic disease causing copper deposits in various tissues. Given the specificity of the underlying pathology, it is a good model to investigate the effects of copper toxicity on cognitive functions in humans. If left untreated, WD results in neurodegeneration and organ failure, but irrespective of potential brain damage, the medication might reduce cortical norepinephrine (NE) levels. In line with this, dysexecutive symptoms including increased impulsivity have been reported for WD patients, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. We investigated inhibition and the associated neurophysiological correlates in n = 26 WD patients with mild-to-moderate clinical symptoms and matched healthy controls who completed a Go/Nogo task, while an EEG was recorded. Although the behavioral data do not show increased impulsivity in WD, the neurophysiological data show that evaluative processing of successful inhibition (as reflected by the P3 component) was strongly compromised. This was reflected by a decrease in ACC activity which was positively correlated with the severity of WD symptoms, stressing the importance of copper (toxicity) for neurocognitive functioning and impulsivity. These changes are most likely due to a combination of NE deficiency induced by WD medication as well as WD-induced brain damage. The fact that changes were still evident on a neurophysiological level suggests that neurophysiological correlates of cognitive processes and functions provide a more sensitive index of toxicity and/or treatment efficiency than purely behavioral measures.

  19. Latent inhibition in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdlow, N R; Braff, D L; Hartston, H; Perry, W; Geyer, M A

    1996-05-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) refers to the retarded acquisition of a conditioned response that occurs if the subject being tested is first preexposed to the to-be-conditioned stimulus (CS) without the paired unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Because the 'irrelevance' of the to-be-conditioned stimulus is established during non-contingent preexposure, the slowed acquisition of the CS-UCS association is thought to reflect the process of overcoming this learned irrelevance. Latent inhibition has been reported to be diminished in acutely hospitalized schizophrenia patients. If acutely hospitalized schizophrenia patients are preexposed to the CS, they learn the association as fast as, and perhaps faster than, patients who are not preexposed to the CS. This finding has been interpreted as reflecting the inability of acute schizophrenia patients to ignore irrelevant stimuli. In this study, the LI paradigm was identical to the one used in previous reports of LI deficits in schizophrenia patients (Baruch et al., 1988). Latent inhibition was observed in normal control subjects (n = 73), including individuals identified as 'psychosis-prone' based on established screening criteria, and in anxiety (n = 19) and mood disorder (n = 13) patients. Learning scores (trials to criterion) in "acutely' hospitalized as well as "chronic' hospitalized schizophrenia patients (n = 45) were significantly elevated in both preexposed and non-preexposed subjects, compared to controls. Acute schizophrenia patients exhibited intact LI. Separate cohorts of acute and chronic schizophrenia patients (n = 23) and normal controls (n = 34) exhibited intact LI when tested in a new, easier-to-acquire computerized LI paradigm. These results fail to identify specific LI deficits in schizophrenia patients, and raise the possibility that previously observed LI deficits in schizophrenia patients may reflect, at least in part, performance deficits related to learning acquisition.

  20. Sonic Hedgehog Controls the Phenotypic Fate and Therapeutic Efficacy of Grafted Neural Precursor Cells in a Model of Nigrostriatal Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Lalitha; Daley, Brian F; Davidson, Beverly L; Boudreau, Ryan L; Lipton, Jack W; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Collier, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    The expression of soluble growth and survival promoting factors by neural precursor cells (NPCs) is suggested to be a prominent mechanism underlying the protective and regenerative effects of these cells after transplantation. Nevertheless, how and to what extent specific NPC-expressed factors contribute to therapeutic effects is not well understood. Using RNA silencing, the current study investigated the roles of two donor NPC molecules, namely glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and sonic hedgehog (SHH), in the protection of substantia nigra dopamine neurons in rats treated with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Analyses indicate that as opposed to the knock-down of GDNF, SHH inhibition caused a profound decline in nigrostriatal neuroprotection. Further, SHH silencing also curbed endogenous neurogenesis and the migration of host brdU+/dcx+ neural precursors into the striatum, which was present in the animals receiving control or GDNF silenced NPCs. A change in graft phenotype, mainly reflected by a reduced proportion of undifferentiated nestin+ cells, as well as a significantly greater host microglial activity, suggested an important role for these processes in the attenuation of neuroprotection and neurogenesis upon SHH silencing. Overall these studies reveal core mechanisms fundamental to grafted NPC-based therapeutic effects, and delineate the particular contributions of two graft-expressed molecules, SHH and GDNF, in mediating midbrain dopamine neuron protection, and host plasticity after NPC transplantation.

