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Sample records for dystrophy gad gene

  1. Cloning and molecular evolution research of porcine GAD65 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hao; SONG Yuefen; LI Li; LIU Di

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) has been found in animal and higher plant tissues as well as in yeasts and microorganisms.In animals the enzyme plays an important role in central nervous system activity because the enzyme substrate glutamic acid is a mediator of excitation process and the product, gamma-aminobutyric acid, is the most important mediator of inhibition process in the central nervous system. GAD65 is one form of the glutamate decarboxylases (GAD), GAD65 has been identified as a major autoantigen in type 1 diabetes, so the GAD65 gene of porcine was cloned by RT-PCR method to construct phylogenetic tree, the homology of 13glutamate decarboxylases (GAD) of different origin was analyzed by multiple alignment.

  2. Identification and transcript analysis of two glutamate decarboxylase genes, CsGAD1 and CsGAD2, reveal the strong relationship between CsGAD1 and citrate utilization in citrus fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Hu, Xiao-Mei; Jin, Long-Fei; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2014-09-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, EC 4.1.1.15) has been suggested to be a key, regulatory point in the biosynthesis of γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and in the utilization of citric acid through GABA shunt pathway. In this study we discovered two GAD genes, named as CsGAD1 and CsGAD2, in citrus genome database and then successfully cloned. Both CsGAD1 and CsGAD2 have a putative pyridoxal 5-phosphate binding domain in the middle region and a putative calmodulin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminus. Gene structure analysis showed that much difference exists in the size of exons and introns or in cis-regulatory elements in promoter region between the two GAD genes. Gene expression indicated that CsGAD1 transcript was predominantly expressed in flower and CsGAD2 transcript was predominantly expressed in fruit juice sacs; in the ripening fruit, CsGAD1 transcript level was at least 2-time higher than CsGAD2 transcript level. Moreover, CsGAD1 transcript level was increased significantly along with the increase of GAD activity and accompanied by a significant decrease of titratable acid (TA), suggesting that it is CsGAD1 rather than CsGAD2 plays a role in the citric acid utilization during fruit ripening. In addition, injection of abscisic acid and foliar spray of K2SO4 significantly increased the TA content of Satsuma mandarin, and significantly decreased GAD activity as well as CsGAD1 transcript, further suggesting the important role of CsGAD1 in the citrate utilization of citrus fruit.

  3. Tomato Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes SlGAD2 and SlGAD3 Play Key Roles in Regulating γ-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Mariko; Koike, Satoshi; Kusano, Miyako; Matsukura, Chiaki; Saito, Kazuki; Ariizumi, Tohru; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) can accumulate relatively high levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during fruit development. However, the molecular mechanism underlying GABA accumulation and its physiological function in tomato fruits remain elusive. We previously identified three tomato genes (SlGAD1, SlGAD2 and SlGAD3) encoding glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), likely the key enzyme for GABA biosynthesis in tomato fruits. In this study, we generated transgenic tomato plants in which each SlGAD was suppressed and those in which all three SlGADs were simultaneously suppressed. A significant decrease in GABA levels, i.e. 50-81% compared with wild-type (WT) levels, was observed in mature green (MG) fruits of the SlGAD2-suppressed lines, while a more drastic reduction (up to tomato fruits. The importance of SlGAD3 expression was also confirmed by generating transgenic tomato plants that over-expressed SlGAD3. The MG and red fruits of the over-expressing transgenic lines contained higher levels of GABA (2.7- to 5.2-fold) than those of the WT. We also determined that strong down-regulation of the SlGADs had little effect on overall plant growth, fruit development or primary fruit metabolism under normal growth conditions.

  4. GABA production and structure of gadB/gadC genes in Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains from human microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, R A; Poluektova, E U; Dyachkova, M S; Klimina, K M; Kovtun, A S; Averina, O V; Orlova, V S; Danilenko, V N

    2016-12-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) is an active biogenic substance synthesized in plants, fungi, vertebrate animals and bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria are considered the main producers of GABA among bacteria. GABA-producing lactobacilli are isolated from food products such as cheese, yogurt, sourdough, etc. and are the source of bioactive properties assigned to those foods. The ability of human-derived lactobacilli and bifidobacteria to synthesize GABA remains poorly characterized. In this paper, we screened our collection of 135 human-derived Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains for their ability to produce GABA from its precursor monosodium glutamate. Fifty eight strains were able to produce GABA. The most efficient GABA-producers were Bifidobacterium strains (up to 6 g/L). Time profiles of cell growth and GABA production as well as the influence of pyridoxal phosphate on GABA production were studied for L. plantarum 90sk, L. brevis 15f, B. adolescentis 150 and B. angulatum GT102. DNA of these strains was sequenced; the gadB and gadC genes were identified. The presence of these genes was analyzed in 14 metagenomes of healthy individuals. The genes were found in the following genera of bacteria: Bacteroidetes (Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Alistipes, Odoribacter, Prevotella), Proteobacterium (Esherichia), Firmicutes (Enterococcus), Actinobacteria (Bifidobacterium). These data indicate that gad genes as well as the ability to produce GABA are widely distributed among lactobacilli and bifidobacteria (mainly in L. plantarum, L. brevis, B. adolescentis, B. angulatum, B. dentium) and other gut-derived bacterial species. Perhaps, GABA is involved in the interaction of gut microbiota with the macroorganism and the ability to synthesize GABA may be an important feature in the selection of bacterial strains - psychobiotics.

  5. Adenovector GAD65 gene delivery into the rat trigeminal ganglion produces orofacial analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vit, Jean-Philippe; Ohara, Peter T; Sundberg, Christopher; Rubi, Blanca; Maechler, Pierre; Liu, Chunyan; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro; Castro, Maria; Jasmin, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Background Our goal is to use gene therapy to alleviate pain by targeting glial cells. In an animal model of facial pain we tested the effect of transfecting the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) gene into satellite glial cells (SGCs) of the trigeminal ganglion by using a serotype 5 adenovector with high tropisms for glial cells. We postulated that GABA produced from the expression of GAD would reduce pain behavior by acting on GABA receptors on neurons within the ganglion. Results Injection of adenoviral vectors (AdGAD65) directly into the trigeminal ganglion leads to sustained expression of the GAD65 isoform over the 4 weeks observation period. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that adenovirus-mediated GAD65 expression and GABA synthesis were mainly in SGCs. GABAA and GABAB receptors were both seen in sensory neurons, yet only GABAA receptors decorated the neuronal surface. GABA receptors were not found on SGCs. Six days after injection of AdGAD65 into the trigeminal ganglion, there was a statistically significant decrease of pain behavior in the orofacial formalin test, a model of inflammatory pain. Rats injected with control virus (AdGFP or AdLacZ) had no reduction in their pain behavior. AdGAD65-dependent analgesia was blocked by bicuculline, a selective GABAA receptor antagonist, but not by CGP46381, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. Conclusion Transfection of glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion with the GAD gene blocks pain behavior by acting on GABAA receptors on neuronal perikarya. PMID:19656360

  6. 用ENDEAVOUR软件鉴定肥胖症致病基因GAD2%Verification of candidate gene GAD2 for human obesity by ENDEAVOUR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张焕萍; 张小白

    2011-01-01

    Disease genes identification is very important for understanding disease pathogenesis and improving clinic treatment. The computational gene prioritization tools have the advantages of huge data sources, efficient data processing and low costs. Many researchers have studied the disputing candidate disease gene GAD2 for obesity on chromosome 1 Op 12 by association studies but obtained contradictory conclusions. In this paper, the probability of gene GAD2 being an obesity disease gene is verified by the computational gene prioritization tool ENDEAVOUR. The prioritization strategies of ENDEAVOUR are based on the similarity between the candidate gene and the profile derived from genes already known to be involved in the processes (the training genes) by genomic data fusion. In the computational results, the first rank of gene GAD2 means that the probability of gene GAD2 being an obesity disease gene is high. The results are helpful to explain the biological mechanism of gene GAD2 and genetic factors of the complex obesity disease..%鉴别复杂疾病致病基因对于治疗和预防疾病作用非常重要,致病基因预测软件是鉴别致病基因的有效工具.位于染色体10p12的基因GAD2是尚有争议的肥胖基因,许多研究者用实验方法研究基因GAD2,却得出了不一致的结论.基于生物计算的致病基因预测软件能弥补实验的不足,已成为揭示疾病发病机理和预测致病基因的有效途径,本文采用ENDEAVOUR软件来验证基因GAD2是否为肥胖症致病基因,该软件运用多种生物数据,根据每一个候选基因与已知致病基因的相似程度以排序,结果在35个候选基因中,基因GAD2排在最前面,表明基因GAD2最可能是肥胖症致病基因.预测结果有利于重新解释基因GAD2的生物功能,促使肥胖症药物的研制及治疗水平的提高.

  7. Combinational spinal GAD65 gene delivery and systemic GABA-mimetic treatment for modulation of spasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Kakinohana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Loss of GABA-mediated pre-synaptic inhibition after spinal injury plays a key role in the progressive increase in spinal reflexes and the appearance of spasticity. Clinical studies show that the use of baclofen (GABA(B receptor agonist, while effective in modulating spasticity is associated with major side effects such as general sedation and progressive tolerance development. The goal of the present study was to assess if a combined therapy composed of spinal segment-specific upregulation of GAD65 (glutamate decarboxylase gene once combined with systemic treatment with tiagabine (GABA uptake inhibitor will lead to an antispasticity effect and whether such an effect will only be present in GAD65 gene over-expressing spinal segments. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adult Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were exposed to transient spinal ischemia (10 min to induce muscle spasticity. Animals then received lumbar injection of HIV1-CMV-GAD65 lentivirus (LVs targeting ventral α-motoneuronal pools. At 2-3 weeks after lentivirus delivery animals were treated systemically with tiagabine (4, 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg or vehicle and the degree of spasticity response measured. In a separate experiment the expression of GAD65 gene after spinal parenchymal delivery of GAD65-lentivirus in naive minipigs was studied. Spastic SD rats receiving spinal injections of the GAD65 gene and treated with systemic tiagabine showed potent and tiagabine-dose-dependent alleviation of spasticity. Neither treatment alone (i.e., GAD65-LVs injection only or tiagabine treatment only had any significant antispasticity effect nor had any detectable side effect. Measured antispasticity effect correlated with increase in spinal parenchymal GABA synthesis and was restricted to spinal segments overexpressing GAD65 gene. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data show that treatment with orally bioavailable GABA-mimetic drugs if combined with spinal-segment-specific GAD65 gene overexpression can

  8. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments.

  9. Gender differences in associations of glutamate decarboxylase 1 gene (GAD1 variants with panic disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Weber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Panic disorder is common (5% prevalence and females are twice as likely to be affected as males. The heritable component of panic disorder is estimated at 48%. Glutamic acid dehydrogenase GAD1, the key enzyme for the synthesis of the inhibitory and anxiolytic neurotransmitter GABA, is supposed to influence various mental disorders, including mood and anxiety disorders. In a recent association study in depression, which is highly comorbid with panic disorder, GAD1 risk allele associations were restricted to females. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nineteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs tagging the common variation in GAD1 were genotyped in two independent gender and age matched case-control samples (discovery sample n = 478; replication sample n = 584. Thirteen SNPs passed quality control and were examined for gender-specific enrichment of risk alleles associated with panic disorder by using logistic regression including a genotype×gender interaction term. The latter was found to be nominally significant for four SNPs (rs1978340, rs3762555, rs3749034, rs2241165 in the discovery sample; of note, the respective minor/risk alleles were associated with panic disorder only in females. These findings were not confirmed in the replication sample; however, the genotype×gender interaction of rs3749034 remained significant in the combined sample. Furthermore, this polymorphism showed a nominally significant association with the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire sum score. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study represents the first systematic evaluation of gender-specific enrichment of risk alleles of the common SNP variation in the panic disorder candidate gene GAD1. Our tentative results provide a possible explanation for the higher susceptibility of females to panic disorder.

  10. Identification of the CRB1 gene and analysis of its role in autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, Antonia Ingrid den

    2002-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies generally lead to severe visual impairment early in life. Most genes involved in retinal dystrophies are expressed exclusively or predominantly in the retina or the RPE. To identify candidate genes for inherited retinal dystrophies, we isolated

  11. Molecular mechanisms in muscular dystrophy: a gene expression profiling study.

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by progres¬sive muscle weakness and wasting. Although the underlying genetic defects of a large number of muscular dystrophies are now know, the molecular mechanisms resulting in the devastating effects of the disease are not yet clear. Furthermore, the muscular dystrophies differ in clinical presentation and severity. The processes responsible for this di¬vergence are largely unknown as well. In this thesis, gene e...

  12. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Yoshida, Ryo [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ohta, Shinji [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Fukusaki, Eiichiro [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Mukai, Yukio, E-mail: y_mukai@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields}We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. {yields} Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. {yields} Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. {yields} Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. {yields} Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The {Delta}uga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for {Delta}uga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan

  13. The new frontier in muscular dystrophy research: booster genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvall, Eva; Wewer, Ulla M

    2003-01-01

    More than 30 different forms of muscular dystrophy (MD) have been molecularly characterized and can be diagnosed, but progress toward treatment has been slow. Gene replacement therapy has met with great difficulty because of the large size of the defective genes and because of difficulties...... of the boosters are better understood, drugs may be developed to provide the boost to muscle. Some of the experiences in models of muscular dystrophy may inspire new approaches in other genetic degenerative diseases as well....

  14. Gene Therapy and Gene Editing for the Corneal Dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Keryn A; Irani, Yazad D

    2016-01-01

    Despite ever-increasing understanding of the genetic underpinnings of many corneal dystrophies, gene therapy designed to ameliorate disease has not yet been reported in any human patient. In this review, we explore the likely reasons for this apparent failure of translation. We identify the requirements for success: the genetic defect involved must have been identified and mapped, vision in the affected patient must be significantly impaired or likely to be impaired, no better or equivalently effective treatment must be available, the treatment must be capable of modulating corneal pathology, and delivery of the construct to the appropriate cell must be practicable. We consider which of the corneal dystrophies might be amenable to treatment by genetic manipulations, summarize existing therapeutic options for treatment, and explore gene editing using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas and other similar transformative technologies as the way of the future. We then summarize recent laboratory-based advances in gene delivery and the development of in vitro and in vivo models of the corneal dystrophies. Finally, we review recent experimental work that has increased our knowledge of the pathobiology of these conditions.

  15. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophy: Lessons Learned and Path Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendell, Jerry R.; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Sahenk, Zarife; Malik, Vinod; Kaspar, Brian K.; Walker, Christopher M.; Clark, K. Reed

    2012-01-01

    Our Translational Gene Therapy Center has used small molecules for exon skipping and mutation suppression and gene transfer to replace or provide surrogate genes as tools for molecular-based approaches for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. Exon skipping is targeted at the pre-mRNA level allowing one or more exons to be omitted to restore the reading frame. In Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), clinical trials have been performed with two different oligomers, a 2′O-methyl-ribo-oligonucleoside-phosphorothioate (2′OMe) and a phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO). Both have demonstrated early evidence of efficacy. A second molecular approach involves suppression of stop codons to promote readthrough of the DMD gene. We have been able to establish proof of principle for mutation suppression using the aminoglycoside, gentamicin. A safer, orally administered, alternative agent referred to as Ataluren (PTC124) has been used in clinical trials and is currently under consideration for approval by the FDA. Using a gene therapy approach, we have completed two trials and have initiated a third. For DMD, we used a mini-dystrophin transferred in adeno-associated virus (AAV). In this trial an immune response was seen directed against transgene product, a quite unexpected outcome that will help guide further studies. For limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2D (alpha-sarcoglycan deficiency), the transgene was again transferred using AAV but in this study, a muscle specific creatine kinase promoter controlled gene expression that persisted for six months. A third gene therapy trial has been initiated with transfer of the follistatin gene in AAV directly to the quadriceps muscle. Two diseases with selective quadriceps muscle weakness are undergoing gene transfer including sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Increasing the size and strength of the muscle is the goal of this study. Most importantly, no adverse events have been encountered in

  16. Analysis of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene mutation in corneal dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杨; 孙旭光; 任慧媛; 董冰; 王智群; 孙秀英

    2004-01-01

    Background Corneal dystrophy is a group of inherited blinding diseases of the cornea. This study was to identify the mutations of the keratoepithelin (KE) gene for proper diagnosis of corneal dystrophy. Methods Three families with corneal dystrophy were analysed. Thirteen individuals at risk for corneal dystrophy in family A, the proband and her son in family B, and the proband in family C were examined after their blood samples were obtained. Mutation screening of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene (BIGH3 gene) was performed. Results Five individuals in family A were found by clinical evaluation to be affected with granular corneal dystrophy and carried the BIGH3 mutation W555R. However, both probands in families B and C, also diagnosed with granular corneal dystrophy, harboured the BIGH3 mutation R124H. Conclusion Molecular genetic analysis can improve accurate diagnosis of corneal dystrophy.

  17. FHL1 reduces dystrophy in transgenic mice overexpressing FSHD muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Feeney

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1.

  18. Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Myotonic Dystrophy: DMPK Gene Mutation, Insulin Resistance and Development of Steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhardwaj, Rishi R.; Andrea Duchini

    2010-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is a multisystemic disorder characterized by repeat expansion mutations of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene resulting in a defective muscular insulin receptor and insulin resistance. We describe a patient with myotonic dystrophy who developed biopsy-proven non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. We suggest that patients with myotonic dystrophy are at risk of developing steatohepatitis. The relationship between defective insulin receptor and development of steatohe...

  19. Translational Studies of GALGT2 Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul T. Martin, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Research Institute...for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0416 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Paul T. Martin...translational studies in support of developing GALGT2 gene therapy for use in Duchenne Muscular dystrophy patients. In year 2, we have completed

  20. In vitro mapping of Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) gene promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storbeck, C.J.; Sabourin, L. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada); Baird, S. [Children`s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Myotonic Dystrophy Kinase (DMK) gene has been cloned and shared homology to serine/threonine protein kinases. Overexpression of this gene in stably transfected mouse myoblasts has been shown to inhibit fusion into myotubes while myoblasts stably transfected with an antisense construct show increased fusion potential. These experiments, along with data showing that the DM gene is highly expressed in muscle have highlighted the possibility of DMK being involved in myogenesis. The promoter region of the DM gene lacks a consensus TATA box and CAAT box, but harbours numerous transcription binding sites. Clones containing extended 5{prime} upstream sequences (UPS) of DMK only weakly drive the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) when transfected into C2C12 mouse myoblasts. However, four E-boxes are present in the first intron of the DM gene and transient assays show increased expression of the CAT gene when the first intron is present downstream of these 5{prime} UPS in an orientation dependent manner. Comparison between mouse and human sequence reveals that the regions in the first intron where the E-boxes are located are highly conserved. The mapping of the promoter and the importance of the first intron in the control of DMK expression will be presented.

  1. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Hayder Abdul-Razak; Alberto Malerba; George Dickson

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currentl...

  2. Cloning, sequence analysis of GAD gene from indica rice and its plant expression vector construction%籼稻GAD基因的克隆、序列分析及其植物表达载体构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志伟; 许明; 林忠辉; 蔡小玲; 郑金贵

    2012-01-01

    [目的]克隆籼稻谷氨酸脱羧酶(GAD)基因的全长cDNA,并进行序列分析和植物表达载体构建,为改良水稻的营养保健品质奠定基础.[方法]根据已知植物GAD基因的保守区域设计引物,以高GABA籼稻品系“新-9-4”的胚芽为材料,利用RT-PCR和RACE技术克隆GAD基因的全长cDNA;扩增其编码序列,构建双T-DNA植物表达载体.[结果]扩增获得长1962 bp的籼稻GAD基因全长cDNA(OsiGAD),包含1479 bp的开放阅读框,编码492个氨基酸.OsiGAD与已报道的水稻GAD基因OsGAD1、OsGAD2、OsGAD3的核苷酸序列同源性分别为67.1%、69.4%、98.3%,推导氨基酸序列的同源性分别为77.6%、70.1%、100.0%.OsiGAD蛋白序列具有磷酸吡哆醛结合位点和与钙调蛋白结合的C端延伸区域;构建了其具有水稻胚乳特异表达特性的双T-DNA植物高效表达载体pCDMAR-OsiGAD-hpt,选择标记基因和OsiGAD-因分别位于此载体的两个不同T-DNA区.[结论]克隆获得的籼稻GAD基因OsiGAD长1962 bp,并成功构建了其双T-DNA植物高效表达载体.%[Objective]The current experiment was conducted to clone the full length cDNA of glutamate decarboxy-lase (GAD) gene from indica rice,and then analyze its sequence followed by the construction of plant expression vector to provide references for improving rice nutrition and healthcare quality. [Method]Full length cDNA of GAD gene from indica rice 'Xin-9-4' rich in GABA was cloned by RT-PCR and RACE based on the specific primers of the conserved domain of other GAD genes. Coding sequence was amplified and double T-DNA plant expression vector was constructed. [Result] The amplified full length cDNA (1962 bp) of GAD gene denominated as OsiGAD contained a 1479 bp ORF encoding a 492-amino-acid polypeptide. OsiGAD shared 67.1,69.4 and 98.3% homology with nucleotide sequence of rice OsGADl,OsGAD2 and 0sGAD3,respectively and the deduced amino acid sequence identity was 77.6,70.1 and 100.0%,respectively

  3. Molecular mechanisms in muscular dystrophy : a gene expression profiling study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turk, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by progres¬sive muscle weakness and wasting. Although the underlying genetic defects of a large number of muscular dystrophies are now know, the molecular mechanisms resulting in the devastating effects of the disease are

  4. Clinical course of cone dystrophy caused by mutations in the RPGR gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Soerjoesing, G.G.; Florijn, R.J.; Tjiam, A.G.; Hollander, A.I. den; Born, L.I. van den; Riemslag, F.C.; Bergen, A.A.B.; Klaver, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the RPGR gene predominantly cause rod photoreceptor disorders with a large variability in clinical course. In this report, we describe two families with mutations in this gene and cone involvement. METHODS: We investigated an X-linked cone dystrophy family (1) with 25

  5. Clinical course of cone dystrophy caused by mutations in the RPGR gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.H.J. Thiadens (Alberta); G.G. Soerjoesing (Gyan); R.J. Florijn; A.G. Tjiam; A.I. Hollander (Anneke); L.I. van den Born (Ingeborgh); F.C.C. Riemslag (Frans); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mutations in the RPGR gene predominantly cause rod photoreceptor disorders with a large variability in clinical course. In this report, we describe two families with mutations in this gene and cone involvement. Methods: We investigated an X-linked cone dystrophy family (1)

  6. Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-26

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy; Muscular Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Steinert's Disease; Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

  7. DGGE based whole-gene mutation scanning of the dystrophlin gene in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, RMW; Mulder, IM; Vossen, R; de Koning-Gans, PAM; Kraak, M; Ginjaar, IB; van der Hout, AH; Bakker, E; Buys, CHCM; van Essen, AJ; den Dunnen, JT

    2004-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD and BMD) are caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Large rearrangements in the gene are found in about two,thirds of DMD patients, with similar to60% carrying deletions and 5-10% carrying duplications. Most of the remaining 30-35% of patients are exp

  8. Splicing-correcting therapeutic approaches for retinal dystrophies: where endogenous gene regulation and specificity matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Niccolò; Casarosa, Simona; Denti, Michela A

    2014-05-27

    Splicing is an important and highly regulated step in gene expression. The ability to modulate it can offer a therapeutic option for many genetic disorders. Antisense-mediated splicing-correction approaches have recently been successfully exploited for some genetic diseases, and are currently demonstrating safety and efficacy in different clinical trials. Their application for the treatment of retinal dystrophies could potentially solve a vast panel of cases, as illustrated by the abundance of mutations that could be targeted and the versatility of the technique. In this review, we will give an insight of the different therapeutic strategies, focusing on the current status of their application for retinal dystrophies.

  9. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in the Netherlands: gene defect identified in half the families.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, A.J. van der; Frankhuizen, W.S.; Barth, P.G.; Howeler, C.J.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Spaans, F.; Wintzen, A.R.; Wokke, J.H.J.; Ommen, G.J.B. van

    2007-01-01

    Pheno- and genotype correlation is attempted in a Dutch cross-sectional study on limb- girdle muscular dystrophy. Sarcoglycans, caveolin-3, calpain-3, and dysferlin were analyzed on muscle tissue. Mutation analysis of the calpain-3, caveolin-3, and fukutin-related protein gene was executed in succes

  10. Comprehensive analysis of the achromatopsia genes CNGA3 and CNGB3 in progressive cone dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Roosing, S.; Collin, R.W.J.; Moll-Ramirez, N. van; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Schooneveld, M.J. van; Hollander, A.I. den; Born, L.I. van den; Hoyng, C.B.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Klaver, C.C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the major achromatopsia genes (CNGA3 and CNGB3) play a role in the cause of progressive cone dystrophy (CD). DESIGN: Prospective multicenter study. PARTICIPANTS: Probands (N = 60) with autosomal recessive (ar) CD from various ophthalmogenetic clinics in The Netherla

  11. Accurate assessment of intragenic recombination frequency within the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbs, S; Roberts, R G; Mathew, C G; Bentley, D R; Bobrow, M

    1990-08-01

    Polymorphic loci that lie at the two extremities of the Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) gene have been used to estimate intragenic recombination rates. Multipoint linkage analysis of the CEPH panel of families suggests a total intragenic recombination frequency of nearly 0.12 (confidence intervals 0.041-0.226) over the genomic length of approximately 2 Mb.

  12. Murine muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 (Lama2) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Wu, X R; Wewer, U M;

    1994-01-01

    The classic murine muscular dystrophy strain, dy, was first described almost 40 years ago. We have identified the molecular basis of an allele of dy, called dy2J, by detecting a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene--the first identified mutation in laminin-2. The G to A mutation in a splice...

  13. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  14. Intravenous immunoglobulin in patients with anti-GAD antibody-associated neurological diseases and patients with inflammatory myopathies: effects on clinicopathological features and immunoregulatory genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2005-12-01

    Controlled trials with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) were conducted in patients with Stiff-Person Syndrome (SPS) and dermatomyositis (DM), two humorally mediated neurological disorders, and in inclusion body myositis (IBM), a T-cell-mediated inflammatory myopathy. The clinical efficacy was compared with alterations on tissue expression of complement, cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and immunoregulatory genes. The following patients were randomized in three separate trials to receive IVIg or placebo for 3 mo: (a) 16 patients with anti-GAD antibody-positive SPS; (b) 15 patients with DM resistant to therapies; and (c) 19 patients with IBM. After a washout, they crossed to the alternative therapy for another 3 mo. Efficacy was based on the difference in the respective disease scores from baseline to the second and third month of the infusions. In patients with SPS and DM, the scores changed positively and significantly from months 1 through 3, but returned to baseline when the patients crossed to placebo. In contrast, the scores in the placebo-randomized group remained constant or worsened from months 1 to 3, but improved significantly after crossing to IVIg. The muscle scores of patients with IBM did not significantly change between IVIg or placebo. In SPS, the anti-GAD65 antibody titers declined after IVIg but not after placebo. In DM, there was reduction of complement consumption, interception of membranolytic attack complex formation, downregulation of inflammation, fibrosis, cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules, and alterations in thousands of immunoregulatory genes. We conclude that IVIg is a safe and effective therapy for patients with SPS and DM unresponsive to other agents. In tissues, IVIg restores tissue cytoarchitecture by suppressing the inflammatory mediators at the protein, mRNA, and gene level.

  15. Lighting a candle in the dark: advances in genetics and gene therapy of recessive retinal dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Anneke I; Black, Aaron; Bennett, Jean; Cremers, Frans P M

    2010-09-01

    Nonsyndromic recessive retinal dystrophies cause severe visual impairment due to the death of photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium cells. These diseases until recently have been considered to be incurable. Molecular genetic studies in the last two decades have revealed the underlying molecular causes in approximately two-thirds of patients. The mammalian eye has been at the forefront of therapeutic trials based on gene augmentation in humans with an early-onset nonsyndromic recessive retinal dystrophy due to mutations in the retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein 65kDa (RPE65) gene. Tremendous challenges still lie ahead to extrapolate these studies to other retinal disease-causing genes, as human gene augmentation studies require testing in animal models for each individual gene and sufficiently large patient cohorts for clinical trials remain to be identified through cost-effective mutation screening protocols.

  16. From "glycosyltransferase" to "congenital muscular dystrophy": integrating knowledge from NCBI Entrez Gene and the Gene Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S; Zeng, Kelly; Bodenreider, Olivier; Sheth, Amit

    2007-01-01

    Entrez Gene (EG), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and the Gene Ontology (GO) are three complementary knowledge resources that can be used to correlate genomic data with disease information. However, bridging between genotype and phenotype through these resources currently requires manual effort or the development of customized software. In this paper, we argue that integrating EG and GO provides a robust and flexible solution to this problem. We demonstrate how the Resource Description Framework (RDF) developed for the Semantic Web can be used to represent and integrate these resources and enable seamless access to them as a unified resource. We illustrate the effectiveness of our approach by answering a real-world biomedical query linking a specific molecular function, glycosyltransferase, to the disorder congenital muscular dystrophy.

  17. Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy associated with CYP4V2 gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Lin, Jian; Nishiguchi, Koji; Kondo, Mineo; Sugita, Jiro; Miyake, Yozo

    2006-01-01

    Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy (BCD) is an autosomal recessive chorioretinal dystrophy characterized by progressive night blindness, tiny, yellowish, glistening retinal crystals, choroidal sclerosis, and crystalline deposits in the peripheral cornea. Recent studies have demonstrated that the CYP4V2 gene which encodes a CYP450 family protein is the causative gene of the disease. We have identified a homozygous mutation in the CYP4V2 gene in 8 separate Japanese patients with BCD and conclude that mutations in the CYP4V2 gene are the major cause of BCD. The IVS6-8_c.810del/insGC mutation is found at a higher frequency in the Asian populations suggesting a founder effect.

  18. Progress and prospects of gene therapy clinical trials for the muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Niclas E; Seto, Jane T; Hall, John K; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Odom, Guy L

    2016-04-15

    Clinical trials represent a critical avenue for new treatment development, where early phases (I, I/II) are designed to test safety and effectiveness of new therapeutics or diagnostic indicators. A number of recent advances have spurred renewed optimism toward initiating clinical trials and developing refined therapies for the muscular dystrophies (MD's) and other myogenic disorders. MD's encompass a heterogeneous group of degenerative disorders often characterized by progressive muscle weakness and fragility. Many of these diseases result from mutations in genes encoding proteins of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC). The most common and severe form among children is Duchenne muscular dystrophy, caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, with an average life expectancy around 25 years of age. Another group of MD's referred to as the limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) can affect boys or girls, with different types caused by mutations in different genes. Mutation of the α-sarcoglycan gene, also a DGC component, causes LGMD2D and represents the most common form of LGMD. Early preclinical and clinical trial findings support the feasibility of gene therapy via recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors as a viable treatment approach for many MDs. In this mini-review, we present an overview of recent progress in clinical gene therapy trials of the MD's and touch upon promising preclinical advances.

  19. Relatively low proportion of dystrophin gene deletions in Israeili Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shomrat, R.; Gluck, E.; Legum, C.; Shiloh, Y. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)

    1994-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the X-linked dystrophin gene. The most common mutations in western populations are deletions that are spread non-randomly throughout the gene. Molecular analysis of the dystrophin gene structure by hybridization of the full length cDNA to Southern blots and by PCR in 62 unrelated Israeli male DMD/BMD patients showed deletions in 23 (37%). This proportion is significantly lower than that found in European and North American populations (55-65%). Seventy-eight percent of the deletions were confined to exons 44-52, half of these exons 44-45, and the remaining 22% to exons 1 and 19. There was no correlation between the size of the deletion and the severity of the disease. All the deletions causing frameshift resulted in the DMD phenotypes. 43 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. ISPD gene mutations are a common cause of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirak, Sebahattin; Foley, Aileen Reghan; Herrmann, Ralf; Willer, Tobias; Yau, Shu; Stevens, Elizabeth; Torelli, Silvia; Brodd, Lina; Kamynina, Alisa; Vondracek, Petr; Roper, Helen; Longman, Cheryl; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Marrosu, Gianni; Nürnberg, Peter; Michele, Daniel E; Plagnol, Vincent; Hurles, Matt; Moore, Steven A; Sewry, Caroline A; Campbell, Kevin P; Voit, Thomas; Muntoni, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Dystroglycanopathies are a clinically and genetically diverse group of recessively inherited conditions ranging from the most severe of the congenital muscular dystrophies, Walker-Warburg syndrome, to mild forms of adult-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Their hallmark is a reduction in the functional glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, which can be detected in muscle biopsies. An important part of this glycosylation is a unique O-mannosylation, essential for the interaction of α-dystroglycan with extracellular matrix proteins such as laminin-α2. Mutations in eight genes coding for proteins in the glycosylation pathway are responsible for ∼50% of dystroglycanopathy cases. Despite multiple efforts using traditional positional cloning, the causative genes for unsolved dystroglycanopathy cases have escaped discovery for several years. In a recent collaborative study, we discovered that loss-of-function recessive mutations in a novel gene, called isoprenoid synthase domain containing (ISPD), are a relatively common cause of Walker-Warburg syndrome. In this article, we report the involvement of the ISPD gene in milder dystroglycanopathy phenotypes ranging from congenital muscular dystrophy to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and identified allelic ISPD variants in nine cases belonging to seven families. In two ambulant cases, there was evidence of structural brain involvement, whereas in seven, the clinical manifestation was restricted to a dystrophic skeletal muscle phenotype. Although the function of ISPD in mammals is not yet known, mutations in this gene clearly lead to a reduction in the functional glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, which not only causes the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome but is also a common cause of the milder forms of dystroglycanopathy.

  1. Expression of the Murine Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene in Muscle and Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Pearlman, Joel A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Ranier, Joel E.; Reeves, Alice A.; Caskey, C. Thomas

    1988-03-01

    Complementary DNA clones were isolated that represent the 5' terminal 2.5 kilobases of the murine Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Dmd) messenger RNA (mRNA). Mouse Dmd mRNA was detectable in skeletal and cardiac muscle and at a level approximately 90 percent lower in brain. Dmd mRNA is also present, but at much lower than normal levels, in both the muscle and brain of three different strains of dystrophic mdx mice. The identification of Dmd mRNA in brain raises the possibility of a relation between human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene expression and the mental retardation found in some DMD males. These results also provide evidence that the mdx mutations are allelic variants of mouse Dmd gene mutations.

  2. A new mutation of the fukutin gene causing late-onset limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisager, M; Duno, M; Hansen, F Juul; Krag, T O; Vissing, C R; Vissing, J

    2013-07-01

    Defects in glycosylations of α-dystroglycan are associated with mutations in several genes, including the fukutin gene (FKTN). Hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan results in several forms of muscular dystrophy with variable phenotype. Outside Japan, the prevalence of muscular dystrophies related to aberrations of FKTN is rare, with only eight reported cases of limb girdle phenotype (LGMD2M). We describe the mildest affected patient outside Japan with genetically confirmed LGMD2M and onset of symptoms at age 14. She was brought to medical attention at age 12, not because of muscle weakness, but due to episodes of tachycardia caused by Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. On examination, she had rigid spine syndrome, a typical limb girdle dystrophy pattern of muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and serum CK levels >2000 IU/L (normal G; p.Y306C mutation in the FKTN gene was found. The case confirms FKTN mutations as a cause of LGMD2M without mental retardation and expands the phenotypic spectrum for LGMD2M to include cardiomyopathy and rigid spine syndrome in the mildest affected non-Japanese patient reported so far.

  3. From proteins to genes: immunoanalysis in the diagnosis of muscular dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barresi Rita

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Muscular dystrophies are a large heterogeneous group of inherited diseases that cause progressive muscle weakness and permanent muscle damage. Very few muscular dystrophies show sufficient specific clinical features to allow a definite diagnosis. Because of the currently limited capacity to screen for numerous genes simultaneously, muscle biopsy is a time and cost-effective test for many of these disorders. Protein analysis interpreted in correlation with the clinical phenotype is a useful way of directing genetic testing in many types of muscular dystrophies. Immunohistochemistry and western blot are complementary techniques used to gather quantitative and qualitative information on the expression of proteins involved in this group of diseases. Immunoanalysis has a major diagnostic application mostly in recessive conditions where the absence of labelling for a particular protein is likely to indicate a defect in that gene. However, abnormalities in protein expression can vary from absence to very subtle reduction. It is good practice to test muscle biopsies with antibodies for several proteins simultaneously and to interpret the results in context. Indeed, there is a degree of direct or functional association between many of these proteins that is reflected by the presence of specific secondary abnormalities that are of value, especially when the diagnosis is not straightforward.

  4. Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy is caused by mutations in the novel gene CYP4V2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anren; Jiao, Xiaodong; Munier, Francis L; Schorderet, Daniel F; Yao, Wenliang; Iwata, Fumino; Hayakawa, Mutsuko; Kanai, Atsushi; Shy Chen, Muh; Alan Lewis, Richard; Heckenlively, John; Weleber, Richard G; Traboulsi, Elias I; Zhang, Qingjiong; Xiao, Xueshan; Kaiser-Kupfer, Muriel; Sergeev, Yuri V; Hejtmancik, J Fielding

    2004-05-01

    Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy (BCD) is an autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy characterized by multiple glistening intraretinal crystals scattered over the fundus, a characteristic degeneration of the retina, and sclerosis of the choroidal vessels, ultimately resulting in progressive night blindness and constriction of the visual field. The BCD region of chromosome 4q35.1 was refined to an interval flanked centromerically by D4S2924 by linkage and haplotype analysis; mutations were found in the novel CYP450 family member CYP4V2 in 23 of 25 unrelated patients with BCD tested. The CYP4V2 gene, transcribed from 11 exons spanning 19 kb, is expressed widely. Homology to other CYP450 proteins suggests that CYP4V2 may have a role in fatty acid and steroid metabolism, consistent with biochemical studies of patients with BCD.

  5. Deletion Analysis Of The Duchenne/Becker Muscular Dystrophy Gene Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastur R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD and Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD is mainly based on clinical profile, serum CPK values, muscle biopsy and immunostaining for dystrophin. Most recent and accurate method for diagnosing DMD/BMD is by detection of mutations in the DMD gene. This was done in 100 unrelated patients using 19 exons including the promoter region in two sets of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR. These primers amplify most of the exons in the deletion prone ′hotspot′ regions allowing determination of deletion end point. Intragenic deletions were detected in 74 patients indicating that the use of PCR-based assays will allow deletion detection help in prenatal diagnosis for most of the DMD/BMD patients. The frequency of deletions observed in the present study was 74%.

  6. Successful Gene Therapy in the RPGRIP1-deficient Dog: a Large Model of Cone–Rod Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhériteau, Elsa; Petit, Lolita; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Libeau, Lyse; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Guihal, Caroline; François, Achille; Guyon, Richard; Provost, Nathalie; Lemoine, Françoise; Papal, Samantha; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    For the development of new therapies, proof-of-concept studies in large animal models that share clinical features with their human counterparts represent a pivotal step. For inherited retinal dystrophies primarily involving photoreceptor cells, the efficacy of gene therapy has been demonstrated in canine models of stationary cone dystrophies and progressive rod–cone dystrophies but not in large models of progressive cone–rod dystrophies, another important cause of blindness. To address the last issue, we evaluated gene therapy in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1)-deficient dog, a model exhibiting a severe cone–rod dystrophy similar to that seen in humans. Subretinal injection of AAV5 (n = 5) or AAV8 (n = 2) encoding the canine Rpgrip1 improved photoreceptor survival in transduced areas of treated retinas. Cone function was significantly and stably rescued in all treated eyes (18–72% of those recorded in normal eyes) up to 24 months postinjection. Rod function was also preserved (22–29% of baseline function) in four of the five treated dogs up to 24 months postinjection. No detectable rod function remained in untreated contralateral eyes. More importantly, treatment preserved bright- and dim-light vision. Efficacy of gene therapy in this large animal model of cone–rod dystrophy provides great promise for human treatment. PMID:24091916

  7. Uncovering the profile of mutations of transforming growth factor beta-induced gene in Chinese corneal dystrophy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dan Hao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To uncover the mutations profile of transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI gene in Chinese corneal dystrophy patients and further investigate the characteristics of genotype-phenotype correlations. METHODS: Forty-two subjects (6 unrelated families including 15 patients and 8 unaffected members, and 19 sporadic patients of Chinese origin were subjected to phenotypic and genotypic characterization. The corneal phenotypes of patients were documented by slit lamp photography. Mutation screening of the coding regions of TGFBI was performed by direct sequencing. RESULTS: We detected four corneal dystrophy types. The most frequent phenotypes were granular corneal dystrophy (GCD (including 3 families and 8 sporadic patients and lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD (including 2 families and 9 sporadic patients. The next phenotypes were corneal dystrophy of Bowman layer (CDB (1 family and 1 sporadic patient and epithelial basement membrane dystrophy (EBMD (1 sporadic patient. Six distinct mutations responsible for TGFBI corneal dystrophies were identified in 30 individuals with corneal dystrophies. Those were, p.R124H mutation in 1 family and 2 sporadic patients with GCD, p.R555W mutation in 2 families and 3 sporadic patients with GCD, p.R124C mutation in 2 families and 7 sporadic patients with LCD, p.A620D mutation in 1 sporadic patient with LCD, p.H626R mutation in 1 sporadic patient with LCD, and p.R555Q in 1 family and 1 sporadic patient with CDB. No mutation was detected in the remaining 3 atypical GCD patients and 1 EBMD patient. CONCLUSION: GCD and LCD are the most frequent phenotypes in Chinese population. R555W was the most common mutation for GCD; R124C was the most common mutation for LCD. Our findings extend the mutational spectrum of TFGBI, and this is the extensively delineated TGFBI mutation profile associated with the various corneal dystrophies in the Chinese population.

  8. ABCA4 gene analysis in patients with autosomal recessive cone and cone rod dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiratschky, Veronique B D; Grau, Tanja; Bernd, Antje; Zrenner, Eberhart; Jägle, Herbert; Renner, Agnes B; Kellner, Ulrich; Rudolph, Günther; Jacobson, Samuel G; Cideciyan, Artur V; Schaich, Simone; Kohl, Susanne; Wissinger, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute a family of large membrane proteins, which transport a variety of substrates across membranes. The ABCA4 protein is expressed in photoreceptors and possibly functions as a transporter for N-retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine (N-retinylidene-PE), the Schiff base adduct of all-trans-retinal with PE. Mutations in the ABCA4 gene have been initially associated with autosomal recessive Stargardt disease. Subsequent studies have shown that mutations in ABCA4 can also cause a variety of other retinal dystrophies including cone rod dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa. To determine the prevalence and mutation spectrum of ABCA4 gene mutations in non-Stargardt phenotypes, we have screened 64 unrelated patients with autosomal recessive cone (arCD) and cone rod dystrophy (arCRD) applying the Asper Ophthalmics ABCR400 microarray followed by DNA sequencing of all coding exons of the ABCA4 gene in subjects with single heterozygous mutations. Disease-associated ABCA4 alleles were identified in 20 of 64 patients with arCD or arCRD. In four of 64 patients (6%) only one mutant ABCA4 allele was detected and in 16 patients (25%), mutations on both ABCA4 alleles were identified. Based on these data we estimate a prevalence of 31% for ABCA4 mutations in arCD and arCRD, supporting the concept that the ABCA4 gene is a major locus for various types of degenerative retinal diseases with abnormalities in cone or both cone and rod function.

  9. Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy and Inherited Retinal Dystrophy in Bukhara Jews Due to Linked Mutations in the PABPN1 and NRL Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Itzhak; Blumen, Sergiu C; Newman, Hadas; Rizel, Leah; Khayat, Morad; Hanna, Rana; St Guily, Jean Lacau; Tiosano, Beatrice; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2017-07-01

    We have previously described two unrelated Bukhara Jews (BJs) with a combination of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) and inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD), because of mutations in two linked genes: PABPN1 and NRL. Here we investigated the prevalence of the NRL mutation among BJs with OPMD. PABPN1 and NRL mutation testing were performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing on two cohorts of Bukhara Jewish patients: OPMD patients (with or without IRD) and IRD patients (without OPMD). Of 24 unrelated chromosomes from Bukhara Jewish OPMD patients, 19 (79%) harbored the NRL mutation. In contrast, the NRL mutation was not detected in Bukhara Jewish patients diagnosed with IRD but without OPMD. Our findings provide an explanation for the reoccurrence of IRD in Bukhara Jewish OPMD homozygotes. Moreover, they indicate that Bukhara Jewish OPMD patients are at high risk for carrying the NRL mutation, and should be offered appropriate genetic counseling and testing.

  10. Expression of GAD of cochlea in FMR1 gene Knock-out mice%Fmr1基因敲除小鼠耳蜗GAD的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏雄; 杜娜; 孙卫文; 黄月玲; 沈岩松; 戴丽军; 陈盛强; 马钊恩; 张建国

    2012-01-01

    目的 对4 周龄Fmr1 基因敲除小鼠的耳蜗的GAD 表达进行观察,探讨耳蜗GAD 的表达是否受FMRP 的影响.方法 使用PCR 技术对Fmr1 基因敲除小鼠鉴定后对4 周龄的Fmr1 基因敲除小鼠和野生型小鼠各15 只进行耳蜗的苏木精-伊红(HE) 染色和GAD 免疫组织化学的表达观察,数据采用多因素方差分析处理.结果 耳蜗HE 染色结果:4 周龄组KO 鼠较WT 鼠形态学观察无差异.4 周龄KO 小鼠的耳蜗中GAD 表达的平均阳性细胞数均高于WT 小鼠,P<0.01,差异具有统计学意义.结论 GAD 表达的改变可能与FMR1 基因KO 小鼠听源性惊厥发病有关.

  11. A gene for autosomal dominant progressive cone dystrophy (CORD5) maps to chromosome 17p12-p13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balciuniene, J.; Holmgren, G.; Forsman, K. [University Hospital, Umea (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-11-20

    Inherited retinal dystrophy is a common cause of visual impairment. Cone dystrophy affects the cone function and is manifested as progressive loss of the central vision, defective color vision, and photophobia. Linkage was demonstrated between progressive cone dystrophy (CORD5) and genetic markers on chromosome 17p12-p13 in a five-generation family. Multipoint analysis gave a maximum lod score of 7.72 at the marker D17S938. Recombinant haplotypes in the family suggest that the cone dystrophy locus is located in a 25-cM interval between the markers D17S926/D17S849 and D17S804/D17S945. Furthermore, one recombination was detected between the disease locus and a microsatellite marker in the candidate gene RCV1, encoding the retinal protein recoverin. Two additional candidate genes encoding retinal guanylate cyclase (GUC2D) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) are located at 17p13.1. Moreover, loci for retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis have been mapped to the same region. Identification of the cone dystrophy locus may be of importance not only for identifying functional genes in the cone system, but also for identifying genes for other retinal disorders. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Muscular dystrophies and myopathies: the spectrum of mutated genes in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehlíková, K; Skálová, D; Zídková, J; Haberlová, J; Voháňka, S; Mazanec, R; Mrázová, L; Vondráček, P; Ošlejšková, H; Zámečník, J; Honzík, T; Zeman, J; Magner, M; Šišková, D; Langová, M; Gregor, V; Godava, M; Smolka, V; Fajkusová, L

    2017-03-01

    Inherited neuromuscular disorder (NMD) is a wide term covering different genetic disorders affecting muscles, nerves, and neuromuscular junctions. Genetic and clinical heterogeneity is the main drawback in a routine gene-by-gene diagnostics. We present Czech NMD patients with a genetic cause identified using targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) and the spectrum of these causes. Overall 167 unrelated patients presenting NMD falling into categories of muscular dystrophies, congenital muscular dystrophies, congenital myopathies, distal myopathies, and other myopathies were tested by targeted NGS of 42 known NMD-related genes. Pathogenic or probably pathogenic sequence changes were identified in 79 patients (47.3%). In total, 37 novel and 51 known disease-causing variants were detected in 23 genes. In addition, variants of uncertain significance were suspected in 7 cases (4.2%), and in 81 cases (48.5%) sequence changes associated with NMD were not found. Our results strongly indicate that for molecular diagnostics of heterogeneous disorders such as NMDs, targeted panel testing has a high-clinical yield and should therefore be the preferred first-tier approach. Further, we show that in the genetic diagnostic practice of NMDs, it is necessary to take into account different types of inheritance including the occurrence of an autosomal recessive disorder in two generations of one family. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Preferential Nucleosome Assembly at DNA Triplet Repeats from the Myotonic Dystrophy Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Amirhaeri, Sorour; Kang, Seongman; Wells, Robert D.; Griffith, Jack D.

    1994-07-01

    The expansion of CTG repeats in DNA occurs in or near genes involved in several human diseases, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington's disease. Nucleosomes, the basic structural element of chromosomes, consist of 146 base pairs of DNA coiled about an octamer of histone proteins and mediate general transcriptional repression. Electron microscopy was used to examine in vitro the nucleosome assembly of DNA containing repeating CTG triplets. The efficiency of nucleosome formation increased with expanded triplet blocks, suggesting that such blocks may repress transcription through the creation of stable nucleosomes.

  14. A new mutation of the fukutin gene causing late-onset limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Maria; Duno, M; Hansen, Flemming Juul;

    2013-01-01

    to aberrations of FKTN is rare, with only eight reported cases of limb girdle phenotype (LGMD2M). We describe the mildest affected patient outside Japan with genetically confirmed LGMD2M and onset of symptoms at age 14. She was brought to medical attention at age 12, not because of muscle weakness, but due...... to episodes of tachycardia caused by Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. On examination, she had rigid spine syndrome, a typical limb girdle dystrophy pattern of muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and serum CK levels >2000 IU/L (normal G; p.Y306C mutation in the FKTN gene was found. The case confirms FKTN mutations...

  15. RNA interference gene therapy in dominant retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy mouse models caused by GCAP1 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eJiang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi knockdown is an efficacious therapeutic strategy for silencing genes causative for dominant retinal dystrophies. To test this, we used self-complementary (sc AAV2/8 vector to develop an RNAi-based therapy in two dominant retinal degeneration mouse models. The allele-specific model expresses transgenic bovine GCAP1(Y99C establishing a rapid RP-like phenotype, whereas the nonallele-specific model expresses mouse GCAP1(L151F producing a slowly progressing cone/rod dystrophy (CORD. The late onset GCAP1(L151F-CORD mimics the dystrophy observed in human GCAP1-CORD patients. Subretinal injection of scAAV2/8 carrying shRNA expression cassettes specific for bovine or mouse GCAP1 showed strong expression at one week post-injection. In both allele-specific (GCAP1(Y99C-RP and nonallele-specific (GCAP1(L151F-CORD models of dominant retinal dystrophy, RNAi-mediated gene silencing enhanced photoreceptor survival, delayed onset of degeneration and improved visual function. Such results provide a proof of concept toward effective RNAi-based gene therapy mediated by scAAV2/8 for dominant retinal disease based on GCAP1 mutation. Further, nonallele-specific RNAi knockdown of GCAP1 may prove generally applicable toward the rescue of any human GCAP1-based dominant cone-rod dystrophy.

  16. Identification of a novel X-linked gene responsible for Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bione, S; Maestrini, E; Rivella, S; Mancini, M; Regis, S; Romeo, G; Toniolo, D

    1994-12-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by slowly progressing contractures, wasting of skeletal muscle and cardiomyopathy. Heart block is a frequent cause of death. The disease gene has been mapped to distal Xq28. Among many genes in this region, we selected eight transcripts expressed at high levels in skeletal muscle, heart and/or brain as the best candidates for the disease. We now report, in all five patients studied, unique mutations in one of the genes, STA: these mutations result in the loss of all or part of the protein. The EDMD gene encodes a novel serine-rich protein termed emerin, which contains a 20 amino acid hydrophobic domain at the C terminus, similar to that described for many membrane proteins of the secretory pathway involved in vesicular transport.

  17. Screening of Dystrophin Gene Deletions in Egyptian Patients with DMD/BMD Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila K. Effat

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD are allelic disorders caused by mutations within the dystrophin gene. Our study has identified 100 Egyptian families collected from the Human Genetics Clinic, National Research Center, Cairo. All cases were subjected to complete clinical evaluation pedigree analysis, electromyography studies, estimation of serum creatine phosphokinase enzyme (CPK levels and DNA analysis. Multiplex PCR using 18 pairs of specific primers were used for screening of deletion mutations within the dystrophin gene. A frequency of 55% among the families. Sixty per cent of detected deletions involved multiple exons spanning the major or the minor hot spot of the dystrophin gene. The remainder 40% which mainly involved exon 45. Comparing these findings with frequencies of other countries it was found that our figures fall within the reported range of 40%– for deletions. The distribution of deletions in our study and other different studies was variable and specific ethnic differences do not apparently account for specific deletions. In addition this study concluded that employment of the 18 exon analysis is a cost effective and a highly accurate (97% to launch a nationwide program.

  18. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1F is caused by a microdeletion in the transportin 3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melià, Maria J; Kubota, Akatsuki; Ortolano, Saida; Vílchez, Juan J; Gámez, Josep; Tanji, Kurenai; Bonilla, Eduardo; Palenzuela, Lluís; Fernández-Cadenas, Israel; Pristoupilová, Anna; García-Arumí, Elena; Andreu, Antoni L; Navarro, Carmen; Hirano, Michio; Martí, Ramon

    2013-05-01

    In 2001, we reported linkage of an autosomal dominant form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1F, to chromosome 7q32.1-32.2, but the identity of the mutant gene was elusive. Here, using a whole genome sequencing strategy, we identified the causative mutation of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1F, a heterozygous single nucleotide deletion (c.2771del) in the termination codon of transportin 3 (TNPO3). This gene is situated within the chromosomal region linked to the disease and encodes a nuclear membrane protein belonging to the importin beta family. TNPO3 transports serine/arginine-rich proteins into the nucleus, and has been identified as a key factor in the HIV-import process into the nucleus. The mutation is predicted to generate a 15-amino acid extension of the C-terminus of the protein, segregates with the clinical phenotype, and is absent in genomic sequence databases and a set of >200 control alleles. In skeletal muscle of affected individuals, expression of the mutant messenger RNA and histological abnormalities of nuclei and TNPO3 indicate altered TNPO3 function. Our results demonstrate that the TNPO3 mutation is the cause of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1F, expand our knowledge of the molecular basis of muscular dystrophies and bolster the importance of defects of nuclear envelope proteins as causes of inherited myopathies.

  19. Relationship between serum GAD-Ab and the genetic polymorphisms of GAD2 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Qiao, Z R; Liu, D B; Zeng, J T; Zhang, J; Bo, Y; Zu, H Y; Hu, Q; Wu, X; Dong, S S

    2015-04-10

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between serum glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibody (Ab) levels and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the glutamic acid de-carboxylase 2 (GAD2) 5'-untranslated region and the susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in the Han population. The distributions of patients with SNPs in the GAD2 5'-untranslated region (rs2236418, rs185649317, and rs8190590) and type 2 diabetes and that of the healthy group were genotyped and analyzed using Sequenom MassArray SNP genotyp-ing. GAD-Ab levels were also detected. The frequency distributions of the AA, AG, and GG genotypes in the polymorphic site rs2236418 in the diabetes GAD-Ab-positive group were 45.9, 42.8, and 11.4%, respectively, whereas those in the control group were 36.6, 43.7, and 19.8%, respectively. The difference between the 2 groups was statis-tically significant (P 2.623 (1.351-4.937) and 2.152 (1.375-4.202), respectively). The associations of the 3 SNPs of the GAD2 gene 5'-un-translated region polymorphisms with susceptibility to type 2 diabe-tes in the Chongqing Han population were significant. The SNP of rs2236418 in the Chongqing Han population of diabetic patients with serum GAD-Ab levels was significantly correlated with the SNPs rs185649317 and rs8190590.

  20. Gene expression profiling in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amets Sáenz

    Full Text Available Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A is a recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in calpain 3 (CAPN3. Calpain 3 plays different roles in muscular cells, but little is known about its functions or in vivo substrates. The aim of this study was to identify the genes showing an altered expression in LGMD2A patients and the possible pathways they are implicated in. Ten muscle samples from LGMD2A patients with in which molecular diagnosis was ascertained were investigated using array technology to analyze gene expression profiling as compared to ten normal muscle samples. Upregulated genes were mostly those related to extracellular matrix (different collagens, cell adhesion (fibronectin, muscle development (myosins and melusin and signal transduction. It is therefore suggested that different proteins located or participating in the costameric region are implicated in processes regulated by calpain 3 during skeletal muscle development. Genes participating in the ubiquitin proteasome degradation pathway were found to be deregulated in LGMD2A patients, suggesting that regulation of this pathway may be under the control of calpain 3 activity. As frizzled-related protein (FRZB is upregulated in LGMD2A muscle samples, it could be hypothesized that beta-catenin regulation is also altered at the Wnt signaling pathway, leading to an incorrect myogenesis. Conversely, expression of most transcription factor genes was downregulated (MYC, FOS and EGR1. Finally, the upregulation of IL-32 and immunoglobulin genes may induce the eosinophil chemoattraction explaining the inflammatory findings observed in presymptomatic stages. The obtained results try to shed some light on identification of novel therapeutic targets for limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

  1. Clinical study of DMD gene point mutation causing Becker muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-qing CAO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  DMD gene point mutation, mainly nonsense mutation, always cause the most severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. However, we also observed some cases of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD carrying DMD point mutation. This paper aims to explore the mechanism of DMD point mutation causing BMD, in order to enhance the understanding of mutation types of BMD.  Methods  Sequence analysis was performed in 11 cases of BMD confirmed by typical clinical manifestations and muscle biopsy. The exon of DMD gene was detected non-deletion or duplication by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA.  Results  Eleven patients carried 10 mutation types without mutational hotspot. Six patients carried nonsense mutations [c.5002G>T, p.(Glu1668X; c.1615C > T, p.(Arg539X; c.7105G > T, p.(Glu2369X; c.5287C > T, p.(Arg1763X; c.9284T > G, p.(Leu3095X]. One patient carried missense mutation [c.5234G > A, p.(Arg1745His]. Two patients carried frameshift mutations (c.10231dupT, c.10491delC. Two patients carried splicing site mutations (c.4518 + 3A > T, c.649 + 2T > C.  Conclusions  DMD gene point mutation may result in BMD with mild clinical symptoms. When clinical manifestations suggest the possibility of BMD and MLPA reveals non?deletion or duplication mutation of DMD gene, BMD should be considered. Study on the mechanism of DMD point mutation causing BMD is very important for gene therapy of DMD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.06.005

  2. Automated DNA mutation detection using universal conditions direct sequencing: application to ten muscular dystrophy genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Bai-Lin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most common and efficient methods for detecting mutations in genes is PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing. Until recently, the process of designing PCR assays has been to focus on individual assay parameters rather than concentrating on matching conditions for a set of assays. Primers for each individual assay were selected based on location and sequence concerns. The two primer sequences were then iteratively adjusted to make the individual assays work properly. This generally resulted in groups of assays with different annealing temperatures that required the use of multiple thermal cyclers or multiple passes in a single thermal cycler making diagnostic testing time-consuming, laborious and expensive. These factors have severely hampered diagnostic testing services, leaving many families without an answer for the exact cause of a familial genetic disease. A search of GeneTests for sequencing analysis of the entire coding sequence for genes that are known to cause muscular dystrophies returns only a small list of laboratories that perform comprehensive gene panels. The hypothesis for the study was that a complete set of universal assays can be designed to amplify and sequence any gene or family of genes using computer aided design tools. If true, this would allow automation and optimization of the mutation detection process resulting in reduced cost and increased throughput. Results An automated process has been developed for the detection of deletions, duplications/insertions and point mutations in any gene or family of genes and has been applied to ten genes known to bear mutations that cause muscular dystrophy: DMD; CAV3; CAPN3; FKRP; TRIM32; LMNA; SGCA; SGCB; SGCG; SGCD. Using this process, mutations have been found in five DMD patients and four LGMD patients (one in the FKRP gene, one in the CAV3 gene, and two likely causative heterozygous pairs of variations in the CAPN3 gene of two other

  3. Epigenetic signature of panic disorder: a role of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) DNA hypomethylation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domschke, Katharina; Tidow, Nicola; Schrempf, Marie; Schwarte, Kathrin; Klauke, Benedikt; Reif, Andreas; Kersting, Anette; Arolt, Volker; Zwanzger, Peter; Deckert, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    Glutamate decarboxylases (GAD67/65; GAD1/GAD2) are crucially involved in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis and thus were repeatedly suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. In the present study, DNA methylation patterns in the GAD1 and GAD2 promoter and GAD1 intron 2 regions were investigated for association with panic disorder, with particular attention to possible effects of environmental factors. Sixty-five patients with panic disorder (f=44, m=21) and 65 matched healthy controls were analyzed for DNA methylation status at 38 GAD1 promoter/intron2 and 10 GAD2 promoter CpG sites via direct sequencing of sodium bisulfate treated DNA extracted from blood cells. Recent positive and negative life events were ascertained. Patients and controls were genotyped for GAD1 rs3762556, rs3791878 and rs3762555, all of which are located in the analyzed promoter region. Patients with panic disorder exhibited significantly lower average GAD1 methylation than healthy controls (p<0.001), particularly at three CpG sites in the promoter as well as in intron 2. The occurrence of negative life events was correlated with relatively decreased average methylation mainly in the female subsample (p=0.01). GAD1 SNP rs3762555 conferred a significantly lower methylation at three GAD1 intron 2 CpG sites (p<0.001). No differential methylation was observed in the GAD2 gene. The present pilot data suggest a potentially compensatory role of GAD1 gene hypomethylation in panic disorder possibly mediating the influence of negative life events and depending on genetic variation. Future studies are warranted to replicate the present finding in independent samples, preferably in a longitudinal design.

  4. Pathogenic mutations of TGFBI and CHST6 genes in Chinese patients with Avellino, lattice, and macular corneal dystrophies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-nan HUO; Yu-feng YAO; Ping YU

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate gene mutations associated with three different types of corneal dystrophies (CDs),and to establish a phenotype-genotype correlation.Methods:Two patients with Avellino corneal dystrophy (ACD),four patients with lattice corneal dystrophy type Ⅰ (LCD Ⅰ) from one family,and three patients with macular corneal dystrophy type Ⅰ (MCD Ⅰ) were subjected to both clinical and genetic examinations.Slit lamp examination was performed for all the subjects to assess their corneal phenotypes.Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes.The coding regions of the human transforming growth factor β-induced (TGFB/)gene and carbohydrate sulfotransferase 6 (CHST6) gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subjected to direct sequencing.DNA samples from 50 healthy volunteers were used as controls.Results:Clinical examination showed three different phenotypes of CDs.Genetic examination identified that two ACD subjects were associated with homozygous R124H mutation of TGFB/,and four LCD Ⅰ subjects were all associated with R124C heterozygous mutation.One MCD Ⅰ subject was associated with a novel S51X homozygous mutation in CHST6,while the other two MCD Ⅰ subjects harbored a previously reported W232X homozygous mutation.Conclusions:Our study highlights the prevalence of codon 124 mutations in the TGFB/gene among the Chinese ACD and LCD Ⅰ patients.Moreover,we found a novel mutation among MCD Ⅰ patients.

  5. Targeted knockdown of Cerkl, a retinal dystrophy gene, causes mild affectation of the retinal ganglion cell layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garanto, A.; Vicente-Tejedor, J.; Riera, M.; Villa, P. de la; Gonzalez-Duarte, R.; Blanco, R.; Marfany, G.

    2012-01-01

    In order to approach the function of the retinal dystrophy CERKL gene we generated a novel knockout mouse model by cre-mediated targeted deletion of the Cerkl first exon and proximal promoter. The excised genomic region (2.3kb) encompassed the first Cerkl exon, upstream sequences including the proxi

  6. Clinical characteristics of rod and cone photoreceptor dystrophies in patients with mutations in the C8orf37 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, R.A.C. van; Estrada-Cuzcano, A.; Banin, E.; Rotenstreich, Y.; Hipp, S.; Kohl, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Collin, R.W.J.; Klevering, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide the clinical features in patients with retinal disease caused by C8orf37 gene mutations. METHODS: Eight patients--four diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and four with cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), carrying causal C8orf37 mutations--were clinically evaluated, including

  7. Immunity and AAV-mediated gene therapy for muscular dystrophies in large animal models and human trials

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated gene replacement for the treatment of muscular dystrophy represents a promising therapeutic strategy in modern medicine. One major obstacle in using AAV vectors for in vivo gene delivery is the development of host immune responses to the viral capsid protein and transgene products as evidenced in animal models and human trials for a range of genetic diseases. Here, we review immunity against AAV vector and transgene in the context of gene delivery ...

  8. Becker muscular dystrophy in Indian patients: Analysis of dystrophin gene deletion patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastur Rashna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene with variable phenotypes. Becker muscular dystrophy patients have low levels of nearly full-length dystrophin and carry in-frame mutations, which allow partial functioning of the protein. Aim: To study the deletion patterns of BMD and to correlate the same with reading frame rule and different phenotypes. Setting: A tertiary care teaching hospital. Design: This is a prospective hospital-based study. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two exons spanning different "hot spot" regions using Multiplex PCR techniques were studied in 347 patients. Two hundred and twenty-two showed deletions in one or more of the 32 exons. Out of these, 46 diagnosed as BMD patients were analyzed. Results: Forty-six BMD patients showed deletions in both regions of the dystrophin gene. Out of these 89.1% (41/46 were in-frame deletions. Deletions starting with Exon 45 were found in 76.1% (35/46 of the cases. Mutations in the majority of cases i.e. 39/46 (84.8% were seen in 3′ downstream region (Exon 45-55, distal rod domain. Few, i.e. 5/46 (10.8% showed deletions in 5′ upstream region (Exons 3-20, N-terminus and proximal rod domain of the gene, while in 2/46 (4.4% large mutations (>40 bp spanning both regions (Exons 3-55 were detected. Conclusion: This significant gene deletion analysis has been carried out for BMD patients particularly from Western India using 32 exons.

  9. Immunity and AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophies in Large Animal Models and Human Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zejing; Tapscott, Stephen J; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Storb, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated gene replacement for the treatment of muscular dystrophy represents a promising therapeutic strategy in modern medicine. One major obstacle in using AAV vectors for in vivo gene delivery is the development of host immune responses to the viral capsid protein and transgene products as evidenced in animal models and human trials for a range of genetic diseases. Here, we review immunity against AAV vector and transgene in the context of gene delivery specific to muscles for treating muscular dystrophies and non-muscle diseases in large animal models and human trials, factors that influence the intensity of the immune responses, and immune modulatory strategies to prevent unwanted immune responses and induce tolerance to the vector and therapeutic gene for a successful gene therapy.

  10. Emerging gene editing strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy targeting stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eBertoni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The progressive loss of muscle mass characteristic of many muscular dystrophies impairs the efficacy of most of the gene and molecular therapies currently being pursued for the treatment of those disorders. It is becoming increasingly evident that a therapeutic application, to be effective, needs to target not only mature myofibers, but also muscle progenitors cells or muscle stem cells able to form new muscle tissue and to restore myofibers lost as the result of the diseases or during normal homeostasis so as to guarantee effective and lost lasting effects. Correction of the genetic defect using oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs or engineered nucleases holds great potential for the treatment of many of the musculoskeletal disorders. The encouraging results obtained by studying in vitro systems and model organisms have set the groundwork for what is likely to become an emerging field in the area of molecular and regenerative medicine. Furthermore, the ability to isolate and expand from patients various types of muscle progenitor cells capable of committing to the myogenic lineage provides the opportunity to establish cell lines that can be used for transplantation following ex vivo manipulation and expansion.The purpose of this article is to provide a perspective on approaches aimed at correcting the genetic defect using gene editing strategies and currently under development for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, the most sever of the neuromuscular disorders. Emphasis will be placed on describing the potential of using the patient own stem cell as source of transplantation and the challenges that gene editing technologies face in the field of regenerative biology.

  11. Intellectual Ability in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Dystrophin Gene Mutation Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasic Milic V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common form of muscular dystrophy during childhood. Mutations in dystrophin (DMD gene are also recognized as a cause of cognitive impairment. We aimed to determine the association between intelligence level and mutation location in DMD genes in Serbian patients with DMD. Forty-one male patients with DMD, aged 3 to 16 years, were recruited at the Clinic for Neurology and Psychiatry for Children and Youth in Belgrade, Serbia. All patients had defined DMD gene deletions or duplications [multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification (MLPA, polymerase chain reaction (PCR] and cognitive status assessment (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Brunet-Lezine scale, Vineland-Doll scale. In 37 patients with an estimated full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ, six (16.22% had borderline intelligence (70

  12. Entire CAPN3 gene deletion in a patient with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaka, Oihane; Azpitarte, Margarita; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro; Zulaika, Miren; Casas-Fraile, Leire; Sanz, Raúl; Trevisiol, Nathalie; Levy, Nicolas; Bartoli, Marc; Krahn, Martin; López de Munain, Adolfo; Sáenz, Amets

    2014-09-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) due to mutations in the CAPN3 gene is one of the most common of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. We describe a patient who had a typical LGMD2A phenotype and posterior compartment involvement on MRI. Different genetic analyses were performed, including microarray analysis. There was an apparently homozygous mutation in exon 24, c.2465G>T, p.(*822Leuext62*), and a lack of correlation in the disease segregation analyses. This suggested the presence of a genomic rearrangement. In fact, a heterozygous deletion of the entire CAPN3 gene was found. This novel deletion comprised the terminal region of the GANC gene and the entire CAPN3 gene. This finding points out the need to reconsider and adapt our current strategy of molecular diagnosis in order to detect these types of genomic rearrangements that escape standard mutation screening procedures.

  13. Dominant cone-rod dystrophy: a mouse model generated by gene targeting of the GCAP1/Guca1a gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateek K Buch

    Full Text Available Cone dystrophy 3 (COD3 is a severe dominantly inherited retinal degeneration caused by missense mutations in GUCA1A, the gene encoding Guanylate Cyclase Activating Protein 1 (GCAP1. The role of GCAP1 in controlling cyclic nucleotide levels in photoreceptors has largely been elucidated using knock-out mice, but the disease pathology in these mice cannot be extrapolated directly to COD3 as this involves altered, rather than loss of, GCAP1 function. Therefore, in order to evaluate the pathology of this dominant disorder, we have introduced a point mutation into the murine Guca1a gene that causes an E155G amino acid substitution; this is one of the disease-causing mutations found in COD3 patients. Disease progression in this novel mouse model of cone dystrophy was determined by a variety of techniques including electroretinography (ERG, retinal histology, immunohistochemistry and measurement of cGMP levels. It was established that although retinal development was normal up to 3 months of age, there was a subsequent progressive decline in retinal function, with a far greater alteration in cone than rod responses, associated with a corresponding loss of photoreceptors. In addition, we have demonstrated that accumulation of cyclic GMP precedes the observed retinal degeneration and is likely to contribute to the disease mechanism. Importantly, this knock-in mutant mouse has many features in common with the human disease, thereby making it an excellent model to further probe disease pathogenesis and investigate therapeutic interventions.

  14. A missense mutation in the dystrophin gene in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Burghes, A H; Bartolo, C; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Mendell, J R

    1993-08-01

    About two thirds of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients have either gene deletions or duplications. The other DMD cases are most likely the result of point mutations that cannot be easily identified by current strategies. Utilizing a heteroduplex technique and direct sequencing of amplified products, we screened our nondeletion/duplication DMD population for point mutations. We now describe what we believe to be the first dystrophin missense mutation in a DMD patient. The mutation results in the substitution of an evolutionarily conserved leucine to arginine in the actin-binding domain. The patient makes a dystrophin protein which is properly localized and is present at a higher level than is observed in DMD patients. This suggests that an intact actin-binding domain is necessary for protein stability and essential for function.

  15. The myotonic dystrophy kinase 3{prime}-untranslated region and its effect on gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, C.W.Y.; Sabourin, L.A.; Narang, M.A. [Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease involving the expansion of an unstable CTG repeat in the 3{prime}-untranslated (3{prime}-UTR) region of the DM kinase (DMK) gene. Increased levels of mRNA in congenital compared to normal tissue have been shown, suggesting elevated DMK levels may be responsible for the disease phenotype. To study the effect of the DMK 3{prime}UTR on gene expression, a reporter gene system was constructed using the constitutive CMV promoter with the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) open reading frame and the DMK 3{prime}UTR containing from 5 repeats up to 90 repeats. Transient transfection into a rhabdomyosarcoma cell line shows a three-fold increase in CAT activity from constructs containing a wildtype 3{prime}UTR (5 and 20 repeats) compared to a control construct containing only a poly(A) signal. Reporter constructs with repeats in the protomutation (50 repeats) and mutation (90 repeats) range show a greater than 10-fold increase over control CAT activity. These results suggest the presence of elements in the DMK 3{prime}UTR capable of conferring increased gene expression. We are currently investigating cell-specific activity of the constructs and conducting deletion mapping to identify regulatory elements in the 3{prime}-UTR.

  16. Gene therapies that restore dystrophin expression for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Hamm, Jacqueline N; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common inherited genetic diseases and is caused by mutations to the DMD gene that encodes the dystrophin protein. Recent advances in genome editing and gene therapy offer hope for the development of potential therapeutics. Truncated versions of the DMD gene can be delivered to the affected tissues with viral vectors and show promising results in a variety of animal models. Genome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been used to restore dystrophin expression by deleting one or more exons of the DMD gene in patient cells and in a mouse model that led to functional improvement of muscle strength. Exon skipping with oligonucleotides has been successful in several animal models and evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Next-generation oligonucleotide formulations offer significant promise to build on these results. All these approaches to restoring dystrophin expression are encouraging, but many hurdles remain. This review summarizes the current state of these technologies and summarizes considerations for their future development.

  17. Gene correction of a duchenne muscular dystrophy mutation by meganuclease-enhanced exon knock-in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popplewell, Linda; Koo, Taeyoung; Leclerc, Xavier; Duclert, Aymeric; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Gouble, Agnés; Mouly, Vincent; Voit, Thomas; Pâques, Frédéric; Cédrone, Frédéric; Isman, Olga; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J; Dickson, George

    2013-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe inherited, muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Gene therapy development for DMD has concentrated on vector-based DMD minigene transfer, cell-based gene therapy using genetically modified adult muscle stem cells or healthy wild-type donor cells, and antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon-skipping therapy to restore the reading frame of the mutated DMD gene. This study is an investigation into DMD gene targeting-mediated correction of deletions in human patient myoblasts using a target-specific meganuclease (MN) and a homologous recombination repair matrix. The MN was designed to cleave within DMD intron 44, upstream of a deletion hotspot, and integration-competent lentiviral vectors expressing the nuclease (LVcMN) were generated. MN western blotting and deep gene sequencing for LVcMN-induced non-homologous end-joining InDels (microdeletions or microinsertions) confirmed efficient MN expression and activity in transduced DMD myoblasts. A homologous repair matrix carrying exons 45-52 (RM45-52) was designed and packaged into integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs; LVdRM45-52). After cotransduction of DMD myoblasts harboring a deletion of exons 45 to 52 with LVcMN and LVdRM45-52 vectors, targeted knock-in of the RM45-52 region in the correct location in DMD intron 44, and expression of full-length, correctly spliced wild-type dystrophin mRNA containing exons 45-52 were observed. This work demonstrates that genome surgery on human DMD gene mutations can be achieved by MN-induced locus-specific genome cleavage and homologous recombination knock-in of deleted exons. The feasibility of human DMD gene repair in patient myoblasts has exciting therapeutic potential.

  18. Screening for Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Executive Director's Corner Resources Public Screening for Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) If you suspect that you might suffer from generalized anxiety disorder, also known as GAD, answer the questions below, ...

  19. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goknur Haliloglu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenitalmuscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in theWestern world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagenVI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may beoverlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There hasbeen some radical efforts for cure especially through the apoptosis cascades.Key words: Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, collgen VI genes, Bethlemmyopathy, autophagy.

  20. Are all the previously reported genetic variants in limb girdle muscular dystrophy genes pathogenic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Garofalo, Arcomaria; Mutarelli, Margherita; Savarese, Marco; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of variants in autosomal genes associated with the limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) have been reported as being causative. However, in most cases the proof of pathogenicity derives from their non-occurrence in hundreds of healthy controls and/or from segregation studies in small families. The limited statistics of the genetic variations in the general population may hamper a correct interpretation of the effect of variants on the protein. To clarify the meaning of low-frequency variants in LGMD genes, we have selected all variants described as causative in the Leiden Open Variation Database and the Human Gene Mutation Database. We have systematically searched for their frequency in the NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) and in our internal database. Surprisingly, the ESP contains about 4% of the variants previously associated with a dominant inheritance and about 9% of those associated with a recessive inheritance. The putative disease alleles are much more frequent than those estimated considering the disease prevalence. In conclusion, we hypothesize that a number of disease-associated variants are non-pathogenic and that other variations are not fully penetrant, even if they affect the protein function, suggesting a more complex genetic mechanisms for such heterogeneous disorders.

  1. [Relationship between gene mutations and intelligence in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Bo; Ma, Hong-Wei; Wang, Lin; Tian, Xiao-Bo; Hu, Man; Ren, Shuang; Tan, Ying-Hua

    2011-10-01

    To study the level of intelligence in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and the relationship between the level of intelligence and gene mutations. One hundred and two children with DMD between January 2009 and March 2011 were enrolled. DMD gene detection was performed through the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) in 84 cases. The level and the structure of intelligence were evaluated by Chinese Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (C-WISC) in 50 children with DMD (≥6 years old; DMD group) and in 50 age-and gender-matched healthy children (control group). The average intelligence quotient (IQ) was 84±21 in 102 children with DMD. Thirty patients (29.4%) had the full intelligence quotient (FIQ) less than 70. The FIQ, verbal intelligence quotient (VIQ), performance intelligence quotient (PIQ) and the scores of 11 sub-tests of intelligence in the DMD group were significantly lower than those in the control group (Pchildren with DMD are lower than those in healthy children. There is association between mental retardation and gene mutations.

  2. GAD2 Alternative Transcripts in the Human Prefrontal Cortex, and in Schizophrenia and Affective Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasey N Davis

    Full Text Available Genetic variation and early adverse environmental events work together to increase risk for schizophrenia. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in adult mammalian brain, plays a major role in normal brain development, and has been strongly implicated in the pathobiology of schizophrenia. GABA synthesis is controlled by two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD genes, GAD1 and GAD2, both of which produce a number of alternative transcripts. Genetic variants in the GAD1 gene are associated with increased risk for schizophrenia, and reduced expression of its major transcript in the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. No consistent changes in GAD2 expression have been found in brains from patients with schizophrenia. In this work, with the use of RNA sequencing and PCR technologies, we confirmed and tracked the expression of an alternative truncated transcript of GAD2 (ENST00000428517 in human control DLPFC homogenates across lifespan besides the well-known full length transcript of GAD2. In addition, using quantitative RT-PCR, expression of GAD2 full length and truncated transcripts were measured in the DLPFC of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. The expression of GAD2 full length transcript is decreased in the DLPFC of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients, while GAD2 truncated transcript is increased in bipolar disorder patients but decreased in schizophrenia patients. Moreover, the patients with schizophrenia with completed suicide or positive nicotine exposure showed significantly higher expression of GAD2 full length transcript. Alternative transcripts of GAD2 may be important in the growth and development of GABA-synthesizing neurons as well as abnormal GABA signaling in the DLPFC of patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders.

  3. Myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Charles A

    2014-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (dystrophia myotonica, DM) is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders in populations of European descent. DM type 1 was first described over a century ago. More recently, a second form of the disease, DM type 2 was recognized, which results from repeat expansion in a different gene. Both disorders have autosomal dominant inheritance and multisystem features, including myotonic myopathy, cataract, and cardiac conduction disease. This article reviews the clinical presentation and pathophysiology of DM and discusses current management and future potential for developing targeted therapies.

  4. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices The Search for a Cure en español Distrofia muscular About MD Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a genetic ... muscles and cause different degrees of muscle weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and the most ...

  5. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices The Search for a Cure en español Distrofia muscular About MD Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a ... muscles and cause different degrees of muscle weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and the ...

  6. A different spectrum of DMD gene mutations in local Chinese patients with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ivan Fai-man Lo; Kent Keung-san Lai; Tony Ming-for Tong; Stephen Tak-sum Lam

    2006-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are X-linked recessive, allelic disorders. This study was conducted to look into the spectrum of DMD gene mutations in Hong Kong Chinese patients with Duchenne or Becket muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD), and to study genotype-phenotype correlation.Methods A retrospective review of 67 patients.Results Twenty-three (34.3%) patients had exon deletions; whereas 5 (7.5%) patients had exon duplications.Twenty-three (34.3%) patients had small mutations, including 17-point mutations and 6 small insertions or deletions. No correlation was found between the type of mutation and the muscle phenotype or mental retardation.Significantly fewer maternal carriers were found in patients with exon deletions, and a positive family history was more common in those with small mutations. DMD phenotype was significantly less common in patients with exon deletions/duplications at the 5' hotspot, whereas all 4 small mutations associated with mental retardation were located in the 3' end of the gene.Conclusions The percentage of DMD exon deletions in local Chinese patients was significantly lower than the commonly quoted 60%. This indicated an ethnic or regional difference in predisposition to DMD exon deletions.

  7. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenitalmuscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in theWestern world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagenVI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may beoverlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There hasbeen some radical efforts for cure espe...

  8. Defective Regulation of MicroRNA Target Genes in Myoblasts from Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy Patients*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Petr; Stankevicins, Luiza; Ansseau, Eugenie; Petrov, Andrei; Barat, Ana; Dessen, Philippe; Robert, Thomas; Turki, Ahmed; Lazar, Vladimir; Labourer, Emmanuel; Belayew, Alexandra; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S.

    2013-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant hereditary neuromuscular disorder linked to the deletion of an integral number of 3.3-kb-long macrosatellite repeats (D4Z4) within the subtelomeric region of chromosome 4q. Most genes identified in this region are overexpressed in FSHD myoblasts, including the double homeobox genes DUX4 and DUX4c. We have carried out a simultaneous miRNome/transcriptome analysis of FSHD and control primary myoblasts. Of 365 microRNAs (miRNAs) analyzed in this study, 29 were found to be differentially expressed between FSHD and normal myoblasts. Twenty-one microRNAs (miR-1, miR-7, miR-15a, miR-22, miR-30e, miR-32, miR-107, miR-133a, miR-133b, miR-139, miR-152, miR-206, miR-223, miR-302b, miR-331, miR-362, miR-365, miR-382, miR-496, miR-532, miR-654, and miR-660) were up-regulated, and eight were down-regulated (miR-15b, miR-20b, miR-21, miR-25, miR-100, miR-155, miR-345, and miR-594). Twelve of the miRNAs up-regulated in FHSD were also up-regulated in the cells ectopically expressing DUX4c, suggesting that this gene could regulate miRNA gene transcription. The myogenic miRNAs miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-206 were highly expressed in FSHD myoblasts, which nonetheless did not prematurely enter myogenic differentiation. This could be accounted for by the fact that in FSHD myoblasts, functionally important target genes, including cell cycle, DNA damage, and ubiquitination-related genes, escape myogenic microRNA-induced repression. PMID:24145033

  9. High diversity in the TCR repertoire of GAD65 autoantigen-specific human CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Anne; Lindner, Annett; Catani, Mara; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; Dahl, Andreas; Klemroth, Sylvia; Kühn, Denise; Dietz, Sevina; Bickle, Marc; Ziegler, Anette-Gabrielle; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2015-03-15

    Autoreactive CD4(+) T cells are an essential feature of type 1 diabetes mellitus. We applied single-cell TCR α- and β-chain sequencing to peripheral blood GAD65-specific CD4(+) T cells, and TCR α-chain next-generation sequencing to bulk memory CD4(+) T cells to provide insight into TCR diversity in autoimmune diabetes mellitus. TCRs obtained for 1650 GAD65-specific CD4(+) T cells isolated from GAD65 proliferation assays and/or GAD65 557I tetramer staining in 6 patients and 10 islet autoantibody-positive children showed large diversity with 1003 different TCRs identified. TRAV and TRBV gene usage was broad, and the TRBV5.1 gene was most prominent within the GAD65 557I tetramer(+) cells. Limited overlap (<5%) was observed between TCRs of GAD65-proliferating and GAD65 557I tetramer(+) CD4(+) T cells. Few TCRs were repeatedly found in GAD65-specific cells at different time points from individual patients, and none was seen in more than one subject. However, single chains were often shared between patients and used in combination with different second chains. Next-generation sequencing revealed a wide frequency range (<0.00001-1.62%) of TCR α-chains corresponding to GAD65-specific T cells. The findings support minor selection of genes and TCRs for GAD65-specific T cells, but fail to provide strong support for TCR-targeted therapies. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Polymorphisms of the Homologous Recombination Gene RAD51 in Keratoconus and Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Synowiec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We investigated the association between genotypes and haplotypes of the c.-61G>T (rs 1801320 and c.-98G>C (rs 1801321 polymorphisms of the RAD51 gene and the occurrence of keratoconus (KC and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD in dependence on some environmental factors. Methods. The polymorphisms were genotyped in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 100 KC and 100 FECD patients as well as 150 controls with PCR-RFLP. Results. The G/T genotype of the c.-61G>T polymorphism was associated with significantly increased frequency occurrence of KC (crude OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.75–5.13. On the other hand, the G/G genotype of this polymorphism was positively correlated with a decreased occurrence of this disease (crude OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.31–0.88. We did not find any correlation between genotypes/alleles of the c.-98G>C polymorphism and the occurrence of KC. We also found that the G/G genotype and G allele of the c.-98G>C polymorphism had a protective effect against FECD (crude OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.28–0.92; crude OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.30–0.92, resp., while the G/C genotype and the C allele increased FECD occurrence (crude OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.01–3.36; crude OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.09–3.29, resp.. Conclusions. The c.-61T/T and c.-98G>C polymorphisms of the RAD51 gene may have a role in the KC and FECD pathogenesis and can be considered as markers in these diseases.

  11. Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dystrophy > Facts About Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy Facts About Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy This information was developed by the ... is the best person to answer specific questions. Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy Defined What is Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy? ...

  12. GAD67 deficiency in parvalbumin interneurons produces deficits in inhibitory transmission and network disinhibition in mouse prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Matthew S; Krishnan, Keerthi; Huang, Z Josh

    2015-05-01

    In mammalian neocortex, the delicate balance of neural circuits is regulated by a rich repertoire of inhibitory control mechanisms mediated by diverse classes of GABAergic interneurons. A key step common to all GABAergic neurons is the synthesis of GABA, catalyzed by 2 isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylases (GAD). Among these, GAD67 is the rate-limiting enzyme. GAD67 level is regulated by neural activity and is altered in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. The significance of altered GAD67 levels on inhibitory transmission, however, remains unclear. The presence of GAD65, postsynaptic GABA receptor regulation, and the diversity of cortical interneurons make the link from GAD67 levels to GABA transmission less than straightforward. Here, we selectively removed one allele of the GAD67 gene, Gad1, in PV interneurons in juvenile mice. We found substantial deficits in transmission from PV to pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortex, along with increases of pyramidal cell excitability and excitation/inhibition balance in PV cells. Synaptic deficits recovered in adult mice, suggesting engagement of homeostatic and compensatory mechanisms. These results demonstrate that GAD67 levels directly influence synaptic inhibition. Thus, GAD67 deficiency in PV cells likely contributes to cortical dysfunction in disease states; the reversibility of synaptic deficits suggests nonpermanent damage to inhibitory circuitry.

  13. An intronic deletion in the PROM1 gene leads to autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidinger, Osnat; Leibu, Rina; Newman, Hadas; Rizel, Leah; Perlman, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genetic basis for autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) in a consanguineous Israeli Jewish family. Methods Patients underwent a detailed ophthalmic evaluation, including eye examination, visual field testing, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and electrophysiological tests, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was performed to identify homozygous regions shared among two of the affected individuals. Mutation screening of the underlying gene was performed with direct sequencing. In silico and in vitro analyses were used to predict the effect of the identified mutation on splicing. Results The affected family members are three siblings who have various degrees of progressive visual deterioration, glare, color vision abnormalities, and night vision difficulties. Visual field tests revealed central scotomas of different extension. Cone and rod ERG responses were reduced, with cones more severely affected. Homozygosity mapping revealed several homozygous intervals shared among two of the affected individuals. One included the PROM1 gene. Sequence analysis of the 26 coding exons of PROM1 in one affected individual revealed no mutations in the coding sequence or in intronic splice sites. However, in intron 21, proximate to the intron–exon junction, we observed a homozygous 10 bp deletion between positions −26 and −17 (c.2281–26_-17del). The deletion was linked to a known SNP, c.2281–6C>G. The deletion cosegregated with the disease in the family, and was not detected in public databases or in 101 ethnically-matched control individuals. In silico analysis predicted that this deletion would lead to altered intron 21 splicing. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that a recognition site for the SRSF2 splicing factor is located within the deleted sequence. The in vitro splicing assay demonstrated that c.2281–26_-17del leads to

  14. Dystrophin gene mutation location and the risk of cognitive impairment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, P.J.; Betts, G.A.; Maroulis, S.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Pedersen, R.L.; Mowat, D.R.; Johnston, H.M.; Buckley, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A significant component of the variation in cognitive disability that is observed in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is known to be under genetic regulation. In this study we report correlations between standardised measures of intelligence and mutational class, mutation size, mutation

  15. Lighting a candle in the dark: advances in genetics and gene therapy of recessive retinal dystrophies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, A.I. den; Black, A.; Bennett, J.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Nonsyndromic recessive retinal dystrophies cause severe visual impairment due to the death of photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium cells. These diseases until recently have been considered to be incurable. Molecular genetic studies in the last two decades have revealed the underlying molecul

  16. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A resulting from homozygous G2338C transversion mutation in the calpain-3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Surgan, Victoria; Grewal, Raji P

    2010-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy represents a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of myopathies. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Type 2A, which is transmitted in an autosomal-recessive pattern, is caused by mutations in the calpain-3 (CAPN3) gene. A number of mutations have been reported in patients from throughout the world but not in the Asian-Indian population. We describe a genotype/phenotype analysis of an Asian-Indian patient with a history, neurologic examination, and investigations consistent with muscular dystrophy. Genetic analysis of this patient showed a homozygous G2338C transversion resulting in an amino acid change from aspartic acid 780 histidine in the CAPN3 gene confirming Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Type 2A. Subsequent testing of the patient's family revealed that his parents and sister were heterozygous unaffected carriers. The G2338C transversion was detected as a compound heterozygous mutation in one patient in Germany. We report a homozygous case and expand the clinical spectrum of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Type 2A to include Asian-Indians.

  17. A Case of Transforming Growth Factor-β-Induced Gene-Related Oculorenal Syndrome: Granular Corneal Dystrophy Type II with a Unique Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Oyama, Yuko; Nozu, Kandai; Iijima, Kazumoto; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    Many types of inherited renal diseases have ocular features that occasionally support a diagnosis. The following study describes an unusual example of a 40-year-old woman with granular corneal dystrophy type II complicated by renal involvement. These two conditions may coincidentally coexist; however, there are some reports that demonstrate an association between renal involvement and granular corneal dystrophy type II. Granular corneal dystrophy type II is caused by a mutation in the transforming growth factor-β-induced (TGFBI) gene. The patient was referred to us because of the presence of mild proteinuria without hematuria that was subsequently suggested to be granular corneal dystrophy type II. A kidney biopsy revealed various glomerular and tubular basement membrane changes and widening of the subendothelial space of the glomerular basement membrane by electron microscopy. However, next-generation sequencing revealed that she had no mutation in a gene that is known to be associated with monogenic kidney diseases. Conversely, real-time polymerase chain reaction, using a simple buccal swab, revealed TGFBI heteromutation (R124H). The TGFBI protein plays an important role in cell-collagen signaling interactions, including extracellular matrix proteins which compose the renal basement membrane. This mutation can present not only as corneal dystrophy but also as renal disease. TGFBI-related oculorenal syndrome may have been unrecognized. It is difficult to diagnose this condition without renal electron microscopic studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detailed report of nephropathy associated with a TGFBI mutation.

  18. Genome-wide linkage and sequence analysis challenge CCDC66 as a human retinal dystrophy candidate gene and support a distinct NMNAT1-related fundus phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A O; Budde, B S; Nürnberg, P; Kawalia, A; Lenzner, S; Bolz, H J

    2017-03-30

    To uncover the genotype underlying early-onset cone-rod dystrophy and central nummular macular atrophic lesion in 2 siblings from an endogamous Arab family, we performed targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 44 retinal dystrophy genes, whole-exome sequencing (WES) and genome-wide linkage analysis. Targeted NGS and WES in the index patient highlighted 2 homozygous variants, a CCDC66 frameshift deletion and a novel missense NMNAT1 variant, c.500G>A (p.Asn167Ser). Linkage and segregation analysis excluded the CCDC66 variant and confirmed the NMNAT1 mutation. Biallelic NMNAT1 mutations cause Leber congenital amaurosis with a central nummular macular atrophic lesion (LCA9). The NMNAT1 mutation reported here underlied cone-rod dystrophy rather than LCA but the fundus lesion was compatible with that of LCA9 patients, highlighting that such a fundus appearance should raise suspicion for biallelic mutations in NMNAT1 when in the context of any retinal dystrophy. Although Ccdc66 mutations have been proposed to cause retinal disease in dogs, our results and public databases challenge CCDC66 as a candidate gene for human retinal dystrophy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Myotonia congenita and myotonic dystrophy in the same family: coexistence of a CLCN1 mutation and expansion in the CNBP (ZNF9) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, C; Van Ghelue, M; Tranebjaerg, L

    2010-01-01

    Sun C, Van Ghelue M, Tranebjaerg L, Thyssen F, Nilssen Ø, Torbergsen T. Myotonia congenita and myotonic dystrophy in the same family: coexistence of a CLCN1 mutation and expansion in the CNBP (ZNF9) gene. Myotonia is characterized by hyperexcitability of the muscle cell membrane. Myotonic disorders...... according to additional clinical features or/and underlying genetic defects. However, the phenotypes and the pathological mechanisms of these myotonic disorders are still not entirely understood. Currently, four genes are identified to be involved in myotonia: the muscle voltage-gated sodium and chloride...... channel genes SCN4A and CLCN1, the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) gene, and the CCHC-type zinc finger, nucleic acid binding protein gene CNBP. Additional gene(s) and/or modifying factor(s) remain to be identified. In this study, we investigated a large Norwegian family with clinically different...

  20. Deletion analysis of the dystrophin gene in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients: Use in carrier diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari D

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The dystrophin gene was analyzed in 8 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and 10 Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD unrelated families (22 subjects: 18 index cases and 4 sibs for the presence of deletions by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR; 27 exons and Southern hybridization using 8 cDMD probes. Deletions were identified in 5 DMD and 7 BMD patients (6 index cases and 1 sib. The concordance between the clinical phenotype and 'reading frame hypothesis' was observed in 11/12 patients (92%. The female relatives of DMD/BMD patients with identifiable deletions were examined by quantitative mPCR. Carriers were identified in 7 families. We also describe a variation in the HindIII pattern with cDNA probe 8 and 11-14. Molecular characterization of the dystrophin gene in this study has been helpful in advising the patients concerning the inheritance of the condition, and carrier diagnosis of female relatives, and should also prove useful for prenatal diagnosis.

  1. Differential expression of genes involved in the degeneration and regeneration pathways in mouse models for muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofre-Oliveira, P C G; Santos, A L F; Martins, P M; Ayub-Guerrieri, D; Vainzof, M

    2012-03-01

    The genetically determined muscular dystrophies are caused by mutations in genes coding for muscle proteins. Differences in the phenotypes are mainly the age of onset and velocity of progression. Muscle weakness is the consequence of myofiber degeneration due to an imbalance between successive cycles of degeneration/regeneration. While muscle fibers are lost, a replacement of the degraded muscle fibers by adipose and connective tissues occurs. Major investigation points are to elicit the involved pathophysiological mechanisms to elucidate how each mutation can lead to a specific degenerative process and how the regeneration is stimulated in each case. To answer these questions, we used four mouse models with different mutations causing muscular dystrophies, Dmd (mdx), SJL/J, Large (myd) and Lama2 (dy2J) /J, and compared the histological changes of regeneration and fibrosis to the expression of genes involved in those processes. For regeneration, the MyoD, Myf5 and myogenin genes related to the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells were studied, while for degeneration, the TGF-β1 and Pro-collagen 1α2 genes, involved in the fibrotic cascade, were analyzed. The result suggests that TGF-β1 gene is activated in the dystrophic process in all the stages of degeneration, while the activation of the expression of the pro-collagen gene possibly occurs in mildest stages of this process. We also observed that each pathophysiological mechanism acted differently in the activation of regeneration, with distinctions in the induction of proliferation of satellite cells, but with no alterations in stimulation to differentiation. Dysfunction of satellite cells can, therefore, be an important additional mechanism of pathogenesis in the dystrophic muscle.

  2. Muscle diseases: the muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Pytel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Dystrophic muscle disease can occur at any age. Early- or childhood-onset muscular dystrophies may be associated with profound loss of muscle function, affecting ambulation, posture, and cardiac and respiratory function. Late-onset muscular dystrophies or myopathies may be mild and associated with slight weakness and an inability to increase muscle mass. The phenotype of muscular dystrophy is an endpoint that arises from a diverse set of genetic pathways. Genes associated with muscular dystrophies encode proteins of the plasma membrane and extracellular matrix, and the sarcomere and Z band, as well as nuclear membrane components. Because muscle has such distinctive structural and regenerative properties, many of the genes implicated in these disorders target pathways unique to muscle or more highly expressed in muscle. This chapter reviews the basic structural properties of muscle and genetic mechanisms that lead to myopathy and muscular dystrophies that affect all age groups.

  3. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscular dystrophy. It's important to be vaccinated for pneumonia and to keep up to date with influenza shots. Dietary changes haven't been shown to slow the progression of muscular dystrophy. But proper nutrition is essential because limited mobility can contribute to ...

  4. More deletions in the 5{prime} region than in the central region of the dystrophin gene were identified among Filipino Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-06

    This report describes mutations in the dystrophin gene and the frequency of these mutations in Filipino pedigrees with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD). The findings suggest the presence of genetic variability among DMD/BMD patients in different populations. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  5. CDH3 gene related hypotrichosis and juvenile macular dystrophy – A case with a novel mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Karti

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions and importance: This case of HJMD was related to a novel homozygous mutation, termed c.447_467del (p.149_156del. These findings have significance for the future mutational analysis and genetic counseling of families with HJMD, particularly in our region. The presence of sparse hair in childhood, with or without limb anomalies, should alert clinicians to request an eye consultation. Pediatricians, dermatologists, and ophthalmologists should be aware of the rarely seen entity of juvenile macular dystrophy with hypotrichosis.

  6. Germinal mosaicism in a sample of families with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy with partial deletions in the DMD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-López, Cesárea; García-de Teresa, Benilde; González-del Angel, Ariadna; Alcántara-Ortigoza, Miguel Angel

    2014-02-01

    Germinal mosaicism should be considered when estimating the recurrence risk in families with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (D/BMD). Germinal mosaicism, however, has not been assessed in Mexican families with deletions in the DMD gene. To determine the distribution of deletions in the two hot spots and the proportion of de novo and transmitted deletions, we analyzed 153 individuals with D/BMD and a DMD partial deletion and 322 of their maternal female relatives. Predilection for the distal hot spot was observed in 112 families (73%), while gene dosage analysis of female relatives of D/BMD patients identified germinal mosaicism deletions in at least 11.6% of the patients' families, thought to result from de novo mutations. Recurrence risk due to germinal mosaicism justifies carrier detection in maternal female relatives and prenatal diagnosis in mothers of individuals with apparently de novo DMD deletions.

  7. Convergent myotonic dystrophy (DM) haplotypes on 19q13.3: Potential inconsistencies in human disease gene localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsilfidis, C. [Eye Research Institute of Canada, Toronto (Canada); Whiting, E.J. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada); Korneluk, R.G. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada)]|[Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease which has been shown to be caused by an unstable trinucleotide repeat located on chromosome 19q. We have conducted extensive haplotype analysis on 103 DM chromosome using thirteen 19q13.3 loci identifying 18 RFLPs, spanning a physical distance of 1.3 Mb containing the myotonic dystrophy gene. Three major haplotypes, H1, H2 and H3, comprising 45.6% of the DM chromosomes, were observed in our population. The later two haplotypes, observed exclusively on DM chromosomes of French Canadian origin, contain a 500 kb core region that is identical. The low frequency of this core on normal chromosomes (0.8%) is consistent with a mapping of the DM gene within this region. However, the DM mutation is found 160 kb distal to the point of divergence between these two haplotypes. In contrast, the 450 kb shared by haplotypes H1 and H2 contain the DM mutation. Further, analysis of the DM region using a polymorphic microsatellite GJ-VSSM2 located 15 kb telomeric to the DM gene revealed strong allelic association of allele V on DM chromosomes (present on 6% of normal and 88.2% of DM chromosomes). The fact that allele V was found on all DM chromosomes with the three major haplotypes is indicative of their common origin and includes the two French Canadian haplotypes which share a region proximal to the DM mutation. This analysis indicates that convergent haplotypes, in the absence of a more extensive linkage disequilibrium analysis, may lead to a spurious disease gene localization.

  8. CTG repeats distribution and Alu insertion polymorphism at myotonic dystrophy (DM) gene in Amhara and Oromo populations of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennarelli, M; Pavoni, M; Cruciani, F; De Stefano, G; Dallapiccola, B; Novelli, G

    1999-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a dominantly inherited neuromuscular disease, highly variable and multisystemic, which is caused by the expansion of a CTG repeat located in the 3' untranslated region of the DMPK gene. Normal alleles show a copy number of 5-37 repeats on normal chromosomes, amplified to 50-3000 copies on DM chromosomes. The trinucleotide repeat shows a trimodal allele distribution in the majority of the examined population. The first class includes alleles carrying (CTG)5, the second class, alleles in the range 7-18 repeats, and the third class, alleles (CTG) > or =19. The frequency of this third class is directly related to the prevalence of DM in different populations, suggesting that normal large-sized alleles predispose toward DM. We studied CTG repeat allele distribution and Alu insertion and/or deletion polymorphism at the myotonic dystrophy locus in two major Ethiopian populations, the Amhara and Oromo. CTG allele distribution and haplotype analysis on a total of 224 normal chromosomes showed significant differences between the two ethnic groups. These differences have a bearing on the out-of-Africa hypothesis for the origin of the DM mutation. In addition, (CTG) > or =19 were exclusively detected in the Amhara population, confirming the predisposing role of these alleles compared with the DM expansion-mutation.

  9. Gene changes in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Comparison of multiplex PCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohli Sudha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a common X-linked recessive neuromuscular disorder, affecting 1 in 3,500 live male births. About 65% of cases are caused by deletions; ~5% to 8%, by duplication; and the remaining, by point mutations of the dystrophin gene. The frequency of complex rearrangements (double-deletion and non-contiguous duplications is reported to be 4%. Aim: In this study, we examined the usefulness of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA for screening of deletion and duplication mutations in a group of DMD/ BMD (Becker muscular dystrophy patients from India. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 180 patients referred from all over India, by both multiplex PCR technique (22 exons and MLPA (all 79 exons. Results and Conclusion: By multiplex PCR, deletions were detected in 90 (50% patients. MLPA studies in these cases detected 3 additional deletions, 16 (8.9% duplications and 2 point mutations. MLPA is useful to verify absence of deletions/ duplications in all 79 exons. This sets the stage to look for point mutations using RNA- or DNA-based tests because of the availability of the drug PTC124. Also, the extent of the deletions and duplications could be more accurately defined by MLPA. The delineation of the precise extent of deletion helps in deciding whether exon-skipping technique would be useful as therapy.

  10. MUTATIONS IN CORNEAL CARBOHYDRATE SULFOTRANSFERASE 6 GENE (CHST6 IN IRANIAN MACULAR CORNEAL DYSTROPHY (MCD PATIENTS: A REPORT OF 7 PATIENTS FROM IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra ATAEI

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveMacular Corneal Dystrophy (MCD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder affecting the stroma of cornea. Most cases of MCD are caused by mutations in CHST6 gene. The aim of this study was to determine mutations in the carbohydrate sulfotransferase 6 gene (CHST6 through genetic analysis of 7 Iranian patients with MCD.Materials & MethodsWe screened the CHST6 gene to determine the range of pathogenic mutations. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. The coding regions of the CHST6 gene were amplified using three pairs of primers, and directly sequenced in the final step.ResultsFour mutations were found to affect the translated protein and each of them corresponded to a particular disease haplotype that has been previously reported.Keywords:Macular Corneal Dystrophy (MCD, Iranian Patients, Carbohydrate Sulfotransferase 6 Gene (CHST6

  11. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goknur Haliloglu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenital muscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in the Western world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagen VI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may be overlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There has been some radical efforts for cure especially through the apoptosis cascades.

  12. Knockdown of col22a1 gene in zebrafish induces a muscular dystrophy by disruption of the myotendinous junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvet, Benjamin; Guiraud, Alexandre; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Zwolanek, Daniela; Guillon, Emilie; Bretaud, Sandrine; Monnot, Catherine; Schulze, Jörg; Bader, Hannah L; Allard, Bruno; Koch, Manuel; Ruggiero, Florence

    2013-11-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the major site of force transfer in skeletal muscle, and defects in its structure correlate with a subset of muscular dystrophies. Col22a1 encodes the MTJ component collagen XXII, the function of which remains unknown. Here, we have cloned and characterized the zebrafish col22a1 gene and conducted morpholino-based loss-of-function studies in developing embryos. We showed that col22a1 transcripts localize at muscle ends when the MTJ forms and that COLXXII protein integrates the junctional extracellular matrix. Knockdown of COLXXII expression resulted in muscular dystrophy-like phenotype, including swimming impairment, curvature of embryo trunk/tail, strong reduction of twitch-contraction amplitude and contraction-induced muscle fiber detachment, and provoked significant activation of the survival factor Akt. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence studies revealed that absence of COLXXII caused a strong reduction of MTJ folds and defects in myoseptal structure. These defects resulted in reduced contractile force and susceptibility of junctional extracellular matrix to rupture when subjected to repeated mechanical stress. Co-injection of sub-phenotypic doses of morpholinos against col22a1 and genes of the major muscle linkage systems showed a synergistic gene interaction between col22a1 and itga7 (α7β1 integrin) that was not observed with dag1 (dystroglycan). Finally, pertinent to a conserved role in humans, the dystrophic phenotype was rescued by microinjection of recombinant human COLXXII. Our findings indicate that COLXXII contributes to the stabilization of myotendinous junctions and strengthens skeletal muscle attachments during contractile activity.

  13. Multi-parametric MRI at 14T for muscular dystrophy mice treated with AAV vector-mediated gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Park

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a non-invasive tool for the monitoring of gene therapy for muscular dystrophy. The clinical investigations for this family of diseases often involve surgical biopsy which limits the amount of information that can be obtained due to the invasive nature of the procedure. Thus, other non-invasive tools may provide more opportunities for disease assessment and treatment responses. In order to explore this, dystrophic mdx4cv mice were systemically treated with a recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV vector containing a codon-optimized micro-dystrophin gene. Multi-parametric MRI of T2, magnetization transfer, and diffusion effects alongside 3-D volume measurements were then utilized to monitor disease/treatment progression. Mice were imaged at 10 weeks of age for pre-treatment, then again post-treatment at 8, 16, and 24 week time points. The efficacy of treatment was assessed by physiological assays for improvements in function and quantification of expression. Tissues from the hindlimbs were collected for histological analysis after the final time point for comparison with MRI results. We found that introduction of the micro-dystrophin gene restored some aspects of normal muscle histology and pathology such as decreased necrosis and resistance to contraction-induced injury. T2 relaxation values showed percentage decreases across all muscle types measured (tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, and soleus when treated groups were compared to untreated groups. Additionally, the differences between groups were statistically significant for the tibialis anterior as well. The diffusion measurements showed a wider range of percentage changes and less statistical significance while the magnetization transfer effect measurements showed minimal change. MR images displayed hyper-intense regions of muscle that correlated with muscle pathology in

  14. Myotonic Dystrophy Family Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-28

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy 1; Myotonic Dystrophy 2; Dystrophia Myotonica; Dystrophia Myotonica 1; Dystrophia Myotonica 2; Myotonia Dystrophica; Myotonic Dystrophy, Congenital; Myotonic Myopathy, Proximal; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Proximal Myotonic Myopathy; Steinert Disease; Steinert Myotonic Dystrophy; Steinert's Disease; Myotonia Atrophica

  15. R25G mutation in exon 1 of LMNA gene is associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Wo-liang; HUANG Wei-jun; HUANG Chun-yan; WANG Jing-feng; XIE Shuang-lun; NIE Ru-qiong; LIU Ying-mei; LIU Pin-ming; ZHOU Shu-xian; CHEN Su-qin

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutations of the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), conduction system defects and skeletal muscle dystrophy. Here we report a family with a mutation of the LMNA gene to identify the relationship between genotype and phenotype.Methods All 30 members of the family underwent clinical and genetic evaluation. A mutation analysis of the LMNA gene was performed. All of the 12 exons of LMNA gene were extended with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the PCR products were screened for gene mutation by direct sequencing.Results Ten members of the family had limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and 6 are still alive. Two patients suffered from DCM. Cardiac arrhythmias included atrioventricular block and atrial fibrillation; sudden death occurred in 2 patients. The pattern of inheritance was autosomal dominant. Mutation c.73C>G (R25G) in exon 1 encoding the globular domains was confirmed in all of the affected members, resulting in the conversion of arginine (Arg) to glycine (Gly). Conclusions The mutation R25G in exon 1 of LMNA gene we reported here in a Chinese family had a phenotype of malignant arrhythmia and mild LGMD, suggesting that patients with familial DCM, conduction system defects and skeletal muscle dystrophy should be screened by genetic testing for the LMNA gene.

  16. Evaluation of point mutations in dystrophin gene in Iranian Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients: introducing three novel variants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MARYAM HAGHSHENAS; MOHAMMAD TAGHI AKBARI; SHOHREH ZARE KARIZI; FARAVAREH KHORDADPOOR DEILAMANI; SHAHRIAR NAFISSI; ZIVAR SALEHI

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked neuromuscular diseases characterized by progres-sive muscular weakness and degeneration of skeletal muscles. Approximately two-thirds of the patients have large deletionsor duplications in the dystrophin gene and the remaining one-third have point mutations. This study was performed to eval-uate point mutations in Iranian DMD/BMD male patients. A total of 29 DNA samples from patients who did not show anylarge deletion/duplication mutations following multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex ligation-dependentprobe amplification (MLPA) screening were sequenced for detection of point mutations in exons 50–79. Also exon 44 wassequenced in one sample in which a false positive deletion was detected by MLPA method. Cycle sequencing revealed fournonsense, one frameshift and two splice site mutations as well as two missense variants

  17. Evaluation of point mutations in dystrophin gene in Iranian Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients: introducing three novel variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghshenas, Maryam; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Karizi, Shohreh Zare; Deilamani, Faravareh Khordadpoor; Nafissi, Shahriar; Salehi, Zivar

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked neuromuscular diseases characterized by progressive muscular weakness and degeneration of skeletal muscles. Approximately two-thirds of the patients have large deletions or duplications in the dystrophin gene and the remaining one-third have point mutations. This study was performed to evaluate point mutations in Iranian DMD/BMD male patients. A total of 29 DNA samples from patients who did not show any large deletion/duplication mutations following multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) screening were sequenced for detection of point mutations in exons 50-79. Also exon 44 was sequenced in one sample in which a false positive deletion was detected by MLPA method. Cycle sequencing revealed four nonsense, one frameshift and two splice site mutations as well as two missense variants.

  18. Analysis list: Gad1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Gad1 Pluripotent stem cell + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Gad1....1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Gad1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscienced...bc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Gad1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Gad1.Pluripotent_s

  19. Identification of a Novel Mutation in the Titin Gene in a Chinese Family with Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wen; Chen, Han; Deng, Xiong; Yuan, Lamei; Yang, Yan; Song, Zhi; Yang, Zhijian; Wu, Yuan; Deng, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a highly heterogeneous group of genetic myopathies characterized by progressive proximal pelvic and/or shoulder girdle muscle weakness, with the onset ages ranging from early childhood to late adulthood. The identification of these dystrophies through genetic testing will not only inform long-term prognosis but will also assist in directing care more efficiently, including more frequent cardiorespiratory monitoring and prophylactic treatments. The aim of this study was to identify the responsible gene in a five-generation Chinese Han pedigree with autosomal recessive LGMD. Exome sequencing was conducted and a novel mutation c.107788T>C (p.W35930R) in the titin gene (TTN) was identified. The mutation co-segregated with the disorder in the family and was absent in normal controls. Our discovery broadens the mutation spectrum of the TTN gene associated with LGMD2J.