  1. Dexibuprofen prevents neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in APPswe/PS1dE9 through multiple signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miren Ettcheto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to elucidate the neuronal pathways associated to NSAIDs causing a reduction of the risk and progression of Alzheimer's disease. The research was developed administering the active enantiomer of ibuprofen, dexibuprofen (DXI, in order to reduce associated gastric toxicity. DXI was administered from three to six-month-old female APPswe/PS1dE9 mice as a model of familial Alzheimer's disease. DXI treatment reduced the activation of glial cells and the cytokine release involved in the neurodegenerative process, especially TNFα. Moreover, DXI reduced soluble β-amyloid (Aβ1-42 plaque deposition by decreasing APP, BACE1 and facilitating Aβ degradation by enhancing insulin-degrading enzyme. DXI also decreased TAU hyperphosphorylation inhibiting c-Abl/CABLES/p-CDK5 activation signal pathway and prevented spatial learning and memory impairment in transgenic mice. Therefore, chronic DXI treatment could constitute a potential AD-modifying drug, both restoring cognitive functions and reversing multiple brain neuropathological hallmarks.

  2. [Compensatory mechanisms to heal neuroplasticity impairment under Alzheiemer's disease neurodegeneration. I: The role of amyloid beta and its' precursor protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudinov, A R; Kudinova, N V; Kezlia, E V; Kozyrev, K M; Medvedev, A E; Berezov, T T

    2012-01-01

    In-depth scholar literature analysis of Alzheimer's disease neurodegenerative features of amyloid beta protein neurochemistry modification and excessive phosphorylation of tau protein (and associated neuronal cytoskeleton rearrangements) are secondary phenomena. At early disease stage these neurobiochemical mechanisms are reversible and serve to heal an impairment of biophysical properties of neuronal membranes, neurotransmission, basic neuronal function and neuroplasticity, while preserving anatomical and functional brain fields. Abeta and tau could well serve to biochemically restore physico-chemical properties of neual membranes due to a role these proteins play in lipid metabolism. Under such scenario therapeutic block of aggregation and plaque formation of Abeta and inhibition of tau phosphorylation, as well as pharmaceutical modification of other secondary neurodegenerative features (such as a cascade of oxidative stress reactions) are unable to provide an effective cure of Alzheimer's disease and related pathologies of the Central and peripheral nervous systems, because they are not arraying primary pathagenetic cause. We review the role of Abeta in compensatory mechanisms of neuroplasticity restoration under normal physiological condition and Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Bernard J; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E

    2016-03-15

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny.

  4. Linking aβ42-induced hyperexcitability to neurodegeneration, learning and motor deficits, and a shorter lifespan in an Alzheimer's model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Ping