  20. The molecular genetics of the corneal dystrophies--current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintworth, Gordon K

    2003-05-01

    The pertinent literature on inherited corneal diseases is reviewed in terms of the chromosomal localization and identification of the responsible genes. Disorders affecting the cornea have been mapped to human chromosome 1 (central crystalline corneal dystrophy, familial subepithelial corneal amyloidosis, early onset Fuchs dystrophy, posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy), chromosome 4 (Bietti marginal crystalline dystrophy), chromosome 5 (lattice dystrophy types 1 and IIIA, granular corneal dystrophy types 1, 2 and 3, Thiel-Behnke corneal dystrophy), chromosome 9 (lattice dystrophy type II), chromosome 10 (Thiel-Behnke corneal dystrophy), chromosome 12 (Meesmann dystrophy), chromosome 16 (macular corneal dystrophy, fish eye disease, LCAT disease, tyrosinemia type II), chromosome 17 (Meesmann dystrophy, Stocker-Holt dystrophy), chromosome 20 (congenital hereditary endothelial corneal dystrophy types I and II, posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy), chromosome 21 (autosomal dominant keratoconus) and the X chromosome (cornea verticillata, cornea farinata, deep filiform corneal dystrophy, keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans, Lisch corneal dystrophy). Mutations in nine genes (ARSC1, CHST6, COL8A2, GLA, GSN, KRT3, KRT12, M1S1and TGFBI [BIGH3]) account for some of the corneal diseases and three of them are associated with amyloid deposition in the cornea (GSN, M1S1, TGFBI) including most of the lattice corneal dystrophies (LCDs) [LCD types I, IA, II, IIIA, IIIB, IV, V, VI and VII] recognized by their lattice pattern of linear opacities. Genetic studies on inherited diseases affecting the cornea have provided insight into some of these disorders at a basic molecular level and it has become recognized that distinct clinicopathologic phenotypes can result from specific mutations in a particular gene, as well as some different mutations in the same gene. A molecular genetic understanding of inherited corneal diseases is leading to a better appreciation of the

  1. Muscle-specific CRISPR/Cas9 dystrophin gene editing ameliorates pathophysiology in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Niclas E; Hall, John K; Odom, Guy L; Phelps, Michael P; Andrus, Colin R; Hawkins, R David; Hauschka, Stephen D; Chamberlain, Joel R; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2017-02-14

    Gene replacement therapies utilizing adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors hold great promise for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A related approach uses AAV vectors to edit specific regions of the DMD gene using CRISPR/Cas9. Here we develop multiple approaches for editing the mutation in dystrophic mdx(4cv) mice using single and dual AAV vector delivery of a muscle-specific Cas9 cassette together with single-guide RNA cassettes and, in one approach, a dystrophin homology region to fully correct the mutation. Muscle-restricted Cas9 expression enables direct editing of the mutation, multi-exon deletion or complete gene correction via homologous recombination in myogenic cells. Treated muscles express dystrophin in up to 70% of the myogenic area and increased force generation following intramuscular delivery. Furthermore, systemic administration of the vectors results in widespread expression of dystrophin in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated muscle-specific gene editing has significant potential for therapy of neuromuscular disorders.

  2. RNAi-mediated gene suppression in a GCAP1(L151F cone-rod dystrophy mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiang

    Full Text Available Dominant mutations occurring in the high-affinity Ca(2+-binding sites (EF-hands of the GUCA1A gene encoding guanylate cyclase-activating protein 1 (GCAP1 cause slowly progressing cone-rod dystrophy (CORD in a dozen families worldwide. We developed a nonallele-specific adeno-associated virus (AAV-based RNAi knockdown strategy to rescue the retina degeneration caused by GCAP1 mutations. We generated three genomic transgenic mouse lines expressing wildtype (WT and L151F mutant mouse GCAP1 with or without a C-terminal GFP fusion. Under control of endogenous regulatory elements, the transgenes were expressed specifically in mouse photoreceptors. GCAP1(L151F and GCAP1(L151F-GFP transgenic mice presented with a late onset and slowly progressive photoreceptor degeneration, similar to that observed in human GCAP1-CORD patients. Transgenic expression of WT GCAP1-EGFP in photoreceptors had no adverse effect. Toward therapy development, a highly effective anti-mGCAP1 shRNA, mG1hp4, was selected from four candidate shRNAs using an in-vitro screening assay. Subsequently a self-complementary (sc AAV serotype 2/8 expressing mG1hp4 was delivered subretinally to GCAP1(L151F-GFP transgenic mice. Knockdown of the GCAP1(L151F-GFP transgene product was visualized by fluorescence live imaging in the scAAV2/8-mG1hp4-treated retinas. Concomitant with the mutant GCAP1-GFP fusion protein, endogenous GCAP1 decreased as well in treated retinas. We propose nonallele-specific RNAi knockdown of GCAP1 as a general therapeutic strategy to rescue any GCAP1-based dominant cone-rod dystrophy in human patients.

  3. Deletion Analysis Of The Duchenne/Becker Muscular Dystrophy Gene Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastur P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of Duchenna Muscular Dystrophy (DMD and Becker Muscular Dystorphy (BMD is mainly based on clinical profile, serum CPK values, muscle biopsy and immunostaining for dystrophin. This was done in 100 unrelated patients using 19 exons including the promoter region in two sets of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR. These primers amplify most of the exons in the deletion prone ′hot spot′ regions allowing determinations of deletion end points. Intragenic deletions were detected in 74 patients indicating that the use of PCR- based assays will allow deletion detection help in prenatal diagnosis for most of the DMD/BMD patients. The frequency of deletions observed in the present study was 74%.

  4. mir-500-Mediated GAD67 Downregulation Contributes to Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhen-Zhen; Wei, Jia-You; Ou-Yang, Han-Dong; Li, Dai; Xu, Ting; Wu, Shao-Ling; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Cui-Cui; Ma, Chao; Xin, Wen-Jun

    2016-06-08

    Neuropathic pain is a common neurobiological disease involving multifaceted maladaptations ranging from gene modulation to synaptic dysfunction, but the interactions between synaptic dysfunction and the genes that are involved in persistent pain remain elusive. In the present study, we found that neuropathic pain induced by the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel or L5 ventral root transection significantly impaired the function of GABAergic synapses of spinal dorsal horn neurons via the reduction of the GAD67 expression. We also found that mir-500 expression was significantly increased and involved in the modulation of GAD67 expression via targeting the specific site of Gad1 gene in the dorsal horn. In addition, knock-out of mir-500 or using mir-500 antagomir rescued the GABAergic synapses in the spinal dorsal horn neurons and attenuated the sensitized pain behavior in the rats with neuropathic pain. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the function significance and the underlying molecular mechanisms of mir-500 in the process of neuropathic pain, which sheds light on the development of novel therapeutic options for neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is a common neurobiological disease involving multifaceted maladaptations ranging from gene modulation to synaptic dysfunction, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. The present study illustrates for the first time a mir-500-mediated mechanism underlying spinal GABAergic dysfunction and sensitized pain behavior in neuropathic pain induced by the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel or L5 ventral root transection, which sheds light on the development of novel therapeutic options for neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/366321-11$15.00/0.

  5. Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) caused by duplication of exons 3-6 of the dystrophin gene presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, A.C.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; Becker, L. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is a progressive myocardial disease presenting with congestive heart failure in teenage males without clinical signs of skeletal myopathy. Tight linkage of XLCM to the DMD locus has been demonstrated; it has been suggested that, at least in some families, XLCM is a {open_quotes}dystrophinopathy.{close_quotes} We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with acute heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. He had no history of muscle weakness, but physical examination revealed pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles. He subsequently received a heart transplantation. Family history was negative. Serum CK level at the time of diagnosis was 10,416. Myocardial biopsy showed no evidence of carditis. Dystrophin staining of cardiac and skeletal muscle with anti-sera to COOH and NH{sub 2}termini showed a patchy distribution of positivity suggestive of Becker muscular dystrophy. Analysis of 18 of the 79 dystrophin exons detected a duplication that included exons 3-6. The proband`s mother has an elevated serum CK and was confirmed to be a carrier of the same duplication. A mutation in the muscle promotor region of the dystrophin gene has been implicated in the etiology of SLCM. However, Towbin et al. (1991) argued that other 5{prime} mutations in the dystrophin gene could cause selective cardiomyopathy. The findings in our patient support the latter hypothesis. This suggests that there are multiple regions in the dystrophin gene which, when disrupted, can cause isolated dilated cardiomyopathy.

  6. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function.

  7. Identification of a gene expression core signature for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) via integrative analysis reveals novel potential compounds for treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Ichim-Moreno, Norú

    2010-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked form of muscular dystrophy and one of the most prevalent genetic disorders of childhood. DMD is characterized by rapid progression of muscle degeneration, and ultimately death. Currently, glucocorticoids are the only available treatment for DMD, but they have been shown to result in serious side effects. The purpose of this research was to define a core signature of gene expression related to DMD via integrative analysis of mouse and human datasets. This core signature was subsequently used to screen for novel potential compounds that antagonistically affect the expression of signature genes. With this approach we were able to identify compounds that are 1) already used to treat DMD, 2) currently under investigation for treatment, and 3) so far unknown but promising candidates. Our study highlights the potential of meta-analyses through the combination of datasets to unravel previously unrecognized associations and reveal new relationships. © IEEE.

  8. GAD65 epitope mapping and search for novel autoantibodies in GAD-associated neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouka, P; Alexopoulos, H; Akrivou, S; Trohatou, O; Politis, P K; Dalakas, M C

    2015-04-15

    Antibodies against Glutamic-acid-decarboxylase (GAD65) are seen in various CNS excitability disorders including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, encephalitis and epilepsy. To explore pathogenicity, we examined whether distinct epitope specificities or other co-existing antibodies may account for each disorder. The epitope recognized by all 27 tested patients, irrespective of clinical phenotype, corresponded to the catalytic core of GAD. No autoantibodies against known GABAergic antigens were found. In a screen for novel specificities using live hippocampal neurons, three epilepsy patients, but no other, were positive. We conclude that no GAD-specific epitope defines any neurological syndrome but other antibody specificities may account for certain phenotypes.

  9. [Generalized anxiety disorders (GAD)--a neglected illness? Background und aims of the GAD-P study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittchen, H U; Linden, M; Schwarzer, W; Riemann, D; Boerner, R J; Bandelow, B

    2001-01-01

    In the past Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)--previously classified as anxiety neurosis--was regarded as not being a separate diagnostic entity. On the basis of new explicit criteria for GAD in the 90ies, GAD-specific pharmacological (i.e. SNRI) and psychological treatments with improved efficacy have become available. The Generalized Anxiety and Depression in Primary care study (GAD-P) investigates the prevalence of GAD in primary care settings and evaluates the patterns of care provided. Aims, methods and findings of the GAD-P study are described in this supplement.

  10. Cellular Reprogramming, Genome Editing, and Alternative CRISPR Cas9 Technologies for Precise Gene Therapy of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Gee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, the development of two innovative technologies, namely, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and the CRISPR Cas9 system, has enabled researchers to model diseases derived from patient cells and precisely edit DNA sequences of interest, respectively. In particular, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD has been an exemplary monogenic disease model for combining these technologies to demonstrate that genome editing can correct genetic mutations in DMD patient-derived iPSCs. DMD is an X-linked genetic disorder caused by mutations that disrupt the open reading frame of the dystrophin gene, which plays a critical role in stabilizing muscle cells during contraction and relaxation. The CRISPR Cas9 system has been shown to be capable of targeting the dystrophin gene and rescuing its expression in in vitro patient-derived iPSCs and in vivo DMD mouse models. In this review, we highlight recent advances made using the CRISPR Cas9 system to correct genetic mutations and discuss how emerging CRISPR technologies and iPSCs in a combined platform can play a role in bringing a therapy for DMD closer to the clinic.

  11. Terapia gênica em distrofias hereditárias de retina Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Côco

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available As distrofias hereditárias de retina abrangem um amplo número de doenças caracterizadas por lenta e progressiva degeneração da retina. São o resultado de mutações em genes expressos em fotorreceptores e no epitélio pigmentado da retina. A herança pode ser autossômica dominante, autossômica recessiva, ligada ao X recessiva, digênica ou herança mitocondrial. Atualmente não há tratamento para essas doenças e os pacientes convivem com a perda progressiva da visão. O aconselhamento genético e o suporte para reabilitação têm indicação nestes casos. Pesquisas envolvendo a base molecular e genética dessas doenças está continuamente em expansão e ampliam as perspectivas para novas formas de tratamento. Dessa forma, a terapia gênica, que consiste na inserção de material genético exógeno em células de um indivíduo com finalidade terapêutica, tem sido a principal forma de tratamento para as distrofias hereditárias de retina. O olho é um órgão peculiar para a terapia gênica, pois é anatomicamente dividido em compartimentos, imunologicamente privilegiado e com meios transparentes. A maioria das doenças oculares tem defeitos em genes conhecidos. Além disso, há modelo animal bem caracterizado para algumas condições. Propostas para pesquisa clínica em terapia gênica nas degenerações retinianas hereditárias com defeito no gene RPE65, recentemente tiveram aprovação ética e os resultados preliminares obtidos trouxeram grandes expectativas na melhora da qualidade de vida dos pacientes.The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these

  12. Konfirmasi spesifitas GAD65 terhadap anti-GAD65 pada tikus DM dan pasien DM tipe 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aulanni’a Aulanni’a

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65 from bovine brain has been studied to obtain basic knowledge and diagnosis and prediction of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM patients. The importance of GAD65 in DM diagnosis based on its patogenesis. One of the autoimmune marker that can be used to detect beta-pancreas destruction in Diabetes Type I is the antibody to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65. Most of the pre-diabetic patients indicate the reactive autoantibody to GAD65. For early detection of anti-GAD65 in the serum of the patient, human recombinat GAD65 has been succeed to be used. However this is not economical, therefore, it is necessary to find the alternative source of cheaper GAD65. The aim of this research is to develop an early detection kit of Type 1 DM based on antibody- GAD65, since the longest patient suffering from DM has higher probability to be complicated, especially for uncured patients. The anti- GAD65 antibodies induced by anti-GAD65 synthetized and labelled by alkaline phosphatase can be used as reagent detection early DM patients. The ten patients of DM as samples (positive of anti-GAD65 and five rats of DM were positive with western blott technique using reagents as result of this research. It can be concluded, GAD65 enzyme isolated from bovine brain induced anti-GAD65 production and have possibilities to be packaged in a diagnostic kit for patient pre DM.

  13. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and muscle loss. Some forms of MD appear in infancy ... types can vary in whom they affect, which muscles they affect, and what the symptoms are. All ...

  14. Identification of the First De Novo UBIAD1 Gene Mutation Associated with Schnyder Corneal Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R. Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report the identification of the first de novo UBIAD1 missense mutation in an individual with Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD. Methods. A slit lamp examination was performed on a 47-year-old woman without a family history of corneal disorders. The proband’s parents, two sisters, and son were also examined and genomic DNA from all six individuals was collected. The exons and exon-intron boundaries of UBIAD1 were screened using Sanger sequencing. Identified mutations were screened for in 200 control chromosomes. In silico analysis predicted the impact of identified mutations on protein function and structure. Results. Slit lamp examination of the proband revealed findings consistent with SCD. Corneas of the family members appeared unaffected. Screening of UBIAD1 in the proband identified a novel heterozygous c.308C>T mutation, predicted to encode the missense amino acid substitution p.(Thr103Ile. This mutation was not identified in any of the family members or in 200 control chromosomes and was predicted to be damaging to normal protein function and structure. Conclusions. We present a novel heterozygous de novo missense mutation in UBIAD1, p.(Thr103Ile, identified in a patient with classic clinical features of SCD. This highlights the value of genetic testing in clinical diagnostic settings, even in the absence of a positive family history.

  15. A multicenter study to map genes for Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy: baseline characteristics and heritability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louttit, Megan D; Kopplin, Laura J; Igo, Robert P; Fondran, Jeremy R; Tagliaferri, Angela; Bardenstein, David; Aldave, Anthony J; Croasdale, Christopher R; Price, Marianne O; Rosenwasser, George O; Lass, Jonathan H; Iyengar, Sudha K

    2012-01-01

    To describe the methods for family and case-control recruitment for a multicenter genetic and associated heritability analyses of Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD). Twenty-nine enrolling sites with 62 trained investigators and coordinators gathered individual and family information, graded the phenotype, and collected blood and/or saliva for genetic analysis on all individuals with and without FECD. The degree of FECD was assessed in a 0 to 6 semiquantitative scale using standardized clinical methods with pathological verification of FECD on at least 1 member of each family. Central corneal thickness was measured by ultrasonic pachymetry. Three hundred twenty-two families with 330 affected sibling pairs with FECD were enrolled and included a total of 650 sibling pairs of all disease grades. Using the entire 7-step FECD grading scale or a dichotomous definition of severe disease, heritability was assessed in families via sib-sib correlations. Both binary indicators of severe disease and semiquantitative measures of disease severity were significantly heritable, with heritability estimates of 30% for severe disease, 37% to 39% for FECD score, and 47% for central corneal thickness. Genetic risk factors have a strong role in the severity of the FECD phenotype and corneal thickness. Genotyping this cohort with high-density genetic markers followed by appropriate statistical analyses should lead to novel loci for disease susceptibility.

  16. Report of limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2a in 6 Iranian patients, one with a novel deletion in CAPN3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaee, Mahsa; Kariminejad, Ariana; Fattahi, Zohreh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Godarzi, Hamed Reza; Beheshtian, Maryam; Vazehan, Raheleh; Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Calpain3 is a calcium-dependent intracellular protease involved in an autosomal recessive form of muscular dystrophy known as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A. Many pathogenic mutations have been identified in calpain3, encoded by the CAPN3 gene, which leads to weakness of the pelvic and shoulder girdle muscles. In the present study, whole exome sequencing was performed on six unrelated Iranian families who presented with progressive muscle weakness, with a strong suspicion of Calpainopathies. Genetic analysis of CAPN3 gene revealed five causative variants which had not been reported in the Iranian population before including a novel 6 bp deletion (c.795_800delCATTGA) and four previously reported mutations (c.1939G > T, c.2243G > A, c.2257delGinsAA, and c.2380 + 2T > G). Our findings indicate that exome sequencing can be a very effective and affordable method to diagnose heterogeneous muscular dystrophies, especially in consanguineous populations such as Iran.

  17. CREB-Dependent Regulation of GAD65 Transcription by BDNF/TrkB in Cortical Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Huertas, Carlos; Rico, Beatriz

    2011-04-01

    In the cerebral cortex, the functional output of projection neurons is fine-tuned by inhibitory neurons present in the network, which use γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as their main neurotransmitter. Previous studies have suggested that the expression levels of the rate-limiting GABA synthetic enzyme, GAD65, depend on brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/TrkB activation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which this neurotrophic factor and its receptor controls GABA synthesis are still unknown. Here, we show a direct regulation of the GAD65 gene by BDNF-TrkB signaling via CREB in cortical interneurons. Conditional ablation of TrkB in cortical interneurons causes a cell-autonomous decrease in the synaptically enriched GAD65 protein and its transcripts levels, suggesting that transcriptional regulation of the GAD65 gene is altered. Dissection of the intracellular pathway that underlies this process revealed that BDNF/TrkB signaling controls the transcription of GAD65 in a Ras-ERK-CREB-dependent manner. Our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism through which BDNF/TrkB signaling may modulate the maturation and function of cortical inhibitory circuits.

  18. Allele-specific Gene Silencing of Mutant mRNA Restores Cellular Function in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Noguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD is an inherited muscle disorder characterized clinically by muscle weakness, distal joint hyperlaxity, and proximal joint contractures. Sporadic and recessive mutations in the three collagen VI genes, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, are reported to be causative. In the sporadic forms, a heterozygous point mutation causing glycine substitution in the triple helical domain has been identified in higher rate. In this study, we examined the efficacy of siRNAs, which target point mutation site, on specific knockdown toward transcripts from mutant allele and evaluated consequent cellular phenotype of UCMD fibroblasts. We evaluated the effect of siRNAs targeted to silence-specific COL6A1 alleles in UCMD fibroblasts, where simultaneous expression of both wild-type and mutant collagen VI resulted in defective collagen localization. Addition of mutant-specific siRNAs allowed normal extracellular localization of collagen VI surrounding fibroblasts, suggesting selective inhibition of mutant collagen VI. Targeting the single-nucleotide COL6A1 c.850G>A (p.G284R mutation responsible a sporadic autosomal dominant form of UCMD can potently and selectively block expression of mutant collagen VI. These results suggest that allele-specific knockdown of the mutant mRNA can potentially be considered as a therapeutic procedure in UCMD due to COL6A1 point mutations.

  19. Deregulation of the protocadherin gene FAT1 alters muscle shapes: implications for the pathogenesis of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Caruso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Generation of skeletal muscles with forms adapted to their function is essential for normal movement. Muscle shape is patterned by the coordinated polarity of collectively migrating myoblasts. Constitutive inactivation of the protocadherin gene Fat1 uncoupled individual myoblast polarity within chains, altering the shape of selective groups of muscles in the shoulder and face. These shape abnormalities were followed by early onset regionalised muscle defects in adult Fat1-deficient mice. Tissue-specific ablation of Fat1 driven by Pax3-cre reproduced muscle shape defects in limb but not face muscles, indicating a cell-autonomous contribution of Fat1 in migrating muscle precursors. Strikingly, the topography of muscle abnormalities caused by Fat1 loss-of-function resembles that of human patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD. FAT1 lies near the critical locus involved in causing FSHD, and Fat1 mutant mice also show retinal vasculopathy, mimicking another symptom of FSHD, and showed abnormal inner ear patterning, predictive of deafness, reminiscent of another burden of FSHD. Muscle-specific reduction of FAT1 expression and promoter silencing was observed in foetal FSHD1 cases. CGH array-based studies identified deletion polymorphisms within a putative regulatory enhancer of FAT1, predictive of tissue-specific depletion of FAT1 expression, which preferentially segregate with FSHD. Our study identifies FAT1 as a critical determinant of muscle form, misregulation of which associates with FSHD.

  20. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy region gene-1 (FRG-1) is an actin-bundling protein associated with muscle-attachment sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Jones, Takako Iida; Tang, Vivian W; Brieher, William M; Jones, Peter L

    2010-04-01

    In vertebrates, overexpression of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) recapitulates the pathophysiology exhibited by FSHD patients, although the role of FRG1 in FSHD remains controversial and no precise function for FRG1 has been described in any organism. To gain insight into the function and potential role of FRG1 in FSHD, we analyzed the highly conserved Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog, frg-1. C. elegans body-wall muscles contain two distinct subcellular pools of FRG-1: nuclear FRG-1, concentrated in the nucleoli; and cytoplasmic FRG-1, associated with the Z-disk and costamere-like structures known as dense bodies. Functionally, we demonstrate that FRG-1 is an F-actin-bundling protein, consistent with its localization to dense bodies; this activity is conserved in human FRG1. This is particularly intriguing because it places FRG-1 along side the list of dense-body components whose vertebrate orthologs are involved in the myriad myopathies associated with disrupted costameres and Z-disks. Interestingly, overexpressed FRG-1 preferentially accumulates in the nucleus and, when overexpressed specifically from the frg-1 promoter, disrupts the adult ventral muscle structure and organization. Together, these data further support a role for FRG1 overexpression in FSHD pathophysiology and reveal the previously unsuspected direct involvement of FRG-1 in muscle structure and integrity.

  1. Improving the management of Inherited Retinal Dystrophies by targeted sequencing of a population-specific gene panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Gil, Nereida; Méndez-Vidal, Cristina; Romero-Pérez, Laura; González-del Pozo, María; Rodríguez-de la Rúa, Enrique; Dopazo, Joaquín; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has overcome important limitations to the molecular diagnosis of Inherited Retinal Dystrophies (IRD) such as the high clinical and genetic heterogeneity and the overlapping phenotypes. The purpose of this study was the identification of the genetic defect in 32 Spanish families with different forms of IRD. With that aim, we implemented a custom NGS panel comprising 64 IRD-associated genes in our population, and three disease-associated intronic regions. A total of 37 pathogenic mutations (14 novels) were found in 73% of IRD patients ranging from 50% for autosomal dominant cases, 75% for syndromic cases, 83% for autosomal recessive cases, and 100% for X-linked cases. Additionally, unexpected phenotype-genotype correlations were found in 6 probands, which led to the refinement of their clinical diagnoses. Furthermore, intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability was observed in two cases. Moreover, two cases unsuccessfully analysed by exome sequencing were resolved by applying this panel. Our results demonstrate that this hypothesis-free approach based on frequently mutated, population-specific loci is highly cost-efficient for the routine diagnosis of this heterogeneous condition and allows the unbiased analysis of a miscellaneous cohort. The molecular information found here has aid clinical diagnosis and has improved genetic counselling and patient management. PMID:27032803

  2. Genetics of corneal endothelial dystrophies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chitra Kannabiran

    2009-12-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains the level of hydration in the cornea. Dysfunction of the endothelium results in excess accumulation of water in the corneal stroma, leading to swelling of the stroma and loss of transparency. There are four different corneal endothelial dystrophies that are hereditary, progressive, non-inflammatory disorders involving dysfunction of the corneal endothelium. Each of the endothelial dystrophies is genetically heterogeneous with different modes of transmission and/or different genes involved in each subtype. Genes responsible for disease have been identified for only a subset of corneal endothelial dystrophies. Knowledge of genes involved and their function in the corneal endothelium can aid understanding the pathogenesis of the disorder as well as reveal pathways that are important for normal functioning of the endothelium.

  3. Cultural-based biases of the GAD-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkerson, Holly A; Thibodeau, Michel A; Brandt, Charles P; Zvolensky, Michael J; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2015-04-01

    The GAD-7 is a popular measure of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) symptoms that has been used across many cultural groups. Existing evidence demonstrates that the prevalence of GAD varies across self-identified ethnic/cultural groups, a phenomenon that some researchers attribute to cross-cultural measurement error rather than to actual differences in rates of GAD. Nonetheless, the effect of culture on factor structure and response patterns to the GAD-7 have not been examined and could result over- or under-estimated GAD-7 scores across different cultural groups. The current investigation assessed the factor structure of the GAD-7 in White/Caucasian, Hispanic, and Black/African American undergraduates and tested for cultural-based biases. A modified one-factor model exhibited good fit across subsamples. Results revealed that Black/African American participants with high GAD symptoms scored lower on the GAD-7 than other participants with similar GAD symptoms. Results highlight the need for culturally sensitive GAD screening tools.

  4. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) expression and possible function in mouse tooth germ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kana; Wada, Hiroko; Nagata, Kengo; Fujiwara, Hiroaki; Wada, Naohisa; Someya, Hirotaka; Mikami, Yurie; Sakai, Hidetaka; Kiyoshima, Tamotsu

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal expression of Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) is involved in the pathogenesis of FSHD. FRG1 is also important for the normal muscular and vascular development. Our previous study showed that FRG1 is one of the highly expressed genes in the mandible on embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) than on E12.0. In this study, we investigated the temporospatial expression pattern of FRG1 mRNA and protein during the development of the mouse lower first molar, and also evaluated the subcellular localization of the FRG1 protein in mouse dental epithelial (mDE6) cells. The FRG1 expression was identified in the dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells at the initiation and bud stages. It was detected in the inner enamel epithelium at the cap and early bell stages. At the late bell and root formation stages, these signals were detected in ameloblasts and odontoblasts during the formation of enamel and dentin matrices, respectively. The FRG1 protein was localized in the cytoplasm in the mouse tooth germ in vivo, while FRG1 was detected predominantly in the nucleus and faintly in the cytoplasm in mDE6 cells in vitro. In mDE6 cells treated with bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), the protein expression of FRG1 increased in cytoplasm, suggesting that FRG1 may translocate to the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that FRG1 is involved in the morphogenesis of the tooth germ, as well as in the formation of enamel and dentin matrices and that FRG1 may play a role in the odontogenesis in the mouse following BMP4 stimulation.

  5. Selective loss of parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons in the cerebral cortex of maternally stressed Gad1-heterozygous mouse offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, T; Furukawa, T; Iwata, S; Yanagawa, Y; Fukuda, A

    2014-03-11

    Exposure to maternal stress (MS) and mutations in GAD1, which encodes the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 67, are both risk factors for psychiatric disorders. However, the relationship between these risk factors remains unclear. Interestingly, the critical period of MS for psychiatric disorders in offspring corresponds to the period of GABAergic neuron neurogenesis and migration in the fetal brain, that is, in the late stage of gestation. Indeed, decrement of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus (HIP) has often been observed in schizophrenia patients. In the present study, we used GAD67-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mice (that is, mice in which the Gad1 gene is heterozygously deleted; GAD67(+/GFP)) that underwent prenatal stress from embryonic day 15.0 to 17.5 and monitored PV-positive GABAergic neurons to address the interaction between Gad1 disruption and stress. Administration of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine revealed that neurogenesis of GFP-positive GABAergic neurons, but not cortical plate cells, was significantly diminished in fetal brains during MS. Differential expression of glucocorticoid receptors by different progenitor cell types may underlie this differential outcome. Postnatally, the density of PV-positive, but not PV-negative, GABAergic neurons was significantly decreased in the mPFC, HIP and somatosensory cortex but not in the motor cortex of GAD67(+/GFP) mice. By contrast, these findings were not observed in wild-type (GAD67(+/+)) offspring. These results suggest that prenatal stress, in addition to heterozygous deletion of Gad1, could specifically disturb the proliferation of neurons destined to be PV-positive GABAergic interneurons.

  6. Utility of a next-generation sequencing-based gene panel investigation in German patients with genetically unclassified limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Marius; Gläser, Dieter; Joshi, Pushpa Raj; Zierz, Stephan; Wenninger, Stephan; Schoser, Benedikt; Deschauer, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) are genetically heterogeneous and the diagnostic work-up including conventional genetic testing using Sanger sequencing remains complex and often unsatisfactory. We performed targeted sequencing of 23 LGMD-related genes and 15 genes in which alterations result in a similar phenotype in 58 patients with genetically unclassified LGMDs. A genetic diagnosis was possible in 19 of 58 patients (33 %). LGMD2A was the most common form, followed by LGMD2L and LGMD2I. In two patients, pathogenic mutations were identified in genes that are not classified as LGMD genes (glycogen branching enzyme and valosin-containing protein). Thus, a focused next-generation sequencing-based gene panel is a rather satisfactory tool for the diagnosis in unclassified LGMDs.

  7. North Carolina macular dystrophy (MCDR1) caused by a novel tandem duplication of the PRDM13 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lori S.; Wheaton, Dianna K.; Locke, Kirsten G.; Jones, Kaylie D.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Blanton, Susan H.; Birch, David G.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the underlying cause of disease in a large family with North Carolina macular dystrophy (NCMD). Methods A large four-generation family (RFS355) with an autosomal dominant form of NCMD was ascertained. Family members underwent comprehensive visual function evaluations. Blood or saliva from six affected family members and three unaffected spouses was collected and DNA tested for linkage to the MCDR1 locus on chromosome 6q12. Three affected family members and two unaffected spouses underwent whole exome sequencing (WES) and subsequently, custom capture of the linkage region followed by next-generation sequencing (NGS). Standard PCR and dideoxy sequencing were used to further characterize the mutation. Results Of the 12 eyes examined in six affected individuals, all but two had Gass grade 3 macular degeneration features. Large central excavation of the retinal and choroid layers, referred to as a macular caldera, was seen in an age-independent manner in the grade 3 eyes. The calderas are unique to affected individuals with MCDR1. Genome-wide linkage mapping and haplotype analysis of markers from the chromosome 6q region were consistent with linkage to the MCDR1 locus. Whole exome sequencing and custom-capture NGS failed to reveal any rare coding variants segregating with the phenotype. Analysis of the custom-capture NGS sequencing data for copy number variants uncovered a tandem duplication of approximately 60 kb on chromosome 6q. This region contains two genes, CCNC and PRDM13. The duplication creates a partial copy of CCNC and a complete copy of PRDM13. The duplication was found in all affected members of the family and is not present in any unaffected members. The duplication was not seen in 200 ethnically matched normal chromosomes. Conclusions The cause of disease in the original family with MCDR1 and several others has been recently reported to be dysregulation of the PRDM13 gene, caused by either single base substitutions in a DNase 1

  8. Duchenne型肌营养不良症基因诊断进展%The development of gene diagnoses on Duchenne muscular dystrophie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦英

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne dystrophies (DMD)是人类常见的X染色体连锁隐性遗传病,至今尚无有效的治疗方法.DMD由人类Dystrophin基因突变引起,其突变机制复杂,探索简便、准确的基因突变检测技术是DMD研究的热点之一.基因诊断已经被广泛应用到DMD的临床研究中,并且在确诊患者、筛查携带者、产前诊断以及指导基因治疗等方面取得了较大进展.%The Duchenne dystrophies (DMD) is X - linked recessive diseases that from mutations in dystrophin gene, but there are no valid interventions available for the treatment of the condition presenly. It is significant to find more feasible strategies for detecting mutations of dystrophin gene. Gene diagnosis has been widely applied to DMD in clinical research, and confirmed patients, antenatal diagnosis, screening carriers as well as guidance and achieved considerable progress in gene therapy.

  9. Identification of novel CYP4V2 gene mutations in 92 Chinese families with Bietti’s crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiao Hong; Guo, Hong; Xu, Hai Wei; Li, Qi You; Jin, Xin; Bai, Yun; Li, Shi Ying

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the spectrum of CYP4V2 gene mutations in 92 unrelated Chinese probands with Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy (BCD) and to describe the molecular and clinical characteristics of four novel CYP4V2 mutations associated with BCD. Methods All study participants underwent a complete ophthalmological examination. Mutational screening of CYP4V2 coding regions and flanking intron sequences was examined via directional Sanger sequencing, with allele separation confirmed by screening other family members. Subsequent in silico analysis of the mutational consequence on protein function was undertaken, with the impact of the novel mutation on pre-mRNA splicing examined via RT–PCR. Results Fifteen disease-causing variants were identified in 92 probands with BCD, including four novel mutations and eleven previously reported mutations. The most prevalent mutation was c.802_810del17insGC, which was detected in 69 unrelated families, with an allele frequency of 52.7% (97/184). Homozygosity was revealed in 35 unrelated families, and compound heterozygosity was observed in 43 subjects. Four patients harbored four novel variants, with these mutations cosegregated within all affected individuals and were not found in unaffected family members and 100 unrelated controls. Transcriptional analysis of a novel splice mutation revealed altered RNA splicing. In silico analysis predicted that the missense variant, p.Tyr343Asp, disrupted the CYP4V2 surface electrostatic potential distribution and spatial conformation. Among the patients with four novel mutations, genotype did not always correlate with age at onset, disease course, or electroretinogram (ERG) changes, with phenotypic variations even noted within the same genotype. Conclusions The c.802_810del17insCG mutation was the most common mutation in the 92 Chinese probands with BCD examined. Four novel mutations were identified, contributing to the spectrum of CYP4V2 mutations associated with BCD, with no clear link

  10. An empiric comparison of linkage disequilibrium parameters in disease gene localizations; the myotonic dystrophy experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podolsky, L.; Baird, S.; Korneluk, R.G. [Children`s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Analyses of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between markers of known location and disease phenotypes often provide valuable information in efforts to clone the causative genes. However, there exist a number of factors which may attenuate a consistent inverse relationship between physical distance and LD for a given pairing of a genetic marker and a human disease gene. Chief among these is the effect of the general population frequency of an allele which demonstrates LD with a disease gene. Possibly as a result of this, a number of methods of calculating LD has been proposed. We have calculated seven such LD parameters for twelve physically mapped RFLP`s from a 1.3 Mb DM gene containing region of 19q13.3 using 107 DM and 213 non-DM chromosomes. Correlation of the DM-marker physical distance with LD for the 12 loci reveals the Yule coefficient and Dij{prime} parameter to give the most consistent relationship. The D{prime} parameter shown to have a relative allele frequency independence gave only a weak correlation. A similar analysis is being carried out on published cystic fibrosis genetic and physical mapping data. The parameters identified in this study may be the most appropriate for future LD based localizations of disease genes.

  11. MUTATIONS IN CORNEAL CARBOHYDRATE SULFOTRANSFERASE 6 GENE (CHST6 IN IRANIAN MACULAR CORNEAL DYSTROPHY (MCD PATIENTS: A REPORT OF 7 PATIENTS FROM IRAN

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    HOUSHMAND Massoud MD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectiveMacular Corneal Dystrophy (MCD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder affecting the stroma of cornea. Most cases of MCD are caused by mutations in CHST6 gene. The aim of this study was to determine mutations in the carbohydrate sulfotransferase 6 gene (CHST6 through genetic analysis of 7 Iranian patients with MCD.Materials & MethodsWe screened the CHST6 gene to determine the range of pathogenic mutations. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. The coding regions of the CHST6 gene were amplified using three pairs of primers, and directly sequenced in the final step.ResultsFour mutations were found to affect the translated protein and each of them corresponded to a particular disease haplotype that has been previously reported

  12. A NEW APPROACH TO GENE DIAGNOSIS OF DUCHENNE/BECKER MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY AMPLIFIED FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许顺斌; 黄尚志; 罗会元

    1994-01-01

    Four (CA), repeats, located in introns,44,45,49 and 50 of the dystrophin gene,were evaluated in Chinese.These loci are highly polymorphic,with polymorphism information contents of 0.872,0.772,0.870 and 0.718,respectively.All four loci can be easily amplified and labelled using two duplex PCR reactions with α-32P-dCTP and can be detected by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.Using these four loci and the two polymorphic(CA)n repeats located at the 5′ and 3′ ends of the dystrophin gene,we have developed a new PCR-based procedure-Amp-FLP( amplified fragment length polymorphism)linkage analysis for the gene diagnosis of DMD/BMD.This method can detect intragenic recombination rapidly and efficiently and greatly improves the success rate of carrier deterction and prenatal diagnosis in non-deletion DMD/BMD families.All of the loci used in this procedure are intragenic.In addition ,the loci in introns 44,45,49 and 50 are located in the deletion-prone region of the dystrophin gene,making them valuable and usefui in the identification of deletion mutations.Here we report one case of deletion detection using these four loci.

  13. Advanced Gene Therapy for Treatment of Cardiomyopathy and Respiratory Insufficiency in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    lasting and elevated gene expression in cardiac and skeletal muscles in murine, canine, and rhesus monkey models, suggesting the feasibility of using...patients. Juvenile GRMD dogs will be administered a single dose of vector to the intrapleural space and serially assessed for respiratory function

  14. Brain MRI Findings in Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in 13 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (MDCIC and Fukutin-related protein (FKRP gene mutations were retrospectively reviewed in a study at Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, and European centers.

  15. Otx2 gene deletion in adult mouse retina induces rapid RPE dystrophy and slow photoreceptor degeneration.

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    Francis Béby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many developmental genes are still active in specific tissues after development is completed. This is the case for the homeobox gene Otx2, an essential actor of forebrain and head development. In adult mouse, Otx2 is strongly expressed in the retina. Mutations of this gene in humans have been linked to severe ocular malformation and retinal diseases. It is, therefore, important to explore its post-developmental functions. In the mature retina, Otx2 is expressed in three cell types: bipolar and photoreceptor cells that belong to the neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, a neighbour structure that forms a tightly interdependent functional unit together with photoreceptor cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Conditional self-knockout was used to address the late functions of Otx2 gene in adult mice. This strategy is based on the combination of a knock-in CreERT2 allele and a floxed allele at the Otx2 locus. Time-controlled injection of tamoxifen activates the recombinase only in Otx2 expressing cells, resulting in selective ablation of the gene in its entire domain of expression. In the adult retina, loss of Otx2 protein causes slow degeneration of photoreceptor cells. By contrast, dramatic changes of RPE activity rapidly occur, which may represent a primary cause of photoreceptor disease. CONCLUSIONS: Our novel mouse model uncovers new Otx2 functions in adult retina. We show that this transcription factor is necessary for long-term maintenance of photoreceptors, likely through the control of specific activities of the RPE.

  16. Testing short LNA-modified oligonucleotides for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Vanessa Borges

    2015-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Biologia Molecular e Genética, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2015 A base hereditária de cada organismo vivo é o genoma, uma longa sequência de ácido desoxirribonucleico (DNA), que contém a informação genética organizada em genes. Em eucariotas, os genes são compostos por exões, interrompidos por intrões. Os exões contêm a informação genética que é traduzida em proteína. Uma vez que a informação genética se encontra no núcleo da célula, e a maquinaria de t...

  17. A duchenne muscular dystrophy gene hot spot mutation in dystrophin-deficient cavalier king charles spaniels is amenable to exon 51 skipping.

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    Gemma L Walmsley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, which afflicts 1 in 3500 boys, is one of the most common genetic disorders of children. This fatal degenerative condition is caused by an absence or deficiency of dystrophin in striated muscle. Most affected patients have inherited or spontaneous deletions in the dystrophin gene that disrupt the reading frame resulting in unstable truncated products. For these patients, restoration of the reading frame via antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach. The major DMD deletion "hot spot" is found between exons 45 and 53, and skipping exon 51 in particular is predicted to ameliorate the dystrophic phenotype in the greatest number of patients. Currently the mdx mouse is the most widely used animal model of DMD, although its mild phenotype limits its suitability in clinical trials. The Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD model has a severe phenotype, but due to its large size, is expensive to use. Both these models have mutations in regions of the dystrophin gene distant from the commonly mutated DMD "hot spot". METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe the severe phenotype, histopathological findings, and molecular analysis of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy (CKCS-MD. The dogs harbour a missense mutation in the 5' donor splice site of exon 50 that results in deletion of exon 50 in mRNA transcripts and a predicted premature truncation of the translated protein. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated skipping of exon 51 in cultured myoblasts from an affected dog restored the reading frame and protein expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Given the small size of the breed, the amiable temperament and the nature of the mutation, we propose that CKCS-MD is a valuable new model for clinical trials of antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping and other therapeutic approaches for DMD.

  18. Myopia and Late-Onset Progressive Cone Dystrophy Associate to LVAVA/MVAVA Exon 3 Interchange Haplotypes of Opsin Genes on Chromosome X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Orsolya; Rajta, István; Vajas, Attila; Takács, Lili; Csutak, Adrienne; Fodor, Mariann; Kolozsvári, Bence; Resch, Miklós; Sényi, Katalin; Lesch, Balázs; Szabó, Viktória; Berta, András; Balogh, István; Losonczy, Gergely

    2017-03-01

    Rare interchange haplotypes in exon 3 of the OPN1LW and OPN1MW opsin genes cause X-linked myopia, color vision defect, and cone dysfunction. The severity of the disease varies on a broad scale from nonsyndromic high myopia to blue cone monochromatism. Here, we describe a new genotype-phenotype correlation attributed to rare exon 3 interchange haplotypes simultaneously present in the long- and middle-wavelength sensitive opsin genes (L- and M-opsin genes). A multigenerational family with X-linked high myopia and cone dystrophy was investigated. Affected male patients had infantile onset myopia with normal visual acuity and color vision until their forties. Visual acuity decreased thereafter, along with the development of severe protan and deutan color vision defects. A mild decrease in electroretinography response of cone photoreceptors was detected in childhood, which further deteriorated in middle-aged patients. Rods were also affected, however, to a lesser extent than cones. Clinical exome sequencing identified the LVAVA and MVAVA toxic haplotypes in the OPN1LW and OPN1MW opsin genes, respectively. Here, we show that LVAVA haplotype of the OPN1LW gene and MVAVA haplotype of the OPN1MW gene cause apparently nonsyndromic high myopia in young patients but lead to progressive cone-rod dystrophy with deuteranopia and protanopia in middle-aged patients corresponding to a previously unknown disease course. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the joint effect of these toxic haplotypes in the two opsin genes on chromosome X.

  19. Cone rod dystrophies

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    Hamel Christian P

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs (prevalence 1/40,000 are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP, also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7. Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far. The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs, CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs, and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs. It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is

  20. Screening Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients for deletions in 30 exons of the dystrophin gene by three-multiplex PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risch, N. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Deletion mutations of the dystrophin gene may cause either the severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or the milder, allelic Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and are clustered in two high-frequency-deletion regions (HFDRs) located, respectively, 500 kb and 1,200 kb downstream from the 5[prime] end of the gene. Three PCR reactions described allowed the analysis of a total of 30 exons and led, to the identification of three additional deletions involving the following exons: (a) 42 only, (b) 28-42, and (c) 16 only, none of which were detected with the two original multiplex reactions. Therefore, the three modified multiplexes detected 95 of the 96 deletions identified among the 152 patients studied so far by using Southern analysis and cDNA probes. The only deletion that remained undetected with this system involves exons 22-25 and generates the junction fragment described elsewhere. The percentage of deletion mutations among DMS/BMD patients amounts to 63%, which is in agreement with similar estimates from other laboratories. When field-inversion gel electrophoresis is coupled to Southern analysis, the detection rate of deletion and duplication mutations reaches 65%.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of RELN and GAD1 in the frontal cortex (FC) of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhubi, Adrian; Chen, Ying; Guidotti, Alessandro; Grayson, Dennis R

    2017-11-01

    Both Reelin (RELN) and glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD1) have been implicated in the pathophysiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). We have previously shown that both mRNAs are reduced in the cerebella (CB) of ASD subjects through a mechanism that involves increases in the amounts of MECP2 binding to the corresponding promoters. In the current study, we examined the expression of RELN, GAD1, GAD2, and several other mRNAs implicated in this disorder in the frontal cortices (FC) of ASD and CON subjects. We also focused on the role that epigenetic processes play in the regulation of these genes in ASD brain. Our goal is to better understand the molecular basis for the down-regulation of genes expressed in GABAergic neurons in ASD brains. We measured mRNA levels corresponding to selected GABAergic genes using qRT-PCR in RNA isolated from both ASD and CON groups. We determined the extent of binding of MECP2 and DNMT1 repressor proteins by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. The amount of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) present in the promoters of the target genes was quantified by methyl DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) and hydroxyl MeDIP (hMeDIP). We detected significant reductions in the mRNAs associated with RELN and GAD1 and significant increases in mRNAs encoding the Ten-eleven Translocation (TET) enzymes 1, 2, and 3. We also detected increased MECP2 and DNMT1 binding to the corresponding promoter regions of GAD1, RELN, and GAD2. Interestingly, there were decreased amounts of 5mC at both promoters and little change in 5hmC content in these same DNA fragments. Our data demonstrate that RELN, GAD1, and several other genes selectively expressed in GABAergic neurons, are down-regulated in post-mortem ASD FC. In addition, we observed increased DNMT1 and MECP2 binding at the corresponding promoters of these genes. The finding of increased MECP2 binding to the RELN, GAD1 and GAD2 promoters, with reduced amounts of 5mC and unchanged

  2. Homing of GAD65 specific autoimmunity and development of insulitis requires expression of both DQ8 and human GAD65 in transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elagin, Raya B.; Balijepalli, Sadguna; Diacovo, Maria J.; Baekkeskov, Steinunn; Jaume, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    MHC-class II genes determine susceptibility in human type-1 diabetes. In their context, presentation of target antigen(s) results in autoimmunity and β-cell destruction. An animal model, in which human β-cell autoantigen(s) are presented to effector-cells in the context of human MHC-class II diabetes susceptibility genes, would be desirable for studying molecular mechanisms of disease and developing antigen-specific immune-interventions. We report the development of antigen-specific insulitis in double-transgenic mice carrying the HLA-DQ8 diabetes susceptibility haplotype and expressing the human autoantigen GAD65 in pancreatic β-cells. Immunization with human GAD65 cDNA resulted in severe insulitis and low antibody levels in double-transgenic mice while control mice were mostly insulitis free. CFA/protein immunization resulted in high antibody levels and modest insulitis. Pancreatic lymphocytic infiltration progressed through stages (exocrine pancreas followed by peri and intra-insulitis). Adoptive transfer of splenocytes from DNA-immunized mice resulted in development of insulitis in recipient transgenics. Our results show that immunization with a clinically relevant, type-1 diabetes human autoantigen, in a humanized genetic setting, results in the development of an immune response that homes to islets of Langerhans. This animal model will facilitate studies of autoimmunity to GAD65 in the context of HLA-DQ8, and development of methods to induce tolerance and prevent insulitis. PMID:19289270

  3. A gene for late-onset fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy maps to chromosome 1p13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M.; Bonneau, D.; Souied, E.; Camuzat, A.; Munnich, A.; Kaplan, J. [Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Dufier, J.L. [Hopital Laeennec, Paris (France); Amalric, P. [Consultation d`Ophtalmologie, Albi (France); Weissenbach, J. [Genethon, Evry (France)

    1995-02-01

    Fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disease responsible for a progressive loss of visual acuity in adulthood, with pigmentary changes of the macula, perimacular flecks, and atrophy of the retinal pigmentary epithelium. Since this condition shares several clinical features with Stargardt disease, which has been mapped to chromosome 1p21-p13, we tested the disease for linkage to chromosome 1p. We report the mapping of the disease locus to chromosome 1p13-p21, in the genetic interval defined by loci D1S435 and D1S415, in four multiplex families (maximum lod score 4.79 at recombination fraction 0 for probe AFM217xb2 at locus D1S435). Thus, despite differences in the age at onset, clinical course, and severity, fundus flavimaculatus with macular dystrophy and Stargardt disease are probably allelic disorders. This result supports the view that allelic mutations produce a continuum of macular dystrophies, with onset in early childhood to late adulthood. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Novel mutations in DNAJB6 gene cause a very severe early-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1D disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmio, Johanna; Jonson, Per Harald; Evilä, Anni; Auranen, Mari; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Sarkozy, Anna; Kiuru-Enari, Sari; Sandell, Satu; Pihko, Helena; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-11-01

    DNAJB6 is the causative gene for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1D (LGMD1D). Four different coding missense mutations, p.F89I, p.F93I, p.F93L, and p.P96R, have been reported in families from Europe, North America and Asia. The previously known mutations cause mainly adult-onset proximal muscle weakness with moderate progression and without respiratory involvement. A Finnish family and a British patient have been studied extensively due to a severe muscular dystrophy. The patients had childhood-onset LGMD, loss of ambulation in early adulthood and respiratory involvement; one patient died of respiratory failure aged 32. Two novel mutations, c.271T > A (p.F91I) and c.271T > C (p.F91L), in DNAJB6 were identified by whole exome sequencing as a cause of this severe form of LGMD1D. The results were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The anti-aggregation effect of the mutant DNAJB6 was investigated in a filter-trap based system using transient transfection of mammalian cell lines and polyQ-huntingtin as a model for an aggregation-prone protein. Both novel mutant proteins show a significant loss of ability to prevent aggregation.

  5. Early-progressive dilated cardiomyopathy in a family with Becker muscular dystrophy related to a novel frameshift mutation in the dystrophin gene exon 27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Takeshi; Fitzgerald, Kristi; Scavena, Mena; Gidding, Samuel; Cox, Mary O; Marks, Harold; Flanigan, Kevin M; Moore, Steven A

    2015-03-01

    We report a family in which two male siblings with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) developed severe dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and progressive heart failure (HF) at age 11 years; one died at age 14 years while awaiting heart transplant and the other underwent left ventricular assist device implantation at the same age. Genetic analysis of one sibling showed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 27 of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene (c.3779_3785delCTTTGGAinsGG), in which seven base pairs are deleted and two are inserted. Although this predicts an amino-acid substitution and premature termination (p.Thr1260Argfs*8), muscle biopsy dystrophin immunostaining instead indicates that the mutation is more likely to alter splicing. Despite relatively preserved skeletal muscular performance, both the siblings developed progressive HF secondary to early-onset DCM. In addition, their 7-year-old nephew with delayed gross motor development, mild proximal muscle weakness and markedly elevated serum creatine kinase level (>13 000 IU l(-1)) at 16 months was recently demonstrated to have the familial DMD mutation. Here, we report a novel genotype of BMD with early-onset DCM and progressive lethal HF during early adolescence.

  6. Activity-Dependent Bidirectional Regulation of GAD Expression in a Homeostatic Fashion Is Mediated by BDNF-Dependent and Independent Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanno-Iijima, Yoko; Tanaka, Masami; Iijima, Takatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity, or synaptic scaling, is a mechanism that tunes neuronal transmission to compensate for prolonged, excessive changes in neuronal activity. Both excitatory and inhibitory neurons undergo homeostatic changes based on synaptic transmission strength, which could effectively contribute to a fine-tuning of circuit activity. However, gene regulation that underlies homeostatic synaptic plasticity in GABAergic (GABA, gamma aminobutyric) neurons is still poorly understood. The present study demonstrated activity-dependent dynamic scaling in which NMDA-R (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor) activity regulated the expression of GABA synthetic enzymes: glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67). Results revealed that activity-regulated BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) release is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity-dependent up-scaling of these GAD isoforms. Bidirectional forms of activity-dependent GAD expression require both BDNF-dependent and BDNF-independent pathways, both triggered by NMDA-R activity. Additional results indicated that these two GAD genes differ in their responsiveness to chronic changes in neuronal activity, which could be partially caused by differential dependence on BDNF. In parallel to activity-dependent bidirectional scaling in GAD expression, the present study further observed that a chronic change in neuronal activity leads to an alteration in neurotransmitter release from GABAergic neurons in a homeostatic, bidirectional fashion. Therefore, the differential expression of GAD65 and 67 during prolonged changes in neuronal activity may be implicated in some aspects of bidirectional homeostatic plasticity within mature GABAergic presynapses.

  7. A case of Becker muscular dystrophy resulting from the skipping of four contiguous exons (71-74) of the dystrophin gene during mRNA maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patria, S Y; Alimsardjono, H; Nishio, H; Takeshima, Y; Nakamura, H; Matsuo, M

    1996-07-01

    The mutations in one-third of both Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown because they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. Here we report the first example of multiple exon skipping during the splicing of dystrophin mRNA precursor encoded by an apparently normal dystrophin gene. A 9-year-old Japanese boy exhibiting excessive fatigue and high serum creatine kinase activity was examined for dystrophinopathy. An immunohistochemical study of muscle tissue biopsy disclosed faint and discontinuous staining of the N-terminal and rod domains of dystrophin but no staining at all of the C-terminal domain of dystrophin. The dystrophin transcript from muscle tissue was analyzed by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. An amplified product encompassing exons 67-79 of dystrophin cDNA was found to be smaller than that of the wild-type product. Sequence analysis of this fragment showed that the 3' end of exon 70 was directly connected to the 5' end of exon 75 and, thus, that exons 71-74 were completely absent. As a result, a truncated dystrophin protein lacking 110 amino acids from the C-terminal domain should result from translation of this truncated mRNA, and the patient was diagnosed as having Becker muscular dystrophy at the molecular level. Genomic DNA was analyzed to identify the cause of the disappearance of these exons. Every exon-encompassing region could be amplified from genomic DNA, indicating that the dystrophin gene is intact. Furthermore, sequencing of these amplified products did not disclose any particular nucleotide change that could be responsible for the multiple exon skipping observed. Considering that exons 71-74 are spliced out alternatively in some tissue-specific isoforms, to suppose that the alternative splicing machinery is present in the muscle tissue of the index case and that it is activated by an undetermined mechanism is reasonable. These results illustrate a novel genetic anomaly that

  8. Wasting mechanisms in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-10-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  9. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferlini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies.

  10. Targeting latent TGFβ release in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceco, Ermelinda; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon; Miller, Tamari; DeJesus, Adam; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Smith, Lucas R; Barton, Elisabeth R; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-10-22

    Latent transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) binding proteins (LTBPs) bind to inactive TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. In mice, muscular dystrophy symptoms are intensified by a genetic polymorphism that changes the hinge region of LTBP, leading to increased proteolytic susceptibility and TGFβ release. We have found that the hinge region of human LTBP4 was also readily proteolysed and that proteolysis could be blocked by an antibody to the hinge region. Transgenic mice were generated to carry a bacterial artificial chromosome encoding the human LTBP4 gene. These transgenic mice displayed larger myofibers, increased damage after muscle injury, and enhanced TGFβ signaling. In the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the human LTBP4 transgene exacerbated muscular dystrophy symptoms and resulted in weaker muscles with an increased inflammatory infiltrate and greater LTBP4 cleavage in vivo. Blocking LTBP4 cleavage may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce TGFβ release and activity and decrease inflammation and muscle damage in muscular dystrophy.

  11. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy.

  12. [Genetic diagnostic testing in inherited retinal dystrophies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, S; Biskup, S

    2013-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically highly heterogeneous. They can be divided according to the clinical phenotype and course of the disease, as well as the underlying mode of inheritance. Isolated retinal dystrophies (i.e., retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone and cone-rod dystrophy, macular dystrophy, achromatopsia, congenital stationary nightblindness) and syndromal forms (i.e., Usher syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome) can be differentiated. To date almost 180 genes and thousands of distinct mutations have been identified that are responsible for the different forms of these blinding illnesses. Until recently, there was no adequate diagnostic genetic testing available. With the development of the next generation sequencing technologies, a comprehensive genetic screening analysis for all known genes for inherited retinal dystrophies has been established at reasonable costs and in appropriate turn-around times. Depending on the primary clinical diagnosis and the presumed mode of inheritance, different diagnostic panels can be chosen for genetic testing. Statistics show that in 55-80 % of the cases the genetic defect of the inherited retinal dystrophy can be identified with this approach, depending on the initial clinical diagnosis. The aim of any genetic diagnostics is to define the genetic cause of a given illness within the affected patient and family and thereby i) confirm the clinical diagnosis, ii) provide targeted genetic testing in family members, iii) enable therapeutic intervention, iv) give a prognosis on disease course and progression and v) in the long run provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches and personalised medicine.

  13. LAMA2-related myopathy; frequency among congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkken, Nicoline; Born, Alfred Peter; Duno, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Muscular dystrophy caused by LAMA2-gene mutations is an autosomal recessive disease typically presenting as a severe, early-onset congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD). However, milder cases with a limb-girdle type muscular dystrophy (LGMD) have been described. Methods: In this study...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: myotonic dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions myotonic dystrophy myotonic dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Myotonic dystrophy is part of a group of inherited disorders ...

  15. Establishing baseline rod electroretinogram values in achromatopsia and cone dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Isaac; Khan, Naheed W; Branham, Kari; Wissinger, B; Kohl, Susanne; Heckenlively, J R

    2012-12-01

    To establish the normal range of values for rod-isolated b-wave amplitudes in achromatopsia and cone dystrophies. We reviewed charts of 112 patients with various types of cone dystrophy, and compared their standardized electroretinographic rod b-wave amplitudes with age-matched normal controls. Twenty-six patients had known mutations in achromatopsia and cone dystrophy genes, while 53 were characterized by their inheritance pattern since they had yet to have their gene identified. Visual acuity information and scotomata were documented. We found that patients with achromatopsia and cone dystrophy had rod b-wave amplitudes that were significantly lower than age-matched controls, but found no evidence of rod amplitude progression nor loss of peripheral visual fields in the study group. We found that cone dystrophy patients of all types had depressed rod-isolated ERGs across the board. If typical diagnostic criteria are used, these patients might be considered to have "abnormal" rod-isolated electroretinographic values, and might be called "cone-rod dystrophy", even though the waveforms are stable for years. Patients with cone-rod dysfunction patterns on ERG can be better understood by also performing kinetic (Goldmann) visual fields, which will help to distinguish cone dystrophies from progressive cone-rod dystrophies by central scotomata size and progression over time in many forms of cone-rod dystrophy.

  16. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): When Worry Gets Out of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health, money, or family problems. But people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) feel extremely worried or feel nervous about ... I find more information? To learn more about generalized anxiety disorder, visit: MedlinePlus (National Library of Medicine) http: / / medlineplus. ...

  17. Compartmentalization of GABA synthesis by GAD67 differs between pancreatic beta cells and neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Kanaani

    Full Text Available The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is synthesized by the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD in neurons and in pancreatic β-cells in islets of Langerhans where it functions as a paracrine and autocrine signaling molecule regulating the function of islet endocrine cells. The localization of the two non-allelic isoforms GAD65 and GAD67 to vesicular membranes is important for rapid delivery and accumulation of GABA for regulated secretion. While the membrane anchoring and trafficking of GAD65 are mediated by intrinsic hydrophobic modifications, GAD67 remains hydrophilic, and yet is targeted to vesicular membrane pathways and synaptic clusters in neurons by both a GAD65-dependent and a distinct GAD65-independent mechanism. Herein we have investigated the membrane association and targeting of GAD67 and GAD65 in monolayer cultures of primary rat, human, and mouse islets and in insulinoma cells. GAD65 is primarily detected in Golgi membranes and in peripheral vesicles distinct from insulin vesicles in β-cells. In the absence of GAD65, GAD67 is in contrast primarily cytosolic in β-cells; its co-expression with GAD65 is necessary for targeting to Golgi membranes and vesicular compartments. Thus, the GAD65-independent mechanism for targeting of GAD67 to synaptic vesicles in neurons is not functional in islet β-cells. Therefore, only GAD65:GAD65 homodimers and GAD67:GAD65 heterodimers, but not the GAD67:GAD67 homodimer gain access to vesicular compartments in β-cells to facilitate rapid accumulation of newly synthesized GABA for regulated secretion and fine tuning of GABA-signaling in islets of Langerhans.

  18. Deletion of exon 26 of the dystrophin gene is associated with a mild Becker muscular dystrophy phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten; Vissing, John

    2011-01-01

    calf hypertrophy was noted. Creatine kinase was normal or raised maximally to 500 U/l. The muscle biopsy was myopathic with increased fiber size variation and many internal nuclei, but no dystrophy. No comorbidity was found. In both cases, western blot showed a reduced dystrophin band. Genetic...... associated with an exon 26 deletion. The proband, a 23-year-old man, had slightly delayed motor milestones, walking 1 1/2 years old. He had no complaints of muscle weakness, but had muscle pain. Clinical examination revealed no muscle wasting or loss of power, but his CK was 1500-7000 U/l. Muscle biopsy...... showed dystrophic changes. He had comorbidity with dystonia, slight mental retardation, low stature and neuropathy. The brother of the proband's mother came to medical attention when he was 43 years old. He complained about muscle pain. On examination, a MRC grade 4+ hip extention palsy and a discrete...

  19. Deletion of exon 26 of the dystrophin gene is associated with a mild Becker muscular dystrophy phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten; Vissing, John

    2011-01-01

    calf hypertrophy was noted. Creatine kinase was normal or raised maximally to 500 U/l. The muscle biopsy was myopathic with increased fiber size variation and many internal nuclei, but no dystrophy. No comorbidity was found. In both cases, western blot showed a reduced dystrophin band. Genetic...... associated with an exon 26 deletion. The proband, a 23-year-old man, had slightly delayed motor milestones, walking 1 1/2 years old. He had no complaints of muscle weakness, but had muscle pain. Clinical examination revealed no muscle wasting or loss of power, but his CK was 1500-7000 U/l. Muscle biopsy...... showed dystrophic changes. He had comorbidity with dystonia, slight mental retardation, low stature and neuropathy. The brother of the proband's mother came to medical attention when he was 43 years old. He complained about muscle pain. On examination, a MRC grade 4+ hip extention palsy and a discrete...

  20. Lack of support for the association between GAD2 polymorphisms and severe human obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M Swarbrick

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The demonstration of association between common genetic variants and chronic human diseases such as obesity could have profound implications for the prediction, prevention, and treatment of these conditions. Unequivocal proof of such an association, however, requires independent replication of initial positive findings. Recently, three (-243 A>G, +61450 C>A, and +83897 T>A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within glutamate decarboxylase 2 (GAD2 were found to be associated with class III obesity (body mass index > 40 kg/m2. The association was observed among 188 families (612 individuals segregating the condition, and a case-control study of 575 cases and 646 lean controls. Functional data supporting a pathophysiological role for one of the SNPs (-243 A>G were also presented. The gene GAD2 encodes the 65-kDa subunit of glutamic acid decarboxylase-GAD65. In the present study, we attempted to replicate this association in larger groups of individuals, and to extend the functional studies of the -243 A>G SNP. Among 2,359 individuals comprising 693 German nuclear families with severe, early-onset obesity, we found no evidence for a relationship between the three GAD2 SNPs and obesity, whether SNPs were studied individually or as haplotypes. In two independent case-control studies (a total of 680 class III obesity cases and 1,186 lean controls, there was no significant relationship between the -243 A>G SNP and obesity (OR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.83-1.18, p = 0.89 in the pooled sample. These negative findings were recapitulated in a meta-analysis, incorporating all published data for the association between the -243G allele and class III obesity, which yielded an OR of 1.11 (95% CI 0.90-1.36, p = 0.28 in a total sample of 1,252 class III obese cases and 1,800 lean controls. Moreover, analysis of common haplotypes encompassing the GAD2 locus revealed no association with severe obesity in families with the condition. We also obtained functional data for the

  1. A GCG expansion (GCG)₁₁ in polyadenylate-binding protein nuclear 1 gene caused oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Juan; Zhang, Huina; Zhou, Yandan; Wu, Han; Wang, Changjun; Shi, Xin

    2011-01-01

    To identify the mutation in polyadenylate-binding protein nuclear 1 gene (PABPN1, previously termed PABP2) in a Chinese family with autosomal, dominantly inherited oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were conducted on available living family members from three generations. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes of every available family member, and the fragment flanking the (GCG)(n) of the PABPN1 gene was amplified by PCR. Mutations were screened by DNA sequencing. Photographs of deceased family members were examined for signs of OPMD. Clinical features of OPMD were found in all patients in generation II except the youngest sister, and no clinical manifestations were found in generation III. Mutation sequencing demonstrated that (GCG)₆ in the wild PABPN1 gene was expanded to heterozygous (GCG)₁₁ in all affected family members and in some but not all unaffected members. In a Chinese family with autosomal dominantly inherited OPMD, a heterozygous (GCG)₁₁ expansion was identified in all affected family members and in several young unaffected members.

  2. Precise Correction of the Dystrophin Gene in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patient Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Lisa Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a severe muscle-degenerative disease caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. Genetic correction of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs by TALENs or CRISPR-Cas9 holds promise for DMD gene therapy; however, the safety of such nuclease treatment must be determined. Using a unique k-mer database, we systematically identified a unique target region that reduces off-target sites. To restore the dystrophin protein, we performed three correction methods (exon skipping, frameshifting, and exon knockin in DMD-patient-derived iPSCs, and found that exon knockin was the most effective approach. We further investigated the genomic integrity by karyotyping, copy number variation array, and exome sequencing to identify clones with a minimal mutation load. Finally, we differentiated the corrected iPSCs toward skeletal muscle cells and successfully detected the expression of full-length dystrophin protein. These results provide an important framework for developing iPSC-based gene therapy for genetic disorders using programmable nucleases.

  3. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body move. People with MD have incorrect or missing information in their genes, which prevents them from ... some people with MD may need help getting books out during class or rides to and from ...

  4. Trinucleotide Repeat Expansion in the Transcription Factor 4 (TCF4) Gene Leads to Widespread mRNA Splicing Changes in Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieben, Eric D.; Aleff, Ross A.; Tang, Xiaojia; Butz, Malinda L.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Highsmith, Edward W.; Jen, Jin; Vasmatzis, George; Patel, Sanjay V.; Maguire, Leo J.; Baratz, Keith H.; Fautsch, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To identify RNA missplicing events in human corneal endothelial tissue isolated from Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD). Methods Total RNA was isolated and sequenced from corneal endothelial tissue obtained during keratoplasty from 12 patients with FECD and 4 patients undergoing keratoplasty or enucleation for other indications. The length of the trinucleotide repeat (TNR) CTG in the transcription factor 4 (TCF4) gene was determined using leukocyte-derived DNA analyzed by a combination of Southern blotting and Genescan analysis. Commercial statistical software was used to quantify expression of alternatively spliced genes. Validation of selected alternative splicing events was performed by using RT-PCR. Gene sets identified were analyzed for overrepresentation using Web-based analysis system. Results Corneal endothelial tissue from FECD patients containing a CTG TNR expansion sequence in the TCF4 gene revealed widespread changes in mRNA splicing, including a novel splicing event involving FGFR2. Differential splicing of NUMA1, PPFIBP1, MBNL1, and MBNL2 transcripts were identified in all FECD samples containing a TNR expansion. The differentially spliced genes were enriched for products that localize to the cell cortex and bind cytoskeletal and cell adhesion proteins. Conclusions Corneal endothelium from FECD patients harbors a unique signature of mis-splicing events due to CTG TNR expansion in the TCF4 gene, consistent with the hypothesis that RNA toxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of FECD. Changes to the endothelial barrier function, a known event in the development of FECD, was identified as a key biological process influenced by the missplicing events. PMID:28118661

  5. Novel Candidate Genes and a Wide Spectrum of Structural and Point Mutations Responsible for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies Revealed by Exome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro-Miró, Marta; Tonda, Raul; Escudero-Ferruz, Paula; Andrés, Rosa; Mayor-Lorenzo, Andrés; Castro, Joaquín; Ciccioli, Marcela; Hidalgo, Daniel A.; Rodríguez-Ezcurra, Juan José; Farrando, Jorge; Pérez-Santonja, Juan J.; Cormand, Bru; Marfany, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Background NGS-based genetic diagnosis has completely revolutionized the human genetics field. In this study, we have aimed to identify new genes and mutations by Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) responsible for inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD). Methods A cohort of 33 pedigrees affected with a variety of retinal disorders was analysed by WES. Initial prioritization analysis included around 300 IRD-associated genes. In non-diagnosed families a search for pathogenic mutations in novel genes was undertaken. Results Genetic diagnosis was attained in 18 families. Moreover, a plausible candidate is proposed for 10 more cases. Two thirds of the mutations were novel, including 4 chromosomal rearrangements, which expand the IRD allelic heterogeneity and highlight the contribution of private mutations. Our results prompted clinical re-evaluation of some patients resulting in assignment to a syndromic instead of non-syndromic IRD. Notably, WES unveiled four new candidates for non-syndromic IRD: SEMA6B, CEP78, CEP250, SCLT1, the two latter previously associated to syndromic disorders. We provide functional data supporting that missense mutations in CEP250 alter cilia formation. Conclusion The diagnostic efficiency of WES, and strictly following the ACMG/AMP criteria is 55% in reported causative genes or functionally supported new candidates, plus 30% families in which likely pathogenic or VGUS/VUS variants were identified in plausible candidates. Our results highlight the clinical utility of WES for molecular diagnosis of IRD, provide a wider spectrum of mutations and concomitant genetic variants, and challenge our view on syndromic vs non-syndromic, and causative vs modifier genes. PMID:28005958

  6. A Novel Compound Heterozygous Mutation in the CYP4V2 Gene in a Japanese Patient with Bietti’s Crystalline Corneoretinal Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Yokoi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the clinical and genetic characteristics of a Japanese family in which one member exhibited Bietti’s crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy (BCD. Methods: Using direct sequencing, mutation screening was performed in the CYP4V2 gene of both the patient with BCD and her daughter. Ophthalmic examinations were performed to determine the clinical features of both subjects. Results: The 64-year-old female patient had a bilateral visual acuity of 0.4. Slit lamp examination revealed bilateral crystalline-like deposits at the superior limbus of the cornea. Fundus examination revealed there was chorioretinal atrophy along with numerous glistening yellowish-white crystalline deposits that were scattered throughout the posterior pole and the mid-peripheral retina. Standard flash electroretinography showed an extinguished electroretinogram and Goldmann kinetic perimetry detected a relative scotoma. Genetic analysis revealed that the patient had a heterozygous mutation in the CYP4V2 gene (IVS6–8delTCATACAGGTCATCGCG/GC, which is the most commonly found mutation in Japanese patients with BCD. Furthermore, the patient was also shown to have a novel heterozygous point mutation in exon 9 of the CYP4V2 gene (c.1168C>T. In contrast, her daughter exhibited no clinical findings for BCD even though she carried the same heterozygous mutation in the CYP4V2 gene (c.1168C>T. Conclusion: A novel compound heterozygous mutation was found in the CYP4V2 gene of a patient with BCD. This previously unreported c.1168C>T mutation causes a missense mutation (p.R390C in the CYP4V2 protein.

  7. Exploiting the full power of temporal gene expression profiling through a new statistical test: Application to the analysis of muscular dystrophy data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turk Rolf

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of biologically interesting genes in a temporal expression profiling dataset is challenging and complicated by high levels of experimental noise. Most statistical methods used in the literature do not fully exploit the temporal ordering in the dataset and are not suited to the case where temporal profiles are measured for a number of different biological conditions. We present a statistical test that makes explicit use of the temporal order in the data by fitting polynomial functions to the temporal profile of each gene and for each biological condition. A Hotelling T2-statistic is derived to detect the genes for which the parameters of these polynomials are significantly different from each other. Results We validate the temporal Hotelling T2-test on muscular gene expression data from four mouse strains which were profiled at different ages: dystrophin-, beta-sarcoglycan and gamma-sarcoglycan deficient mice, and wild-type mice. The first three are animal models for different muscular dystrophies. Extensive biological validation shows that the method is capable of finding genes with temporal profiles significantly different across the four strains, as well as identifying potential biomarkers for each form of the disease. The added value of the temporal test compared to an identical test which does not make use of temporal ordering is demonstrated via a simulation study, and through confirmation of the expression profiles from selected genes by quantitative PCR experiments. The proposed method maximises the detection of the biologically interesting genes, whilst minimising false detections. Conclusion The temporal Hotelling T2-test is capable of finding relatively small and robust sets of genes that display different temporal profiles between the conditions of interest. The test is simple, it can be used on gene expression data generated from any experimental design and for any number of conditions, and it

  8. Comparison of Mutation Profiles in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene among Populations: Implications for Potential Molecular Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Berenice López-Hernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Novel therapeutic approaches are emerging to restore dystrophin function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD, a severe neuromuscular disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness. Some of the molecular therapies, such as exon skipping, stop codon read-through and internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation rely on the type and location of mutations. Hence, their potential applicability worldwide depends on mutation frequencies within populations. In view of this, we compared the mutation profiles of the populations represented in the DMD Leiden Open-source Variation Database with original data from Mexican patients (n = 162 with clinical diagnosis of the disease. Our data confirm that applicability of exon 51 is high in most populations, but also show that differences in theoretical applicability of exon skipping may exist among populations; Mexico has the highest frequency of potential candidates for the skipping of exons 44 and 46, which is different from other populations (p < 0.001. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive comparison of theoretical applicability of exon skipping targets among specific populations.

  9. Comparison of mutation profiles in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene among populations: implications for potential molecular therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Gómez-Díaz, Benjamín; Luna-Angulo, Alexandra Berenice; Anaya-Segura, Mónica; Bunyan, David John; Zúñiga-Guzman, Carolina; Escobar-Cedillo, Rosa Elena; Roque-Ramírez, Bladimir; Ruano-Calderón, Luis Angel; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; López-Hernández, Julia Angélica; Estrada-Mena, Francisco Javier; García, Silvia; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio

    2015-03-09

    Novel therapeutic approaches are emerging to restore dystrophin function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a severe neuromuscular disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness. Some of the molecular therapies, such as exon skipping, stop codon read-through and internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation rely on the type and location of mutations. Hence, their potential applicability worldwide depends on mutation frequencies within populations. In view of this, we compared the mutation profiles of the populations represented in the DMD Leiden Open-source Variation Database with original data from Mexican patients (n = 162) with clinical diagnosis of the disease. Our data confirm that applicability of exon 51 is high in most populations, but also show that differences in theoretical applicability of exon skipping may exist among populations; Mexico has the highest frequency of potential candidates for the skipping of exons 44 and 46, which is different from other populations (p < 0.001). To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive comparison of theoretical applicability of exon skipping targets among specific populations.

  10. A Multi-Center Study to Map Genes for Fuchs’ Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy: Baseline Characteristics and Heritability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louttit, Megan D; Kopplin, Laura J; Igo, Robert P; Fondran, Jeremy R; Tagliaferri, Angela; Bardenstein, David; Aldave, Anthony J; Croasdale, Christopher R; Price, Marianne; Rosenwasser, George O; Lass, Jonathan H; Iyengar, Sudha K

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the methods for family and case-control recruitment for a multi-center genetic and associated heritability analysis of Fuchs’ Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy (FECD). Methods Twenty-nine enrolling sites with 62 trained investigators and coordinators gathered individual and family information, graded the phenotype, and collected blood and/or saliva for genetic analysis on all individuals with and without FECD. The degree of FECD was assessed in a 0–6 semi-quantitative scale using standardized clinical methods with pathologic verification of FECD on at least one member of each family. Central corneal thickness was measured by ultrasonic pachymetry. Results Three hundred twenty-two families with 330 affected sibling pairs with FECD were enrolled, and included a total of 650 sibling pairs of all disease grades. Using the entire 0–6 step FECD grading scale or a dichotomous definition of severe disease, heritability was assessed in families via sib-sib correlations. Both binary indicators of severe disease as well as semi-quantitative measures of disease severity were significantly heritable, with heritability estimates of 30% for severe disease, 37–39% for FECD score and 47% for central corneal thickness. Conclusion Genetic risk factors have a strong role in the severity of the FECD phenotype and corneal thickness. Genotyping this cohort with high-density genetic markers followed by appropriate statistical analyses should lead to novel loci for disease susceptibility. PMID:22045388

  11. Gene expression in mdx mouse muscle in relation to age and exercise: aberrant mechanical-metabolic coupling and implications for pre-clinical studies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerino, Giulia Maria; Cannone, Maria; Giustino, Arcangela; Massari, Ada Maria; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Cozzoli, Anna; De Luca, Annamaria

    2014-11-01

    Weakness and fatigability are typical features of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and are aggravated in dystrophic mdx mice by chronic treadmill exercise. Mechanical activity modulates gene expression and muscle plasticity. Here, we investigated the outcome of 4 (T4, 8 weeks of age) and 12 (T12, 16 weeks of age) weeks of either exercise or cage-based activity on a large set of genes in the gastrocnemius muscle of mdx and wild-type (WT) mice using quantitative real-time PCR. Basal expression of the exercise-sensitive genes peroxisome-proliferator receptor γ coactivator 1α (Pgc-1α) and Sirtuin1 (Sirt1) was higher in mdx versus WT mice at both ages. Exercise increased Pgc-1α expression in WT mice; Pgc-1α was downregulated by T12 exercise in mdx muscles, along with Sirt1, Pparγ and the autophagy marker Bnip3. Sixteen weeks old mdx mice showed a basal overexpression of the slow Mhc1 isoform and Serca2; T12 exercise fully contrasted this basal adaptation as well as the high expression of follistatin and myogenin. Conversely, T12 exercise was ineffective in WT mice. Damage-related genes such as gp91-phox (NADPH-oxidase2), Tgfβ, Tnfα and c-Src tyrosine kinase were overexpressed in mdx muscles and not affected by exercise. Likewise, the anti-inflammatory adiponectin was lower in T12-exercised mdx muscles. Chronic exercise with minor adaptive effects in WT muscles leads to maladaptation in mdx muscles with a disequilibrium between protective and damaging signals. Increased understanding of the pathways involved in the altered mechanical-metabolic coupling may help guide appropriate physical therapies while better addressing pharmacological interventions in translational research.

  12. [Dystroglycan linkage and muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Teruo

    2002-11-01

    Dystroglycan is a key complex between basal lamina laminin, extracellularly and membrano-cytoskeleton, intracellularly. The damage of this linkage is turned out to cause muscular dystrophies. Dystroglycan knockout is lethal. Dystroglycan-associated intracellular proteins such as dystrophin, dystrobrevin, sarcoglycans, plectin and caveolin-3 are responsible for causing severe (Duchenne type) and moderate forms (Becker, LGMDs). Laminin, dystroglycan-binding extracellular protein, is deficient in the most severe form of congenital muscular dystrophy with normal intelligence and eye. Recently, a remarkable progress is made in most severe forms of congenital muscular dystrophy with anomalies of brain and eye such as Fukuyama type (Japan) and muscle-eye-brain disease (Finland). The gene product for Fukuyama type, fukutin, belongs to a family of glycosylation enzymes in bacteria and yeast. Since alpha-dystroglycan contains 14-15 o-glycans, ser/thr-mannose 2-1 GlcNAc 4-1 Gal 3-2 Sial in the middle third mucin-domain and the sial-o-glycan is essential for laminin-binding, and since alpha-dystroglycan is defective in Fukuyama type sarcolemma with anti both sugar moiety- and peptide-antidodies, defective fukutin causes incomplete o-glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan. In '02, it is clarified that a glycosylation enzyme, POMGnT1 which modifies GlcNAc onto ser/thr-mannose, is defective in 6 MEB patients. The loss of the enzyme activity is turned out to lose alpha-dystroglycan from sarcolemma of MEB. These data strongly suggests that o-glycosylation defect of alpha-dystroglycan causes the most severe congenital muscular dystrophy such as Fukuyama type, MEB and Walker Warburg syndrome.

  13. GAD65 is essential for synthesis of GABA destined for tonic inhibition regulating epileptiform activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne B; Nilsen, Linn Hege; Eyjolfsson, Elvar M;

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: GABA is synthesized from glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), which exists in two isoforms, that is, GAD65 and GAD67. In line with GAD65 being located in the GABAergic synapse, several studies have demonstrated that this isoform is important during sustained synaptic transmission....... In contrast, the functional significance of GAD65 in the maintenance of GABA destined for extrasynaptic tonic inhibition is less well studied. Using GAD65-/- and wild type GAD65+/+ mice, this was examined employing the cortical wedge preparation, a model suitable for investigating extrasynaptic GABA......(A) receptor activity. An impaired tonic inhibition in GAD65-/- mice was revealed demonstrating a significant role of GAD65 in the synthesis of GABA acting extrasynaptically. The correlation between an altered tonic inhibition and metabolic events as well as the functional and metabolic role of GABA...

  14. Gluconic acid production by gad mutant of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dexin; Wang, Chenhong; Wei, Dong; Shi, Jiping; Kim, Chul Ho; Jiang, Biao; Han, Zengsheng; Hao, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae produces many economically important chemicals. Using glucose as a carbon source, the main metabolic product in K. pneumoniae is 2,3-butanediol. Gluconic acid is an intermediate of the glucose oxidation pathway. In the current study, a metabolic engineering strategy was used to develop a gluconic acid-producing K. pneumoniae strain. Deletion of gad, resulting in loss of gluconate dehydrogenase activity, led to the accumulation of gluconic acid in the culture broth. Gluconic acid accumulation by K. pneumoniae Δgad was an acid-dependent aerobic process, with accumulation observed at pH 5.5 or lower, and at higher levels of oxygen supplementation. Under all other conditions tested, 2,3-butanediol was the main metabolic product of the process. In fed batch fermentation, a final concentration of 422 g/L gluconic acid was produced by K. pneumoniae Δgad, and the conversion ratio of glucose to gluconic acid reached 1 g/g. The K. pneumoniae Δgad described in this study is the first genetically modified strain used for gluconic acid production, and this optimized method for gluconic acid production may have important industrial applications. Gluconic acid is an intermediate of this glucose oxidation pathway. Deletion of gad, resulting in loss of gluconate dehydrogenase activity, led to the accumulation of gluconic acid in the culture broth. In fed batch fermentation, a final concentration of 422 g/L gluconic acid was produced by the K. pneumoniae Δgad strain, and the conversion ratio of glucose to gluconic acid reached 1 g/g.

  15. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  16. Expression of the gene for large subunit of m-calpain is elevated in skeletal muscle from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tajamul Hussain; Harleen Mangath; C. Sundaram; M. P. J. S. Anandaraj

    2000-08-01

    Calpain is an intracellular nonlysosomal protease involved in essential regulatory or processing functions of the cell, mediated by physiological concentrations of Ca2+. However, in an environment of abnormal intracellular calcium, such as that seen in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), calpain is suggested to cause degeneration of muscle owing to enhanced activity. To test whether the reported increase in calpain activity in DMD results from de novo synthesis of the protease, we have assessed the quantitative changes in mRNA specific for m-calpain. mRNA isolated from DMD and control muscle was analysed by dot blot hybridization using a cDNA probe for the large subunit of m-calpain. Compared to control a four-fold increase in specific mRNAwas observed in dystrophic muscle. This enhanced expression of the m-calpain gene in dystrophic condition suggests that the reported increase in m-calpain activity results from de novo synthesis of protease and underlines the important role of m-calpain in DMD.

  17. Severe congenital muscular dystrophy in a Mexican family with a new nonsense mutation (R2578X) in the laminin alpha-2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral-Vazquez, Ramon M; Rosas-Vargas, Haydee; Meza-Espinosa, Pedro; Mendoza, Irma; Huicochea, Juan C; Ramon, Guillermo; Salamanca, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders. Approximately one half of cases diagnosed with classic CMD show primary deficiency of the laminin alpha2 chain of merosin. Complete absence of this protein is usually associated with a severe phenotype characterized by drastic muscle weakness and characteristic changes in white matter in cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we report an 8-month-old Mexican female infant, from a consanguineous family, with classical CMD. Serum creatine kinase was elevated, muscle biopsy showed dystrophic changes, and there were abnormalities in brain MRI. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated the complete absence of laminin alpha2. In contrast, expression of alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-sarcoglycans and dystrophin, all components of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, appeared normal. A homozygous C long right arrow T substitution at position 7781 that generated a stop codon in the G domain of the protein was identified by mutation analysis of the laminin alpha2 gene ( LAMA2). Sequence analysis on available DNA samples of the family showed that parents and other relatives were carriers of the mutation.

  18. A Drosophila model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, Mariska Cathelijne van der

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a severe X-linked disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and sometimes mild mental retardation. The disease is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. DMD is correlated with the absence of Dp427, which is located along the sarcolemma in skeletal

  19. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy:Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rady Ho; My-Le Nguyen; Paul Mather

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy(BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed.

  20. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerard, X.; Garanto Iglesias, A.; Rozet, J.M.; Collin, R.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several

  1. [Current studies in myotonic dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yimeng; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2014-03-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a genetic, progressive, multisystemic disease with muscular disorder as its primary symptom. There are two types of DM (DM1 and DM2) caused by mutations in different genes, and in Japan, DM occurs with an incidence of approximately 1 in 20,000. The pathogenic mechanism underlying the disease is RNA toxicity caused by transcripts of aberrantly elongated CTG or CCTG repeats located in the 3' untranslated region or in the intron. The current treatments for DM is limited to symptomatic care. In this review, we will discuss several new therapeutic strategies based on recent studies of RNA toxicity.

  2. Porcine Zygote Injection with Cas9/sgRNA Results in DMD-Modified Pig with Muscle Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-Hao Yu; Heng Zhao; Yu-Bo Qing; Wei-Rong Pan; Bao-Yu Jia; Hong-Ye Zhao; Xing-Xu Huang; Hong-Jiang Wei

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophinopathy, including Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscle dystrophy (BMD) is an incurable X-linked hereditary muscle dystrophy caused by a mutation in the DMD gene in coding dystrophin. Advances in further understanding DMD/BMD for therapy are expected. Studies on mdx mice and dogs with muscle dystrophy provide limited insight into DMD disease mechanisms and therapeutic testing because of the different pathological manifestations. Miniature pigs share similar physiology an...

  3. Learning about Myotonic Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Genetic Tests Genomics and Health Disparities Genetic Discrimination Human Subjects Research Informed Consent for Genomics Research ... with myotonic dystrophy may have a characteristic facial appearance of wasting and weakness of the jaw and ...

  4. Muscular Dystrophy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Families Live Unlimited Read More Deflazacort demonstrates significant muscle strength improvement in DMD Read More NDA Filing ... the Boot to Support Kids and Adults with Muscular Dystrophy, ALS and Related Diseases Read More Visit ...

  5. 面肩肱型肌营养不良症的基因诊断%Gene diagnosis of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾缨; 张成; 苏全喜

    2001-01-01

    目的对中国人面肩肱型肌营养不良症进行基因诊断。方法用EcoRⅠ以及EcoRⅠ/BlnⅠ消化基因组DNA,0.6%琼脂糖凝胶电泳,P13E11探针进行Southern印迹杂交。结果患者所得EcoRⅠ+BlnⅠ/P13E11 DNA片段长度在15~33 kb之间,而正常对照在41kb以上。发现两个症状前患者。结论以P13E11探针通过Southern印迹杂交探测EcoRⅠ/BlnⅠ双酶消化的基因组DNA可对中国人绝大部分面肩肱型肌营养不良症进行基因诊断,并可进行症状前诊断。%Objective  Perform gene diagnosis for Chinese facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy(FSHD). Methods  Digest genome DNA with restriction enzymes EcoRⅠ only and EcoRⅠ associated with BlnⅠ. Use 0.6% agarose gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting hybridization with probe P13E11. Results  For FSHD patients, the sizes of EcoRⅠ+BlnⅠ/P13E11 DNA fragments ranged from 15kb to 33kb. For normal controls, they were over 41kb. Two presymptomatic patients were found. Conclusion  It is feasible to perform gene diagnosis and presymptomatic diagnosis for most Chinese FSHD patients by Southern blotting hybridization with probe P13E11, following double digestion of genome DNA with restriction enzymes EcoRⅠ and BlnⅠ.

  6. Large deletions of the KCNV2 gene are common in patients with cone dystrophy with supernormal rod response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissinger, Bernd; Schaich, Simone; Baumann, Britta

    2011-01-01

    KCNV2 gene and one also includes the adjacent VLDLR gene. Furthermore, we investigated N-terminal amino acid substitution mutations for its effect on interaction with Kv2.1 using yeast two-hybrid technology. We found that these mutations dramatically reduce or abolish this interaction suggesting a lack...

  7. Expression profiling of muscles from Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy and laminin-alpha 2 deficient congenital muscular dystrophy; is congenital muscular dystrophy a primary fibrotic disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Mariko; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Noguchi, Satoru; Sese, Jun; Okinaga, Takeshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi; Guicheney, Pascale; Ozono, Keiichi; Nishino, Ichizo; Morishita, Shinichi; Toda, Tatsushi

    2006-04-07

    Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) and laminin-alpha2 deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) are congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) and they both are categorized into the same clinical entity of muscular dystrophy as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). All three disorders share a common etiologic defect in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, which connects muscle structural proteins with the extracellular basement membrane. To investigate the pathophysiology of these CMDs, we generated microarray gene expression profiles of skeletal muscle from patients in various clinical stages. Despite diverse pathological changes, the correlation coefficient of overall gene expression among these samples was considerably high. We performed a multi-dimensional statistical analysis, the Distillation, to extract determinant genes that distinguish CMD muscle from normal controls. Up-regulated genes were primarily extracellular matrix (ECM) components, whereas down-regulated genes included structural components of mature muscle. These observations reflect active interstitial fibrosis with less active regeneration of muscle cell components in the CMDs, characteristics that are clearly distinct from those of DMD. Although the severity of fibrosis varied among the specimens tested, ECM gene expression was consistently high without substantial changes through the clinical course. Further, in situ hybridization showed more prominent ECM gene expression on muscle cells than on interstitial tissue cells, suggesting that ECM components are induced by regeneration process rather than by 'dystrophy.' These data imply that the etiology of FCMD and MDC1A differs from that of the chronic phase of classical muscular dystrophy, and the major pathophysiologic change in CMDs might instead result from primary active fibrosis.

  8. Cofactor-dependent conformational heterogeneity of GAD65 and its role in autoimmunity and neurotransmitter homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Itamar; Hoke, David E; Costa, Mauricio G S; Reboul, Cyril F; Porebski, Benjamin T; Cowieson, Nathan P; Leh, Hervé; Pennacchietti, Eugenia; McCoey, Julia; Kleifeld, Oded; Borri Voltattorni, Carla; Langley, David; Roome, Brendan; Mackay, Ian R; Christ, Daniel; Perahia, David; Buckle, Malcolm; Paiardini, Alessandro; De Biase, Daniela; Buckle, Ashley M

    2014-06-24

    The human neuroendocrine enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyses the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor. GAD exists as two isoforms named according to their respective molecular weights: GAD65 and GAD67. Although cytosolic GAD67 is typically saturated with the cofactor (holoGAD67) and constitutively active to produce basal levels of GABA, the membrane-associated GAD65 exists mainly as the inactive apo form. GAD65, but not GAD67, is a prevalent autoantigen, with autoantibodies to GAD65 being detected at high frequency in patients with autoimmune (type 1) diabetes and certain other autoimmune disorders. The significance of GAD65 autoinactivation into the apo form for regulation of neurotransmitter levels and autoantibody reactivity is not understood. We have used computational and experimental approaches to decipher the nature of the holo → apo conversion in GAD65 and thus, its mechanism of autoinactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations of GAD65 reveal coupling between the C-terminal domain, catalytic loop, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-binding domain that drives structural rearrangement, dimer opening, and autoinactivation, consistent with limited proteolysis fragmentation patterns. Together with small-angle X-ray scattering and fluorescence spectroscopy data, our findings are consistent with apoGAD65 existing as an ensemble of conformations. Antibody-binding kinetics suggest a mechanism of mutually induced conformational changes, implicating the flexibility of apoGAD65 in its autoantigenicity. Although conformational diversity may provide a mechanism for cofactor-controlled regulation of neurotransmitter biosynthesis, it may also come at a cost of insufficient development of immune self-tolerance that favors the production of GAD65 autoantibodies.

  9. Adult and embryonic GAD transcripts are spatiotemporally regulated during postnatal development in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Popp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, is synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD. GAD exists in two adult isoforms, GAD65 and GAD67. During embryonic brain development at least two additional transcripts exist, I-80 and I-86, which are distinguished by insertions of 80 or 86 bp into GAD67 mRNA, respectively. Though it was described that embryonic GAD67 transcripts are not detectable during adulthood there are evidences suggesting re-expression under certain pathological conditions in the adult brain. In the present study we systematically analyzed for the first time the spatiotemporal distribution of different GADs with emphasis on embryonic GAD67 mRNAs in the postnatal brain using highly sensitive methods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: QPCR was used to precisely investigate the postnatal expression level of GAD related mRNAs in cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb of rats from P1 throughout adulthood. Within the first three postnatal weeks the expression of both GAD65 and GAD67 mRNAs reached adult levels in hippocampus, cortex, and cerebellum. The olfactory bulb showed by far the highest expression of GAD65 as well as GAD67 transcripts. Embryonic GAD67 splice variants were still detectable at birth. They continuously declined to barely detectable levels during postnatal development in all investigated regions with exception of a comparatively high expression in the olfactory bulb. Radioactive in situ hybridizations confirmed the occurrence of embryonic GAD67 transcripts in the olfactory bulb and furthermore detected their localization mainly in the subventricular zone and the rostral migratory stream. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Embryonic GAD67 transcripts can hardly be detected in the adult brain, except for specific regions associated with neurogenesis and high synaptic plasticity. Therefore a functional role in processes like proliferation, migration or

  10. Instability of the expanded (CTG){sub n} repeats in the myotonin protein kinase gene in cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Patel, B.J.; Monckton, D.G. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and other

    1996-08-15

    The mutation associated with myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the expansion of an unstable trinucleotide repeat, (CTG){sub n}, in the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the myotonin protein kinase gene. Although expanded repeats show both germline and somatic instability, the mechanisms of the instability are poorly understood. To establish a model system in which somatic instability of the DM repeat could be studied in more detail, we established lymphoblastoid cell lines (LBCL) from DM patients. Analysis of the DNA from DM LBCL using Southern blotting showed that the (CTG). repeats were apparently stable up to 29 passages in culture. To study infrequent repeat size mutations that are undetectable due to the size heterogeneity, we established LBCL of single-cell origins by cloning using multiple steps of limiting dilution. After expansion to approximately 10{sup 6} cells (equivalent to approximately 20 cell cycles), the DNAs of these cell lines were analyzed by the small pool PCR technique using primers flanking the (CTG), repeat region. Two types of mutations of the expanded (CTG){sub n} repeat alleles were detected: (1) frequent mutations that show small changes of the (CTG){sub n} repeat size, resulting in alleles in a normal distribution around the progenitor allele, and (2) relatively rare mutations with large changes of the (CTG){sub n} repeat size, with a bias toward contraction. The former may represent the mechanism responsible for the so matic heterogeneity of the (CTG), repeat size observe in blood cells of DM patients. This in vitro experimental system will be useful for further studies on mechanisms involved in the regulation of the somatic stability of the (CTG). repeats in DM. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Pedigree analysis and exclusion of alpha-tocopherol transfer protein (TTPA) as a candidate gene for neuroaxonal dystrophy in the American Quarter Horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finno, C J; Famula, T; Aleman, M; Higgins, R J; Madigan, J E; Bannasch, D L

    2013-01-01

    Equine neuroaxonal dystrophy/equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy (NAD/EDM) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting young horses of various breeds that resembles ataxia with vitamin E deficiency in humans, an inherited disorder caused by mutations in the alpha-tocopherol transfer protein gene (TTPA). To evaluate variants found upon sequencing TTPA in the horse, the mode of inheritance for NAD/EDM had to be established. NAD/EDM in the American Quarter Horse (QH) is caused by a mutation in TTPA. 88 clinically phenotyped (35 affected [ataxia score ≥2], 53 unaffected) QHs with a diagnosis of NAD/EDM with 6 affected and 4 unaffected cases confirmed at postmortem examination. Pedigrees and genotypes across 54,000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were assessed to determine heritability and mode of inheritance of NAD/EDM. TTPA sequence of exon/intron boundaries was evaluated in 2 affected and 2 control horses. An association analysis was performed by 71 SNPs surrounding TTPA and 8 SNPs within TTPA that were discovered by sequencing. RT-PCR for TTPA was performed on mRNA from the liver of 4 affected and 4 control horses. Equine NAD/EDM appears to be inherited as a polygenic trait and, within this family of QHs, demonstrates high heritability. Sequencing of TTPA identified 12 variants. No significant association was found using the 79 available variants in and surrounding TTPA. RT-PCR yielded PCR products of equivalent sizes between affected cases and controls. NAD/EDM demonstrates heritability in this family of QHs. Variants in TTPA are not responsible for NAD/EDM in this study population. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Decline in titers of anti-idiotypic antibodies specific to autoantibodies to GAD65 (GAD65Ab precedes development of GAD65Ab and type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Elding Larsson

    Full Text Available The humoral Idiotypic Network consisting of antibodies and their anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id can be temporarily upset by antigen exposure. In the healthy immune response the original equilibrium is eventually restored through counter-regulatory mechanisms. In certain autoimmune diseases however, autoantibody levels exceed those of their respective anti-Id, indicating a permanent disturbance in the respective humoral Idiotypic Network. We investigated anti-Id directed to a major Type 1 diabetes (T1D-associated autoantibody (GAD65Ab in two independent cohorts during progression to disease. Samples taken from participants of the Natural History Study showed significantly lower anti-Id levels in individuals that later progressed to T1D compared to non-progressors (anti-Id antibody index of 0.06 vs. 0.08, respectively, p = 0.02. We also observed a significant inverse correlation between anti-Id levels and age at sampling, but only in progressors (p = 0.014. Finally, anti-Id levels in progressors showed a significant decline during progression as compared to longitudinal anti-Id levels in non-progressors (median rate of change: -0.0004 vs. +0.0004, respectively, p = 0.003, suggesting a loss of anti-Id during progression. Our analysis of the Diabetes Prediction in Skåne cohort showed that early in life (age 2 individuals at risk have anti-Id levels indistinguishable from those in healthy controls, indicating that low anti-Id levels are not an innate characteristic of the immune response in individuals at risk. Notably, anti-Id levels declined significantly in individuals that later developed GAD65Ab suggesting that the decline in anti-Id levels precedes the emergence of GAD65Ab (median rate of change: -0.005 compared to matched controls (median rate of change: +0.001 (p = 0.0016. We conclude that while anti-Id are present early in life, their levels decrease prior to the appearance of GAD65Ab and to the development of T1D.

  13. Ex vivo gene editing of the dystrophin gene in muscle stem cells mediated by peptide nucleic acid single stranded oligodeoxynucleotides induces stable expression of dystrophin in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nik-Ahd, Farnoosh; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which result in the complete absence of dystrophin protein throughout the body. Gene correction strategies hold promise to treating DMD. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated the ability of peptide nucleic acid single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (PNA-ssODNs) to permanently correct single-point mutations at the genomic level. In this study, we show that PNA-ssODNs can target and correct muscle satellite cells (SCs), a population of stem cells capable of self-renewing and differentiating into muscle fibers. When transplanted into skeletal muscles, SCs transfected with correcting PNA-ssODNs were able to engraft and to restore dystrophin expression. The number of dystrophin-positive fibers was shown to significantly increase over time. Expression was confirmed to be the result of the activation of a subpopulation of SCs that had undergone repair as demonstrated by immunofluorescence analyses of engrafted muscles using antibodies specific to full-length dystrophin transcripts and by genomic DNA analysis of dystrophin-positive fibers. Furthermore, the increase in dystrophin expression detected over time resulted in a significant improvement in muscle morphology. The ability of transplanted cells to return into quiescence and to activate upon demand was confirmed in all engrafted muscles following injury. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using gene editing strategies to target and correct SCs and further establish the therapeutic potential of this approach to permanently restore dystrophin expression into muscle of DMD patients.

  14. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Mah JK

    2016-01-01

    Jean K Mah Department of Pediatrics and Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Abstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the...

  15. Diagnosis and cell-based therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans, mice, and zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetically caused muscle degenerative disorders. The Kunkel laboratory has had a longstanding research program into the pathogenesis and treatment of these diseases. Starting with our identification of dystrophin as the defective protein in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), we have continued our work on normal dystrophin function and how it is altered in muscular dystrophy. Our work has led to the identification of the defective genes in...

  16. Preliminary study on the molecular structure of 3’ region of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene in Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余龙; 赵寿元

    1996-01-01

    Number and order of HindⅢ exon-containing fragments (Hd) at 3’ region of DMD gene were studied systematically using 16 partly-overlapping cDNA subprobes which were produced from dystrophin cDNA 9- 14 with each of 9 restriction endonudeases. There are 25 Hd fragments corresponding to cDNA 9 -14 in DMD gene. Since then, the exact length and the new order of Hd fragments are established. A new 2.1 kb fragment (Hd 55) is revealed, a 5.2 kb fragment (formely designated as Hd 59) is excluded and the existence of a controversial 3.2 kb fragment (Hd 64) is confirmed. Besides, three new exons were revealed by comparing the PvuⅡ and the XbaⅠ hybridization patterns with the Hindlll hybridization patterns for these cDNA subprobes. It is concluded that there are at least 66 Hd fragments, or 79 exons in DMD gene basing on the discovery of three additional exons. The corresponding relationship between the 66 Hd fragments and the SfiⅠ large scale physical map has been studied, and at least 17 Hd fragments or 19 exo

  17. Occult Macular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işıl Sayman Muslubaş

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Occult macular dystrophy is an inherited macular dystrophy characterized by a progressive decline of bilateral visual acuity with normal fundus appearance, fluorescein angiogram and full-field electroretinogram. This case report presents a 20-year-old female patient with bilateral progressive decline of visual acuity for six years. Her visual acuity was 3-4/10 in both eyes. Anterior segment and fundus examination, fluorescein angiogram and full-field electroretinogram were normal. She could read all Ishihara pseudoisochromatic plates. Fundus autofluorescence imaging was normal. There was a mild central hyporeflectance on fundus infrared reflectance imaging in both eyes. Reduced foveal thickness and alterations of the photoreceptor inner and outer segment junction were observed by optical coherence tomography in both eyes. Central scotoma was also found by microperimetry and reduced central response was revealed by multifocal electroretinogram in both eyes. These findings are consistent with the clinical characteristics of occult macular dystrophy

  18. Clinical and molecular genetic spectrum of autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy due to mutations of the lamin A/C gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, G; Mercuri, E; Muchir, A; Urtizberea, A; Bécane, H M; Recan, D; Merlini, L; Wehnert, M; Boor, R; Reuner, U; Vorgerd, M; Wicklein, E M; Eymard, B; Duboc, D; Penisson-Besnier, I; Cuisset, J M; Ferrer, X; Desguerre, I; Lacombe, D; Bushby, K; Pollitt, C; Toniolo, D; Fardeau, M; Schwartz, K; Muntoni, F

    2000-08-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is characterized by early contractures of the elbows and Achilles tendons, slowly progressive muscle wasting and weakness, and life-threatening cardiomyopathy with conduction blocks. We recently identified LMNA encoding two nuclear envelope proteins, lamins A and C, to be implicated in the autosomal dominant form of EDMD. Here, we report on the variability of the phenotype and spectrum of LMNA mutations in 53 autosomal dominant EDMD patients (36 members of 6 families and 17 sporadic cases). Twelve of the 53 patients showed cardiac involvement exclusively, although the remaining 41 all showed muscle weakness and contractures. We were able to identify a common phenotype among the patients with skeletal muscle involvement, consisting of humeroperoneal wasting and weakness, scapular winging, rigidity of the spine, and elbow and Achilles tendon contractures. The disease course was generally slow, but we observed either a milder phenotype characterized by late onset and a mild degree of weakness and contractures or a more severe phenotype with early presentation and a rapidly progressive course in a few cases. Mutation analysis identified 18 mutations in LMNA (i.e., 1 nonsense mutation, 2 deletions of a codon, and 15 missense mutations). All the mutations were distributed between exons 1 and 9 in the region of LMNA that is common to lamins A and C. LMNA mutations arose de novo in 76% of the cases; 2 of these de novo mutations were typical hot spots, and 2 others were identified in 2 unrelated cases. There was no clear correlation between the phenotype and type or localization of the mutations within the gene. Moreover, a marked inter- and intra-familial variability in the clinical expression of LMNA mutations exists, ranging from patients expressing the full clinical picture of EDMD to those characterized only by cardiac involvement, which points toward a significant role of possible modifier genes in the course of this disease

  19. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei [Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Ouyang, Pin, E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  20. A novel point mutation (G[sup [minus]1] to T) in a 5[prime] splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, Yoko; Nishio, Hisahide; Kitoh, Yoshihiko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Narita, Naoko; Wada, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Matsuo, Masafumi (Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. The authors now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5[prime] splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5[prime] splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G[sup [minus]1]-to-T mutation at the 5[prime] splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Limb girdle muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of the study was to describe the clinical spectrum of limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs), the pitfalls of the current classification system for LGMDs, and emerging therapies for these conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: Close to half of all LGMD subtypes have been...

  2. Dominant cystoid macular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saksens, N.T.M.; Huet, R.A.C. van; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.; Boon, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics and long-term follow-up in patients with autosomal dominant cystoid macular dystrophy (DCMD). DESIGN: Retrospective case series. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-seven patients with DCMD. METHODS: Extensive ophthalmic examination, including visual acuity (VA),

  3. Central areolar choroidal dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, C.J.F.; Klevering, B.J.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, M.N.; Theelen, T.; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics, follow-up data and molecular genetic background in a large group of patients with central areolar choroidal dystrophy (CACD). DESIGN: Retrospective case series study. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred three patients with CACD from the Netherlands. METHODS

  4. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1): a triplet repeat expansion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok; Agarwal, Sarita; Agarwal, Divya; Phadke, Shubha R

    2013-06-15

    Myotonic dystrophy is a progressive multisystem genetic disorder affecting about 1 in 8000 people worldwide. The unstable repeat expansions of (CTG)n or (CCTG)n in the DMPK and ZNF9 genes cause the two known subtypes of myotonic dystrophy: (i) myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and (ii) myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) respectively. There is currently no cure but supportive management helps equally to reduce the morbidity and mortality and patients need close follow up to pay attention to their clinical problems. This review will focus on the clinical features, molecular view and genetics, diagnosis and management of DM1.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Bietti crystalline dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Bietti crystalline dystrophy Bietti crystalline dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Bietti crystalline dystrophy is a disorder in which numerous ...

  6. Primary cataract as a key to recognition of myotonic dystrophy type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Erasmus, C.E.; Ockeloen, C.W.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Eggink, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Primary cataract is often the initial manifestation of the adult-onset type of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), the most common muscular dystrophy in adults. It is caused by a CTG repeat expansion within the DMPK gene, and anticipation may cause earlier onset and more severe symptoms in

  7. Diagnostic Validity of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 7 (GAD-7 among Pregnant Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Yue Zhong

    Full Text Available Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD during pregnancy is associated with several adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes. A reliable and valid screening tool for GAD should lead to earlier detection and treatment. Among pregnant Peruvian women, a brief screening tool, the GAD-7, has not been validated. This study aims to evaluate the reliability and validity of the GAD-7.Of 2,978 women who attended their first perinatal care visit and had the GAD-7 screening, 946 had a Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. The Cronbach's alpha was calculated to examine the reliability. We assessed the criterion validity by calculating operating characteristics. The construct validity was evaluated using factor analysis and association with health status on the CIDI. The cross-cultural validity was explored using the Rasch Rating Scale Model (RSM.The reliability of the GAD-7 was good (Cronbach's alpha = 0.89. A cutoff score of 7 or higher, maximizing the Youden Index, yielded a sensitivity of 73.3% and a specificity of 67.3%. One-factor structure of the GAD-7 was confirmed by exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Concurrent validity was supported by the evidence that higher GAD-7 scores were associated with poor self-rated physical and mental health. The Rasch RSM further confirmed the cross-cultural validity of the GAD-7.The results suggest that the Spanish-language version of the GAD-7 may be used as a screening tool for pregnant Peruvian women. The GAD-7 has good reliability, factorial validity, and concurrent validity. The optimal cutoff score obtained by maximizing the Youden Index should be considered cautiously; women who screened positive may require further investigation to confirm GAD diagnosis.

  8. Functional protein networks unifying limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrée, Antoine de

    2011-01-01

    Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD) is a rare progressive heterogeneous disorder that can be caused by mutations in at least 21 different genes. These genes are often widely expressed and encode proteins with highly differing functions. And yet mutations in all of them give rise to a similar clini

  9. Functional protein networks unifying limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrée, Antoine de

    2011-01-01

    Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD) is a rare progressive heterogeneous disorder that can be caused by mutations in at least 21 different genes. These genes are often widely expressed and encode proteins with highly differing functions. And yet mutations in all of them give rise to a similar

  10. A paleointensity test of the geocentric axial dipole (GAD) hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veikkolainen, Toni; Heimpel, Moritz; Evans, Michael E.; Pesonen, Lauri J.; Korhonen, Kimmo

    2017-04-01

    The geocentric axial dipole (GAD) model is central to many aspects of geophysics, including plate tectonics and paleoclimate. But its validity is by no means firmly established, particularly for the Precambrian. One test that has met with some success involves the distribution of paleomagnetic inclination angles. It works because any given field morphology has its own distinct probability distribution function (PDF) against which data compilations can be tested. Here, we investigate a second possible test using published paleointensity data. Once again, any given field morphology has a specific PDF of intensity. Likely field models consist of an underlying GAD on which is superimposed modest zonal quadrupole and octupole components. The corresponding paleointensity PDFs turn out to have more complicated shapes than their inclination counterparts, often having multiple maxima and minima. Given sufficient data, this complexity offers greater discrimination between models. In this paper, the potential of the paleointensity test is assessed using an extension of the PINT paleointensity database. We found it useful to analyse the Phanerozoic and Precambrian intervals separately. Despite the inherent limitations of this kind of analysis, a tripartite geodynamo with small zonal multipoles appears to be a good starting point on a way towards more fine-tuned models.

  11. Anoctamin 5 muscular dystrophy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten; Petri, Helle

    2013-01-01

    Since the initial description in 2010 of anoctamin 5 deficiency as a cause of muscular dystrophy, a handful of papers have described this disease in cases of mixed populations. We report the first large regional study and present data on new aspects of prevalence, muscular and cardiac phenotypic...... characteristics, and muscle protein expression. All patients in our neuromuscular unit with genetically unclassified, recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2), Miyoshi-type distal myopathy (MMD) or persistent asymptomatic hyperCK-emia (PACK) were assessed for mutations in the ANO5 gene. Genetically...... confirmed patients were evaluated with muscular and cardiopulmonary examination. Among 40 unclassified patients (28 LGMD2, 5 MMD, 7 PACK), 20 were homozygous or compound heterozygous for ANO5 mutations, (13 LGMD2, 5 MMD, 2 PACK). Prevalence of ANO5 deficiency in Denmark was estimated at 1:100.000 and ANO5...

  12. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J.;

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehens...

  13. Genetics of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Danny S C; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Ng, Tsz Kin; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by crystalline deposits in the retina, followed by progressive atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris, and photoreceptors. CYP4V2 has been identified as the causative gene for BCD. The CYP4V2 gene belongs to the cytochrome P450 superfamily and encodes for fatty acid ω-hydroxylase of both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The CYP4V2 protein is localized most abundantly within the endoplasmic reticulum in the RPE and is postulated to play a role in the physiological lipid recycling system between the RPE and photoreceptors to maintain visual function. Electroretinographic assessments have revealed progressive dysfunction of rod and cone photoreceptors in patients with BCD. Several genotypes have been associated with more severe phenotypes based on clinical and electrophysiological findings. With the advent of multimodal imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, more precise delineation of BCD severity and progression is now possible, allowing for the potential future development of targets for gene therapy.

  14. Common Distribution of gad Operon in Lactobacillus brevis and its GadA Contributes to Efficient GABA Synthesis toward Cytosolic Near-Neutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinglong; Tun, Hein Min; Law, Yee-Song; Khafipour, Ehsan; Shah, Nagendra P.