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most prevalent form of dementia in the elderly. β-amyloid (Aβ accumulation in the brain is thought to be a primary event leading to eventual cognitive and motor dysfunction in AD. Aβ has been shown to promote neuronal hyperactivity, which is consistent with enhanced seizure activity in mouse models and AD patients. Little, however, is known about whether, and how, increased excitability contributes to downstream pathologies of AD. Here, we show that overexpression of human Aβ42 in a Drosophila model indeed induces increased neuronal activity. We found that the underlying mechanism involves the selective degradation of the A-type K+ channel, Kv4. An age-dependent loss of Kv4 leads to an increased probability of AP firing. Interestingly, we find that loss of Kv4 alone results in learning and locomotion defects, as well as a shortened lifespan. To test whether the Aβ42-induced increase in neuronal excitability contributes to, or exacerbates, downstream pathologies, we transgenically over-expressed Kv4 to near wild-type levels in Aβ42-expressing animals. We show that restoration of Kv4 attenuated age-dependent learning and locomotor deficits, slowed the onset of neurodegeneration, and partially rescued premature death seen in Aβ42-expressing animals. We conclude that Aβ42-induced hyperactivity plays a critical role in the age-dependent cognitive and motor decline of this Aβ42-Drosophila model, and possibly in AD.

  5. The role of Ser129 phosphorylation of α-synuclein in neurodegeneration of Parkinson's disease: a review of in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Kato, Takeo; Arawaka, Shigeki

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. The motor impairments of Parkinson's disease are caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and associated with the appearance of fibrillar aggregates of α-synuclein (α-syn) called Lewy bodies. Approximately 90% of α-syn deposited in Lewy bodies is phosphorylated at serine 129 (Ser129). In contrast, only 4% or less of total α-syn is phosphorylated at this residue in the normal brain. This suggests that the accumulation of Ser129-phosphorylated α-syn leads to the formation of Lewy bodies and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. Our laboratory and others have performed experiments using in vivo models of Parkinson's disease to elucidate the role of increased Ser129 phosphorylation in α-syn neurotoxicity. However, there has been a lack of consistency among these models. In this review, we summarize the main findings regarding the relationship between Ser129 phosphorylation and α-syn neurotoxicity, and examine the differences among models. We further discuss the role of Ser129 phosphorylation in α-syn aggregation and the future directions to test the potential of Ser129 phosphorylation as a therapeutic target for slowing the progression of Parkinson's disease.

  6. N-Acetyl Cysteine Protects against Methamphetamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration via Modulation of Redox Status and Autophagy in Dopaminergic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Chandramani Shivalingappa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine- (MA- induced neurotoxicity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and enhanced oxidative stress. Our previous study demonstrated that MA induces autophagy in a dopaminergic neuronal cell model (N27 cells. The cellular mechanisms underlying MA-induced autophagy and apoptosis remain poorly characterized. In the present study we sought to investigate the importance of GSH redox status in MA-induced neurotoxicity using a thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC. Morphological and biochemical analysis revealed that MA-induced autophagy in N27 dopaminergic cells was associated with pronounced depletion of GSH levels. Moreover, pretreatment with NAC reduced MA-induced GSH depletion and autophagy, while depletion of GSH using L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO enhanced autophagy. Furthermore, treatment with NAC significantly attenuated MA-induced apoptotic cell death as well as oxidative stress markers, namely, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE. Together, these results suggest that NAC exhibits significant protective effects against MA-induced dopaminergic cell death, presumably via modulation of the GSH level and autophagy. Collectively, our data provide mechanistic insights into the role of cellular GSH redox status in MA-induced autophagy and apoptotic cell death, and additional studies are needed to determine the therapeutic effectiveness of cellular redox modifiers in attenuating dopaminergic neurodegeneration in vivo.

  7. Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress Paradigm Established Effects of Pro- and Anti-inflammatory Cytokine on Neurodegeneration-Linked Depressive States in Hamsters with Brain Endothelial Damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Ennio; Fazzari, Gilda; Mele, Maria; Alò, Raffaella; Zizza, Merylin; Jiao, Wei; Di Vito, Anna; Barni, Tullio; Mandalà, Maurizio; Canonaco, Marcello