    2017-01-01

    Many strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and bifidobacteria have exhibited strain-specific capacity to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) via their glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) system, which is one of amino acid-dependent acid resistance (AR) systems in bacteria. However, the linkage between bacterial AR and GABA production capacity has not been well established. Meanwhile, limited evidence has been provided to the global diversity of GABA-producing LAB and bifidobacteria, and their mechanisms of efficient GABA synthesis. In this study, genomic survey identified common distribution of gad operon-encoded GAD system in Lactobacillus brevis for its GABA production among varying species of LAB and bifidobacteria. Importantly, among four commonly distributed amino acid-dependent AR systems in Lb. brevis, its GAD system was a major contributor to maintain cytosolic pH homeostasis by consuming protons via GABA synthesis. This highlights that Lb. brevis applies GAD system as the main strategy against extracellular and intracellular acidification demonstrating its high capacity of GABA production. In addition, the abundant GadA retained its activity toward near-neutral pH (pH 5.5–6.5) of cytosolic acidity thus contributing to efficient GABA synthesis in Lb. brevis. This is the first global report illustrating species-specific characteristic and mechanism of efficient GABA synthesis in Lb. brevis. PMID:28261168

  15. Use of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire to Identify Individuals with Gad: An Indian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available 1.1.Background and Objectives: The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ has been established as an efficacious tool to identify individuals with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD as against those with other anxiety disorders. We report on the use of the PSWQ in the Indian population to identify individuals with GAD. 1.2.Methods: 30 individuals with GAD and 60 with other anxiety disorders without GAD completed the PSWQ. 1.3.Results: Using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis, a score of 64, which optimized both sensitivity and specificity, was found to discriminate between individuals with GAD and those with other anxiety disorders without GAD. 1.4.Limitations:The study conducted on a small sample would benefit from further research to establish the PSWQ as an efficacious tool for identify individuals with GAD. 1.5.Conclusion: Results from the current study offer strong support for the use of the PSWQ for initial screening and identification of individuals with GAD who present for treatment for anxiety disorders.

  16. Characterization of hydroxyl radical modified GAD65: a potential autoantigen in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Wajid A; Sherwani, Subuhi; Khan, Wahid A; Ali, Rashid

    2009-02-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD(65)) is an immunological marker of type 1 autoimmune diabetes. High titre of autoantibodies against GAD(65) (GAD(65)Abs) have also been detected in some other autoimmune diseases. In search of a potential immunological marker of type 1 diabetes, in vitro GAD(65) was modified by hydroxyl radical followed by the study of structural and conformational perturbed protein by different spectroscopic techniques (UV, fluorescence and CD) and thermal denaturation profile. Binding studies of circulating autoantibodies from diabetic groups (type 1 and type 2) with native and reactive oxygen species (ROS) modified GAD(65), exhibited high recognition of type 1 diabetic serum autoantibodies with modified antigen (p group and control group (n = 10) was checked by inhibition enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative precipitin titration assay. Relative affinity of ROS-GAD(65)Abs for modified and native GAD(65) was in the order of 1.56 x 10(- 6) and 2.72 x 10(- 7) M, as calculated by Langmuir plot. In coherence, ROS oxidation of GAD(65) causes conformational perturbation, generating highly immunogenic unique neoepitopes that may be one of the factors in antigen-driven induction of type 1 diabetes autoantibodies that can serve as a potential marker in early diagnosis/prognosis of the disease.

  17. Assessment of disease activity in muscular dystrophies by noninvasive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Katie K; Lim, Leland; Speedy, Sedona; Rando, Thomas A

    2013-05-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a class of disorders that cause progressive muscle wasting. A major hurdle for discovering treatments for the muscular dystrophies is a lack of reliable assays to monitor disease progression in animal models. We have developed a novel mouse model to assess disease activity noninvasively in mice with muscular dystrophies. These mice express an inducible luciferase reporter gene in muscle stem cells. In dystrophic mice, muscle stem cells activate and proliferate in response to muscle degeneration, resulting in an increase in the level of luciferase expression, which can be monitored by noninvasive, bioluminescence imaging. We applied this noninvasive imaging to assess disease activity in a mouse model of the human disease limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B (LGMD2B), caused by a mutation in the dysferlin gene. We monitored the natural history and disease progression in these dysferlin-deficient mice up to 18 months of age and were able to detect disease activity prior to the appearance of any overt disease manifestation by histopathological analyses. Disease activity was reflected by changes in luciferase activity over time, and disease burden was reflected by cumulative luciferase activity, which paralleled disease progression as determined by histopathological analysis. The ability to monitor disease activity noninvasively in mouse models of muscular dystrophy will be invaluable for the assessment of disease progression and the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions.

  18. Ctip2-, Satb2-, Prox1-, and GAD65-Expressing Neurons in Rat Cultures: Preponderance of Single- and Double-Positive Cells, and Cell Type-Specific Expression of Neuron-Specific Gene Family Members, Nsg-1 (NEEP21) and Nsg-2 (P19).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilio, Laura; Yap, Chan Choo; Winckler, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    The brain consists of many distinct neuronal cell types, but which cell types are present in widely used primary cultures of embryonic rodent brain is often not known. We characterized how abundantly four cell type markers (Ctip2, Satb2, Prox1, GAD65) were represented in cultured rat neurons, how easily neurons expressing different markers can be transfected with commonly used plasmids, and whether neuronal-enriched endosomal proteins Nsg-1 (NEEP21) and Nsg-2 (P19) are ubiquitously expressed in all types of cultured neurons. We found that cultured neurons stably maintain cell type identities that are reflective of cell types in vivo. This includes neurons maintaining simultaneous expression of two transcription factors, such as Ctip2+/Satb2+ or Prox1+/Ctip2+ double-positive cells, which have also been described in vivo. Secondly, we established the superior efficiency of CAG promoters for both Lipofectamine-mediated transfection as well as for electroporation. Thirdly, we discovered that Nsg-1 and Nsg-2 were not expressed equally in all neurons: whereas high levels of both Nsg-1 and Nsg-2 were found in Satb2-, Ctip2-, and GAD65-positive neurons, Prox1-positive neurons in hippocampal cultures expressed low levels of both. Our findings thus highlight the importance of identifying neuronal cell types for doing cell biology in cultured neurons: Keeping track of neuronal cell type might uncover effects in assays that might otherwise be masked by the mixture of responsive and non-responsive neurons in the dish.

  19. Green tea extract and its major polyphenol (−)-epigallocatechin gallate improve muscle function in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olivier M. Dorchies; Stéphanie Wagner; Ophélie Vuadens; Katri Waldhauser; Timo M. Buetler; Pavel Kucera; Urs T. Ruegg

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a frequent muscular disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that contributes to the stabilization of muscle fiber membrane...

  20. DMD基因外显子缺失导致进行性肌营养不良%Deletion of exons of DMD gene lead to progressive muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王银龙; 潘秀兰; 王友明; 闫纪琳; 魏东敏; 耿建芳; 单铁英

    2013-01-01

    Objective To specific diagnose DMD patient by using gene analysis,further more for carrier and pregnant diagnosis.Methods Multi-PCR method was conducted to analyze DMD gene mutation in DMD/BMD patients.Results Five of eleven patients were found deletion of exons of DMD gene.The deletions are exon 45,48,51 and two exon 4.Conclusion Deletion of exons of DMD gene lead to progressive muscular dystrophy.%目的 通过基因分析对DMD患者做出准确诊断,以便检出携带者和进行产前诊断.方法 运用多重PCR技术对来该院就诊临床上诊断为DMD/BMD患者进行DMD基因突变分析.结果 11例诊断为DMD/BMD患者中发现5例有DMD基因外显子缺失,分别是外显子45、48、51各1例,外显子4有2例.结论 DMD基因外显子缺失导致进行性肌营养不良.

  1. Therapeutics in duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, Jonathan B

    2006-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disorder affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 live born males, characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Several different strategies are being investigated in developing a cure for this disorder. Until a cure is found, therapeutic and supportive care is essential in preventing complications and improving the afflicted child's quality of life. Currently, corticosteroids are the only class of drug that has been extensively studied in this condition, with controversy existing over the use of these drugs, especially in light of the multiple side effects that may occur. The use of nutritional supplements has expanded in recent years as researchers improve our abilities to use gene and stem cell therapies, which will hopefully lead to a cure soon. This article discusses the importance of therapeutic interventions in children with DMD, the current debate over the use of corticosteroids to treat this disease, the growing use of natural supplements as a new means of treating these boys and provides an update on the current state of gene and stem cell therapies.

  2. The paradox of muscle hypertrophy in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornegay, Joe N; Childers, Martin K; Bogan, Daniel J; Bogan, Janet R; Nghiem, Peter; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Howard, James F; Schatzberg, Scott J; Dow, Jennifer L; Grange, Robert W; Styner, Martin A; Hoffman, Eric P; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene cause Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy in humans and syndromes in mice, dogs, and cats. Affected humans and dogs have progressive disease that leads primarily to muscle atrophy. Mdx mice progress through an initial phase of muscle hypertrophy followed by atrophy. Cats have persistent muscle hypertrophy. Hypertrophy in humans has been attributed to deposition of fat and connective tissue (pseudohypertrophy). Increased muscle mass (true hypertrophy) has been documented in animal models. Muscle hypertrophy can exaggerate postural instability and joint contractures. Deleterious consequences of muscle hypertrophy should be considered when developing treatments for muscular dystrophy.

  3. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most pr...... oligonucleotides (2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2OME-PS), phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO)) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA)....

  4. A clinical and genetic study in myotonic dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Höweler (Chris)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic counselling for myotonic dystrophy patients appears to be relatively simple. The disease is transtnitted as an autosomal dominant trait, and the patients risk of transmitting the abnormal gene to his children is 50%. However, many patients at the age at which genetic counsell

  5. DNA Damage, Somatic Aneuploidy, and Malignant Sarcoma Susceptibility in Muscular Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Albeit genetically highly heterogeneous, muscular dystrophies (MDs) share a convergent pathology leading to muscle wasting accompanied by proliferation of fibrous and fatty tissue, suggesting a common MD-pathomechanism. Here we show that mutations in muscular dystrophy genes (Dmd, Dysf, Capn3, Large) lead to the spontaneous formation of skeletal muscle-derived malignant tumors in mice, presenting as mixed rhabdomyo-, fibro-, and liposarcomas. Primary MD-gene defects and strain background stro...

  6. Molecular and functional characterization of GAD67-expressing, newborn granule cells in mouse dentate gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, Carolina; Irinopoulou, Theano; Cauli, Bruno; Poncer, Jean Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs) have been suggested to synthesize both GABA and glutamate immediately after birth and under pathological conditions in the adult. Expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67 by GCs during the first few weeks of postnatal development may then allow for transient GABA synthesis and synaptic release from these cells. Here, using the GAD67-EGFP transgenic strain G42, we explored the phenotype of GAD67-expressing GCs in the mouse dentate gyrus. We report a transient, GAD67-driven EGFP expression in differentiating GCs throughout ontogenesis. EGFP expression correlates with the expression of GAD and molecular markers of GABA release and uptake in 2–4 weeks post-mitotic GCs. These rather immature cells are able to fire action potentials (APs) and are synaptically integrated in the hippocampal network. Yet they show physiological properties that differentiate them from mature GCs. Finally, GAD67-expressing GCs express a specific complement of GABAA receptor subunits as well as distinctive features of synaptic and tonic GABA signaling. Our results reveal that GAD67 expression in dentate gyrus GCs is a transient marker of late differentiation that persists throughout life and the G42 strain may be used to visualize newborn GCs at a specific, well-defined differentiation stage. PMID:23565079

  7. Clinical characteristics of patients with cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Silva Aguiar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD, present in GABAergic neurons and in pancreatic beta cells, catalyzes the conversion of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA. The cerebellum is highly susceptible to immune-mediated mechanisms, with the potentially treatable autoimmune cerebellar ataxia associated with the GAD antibody (CA-GAD-ab being a rare, albeit increasingly detected condition. Few cases of CA-GAD-ab have been described. Methods This retrospective and descriptive study evaluated the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with CA-GAD-ab. Result Three patients with cerebellar ataxia, high GAD-ab titers and autoimmune endocrine disease were identified. Patients 1 and 2 had classic stiff person syndrome and insidious-onset cerebellar ataxia, while Patient 3 had pure cerebellar ataxia with subacute onset. Patients received intravenous immunoglobulin therapy with no response in Patients 1 and 3 and partial recovery in Patient 2. Conclusion CA-GAD-ab is rare and its clinical presentation may hamper diagnosis. Clinicians should be able to recognize this potentially treatable autoimmune cerebellar ataxia.

  8. Annexin A6 modifies muscular dystrophy by mediating sarcolemmal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaggart, Kayleigh A; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Vo, Andy H; Swanson, Kaitlin E; Kim, Ellis Y; Fahrenbach, John P; Holley-Cuthrell, Jenan; Eskin, Ascia; Chen, Zugen; Squire, Kevin; Heydemann, Ahlke; Palmer, Abraham A; Nelson, Stanley F; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-22

    Many monogenic disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, display phenotypic variability despite the same disease-causing mutation. To identify genetic modifiers of muscular dystrophy and its associated cardiomyopathy, we used quantitative trait locus mapping and whole genome sequencing in a mouse model. This approach uncovered a modifier locus on chromosome 11 associated with sarcolemmal membrane damage and heart mass. Whole genome and RNA sequencing identified Anxa6, encoding annexin A6, as a modifier gene. A synonymous variant in exon 11 creates a cryptic splice donor, resulting in a truncated annexin A6 protein called ANXA6N32. Live cell imaging showed that annexin A6 orchestrates a repair zone and cap at the site of membrane disruption. In contrast, ANXA6N32 dramatically disrupted the annexin A6-rich cap and the associated repair zone, permitting membrane leak. Anxa6 is a modifier of muscular dystrophy and membrane repair after injury.

  9. Duchenne肌营养不良基因突变与智力关系的研究进展%The development of relationship between DMD gene mutation and intelligence with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽波

    2010-01-01

    随着分子生物学技术水平的不断提高,近年来对Duchenne肌营养不良(DMD)基因突变类型与智力发育关系的研究不断深入.DMD患儿的智力水平与基因突变类型存在一定的联系,DMD基因突变发生在45号外显子后,尤其是63号外显子后的患者发生智力低下的程度大于发生在45号之前外显子的突变,提示DMD基因突变越接近3'端越有可能导致智力低下.%With the development of the molecular biology technic in recent years, the research about the relations between the type of gene mutation and the intelligence growth with the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was developed.There are some connections in the intelligence and the type of gene mutation of the children with DMD. The children with DMD have lower intelligence when the mutation is after the 45 exon especially the 63 exon than before the 45 exon. It has more possibility to cause the lower intelligence when the the DMD gene mutation is closer to the end of 3'terminal.

  10. A molecular protocol for diagnosing myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, M; Marger, R S; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Kissel, J T; Mendell, J R; Prior, T W

    1995-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by an unstable CTG repeat sequence in the 3' untranslated region of the myotonin protein kinase gene. The CTG repeat is present 5-30 times in the normal population, whereas DM patients have CTG expansions of 50 to several thousand repeats. The age of onset of the disorder and the severity of the phenotype is roughly correlated with the size of the CTG expansion. We developed a molecular protocol for the diagnosis of DM based on an initial polymerase chain reaction screen to detect normal-sized alleles and small expansions, followed by an improved Southern protocol to detect larger expansions.

  11. Ctip2-, Satb2-, Prox1-, and GAD65-Expressing Neurons in Rat Cultures: Preponderance of Single- and Double-Positive Cells, and Cell Type-Specific Expression of Neuron-Specific Gene Family Members, Nsg-1 (NEEP21 and Nsg-2 (P19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Digilio

    Full Text Available The brain consists of many distinct neuronal cell types, but which cell types are present in widely used primary cultures of embryonic rodent brain is often not known. We characterized how abundantly four cell type markers (Ctip2, Satb2, Prox1, GAD65 were represented in cultured rat neurons, how easily neurons expressing different markers can be transfected with commonly used plasmids, and whether neuronal-enriched endosomal proteins Nsg-1 (NEEP21 and Nsg-2 (P19 are ubiquitously expressed in all types of cultured neurons. We found that cultured neurons stably maintain cell type identities that are reflective of cell types in vivo. This includes neurons maintaining simultaneous expression of two transcription factors, such as Ctip2+/Satb2+ or Prox1+/Ctip2+ double-positive cells, which have also been described in vivo. Secondly, we established the superior efficiency of CAG promoters for both Lipofectamine-mediated transfection as well as for electroporation. Thirdly, we discovered that Nsg-1 and Nsg-2 were not expressed equally in all neurons: whereas high levels of both Nsg-1 and Nsg-2 were found in Satb2-, Ctip2-, and GAD65-positive neurons, Prox1-positive neurons in hippocampal cultures expressed low levels of both. Our findings thus highlight the importance of identifying neuronal cell types for doing cell biology in cultured neurons: Keeping track of neuronal cell type might uncover effects in assays that might otherwise be masked by the mixture of responsive and non-responsive neurons in the dish.

  12. First Identification of a Triple Corneal Dystrophy Association: Keratoconus, Epithelial Basement Membrane Corneal Dystrophy and Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Mazzotta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the observation of a triple corneal dystrophy association consisting of keratoconus (KC, epithelial basement membrane corneal dystrophy (EBMCD and Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD. Methods: A 55-year-old male patient was referred to our cornea service for blurred vision and recurrent foreign body sensation. He reported bilateral recurrent corneal erosions with diurnal visual fluctuations. He underwent corneal biomicroscopy, Scheimpflug tomography, in vivo HRT confocal laser scanning microscopy and genetic testing for TGFBI and ZEB1 mutations using direct DNA sequencing. Results: Biomicroscopic examination revealed the presence of subepithelial central and paracentral corneal opacities. The endothelium showed a bilateral flecked appearance, and the posterior corneal curvature suggested a possible concomitant ectatic disorder. Corneal tomography confirmed the presence of a stage II KC in both eyes. In vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed a concomitant bilateral EBMCD with hyperreflective deposits in basal epithelial cells, subbasal Bowman's layer microfolds and ridges with truncated subbasal nerves as pseudodendritic elements. Stromal analysis revealed honeycomb edematous areas, and the endothelium showed a strawberry surface configuration typical of FECD. The genetic analysis resulted negative for TGFBI mutations and positive for a heterozygous mutation in exon 7 of the gene ZEB1. Conclusion: This is the first case reported in the literature in which KC, EBMCD and FECD are present in the same patient and associated with ZEB1 gene mutation. The triple association was previously established by means of morphological analysis of the cornea using corneal Scheimpflug tomography and in vivo HRT II confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  13. Alterations in cerebellar glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) activity in a genetic model of torsion dystonia (rat).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmans, G A; Beales, M; Lorden, J F; Gordon, J H

    1984-07-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) activity was studied in specific brain regions of a newly identified genetic (rat) model of human torsion dystonia. GAD activity was found to be significantly increased in the deep cerebellar nuclei of dystonic rats at 16, 20, and 24 days of age. GAD activity in the other regions examined (vermis, cerebellar hemispheres, caudate nucleus, and globus pallidus) did not differ from that of age-matched normal littermate controls. Diazepam treatment significantly reduced the frequency of dystonic movements in the mutant.

  14. Developmental Defects in a Zebrafish Model for Muscular Dystrophies Associated with the Loss of Fukutin-Related Protein (FKRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, Paul; Bassett, David; Lochmuller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2008-01-01

    A number of muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of [alpha]-dystroglycan and many are now known to result from mutations in a number of genes encoding putative or known glycosyltransferases. These diseases include severe forms of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) such as Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy…

  15. Developmental Defects in a Zebrafish Model for Muscular Dystrophies Associated with the Loss of Fukutin-Related Protein (FKRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, Paul; Bassett, David; Lochmuller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2008-01-01

    A number of muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of [alpha]-dystroglycan and many are now known to result from mutations in a number of genes encoding putative or known glycosyltransferases. These diseases include severe forms of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) such as Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy…

  16. Modifying muscular dystrophy through TGFβ

    OpenAIRE

    Ceco, Ermelinda; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy arises from ongoing muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration. This imbalance leads to loss of muscle with replacement by scar or fibrosis resulting in muscle weakness and, eventually, loss of muscle function. Human muscular dystrophy is characterized by a wide range of disease severity, even when the same genetic mutation is present. This variability implies that other factors, both genetic and environmental, modify the disease outcome. There has been an ongoing ef...

  17. Modifying muscular dystrophy through transforming growth factor-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceco, Ermelinda; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    Muscular dystrophy arises from ongoing muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration. This imbalance leads to loss of muscle, with replacement by scar or fibrotic tissue, resulting in muscle weakness and, eventually, loss of muscle function. Human muscular dystrophy is characterized by a wide range of disease severity, even when the same genetic mutation is present. This variability implies that other factors, both genetic and environmental, modify the disease outcome. There has been an ongoing effort to define the genetic and molecular bases that influence muscular dystrophy onset and progression. Modifier genes for muscle disease have been identified through both candidate gene approaches and genome-wide surveys. Multiple lines of experimental evidence have now converged on the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway as a modifier for muscular dystrophy. TGF-β signaling is upregulated in dystrophic muscle as a result of a destabilized plasma membrane and/or an altered extracellular matrix. Given the important biological role of the TGF-β pathway, and its role beyond muscle homeostasis, we review modifier genes that alter the TGF-β pathway and approaches to modulate TGF-β activity to ameliorate muscle disease.

  18. [Duchenne muscular dystrophy pathophysiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péréon, Y; Mercier, S; Magot, A

    2015-12-01

    Dystrophin is a large cytoskeletal protein located at the plasma membrane in both muscle and non-muscle tissues, which mediates interactions between the cytoskeleton, cell membrane, and extracellular matrix. Dystrophin is a key component of multiprotein complexes (dystrophin- associated glycoprotein complex, or DGC). It is also involved in many intracellular cascades affecting membrane proteins such as calcium channels, or various signalisation pathways. In Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, both dystrophin and DGC proteins are missing. This induces excessive membrane fragility and permeability, dysregulation of calcium homeostasis, oxidative damage, which in turn favour muscle cell necrosis. The latter is initially followed by regeneration. With age, the regenerative capacity of the muscles appears to be exhausted and muscle fibres are gradually replaced by connective and adipose tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Adult foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir Balarin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Adult foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy is a rare pathology. Less than 1% of the reported cases display perifoveal capillary permeability. The three-year follow-up period of the case revealed a rare form, which had not yet been documented. The patient was a 40-year-old female with normal visual acuity, and a minor complaint of metamorphopsia on the left eye. Retinography showed a perifoveal yellowish subretinal area OS.Angiography showed perifoveal leakage OS. Follow up showed that, over 3 years, capillary incompetence disappeared and the yellow area underwent alterations, becoming atrophic OS. Angiography also showed hyperfluorescence (windows defect. Towards the end, it resembled the appearance of late stage of Best's Disease.

  20. Stiff Person syndrome and other anti-GAD-associated neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayalu, Praveen; Teener, James W

    2012-11-01

    Antibodies directed against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) are present in many patients with stiff person syndrome and increasingly found in patients with other symptoms indicative of central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction, such as ataxia. The classic clinical features of stiff person syndrome include muscular stiffness with superimposed painful muscular spasms. Gait is often impaired. Other CNS disorders associated with GAD antibodies include progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), limbic encephalitis, and even epilepsy. Glutamic acid decarboxylase is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter. Presumably, antibodies directed against GAD impair GABA production, but the precise pathogenic mechanism of GAD-antibody-related neurologic disorders is uncertain. Many patients respond to treatment with immunomodulating therapy. Symptomatic treatment with agents that enhance GABA activity, such as benzodiazepines and baclofen, is also helpful for many patients.

  1. Immunology of stiff person syndrome and other GAD-associated neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Harry; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2013-11-01

    Antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of GABA, are associated with an array of distinct, mostly autoimmune, neurological conditions. In all associated syndromes, namely stiff person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, epilepsy, limbic encephalitis or abnormal eye movements, anti-GAD antibodies are detected at high titers and play a fundamental role in diagnosis, but do not correlate with disease severity, diversity of symptomatology or response to therapies. Despite considerable efforts, including in vitro (enzymatic assays) and in vivo (animal models) systems, the pathogenicity of anti-GAD antibodies has not been unequivocally proven for any specific condition. The search for the responsible autoantigen has revealed a few other antigenic targets, particularly for SPS, localized in the pre- or post-synaptic inhibitory neuronal synapses. Cumulative clinical and laboratory evidence indicates that anti-GAD and related antibodies define a novel group of syndromes, collectively known as 'hyperexcitability disorders'.

  2. Genetic heterogeneity of butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy of the fovea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Cremers, F.P.M.; Helm, L.J.M. van den; Hoyng, C.B.; Deutman, A.F.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Butterfly-shaped macular dystrophy (BSMD) has so far only been associated with mutations in the peripherin/RDS gene. The initial aim of our study was to investigate the peripherin/RDS gene as the causative gene in a family with BSMD. Subsequently the putative involvement of the ROM-1 gene,

  3. Knockdown of GAD67 protein levels normalizes neuronal activity in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, Lazlo; van Marion, Ingrid; Taï, Khalid

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine depletion of the striatum is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The loss of dopamine upregulates GAD67 expression in the striatal projection neurons and causes other changes in the activity of the basal ganglia circuit.......Dopamine depletion of the striatum is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The loss of dopamine upregulates GAD67 expression in the striatal projection neurons and causes other changes in the activity of the basal ganglia circuit....

  4. Evolution and expression analysis of the soybean glutamate decarboxylase gene family

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tae Kyung Hyun; Seung Hee Eom; Xiao Han; Ju-Sung Kim

    2014-12-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is an enzyme that catalyses the conversion of L-glutamate into -aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is a four-carbon non-protein amino acid present in all organisms. Although plant GAD plays important roles in GABA biosynthesis, our knowledge concerning GAD gene family members and their evolutionary relationship remains limited. Therefore, in this study, we have analysed the evolutionary mechanisms of soybean GAD genes and suggested that these genes expanded in the soybean genome partly due to segmental duplication events. The approximate dates of duplication events were calculated using the synonymous substitution rate, and we suggested that the segmental duplication of GAD genes in soybean originated 9.47 to 11.84 million years ago (Mya). In addition, all segmental duplication pairs (GmGAD1/3 and GmGAD2/4) are subject to purifying selection. Furthermore, GmGAD genes displayed differential expression either in their transcript abundance or in their expression patterns under abiotic stress conditions like salt, drought, and cold. The expression pattern of paralogous pairs suggested that they might have undergone neofunctionalization during the subsequent evolution process. Taken together, our results provide valuable information for the evolution of the GAD gene family and represent the basis for future research on the functional characterization of GAD genes in higher plants.

  5. Ascending Midbrain Dopaminergic Axons Require Descending GAD65 Axon Fascicles for Normal Pathfinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Marcela Garcia-Peña

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Nigrostriatal pathway (NSP is formed by dopaminergic axons that project from the ventral midbrain to the dorsolateral striatum as part of the medial forebrain bundle. Previous studies have implicated chemotropic proteins in the formation of the NSP during development but little is known of the role of substrate-anchored signals in this process. We observed in mouse and rat embryos that midbrain dopaminergic axons ascend in close apposition to descending GAD65-positive axon bundles throughout their trajectory to the striatum. To test whether such interaction is important for dopaminergic axon pathfinding, we analyzed transgenic mouse embryos in which the GAD65 axon bundle was reduced by the conditional expression of the diphtheria toxin. In these embryos we observed dopaminergic misprojection into the hypothalamic region and abnormal projection in the striatum. In addition, analysis of Robo1/2 and Slit1/2 knockout embryos revealed that the previously described dopaminergic misprojection in these embryos is accompanied by severe alterations in the GAD65 axon scaffold. Additional studies with cultured dopaminergic neurons and whole embryos suggest that NCAM and Robo proteins are involved in the interaction of GAD65 and dopaminergic axons. These results indicate that the fasciculation between descending GAD65 axon bundles and ascending dopaminergic axons is required for the stereotypical NSP formation during brain development and that known guidance cues may determine this projection indirectly by instructing the pathfinding of the axons that are part of the GAD65 axon scaffold.

  6. Paternal transmission of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Bergoffen, J; Kant, J.; Sladky, J; McDonald-McGinn, D; Zackai, E H; Fischbeck, K H

    1994-01-01

    The congenital form of myotonic dystrophy is reported to be almost exclusively, if not exclusively, maternally transmitted. We present a case of congenital myotonic dystrophy which was inherited from a mildly affected father. This family illustrates that the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy can occur without intrauterine or other maternal factors related to the disease. The possibility of paternal transmission of the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy could be considered when counsell...

  7. Rimmed vacuoles in Becker muscular dystrophy have similar features with inclusion myopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunari Momma

    Full Text Available Rimmed vacuoles in myofibers are thought to be due to the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, and can be characteristic in certain myopathies with protein inclusions in myofibers. In this study, we performed a detailed clinical, molecular, and pathological characterization of Becker muscular dystrophy patients who have rimmed vacuoles in muscles. Among 65 Becker muscular dystrophy patients, we identified 12 patients who have rimmed vacuoles and 11 patients who have deletions in exons 45-48 in DMD gene. All patients having rimmed vacuoles showed milder clinical features compared to those without rimmed vacuoles. Interestingly, the rimmed vacuoles in Becker muscular dystrophy muscles seem to represent autophagic vacuoles and are also associated with polyubiquitinated protein aggregates. These findings support the notion that rimmed vacuoles can appear in Becker muscular dystrophy, and may be related to the chronic changes in muscle pathology induced by certain mutations in the DMD gene.

  8. Rimmed vacuoles in Becker muscular dystrophy have similar features with inclusion myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momma, Kazunari; Noguchi, Satoru; Malicdan, May Christine V; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Minami, Narihiro; Kamakura, Keiko; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nishino, Ichizo

    2012-01-01

    Rimmed vacuoles in myofibers are thought to be due to the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, and can be characteristic in certain myopathies with protein inclusions in myofibers. In this study, we performed a detailed clinical, molecular, and pathological characterization of Becker muscular dystrophy patients who have rimmed vacuoles in muscles. Among 65 Becker muscular dystrophy patients, we identified 12 patients who have rimmed vacuoles and 11 patients who have deletions in exons 45-48 in DMD gene. All patients having rimmed vacuoles showed milder clinical features compared to those without rimmed vacuoles. Interestingly, the rimmed vacuoles in Becker muscular dystrophy muscles seem to represent autophagic vacuoles and are also associated with polyubiquitinated protein aggregates. These findings support the notion that rimmed vacuoles can appear in Becker muscular dystrophy, and may be related to the chronic changes in muscle pathology induced by certain mutations in the DMD gene.

  9. Toward dissecting the etiology of schizophrenia: HDAC1 and DAXX regulate GAD67 expression in an in vitro hippocampal GABA neuron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subburaju, S; Coleman, A J; Ruzicka, W B; Benes, F M

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with GABA neuron dysfunction in the hippocampus, particularly the stratum oriens of sector CA3/2. A gene expression profile analysis of human postmortem hippocampal tissue followed by a network association analysis had shown a number of genes differentially regulated in SZ, including the epigenetic factors HDAC1 and DAXX. To characterize the contribution of these factors to the developmental perturbation hypothesized to underlie SZ, lentiviral vectors carrying short hairpin RNA interference (shRNAi) for HDAC1 and DAXX were used. In the hippocampal GABA neuron culture model, HiB5, transduction with HDAC1 shRNAi showed a 40% inhibition of HDAC1 mRNA and a 60% inhibition of HDAC1 protein. GAD67, a enzyme associated with GABA synthesis, was increased twofold (mRNA); the protein showed a 35% increase. The expression of DAXX, a co-repressor of HDAC1, was not influenced by HDAC1 inhibition. Transduction of HiB5 cells with DAXX shRNAi resulted in a 30% inhibition of DAXX mRNA that translated into a 90% inhibition of DAXX protein. GAD1 mRNA was upregulated fourfold, while its protein increased by ~30%. HDAC1 expression was not altered by inhibition of DAXX. However, a physical interaction between HDAC1 and DAXX was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of HDAC1 or DAXX increased expression of egr-1, transcription factor that had previously been shown to regulate the GAD67 promoter. Our in vitro results point to a key role of both HDAC1 and DAXX in the regulation of GAD67 in GABAergic HiB5 cells, strongly suggesting that these epigenetic/transcription factors contribute to mechanisms underlying GABA cell dysfunction in SZ. PMID:26812044

  10. Toward dissecting the etiology of schizophrenia: HDAC1 and DAXX regulate GAD67 expression in an in vitro hippocampal GABA neuron model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subburaju, S; Coleman, A J; Ruzicka, W B; Benes, F M

    2016-01-26

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with GABA neuron dysfunction in the hippocampus, particularly the stratum oriens of sector CA3/2. A gene expression profile analysis of human postmortem hippocampal tissue followed by a network association analysis had shown a number of genes differentially regulated in SZ, including the epigenetic factors HDAC1 and DAXX. To characterize the contribution of these factors to the developmental perturbation hypothesized to underlie SZ, lentiviral vectors carrying short hairpin RNA interference (shRNAi) for HDAC1 and DAXX were used. In the hippocampal GABA neuron culture model, HiB5, transduction with HDAC1 shRNAi showed a 40% inhibition of HDAC1 mRNA and a 60% inhibition of HDAC1 protein. GAD67, a enzyme associated with GABA synthesis, was increased twofold (mRNA); the protein showed a 35% increase. The expression of DAXX, a co-repressor of HDAC1, was not influenced by HDAC1 inhibition. Transduction of HiB5 cells with DAXX shRNAi resulted in a 30% inhibition of DAXX mRNA that translated into a 90% inhibition of DAXX protein. GAD1 mRNA was upregulated fourfold, while its protein increased by ~30%. HDAC1 expression was not altered by inhibition of DAXX. However, a physical interaction between HDAC1 and DAXX was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of HDAC1 or DAXX increased expression of egr-1, transcription factor that had previously been shown to regulate the GAD67 promoter. Our in vitro results point to a key role of both HDAC1 and DAXX in the regulation of GAD67 in GABAergic HiB5 cells, strongly suggesting that these epigenetic/transcription factors contribute to mechanisms underlying GABA cell dysfunction in SZ.

  11. Increased binding of MeCP2 to the GAD1 and RELN promoters may be mediated by an enrichment of 5-hmC in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhubi, A; Chen, Y; Dong, E; Cook, E H; Guidotti, A; Grayson, D R

    2014-01-21

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms related to altered social interactions/communication and restricted and repetitive behaviors. In addition to genetic risk, epigenetic mechanisms (which include DNA methylation/demethylation) are thought to be important in the etiopathogenesis of ASD. We studied epigenetic mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of candidate genes in cerebella of ASD patients, including the binding of MeCP2 (methyl CpG binding protein-2) to the glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD1), glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD2), and Reelin (RELN) promoters and gene bodies. Moreover, we performed methyl DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) and hydroxymethyl DNA immunoprecipitation (hMeDIP) to measure total 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) in the same regions of these genes. The enrichment of 5-hmC and decrease in 5-mC at the GAD1 or RELN promoters detected by 5-hmC and 5-mC antibodies was confirmed by Tet-assisted bisulfite (TAB) pyrosequencing. The results showed a marked and significant increase in MeCP2 binding to the promoter regions of GAD1 and RELN, but not to the corresponding gene body regions in cerebellar cortex of ASD patients. Moreover, we detected a significant increase in TET1 expression and an enrichment in the level of 5-hmC, but not 5-mC, at the promoters of GAD1 and RELN in ASD when compared with CON. Moreover, there was increased TET1 binding to these promoter regions. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that an increase of 5-hmC (relative to 5-mC) at specific gene domains enhances the binding of MeCP2 to 5-hmC and reduces expression of the corresponding target genes in ASD cerebella.

  12. Diagnostic clues and manifesting carriers in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schottlaender, Lucia V; Petzold, Axel; Wood, Nicholas; Houlden, Henry

    2015-01-15

    Mutations in the fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene are a known cause of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Clinically, patients resemble Becker's muscular dystrophy and generally present in the first two decades of life with a mild, progressive phenotype. Cardiac involvement is variable. Heterozygous carriers are usually clinically unaffected. We report a patient presenting later in life with life-threatening cardiac failure and we describe for the first time clinically manifesting carriers in the family.

  13. The Intriguing Regulators of Muscle Mass in Sarcopenia and Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sakuma, Kunihiro; Aoi, Wataru; Yamaguchi, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the biology of muscle have led to new interest in the pharmacological treatment of muscle wasting. Loss of muscle mass and increased intramuscular fibrosis occur in both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. Several regulators (mammalian target of rapamycin, serum response factor, atrogin-1, myostatin, etc.) seem to modulate protein synthesis and degradation or transcription of muscle-specific genes during both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. This revie...

  14. Recent advances in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perkins KJ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kelly J Perkins,1,2 Kay E Davies21Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, 2MRC Functional Genomics Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UKAbstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, an allelic X-linked progressive muscle-wasting disease, is one of the most common single-gene disorders in the developed world. Despite knowledge of the underlying genetic causation and resultant pathophysiology from lack of dystrophin protein at the muscle sarcolemma, clinical intervention is currently restricted to symptom management. In recent years, however, unprecedented advances in strategies devised to correct the primary defect through gene- and cell-based therapeutics hold particular promise for treating dystrophic muscle. Conventional gene replacement and endogenous modification strategies have greatly benefited from continued improvements in encapsidation capacity, transduction efficiency, and systemic delivery. In particular, RNA-based modifying approaches such as exon skipping enable expression of a shorter but functional dystrophin protein and rapid progress toward clinical application. Emerging combined gene- and cell-therapy strategies also illustrate particular promise in enabling ex vivo genetic correction and autologous transplantation to circumvent a number of immune challenges. These approaches are complemented by a vast array of pharmacological approaches, in particular the successful identification of molecules that enable functional replacement or ameliorate secondary DMD pathology. Animal models have been instrumental in providing proof of principle for many of these strategies, leading to several recent trials that have investigated their efficacy in DMD patients. Although none has reached the point of clinical use, rapid improvements in experimental technology and design draw this goal ever closer. Here, we review therapeutic approaches to DMD, with particular emphasis on recent progress in strategic development, preclinical evaluation and

  15. A polymorphism in the MSH3 mismatch repair gene is associated with the levels of somatic instability of the expanded CTG repeat in the blood DNA of myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Fernando; Vásquez, Melissa; Santamaría, Carolina; Cuenca, Patricia; Corrales, Eyleen; Monckton, Darren G

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mosaicism of the expanded CTG repeat in myotonic dystrophy type 1 is age-dependent, tissue-specific and expansion-biased, contributing toward the tissue-specificity and progressive nature of the symptoms. Previously, using regression modelling of repeat instability we showed that variation in the rate of somatic expansion in blood DNA contributes toward variation in age of onset, directly implicating somatic expansion in the disease pathway. Here, we confirm these results using a larger more genetically homogenous Costa Rican DM1 cohort (p<0.001). Interestingly, we also provide evidence that supports subtle sex-dependent differences in repeat length-dependent age at onset and somatic mutational dynamics. Previously, we demonstrated that variation in the rate of somatic expansion was a heritable quantitative trait. Given the important role that DNA mismatch repair genes play in mediating expansions in mouse models, we tested for modifier gene effects with 13 DNA mismatch gene polymorphisms (one each in MSH2, PMS2, MSH6 and MLH1; and nine in MSH3). After correcting for allele length and age effects, we identified three polymorphisms in MSH3 that were associated with variation in somatic instability: Rs26279 (p=0.003); Rs1677658 (p=0.009); and Rs10168 (p=0.031). However, only the association with Rs26279 remained significant after multiple testing correction. Although we revealed a statistically significant association between Rs26279 and somatic instability, we did not detect an association with the age at onset. Individuals with the A/A genotype for Rs26279 tended to show a greater propensity to expand the CTG repeat than other genotypes. Interestingly, this SNP results in an amino acid change in the critical ATPase domain of MSH3 and is potentially functionally dimorphic. These data suggest that MSH3 is a key player in generating somatic variation in DM1 patients and further highlight MSH3 as a potential therapeutic target.

  16. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and substance P in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis: Effects of vagal stimulation on GAD immunoreactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelio, F.; Gibbs, M. A.; Mehler, W. R.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of its biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the neuropeptide substance P in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), and gelatinous nucleus (GEL). In addition, electrical stimulation was applied to the night vagus nerve at the cervical level to assess the effects on GAD-immunoreactivity (GAR-IR). GAD-IR terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. They showed pronounced density at the level of the ASP and gradual decrease towards the solitary complex. Nerve cells were not labelled in our preparations. Ultrastructural studies showed symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contracts between labelled terminals and non-immunoreactive dendrites, axons, or neurons. Some of the labelled terminals contained both clear- and dense-core vesicles. Our preliminary findings, after electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, revealed a bilateral decrease of GAD-IR that was particularly evident at the level of the ASP. SP-immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed varying densities in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. In our preparations, the lateral sub-division of the NTS showed the greatest accumulation. The ASP showed medium density of immunoreactive varicosities and terminals and the AP and GEL displayed scattered varicose axon terminals. The electron microscopy revealed that all immunoreactive terminals contained clear-core vesicles which make symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contact with unlabelled dendrites. It is suggested that the GABAergic terminals might correspond to vagal afferent projections and that GAD/GABA and substance P might be co-localized in the same terminal allowing the possibility of a regulated release of the transmitters in relation to demands.

  17. Insomnia and generalized anxiety disorder: effects of cognitive behavior therapy for gad on insomnia symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Lynda; Morin, Charles M; Langlois, Frédéric; Ladouceur, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Although clinical practice suggests that sleep complaints are frequent among patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), frequency, severity, types of insomnia complaints, and relationship to GAD diagnosis severity in patients diagnosed using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria are not well documented. Clinical data about the impact on insomnia symptoms of treating GAD worries are also lacking. The present study examined these aspects in 44 GAD patients who participated in a treatment study specifically addressing excessive worries through CBT interventions. All patients were assessed using a structured clinical interview and the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule-IV (ADIS-IV). They also completed anxiety and insomnia inventories, including the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), a self-report measure which assesses insomnia type, severity and interference with daily life. Among this sample, 47.7% reported difficulties initiating sleep, 63.6% reported difficulties maintaining sleep, and 56.8% complained of waking too early in the morning. The majority of these patients (86.5%) reported never having experienced insomnia without having excessive worries. However, insomnia severity and GAD severity were not correlated. In this sample, patients with severe GAD did not necessarily report more severe insomnia symptoms. Regarding treatment impact on insomnia complaints, ISI post-treatment scores were significantly lower after treatment. Mean post-treatment scores almost reached ISI's "absence of clinical insomnia" category. Results indicate that this CBT package for GAD does have a significant impact on sleep quality even if sleep disturbances were not specifically addressed during treatment.

  18. Glutamate alteration of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in GABAergic neurons: the role of cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnerie, Hubert; Le Roux, Peter D

    2008-09-01

    Brain cell vulnerability to neurologic insults varies greatly, depending on their neuronal subpopulation. Among cells that survive a pathological insult such as ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that could compromise brain function. We previously reported that surviving cortical GABAergic neurons exposed to glutamate in vitro displayed an NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated alteration in the levels of the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67) [Monnerie, H., Le Roux, P., 2007. Reduced dendrite growth and altered glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65- and 67-kDa isoform protein expression from mouse cortical GABAergic neurons following excitotoxic injury in vitro. Exp. Neurol. 205, 367-382]. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which glutamate excitotoxicity caused a change in cortical GABAergic neurons' GAD protein levels. Removing extracellular calcium prevented the NMDAR-mediated decrease in GAD protein levels, measured using Western blot techniques, whereas inhibiting calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels had no effect. Glutamate's effect on GAD protein isoforms was significantly attenuated by preincubation with the cysteine protease inhibitor N-Acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-norleucinal (ALLN). Using class-specific protease inhibitors, we observed that ALLN's effect resulted from the blockade of calpain and cathepsin protease activities. Cell-free proteolysis assay confirmed that both proteases were involved in glutamate-induced alteration in GAD protein levels. Together these results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic stimulation of NMDAR in cultured cortical neurons leads to altered GAD protein levels from GABAergic neurons through intracellular calcium increase and protease activation including calpain and cathepsin. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered balance between excitation

  19. Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy caused by uniparental disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Joyce; Ridgway, Oliver; Hardy, Carol; Kurian, Manju A; Kurian, Manju; Jayawant, Sandeep; Hughes, Sarah; Pretorius, Pieter; Németh, Andrea H

    2014-04-01

    Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the phospholipase A2 group 6 (Pla2G6) gene. Affected individuals usually present between the ages of 6 months and 2 years with rapid cognitive and motor regression and axial hypotonia. Gait disturbance, limb spasticity, cerebellar signs, and optic atrophy are other common features associated with INAD. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can sometimes contribute towards the diagnosis, the confirmation of INAD is by Pla2G6 gene analysis. In this case report, we describe the first individual (female) with INAD due to a combination of uniparental heterodisomy and isodisomy; we discuss the possible underlying mechanism and highlight the importance of parental carrier testing in accurately predicting the recurrence risk in these families. We also confirm the recent report of hypertrophy of the clava (also known as the 'gracile tubercle') as a useful MRI sign in INAD.

  20. Meretoja's Syndrome: Lattice Corneal Dystrophy, Gelsolin Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, C.; Neves, M.; Oliveira, L.; Beirão, M.

    2017-01-01

    Lattice corneal dystrophy gelsolin type was first described in 1969 by Jouko Meretoja, a Finnish ophthalmologist. It is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in gelsolin gene resulting in unstable protein fragments and amyloid deposition in various organs. The age of onset is usually after the third decade of life and typical diagnostic triad includes progressive bilateral facial paralysis, loose skin, and lattice corneal dystrophy. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient referred to our Department of Ophthalmology by severe dry eye and incomplete eyelid closure. She had severe bilateral facial paresis, significant orbicularis, and perioral sagging as well as hypoesthesia of extremities and was diagnosed with Meretoja's syndrome at the age of 50, confirmed by the presence of gelsolin mutation. At our observation she had bilateral diminished tear film break-up time and Schirmer test, diffuse keratitis, corneal opacification, and neovascularization in the left eye. She was treated with preservative-free lubricants and topical cyclosporine, associated with nocturnal complete occlusion of both eyes, and underwent placement of lacrimal punctal plugs. Ocular symptoms are the first to appear and our role as ophthalmologists is essential for the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of ocular alterations in these patients. PMID:28250773

  1. Ocular abnormality in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, J; Hamblet, J; Menefee, M

    1978-08-01

    A 61-year-old white woman with terminal myotonic dystrophy exhibited advanced peripheral and central retinopathy. Retinal lesions were characterized by hyperpigmentation, common, though nonspecific, in myotonic dystrophy. They resemble both heredo (tapetoretinal) and idiopathic involutional degenerations but rarely cause severe visual impairment. Neither the type nor degree of retinopathy appears to correlate with other ocular features or with the stage of the underlying disease. Our histologic observations confirm and extend those previously described. Electron microscopy suggests a primary disorder of mitochondria which may also affect smooth muscle and the myocardium.

  2. The role of stem cells in muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meregalli, Mirella; Farini, Andrea; Colleoni, Federica; Cassinelli, Letizia; Torrente, Yvan

    2012-06-01

    Muscular dystrophies are heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders of inherited origin, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Cell-based therapies were used to promote muscle regeneration with the hope that the host cells repopulated the muscle and improved muscle function and pathology. Stem cells were preferable for therapeutic applications, due to their capacity of self-renewal and differentiative potential. In the last years, encouraging results were obtained with adult stem cells to treat muscular dystrophies. Adult stem cells were found into various tissues of the body and they were able to maintain, generate, and replace terminally differentiated cells within their own specific tissue because of cell turnover or tissue injury. Moreover, it became clear that these cells could participate into regeneration of more than just their resident organ. Here, we described multiple types of muscle and non muscle-derived myogenic stem cells, their characterization and their possible use to treat muscular dystrophies. We also underlined that most promising possibility for the management and therapy of DMD is a combination of different approaches, such as gene and stem cell therapy.

  3. Mutation screening of BIGH3 gene in a Chinese family with granular corneal dystrophies%一颗粒状角膜营养不良家系BIGH3基因突变的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑洁; 薛敏; 张棣; 周青; 汪渊; 李寿玲

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the mutation of BIGH3 gene in a Chinese family with granular corneal dystro-phies( GCD) . Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of the GCD patients,the relatives of the GCD family and the normal controls. The 3 exons(4,11,12)of the BIGH3 gene were amplified by PCR and sequenced bidirectionally. The sequencing results were analyzed by DNAStar software. Results Directly sequen-cing of 4 affected members revealed a G to A transition at codon 124(CGC>CAC),producing R124H mutation of BIGH3 gene. Two synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism( SNPs) of BIGH3 gene were found in the family. The classification based on genetic information of this family was GCD type II. Conclusion BIGH3 gene mutation is the disease-causing gene of this GCD family, mutation type is R124H heterozygous mutations.%目的:对一颗粒状角膜营养不良( GCD )家系进行BIGH3基因突变筛查,以确定其致病基因。方法收集一常染色体显性遗传的GCD家系,提取该家系患者及正常者的DNA,通过聚合酶链式反应( PCR)扩增BIGH3基因的目的片段,纯化后直接测序,用DNAStar软件分析测序结果,检测其BIGH3基因突变的类型。结果该家系患者均检测出第4外显子的R124H突变(CGC>CAC),而家系中的正常者及50例正常对照者的BIGH3基因中均未发现该突变。家系成员都检测出第11、12外显子的同义单核苷酸多态性( SNP)。通过基因检测,确定该家系角膜营养不良的分型,即为GCDⅡ型,又称Avellino角膜营养不良( ACD)。结论 BIGH3基因突变导致了该家系角膜营养不良患者的角膜病变,突变类型为R124H杂合突变。

  4. Corneal stromal dystrophies: a clinical pathologic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Barbosa Abreu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Corneal dystrophy is defined as bilateral and symmetric primary corneal disease, without previous associated ocular inflammation. Corneal dystrophies are classified according to the involved corneal layer in superficial, stromal, and posterior dystrophy. Incidence of each dystrophy varies according to the geographic region studied. PURPOSE: To evaluate the prevalence of stromal corneal dystrophies among corneal buttons specimens obtained by penetrating keratoplasty (PK in an ocular pathology laboratory and to correlate the diagnosis with patient age and gender. METHODS: Corneal button cases of penetrating keratoplasty from January-1996 to May-2009 were retrieved from the archives of The Henry C. Witelson Ophthalmic Pathology Laboratory and Registry, Montreal, Canada. The cases with histopathological diagnosis of stromal corneal dystrophies were stained with special stains (Peroxid acid Schiff, Masson trichrome, Congo red analyzed under polarized light, and alcian blue for classification and correlated with epidemiological information (age at time of PK and gender from patients' file. RESULTS: 1,300 corneal buttons cases with clinical diagnose of corneal dystrophy were retrieved. Stromal corneal dystrophy was found in 40 (3.1% cases. Lattice corneal dystrophy was the most prevalent with 26 cases (65%. Nineteen were female (73.07% and the PK was performed at average age of 59.3 years old. Combined corneal dystrophy was found in 8 (20% cases, 5 (62.5% of them were female and the average age of the penetrating keratoplasty was 54.8 years old. Granular corneal dystrophy was represented by 5 (12.5% cases, and 2 (40% of them were female. Penetrating keratoplasty was performed at average age of 39.5 years old in granular corneal dystrophy cases. Macular corneal dystrophy was present in only 1 (2.5% case, in a 36 years old female. CONCLUSION: Systematic histopathological approach and evaluation, including special stains in all stromal

  5. GAD Antibody-Associated Late-Onset Cerebellar Ataxia in Two Female Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kuchling

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GAD-ab-associated cerebellar ataxia is a rare neurological disorder characterized by cerebellar symptoms concomitant with high GAD-ab levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Case Report: We report on 2 female siblings (aged 74 and 76 years presenting with gradual progression of rotational vertigo, gait ataxia and vertical diplopia, continuously progressing for 6 months and 6 years, respectively. Autoimmune laboratory examinations showed remarkably increased serum and CSF GAD-ab levels. Their medical histories revealed late-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and other concomitant autoimmune disorders (Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Cerebral MRI and laboratory examinations were unremarkable. The diagnosis of GAD-ab-associated cerebellar ataxia with particular brainstem involvement was established in both women. After the exclusion of an underlying malignancy, immunosuppressive therapy has been initiated in both patients, which resulted in stabilization in one and in clinical improvement in the other patient. Discussion: The unique association of autoantibody-mediated cerebellar ataxia and late-onset T1DM in 2 siblings with similar clinical and paraclinical phenotypes strengthens the concept that hereditary factors might play a relevant role also in autoimmune diseases so far considered to be sporadic. Moreover, the occurrence of continuous vertical diplopia broadens the clinical spectrum of GAD-ab-associated neurological syndromes.

  6. Frequency of islet cell autoantibodies (IA-2 and GAD in young Brazilian type 1 diabetes patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.C. Pardini

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes, as an autoimmune disease, presents several islet cell-specific autoantibodies such as islet cell antibody (ICA, anti-insulin, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD and the antibody (Ab against tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-like protein known as ICA-512 (IA-2. In order to determine the frequency of the anti-GAD and anti-IA-2 autoantibodies in Brazilian type 1 diabetes patients we studied 35 diabetes mellitus (DM type 1 patients with recent-onset disease (£12 months and 37 type 1 diabetes patients with long-duration diabetes (>12 months who were compared to 12 children with normal fasting glucose. Anti-GAD65 and anti-IA-2 autoantibodies were detected with commercial immunoprecipitation assays. The frequency of positive results in recent-onset DM type 1 patients was 80.0% for GADAb, 62.9% for IA-2Ab and 82.9% for GADAb and/or IA-2Ab. The long-duration type 1 diabetes subjects presented frequencies of 54.1% for GADAb and IA-2Ab, and 67.5% for GAD and/or IA-2 antibodies. The control group showed no positive cases. Anti-GAD and IA-2 assays showed a high frequency of positivity in these Brazilian type 1 diabetes patients, who presented the same prevalence as a Caucasian population.

  7. Phase 2a study of ataluren-mediated dystrophin production in patients with nonsense mutation Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Finkel, Richard S; Flanigan, Kevin M; Wong, Brenda; Bönnemann, Carsten; Sampson, Jacinda; Sweeney, H Lee; Reha, Allen; Northcutt, Valerie J; Elfring, Gary; Barth, Jay; Peltz, Stuart W

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 13% of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene, resulting in a premature stop codon in the corresponding mRNA and failure to generate a functional protein. Ataluren (PTC124...

  8. Common recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies differential diagnosis: why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotta, Ana; Carvalho, Elmano; da-Cunha-Júnior, Antonio Lopes; Paim, Júlia Filardi; Navarro, Monica M; Valicek, Jaquelin; Menezes, Miriam Melo; Nunes, Simone Vilela; Xavier Neto, Rafael; Takata, Reinaldo Issao; Vargas, Antonio Pedro

    2014-09-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophies are heterogeneous autosomal hereditary neuromuscular disorders. They produce dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy and they are associated with mutations in several genes involved in muscular structure and function. Detailed clinical, laboratorial, imaging, diagnostic flowchart, photographs, tables, and illustrated diagrams are presented for the differential diagnosis of common autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes diagnosed nowadays at one reference center in Brazil. Preoperative image studies guide muscle biopsy site selection. Muscle involvement image pattern differs depending on the limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtype. Muscle involvement is conspicuous at the posterior thigh in calpainopathy and fukutin-related proteinopathy; anterior thigh in sarcoglycanopathy; whole thigh in dysferlinopathy, and telethoninopathy. The precise differential diagnosis of limb girdle muscular dystrophies is important for genetic counseling, prognostic orientation, cardiac and respiratory management. Besides that, it may probably, in the future, provide specific genetic therapies for each subtype.

  9. A heterozygous 21-bp deletion in CAPN3 causes dominantly inherited limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Barresi, Rita; Witting, Nanna;

    2016-01-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A is the most common limb girdle muscular dystrophy form worldwide. Although strict recessive inheritance is assumed, patients carrying a single mutation in the calpain 3 gene (CAPN3) are reported. Such findings are commonly attributed to incomplete mutation...... creatine kinase or myoglobin. Muscle weakness was generally milder than observed in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, but affected the same muscle groups (proximal leg, lumbar paraspinal and medial gastrocnemius muscles). In some cases, the weakness was severely disabling. The 21-bp deletion did...... affecting the calpain 3 homodimer. This renders patients deficient in calpain 3 as in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, albeit in a milder form in most cases. Based on findings in 10 families, our study indicates that a dominantly inherited pattern of calpainopathy exists, and should be considered...

  10. Common recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies differential diagnosis: why and how?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cotta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Limb girdle muscular dystrophies are heterogeneous autosomal hereditary neuromuscular disorders. They produce dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy and they are associated with mutations in several genes involved in muscular structure and function. Detailed clinical, laboratorial, imaging, diagnostic flowchart, photographs, tables, and illustrated diagrams are presented for the differential diagnosis of common autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes diagnosed nowadays at one reference center in Brazil. Preoperative image studies guide muscle biopsy site selection. Muscle involvement image pattern differs depending on the limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtype. Muscle involvement is conspicuous at the posterior thigh in calpainopathy and fukutin-related proteinopathy; anterior thigh in sarcoglycanopathy; whole thigh in dysferlinopathy, and telethoninopathy. The precise differential diagnosis of limb girdle muscular dystrophies is important for genetic counseling, prognostic orientation, cardiac and respiratory management. Besides that, it may probably, in the future, provide specific genetic therapies for each subtype.

  11. Dynamic regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 gene expression in rat testis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haixiong Liu; Shifeng Li; Yunbin Zhang; Yuanchang Yan; Yiping Li

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) produces γ-amino-butyric acid,the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in adult mammalian brain.Previous experiments,per-formed in brain,showed that GAD65 gene possesses two TATA-less promoters,although the significance is unknown.Here,by rapid amplification of cDNA ends method,two distinct GAD65 mRNA isoforms transcribed from two independent clusters of transcription start sites were identified in post-natal rat testis.RT-PCR results revealed that the two mRNA isoforms had distinct expression patterns during post-natal testis maturation,suggesting that GAD65 gene expression was regulated by alternative promoters at the transcription level.By using GAD65-speciflc antibodies,western blotting analysis showed that the 58-kDa GAD65,N-terminal 69 amino acids truncated form of full-length GAD65 protein,was developmentally expressed during post-natal testis matu-ration,suggesting that GAD65 gene expression in testis may also be regulated by post-translational processing.Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that GAD65 protein was presented in Leydig cells of Day 1 testis,primary spermatocytes and spermatids of post-natal of Day 90 testis.The above results suggested that GAD65 gene expression is dynamically regulated at mul-tiple levels during post-natal testis maturation.

  12. Benign concentric annular macular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Salles de Moura Mendonça

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the authors is to show clinical findings of a patient with benign concentric annular macular dystrophy, which is an unusual condition, and part of the "bull’s eye" maculopathy differential diagnosis. An ophthalmologic examination with color perception, fluorescein angiography, and ocular electrophysiology was performed.

  13. Prednisone Therapy for Duchenne Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of prednisone on muscle function and the extent of steroid-related adverse effects were studied in 17 ambulant children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD at University Hospital, Groningen; Rehabilitation Centre, Utrecht; and Leiden University Medical Centre, the Netherlands.

  14. Glucocorticoids for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Dubowitz Neuromuscular Centre, Great Ormond Street Hospital, and other centers in the UK, conducted a prospective longitudinal study across 17 neuromuscular centers in the UK of 360 boys aged 3-15 years with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who were treated with daily or intermittent (10 days on/10 days off prednisolone for a mean duration of 4 years.

  15. Inherited myopathies and muscular dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardamone, Michael; Darras, Basil T.; Ryan, Monique M.

    The inherited myopathies and muscular dystrophies are a diverse group of muscle diseases presenting with common complaints and physical signs: weakness, motor delay, and respiratory and bulbar dysfunction. The myopathies are caused by genetic defects in the contractile apparatus of muscle, and

  16. AMPUTATION AND REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTZEN, JHB; EISMA, WH

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by chronic burning pain, restricted range of motion, oedema and vasolability. Patients are difficult to treat and the prognosis is very often poor. This report emphasizes that an amputation in case of a reflex sympathetic

  17. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  18. [Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)--an autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursky, T; Bandzuchova, E

    1999-02-01

    The number of antibodies to pancreatic beta-cell antigens in IDDM increased in the last years, involving antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADab). A short review is given about the diagnostic and prognostic value of GADab determination in IDDM. The GAD plays an important, possibly a key role in the initial immunological events leading to the destruction of beta cells. The question is open whether the immunological reaction against GAD is a primary one, or if it is a result of mimicry of a part of an infectious protein antigen (Coxackie virus). The immunological reaction to GAD is associated with both humoral and cellular responses. The cellular response seems to be more important than the humoral one. The cellular response may be mediated through the HLA complex class I cells (cytotoxic lymphocytes) and the HLA complex class II cells (helper lymphocytes). There are arguments for both possibilities. The principles of GADab determination are shortly described. (Ref. 34.)

  19. Miller-Fisher Syndrome: Are Anti-GAD Antibodies Implicated in Its Pathophysiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis E. Dagklis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS is considered as a variant of the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS and its characteristic clinical features are ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Typically, it is associated with anti-GQ1b antibodies; however, a significant percentage (>10% of these patients are seronegative. Here, we report a 67-year-old female patient who presented with the typical clinical features of MFS. Workup revealed antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD in relatively high titers while GQ1b antibodies were negative. Neurological improvement was observed after intravenous gamma globulin and follow-up examinations showed a continuous clinical amelioration with simultaneous decline of anti-GAD levels which finally returned to normal values. This case indicates that anti-GAD antibodies may be associated with a broader clinical spectrum and future studies in GQ1b-seronegative patients could determine ultimately their clinical and pathogenetic significance in this syndrome.

  20. Navigating the current landscape of clinical genetic testing for inherited retinal dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kristy; Garg, Seema

    2015-04-01

    Inherited eye disorders are a significant cause of vision loss. Genetic testing can be particularly helpful for patients with inherited retinal dystrophies because of genetic heterogeneity and overlapping phenotypes. The need to identify a molecular diagnosis for retinal dystrophies is particularly important in the era of developing novel gene therapy-based treatments, such as the RPE65 gene-based clinical trials and others on the horizon, as well as recent advances in reproductive options. The introduction of massively parallel sequencing technologies has significantly advanced the identification of novel gene candidates and has expanded the landscape of genetic testing. In a relatively short time clinical medicine has progressed from limited testing options to a plethora of choices ranging from single-gene testing to whole-exome sequencing. This article outlines currently available genetic testing and factors to consider when selecting appropriate testing for patients with inherited retinal dystrophies.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: lattice corneal dystrophy type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... corneal dystrophy type I lattice corneal dystrophy type I Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Lattice corneal dystrophy type I is an eye disorder that affects the clear, ...

  2. Cysteamine treatment ameliorates alterations in GAD67 expression and spatial memory in heterozygous reeler mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutiyanawalla, Ammar; Promsote, Wanwisa; Terry, Alvin; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2012-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling through its receptor, TrkB is known to regulate GABAergic function and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 expression in neurons. Alterations in BDNF signalling have been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and as a result, they are a potential therapeutic target. Interestingly, heterozygous reeler mice (HRM) have decreased GAD67 expression in the frontal cortex and hippocampus and they exhibit many behavioural and neurochemical abnormalities similar to schizophrenia. In this study, we evaluated the potential of cysteamine, a neuroprotective compound to improve the deficits in GAD67 expression and cognitive function in HRM. We found that cysteamine administration (150 mg/kg.d, through drinking water) for 30 d significantly ameliorated the decreases in GAD67, mature BDNF and full-length TrkB protein levels found in frontal cortex and hippocampus of HRM. A significant attenuation of the increased levels of truncated BDNF in frontal cortex and hippocampus, as well as truncated TrkB in frontal cortex of HRM was also observed following cysteamine treatment. In behavioural studies, HRM were impaired in a Y-maze spatial recognition memory task, but not in a spontaneous alternation task or a sensorimotor, prepulse inhibition (PPI) procedure. Cysteamine improved Y-maze spatial recognition in HRM to the level of wide-type controls and it improved PPI in both wild-type and HRM. Finally, mice deficient in TrkB, showed a reduced response to cysteamine in GAD67 expression suggesting that TrkB signalling plays an important role in GAD67 regulation by cysteamine.

  3. 施耐德角膜营养不良家系的UBIAD1基因突变分析%Mutation in the UBIAD1 gene of a Chinese family with Schnyder crystal corneal dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶思羽; 王丽娅; 余晓菲; 牛超; 庞辰久

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the genetic feature of Schnyder corneal dystrophy identified in a four-generation Chinese family.Method Ophthalmologic examinations were performed in 3 affected members and 2 unaffected members of a family with Schnyder corneal dystrophy and controls.Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood.The coding regions,3′UTR and 5′UTR of UBIAD1 gene from all samples were screened by polymerase chain reaction(PCR)and direct DNA sequencing using the primers designed according to the sequence of UBIAD1,and comparatively analyzed with data from Genebank.Result The family has 15 members over 4 generations with similar signs and symptoms among proband and affected members.All affected members of the family demonstrated central discoid crystalline deposition with arcus lipoides.Confocal microscopy examination showed multiple depositions of crystalline materials in anterior stroma.OCT showed the high reflective material localized within the anterior stroma.A missense mutation c.305A > G in 1 exon of UBIAD1 gene resulting in a substitution of Asparagine to Serine at codon 102(p.Asnl02Ser)was found in all affected members of the family who were clinically diagnosed as Schnyder corneal dystrophy while not in the unaffected members of the family and controls.Conclusion The missense mutation c.305A > G(p.Asn102Ser)of UBIAD1 gene may cause the disease of the family.Gene screen can assist clinicians in making definitive diagnosis,presymptomatic diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis.%目的 探讨施耐德角膜营养不良家系疾病的遗传学改变.方法 对3例临床诊断为施耐德角膜营养不良患者、2名表型正常成员及健康人进行详细眼科检查,提取外周血DNA,根据UBIAD1基因的DNA序列设计引物,行PCR扩增,扩增产物直接测序,结果与Genebank数据库中UBIAD1基因所有外显子及其5′、3′非翻译区序列进行比对分析.结果 该家系共调查4代15人,家系中其他患病者与先证者症

  4. Knockout of GAD65 has major impact on synaptic GABA synthesized from astrocyte-derived glutamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne Byriel; Eyjolfsson, Elvar M.; Smeland, Olav B.

    2011-01-01

    was further investigated in GAD65 knockout and wild-type mice using [1,2-(13)C]acetate and in some cases γ-vinylGABA (GVG, Vigabatrin), an inhibitor of GABA degradation. A detailed metabolic mapping was obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis of tissue extracts of cerebral cortex...... glutamine both via direct synthesis and via a pathway involving mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, a severe neuronal hypometabolism, involving glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, was observed in cerebral cortex of GAD65 knockout mice....

  5. Natural history of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing KE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is X-linked recessive hereditary disease. DMD gene mutations result in dystrophin deficiency, which causes not only muscle movement disorders but also scoliosis, cognitive dysfunction, urinary tract diseases, respiratory diseases and heart diseases. Most patients die in early adult for respiratory and circulatory failure. Early multidisciplinary therapies will significantly delay disease progression and improve patients' quality of life. However, DMD diagnosis and treatment exist significantly time delay now. In this study, we review the natural history of DMD, including motor, cognitive, respiratory and heart function, for improving DMD early recognition, diagnosis and treatment, so as to benefit DMD patients. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.05.004

  6. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a polyalanine myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brais, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    It has been 10 years since the identification of the first PABPN1 gene (GCN)(n)/polyalanine mutations responsible for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). These mutations have been found in most cases of OPMD diagnosed in more than 35 countries. Sequence analyses have shown that such mutations have occurred numerous times in human history. Although PABPN1 was found early on to be a component of the classic filamentous intranuclear inclusions (INIs), mRNA and other proteins also have been found to coaggregate in the INIs. It is still unclear if the INIs play a pathologic or a protective role. The generation of numerous cell and animal models of OPMD has led to greater insight into its complex molecular pathophysiology and identified the first candidate therapeutic molecules. This paper reviews basic and clinical research on OPMD, with special emphasis on recent developments in the understanding of its pathophysiology.

  7. Identification of deletions and duplications in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene and female carrier status in western India using combined methods of multiplex polymerase chain reaction and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashna S Dastur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The technique of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA assay is an advanced technique to identify deletions and duplications of all the 79 exons of DMD gene in patients with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD and female carriers. Aim: To use MLPA assay to detect deletions which remained unidentified on multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR analysis, scanning 32 exons of the "hot spot" region. Besides knowing the deletions and/or duplications, MLPA was also used to determine the carrier status of the females at risk. Materials and Methods: Twenty male patients showing no deletions on mPCR and 10 suspected carrier females were studied by MLPA assay using P-034 and P-035, probe sets (MRC Holland covering all the 79 exons followed by capillary electrophoresis on sequencing system. Results: On MLPA analysis, nine patients showed deletions of exons other than 32 exons screened by mPCR represented by absence of peak. Value of peak areas were double or more in four patients indicating duplications of exons. Carrier status was confirmed in 50% of females at risk. Conclusion: Combining the two techniques, mPCR followed by MLPA assay, has enabled more accurate detection and extent of deletions and duplications which otherwise would have remained unidentified, thereby increasing the mutation pick up rate. These findings have also allowed prediction of expected phenotype. Determining carrier status has a considerable significance in estimating the risk in future pregnancies and prenatal testing options to limit the birth of affected individuals.

  8. Long-Term Outcomes of Ataluren in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-11

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Disease; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  9. Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) and anti-GAD-related CNS degenerations: protean additions to the autoimmune central neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Fatima; Rowley, Merrill; Jayakrishnan, Bindu; Teuber, Suzanne; Gershwin, M Eric; Mackay, Ian R

    2011-09-01

    Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune neurological disease attributable to autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD) more usually associated with the islet beta cell destruction of autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D). SPS is characterized by interference in neurons with the synthesis/activity of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) resulting in the prototypic progressive spasmodic muscular rigidity of SPS, or diverse neurological syndromes, cerebellar ataxia, intractable epilepsy, myoclonus and several others. Remarkably, a single autoantibody, anti-GAD, can be common to widely different disease expressions, i.e. T1D and SPS. One explanation for these data is the differences in epitope engagement between the anti-GAD reactivity in SPS and T1D: in both diseases, anti-GAD antibody reactivity is predominantly to a conformational epitope region in the PLP- and C-terminal domains of the 65 kDa isoform but, additionally in SPS, there is reactivity to conformational epitope(s) on GAD67, and short linear epitopes in the C-terminal region and at the N-terminus of GAD65. Another explanation for disease expressions in SPS includes ready access of anti-GAD to antigen sites due to immune responsiveness within the CNS itself according to intrathecal anti-GAD-specific B cells and autoantibody. Closer study of the mysterious stiff-person syndrome should enhance the understanding of this disease itself, and autoimmunity in general.

  10. Cognitive content-specificity in future expectancies: role of hopelessness and intolerance of uncertainty in depression and GAD symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Regina; Fontes, Monique; Marroquín, Brett

    2008-10-01

    The present study examined cognitive content-specificity in future-event predictions associated with symptoms of depression and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). College undergraduates (N=284) completed measures of depression, GAD, and rated their certainty that a given set of positive and negative outcomes were or were not likely to happen in their future. Participants also completed measures of hopelessness and intolerance of uncertainty (IU). Individuals (N=263) completed the same measures again 6 weeks later. Certainty in an absence of positive future outcomes was associated with symptoms of depression but not GAD, and hopelessness mediated this relationship - concurrently and when examining change scores over 6 weeks. Certainty in negative outcomes was concurrently associated with both symptoms of depression and GAD, and hopelessness partially mediated these relationships. IU predicted concurrent increases in depression and GAD symptoms, and negative-outcome certainty partially mediated the IU-depression but not the IU-GAD symptom relationship. Change in certainty did not mediate the relationship between changes in IU and GAD symptoms but partially mediated the relationship between change in IU and depression symptoms over time. Hopelessness appears to play a unique role in the relationship between reduced anticipation of positive future outcomes and depression. Although less clearly suggested by the data, IU may contribute to both depression and GAD symptoms but may do so through different pathways.

  11. Assessment of CD4+ T cell responses to glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 using DQ8 tetramers reveals a pathogenic role of GAD65 121-140 and GAD65 250-266 in T1D development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ting Chow

    Full Text Available Susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D is strongly associated with MHC class II molecules, particularly HLA-DQ8 (DQ8: DQA1*03:01/DQB1*03:02. Monitoring T1D-specific T cell responses to DQ8-restricted epitopes may be key to understanding the immunopathology of the disease. In this study, we examined DQ8-restricted T cell responses to glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65 using DQ8 tetramers. We demonstrated that GAD65 121-140 and GAD65 250-266 elicited responses from DQ8+ subjects. Circulating CD4+ T cells specific for these epitopes were detected significantly more often in T1D patients than in healthy individuals after in vitro expansion. T cell clones specific for GAD65 121-140 and GAD65 250-266 carried a Th1-dominant phenotype, with some of the GAD65 121-140-specific T cell clones producing IL-17. GAD65 250-266-specific CD4+ T cells could also be detected by direct ex vivo staining. Analysis of unmanipulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs revealed that GAD65 250-266-specific T cells could be found in both healthy and diabetic individuals but the frequencies of specific T cells were higher in subjects with type 1 diabetes. Taken together, our results suggest a proinflammatory role for T cells specific for DQ8-restricted GAD65 121-140 and GAD65 250-266 epitopes and implicate their possible contribution to the progression of T1D.

  12. Aberrant accumulation of the diabetes autoantigen GAD65 in Golgi membranes in conditions of ER stress and autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phelps, Edward A; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Michael, Iacovos P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islet beta cells are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is implicated in beta cell dysfunction and loss during the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The peripheral membrane protein GAD65 is an autoantigen in human T1D. GAD65 synthesizes GABA......, an important autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule and a survival factor in islets. We show that ER stress in primary beta cells perturbs the palmitoylation cycle controlling GAD65 endomembrane distribution, resulting in aberrant accumulation of the palmitoylated form in trans-Golgi membranes....... The palmitoylated form has heightened immunogenicity, exhibiting increased uptake by antigen presenting cells and T cell stimulation compared to the non-palmitoylated form. Similar accumulation of GAD65 in Golgi membranes is observed in human beta cells in pancreatic sections from GAD65 autoantibody positive...

  13. Compartmentalization of GABA synthesis by GAD67 differs between pancreatic beta cells and neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanaani, Jamil; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Phelps, Edward A;

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is synthesized by the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in neurons and in pancreatic β-cells in islets of Langerhans where it functions as a paracrine and autocrine signaling molecule regulating the function of islet endocrine cells. The localization of...

  14. Diasporicità sull’esempio di Erich Auerbach in Gad Lerner e Miro Silvera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M.M.; Arts, Clemens

    2011-01-01

    A partire dall’esilio di Erich Auerbach a Istanbul dal 1936 al 1947, il contributo propone una riflessione sui concetti di diaspora e di esilio da adattare a due scrittori italo‐ebrei provenienti dalla diaspora orientale: Miro Silvera con Il passeggero occidentale (2009) e Gad Lerner con Scintille

  15. Diasporicità sull’esempio di Erich Auerbach in Gad Lerner e Miro Silvera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M.M.; Arts, Clemens

    2011-01-01

    A partire dall’esilio di Erich Auerbach a Istanbul dal 1936 al 1947, il contributo propone una riflessione sui concetti di diaspora e di esilio da adattare a due scrittori italo‐ebrei provenienti dalla diaspora orientale: Miro Silvera con Il passeggero occidentale (2009) e Gad Lerner con Scintille (

  16. Benzodiazepine Discontinuation among Adults with GAD: A Randomized Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Patrick; Ladouceur, Robert; Morin, Charles M.; Dugas, Michel J.; Baillargeon, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the specific effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) combined with medication tapering for benzodiazepine discontinuation among generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients by using a nonspecific therapy control group. Sixty-one patients who had used benzodiazepines for more than 12 months were randomly assigned to…

  17. Benzodiazepine Discontinuation among Adults with GAD: A Randomized Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Patrick; Ladouceur, Robert; Morin, Charles M.; Dugas, Michel J.; Baillargeon, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the specific effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) combined with medication tapering for benzodiazepine discontinuation among generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients by using a nonspecific therapy control group. Sixty-one patients who had used benzodiazepines for more than 12 months were randomly assigned to…

  18. Diasporicità sull’esempio di Erich Auerbach in Gad Lerner e Miro Silvera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M.M.; Arts, Clemens

    2011-01-01

    A partire dall’esilio di Erich Auerbach a Istanbul dal 1936 al 1947, il contributo propone una riflessione sui concetti di diaspora e di esilio da adattare a due scrittori italo‐ebrei provenienti dalla diaspora orientale: Miro Silvera con Il passeggero occidentale (2009) e Gad Lerner con Scintille (

  19. Morphology of Human Nucleus Accumbens Neurons Based on the Immunohistochemical Expression of Gad67

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanovic Maja

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus accumbens is a part of the ventral striatum along with the caudate nucleus and putamen. The role of the human nucleus accumbens in drug addiction and other psychiatric disorders is of great importance. The aim of this study was to characterize medium spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens according to the immunohistochemical expression of GAD67.

  20. Psycho-organic symptoms as early manifestation of adult onset POMT1-related limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlova, J; Mitrović, Z; Zarković, K; Lovrić, D; Barić, V; Berlengi, L; Bilić, K; Fumić, K; Kranz, K; Huebner, A; von der Hagen, M; Barresi, R; Bushby, K; Straub, V; Barić, I; Lochmüller, H

    2014-11-01

    We report two siblings of Croatian consanguineous healthy parents with a novel homozygous missense mutation in the POMT1 gene, presenting with intellectual disability and psychotic, in particular hallucinatory symptoms and abnormal brain MRIs, preceding classical symptoms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy by several years. Weakness became apparent in early adulthood and both siblings remained ambulant into the 3rd and 4th decade of life. The muscle biopsy showed reduced α-dystroglycan compatible with the POMT1 defect. This case report extends the phenotypic spectrum of POMT1 associated muscular dystrophies to the adult onset limb girdle muscular dystrophies with psycho-organic deficits.

  1. Altered cross-bridge properties in skeletal muscle dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz eGuellich

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Force and motion generated by skeletal muscle ultimately depends on the cyclical interaction of actin with myosin. This mechanical process is regulated by intracellular Ca2+ through the thin filament-associated regulatory proteins i.e.; troponins and tropomyosin. Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic affections characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of the skeletal muscle as a consequence of loss of muscle tissue which directly reduces the number of potential myosin cross-bridges involved in force production. Mutations in genes responsible for skeletal muscle dystrophies have been shown to modify the function of contractile proteins and cross-bridge interactions. Altered gene expression or RNA splicing or post-translational modifications of contractile proteins such as those related to oxidative stress, may affect cross-bridge function by modifying key proteins of the excitation-contraction coupling. Micro-architectural change in myofilament is another mechanism of altered cross-bridge performance. In this review, we provide an overview about changes in cross-bridge performance in skeletal muscle dystrophies and discuss their ultimate impacts on striated muscle function.

  2. Fungal keratitis in Lattice dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Samrat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of fungal keratitis occurring in a patient with lattice dystrophy. A 57-year-old farmer presented with a corneal ulcer following probable entry of paddy husk in the right eye, of one month duration. Corneal scraping revealed pigmented fungal filaments while culture grew Alternaria alternata. Treatment with 5% natamycin eye drops and 1% atropine healed the infection in four weeks. We would like to draw attention to the fact that the cornea in lattice dystrophy is prone to frequent erosions and is a compromised epithelial barrier to invasion by microorganisms. Patients must be made aware of this fact and should seek attention at the earliest following any trivial trauma. Management of minor corneal abrasions in them should be directed at healing the epithelium with adequate lubricants and preventing infection with topical antibiotic prophylaxis.

  3. Translational Research for Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    by successful treatment of patient mutations. In Aim 3, we have completed generation of a DBA/2J congenic mdx strain that appears to better model the...in-frame deletions that are expected to arise by successful treatment of patient mutations. Our transgenic experiments will model the best-case...macrophage infiltration and necrosis), weight loss after weaning, joint contractures , kyphosis, dystrophy of extraocular muscles, abnormal

  4. Genetic polymorphism in muscle biopsies of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand A

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, with an incidence of one in 3500 male new borns, and its milder variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, are allelic X-linked recessive disorders, caused by mutations in the gene coding for dystrophin, a 427 kD cytoskeleton protein. There are no available molecular markers to differentiate these two. The purpose of this study was to study genetic polymorphism in muscular dystrophy and explore its potential in discriminating these two allelic forms of the disease. The results revealed unambiguously the presence of three transcripts : 598bp, 849bp and 1583bp long which are selectively expressed in the muscles afflicted with muscular dystrophy as compared to the normal muscle. 1583bp gene transcript was conspicuously present in the muscle tissues of both DMD and BMD patients whereas 598bp and 849bp long transcripts were exclusively present in DMD but not in BMD patients or normal human subjects. These gene transcripts had no sequence homology with dystrophin gene and these were also present in the families belonging to DMD and BMD patients. These results point to the fact that based upon the selective expression of these three gene transcripts, one could not only differentiate between DMD and BMD diseases at the molecular level, but also between normal and dystrophic muscle. Further, these findings also reveal that apart from dystrophin gene, these gene transcripts may also be responsible for the differential progression of DMD/BMD phenotype.

  5. Identification of CNGA3 mutations in 46 families: common cause of achromatopsia and cone-rod dystrophies in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiqiang; Huang, Li; Xiao, Xueshan; Jia, Xiaoyun; Guo, Xiangming; Zhang, Qingjiong

    2014-09-01

    Mutations in CNGA3 are the most common cause of achromatopsia and cone-rod dystrophies. To identify CNGA3 mutations in patients with cone dystrophies or Leber congenital amaurosis. Clinical data and genomic DNA in 267 Chinese probands from 138 families with cone dystrophies and 129 families with Leber congenital amaurosis collected at the Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Guangzhou, China. Variants in CNGA3 and associated phenotypes, assessed by Sanger sequencing of CNGA3, bioinformatics of variants, and segregation analysis. Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in CNGA3, including 26 novel and 13 known mutations, were identified in 46 probands from 138 families with cone dystrophies, but none were found in any of the probands from 129 families with Leber congenital amaurosis. The 46 probands with CNGA3 mutations could be further classified as likely having achromatopsia (18 probands) and cone-rod dystrophies (28 probands) based on electroretinographic recordings. Analysis of family members in 17 of 46 families demonstrated good segregation of the disease with the CNGA3 mutations. To our knowledge, this study is the first systemic analysis of CNGA3 in Chinese patients and expands the mutational spectrum and associated phenotypes. Our results suggest that CNGA3 mutations are a common cause of cone-rod dystrophies and achromatopsia in the Chinese population. These data indicate that CNGA3-associated cone dystrophies may be a common form of early-onset severe retinal dystrophies. Therapeutic potential such as gene therapy targeting this gene may benefit some children with early-onset severe retinal dystrophies.

  6. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-03-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (Rho(S334)) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of Rho(S334), which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function.

  7. Duchenne肌营养不良患儿的智力特点及与基因突变关系初步探讨%Relationship between gene mutations and intelligence in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽波; 麻宏伟; 王琳; 田晓博; 胡曼; 任爽; 谭迎花

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the level of intelligence in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) , and the relationship between the level of intelligence and gene mutations. Methods One hundred and two children with DMD between January 2009 and March 2011 were enrolled. DMD gene detection was performed through the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) in 84 cases. The level and the structure of intelligence were evaluated by Chinese Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (C-WISC) in 50 children with DMD ( 5s6 years old; DMD group) and in 50 age-and gender-matched healthy children ( control group) . Results The average intelligence quotient ( IQ) was 84 ±21 in 102 children with DMD. Thirty patients (29.4%) had the full intelligence quotient (FIQ) less than 70. The FIQ, verbal intelligence quotient ( V1Q) , performance intelligence quotient (PIQ) and the scores of 11 sub-tests of intelligence in the DMD group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.01 ). The IQ in patients with gene mutations at exon 56-79 was the lowest (59.3 ±11.9) , followed by in patients with gene mutations at exon 45-55 (88. 6 ± 1. 9) , at exonl-29 (97.5 ±9.6) and at exon 30-4 (102. 8 ±3. 8) (P<0.01). Conclusions The FIQ, VIQ and PIQ in children with DMD are lower than those in healthy children. There is association between mental retardation and gene mutations.%目的 了解国内Duchenne肌营养不良(DMD)患儿智力水平及智力低下的比例,初步探讨DMD患儿智力的结构特点及与基因突变类型的关系.方法 选择2009年1月至2011年3月的102例DMD患儿,其中84例患儿通过多重连接依赖式探针扩增(MLPA)方法进行DMD基因检测.102例DMD患儿中,选择≥6岁的50例DMD患儿作为DMD组;另选取50例年龄、性别与DMD组匹配的健康体检儿童作为对照组.采用韦氏智力量表对两组儿童进行智力及智力结构分析.结果 102例DMD患儿的平均智商为84±21,其中30例(29.4%)

  8. RNAseq analysis for the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonorazky, Hernan; Liang, Minggao; Cummings, Beryl; Lek, Monkol; Micallef, Johann; Hawkins, Cynthia; Basran, Raveen; Cohn, Ronald; Wilson, Michael D; MacArthur, Daniel; Marshall, Christian R; Ray, Peter N; Dowling, James J

    2016-01-01

    The precise genetic cause remains elusive in nearly 50% of patients with presumed neurogenetic disease, representing a significant barrier for clinical care. This is despite significant advances in clinical genetic diagnostics, including the application of whole-exome sequencing and next-generation sequencing-based gene panels. In this study, we identify a deep intronic mutation in the DMD gene in a patient with muscular dystrophy using both conventional and RNAseq-based transcriptome analyses. The implications of our data are that noncoding mutations likely comprise an important source of unresolved genetic disease and that RNAseq is a powerful platform for detecting such mutations.

  9. Bietti crystalline dystrophy and choroidal neovascularisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, B; Parvizi, S; Mohamed, M D

    2011-02-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterised by the presence of crystals in the retina and is followed by retinal and choroidal degeneration. We present a novel finding of juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularisation in Bietti crystalline dystrophy and demonstrate a spectral domain optical coherence tomography image of this disorder.

  10. Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy: Contribution of a Molecular and Immunohistochemical Analysis in Diagnosis in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanane Bellayou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD are X-linked recessive disorders caused by mutations of the DMD gene located at Xp21. In DMD patients, dystrophin is virtually absent; whereas BMD patients have 10% to 40% of the normal amount. Deletions in the dystrophin gene represent 65% of mutations in DMD/BMD patients. To explain the contribution of immunohistochemical and genetic analysis in the diagnosis of these dystrophies, we present 10 cases of DMD/BMD with particular features. We have analyzed the patients with immunohistochemical staining and PCR multiplex to screen for exons deletions. Determination of the quantity and distribution of dystrophin by immunohistochemical staining can confirm the presence of dystrophinopathy and allows differentiation between DMD and BMD, but dystrophin staining is not always conclusive in BMD. Therefore, only identification involved mutation by genetic analysis can establish a correct diagnosis.

  11. Laminin alpha2 deficiency and muscular dystrophy; genotype-phenotype correlation in mutant mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, L T; Zhang, X U; Kuang, W

    2003-01-01

    Deficiency of laminin alpha2 is the cause of one of the most severe muscular dystrophies in humans and other species. It is not yet clear how particular mutations in the laminin alpha2 chain gene affect protein expression, and how abnormal levels or structure of the protein affect disease. Animal...... models may be valuable for such genotype-phenotype analysis and for determining mechanism of disease as well as function of laminin. Here, we have analyzed protein expression in three lines of mice with mutations in the laminin alpha2 chain gene and in two lines of transgenic mice overexpressing...... substantially prevented the muscular dystrophy in these mice. However, dy(W)/dy(W) mice, expressing the human laminin alpha2 under the control of the striated muscle-specific portion of the desmin promoter, still developed muscular dystrophy. This failure to rescue is apparently because of insufficient...

  12. Keratoconus in Patients with Macular Stromal Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosrirukvongs, Panida; Ngowyutagon, Panotsom; Booranapong, Wipawee

    2016-01-01

    To show the association between keratoconus and macular dystrophy. All patients with macular dystrophy and associated clinical findings leading to a diagnosis of keratoconus by corneal topography were retrospectively reviewed during a 10-year period. Uncorrected and best-corrected visual acuity, automated refraction, manifest refraction, corneal thickness, and corneal curvature by corneal topography were evaluated Three patients with macular dystrophy exhibiting decreased vision, multifocal white dense deposits, and haze surrounding the deposits in the corneal stroma were evaluated. All had a steep corneal curvature of >47 diopters and a thin cornea consistent with keratoconus. Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in one patient with severely decreased vision. Macular dystrophy was diagnosed based on an Alcian blue-stained pathological specimen. Keratoconus may develop as a result of changes associated with macular dystrophy. Therefore, patients with severely decreased vision should be evaluated for keratoconus to ensure proper management.

  13. Bortezomib partially improves laminin α2 chain-deficient muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Zandra; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely C; Holmberg, Johan; Carmignac, Virginie; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2014-05-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy, caused by mutations in LAMA2 (the gene encoding laminin α2 chain), is a severe and incapacitating disease for which no therapy is yet available. We have recently demonstrated that proteasome activity is increased in laminin α2 chain-deficient muscle and that treatment with the nonpharmaceutical proteasome inhibitor MG-132 reduces muscle pathology in laminin α2 chain-deficient dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice. Here, we explore the use of the selective and therapeutic proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (currently used for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma) in dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice and in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A muscle cells. Outcome measures included quantitative muscle morphology, gene and miRNA expression analyses, proteasome activity, motor activity, and survival. Bortezomib improved several histological hallmarks of disease, partially normalized miRNA expression (miR-1 and miR-133a), and enhanced body weight, locomotion, and survival of dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice. In addition, bortezomib reduced proteasome activity in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A myoblasts and myotubes. These findings provide evidence that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib partially reduces laminin α2 chain-deficient muscular dystrophy. Investigation of the clinical efficacy of bortezomib administration in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A clinical trials may be warranted.

  14. Gene diagnosis in 3 family members of Duchenne muscular dystrophy%3例杜氏肌营养不良家系基因诊断策略探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈远春; 代英; 钟敏

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform gene diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in 3 family members who were negative for DMD gene detected by multiplex PCR and to provide genetic counseling for their family members accordingly .Methods The clinical data and genomic DNA of patients and their family members were collected ,DMD gene mutation were detected by multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) or the 2nd generation of high‐throughput sequencing .Results In the first family ,3 male patients were detected deletion of Exon 7 and 2 female were heterozygous carriers .In the second family ,it was found in the proband that point mutation of c .3127C> T in the Exon 23 of chrX‐32486626 and c .3127C> T heterozygous mutations was confirmed in his mother ,the mother was pregnant with a girl .In the third family ,point mutation of c .2411G>A was detected in the Exon 20 of chrX‐32509581 in the proband and his mother had c .2411G> A heterozygous mutation .Conclusion MLPA or combining with the 2nd generation of high‐throughput sequencing can offer effective gene diagnosis for the patients of DMD and their family members ,and provide the basis for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis .%目的:对3例既往多重PCR基因检测阴性的杜氏肌营养不良(DMD)家系进一步进行基因诊断及家系成员遗传指导。方法收集先证者及其家系成员的临床资料和基因组DNA ,多重连接依赖的探针扩增(MLPA)或第2代高通量测序对DNA样本进行DMD基因突变检测。结果家系1检测到3名男性Exon 7缺失,2名女性杂合子携带者。家系2先证者chrX‐32486626的Exon 23发现c .3127C> T ,其母chrX‐32486626存在c .3127C> T杂合突变,患儿母亲目前孕中胎儿系女孩。家系3先证者chrX‐32509581的Exon 20发现c .2411G>A ,其母chrX‐32509581存在c .2411G> A的杂合突变。结论 MLPA或联合第2代高通量测序能够有效基因确诊DMD患者及其家系成

  15. CYP4V2基因突变在结晶样视网膜变性中的作用机制%Progress in mechanism of CYP4V2 gene mutations for Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瞿玲辉

    2014-01-01

    Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy (BCD) is a common form of hereditary retinal degeneration in Chinese.Mutation of the cytochrome P450 4V2 (CYP4V2) gene,a novel family member of the cytochrome P450 genes on chromosome 4q35,has been identified in BCD patients,with the common mutation locus at c.802-8 _ 810dell7insGC (Exon7del),c.992A > C (p.H331 P) and c.1091-2A > G (Exon 9del).CYP4V2 is responsible for oxidation of various substrates in the metabolic pathway,especially ω-hydroxylase activity towards ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).CYP4V2 appears to be the only CYP4 memeber at significant levels in retinal cells,and it may be a prominent contributor to local metabolism of PUFAs,mainly DHA (C22:6n-3),in retinal cells.To understand and investigate the main mechanism of CYP4V2 gene mutation causing BCD is important in the study of genetic diagnosis and genetic management of BCD.This review summarized the current advance in the genetic mechanism of BCD and function of CYP4V2 gene,elucidated the substrate specificity and unraveled the biochemical pathways that may impact function of CYP4V2 in BCD patients.%结晶样视网膜变性(BCD)是一种常染色体隐性遗传的视网膜退行性疾病,其致病基因为CYP4V2,常见的突变位点是c.802-8_810del17insGC(Exon7del)、c.992A>C(p.H331P)和c.1091-2A>G(Exon 9del),基因突变形式多样.CYP4V2基因属于细胞色素氧化酶P450家族,编码蛋白CYP4V2,主要发挥脂肪酸的ω-氢基化作用.CYP4V2是眼部最主要的发挥多不饱合脂肪酸催化作用的细胞色素氧化酶,其内源性的底物是ω-3族多不饱合脂肪酸,在眼部主要为二十二碳六烯酸(DHA).了解和研究CYP4 V2基因突变导致BCD的发病机制在该病的基因诊断和治疗研究中具有重要意义.就BCD的分子病因学、CYP4V2酶的生化特性和CYP4V2基因突变导致BCD发病机制的研究进展进行综述.

  16. Exon Deletion Pattern in Duchene Muscular Dystrophy in North West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad BARZEGAR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Barzegar M, Habibi P, Bonyady M, Topchizadeh V, Shiva Sh. Exon Deletion Pattern in Duchene Muscular Dystrophy in North West of Iran. Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter; 9(1: 42-48.AbstractObjectiveDuchene and Becker Muscular Dystrophy (DMD/ BMD are x-linked disorders that both are the result of heterogeneous mutations in the dystrophin gene. The frequency and distribution of dystrophin gene deletions in DMD/ BMD patients show different patterns among different populations. This study investigates the deletion rate, type, and distribution of this gene in the Azeri Turk population of North West Iran.Materials &MethodsIn this study, 110 patients with DMD/ BMD were studied for intragenic deletions in 24 exons and promoter regions of dystrophin genes by using multiplex PCR.ResultsDeletions were detected in 63 (57.3% patients, and around 83% localized in the mid-distal hotspot of the gene (on exons 44–52, 21 cases (33.3 % with singleexon deletions, and 42 cases (66.6% with multi-exonic deletions. The most frequent deleted exons were exon 50 (15 % and exon 49 (14%. No deletion was detected in exon 3.ConclusionThis study suggests that the frequency and pattern of dystrophin gene deletions in DMD/ BMD in the Azeri Turk population of North West Iran occur in the same pattern when compared with other ethnic groups.ReferencesEmery AE. Clinical and molecular studies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Prog Clin Biol Res 1989; 306:15-28.Moser H. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: pathogenic aspects and genetic prevention. Hum Genet 1984; 66(1:17-40.Emery AE. Population Frequencies of inherited neuromuscular diseases: a world survey Neuromuscul Disord 1991; I (I:19-29.Bushby KM, Thmabyayah M, Gardner M D. Prevalence and incidence of Becker muscular dystrophy. Lancet 1991; 337(8748:1022-1024.Koenig M, Hoffman EP, Bertelosn CJ, Monaco AP, Feener C, Kunkel LM. Complete cloning of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD DNA and

  17. Therapeutic Potential of Immunoproteasome Inhibition in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farini, Andrea; Sitzia, Clementina; Cassani, Barbara; Cassinelli, Letizia; Rigoni, Rosita; Colleoni, Federica; Fusco, Nicola; Gatti, Stefano; Bella, Pamela; Villa, Chiara; Napolitano, Filomena; Maiavacca, Rita; Bosari, Silvano; Villa, Anna; Torrente, Yvan

    2016-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited fatal genetic disease characterized by mutations in dystrophin gene, causing membrane fragility leading to myofiber necrosis and inflammatory cell recruitment in dystrophic muscles. The resulting environment enriched in proinflammatory cytokines, like IFN-γ and TNF-α, determines the transformation of myofiber constitutive proteasome into the immunoproteasome, a multisubunit complex involved in the activation of cell-mediate immunity. This event has a fundamental role in producing peptides for antigen presentation by MHC class I, for the immune response and also for cytokine production and T-cell differentiation. Here, we characterized for the first time the presence of T-lymphocytes activated against revertant dystrophin epitopes, in the animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the mdx mice. Moreover, we specifically blocked i-proteasome subunit LMP7, which was up-regulated in dystrophic skeletal muscles, and we demonstrated the rescue of the dystrophin expression and the amelioration of the dystrophic phenotype. The i-proteasome blocking lowered myofiber MHC class I expression and self-antigen presentation to T cells, thus reducing the specific antidystrophin T cell response, the muscular cell infiltrate, and proinflammatory cytokine production, together with muscle force recovery. We suggest that i-proteasome inhibition should be considered as new promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy pathology.

  18. Lipogenesis mitigates dysregulated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paran, Christopher W; Zou, Kai; Ferrara, Patrick J; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Muscular dystrophy is accompanied by a reduction in activity of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) that contributes to abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER). Recent findings suggest that skeletal muscle fatty acid synthase (FAS) modulates SERCA activity and muscle function via its effects on SR membrane phospholipids. In this study, we examined muscle's lipid metabolism in mdx mice, a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). De novo lipogenesis was ~50% reduced in mdx muscles compared to wildtype (WT) muscles. Gene expressions of lipogenic and other ER lipid-modifying enzymes were found to be differentially expressed between wildtype (WT) and mdx muscles. A comprehensive examination of muscles' SR phospholipidome revealed elevated phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio in mdx compared to WT mice. Studies in primary myocytes suggested that defects in key lipogenic enzymes including FAS, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), and Lipin1 are likely contributing to reduced SERCA activity in mdx mice. Triple transgenic expression of FAS, SCD1, and Lipin1 (3TG) in mdx myocytes partly rescued SERCA activity, which coincided with an increase in SR PE that normalized PC/PE ratio. These findings implicate a defect in lipogenesis to be a contributing factor for SERCA dysfunction in muscular dystrophy. Restoration of muscle's lipogenic pathway appears to mitigate SERCA function through its effects on SR membrane composition.

  19. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Pospisil, Tyler C.; Jones, Kayla S.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  20. Escherichia coli K-12 survives anaerobic exposure at pH 2 without RpoS, Gad, or hydrogenases, but shows sensitivity to autoclaved broth products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Riggins

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria survive exposure to extreme acid (pH 2 or lower in gastric fluid. Aerated cultures survive via regulons expressing glutamate decarboxylase (Gad, activated by RpoS, cyclopropane fatty acid synthase (Cfa and others. But extreme-acid survival is rarely tested under low oxygen, a condition found in the stomach and the intestinal tract. We observed survival of E. coli K-12 W3110 at pH 1.2-pH 2.0, conducting all manipulations (overnight culture at pH 5.5, extreme-acid exposure, dilution and plating in a glove box excluding oxygen (10% H2, 5% CO2, balance N2. With dissolved O2 concentrations maintained below 6 µM, survival at pH 2 required Cfa but did not require GadC, RpoS, or hydrogenases. Extreme-acid survival in broth (containing tryptone and yeast extract was diminished in media that had been autoclaved compared to media that had been filtered. The effect of autoclaved media on extreme-acid survival was most pronounced when oxygen was excluded. Exposure to H2O2 during extreme-acid treatment increased the death rate slightly for W3110 and to a greater extent for the rpoS deletion strain. Survival at pH 2 was increased in strains lacking the anaerobic regulator fnr. During anaerobic growth at pH 5.5, strains deleted for fnr showed enhanced transcription of acid-survival genes gadB, cfa, and hdeA, as well as catalase (katE. We show that E. coli cultured under oxygen exclusion (<6 µM O2 requires mechanisms different from those of aerated cultures. Extreme acid survival is more sensitive to autoclave products under oxygen exclusion.

  1. 一个视锥-视杆营养不良大家系致病基因的初步鉴定%Identification of mutated gene in a large pedigree with cone-rod dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈蕾; 顾蕾; 顾鸣敏; 吴星伟

    2016-01-01

    目的:明确一个常染色体显性遗传眼底病大家系中患者的临床特征,找出该家系的致病基因,并进行基因诊断。方法:受累患者接受问诊及各项眼科检查;对先证者进行覆盖372个眼科遗传病基因的外显子测序芯片突变筛查,并对其中的10个可疑突变位点进行Sanger测序及验证。结果:该家系患者均表现出类似进展型视锥-视杆细胞营养不良(cone-rod dystrophy,CORD)的特征,且起病较早,症状较重。外显子测序分析发现,在患者视锥-视杆同源盒(cone-rod homeobox,CRX)基因的第3个外显子上存在一个错义突变(c.238G>A),导致该基因编码蛋白第80位的谷氨酸变成赖氨酸。结论:本研究首次在黄种人中发现一个CRX[c.238G>A(p.E80K)]基因突变的CORD大家系,同时提示由该基因突变所致CORD患者的临床表现比p.E80A及p.E80Q所致患者更为严重。%Objective To investigate the clinical manifestations of a large Chinese family presenting with autosomal dominant hereditary retinopathy, and to identify the pathogenic gene. Methods Interrogation and ophthalmological examinations were performed in all the affected members. Three hundred and seventy-two exons in ophthalmic disease-associated genes were sequenced with Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Ten highly suspected mutation sites were sequenced and verified with Sanger sequencing. Results All affected members presented manifestations of progressive cone-rod dystrophy, with early-onset and serious symptoms. A missense mutation in exon 3 (c.238G>A) of CRX gene was identified, resulting in an amino acid change from glutamic acid to lysine (E80K). Conclusions This is the first report of CRX mutation (p.E80K) pedigree in yellow race, and it revealed that manifestations of patients with mutation in p.E80K were more serious than those with mutation in p.E80A and p.E80Q.

  2. Analysis of CHST6 gene mutation in macular corneal dystrophy%斑状角膜营养不良CHST6基因突变分析研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉莲; 李璇; 邹鹏飞; 卢建民

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mutations of the gene in a Chinese family with Macular corneal dystrophy (MCD),and to provide the genetic diagnosis and consultation of heredity for the patients and their families.Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from leukocytes of 3 patients of a family with MCD from the northeast China.The third exon of carbohydrate sulfotransferase 6(CHST6) gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the positions and types of gene mutations were further determined by direct sequencing.Results A common frameshift mutation due to base insert of the third exon:T62A/62-63insA was detected in all 3 MCD patients,and the terminal codon exists at NO.322 base earlier.Conclusions The mutation T62A/62-63insA is first found in MCD family,which can be used for genetic diagnosis and consultation directly.%目的 斑状角膜营养不良(MCD)是一种临床表现为进行性角膜斑状混浊的少见常染色体隐性遗传病,由碳水化合物磺基转移酶(CHST6)基因突变导致,最终常需角膜移植手术治疗.研究MCD患者的CHST6基因突变,为患者及家属提供基因诊断和遗传咨询.方法 聚合酶链式反应法研究.对2009年8月至2010年12月在大连医科大学附属第一医院眼科收治的MCD一家系3例同代患者的CHST6基因的第3外显子片段进行扩增后直接DNA测序,以明确突变位点及突变类型.结果 3例第3外显子均发生共同的复合式突变:T62M62-63insA,致使终止密码子提前出现至第322位碱基.结论 CHST6基因第3外显子的T62A/62-63insA突变可为患者及亲属提供基因诊断及家系遗传指导.且迄今为止该突变首次被发现.

  3. Defense of GAD during the 1950s and early 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, H. R.

    2012-12-01

    Paleomagnetists favoring continental offered empirical and theoretical support for the GAD hypothesis. Initial support came from the discovery that the mean directions of rock units, regardless of polarity, laid down back through the Upper Tertiary centered on the rotational pole. Armed with Fisher's statistics, Hospers (1951, 1953) found that the mean direction of the NRM of Icelandic lava flows back through the Miocene better agreed with the GAD field than with the present field. Similarly, Campbell and Runcorn (1956), Creer (1956), and Irving and Green (1957) respectively found that the natural remanent magnetization of Late Tertiary Columbia River basalts, Quaternary basalts of Argentina, and Late Cenozoic New Volcanics of Victoria supported the hypothesis. If significant continental drift or "true" polar wander has occurred, paleomagnetic data alone cannot determine if the axial element of the GAD hypothesis holds earlier than Late Tertiary. Extending the GAD hypothesis back in time requires an approach involving a means independent of paleomagnetism for determining past latitudes. Irving was the first to realize that the paleoclimatology would work. If the GAD hypothesis holds, then paleolatitudes based on paleomagnetism and paleoclimatology should agree. Irving (1956) found that, except for the Squantum Tillite, the paleomagnetically and paleoclimatically determined paleolatitudes for Europe, North America, India, and Tasmania were in agreement. He concluded that the magnetic and rotational axes have coincided since the Paleozoic. Blackett (1961) also compared paleoclimatic and paleomagnetic data-sets. Irving and Briden (1962, 1964) further appealed to paleoclimatology to defend the hypothesis. Determining the paleolatitude spectra for several paleoclimatic indicators, they found the present latitude of fossil instances inconsistent with the latitude of modern instances while their paleomagnetically determined paleolatitudes, which assumed the GAD hypothesis

  4. Molecular diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallamilli, Babi Ramesh Reddy; Ankala, Arunkanth; Hegde, Madhuri

    2014-10-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD; locus Xp21.2). The mutation spectrum of DMD is unique in that 65% of causative mutations are intragenic deletions, with intragenic duplications and point mutations (along with other sequence variants) accounting for 6% to 10% and 30% to 35%, respectively. The strategy for molecular diagnostic testing for DMD involves initial screening for deletions/duplications using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) followed by full-sequence analysis of DMD for sequence variants. Recently, next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based targeted gene analysis has become clinically available for detection of point mutations and other sequence variants (small insertions, deletions, and indels). This unit initially discusses the strategic algorithm for establishing a molecular diagnosis of DMD and later provides detailed protocols of current molecular diagnostic methods for DMD, including array-CGH, PCR-based Sanger sequencing, and NGS-based sequencing assay.

  5. GAD65 haplodeficiency conveys resilience in animal models of stress-induced psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris eMüller

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic mechanisms are critically involved in the control of fear and anxiety, but their role in the development of stress-induced psychopathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and mood disorders is not sufficiently understood. We studied these functions in two established mouse models of risk factors for stress-induced psychopathologies employing variable juvenile stress and/or social isolation. A battery of emotional tests in adulthood revealed the induction of contextually generalized fear, anxiety, hyperarousal and depression-like symptoms in these paradigms. These reflect the multitude and complexity of stress effects in human PTSD patients. With factor analysis we were able to identify parameters that reflect these different behavioral domains in stressed animals and thus provide a basis for an integrated scoring of affectedness more closely resembling the clinical situation than isolated parameters. To test the applicability of these models to genetic approaches we further tested the role of GABA using heterozygous mice with targeted mutation of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD65 (GAD65+/- mice, which show a delayed postnatal increase in tissue GABA content in limbic and cortical brain areas. Unexpectedly, GAD65(+/- mice did not show changes in exploratory activity regardless of the stressor type and were after the variable juvenile stress procedure protected from the development of contextual generalization in an auditory fear conditioning experiment. Our data demonstrate the complex nature of behavioral alterations in rodent models of stress-related psychopathologies and suggest that GAD65 haplodeficiency, likely through its effect on the postnatal maturation of GABAergic transmission, conveys resilience to some of these stress-induced effects.

  6. PLA2G6基因纯合突变致婴儿神经轴索营养不良一例%A novel homozygous mutation in PLA2G6 gene causes infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy in a case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金玲; 吴蔚; 陈雪峰; 张黎; 王秀敏; 董关萍

    2016-01-01

    目的 对1例临床诊断为婴儿神经轴索营养不良的患儿的临床特点及PLA2G6基因序列进行分析.方法 收集患儿的临床资料,采集患儿及其父母的外周血DNA,用直接测序法分析PLA2G6基因的潜在突变.结果 患儿表现为进行性智力、运动功能倒退,肌张力下降.基因测序显示PLA2G6基因纯合突变G68A(Arg23Gln),其父母该位点均为杂合突变.结论 该患儿神经轴索营养不良的病因为PLA2G6基因纯合突变G68A(Arg23Gln).%Objective To investigate the clinical symptoms and potential mutations in the PLA2G6 gene for a child with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy.Methods Clinical data of the patient was collected.The coding regions of PLA2G6 gene was subjected to Sanger sequencing using blood DNA from the patient and her parents.Results The patient has presented with psychomotor regression and hypotonia,followed by development of tetraparesis.A novel homozygous mutation G68A in the PLA2G6 gene was found by DNA sequencing,while her parents were both heterozygous carriers.Conclusion The psychomotor regression and tetraparesis of the patient was caused by infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy due to a novel homozygous mutation in the PLA2G6 gene,which was inherited from her parents.

  7. δ-Sarcoglycan-deficient muscular dystrophy: from discovery to therapeutic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blain Alison M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mutations in the δ-sarcoglycan gene cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2F (LGMD2F, an autosomal recessive disease that causes progressive weakness and wasting of the proximal limb muscles and often has cardiac involvement. Here we review the clinical implications of LGMD2F and discuss the current understanding of the putative mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis. Preclinical research has benefited enormously from various animal models of δ-sarcoglycan deficiency, which have helped researchers to explore therapeutic approaches for both muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy.

  8. Becker muscular dystrophy with widespread muscle hypertrophy and a non-sense mutation of exon 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, M; Vissing, J

    2013-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy features progressive proximal weakness, wasting and often focal hypertrophy. We present a patient with pain and cramps from adolescence. Widespread muscle hypertrophy, preserved muscle strength and a 10-20-fold raised CPK were noted. Muscle biopsy was dystrophic......, and Western blot showed a 95% reduction of dystrophin levels. Genetic analyses revealed a non-sense mutation in exon 2 of the dystrophin gene. This mutation is predicted to result in a Duchenne phenotype, but resulted in a mild Becker muscular dystrophy with widespread muscle hypertrophy. We suggest...

  9. The clinical and molecular genetic approach to Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy : an updated protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanEssen, AJ; Kneppers, ALJ; vanderHout, AH; Scheffer, H; Ginjaar, IB; tenKate, LP; vanOmmen, GJB; Buys, CHCM; Bakker, E

    1997-01-01

    Detection of large rearrangements in the dystrophin gene in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy is possible in about 65-70% of patients by Southern blotting or multiplex PCR. Subsequently, carrier detection is possible by assessing the intensity of relevant bands, but preferably by a non-quantita

  10. Dominant collagen VI mutations are a common cause of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, NL; Morgelin, M; Peat, R; Goemans, N; North, KN; Bateman, JF; Lamande, [No Value

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the three collagen VI genes COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 cause Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). UCMD, a severe disorder characterized by congenital muscle weakness, proximal joint contractures and marked distal joint hyperextensibility, has been considered

  11. Diagnosis of becker muscular dystrophy : Results of Re-analysis of DNA samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straathof, Chiara S M; Van Heusden, Dave; Ippel, Pieternella F.; Post, Jan G.; Voermans, Nicol C.; De Visser, Marianne; Brusse, Esther; Van Den Bergen, Janneke C.; Van Der Kooi, Anneke J.; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Ginjaar, Hendrika B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The phenotype of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is highly variable, and the disease may be underdiagnosed. We searched for new mutations in the DMD gene in a cohort of previously undiagnosed patients who had been referred in the period 1985-1995. Methods: All requests for DNA analysis

  12. Dominant collagen VI mutations are a common cause of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, NL; Morgelin, M; Peat, R; Goemans, N; North, KN; Bateman, JF; Lamande, [No Value

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the three collagen VI genes COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 cause Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). UCMD, a severe disorder characterized by congenital muscle weakness, proximal joint contractures and marked distal joint hyperextensibility, has been considered

  13. The influence of low dystrophin levels on disease pathology in mouse models for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, Maaike van

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most prevalent neuromuscular disorder, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that prevent synthesis of dystrophin. Fibers that lack dystrophin are sensitive to exercise-induced damage, resulting in progressive muscle wasting, loss of ambulation and premature de

  14. Investigation of Poor Academic Achievement in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, V. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Fee, R.; Goldstein, E.; Stern, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder that presents with progressive muscular weakness. It is caused by a mutation in a gene that results in the absence of specific products that normally localize to muscle cells and the central nervous system (CNS). The majority of affected individuals have IQs within the…

  15. GAD65 autoantibodies and its role as biomarker of Type 1 diabetes and Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA)

    OpenAIRE

    Towns, Roberto; Pietropaolo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of autoimmune diabetes is the presence of adaptive responses directed to neuroendocrine proteins. One of these proteins is glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). While GAD is widely distributed in neuroendocrine tissues, its specific significance in diabetes has paralleled the advances in understanding humoral and cellular immunity in Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and in a subset of Type 2 diabetes (T2D), going from the seminal discoveries of islet autoantibodies to the development a...

  16. Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies: An Indian update on genetics and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadkarni Jayshree

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of molecular diagnostic techniques has greatly improved the diagnosis, carrier detection, prenatal testing and genetic counseling for families with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (D/BMD in India. The prediction of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD patients to have out-framed deletions and Becker′s muscular dystrophy (BMD patients to have in-frame deletions of dystrophin gene holds well in the vast majority of cases. Mutation detection is obviously critical for diagnosis but it may also be important for future therapeutic purposes. These factors underscore the need for earlier referral, genetic counseling and provision of support and rehabilitation services which are the main priorities for psychosocial assessment and intervention at medical and social levels.