    2016-10-11

    The mechanisms by which inflammation affects the different emotional moods are only partially known. Previous works have pointed to stress hormones like glucocorticoids plus the vascular factor endothelin-1 as key factors evoking stressful states especially in relation to endothelial dysfunctions. With this work, it was our intention to establish the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression variations towards depression-like behaviors and consequently the development of neurodegeneration events caused by endothelial damages in the hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Such a rodent, which is considered a valuable animal model to test depression and anxiety states, exhibited a variety of depression-like behaviors including reduction in sucrose consumption, locomotion, and exploration (p stress. Contextually, a tight correlation between unpredictable chronic mild stress-induced depressive states and expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines was detected as shown by marked expression levels (p resilient hamsters. Application of hemodynamic and endothelial functional studies pointed to altered arterial endothelial activities in depressed with respect to resilient animals. Moreover, evident damaged neuronal fields in the above areas of depressed hamsters allowed us to correlate such a behavioral phenomenon to the upregulation of IL-1β and NF-κB. Overall, the differing roles of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines on depressive states, especially in view of brain endothelial damages, may provide novel therapeutic measures against mood disorders linked to neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Correlation between Retinal Vessel Calibre and Neurodegeneration in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the European Consortium for the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy (EUROCONDOR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Soegaard Hansen, Rasmus; Simó, Rafael;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the correlation between retinal vessel calibre and measurements of neurodegeneration in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and no or early diabetic retinopathy (DR). METHODS: Baseline data on 440 patients with T2D from the EUROCONDOR clinical trial were used. DR was graded...... according to the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) scale, and patients with ETDRS levels 10-35 were included. Retinal vessel diameters were measured by semi-automatic software. Calibres were summarized into central retinal artery and vein equivalents (CRAE and CRVE). RESULTS: Median age...... and diabetes duration were 64.0 and 10.3 years, respectively. ETDRS levels were 10 (42.3%), 20 (27.5%) and 35 (30.2%). The median CRAE and CRVE were 146.7 and 215.3 µm, respectively. CRAE did not differ according to ETRDS level (p = 0.12), but wider CRVE were found in patients with higher ETDRS levels (p = 0...

  9. [Adult-onset case of idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation without mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Shinji; Sekine, Takeshi; Ueno, Yuji; Yoshino, Hiroyo; Takahashi, Junko; Tani, Yoshihiko; Kambe, Yasunori; Motoi, Yumiko; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2009-08-01

    A 47-year-old man with a 15-year history of bipolar disorder treated with anti-depressants, lithium carbonate or neuroleptics was admitted because of marked difficulty in gait and speech. At the age 45, he was unable to walk without bilateral assists and became a wheel-chair state. There was no family history and his mother, father and younger sister were neurologically free. General physical examinations revealed no abnormalities. Neurologically, he was moderately demented (mini mental state examination: 18/30) and showed bilateral horizontal gaze nystagmus, parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria and moderate spastic paraparesis. No involuntary movements were noted. Wet blood smear showed acanthocytes, while blood chemistries revealed no abnormalities including levels of serum creatine kinase, hepatic enzymes and blood beta-lipoprotein. Kell antigen expressions of the red blood cells were within normal limit. Western blot analysis with anti-chorein antibody detected normal chorein expression levels of the red blood cells. Cranial MRI showed severe symmetric atrophy of the frontotemporal lobes, caudate nuclei, putamen, and brainstem. Also, MRI-gradient echo showed symmetric iron accumulation in the medial portion of the globus pallidus without surrounding high intensity areas, so called "eye-of-the-tiger sign". Genetic analyses revealed no mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes. Therefore, he was diagnosed as idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). These findings suggest that NBIA is heterogeneous and other additional genes remain to be found.

  10. Leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein is a novel biomarker of neurodegenerative disease in human cerebrospinal fluid and causes neurodegeneration in mouse cerebral cortex.