  17. Aberrant Accumulation of the Diabetes Autoantigen GAD65 in Golgi Membranes in Conditions of ER Stress and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Edward A; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Michael, Iacovos P; Pasquier, Miriella; Kanaani, Jamil; Nano, Rita; Lavallard, Vanessa; Billestrup, Nils; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Baekkeskov, Steinunn

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic islet β-cells are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is implicated in β-cell dysfunction and loss during the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The peripheral membrane protein GAD65 is an autoantigen in human T1D. GAD65 synthesizes γ-aminobutyric acid, an important autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule and a survival factor in islets. We show that ER stress in primary β-cells perturbs the palmitoylation cycle controlling GAD65 endomembrane distribution, resulting in aberrant accumulation of the palmitoylated form in trans-Golgi membranes. The palmitoylated form has heightened immunogenicity, exhibiting increased uptake by antigen-presenting cells and T-cell stimulation compared with the nonpalmitoylated form. Similar accumulation of GAD65 in Golgi membranes is observed in human β-cells in pancreatic sections from GAD65 autoantibody-positive individuals who have not yet progressed to clinical onset of T1D and from patients with T1D with residual β-cell mass and ongoing T-cell infiltration of islets. We propose that aberrant accumulation of immunogenic GAD65 in Golgi membranes facilitates inappropriate presentation to the immune system after release from stressed and/or damaged β-cells, triggering autoimmunity.

  18. Changes in GAD67 mRNA expression evidenced by in situ hybridization in the brain of R6/2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourfinkel-An, I; Parain, K; Hartmann, A; Mangiarini, L; Brice, A; Bates, G; Hirsch, E C

    2003-09-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant disorder with degeneration of medium size striatal neurones. As the disease evolves, other neuronal populations are also progressively affected. A transgenic mouse model of the disease (R6/2) that expresses exon 1 of the human Huntington gene with approximately 150 CAG repeats has been developed, but GABA concentrations are reported to be normal in the striatum of these animals. In the present study, we analysed the status of GABAergic systems by means of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)67 mRNA in situ hybridization in the brain of R6/2 transgenic mice and wild-type littermates. We show that GAD67 expression is normal in the striatum, cerebellum and septum but decreased in the frontal cortex, parietal cortex, globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata of R6/2 mice. These data, which may, in part, account for the behavioural changes seen in these animals, indicate that at 12.5 weeks of age the pathological features seen in the mice differ from those seen in humans with Huntington's disease.

  19. MLPA技术用于假性肥大型肌营养不良症产前基因诊断的价值%Clinical value of MLPA in the prenatal gene diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎青; 李少英; 张慧敏; 何文智; 马晓燕; 王晓蔓; 冼嘉嘉; 孙筱放; 陈敦金

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨多重连接探针扩增(MLPA)技术用于假性肥大型肌营养不良症(DMD)先证者家系中高风险孕妇产前DMD基因诊断的价值.方法 收集2005年至2012年广州医学院第三附属医院、南方医科大学南方医院等4家医院的155例有DMD先证者家系的高风险孕妇,其中7例孕早期孕妇取绒毛标本,148例孕中期孕妇取羊水样本,对绒毛标本和血性羊水标本排除母体DNA污染后,采用MLPA技术对绒毛和羊水样本行胎儿DMD基因检测;计算155个家系中DMD基因外显子突变发生次数.结果 (1)155例孕妇中共检出DMD胎儿27例、胎儿DMD基因携带者28例、正常胎儿100例.155例胎儿中,男胎72例,其中27例为DMD胎儿(38%);女胎83例,其中28例胎儿为DMD基因携带者(34%).(2)27例DMD胎儿中,DMD外显子缺失突变22例(14.2%,22/155);外显子重复突变5例,(3.2%,5/155);28例DMD基因携带者中,DMD外显子杂合缺失突变25例(16.1%,25/155),外显子杂合重复突变3例(1.9%,3/155).155个家系中,DMD基因突变的发生主要分布在外显子45 ~ 52之间,其中外显子49突变发生次数最高,共22次.(3)7例早孕期孕妇的绒毛组织DMD基因诊断结果中,有两例胎儿DMD基因型分别与先证者、孕妇的DMD基因型一致,其中1例为患儿、1例为DMD基因携带者,分别给予终止妊娠和继续妊娠的处理.结论 MLPA技术用于DMD产前基因诊断,能准确区分DMD基因突变是属于缺失型、重复型突变还是杂合性缺失等,对DMD先证者家系的高危孕妇有较高的产前诊断价值,临床结果可靠;绒毛膜活检可用于产前DMD早期基因诊断.%Objective To investigate the clinical value of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) in the prenatal gene diagnosis of high risk pregnant women from Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) families.Methods The 155 high risk pregnant women from DMD families were recruited from 2005 to 2012 in 4 hospitals in

  20. [Muscular Dystrophies Involving the Retinal Function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägle, H

    2016-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are rare disorders, with an incidence of approx. 20 in 100 000. Some dystrophies also affect retinal or optic nerve function. In such cases, the ophthalmological findings may be critical for differential diagnosis or patient counseling. For example in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, where the alteration in retinal function seems to reflect cerebral involvement. Other important forms are mitochondrial and metabolic disorders, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome and the Refsum syndrome. Molecular genetic analysis has become a major tool for differential diagnosis, but may be complex and demanding. This article gives an overview of major muscular dystrophies involving retinal function and their genetic origin, in order to guide differential diagnosis.

  1. Anesthesia for a Patient with Myotonic Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Kalaycı

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy is the most common myotonic syndrome causing abnormalities of the skeletal and smooth muscles as well as problems related to the cardiac, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems. In affected people, reduced functional residual capacity, vital capacity, and peak inspiratory pressure are observed within the respiratory system. As would be expected, anesthetic management of these patients is challenging for anesthesiologists. In addition, delayed recovery from anesthesia and cardiac and pulmonary complications may develop in the intraoperative and early postoperative periods due to sensitivity to sedatives, anesthetic agents, and neuromuscular blocking agents. Myotonic dystrophy can be performed with the use of appropriate anesthesia procedures as well as carefully communication between anesthesiologists and surgeons. In conclusion, myotonic dystrophy has variations, which makes it important to preoperatively determine specific surgical and anesthetic management strategies for each patient. In this article, we present a patient with myotonic dystrophy who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery for symptomatic cholelithiasis and to discuss the relevant literature.

  2. Duchenne muscular dystrophy - a molecular service

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy using molecular technology was instituted at the ..... utilising non-fat dry milk for analysis of proteins and nucleic acids transferred ... acid to high specific activity in vitro by nick translation with DNA polymerase.

  3. Prevalence of generalized retinal dystrophy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Jensen, Hanne; Bregnhøj, Jesper F;

    2014-01-01

    of this study was to examine the prevalence and diagnostic spectrum of generalized retinal dystrophy in the Danish population. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study with data from the Danish Retinitis Pigmentosa Registry that comprises all patients in Denmark with generalized retinal....... RESULTS: Of the 5,602,628 Danish citizens on January 1, 2013, 1622 patients were registered as having a generalized retinal dystrophy and were alive and living in Denmark, corresponding to a prevalence of 1:3,454. In 28% of cases the eye condition was part of a syndrome, while the remaining 72% had eye...... disease only. Aside from simplex cases (45%), the most common hereditary pattern was autosomal recessive (23%). CONCLUSION: This epidemiological survey demonstrates that the prevalence of generalized retinal dystrophy in the Danish population is 1:3454. Many of the dystrophies are the subjects of clinical...

  4. Ventilatory support in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlgemuth, M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Kesteren, R.G. van; Maarel, S.M. van der; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Respiratory insufficiency due to respiratory muscle weakness is a common complication of many neuromuscular diseases. The prevalence of respiratory failure in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is unknown. The authors identified 10 FSHD patients on nocturnal ventilatory support at home,

  5. Autophagy in granular corneal dystrophy type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Il; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative process that is essential for cellular homeostasis and metabolic stress adaptation. Defective autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases including granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2). GCD2 is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by substitution of histidine for arginine at codon 124 (R124H) in the transforming growth factor β-induced gene (TGFBI) on chromosome 5q31. Transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp) is degraded by autophagy, but mutant-TGFBIp accumulates in autophagosomes and/or lysosomes, despite significant activation of basal autophagy, in GCD2 corneal fibroblasts. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy induces cell death of GCD2 corneal fibroblasts through active caspase-3. As there is currently no pharmacological treatment for GCD2, development of novel therapies is required. A potential strategy for preventing cytoplasmic accumulation of mutant-TGFBIp in GCD2 corneal fibroblasts is to enhance mutant-TGFBIp degradation. This could be achieved by activation of the autophagic pathway. Here, we will consider the role and the potential therapeutic benefits of autophagy in GCD2, with focus on TGFBIp degradation, in light of the recently established role of autophagy in protein degradation.

  6. The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklund, Matthew P; Kissel, John T

    2014-08-01

    A collection of more than 30 genetic muscle diseases that share certain key features, limb-girdle muscular dystrophies are characterized by progressive weakness and muscle atrophy of the hips, shoulders, and proximal extremity muscles with postnatal onset. This article discusses clinical, laboratory, and histologic features of the 6 most prevalent limb-girdle dystrophies. In this large group of disorders, certain distinctive features often can guide clinicians to a correct diagnosis.

  7. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: the management of scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Adrian C.; Roper, Helen P.; Chikermane, Ashish A.; Tatman, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This study summaries the current management of scoliosis in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. A literature review of Medline was performed and the collected articles critically appraised. This literature is discussed to give an overview of the current management of scoliosis within Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Importantly, improvements in respiratory care, the use of steroids and improving surgical techniques have allowed patients to maintain quality of life and improved life expectancy in this patient group.

  8. Best practice guidelines and recommendations on the molecular diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Kress, Wolfram; Catalli, Claudio; Hertz, Jens M; Witsch-Baumgartner, Martina; Buckley, Michael F; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Schwartz, Marianne; Scheffer, Hans

    2012-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder that is characterized by myotonic myopathy. The symptoms and severity of myotonic dystrophy type l (DM1) ranges from severe and congenital forms, which frequently result in death because of respiratory deficiency, through to late-onset baldness and cataract. In adult patients, cardiac conduction abnormalities may occur and cause a shorter life span. In subsequent generations, the symptoms in DM1 may present at an earlier age and have a more severe course (anticipation). In myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), no anticipation is described, but cardiac conduction abnormalities as in DM1 are observed and patients with DM2 additionally have muscle pain and stiffness. Both DM1 and DM2 are caused by unstable DNA repeats in untranslated regions of different genes: A (CTG)n repeat in the 3'-UTR of the DMPK gene and a (CCTG)n repeat in intron 1 of the CNBP (formerly ZNF9) gene, respectively. The length of the (CTG)n repeat expansion in DM1 correlates with disease severity and age of onset. Nevertheless, these repeat sizes have limited predictive values on individual bases. Because of the disease characteristics in DM1 and DM2, appropriate molecular testing and reporting is very important for the optimal counseling in myotonic dystrophy. Here, we describe best practice guidelines for clinical molecular genetic analysis and reporting in DM1 and DM2, including presymptomatic and prenatal testing.

  9. Zebrafish models flex their muscles to shed light on muscular dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Berger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that specifically affect skeletal muscle and are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakening. To develop therapies and treatments for these diseases, a better understanding of the molecular basis of muscular dystrophies is required. Thus, identification of causative genes mutated in specific disorders and the study of relevant animal models are imperative. Zebrafish genetic models of human muscle disorders often closely resemble disease pathogenesis, and the optical clarity of zebrafish embryos and larvae enables visualization of dynamic molecular processes in vivo. As an adjunct tool, morpholino studies provide insight into the molecular function of genes and allow rapid assessment of candidate genes for human muscular dystrophies. This unique set of attributes makes the zebrafish model system particularly valuable for the study of muscle diseases. This review discusses how recent research using zebrafish has shed light on the pathological basis of muscular dystrophies, with particular focus on the muscle cell membrane and the linkage between the myofibre cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix.

  10. DNA damage, somatic aneuploidy, and malignant sarcoma susceptibility in muscular dystrophies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang M Schmidt

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Albeit genetically highly heterogeneous, muscular dystrophies (MDs share a convergent pathology leading to muscle wasting accompanied by proliferation of fibrous and fatty tissue, suggesting a common MD-pathomechanism. Here we show that mutations in muscular dystrophy genes (Dmd, Dysf, Capn3, Large lead to the spontaneous formation of skeletal muscle-derived malignant tumors in mice, presenting as mixed rhabdomyo-, fibro-, and liposarcomas. Primary MD-gene defects and strain background strongly influence sarcoma incidence, latency, localization, and gender prevalence. Combined loss of dystrophin and dysferlin, as well as dystrophin and calpain-3, leads to accelerated tumor formation. Irrespective of the primary gene defects, all MD sarcomas share non-random genomic alterations including frequent losses of tumor suppressors (Cdkn2a, Nf1, amplification of oncogenes (Met, Jun, recurrent duplications of whole chromosomes 8 and 15, and DNA damage. Remarkably, these sarcoma-specific genetic lesions are already regularly present in skeletal muscles in aged MD mice even prior to sarcoma development. Accordingly, we show also that skeletal muscle from human muscular dystrophy patients is affected by gross genomic instability, represented by DNA double-strand breaks and age-related accumulation of aneusomies. These novel aspects of molecular pathologies common to muscular dystrophies and tumor biology will potentially influence the strategies to combat these diseases.

  11. DNA damage, somatic aneuploidy, and malignant sarcoma susceptibility in muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M; Uddin, Mohammed H; Dysek, Sandra; Moser-Thier, Karin; Pirker, Christine; Höger, Harald; Ambros, Inge M; Ambros, Peter F; Berger, Walter; Bittner, Reginald E

    2011-04-01

    Albeit genetically highly heterogeneous, muscular dystrophies (MDs) share a convergent pathology leading to muscle wasting accompanied by proliferation of fibrous and fatty tissue, suggesting a common MD-pathomechanism. Here we show that mutations in muscular dystrophy genes (Dmd, Dysf, Capn3, Large) lead to the spontaneous formation of skeletal muscle-derived malignant tumors in mice, presenting as mixed rhabdomyo-, fibro-, and liposarcomas. Primary MD-gene defects and strain background strongly influence sarcoma incidence, latency, localization, and gender prevalence. Combined loss of dystrophin and dysferlin, as well as dystrophin and calpain-3, leads to accelerated tumor formation. Irrespective of the primary gene defects, all MD sarcomas share non-random genomic alterations including frequent losses of tumor suppressors (Cdkn2a, Nf1), amplification of oncogenes (Met, Jun), recurrent duplications of whole chromosomes 8 and 15, and DNA damage. Remarkably, these sarcoma-specific genetic lesions are already regularly present in skeletal muscles in aged MD mice even prior to sarcoma development. Accordingly, we show also that skeletal muscle from human muscular dystrophy patients is affected by gross genomic instability, represented by DNA double-strand breaks and age-related accumulation of aneusomies. These novel aspects of molecular pathologies common to muscular dystrophies and tumor biology will potentially influence the strategies to combat these diseases.

  12. Zebrafish models flex their muscles to shed light on muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joachim; Currie, Peter D

    2012-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that specifically affect skeletal muscle and are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakening. To develop therapies and treatments for these diseases, a better understanding of the molecular basis of muscular dystrophies is required. Thus, identification of causative genes mutated in specific disorders and the study of relevant animal models are imperative. Zebrafish genetic models of human muscle disorders often closely resemble disease pathogenesis, and the optical clarity of zebrafish embryos and larvae enables visualization of dynamic molecular processes in vivo. As an adjunct tool, morpholino studies provide insight into the molecular function of genes and allow rapid assessment of candidate genes for human muscular dystrophies. This unique set of attributes makes the zebrafish model system particularly valuable for the study of muscle diseases. This review discusses how recent research using zebrafish has shed light on the pathological basis of muscular dystrophies, with particular focus on the muscle cell membrane and the linkage between the myofibre cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix.

  13. COOH-Terminal Clustering of Autoantibody and T-Cell Determinants on the Structure of GAD65 Provide Insights Into the Molecular Basis of Autoreactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Hampe, Christiane S.; Arafat, Yasir; Law, Ruby H.P.; Banga, J. Paul; Mackay, Ian R.; Whisstock, James C.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Rowley, Merrill J. (UWASH); (King’s College); (Monash)

    2008-11-19

    To gain structural insights into the autoantigenic properties of GAD65 in type 1 diabetes, we analyzed experimental epitope mapping data in the context of the recently determined crystal structures of GAD65 and GAD67, to allow 'molecular positioning' of epitope sites for B- and T-cell reactivity. Data were assembled from analysis of reported effects of mutagenesis of GAD65 on its reactivity with a panel of 11 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), supplemented by use of recombinant Fab to cross-inhibit reactivity with GAD65 by radioimmunoprecipitation of the same mAbs. COOH-terminal region on GAD65 was the major autoantigenic site. B-cell epitopes were distributed within two separate clusters around different faces of the COOH-terminal domain. Inclusion of epitope sites in the pyridoxal phosphate- and NH{sub 2}-terminal domains was attributed to the juxtaposition of all three domains in the crystal structure. Epitope preferences of different mAbs to GAD65 aligned with different clinical expressions of type 1 diabetes. Epitopes for four of five known reactive T-cell sequences restricted by HLA DRB1*0401 were aligned to solvent-exposed regions of the GAD65 structure and colocalized within the two B-cell epitope clusters. The continuous COOH-terminal epitope region of GAD65 was structurally highly flexible and therefore differed markedly from the equivalent region of GAD67. Structural features could explain the differing antigenicity, and perhaps immunogenicity, of GAD65 versus GAD67. The proximity of B- and T-cell epitopes within the GAD65 structure suggests that antigen-antibody complexes may influence antigen processing by accessory cells and thereby T-cell reactivity.

  14. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marie; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm

    2014-01-01

    disorders, arrhythmias, and device implantation). In the DM cohort, SIR for any cardiac disease was 3.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.01-3.86]; for a cardiac disease belonging to the selected subgroups 6.91 (95% CI: 5.93-8.01) and for other cardiac disease 2.59 (95% CI: 2.03-3.25). For a cardiac disease......AIMS: To quantify the association between myotonic dystrophy (DM) and cardiac disease in a nationwide cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified a nationwide cohort of 1146 DM patients (period 1977-2011) using the National Patient Registry (NPR) and a subcohort of 485 patients who had undergone...... genetic testing for DM1. Information on incident cardiac diseases was obtained from the NPR. We estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cardiac disease compared with the background population, overall and according to selected diagnostic subgroups (cardiomyopathy, heart failure, conduction...

  15. Identification of muscle-specific microRNAs in serum of muscular dystrophy animal models: promising novel blood-based markers for muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideya Mizuno

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a lethal X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Creatine kinase (CK is generally used as a blood-based biomarker for muscular disease including DMD, but it is not always reliable since it is easily affected by stress to the body, such as exercise. Therefore, more reliable biomarkers of muscular dystrophy have long been desired. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, ∼22 nucleotide, noncoding RNAs which play important roles in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, it has been reported that miRNAs exist in blood. In this study, we hypothesized that the expression levels of specific serum circulating miRNAs may be useful to monitor the pathological progression of muscular diseases, and therefore explored the possibility of these miRNAs as new biomarkers for muscular diseases. To confirm this hypothesis, we quantified the expression levels of miRNAs in serum of the dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy mouse model, mdx, and the canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan dog model (CXMD(J, by real-time PCR. We found that the serum levels of several muscle-specific miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133a and miR-206 are increased in both mdx and CXMD(J. Interestingly, unlike CK levels, expression levels of these miRNAs in mdx serum are little influenced by exercise using treadmill. These results suggest that serum miRNAs are useful and reliable biomarkers for muscular dystrophy.

  16. Identification of muscle-specific microRNAs in serum of muscular dystrophy animal models: promising novel blood-based markers for muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hideya; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Ito, Naoki; Kishi, Soichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Hashido, Kazuo

    2011-03-30

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Creatine kinase (CK) is generally used as a blood-based biomarker for muscular disease including DMD, but it is not always reliable since it is easily affected by stress to the body, such as exercise. Therefore, more reliable biomarkers of muscular dystrophy have long been desired. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, ∼22 nucleotide, noncoding RNAs which play important roles in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, it has been reported that miRNAs exist in blood. In this study, we hypothesized that the expression levels of specific serum circulating miRNAs may be useful to monitor the pathological progression of muscular diseases, and therefore explored the possibility of these miRNAs as new biomarkers for muscular diseases. To confirm this hypothesis, we quantified the expression levels of miRNAs in serum of the dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy mouse model, mdx, and the canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan dog model (CXMD(J)), by real-time PCR. We found that the serum levels of several muscle-specific miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133a and miR-206) are increased in both mdx and CXMD(J). Interestingly, unlike CK levels, expression levels of these miRNAs in mdx serum are little influenced by exercise using treadmill. These results suggest that serum miRNAs are useful and reliable biomarkers for muscular dystrophy.

  17. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selsby, Joshua T; Ross, Jason W; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease.

  18. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Khalighi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Myotonic dystrophy (DM is an inherited progressive muscle disorder caused by defects in muscle proteins. As the incidence of this condition is low, not many are familiar with the multisystem involvement. At times, cardiac disease may even be the predominant manifestation in the form of arrhythmias, conduction defects, and cardiomyopathies. The progression of the disease can lead to sudden, unpredictable death. Thus, it is important to identify this subgroup and treat accordingly. Objective: To identify patients with DM and assess their risk for sudden cardiac death. Methods: Nine patients previously diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were evaluated by cardiologists for various reasons, from a general follow-up to cardiac arrest. All of them had electrocardiograms (EKG and 2-D echocardiograms, and seven of them had further electrophysiological (EP studies. Results: Of the nine patients with DM, eight had EKG evidence of conduction abnormalities ranging from first-degree heart block to complete heart block. Of the seven who had EP studies, five had inducible ventricular tachycardia requiring immediate cardioversion and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD implant. Two of them underwent permanent pacemaker placement due to complete heart block and infra-Hissian block. The remaining two patients opted for a conservative approach with yearly EKG monitoring. Conclusion: Because one-third of the cardiac deaths in patients with DM are sudden, there is a strong need to identify these patients and intervene in those at high risk. Prophylactic pacemaker placement is recommended even in those with minimal conduction system abnormality. However, the common practice is to identify patients at high risk of conduction abnormalities by EP studies and then provide them with prophylactic invasive strategies.

  19. Vector-mediated chromosomal integration of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in streptococcus thermophilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The integrative vector pINTRS was used to transfer glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity to Streptococcus thermophilus ST128, thus allowing for the production of '-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In pINTRS, the gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was flanked by DNA fragments homologous to a S. ...

  20. Efficient and fast functional screening of microdystrophin constructs in vivo and in vitro for therapy of duchenne muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Larochelle, Nancy; Orlopp, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked, lethal genetic disorder affecting the skeletal muscle compartment, and is caused by mutation(s) in the dystrophin gene. Gene delivery of microdystrophin constructs using adeno-associated virus (AAV) and antisense-mediated exon skipping restoring...

  1. Current theoretical models of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD): conceptual review and treatment implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Evelyn; DiMarco, Ilyse Dobrow; Hekler, Eric B; Mohlman, Jan; Staples, Alison M

    2009-12-01

    Theoretical conceptualizations of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) continue to undergo scrutiny and refinement. The current paper critiques five contemporary models of GAD: the Avoidance Model of Worry and GAD [Borkovec, T. D. (1994). The nature, functions, and origins of worry. In: G. Davey & F. Tallis (Eds.), Worrying: perspectives on theory assessment and treatment (pp. 5-33). Sussex, England: Wiley & Sons; Borkovec, T. D., Alcaine, O. M., & Behar, E. (2004). Avoidance theory of worry and generalized anxiety disorder. In: R. Heimberg, C. Turk, & D. Mennin (Eds.), Generalized anxiety disorder: advances in research and practice (pp. 77-108). New York, NY, US: Guilford Press]; the Intolerance of Uncertainty Model [Dugas, M. J., Letarte, H., Rheaume, J., Freeston, M. H., & Ladouceur, R. (1995). Worry and problem solving: evidence of a specific relationship. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 19, 109-120; Freeston, M. H., Rheaume, J., Letarte, H., Dugas, M. J., & Ladouceur, R. (1994). Why do people worry? Personality and Individual Differences, 17, 791-802]; the Metacognitive Model [Wells, A. (1995). Meta-cognition and worry: a cognitive model of generalized anxiety disorder. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 23, 301-320]; the Emotion Dysregulation Model [Mennin, D. S., Heimberg, R. G., Turk, C. L., & Fresco, D. M. (2002). Applying an emotion regulation framework to integrative approaches to generalized anxiety disorder. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 9, 85-90]; and the Acceptance-based Model of GAD [Roemer, L., & Orsillo, S. M. (2002). Expanding our conceptualization of and treatment for generalized anxiety disorder: integrating mindfulness/acceptance-based approaches with existing cognitive behavioral models. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 9, 54-68]. Evidence in support of each model is critically reviewed, and each model's corresponding evidence-based therapeutic interventions are discussed. Generally speaking, the models share an

  2. Comparative Autonomic Responses to Diagnostic Interviewing between Individuals with GAD, MDD, SAD and Healthy Controls

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    Diamond, Allison E.; Fisher, Aaron J.

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has been well documented in individuals diagnosed with a range of psychological disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Moreover, these disorders both confer an increased risk of cardiovascular disease—which may relate to increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic tone. Extant research has indicated a reduction in autonomic flexibility in GAD, and while reduced flexibility has also been seen in MDD, the specific physiological alterations have been more difficult to categorize due to methodological limitations, including high co-morbidity rates with anxiety disorders. Prior studies have largely assessed autonomic functioning in stress paradigms or at the trait level, yet to date, no research has investigated the ANS during a diagnostic interview, a ubiquitous task employed in both research and clinical settings. In this study we sought to identify physiological differences in both branches of the ANS across diagnostic categories in the context of a diagnostic interview. Participants (n = 82) were administered a structured clinical interview, during which heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and pre-ejection period (PEP) were recorded in participants carrying a diagnosis of GAD (n = 34), MDD (n = 22), Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD; n = 15) and healthy controls (n = 27). Person-specific linear regression models were employed to assess the level and slope for HR, RSA and PEP throughout the course of the interview. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) model was conducted to baseline differences in HR, RSA and PEP between diagnostic groups. Multiple regression models were then conducted to differences in slope of HR, RSA and PEP throughout the course of the interview amongst diagnostic groups, including both suppression and worry as moderators. Results indicated significant increases in RSA throughout the interview in MDD (p = 0

  3. FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Exondys 51 seems to fill unmet need ... the first drug for a rare form of muscular dystrophy. Exondys 51 (eteplirsen) was granted accelerated approval ...

  4. A founder mutation in Anoctamin 5 is a major cause of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

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    Hicks, Debbie; Sarkozy, A; Muelas, N; Koehler, K; Huebner, A; Hudson, G; Chinnery, P F; Barresi, R; Eagle, M; Polvikoski, T; Bailey, G; Miller, J; Radunovic, A; Hughes, P J; Roberts, R; Krause, S; Walter, M C; Laval, S H; Straub, V; Lochmüller, H; Bushby, K

    2011-01-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies are a group of disorders with wide genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Recently, mutations in the ANO5 gene, which encodes a putative calcium-activated chloride channel belonging to the Anoctamin family of proteins, were identified in five families with one of two previously identified disorders, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2L and non-dysferlin Miyoshi muscular dystrophy. We screened a candidate group of 64 patients from 59 British and German kindreds and found the truncating mutation, c.191dupA in exon 5 of ANO5 in 20 patients, homozygously in 15 and in compound heterozygosity with other ANO5 variants in the rest. An intragenic single nucleotide polymorphism and an extragenic microsatellite marker are in linkage disequilibrium with the mutation, suggesting a founder effect in the Northern European population. We have further defined the clinical phenotype of ANO5-associated muscular dystrophy. Patients show adult onset proximal lower limb weakness with highly raised serum creatine kinase values (average 4500 IU/l) and frequent muscle atrophy and asymmetry of muscle involvement. Onset varies from the early 20 s to 50 s and the weakness is generally slowly progressive, with most patients remaining ambulant for several decades. Distal presentation is much less common but a milder degree of distal lower limb weakness is often observed. Upper limb strength is only mildly affected and cardiac and respiratory function is normal. Females appear less frequently affected. In the North of England population we have identified eight patients with ANO5 mutations, suggesting a minimum prevalence of 0.27/100,000, twice as common as dysferlinopathy. We suggest that mutations in ANO5 represent a relatively common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy with high serum creatine kinase and that mutation screening, particularly of the common mutation c.191dupA, should be an early step in the diagnostic algorithm of adult limb-girdle muscular

  5. Altered cross-bridge properties in skeletal muscle dystrophies.

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    Guellich, Aziz; Negroni, Elisa; Decostre, Valérie; Demoule, Alexandre; Coirault, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Force and motion generated by skeletal muscle ultimately depends on the cyclical interaction of actin with myosin. This mechanical process is regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) through the thin filament-associated regulatory proteins i.e.; troponins and tropomyosin. Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic affections characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of the skeletal muscle as a consequence of loss of muscle tissue which directly reduces the number of potential myosin cross-bridges involved in force production. Mutations in genes responsible for skeletal muscle dystrophies (MDs) have been shown to modify the function of contractile proteins and cross-bridge interactions. Altered gene expression or RNA splicing or post-translational modifications of contractile proteins such as those related to oxidative stress, may affect cross-bridge function by modifying key proteins of the excitation-contraction coupling. Micro-architectural change in myofilament is another mechanism of altered cross-bridge performance. In this review, we provide an overview about changes in cross-bridge performance in skeletal MDs and discuss their ultimate impacts on striated muscle function.

  6. Altered cross-bridge properties in skeletal muscle dystrophies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guellich, Aziz; Negroni, Elisa; Decostre, Valérie; Demoule, Alexandre; Coirault, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Force and motion generated by skeletal muscle ultimately depends on the cyclical interaction of actin with myosin. This mechanical process is regulated by intracellular Ca2+ through the thin filament-associated regulatory proteins i.e.; troponins and tropomyosin. Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic affections characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of the skeletal muscle as a consequence of loss of muscle tissue which directly reduces the number of potential myosin cross-bridges involved in force production. Mutations in genes responsible for skeletal muscle dystrophies (MDs) have been shown to modify the function of contractile proteins and cross-bridge interactions. Altered gene expression or RNA splicing or post-translational modifications of contractile proteins such as those related to oxidative stress, may affect cross-bridge function by modifying key proteins of the excitation-contraction coupling. Micro-architectural change in myofilament is another mechanism of altered cross-bridge performance. In this review, we provide an overview about changes in cross-bridge performance in skeletal MDs and discuss their ultimate impacts on striated muscle function. PMID:25352808

  7. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (UCMD: Clinical and Genetic Correlations

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    Bita BOZORGMEHR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Bozorgmehr B, Kariminejad A, Nafissi Sh, Jebelli B, Andoni U, Gartioux C, Ledeuil C, Allamand Y, Richard P, Kariminejad MH. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (UCMD:Clinical and Genetic Correlations. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Summer; 7(3: 15-22.  Objective:Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD corresponds to the severe end of the clinical spectrum of neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in the genes encoding collagen VI (COL VI. We studied four unrelated families with six affected children that had typical UCMD with dominant and recessive inheritance.Materials & MethodsFour unrelated Iranian families with six affected children with typical UCMD were analyzed for COLVI secretion in skin fibroblast culture and the secretion of COLVI in skin fibroblast culture using quantitative RT–PCR (Q-RT-PCR, and mutation identification was performed by sequencing of complementary DNA.ResultsCOL VI secretion was altered in all studied fibroblast cultures. Two affected sibs carried a homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 12 of COL6A2, while another patient had a large heterozygous deletion in exon 5-8 of COL6A2. The two other affected sibs had homozygote mutation in exon 24 of COL6A2, and the last one was homozygote in COL6A1.ConclusionIn this study, we found out variability in clinical findings and genetic inheritance among UCMD patients, so that the patient with complete absence of COLVI was severely affected and had a large heterozygous deletion in COL6A2. In contrast, the patients with homozygous deletion had mild to moderate decrease in the secretion of COL VI and were mildly tomoderately affected.References1. Voit T. Congenital Muscular Dystrophies Brain Dev 1998;20(2: 65-74.2. Ullrich OZ Ges. Scleroatonic Muscular Dystrophy. NeurolPsychiatr 1930;126:171-201.3. Ullrich O. Monatsschr. Kinderheilkd 1930;47:502-10.4. Mercuri E, Yuva Y, Brown SC, Brockington M, Kinali M, Jungbluth H, et al. Collagen VI involvement in

  8. Neuropsychiatric autoimmune encephalitis without VGKC-complex, NMDAR, and GAD autoantibodies: case report and literature review.

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    Najjar, Souhel; Pearlman, Daniel; Devinsky, Orrin; Najjar, Amanda; Nadkarni, Siddhartha; Butler, Tracy; Zagzag, David

    2013-03-01

    We report a patient with a seronegative autoimmune panencephalitis, adding a subtype to the emerging spectrum of seronegative autoimmune encephalitis, and we review the sparse literature on isolated psychiatric presentations of autoimmune encephalitis. (A PubMed search for "seronegative autoimmune encephalitis," "nonvasculitic autoimmune inflammatory meningoencephalitis," and related terms revealed VGKC)-complex, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibodies. We excluded genetic, metabolic, paraneoplastic, degenerative, and infectious etiologies. The patient's symptoms remitted fully with immune therapy, but recurred in association with widespread bihemispheric brain lesions. Brain biopsy revealed mild nonvasculitic inflammation and prominent vascular hyalinization. Immune therapy with plasma exchanges cleared the MRI abnormalities but, 10 years after onset, the patient still suffers neuropsychiatric sequelae. We conclude that autoimmune panencephalitis seronegative for VGKC-complex, NMDAR, and GAD autoantibodies is a subtype of autoimmune encephalitis that can present with pure neuropsychiatric features and a normal brain MRI. Immunologic mechanisms may account for psychiatric symptoms in a subset of patients now diagnosed with classical psychotic disorders. Delay in starting immune therapy can lead to permanent neuropsychiatric sequelae. We propose a standardized classification system for the autoimmune encephalitides, integrating earlier pathology-oriented terms with more recently defined serologic and clinical phenotypes.

  9. Cognitive Control and Anxiety Disorders: Metacognitive Beliefs and Strategies of Control Thought in GAD and OCD

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    Miguel Ángel Pérez Nieto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se asume la relevancia que los procesos de control cognitivo pueden tener en trastornos de ansiedad como el GAD o el TOC. Se pretende identificar las creencias metacognitivas derivadas del modelo S-REF (Wells y Mathews, 1996, Wells, 2000 que se vincularán en mayor medida al espectro del trastorno de ansiedad generalizada y del trastorno obsesivo-compulsivo y el efecto que dichas creencias pueden tener en el uso de estrategias de control cognitivo. Para ello, una muestra de 75 participantes, 24 con diagnósticod de GAD o de TOC, y 51 sin diagnóstico mentales, fueron evaluados mediante el MCQ-30 y el TCQ. El ANOVA entre los grupos permitió encontrar significativas las mayores puntuaciones en creencias sobre la peligrosidad de no controlar las preocupaciones por parte de los participantes con trastorno de ansiedad. Los análisis de regresión permitieron comprobar que ese tipo de creencias favorecían, además, el uso de estrategias de control cognitivo poco adaptativas, como el castigo.

  10. Using the GAD-Q-IV to identify generalized anxiety disorder in psychiatric treatment seeking and primary care medical samples.

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    Moore, Michael T; Anderson, Nicholas L; Barnes, Jill M; Haigh, Emily A P; Fresco, David M

    2014-01-01

    The fourth edition of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD-Q-IV) is a self-report measure that is commonly used to screen for the presence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The current investigation attempted to identify an optimal cut score using samples obtained from an outpatient psychiatric (n=163) and primary care clinic (n=99). Results indicated that a cut score of 7.67 provided an optimal balance of sensitivity (.85) and specificity (.74) comparable to a previously identified cut score (5.7) across both samples (sensitivity=.90, specificity=.66). However, both cut scores were consistently outperformed by a score representing the criteria for GAD described in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (sensitivity=.89, specificity=.82).

  11. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis associated to Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Bianca; Christofolini, Denise Maria; Conceição, Gabriel Seixas; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2017-09-21

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common muscle disease found in male children. Currently, there is no effective therapy available for Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Therefore, it is essential to make a prenatal diagnosis and provide genetic counseling to reduce the birth of such boys. We report a case of preimplantation genetic diagnosis associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The couple E.P.R., 38-year-old, symptomatic patient heterozygous for a 2 to 47 exon deletion mutation in DMD gene and G.T.S., 39-year-old, sought genetic counseling about preimplantation genetic diagnosis process. They have had a 6-year-old son who died due to Duchenne muscular dystrophy complications. The couple underwent four cycles of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and eight embryos biopsies were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for specific mutation analysis, followed by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) for aneuploidy analysis. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis revealed that two embryos had inherited the maternal DMD gene mutation, one embryo had a chromosomal alteration and five embryos were normal. One blastocyst was transferred and resulted in successful pregnancy. The other embryos remain vitrified. We concluded that embryo analysis using associated techniques of PCR and array CGH seems to be safe for embryo selection in cases of X-linked disorders, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy. RESUMO A distrofia muscular de Duchenne é a doença muscular mais comum observadas em crianças do sexo masculino. Atualmente, não há terapia eficaz disponível para distrofia muscular de Duchenne, portanto, é essencial o diagnóstico pré-natal e o aconselhamento genético para reduzir o nascimento desses meninos. Relatamos um caso de diagnóstico genético pré-implantação associado à distrofia muscular de Duchenne. O casal E.P.R., 38 anos, heterozigota, sintomática para uma mutação de deleção dos éxons 2 a 47 no gene

  12. Cultural adaptation into Spanish of the generalized anxiety disorder-7 (GAD-7 scale as a screening tool

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    Pérez-Páramo María

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD is a prevalent mental health condition which is underestimated worldwide. This study carried out the cultural adaptation into Spanish of the 7-item self-administered GAD-7 scale, which is used to identify probable patients with GAD. Methods The adaptation was performed by an expert panel using a conceptual equivalence process, including forward and backward translations in duplicate. Content validity was assessed by interrater agreement. Criteria validity was explored using ROC curve analysis, and sensitivity, specificity, predictive positive value and negative value for different cut-off values were determined. Concurrent validity was also explored using the HAM-A, HADS, and WHO-DAS-II scales. Results The study sample consisted of 212 subjects (106 patients with GAD with a mean age of 50.38 years (SD = 16.76. Average completion time was 2'30''. No items of the scale were left blank. Floor and ceiling effects were negligible. No patients with GAD had to be assisted to fill in the questionnaire. The scale was shown to be one-dimensional through factor analysis (explained variance = 72%. A cut-off point of 10 showed adequate values of sensitivity (86.8% and specificity (93.4%, with AUC being statistically significant [AUC = 0.957-0.985; p 0.001. Limitations Elderly people, particularly those very old, may need some help to complete the scale. Conclusion After the cultural adaptation process, a Spanish version of the GAD-7 scale was obtained. The validity of its content and the relevance and adequacy of items in the Spanish cultural context were confirmed.

  13. [Congenital muscular dystrophies in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavone-Mauro, Cristina; Barros, Graciela

    2013-09-06

    From the clinical and genetic point of view, congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) are a heterogenic group of diseases within neuromuscular pathologies. The best known forms are: merosin deficiency CMD, collagen VI deficiency CMD, LMNA-related CMD, selenoprotein-related CMD (SEPN1) and alpha-dystroglycan-related CMD. They present with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Most of them are transmitted by recessive autosomal inheritance. The initial manifestations very often begin in infancy or in the neonatal period. There are clinical suspicions of the existence of hypotonia and paresis, and they are characterised by a dystrophic pattern in the muscular biopsy (muscle replaced by fibroadipose tissue, with necrosis and cell regeneration). Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CMD have made it possible to make further progress in the classification of the different subtypes. The aim of this review is to comment on the advances made in recent years as regards the classification of CMD in terms of genetics, the proteins involved and their clinical presentation.

  14. Duchenne muscular dystrophy and epilepsy.

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    Pane, M; Messina, S; Bruno, C; D'Amico, A; Villanova, M; Brancalion, B; Sivo, S; Bianco, F; Striano, P; Battaglia, D; Lettori, D; Vita, G L; Bertini, E; Gualandi, F; Ricotti, V; Ferlini, A; Mercuri, E

    2013-04-01

    Cognitive and behavioral difficulties occur in approximately a third of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of epilepsy in a cohort of 222 DMD patients. Epileptic seizures were found in 14 of the 222 DMD patients (6.3%). The age of onset ranged from 3 months to 16 years (mean 7.8). Seizures were more often focal epilepsy (n=6), generalized tonic-clonic seizures (n=4) or absences (n=4). They were present in 12 of the 149 boys with normal IQ (8.1%) and in two of the 73 with mental retardation (2.7%). In two cases the parents did not report any past or present history of seizures but only 'staring episodes' interpreted as a sign of 'poor attention'. In both patients EEG showed the typical pattern observed in childhood absence epilepsy. Our results suggest that the prevalence of epilepsy in our study (6.3%) is higher than in the general pediatric population (0.5-1%). The risk of epilepsy does not appear to increase in patients with mental retardation.

  15. Laminins in peripheral nerve development and muscular dystrophy.

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    Yu, Wei-Ming; Yu, Huaxu; Chen, Zu-Lin

    2007-06-01

    Laminins are extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that play an important role in cellular function and tissue morphogenesis. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS), laminins are expressed in Schwann cells and participate in their development. Mutations in laminin subunits expressed in the PNS and in skeleton muscle may cause peripheral neuropathies and muscular dystrophy in both humans and mice. Recent studies using gene knockout technology, such as cell-type specific gene targeting techniques, revealed that laminins and their receptors mediate Schwann cell and axon interactions. Schwann cells with disrupted laminin expression exhibit impaired proliferation and differentiation and also undergo apoptosis. In this review, we focus on the potential molecular mechanisms by which laminins participate in the development of Schwann cells.

  16. Circulating Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

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    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Spitali, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. Genetic and biochemical research over the years has characterized the cause, pathophysiology and development of the disease providing several potential therapeutic targets and/or biomarkers. High throughput – omic technologies have provided a comprehensive understanding of the changes occurring in dystrophic muscles. Murine and canine animal models have been a valuable source to profile muscles and body fluids, thus providing candidate biomarkers that can be evaluated in patients. This review will illustrate known circulating biomarkers that could track disease progression and response to therapy in patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We present an overview of the transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics and lipidomic biomarkers described in literature. We show how studies in muscle tissue have led to the identification of serum and urine biomarkers and we highlight the importance of evaluating biomarkers as possible surrogate endpoints to facilitate regulatory processes for new medicinal products. PMID:27858763

  17. Median nail dystrophy involving the thumb nail

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    Rahulkrishna Kota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Median canaliform dystrophy of Heller is a rare entity characterized by a midline or a paramedian ridge or split and canal formation in nail plate of one or both the thumb nails. It is an acquired condition resulting from a temporary defect in the matrix that interferes with nail formation. Habitual picking of the nail base may be responsible for some cases. Histopathology classically shows parakeratosis, accumulation of melanin within and between the nail bed keratinocytes. Treatment of median nail dystrophy includes injectable triamcinalone acetonide, topical 0.1% tacrolimus, and tazarotene 0.05%, which is many a times challenging for a dermatologist. Psychiatric opinion should be taken when associated with the depressive, obsessive-compulsive, or impulse-control disorder. We report a case of 19-year-old male diagnosed as median nail dystrophy.

  18. Weight reduction in boys with muscular dystrophy.

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    Edwards, R H; Round, J M; Jackson, M J; Griffiths, R D; Lilburn, M F

    1984-06-01

    Many children with muscular dystrophy are overweight, and although weight control is pursued in some centres it is unusual to encourage severe dietary restriction for fear that it might lead to accelerated loss of muscle. In this study, two overweight boys with muscular dystrophy were monitored by whole-body nitrogen balance, total body potassium, strength and functional measurements during calorie restriction. Both patients were found to have a transient loss of nitrogen on commencing the low calorie intake: thereafter, weight loss was not found to have any deleterious effect on muscle bulk or function in either patient. It is suggested that controlled weight-reduction in obese children with muscular dystrophy is a safe and practical way of losing excess fat, which can improve mobility and self-esteem, and may possibly effect longevity.

  19. Meretoja’s Syndrome: Lattice Corneal Dystrophy, Gelsolin Type

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    I. Casal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lattice corneal dystrophy gelsolin type was first described in 1969 by Jouko Meretoja, a Finnish ophthalmologist. It is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in gelsolin gene resulting in unstable protein fragments and amyloid deposition in various organs. The age of onset is usually after the third decade of life and typical diagnostic triad includes progressive bilateral facial paralysis, loose skin, and lattice corneal dystrophy. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient referred to our Department of Ophthalmology by severe dry eye and incomplete eyelid closure. She had severe bilateral facial paresis, significant orbicularis, and perioral sagging as well as hypoesthesia of extremities and was diagnosed with Meretoja’s syndrome at the age of 50, confirmed by the presence of gelsolin mutation. At our observation she had bilateral diminished tear film break-up time and Schirmer test, diffuse keratitis, corneal opacification, and neovascularization in the left eye. She was treated with preservative-free lubricants and topical cyclosporine, associated with nocturnal complete occlusion of both eyes, and underwent placement of lacrimal punctal plugs. Ocular symptoms are the first to appear and our role as ophthalmologists is essential for the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of ocular alterations in these patients.

  20. Molecular Genetics and Genetic Testing in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

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    Dušanka Savić Pavićević

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is the most common adult onset muscular dystrophy, presenting as a multisystemic disorder with extremely variable clinical manifestation, from asymptomatic adults to severely affected neonates. A striking anticipation and parental-gender effect upon transmission are distinguishing genetic features in DM1 pedigrees. It is an autosomal dominant hereditary disease associated with an unstable expansion of CTG repeats in the 3′-UTR of the DMPK gene, with the number of repeats ranging from 50 to several thousand. The number of CTG repeats broadly correlates with both the age-at-onset and overall severity of the disease. Expanded DM1 alleles are characterized by a remarkable expansion-biased and gender-specific germline instability, and tissue-specific, expansion-biased, age-dependent, and individual-specific somatic instability. Mutational dynamics in male and female germline account for observed anticipation and parental-gender effect in DM1 pedigrees, while mutational dynamics in somatic tissues contribute toward the tissue-specificity and progressive nature of the disease. Genetic test is routinely used in diagnostic procedure for DM1 for symptomatic, asymptomatic, and prenatal testing, accompanied with appropriate genetic counseling and, as recommended, without predictive information about the disease course. We review molecular genetics of DM1 with focus on those issues important for genetic testing and counseling.

  1. [A genetic systemic disease: clinical description of type 1 myotonic dystrophy in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, P; Pruna, L

    2012-09-01

    Type 1 myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder related to the expansion of a trinucleotide (CTG) repeat in the exon 15 in the 3'-untranslated region of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) gene. Mutant transcripts containing an expanded CUG repeat are retained in nuclear foci and cause numerous dysfunctions by interfering with biogenesis of other mRNAs. Prominent clinical features are progressive muscular weakness and myotonia, which affect skeletal muscles but also white muscles leading to digestive, urinary and obstetrical disorders. Functional prognosis correlates with motor handicap and vital prognosis is linked to cardiac rhythm disturbances and conduction defects due to progressive subendocardial fibrosis, and to complex respiratory dysfunctions, which associate restrictive lung disease, involvement of the central inspiratory pathway, and sleep apnea. Other clinical features are lens opacity, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, several endocrine disorders (gonadal deficiency, hyperparathydoidism), or immunoglobulin deficiency due to immunoglobulin G hypercatabolism. Life expectancy is reduced in myotonic dystrophy, and death is mainly caused by respiratory complications, but also by cardiac arrhythmias. Moreover, an abnormal incidence of tumors has been reported. Therefore, myotonic dystrophy does not only concern neurologists but a multidisciplinary approach is necessary, including at least pneumologist, cardiologist, and physiotherapist. General internists should also be implicated, not only in the initial diagnosis step, but also in the diagnosis of complications and their treatments.

  2. Stem Cell Differentiation Toward the Myogenic Lineage for Muscle Tissue Regeneration: A Focus on Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovidov, Serge; Shi, Xuetao; Sadeghian, Ramin Banan; Salehi, Sahar; Fujie, Toshinori; Bae, Hojae; Ramalingam, Murugan; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue engineering is one of the important ways for regenerating functionally defective muscles. Among the myopathies, the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive disease due to mutations of the dystrophin gene leading to progressive myofiber degeneration with severe symptoms. Although current therapies in muscular dystrophy are still very challenging, important progress has been made in materials science and in cellular technologies with the use of stem cells. It is therefore useful to review these advances and the results obtained in a clinical point of view. This article focuses on the differentiation of stem cells into myoblasts, and their application in muscular dystrophy. After an overview of the different stem cells that can be induced to differentiate into the myogenic lineage, we introduce scaffolding materials used for muscular tissue engineering. We then described some widely used methods to differentiate different types of stem cell into myoblasts. We highlight recent insights obtained in therapies for muscular dystrophy. Finally, we conclude with a discussion on stem cell technology. We discussed in parallel the benefits brought by the evolution of the materials and by the expansion of cell sources which can differentiate into myoblasts. We also discussed on future challenges for clinical applications and how to accelerate the translation from the research to the clinic in the frame of DMD.

  3. Understanding the muscular dystrophy caused by deletion of choline kinase beta in mice.

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    Wu, Gengshu; Sher, Roger B; Cox, Gregory A; Vance, Dennis E

    2009-05-01

    Choline kinase in mice is encoded by two genes, Chka and Chkb. Disruption of murine Chka leads to embryonic lethality, whereas a spontaneously occurring genomic deletion in murine Chkb results in neonatal bone deformity and hindlimb muscular dystrophy. We have investigated the mechanism by which a lack of choline kinase beta, encoded by Chkb, causes hindlimb muscular dystrophy. The biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) is impaired in the hindlimbs of Chkb -/- mice, with an accumulation of choline and decreased amount of phosphocholine. The activity of CTP: phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase is also decreased in the hindlimb muscle of mutant mice. Concomitantly, the activities of PC phospholipase C and phospholipase A2 are increased. The mitochondria in Chkb -/- mice are abnormally large and exhibit decreased inner membrane potential. Despite the muscular dystrophy in Chkb -/- mice, we observed increased expression of insulin like growth factor 1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. However, regeneration of hindlimb muscles of Chkb -/- mice was impaired when challenged with cardiotoxin. Injection of CDP-choline increased PC content of hindlimb muscle and decreased creatine kinase activity in plasma of Chkb -/- mice. We conclude that the hindlimb muscular dystrophy in Chkb -/- mice is due to attenuated PC biosynthesis and enhanced catabolism of PC.

  4. Two cases of myotonic dystrophy manifesting various ophthalmic findings with genetic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ji Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of myotonic dystrophy in one family; both diagnosed from genetic analysis following ophthalmic indications, but before the manifestation of systemic symptoms. A 39-year-old female visited our clinic for routine examination. Mild ptosis, sluggish pupillary response, and bilateral snowflake cataracts were found. Fundus examination revealed an increased cup-to-disc ratio (CDR in both eyes and a defect in the retinal nerve fiber layer in the right eye. Intraocular pressure was low, but within the normal range in both eyes. Because cataracts are characteristic of myotonic dystrophy, we suggested that her 14-year-old daughter, who did not have any systemic complaints, undergo ophthalmic examination. She also had mild ptosis and snowflake cataracts. Both patients underwent genetic evaluation and were diagnosed with myotonic dystrophy caused by unstable expansion of cytosine-thymine-guanine trinucleotide repeats in the dystrophia myotonica-protein kinase gene. Ophthalmologists can diagnose myotonic dystrophy based on clinical and genetic findings, before the manifestation of systemic abnormalities.

  5. Na+ Dysregulation Coupled with Ca2+ Entry through NCX1 Promotes Muscular Dystrophy in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Adam R.; Millay, Douglas P.; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A.; Park, Ki Ho; Sargent, Michelle A.; Collins, James; Altamirano, Francisco; Philipson, Kenneth D.; Allen, Paul D.; Ma, Jianjie; López, José Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Unregulated Ca2+ entry is thought to underlie muscular dystrophy. Here, we generated skeletal-muscle-specific transgenic (TG) mice expressing the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) to model its identified augmentation during muscular dystrophy. The NCX1 transgene induced dystrophy-like disease in all hind-limb musculature, as well as exacerbated the muscle disease phenotypes in δ-sarcoglycan (Sgcd−/−), Dysf−/−, and mdx mouse models of muscular dystrophy. Antithetically, muscle-specific deletion of the Slc8a1 (NCX1) gene diminished hind-limb pathology in Sgcd−/− mice. Measured increases in baseline Na+ and Ca2+ in dystrophic muscle fibers of the hind-limb musculature predicts a net Ca2+ influx state due to reverse-mode operation of NCX1, which mediates disease. However, the opposite effect is observed in the diaphragm, where NCX1 overexpression mildly protects from dystrophic disease through a predicted enhancement in forward-mode NCX1 operation that reduces Ca2+ levels. Indeed, Atp1a2+/− (encoding Na+-K+ ATPase α2) mice, which have reduced Na+ clearance rates that would favor NCX1 reverse-mode operation, showed exacerbated disease in the hind limbs of NCX1 TG mice, similar to treatment with the Na+-K+ ATPase inhibitor digoxin. Treatment of Sgcd−/− mice with ranolazine, a broadly acting Na+ channel inhibitor that should increase NCX1 forward-mode operation, reduced muscular pathology. PMID:24662047

  6. Lack of Support for the Association Between GAD2 Polymorphisms andSevere Human Obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swarbrick, Michael M.; Waldenmaier, Bjorn; Pennacchio, Len A.; Lind,Denise L.; Cavazos, Martha M.; Geller, Frank; Merriman, Raphael; Ustaszewska, Anna; Malloy, Mary; Scherag, Andre; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Rief,Winfried; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Pullinger, Clive R.; Kane, John P.; Dent, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Hinney, Anke; Hebebrand,Johannes; Vaisse, Christian

    2004-11-17

    Demonstration of association between common genetic variants and chronic human diseases such as obesity could have profound implications for the prediction, prevention and treatment of these conditions. Unequivocal proof of such an association, however, requires adherence to established methodological guidelines, which include independent replication of initial positive findings. Recently, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within GAD2 were found to be associated with class III obesity (BMI > 40 kg/m2) in 188 families (612 individuals) segregating the condition and a case-control study of 575 cases and 646 lean controls. Functional data supporting a pathophysiological role for one of the SNPs (-243A>G) were also presented. In the present study, we attempted to replicate this association in larger groups of subjects, and to extend the functional studies of the -243A>G SNP. In 2,327 subjects comprising 692 German nuclear families with severe, early-onset obesity, we found no evidence for a relationship between the three GAD2 SNPs and obesity, whether SNPs were studied individually or as haplotypes. In two independent case-control studies (a total of 680 class III obesity cases and 1,186 lean controls), there was no significant relationship between the -243A>G SNP and obesity (odds ratio (OR) = 0.99, 95% CI 0.83 - 1.18,in the pooled sample). These negative findings were reinforced by a meta-analysis for the association between the 243G allele and class III obesity, which yielded an OR of 1.11 (95% CI 0.90 - 1.36) in a total sample of 1,252 class III obese cases and 1,800 lean controls. Finally,we were unable to confirm or extend the functional data pertaining to the -243A>G variant. Potential confounding variables in association studies involving common variants and complex diseases (low power to detect modest genetic effects, over-interpretation of marginal data, population stratification and biological plausibility) are also discussed in the context of GAD2 and

  7. Misregulated alternative splicing of BIN1 is associated with T tubule alterations and muscle weakness in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugier, Charlotte; Klein, Arnaud F; Hammer, Caroline; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Ivarsson, Ylva; Toussaint, Anne; Tosch, Valérie; Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Messaddeq, Nadia; Kokunai, Yosuke; Tsuburaya, Rie; de la Grange, Pierre; Dembele, Doulaye; Francois, Virginie; Precigout, Guillaume; Boulade-Ladame, Charlotte; Hummel, Marie-Christine; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Sergeant, Nicolas; Laquerrière, Annie; Thibault, Christelle; Deryckere, François; Auboeuf, Didier; Garcia, Luis; Zimmermann, Pascale; Udd, Bjarne; Schoser, Benedikt; Takahashi, Masanori P; Nishino, Ichizo; Bassez, Guillaume; Laporte, Jocelyn; Furling, Denis; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2011-06-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most common muscular dystrophy in adults and the first recognized example of an RNA-mediated disease. Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM1) and myotonic dystrophy of type 1 (DM1) or of type 2 (DM2) are caused by the expression of mutant RNAs containing expanded CUG or CCUG repeats, respectively. These mutant RNAs sequester the splicing regulator Muscleblind-like-1 (MBNL1), resulting in specific misregulation of the alternative splicing of other pre-mRNAs. We found that alternative splicing of the bridging integrator-1 (BIN1) pre-mRNA is altered in skeletal muscle samples of people with CDM1, DM1 and DM2. BIN1 is involved in tubular invaginations of membranes and is required for the biogenesis of muscle T tubules, which are specialized skeletal muscle membrane structures essential for excitation-contraction coupling. Mutations in the BIN1 gene cause centronuclear myopathy, which shares some histopathological features with myotonic dystrophy. We found that MBNL1 binds the BIN1 pre-mRNA and regulates its alternative splicing. BIN1 missplicing results in expression of an inactive form of BIN1 lacking phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate-binding and membrane-tubulating activities. Consistent with a defect of BIN1, muscle T tubules are altered in people with myotonic dystrophy, and membrane structures are restored upon expression of the normal splicing form of BIN1 in muscle cells of such individuals. Finally, reproducing BIN1 splicing alteration in mice is sufficient to promote T tubule alterations and muscle weakness, a predominant feature of myotonic dystrophy.