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    Masakazu Miyajima

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein (LRG is a protein induced by inflammation. It contains a leucine-rich repeat (LRR structure and easily binds with other molecules. However, the function of LRG in the brain during aging and neurodegenerative diseases has not been investigated. Here, we measured human LRG (hLRG concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and observed hLRG expression in post-mortem human cerebral cortex. We then generated transgenic (Tg mice that over-expressed mouse LRG (mLRG in the brain to examine the effects of mLRG accumulation. Finally, we examined protein-protein interactions using a protein microarray method to screen proteins with a high affinity for hLRG. The CSF concentration of hLRG increases with age and is significantly higher in patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP than in healthy elderly people, idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH patients, and individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Tg mice exhibited neuronal degeneration and neuronal decline. Accumulation of LRG in the brains of PDD and PSP patients is not a primary etiological factor, but it is thought to be one of the causes of neurodegeneration. It is anticipated that hLRG CSF levels will be a useful biomarker for the early diagnosis of PDD and PSP.

  11. Temporal pattern of neurodegeneration, programmed cell death, and neuroplastic responses in the thalamus after lateral fluid percussion brain injury in the rat.

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    Dolenec, Petra; Pilipović, Kristina; Rajič, Jelena; Župan, Gordana

    2015-06-01

    The effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on the thalamus are not well characterized. We analyzed neuronal degeneration and loss, apoptosis, programmed cell death-executing pathways, and neuroplastic responses in the rat thalamus during the first week after lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI). The most prominent neurodegenerative and neuroplastic changes were observed in the region containing the posterior thalamic nuclear group and ventral posteromedial and posterolateral thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the LFPI. There was progressive neurodegeneration in these regions, with maximal neuronal loss on Day 7. Increases in numbers of apoptotic cells were detected on Day 1 and were enhanced on Days 3 and 7 after TBI. There was unchanged expression of active caspase-3 at all postinjury time points, but there was increased expression of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) on Day 7. The AIF nuclear translocation was detected on Day 1 and was maximal on Day 7. Total thalamic synaptophysin expression was unchanged, but immunostaining intensities were increased at all time points after TBI. Decreased growth-associated protein-43 expression and signal intensity were observed on Day 1. Our results suggest that progressive neuronal damage and loss, AIF signaling pathway-dependent programmed cell death, and limited neuroplastic changes occur in the rat thalamus during the first week after LFPI induction.

  12. Phenotypes and Genotypes of Patients with Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration in Asian and Caucasian Populations: 2 Cases and Literature Review

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    Chih-Hong Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN is a rare disease caused by pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2, OMIM 606157 mutations. This study is aimed to investigate clinical presentations, pathologies, and genetics in patients with PKAN. Methods. Two patients with PKAN were reported. We reviewed the literature to include additional 19 patients with PKAN in Eastern Asia. These patients were divided into classic and atypical groups by the age of onset. We compared the data on PKAN patients of Asian and Caucasian populations. Results. We found iron deposits in the globus pallidus in our Patient 1 and a heterozygous truncating mutation (c.1408insT in Patient 2. Literature review shows that generalized dystonia and bulbar signs are more common in classic PKAN patients, whereas segmental dystonia and tremors are more specific to atypical ones. Asian patients have less complex presentations—lower prevalence of pyramidal signs, mental impairment, and parkinsonism—than Caucasians. D378G in exon 3 is the most frequent mutation (28% in Asians. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that the distribution of dystonia is the major distinction between subgroups of PKAN. Caucasian patients have more complex presentations than Asians. Exon 3 and 4 are hot spots for screening PANK2 mutations in Asian patients.

  13. Oral treatment with the herbal formula B401 protects against aging-dependent neurodegeneration by attenuating oxidative stress and apoptosis in the brain of R6/2 mice

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    Wang SE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sheue-Er Wang,1,2 Ching-Lung Lin,1 Chih-Hsiang Hsu,1 Shuenn-Jyi Sheu,3 Chung-Hsin Wu1 1Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, 2Department of Pathological Inspection, Saint Paul’s Hospital, Taoyuan, 3Brion Research Institute of Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Neurodegeneration is characterized by progressive neurological deficits due to selective neuronal loss in the nervous system. Huntington’s disease (HD is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder. Neurodegeneration in HD patients shows aging-dependent pattern. Our previous study has suggested that a herbal formula B401 may have neuroprotective effects in the brains of R6/2 mice. Objective: To clarify possible mechanisms for neurodegeneration, which improves the understanding the aging process. This study focuses on clarifying neurodegenerative mechanisms and searching potential therapeutic targets in HD patients. Methods: The oxidative stress and apoptosis were compared in the brain tissue between R6/2 HD mice with and without oral B401 treatment. Expressions of proteins for oxidative stress and apoptosis in the brain tissue of R6/2 HD mice were examined by using immunostaining and Western blotting techniques. Results: R6/2 HD mice with oral B401 treatment significantly reduced reactive oxygen species levels in the blood, but markedly increased expressions of superoxide dismutase 2 in the brain tissue. Furthermore, R6/2 HD mice with oral B401 treatment significantly increased expressions of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, but significantly reduced expressions of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax, calpain, and caspase-3 in the brain tissue. Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence that the herbal formula B401 can remedy for aging-dependent neurodegeneration of R6/2 mice via suppressing oxidative stress and apoptosis in the brain. We suggest that the herbal formula B401 can be developed as a potential health supplement for ameliorating aging

  14. 5-Benzylidene-hydantoin is a new scaffold for SIRT inhibition: From virtual screening to activity assays.

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    Sacconnay, Lionel; Ryckewaert, Lucie; Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco; Petit, Charlotte; Passos, Carolina Dos Santos; Jachno, Jelena; Michailovienė, Vilma; Zubrienė, Asta; Matulis, Daumantas; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Simões-Pires, Claudia Avello; Nurisso, Alessandra

    2016-03-31

    Sirtuins (SIRTs) are a family of enzymes able to catalyze the deacetylation of the N-acetyl lysines of both histone and non-histone substrates. Inhibition of SIRTs catalytic activity was recently reported in the literature as being beneficial in human diseases, with very promising applications in cancer therapy and enzymatic neurodegeneration. By combining a structure-based virtual screening of the Specs database with cell-based assays, we identified the 5-benzylidene-hydantoin as new scaffold for the inhibition of SIRT2 catalytic activity. Compound 97 (Specs ID AH-487/41657829), active in the low μM range against SIRT2, showed the optimal physicochemical properties for passive absorption as well as relatively low cytotoxicity in vitro. Further studies revealed non-competitive and mixed-type kinetics toward acetyl-lysine substrates and NAD(+), respectively, and a non-selective profile for SIRT inhibition. A binding mode consistent with the experimental evidence was proposed by molecular modeling. Additionally, the levels of acetyl-p53 were shown to be increased in HeLa cells treated with 97. Taken together, these results encourage further investigation of 5-benzylidene-hydantoin derivatives for their SIRT-related therapeutic effects.

  15. Modulation of Microglial Activity by Rho-Kinase (ROCK) Inhibition as Therapeutic Strategy in Parkinson's Disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

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    Roser, Anna-Elisa; Tönges, Lars; Lingor, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the progressive degeneration of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system (CNS, PNS), resulting in a reduced innervation of target structures and a loss of function. A shared characteristic of many neurodegenerative diseases is the infiltration of microglial cells into affected brain regions. During early disease stages microglial cells often display a rather neuroprotective phenotype, but switch to a more pro-inflammatory neurotoxic phenotype in later stages of the disease, contributing to the neurodegeneration. Activation of the Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway appears to be instrumental for the modulation of the microglial phenotype: increased ROCK activity in microglia mediates mechanisms of the inflammatory response and is associated with improved motility, increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and release of inflammatory cytokines. Recently, several studies suggested inhibition of ROCK signaling as a promising treatment option for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review article, we discuss the contribution of microglial activity and phenotype switch to the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), two devastating neurodegenerative diseases without disease-modifying treatment options. Furthermore, we describe how ROCK inhibition can influence the microglial phenotype in disease models and explore ROCK inhibition as a future treatment