  8. Muscle MRI findings in patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy with calpain 3 deficiency (LGMD2A) and early contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Eugenio; Bushby, Kate; Ricci, Enzo; Birchall, Daniel; Pane, Marika; Kinali, Maria; Allsop, Joanna; Nigro, Vincenzo; Sáenz, Amets; Nascimbeni, Annachiara; Fulizio, Luigi; Angelini, Corrado; Muntoni, Francesco

    2005-02-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A is a common variant secondary to mutations in the calpain 3 gene. A proportion of patients has early and severe contractures, which can cause diagnostic difficulties with other conditions. We report clinical and muscle magnetic resonance imaging findings in seven limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A patients (four sporadic and three familial) who had prominent and early contractures. All patients showed a striking involvement of the posterior thigh muscles. The involvement of the other thigh muscles was variable and was related to clinical severity. Young patients with minimal functional motor impairment showed a predominant involvement of the adductors and semimembranosus muscles while patients with restricted ambulation had a more diffuse involvement of the posterolateral muscles of the thigh and of the vastus intermedius with relative sparing of the vastus lateralis, sartorius and gracilis. At calf level all patients showed involvement of the soleus muscle and of the medial head of the gastrocnemius with relative sparing of the lateral head. MRI findings were correlated to those found in two patients with the phenotype of limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A without early contractures and the pattern observed was quite similar. However, the pattern observed in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A is different from that reported in other muscle diseases such as Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy which have a significant clinical overlap with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A once early contractures are present. Our results suggest that muscle MRI may help in recognising patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A even when the clinical presentation overlaps with other conditions, and may therefore, be used as an additional investigation to target the appropriate biochemical and genetic tests.

  9. Clinical and genetic characteristics of anti-gad positive type 2 diabetes in Japanese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADab) is considered to be a marker for the autoimmune process against pancreatic β cells. Indeed, nearly 70% of patients with type 1 diabetes is repoted to be GAD ab+. A subgroup of patients diagnosed as type 2 diabetes has GADab. Therefore, it is questioned whether GADab+ patients with type 2 diabetes represent a late onset of type 1 diabetes or a unique disease entity. Fifty five GADab+ patients with type 2 diabetes were compared with 137 GADab- patients. They were admitted to Abe Diabetes Clinic for the control of diabetes. The age at onset of these patients was >30 years, and did not require insulin therapy for at least 6 months from the disease onset. The GADab+ patients had lower urinary C-peptide concentrations (uCPR) [(47.8±48.9) μg/d vs (58.1±49.9) μg/d, P=0.034] than the GADab- patients. The GAD+ patients were assigned insulin therapy more often (81.8% vs 56.3%, P=0.0038) and earlier [(8.5±7.5)years vs (10.1±7.3) years, P=3.3×10-12] than the GAD- patients. The levels of uCPR were associated with the titers of GADab (r=0.32, P=0.038). Among the susceptible HLA alleles for type 1 diabetes, the frequencies of B54 and DRB1* 0405 alleles, but not B61 and DRB1*0901 alleles, were increased among GADab+ patients. There data suggest that the GADab+ type 2 diabetes has an autoimmune nature, although the extent of insulin dependency and the distribution of HLA susceptible alleles are different from type 1 diabetes.

  10. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mah JK

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Jean K Mah Department of Pediatrics and Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Abstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments

  11. Immunoreactivity for GABA, GAD65, GAD67 and Bestrophin-1 in the meninges and the choroid plexus: implications for non-neuronal sources for GABA in the developing mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Tochitani

    Full Text Available Neural progenitors in the developing neocortex, neuroepithelial cells and radial glial cells, have a bipolar shape with a basal process contacting the basal membrane of the meninge and an apical plasma membrane facing the lateral ventricle, which the cerebrospinal fluid is filled with. Recent studies revealed that the meninges and the cerebrospinal fluid have certain roles to regulate brain development. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA is a neurotransmitter which appears first during development and works as a diffusible factor to regulate the properties of neural progenitors. In this study, we examined whether GABA can be released from the meninges and the choroid plexus in the developing mouse brain. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67, both of which are GABA-synthesizing enzymes, are expressed in the meninges. The epithelial cells in the choroid plexus express GAD65. GABA immunoreactivity could be observed beneath the basal membrane of the meninge and in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus. Expression analyses on Bestrophin-1, which is known as a GABA-permeable channel in differentiated glial cells, suggested that the cells in the meninges and the epithelial cells in the choroid plexus have the channels able to permeate non-synaptic GABA into the extracellular space. Further studies showed that GAD65/67-expressing meningeal cells appear in a manner with rostral to caudal and lateral to dorsal gradient to cover the entire neocortex by E14.5 during development, while the cells in the choroid plexus in the lateral ventricle start to express GAD65 on E11-E12, the time when the choroid plexus starts to develop in the developing brain. These results totally suggest that the meninges and the choroid plexus can work as non-neuronal sources for ambient GABA which can modulate the properties of neural progenitors during neocortical development.

  12. Immunoreactivity for GABA, GAD65, GAD67 and Bestrophin-1 in the meninges and the choroid plexus: implications for non-neuronal sources for GABA in the developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitani, Shiro; Kondo, Shigeaki

    2013-01-01

    Neural progenitors in the developing neocortex, neuroepithelial cells and radial glial cells, have a bipolar shape with a basal process contacting the basal membrane of the meninge and an apical plasma membrane facing the lateral ventricle, which the cerebrospinal fluid is filled with. Recent studies revealed that the meninges and the cerebrospinal fluid have certain roles to regulate brain development. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a neurotransmitter which appears first during development and works as a diffusible factor to regulate the properties of neural progenitors. In this study, we examined whether GABA can be released from the meninges and the choroid plexus in the developing mouse brain. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67), both of which are GABA-synthesizing enzymes, are expressed in the meninges. The epithelial cells in the choroid plexus express GAD65. GABA immunoreactivity could be observed beneath the basal membrane of the meninge and in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus. Expression analyses on Bestrophin-1, which is known as a GABA-permeable channel in differentiated glial cells, suggested that the cells in the meninges and the epithelial cells in the choroid plexus have the channels able to permeate non-synaptic GABA into the extracellular space. Further studies showed that GAD65/67-expressing meningeal cells appear in a manner with rostral to caudal and lateral to dorsal gradient to cover the entire neocortex by E14.5 during development, while the cells in the choroid plexus in the lateral ventricle start to express GAD65 on E11-E12, the time when the choroid plexus starts to develop in the developing brain. These results totally suggest that the meninges and the choroid plexus can work as non-neuronal sources for ambient GABA which can modulate the properties of neural progenitors during neocortical development.

  13. Carrier detection in Becker muscular dystrophy using creatine kinase estimation and DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, H M; Sarfarazi, M; Newcombe, R G; Willis, N; Harper, P S

    1985-04-01

    Serum creatine kinase levels in 39 control females and 59 obligate carriers of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) have been used to construct likelihood ratios for carrier detection. In 24 possible carriers of BMD, analysis of DNA with X chromosome specific DNA probes linked to the dystrophy gene, has been used in conjunction with creatine kinase measurement to calculate final risk estimates of carrier status. Incorporation of information from probe genotype into the Bayesian calculation, enables a substantially lower risk to be deliniated for some possible carriers of the BMD gene. Thus, although the existing DNA probes are not sufficiently closely linked to BMD to be used in prenatal diagnosis, they can make a major contribution to genetic counseling by refining the estimated probability of carrier status.

  14. A unique combination of autoimmune limbic encephalitis, type 1 diabetes, and Stiff person syndrome associated with GAD-65 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chandra Mohan; Pandey, Rajendra Kumar; Kumawat, Banshi Lal; Khandelwal, Dinesh; Gandhi, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to GAD-65 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis and Stiff person syndrome, however these diseases rarely occur concurrently. We intend to present a rare case of 35 year old female who was recently diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes presented with 1½ month history of recurrent seizures, subacute onset gait ataxia, dysathria, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive decline. No tumor was found on imaging and the classic paraneoplastic panel was negative. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood was positive for GAD-65 antibodies. Patient showed significant improvement with immunomodulatory therapy. Association of GAD-65 antibodies has been found with various disorders including type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis, Stiff person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and palatal myoclonus. This case presents with unique combination of type 1 diabetes, Stiff person syndrome and limbic encephalitis associated with GAD-65 antibodies that is responsive to immunotherapy. It also highlights the emerging concept of autoimmunity in the causation of various disorders and there associations.

  15. P2RX7 Purinoceptor::a therapeutic target for ameliorating the symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Muscular dystrophies are inherited diseases in which the body’s muscles gradually weaken and waste away. The most common and severe muscular dystrophy—Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)—also includes cognitive (thinking) and behavioral impairments and low bone density as well as chronic inflammation. DMD affects about 1 in 3,500 boys; girls can be carriers of DMD but rarely have any symptoms. At birth, boys who carry a mutation (genetic change) in the gene that make...

  16. The pros and cons of vertebrate animal models for functional and therapeutic research on inherited retinal dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkerman, R.W.; Song, F.; Astuti, G.D.; Huijnen, M.A.; WIjk, E.; Stieger, K.; Collin, R.W.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, huge progress has been made in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD), as well as in the development and implementation of novel therapies, especially in the field of gene therapy. The use of mutant animal models, either natur

  17. Cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Helle; Vissing, John; Witting, Nanna

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the degree of cardiac involvement regarding left ventricular ejection fraction, conduction abnormalities, arrhythmia, risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and the associations between cardiac involvement and cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG)-repeat, neuromuscular involvement, age and gende...... in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1)....

  18. Infrastructure for Clinical Trials in Duchenne Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    following are key research accomplishments for the Year 1 funding period: Manuscripts in process • DM Escolar, C Tesi -Rocha, E Henricson, J Florence, J...in steroid treated Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. In revision for journal submission. • A. Zimmerman, C. Tesi -Rocha, P.R. Clemens, A. Connolly, S.T

  19. Nutrition Considerations in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jillian; Samuels, Emily; Mullins, Lucille

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a serious degenerative muscular disease affecting males. Diagnosis usually occurs in childhood and is confirmed through genetic testing and/or muscle biopsy. Accompanying the disease are several nutrition-related concerns: growth, body composition, energy and protein requirements, constipation, swallowing difficulties, bone health, and complementary medicine. This review article addresses the nutrition aspects of DMD.

  20. Brain Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of dystrophin disorders in the CNS function of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, an animal model of DMD, is reviewed at the University of New South Wales, University of Sydney, Australia.

  1. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  2. INTESTINAL PSEUDOOBSTRUCTION IN MYOTONIC-DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUNNER, HG; HAMEL, BCJ; RIEU, P; HOWELER, CJ; PETERS, FTM

    1992-01-01

    We describe four myotonic dystrophy (DM) patients who developed recurrent intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Some episodes were associated with gastroenteritis, while abdominal crowding may have occurred in one case during the third trimester of pregnancy. In most instances, however, no apparent cause c

  3. Clinical features of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greef, J.C. de; Lemmers, R.J.; Camano, P.; Day, J.W.; Sacconi, S.; Dunand, M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Kiuru-Enari, S.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Rosa, A.L.; Desnuelle, C.; Spuler, S.; Tarnopolsky, M.; Venance, S.L.; Frants, R.R.; Maarel, S.M. van der; Tawil, R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In some 5% of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), no D4Z4 repeat contraction on chromosome 4q35 is observed. Such patients, termed patients with FSHD2, show loss of DNA methylation and heterochromatin markers at the D4Z4 repeat that are similar to patients with D4

  4. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  5. Restoring Dystrophin Expression in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Muscle: Progress in Exon Skipping and Stop Codon Read Through

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Eric P.; Bronson, Abby; Levin, Arthur A.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi; Baudy, Andreas R.; Connor, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene and protein in the late 1980s led to high hopes of rapid translation to molecular therapeutics. These hopes were fueled by early reports of delivering new functional genes to dystrophic muscle in mouse models using gene therapy and stem cell transplantation. However, significant barriers have thwarted translation of these approaches to true therapies, including insufficient therapeutic material (eg, cells and viral vectors), challenge...

  6. In vivo knockdown of GAD67 in the amygdala disrupts fear extinction and the anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, S A; Mou, L; Ressler, K J

    2012-11-13

    In mammals, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission in the amygdala is particularly important for controlling levels of fear and anxiety. Most GABA synthesis in the brain is catalyzed in inhibitory neurons from L-glutamic acid by the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67). In the current study, we sought to examine the acquisition and extinction of conditioned fear in mice with knocked down expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67 in the amygdala using a lentiviral-based (LV) RNA interference strategy to locally induce loss-of-function. In vitro experiments revealed that our LV-siRNA-GAD67 construct diminished the expression of GAD67 as determined with western blot and fluorescent immunocytochemical analyses. In vivo experiments, in which male C57BL/6J mice received bilateral amygdala microinjections, revealed that LV-siRNA-GAD67 injections produce significant inhibition of endogenous GAD67 when compared with control injections. In contrast, no significant changes in GAD65 expression were detected in the amygdala, validating the specificity of LV knockdown. Behavioral experiments showed that LV knockdown of GAD67 results in a deficit in the extinction, but not the acquisition or retention, of fear as measured by conditioned freezing. GAD67 knockdown did not affect baseline locomotion or basal measures of anxiety as measured in open field apparatus. However, diminished GAD67 in the amygdala blunted the anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam (1.5 mg kg(-1)) as measured in the elevated plus maze. Together, these studies suggest that of GABAergic transmission in amygdala mediates the inhibition of conditioned fear and the anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam in adult mice.

  7. Omigapil ameliorates the pathology of muscle dystrophy caused by laminin-α2 deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Erb, M.; Meinen, S.; Barzaghi, P.; Sumanovski, L. T.; Courdier-Fruh, I; Ruegg, M A; T. Meier

    2009-01-01

    Laminin alpha2-deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy, called MDC1A, is a rare, devastating genetic disease characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia ("floppy infant syndrome"), peripheral neuropathy, inability to stand or walk, respiratory distress and premature death in early life. Transgenic overexpression of the apoptosis inhibitor protein BCL-2, or deletion of the pro-apoptotic Bax gene in a mouse model for MDC1A prolong survival and mitigate pathology, indicating that apoptotic events...

  8. North Carolina Macular Dystrophy Is Caused by Dysregulation of the Retinal Transcription Factor PRDM13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Small, Kent W; DeLuca, Adam P; Whitmore, S Scott

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify specific mutations causing North Carolina macular dystrophy (NCMD). DESIGN: Whole-genome sequencing coupled with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of gene expression in human retinal cells. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 141 members of 12 families...... development. Four of these strongly implicate the involvement of PRDM13 in macular development, whereas the pathophysiologic mechanism of the fifth remains unknown but may involve the developmental dysregulation of IRX1....

  9. Cardioembolic stroke prompting diagnosis of LMNA-associated Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Vergé, Luis; Yaou, Rabah Ben; Fernández-Recio, María; Dinca, Luminita; Richard, Pascale; Bonne, Gisèle

    2011-10-01

    The diagnosis of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is suggested by the combination of musculoskeletal weakness and wasting, joint contractures, and cardiac disease. Herein we report a patient in whom an ischemic stroke prompted the diagnosis of EDMD. A mutation in the LMNA gene (c.266G>T, p.Arg89Leu) was found. It had been reported previously exclusively with isolated cardiac disease, thus reinforcing the high phenotypic heterogeneity of laminopathies.

  10. Expression of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex at the skeletal muscle sarcolemma in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Lei; Chao-ping HU; Wang, Yi; Shui-zhen ZHOU; Shi, Yi-Yun; Xi-hua LI

    2015-01-01

    Background  Eccentric exercise or high tension exercise could cause damage to skeletal muscle structure, resulting in deficiency of dystrophin and secondary loss of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) from the sarcolemma, which indicated that down-regulation of dystrophin was one of the key points of skeletal muscle injury from eccentric exercise. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations of DMD gene, resulting in the absence of dystrophin, which means that skeletal muscles o...

  11. Eosinophilic myositis as first manifestation in a patient with type 2 myotonic dystrophy CCTG expansion mutation and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Alain; Lannes, Béatrice; Carapito, Raphaël; Bahram, Seiamak; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Geny, Bernard; Sibilia, Jean; Gottenberg, Jacques Eric

    2015-02-01

    Eosinophilic myositis is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of skeletal muscles. In the absence of an identifiable causative factor or source (including parasitic infection, intake of drugs or L-tryptophan, certain systemic disorders as well as malignant diseases), the diagnosis of idiopathic eosinophilic myositis is usually retained. However, some muscular dystrophies have been recently identified in this subset of eosinophilic myositis. Here, we report a patient with an 8 kb CCTG expansion in intron 1 of the CNBP gene, a mutation characteristic of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), whose first manifestation was "idiopathic" eosinophilic myositis. This report suggests that in "idiopathic" eosinophilic myositis, clinicians should consider muscular dystrophies, including DM2.

  12. Contact lens fitting in a patient with Alport syndrome and posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria da Silva Rosa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alport Syndrome is a hereditary disease that is caused by a gene mutation and affects the production of collagen in basement membranes; this condition causes hemorrhagic nephritis associated with deafness and ocular changes. The X-linked form of this disease is the most common and mainly affects males. Typical ocular findings are dot-and-fleck retinopathy, anterior lenticonus, and posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy. Some cases involving polymorphous corneal dystrophy and corneal ectasia have been previously described. Here we present a case report of a 33-year-old female with Alport syndrome, posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy, and irregular astigmatism, whose visual acuity improved with a rigid gas permeable contact lens.

  13. Altered aquaporin-4 expression in human muscular dystrophies: a common feature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigeri, Antonio; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Repetto, Silvia; Bado, Massimo; Minetti, Carlo; Svelto, Maria

    2002-07-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive lethal muscle disease that affects young boys. Dystrophin, absent in DMD and reduced in the milder form Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD), binds to several membrane-associated proteins known as dystrophin-associated proteins (DAPs). Once this critical structural link is disrupted, muscle fibers become more vulnerable to mechanical and osmotic stress. Recently, we have reported that the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water-selective channel expressed in the sarcolemma of fast-twitch fibers and astrocyte end-feet, is drastically reduced in the muscle and brain of the mdx mouse, the animal model of DMD. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of AQP4 in several DMD/BMD patients of different ages with different mutations in the dystrophin gene. Immunofluorescence results indicate that, compared with healthy control children, AQP4 is reduced severely in all the DMD muscular biopsies analyzed and in 50% of the analyzed BMD. Western blot analysis revealed that the deficiency in sarcolemma AQP4 staining is due to a reduction in total AQP4 muscle protein content rather than to changes in immunoreactivity. Double-immunostaining experiments indicate that AQP4 reduction is independent of changes in the fiber myosin heavy chain composition. AQP4 and a-syntrophin analysis of BMD muscular biopsies revealed that the expression and stability of AQP4 in the sarcolemma does not always decrease when a-syntrophin is strongly reduced. Finally, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy biopsies and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy revealed that AQP4 expression was not altered in these forms of muscular dystrophy. These experiments provide the first evidence of AQP4 reduction in a human pathology and show that this deficiency is an important feature of DMD/BMD.

  14. In vivo confocal microscopy in different types of posterior polymorphous dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Kalpana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior polymorphous dystrophy is a rare corneal dystrophy, usually detected by chance. This case series describes the morphologic features in the three different types of posterior polymorphous dystrophy using confocal microscopy.

  15. Effects of Increase in Amplitude of Occipital Alpha & Theta Brain Waves on Global Functioning Level of Patients with GAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadashi, Mohsen; Birashk, Behrooz; Taremian, Farhad; Asgarnejad, Ali Asghar; Momtazi, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    The basic objective of this study is to investigate the effects of alpha and theta brain waves amplitude increase in occipital area on reducing the severity of symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder and to increase the global functioning level in patients with GAD. This study is a quasi-experimental study with pre-test and post-test with two groups. For this purpose, 28 patients who had been referred to Sohrawardi psychiatric and clinical psychology center in Zanjan were studied based on the interview with the psychiatrist, clinical psychologist and using clinical diagnostic criteria for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders text revision - the DSM-IV-TR Fourth Edition diagnosis of GAD, 14 subjects were studied in neurofeedback treatment group and 14 subjects in the waiting list group. Patients in both groups were evaluated at pre-test and post-test with General Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and Global Assessment Functioning Scale (GAFs). The treatment group received fifteen 30-minute alpha training sessions and fifteen 30-minute theta brain training sessions in occipital area by neurofeedback training (treatment group). This evaluation was performed according to the treatment protocol to increase the alpha and theta waves. And no intervention was done in the waiting list group. But due to ethical issues after the completion of the study all the subjects in the waiting list group were treated. The results showed that increase of alpha and theta brain waves amplitude in occipital area in people with GAD can increase the global functioning level and can reduce symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder in a treatment group, but no such change was observed in the waiting list group. Increase of alpha and theta brain waves amplitude in occipital area can be useful in the treatment of people with GAD.

  16. MDMA decreases glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus and increases seizure susceptibility: Role for glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Courtney L; Morano, Rachel L; Herman, James P; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2016-12-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) is a unique psychostimulant that continues to be a popular drug of abuse. It has been well documented that MDMA reduces markers of 5-HT axon terminals in rodents, as well as humans. A loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons in the hippocampus following MDMA treatment has only been documented recently. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that MDMA reduces glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-IR, another biochemical marker of GABA neurons, in the hippocampus and that this reduction in GAD67-IR neurons and an accompanying increase in seizure susceptibility involve glutamate receptor activation. Repeated exposure to MDMA (3×10mg/kg, ip) resulted in a reduction of 37-58% of GAD67-IR cells in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA1, and CA3 regions, as well as an increased susceptibility to kainic acid-induced seizures, both of which persisted for at least 30days following MDMA treatment. Administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 or the glutamate transporter type 1 (GLT-1) inducer ceftriaxone prevented both the MDMA-induced loss of GAD67-IR neurons and the increased vulnerability to kainic acid-induced seizures. The MDMA-induced increase in the extracellular concentration of glutamate in the hippocampus was significantly diminished in rats treated with ceftriaxone, thereby implicating a glutamatergic mechanism in the neuroprotective effects of ceftriaxone. In summary, the present findings support a role for increased extracellular glutamate and NMDA receptor activation in the MDMA-induced loss of hippocampal GAD67-IR neurons and the subsequent increased susceptibility to evoked seizures.

  17. A case of myotonic dystrophy with electrolyte imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Weon-Jin; Kim, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, So-Mi; Hong, Seung-Jae; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Song, Ran; Yang, Hyung-In; Lee, Yeon-Ah

    2013-07-01

    Type 1 myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder with a multisystem involvement, caused by an abnormal expansion of the CTG sequence of the dystrophic myotonia protein kinase (DMPK) gene. DM1 is a variable multisystem disorder with muscular and nonmuscular abnormalities. Increasingly, endocrine abnormalities, such as gonadal, pancreatic, and adrenal dysfunction are being reported. But, Electrolytes imbalance is a very rare condition in patients with DM1 yet. Herein we present a 42-yr-old Korean male of DM1 with abnormally elevated serum sodium and potassium. The patient had minimum volume of maximally concentrated urine without water loss. It was only cured by normal saline hydration. The cause of hypernatremia was considered by primary hypodipsia. Hyperkalemic conditions such as renal failure, pseudohyperkalemia, cortisol deficiency and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis were excluded. Further endocrine evaluation suggested selective hyperreninemic hypoaldosteronism as a cause of hyperkalemia.

  18. Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy: the most recognizable laminopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Madej-Pilarczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD, a rare inherited disease, is characterized clinically by humero-peroneal muscle atrophy and weakness, multijoint contractures, spine rigidity and cardiac insufficiency with conduction defects. There are at least six types of EDMD known so far, of which five have been associated with mutations in genes encoding nuclear proteins. The majority of the EDMD cases described so far are of the emerinopathy (EDMD1 kind, with a recessive X-linked mode of inheritance, or else laminopathy (EDMD2, with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. In the work described here, the authors have sought to describe the history by which EDMD came to be distinguished as a separate entity, as well as the clinical and genetic characteristics of the disease, the pathophysiology of lamin-related muscular diseases and, finally, therapeutic issues, prevention and ethical aspects.

  19. Prenatal Diagnosis of the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. A Family Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Perera Navarro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most frequent hereditary myopathies that exist. It is characterized by degeneration of the muscle skeletal fibers which produce handicap in the first decade of life bringing about death due to cardiac or respiratory failure. The responsible gene of the disease is known as DMD and it is located in the X chromosome shorter arm. A family history is presented in which the pregnant woman who is the sick patient’s sister asks for a prenatal diagnosis. An indirect molecular study was performed with the STR-50 polymorphic marker. After the analysis of the results in which the lab methodology was applied, the fetus was found to be sick and the family decided to interrupt the pregnancy.

  20. In vivo genome editing improves muscle function in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Christopher E.; Hakim, Chady H.; Ousterout, David G.; Thakore, Pratiksha I.; Moreb, Eirik A.; Rivera, Ruth M. Castellanos; Madhavan, Sarina; Pan, Xiufang; Ran, F. Ann; Yan, Winston X.; Asokan, Aravind; Zhang, Feng; Duan, Dongsheng; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease affecting about 1 out of 5000 male births and caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Genome editing has the potential to restore expression of a modified dystrophin gene from the native locus to modulate disease progression. In this study, adeno-associated virus was used to deliver the CRISPR/Cas9 system to the mdx mouse model of DMD to remove the mutated exon 23 from the dystrophin gene. This includes local and systemic delivery...

  1. In vivo genome editing improves muscle function in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Christopher E.; Hakim, Chady H.; Ousterout, David G.; Thakore, Pratiksha I; Moreb, Eirik A.; Rivera, Ruth M. Castellanos; Madhavan, Sarina; Pan, Xiufang; Ran, F. Ann; Yan, Winston X.; Asokan, Aravind; Zhang, Feng; Duan, Dongsheng; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease affecting about 1 out of 5000 male births and caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Genome editing has the potential to restore expression of a modified dystrophin gene from the native locus to modulate disease progression. In this study, adeno-associated virus was used to deliver the CRISPR/Cas9 system to the mdx mouse model of DMD to remove the mutated exon 23 from the dystrophin gene. This includes local and systemic delivery...

  2. Cataract extraction in eyes with Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Li-xin; HUANG Yu-sen; Ann Mei-Chi Chiu; LIN Ping; YAO Zhan; SUN Jie

    2005-01-01

    @@ It is a common belief that Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy predominantly affects Caucasians but rarely Asians. However, in one Japanese study, primary corneal guttae (first stage of Fuchs' dystrophy) were found in four of 107 cataract patients.1 With the growing popularity of phacoemulsification in China in the past decade, the increased incidence of endothelial decompensation may be due to learning curves among surgeons as well as that the prevalence of Fuchs' dystrophy among Chinese is higher than we thought. Low index of suspicion for Fuchs' dystrophy may result in missing of diagnosis and occurrence of endothelial decompensation, particularly when no extra protection is provided for endothelial cells during phacoemulsification. This study was aimed at improving our knowledge about Fuchs' dystrophy among Chinese population and reminding surgeons of extra endothelial protection during cataract surgery for patients with Fuchs' dystrophy.

  3. Phase 3 Study of Ataluren in Patients With Nonsense Mutation Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-30

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  4. [Ventricular Tachycardia as a First Manifestation of Myotonic Dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, N Yu; Mironova, N A; Sokolov, S F; Mareev, Yu V; Shlevkov, N B; Saidova, M A; Stukalova, O V; Golitsyn, S P

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of bundle-branch reentrant ventricular tachycardia as a first and severe manifestation of myotonic dystrophy. Progressive cardiac conduction disturbances and cardiac arrhythmias are well-known features of myotonic dystrophy, although they are commonly found in late stage of disease in patients with established diagnosis. We review clinical manifestations, diagnostics, management, and prognostic value of cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy.

  5. An unusual central retinal dystrophy associated with ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatci, O A; Ozbek, Z; Köse, S; Durak, I; Kavukçu, S

    2000-06-01

    A number of ichthyosis syndromes may have retinal abnormalities such as the retinitis pigmentosa-like diffuse rod-cone dystrophy in Refsum's syndrome and the maculopathy in Sjögren-Larsson syndrome. We present two sisters who have an unusual, almost identical, bilaterally symmetric central retinal dystrophy associated with ichthyosis vulgaris in the absence of other systemic disorders. We believe that this dystrophy has not been previously described in patients with any of the known varieties of ichthyosis.

  6. Muscular Dystrophies at Different Ages: Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations

    OpenAIRE

    Oriana del Rocío Cruz Guzmán; Ana Laura Chávez García; Maricela Rodríguez-Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Common metabolic and endocrine alterations exist across a wide range of muscular dystrophies. Skeletal muscle plays an important role in glucose metabolism and is a major participant in different signaling pathways. Therefore, its damage may lead to different metabolic disruptions. Two of the most important metabolic alterations in muscular dystrophies may be insulin resistance and obesity. However, only insulin resistance has been demonstrated in myotonic dystrophy. In addition, endocrine di...

  7. Corneal Topography Analysis of Stromal Corneal Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Kocluk, Yusuf; Yalniz-Akkaya, Zuleyha; Burcu, Ayse; Ornek, Firdevs

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to compare the corneal topography and tomography parameters of macular corneal dystrophy (MCD), granular corneal dystrophy (GCD) and lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD) patients obtained by Scheimpflug imaging system. Methods: The charts, photographs and topography images of patients were reviewed retrospectively. This study included 73 eyes of 73 patients (28 MCD, 20 GCG and 25 LCD patients). Topography images were obtained by Pentacam (Oculus Optikgerate, Wetzlar, Germany...

  8. Distinct genetic regions modify specific muscle groups in muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Phenotypic expression in the muscular dystrophies is variable, even with the identical mutation, providing strong evidence that genetic modifiers influence outcome. To identify genetic modifier loci, we used quantitative trait locus mapping in two differentially affected mouse strains with muscular dystrophy. Using the Sgcg model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy that lacks the dystrophin-associated protein γ-sarcoglycan, we evaluated chromosomal regions that segregated with two distinct quan...

  9. Phenotype-Genotype Analysis of Chinese Patients with Early-Onset LMNA-Related Muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Tan

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the correlation between the phenotype and genotype of Chinese patients with early-onset lamin A (LMNA-related muscular dystrophy (MD. The clinical and myopathological data of 21 Chinese pediatric patients with early-onset LMNA-related MD were collected and analyzed. LMNA gene mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing of genomic DNA. Sublocalization of wild-type and mutant proteins were observed by immunofluorescence using cultured fibroblasts and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293 cell. Seven patients were diagnosed with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD and 14 were diagnosed with LMNA-associated congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD. Four biopsy specimens from the L-CMD cases exhibited inflammatory changes. Abnormal nuclear morphology was observed with both transmission electron microscopy and lamin A/C staining. We identified 10 novel and nine known LMNA gene mutations in the 21 patients. Some mutations (c.91G>A, c.94_96delAAG, c.116A>G, c.745C>T, c.746G>A, and c.1580G>C were well correlated with EDMD or L-CMD. LMNA-related MD has a common symptom triad of muscle weakness, joint contractures, and cardiac involvement, but the severity of symptoms and disease progression differ greatly. Inflammatory change in biopsied muscle is a characteristic of early-stage L-CMD. Phenotype-genotype analysis determines that some mutations are well correlated with LMNA-related MD.

  10. [Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy: clinical, hereditary and histological features: study of a family (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, G; Russo, S; Ammatuna, A; Falsaperla, A

    1982-01-01

    The family of an "affected" subject with limb girdle dystrophy has been studied in order to assess the clinical-hereditary characteristics of the disease and to contribute to its definite genetic features (phenotypical expressiveness of the pathologic gene). The diagnosis of certitude was based on the anamnestic-clinical criteria and instrumental investigations, supported by histological and histochemical studies of the muscles. The clinical, electromyographic and biochemical data made it possible to distinguish the "affected" from the "subclinical" and the healthy subjects. The subjects that, without noticeable symptoms of neuromuscular disorders, showed a slight clinical expressiveness which didn't alter the normal social and working activities, have been defined "subclinical". The modalities of hereditary transmission of this form of muscular dystrophy are considered in the light of the genetics most present trends that are tending to overcome the dominant-recessive dualism. The possibility of a modality of transmission definable as "intermediate inheritance" is proposed. In the case of the examined family the hypothesis that a pathologic recessive autosomic gene gives rise to a clinical expressiveness in heterozygote subjects seems tenable. This situation definable as "incomplete recessive" is rarely found in the limb girdle dystrophy.

  11. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L presenting as necrotizing myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ilka; Stoltenburg, Gisela; Deschauer, Marcus; Winterholler, Martin; Hanisch, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Recessive mutations in the ANO5 gene, encoding anoctamin 5, cause proximal limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2L), Miyoshi-type distal myopathy (MM3) and asymptomatic hyper- CKemia. We report a woman with exertion-induced myalgia and weakness in the hip girdle manifesting at the age of 40. Creatine kinase (CK) was increased 20-fold. Histologically the dominating feature was necrotizing myopathy, but long-term immunosuppressive therapy did not change CK level or myopathic symptoms. Molecular genetic investigation led to the finding of the homozygous ANO5 c.191dupA mutation. This is a report of a muscular dystrophy due to ANO5 mutation presenting histologically as necrotizing myopathy. For this reason our finding extends the histological spectrum of myopathies due to ANO5 mutations as well as the possible differential diagnoses for necrotizing myopathy.

  12. Early mechanical dysfunction of the diaphragm in the muscular dystrophy with myositis (Ttnmdm) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Michael A; Pardo, Patricia S; Cox, Gregory A; Boriek, Aladin M

    2008-11-01

    A complex rearrangement mutation in the mouse titin gene leads to an in-frame 83-amino acid deletion in the N2A region of titin. Autosomal recessive inheritance of the titin muscular dystrophy with myositis (Ttn(mdm/mdm)) mutation leads to a severe early-onset muscular dystrophy and premature death. We hypothesized that the N2A deletion would negatively impact the force-generating capacity and passive mechanical properties of the mdm diaphragm. We measured in vitro active isometric contractile and passive length-tension properties to assess muscle function at 2 and 6 wk of age. Micro-CT, myosin heavy chain Western blotting, and histology were used to assess diaphragm structure. Marked chest wall distortions began at 2 wk and progressively worsened until 5 wk. The percentage of myofibers with centrally located nuclei in mdm mice was significantly (P mechanical aberrations of the respiratory pump in mdm mice.

  13. Becker muscular dystrophy with widespread muscle hypertrophy and a non-sense mutation of exon 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witting, N; Duno, M; Vissing, J

    2013-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy features progressive proximal weakness, wasting and often focal hypertrophy. We present a patient with pain and cramps from adolescence. Widespread muscle hypertrophy, preserved muscle strength and a 10-20-fold raised CPK were noted. Muscle biopsy was dystrophic, and Western blot showed a 95% reduction of dystrophin levels. Genetic analyses revealed a non-sense mutation in exon 2 of the dystrophin gene. This mutation is predicted to result in a Duchenne phenotype, but resulted in a mild Becker muscular dystrophy with widespread muscle hypertrophy. We suggest that this unusual phenotype is caused by translation re-initiation downstream from the mutation site. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Importance of Skin Changes in the Differential Diagnosis of Congenital Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uluç Yis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy (OMIM 602541 is characterized with early-onset hypotonia, muscle wasting, proximal weakness, cardiomyopathy, mildly elevated serum creatine kinase (CK levels, and mild-to-moderate intellectual disability. We report two siblings in a consanguineous family admitted for psychomotor delay. Physical examination revealed proximal muscle weakness, contractures in the knee of elder sibling, diffuse mild generalized muscle atrophy, and dry skin with ichthyosis together with multiple nummular eczema in both siblings. Serum CK values were elevated up to 500 U/L. For genetic work-up, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES after Nimblegen enrichment on the Illumina platform. The WES revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation in the Choline Kinase-Beta (CHKB gene c.1031G>A (p.R344Q in exon 9. Ichthyosis-like skin changes with intense pruritus and nummular eczema may lead to clinical diagnosis in cases with megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy.

  15. Effect of cellular therapy in progression of Becker’s muscular dystrophy: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD is an inherited disorder due to deletions of the dystrophin gene that leads to muscle weakness. Effects of bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMNC transplantation in Muscular Dystrophy have shown to be safe and beneficial. We treated a 20-year-old male suffering from BMD with autologous BMMNC transplantation followed by multidisciplinary rehabilitation. He presented with muscle weakness and had difficulty in performing his activities. The BMMNCs were transplanted via intrathecal and intramuscular routes. The effects were measured on clinical and functional changes. Over 9 months, gradual improvement was noticed in muscle strength, respiratory functions and North Star Ambulatory Assessment Scale. Functional Independence Measure, Berg Balance Score, Brooke and Vignos Scale remained stable indicating halting of the progression. The case report suggests that cellular therapy combined with rehabilitation may have possibility of repairing and regenerating muscle fibers and decreasing the rate of progression of BMD.

  16. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: case report and discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Vincenzo; Feinberg, Joseph; Michaels, Jennifer

    2008-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is often cited as the third most common form of muscular dystrophy. Therefore, it should be considered in patients with complaints of progressive weakness. We present the case of a man with facial, truncal, and leg weakness that initially sought medical attention for lower back pain. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed findings in the trapezius, serratus anterior, biceps, triceps, pectoralis major, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles consistent with a myopathic disorder. Subsequent genetic testing identified a FSHD allele size consistent with a FSHD deletion mutation. Therefore, confirming the diagnosis of FSHD. Unfortunately, no effective treatments currently exist for FSHD. However, supportive measures involving physical therapy and the use of orthotics may aid in improving function and mobility.

  17. Molecular and electrophysiological characterization of GFP-expressing CA1 interneurons in GAD65-GFP mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corette J Wierenga

    Full Text Available The use of transgenic mice in which subtypes of neurons are labeled with a fluorescent protein has greatly facilitated modern neuroscience research. GAD65-GFP mice, which have GABAergic interneurons labeled with GFP, are widely used in many research laboratories, although the properties of the labeled cells have not been studied in detail. Here we investigate these cells in the hippocampal area CA1 and show that they constitute ∼20% of interneurons in this area. The majority of them expresses either reelin (70±2% or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP; 15±2%, while expression of parvalbumin and somatostatin is virtually absent. This strongly suggests they originate from the caudal, and not the medial, ganglionic eminence. GFP-labeled interneurons can be subdivided according to the (partially overlapping expression of neuropeptide Y (42±3%, cholecystokinin (25±3%, calbindin (20±2% or calretinin (20±2%. Most of these subtypes (with the exception of calretinin-expressing interneurons target the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells. GFP-labeled interneurons mostly show delayed onset of firing around threshold, and regular firing with moderate frequency adaptation at more depolarized potentials.

  18. New Advanced Technology for Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    References Aristotle. 350 BC. Historia Animalium: Books VII–X. 1991 edition. D.M. Balme, editor. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA. 435–437...hematological disease, and have been proposed as a source for cell based therapies of muscular dystrophy. Since the University of Minnesota is a center...Blood and Marrow Transplantation program at the University of Minnesota to assure that we receive appropriate tissues as they become available. Having

  19. Severe dystrophy in DiGeorge syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barnabás Rózsai; (A)kos Kiss; Gy(o)rgyi Csábi; Márta Czakó; Tamás Decsi

    2009-01-01

    We present the case history of a 3-year-old girl who was examined because of severe dystrophy. In the background, cow's milk allergy was found, but her body weight was unchanged after eliminating milk from her diet. Other types of malabsorption were excluded. Based on nasal regurgitation and facial dysmorphisms, the possibility of DiGeorge syndrome was suspected and was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The authors suggest a new feature associated with DiGeorge syndrome.

  20. Growth hormone evaluation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, L; Granata, C; Ballestrazzi, A; Cornelio, F; Tassoni, P; Tugnoli, S; Cacciari, E

    1988-10-01

    Growth hormone (GH) release with pharmacological tests and sleep test, somatomedin C and auxological features were studied in 10 patients affected by Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. GH release in these patients seems to be lower than normal; moreover some of them are of short stature without an evident relationship with GH deficit. The possible significance of the data obtained is discussed, particularly in relation to the clinical course of the disease, and to current therapeutic trials with a GH release inhibitor (mazindol).

  1. Urological manifestations of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askeland, Eric J; Arlen, Angela M; Erickson, Bradley A; Mathews, Katherine D; Cooper, Christopher S

    2013-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a dystrophinopathy affecting males that is associated with multiple organ system complications. To our knowledge urological complications of Duchenne muscular dystrophy have been described only anecdotally to date. We reviewed the medical charts of 135 patients with Duchenne or Duchenne-Becker muscular dystrophy for demographics and disease progression, urological diagnoses, intervention and followup. Of 135 patients 67 (50%) had at least 1 documented urological diagnosis and 38 (28%) had multiple manifestations. Lower urinary tract symptoms were the most common urological diagnosis (32% of patients). Survival analysis revealed a median age at onset of lower urinary tract symptoms of 23 years (95% CI 17.7-23.9). Intervention was required in 12 patients (9%), most commonly due to nephrolithiasis. Urological morbidity increased with Duchenne muscular dystrophy progression when stratified by clinical progression. Lower urinary tract symptoms were more common in nonambulatory patients (40.7% vs 19%, p = 0.007), those with a diagnosis of scoliosis (44% vs 19.7%, p = 0.003) and/or scoliosis spine surgery (60% vs 22%, p <0.001), and those on invasive respiratory support (53% vs 29%, p = 0.046). Likewise, nephrolithiasis was more common in nonambulatory patients (10% vs 0%, p = 0.017), those with scoliosis (12% vs 0%, p = 0.004) and/or scoliosis spine surgery (20% vs 1%, p <0.001), and those on invasive respiratory support (29% vs 3%, p <0.001). Only 28% of patients with a urological manifestation were referred to urology. As these patients transition into adolescence and adulthood, the increased prevalence of urological manifestations warrants increased awareness and referral to urologists. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The superhealing MRL background improves muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mice from the MRL or “superhealing” strain have enhanced repair after acute injury to the skin, cornea, and heart. We now tested an admixture of the MRL genome and found that it altered the course of muscle pathology and cardiac function in a chronic disease model of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan (Sgcg), a dystrophin-associated protein, develop muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy similar to their human counterparts with limb girdle muscular dyst...

  3. Bietti’ Crystalline Retinal Dystrophy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Şahin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bietti’ crystalline retinal dystrophy (BCD is a rare, auto­somal, recessively inherited disorder, characterized by the deposition of yellow crystals in the corneal limbus and retina. In this paper we aimed to present a pediatric case with BCD, with clinical, electrophysiological and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings and discuss BCD with the light of the literature. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 94-97

  4. CONGENITAL MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Neubauer

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Myotonic dystrophy is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by myotonia, myopathy of voluntary and involuntary muscles, frontal baldness in men, cardiac conduction abnormalities, catharacts, intellectual deterioration and endocrinopathy. Men with this disorder have often gonadal atrophy and infertility. On the other hand women are generally fertile. During pregnancy their myopathy worsens, often causing severe obstetrical complications. Their children may develop congenital form of the disease with signs of myopathy in utero and have great difficulties in maintaining life functions after birth, together with other characteristical signs of this form: bilateral facial weakness, severe hypotonia, feeding difficulties, talipes equinovarus and mental retardation. The authors present a female newborn with such congenital form of myotonic dystrophy.Conclusions. The authors have emphasized the importance of medical history, regular updating of all the cases of neuromuscular diseases in the region and clinical characteristics for the recognition of congenital form of myotonic dystrophy because of possible prenatal diagnostics and better antenatal and postantal care.

  5. [Management of myocardial damage in muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takuhisa

    2011-11-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a fatal complication in many muscular dystrophy cases and has become the most common cause of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) since 2001. HF deaths in DMD occur in young patients and increase, along with respiratory failure, in older patients. Managing HF, therefore, is the most important component of DMD treatment. Management of HF is necessary in DMD patients of all ages because myocardial damage progresses regardless of age and disability. Electrocardiography, echocardiography, myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and natriuretic peptides are used for the diagnosis of myocardial damage and chronic HF. Tissue Doppler echocardiography is in particularly useful for early detection of minute myocardial damage and dysfunction in DMD. The first-line drugs for chronic HF are angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and the prognosis of DMD patients has been improved using these drugs and beta-blockers. Diuretics are added in the presence of pulmonary congestion. Digoxin is most effective at a blood level of 0.5-0.8 ng/mL because of its pharmacokinetics in DMD. Surgical treatment may be necessary in cases of intractable HF. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (biventricular pacing), a treatment with an artificial pacemaker, is indicated for cases that meet specific criteria, including HF with ventricular dyssynchrony. Applications of partial left ventriculectomy (Batista procedure) and left ventricular assist devices in muscular dystrophy are likely in the near future.

  6. Status spasticus and psoas muscle edema due to anti-GAD antibody associated stiff-man syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey

    2015-08-01

    Severe muscle rigidity and spasms are uncommon causes of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admissions. Stiff-man syndrome (SMS) is a rare disorder characterized by continuous muscle spasms, axial muscle rigidity, "tin soldier gait," and continuous motor unit activity on electromyography. There are three clinical variants of SMS; stiff-limb syndrome, classical SMS, and paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. Three types of antibodies have been associated with SMS; however, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies are the most frequent and are seen in the idiopathic type of SMS. The spasms of SMS can be very disabling and severe enough to cause muscle ruptures and skeletal fractures. We present a case of anti-GAD positive SMS with "status spasticus" causing bilateral psoas myoedema and rhabdomyolysis due to repeated axial muscle jerking in a 64-year-old man and discuss the differential diagnosis of a "jerking patient in the ICU."

  7. A splice site mutation in laminin-α2 results in a severe muscular dystrophy and growth abnormalities in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana A Gupta

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. In patients, muscle weakness is usually present at or shortly after birth and is progressive in nature. Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A is a form of CMD caused by a defect in the laminin-α2 gene (LAMA2. Laminin-α2 is an extracellular matrix protein that interacts with the dystrophin-dystroglycan (DGC complex in membranes providing stability to muscle fibers. In an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen to develop zebrafish models of neuromuscular diseases, we identified a mutant fish that exhibits severe muscular dystrophy early in development. Genetic mapping identified a splice site mutation in the lama2 gene. This splice site is highly conserved in humans and this mutation results in mis-splicing of RNA and a loss of protein function. Homozygous lama2 mutant zebrafish, designated lama2(cl501/cl501, exhibited reduced motor function and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and died at 8-15 days post fertilization. The skeletal muscles exhibited damaged myosepta and detachment of myofibers in the affected fish. Laminin-α2 deficiency also resulted in growth defects in the brain and eye of the mutant fish. This laminin-α2 deficient mutant fish represents a novel disease model to develop therapies for modulating splicing defects in congenital muscular dystrophies and to restore the muscle function in human patients with CMD.

  8. A patient with limb girdle muscular dystrophy carries a TRIM32 deletion, detected by a novel CGH array, in compound heterozygosis with a nonsense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, M; Selvatici, R; Scotton, C; Trabanelli, C; Armaroli, A; De Grandis, D; Levy, N; Gualandi, F; Ferlini, A

    2013-06-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2H is a rare autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy, clinically highly variable, caused by mutations in the TRIM32 gene. Here we describe a 35-years-old who experienced progressive muscle weakness. The muscle biopsy revealed an unspecific pattern of atrophic and hypertrophic fibers; the immunohistochemistry for several proteins was normal. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis showed a heterozygous deletion of the entire TRIM32 gene. On the other allele we identified the R316X nonsense mutation. The genetic diagnosis of LGMD2H in this case was reached by using a novel high throughput diagnostic tool.

  9. Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy: a molecular and immunohistochemical approach Distrofia muscular de Duchenne e Becker: abordagem molecular e imuno-histoquímica

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Andrade Freund; Rosana Herminia Scola; Raquel Cristina Arndt; Paulo José Lorenzoni; Claudia Kamoy Kay; Lineu Cesar Werneck

    2007-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. We studied 106 patients with a diagnosis of probable DMD/BMD by analyzing 20 exons of the dystrophin gene in their blood and, in some of the cases, by immunohistochemical assays for dystrophin in muscle biopsies. In 71.7% of the patients, deletions were found in at least one of the exons; 68% of these deletions were in the hot-spot 3' region. Deletions were found in 81.5% of t...

  10. Deregulated microRNAs in myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Greco

    Full Text Available Myotonic Dystrophy Type-2 (DM2 is an autosomal dominant disease caused by the expansion of a CCTG tetraplet repeat. It is a multisystemic disorder, affecting skeletal muscles, the heart, the eye, the central nervous system and the endocrine system. Since microRNA (miRNA expression is disrupted in Myotonic Dystrophy Type-1 and many other myopathies, miRNAs deregulation was studied in skeletal muscle biopsies of 13 DM2 patients and 13 controls. Eleven miRNAs were deregulated: 9 displayed higher levels compared to controls (miR-34a-5p, miR-34b-3p, miR-34c-5p, miR-146b-5p, miR-208a, miR-221-3p and miR-381, while 4 were decreased (miR-125b-5p, miR-193a-3p, miR-193b-3p and miR-378a-3p. To explore the relevance of DM2 miRNA deregulation, the predicted interactions between miRNA and mRNA were investigated. Global gene expression was analyzed in DM2 and controls and bioinformatic analysis identified more than 1,000 miRNA/mRNA interactions. Pathway and function analysis highlighted the involvement of the miRNA-deregulated mRNAs in multiple aspects of DM2 pathophysiology. In conclusion, the observed miRNA dysregulations may contribute to DM2 pathogenetic mechanisms.

  11. Evidence for meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, A.M.; Barnetson, R.A.; Phillips, M.F. [Institute of Medical Genetics, Wales (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), an autosomal dominant disorder, is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy, affecting at least 1 in 8000 of the population. It is a multisystemic disorder, primarily characterized by myotonia, muscle wasting and cataract. The molecular basis of DM is an expanded CTG repeat located within the 3{prime} untranslated region of a putative serine-threonine protein kinase on chromosome 19q13.3. DM exhibits anticipation, that is, with successive generations there is increasing disease severity and earlier age of onset. This mechanism and the fact that the origin of the disease has been attributed to one or a small number of founder chromosomes suggests that, in time, DM should die out. Meiotic drive has been described as a way in which certain alleles are transmitted to succeeding generations in preference to others: preferential transmission of large CTG alleles may account for their continued existence in the gene pool. There is evidence that a CTG allele with > 19 repeats may gradually increase in repeat number over many generations until it is sufficiently large to give a DM phenotype. We report a study of 495 transmissions from individuals heterozygous for the CTG repeat and with repeat numbers within the normal range (5-30). Alleles were simply classified as large or small relative to the other allele in an individual. Of 242 male meioses, 126 transmissions from parent to child were of the larger allele to their offspring (57.7%, p=0.014). This shows that there is strong evidence for meiotic drive favoring the transmission of the larger DM allele in unaffected individuals. Contrary to a previous report of meiotic drive in the male, we have shown that females preferentially transmit the larger DM allele. Taken together, the data suggest the occurrence of meiotic drive in both males and females in this locus.

  12. Parvalbumin and GAD65 interneuron inhibition in the ventral hippocampus induces distinct behavioral deficits relevant to schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Robin; Morrissey, Mark D; Mahadevan, Vivek; Cajanding, Janine D; Woodin, Melanie A; Yeomans, John S; Takehara-Nishiuchi, Kaori; Kim, Jun Chul

    2014-11-05

    Hyperactivity within the ventral hippocampus (vHPC) has been linked to both psychosis in humans and behavioral deficits in animal models of schizophrenia. A local decrease in GABA-mediated inhibition, particularly involving parvalbumin (PV)-expressing GABA neurons, has been proposed as a key mechanism underlying this hyperactive state. However, direct evidence is lacking for a causal role of vHPC GABA neurons in behaviors associated with schizophrenia. Here, we probed the behavioral function of two different but overlapping populations of vHPC GABA neurons that express either PV or GAD65 by selectively inhibiting these neurons with the pharmacogenetic neuromodulator hM4D. We show that acute inhibition of vHPC GABA neurons in adult mice results in behavioral changes relevant to schizophrenia. Inhibiting either PV or GAD65 neurons produced distinct behavioral deficits. Inhibition of PV neurons, affecting ∼80% of the PV neuron population, robustly impaired prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (PPI), startle reactivity, and spontaneous alternation, but did not affect locomotor activity. In contrast, inhibiting a heterogeneous population of GAD65 neurons, affecting ∼40% of PV neurons and 65% of cholecystokinin neurons, increased spontaneous and amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and reduced spontaneous alternation, but did not alter PPI. Inhibition of PV or GAD65 neurons also produced distinct changes in network oscillatory activity in the vHPC in vivo. Together, these findings establish a causal role for vHPC GABA neurons in controlling behaviors relevant to schizophrenia and suggest a functional dissociation between the GABAergic mechanisms involved in hippocampal modulation of sensorimotor processes.

  13. [Progress in the studies of molecular genetics in Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Sui, Rui-fang; Dong, Fang-tian

    2012-10-01

    CYP4V2, a relatively new member of human cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, is termed an "orphan" P450 because its substrate specificity and physiological roles are unknown. Mutations in the CYP4V2 gene is associated with an autosomal recessive inherited ocular disease named Bietti's crystalline dystrophy (BCD). The strong gene-disease associations provide unique opportunities for elucidating the substrate specificity of this orphan P450s and unraveling the biochemical pathways that may be impacted in patients with CYP4V2 functional deficits.

  14. Characterization of myotonic dystrophy kinase (DMK) in heterologous expression systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waring, J.D.; Haq, R.; Mahadevan, M.S. [Children`s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is caused by expansion of a (CTG){sub n} repeat within the 3{prime} untranslated region of the DMK gene. This gene encodes a product with a predicted M.W. of {approximately}69 kDa which has homology to cAMP-regulated serine-threonine protein kinases. In addition, there is a domain with similarity to coiled-coil regions found in myofibrillar proteins and a predicted transmembrane domain found at the extreme C-terminus. As an approach to identifying the function of this gene, we have expressed various forms of DMK by both in vitro translation and in insect cells using a recombinant baculovirus system. These forms include one corresponding to a cDNA isoform which results in a C-terminal truncation, as well as constructs containing varying CTG repeat lengths in their transcripts. Affinity-purified immunoglobulin elicited to a GST fusion protein (including amino acids corresponding to exons 11 and 15 of DMK) specifically recognizes products close to the predicted size. The products have been analyzed for their levels of expression, post-translational modifications, subcellular localization, and kinase activity.

  15. Calcium and the damage pathways in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David G; Gervasio, Othon L; Yeung, Ella W; Whitehead, Nicholas P

    2010-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle-wasting disease caused by the absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Experiments on the mdx mouse, a model of DMD, have shown that mdx muscles are particularly susceptible to stretch-induced damage. In this review, we discuss evidence showing that a series of stretched contractions of mdx muscle fibres causes a prolonged increase in resting intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). The rise in [Ca2+]i is caused by Ca2+ entry through a class of stretch-activated channels (SACNSC) for which one candidate gene is TRPC1. We review the evidence for activation of SACNSC in muscle by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and suggest that stretch-induced ROS production is part of the pathway that triggers increased channel activity. When the TRPC1 gene was transfected into C2 myoblasts, expression occurred throughout the cell. Only when the TRPC1 gene was coexpressed with caveolin-3 did the TRPC1 protein express in the membrane. When TRPC1 was expressed in the membrane, it could be activated by ROS to produce Ca2+ entry and this entry was inhibited by PP2, an inhibitor of src kinase. These results suggest that stretched contractions activate ROS production, which activates src kinase. Activity of this kinase causes opening of SACNSC and allows Ca2+ entry. This pathway appears to be a significant cause of muscle damage in DMD.

  16. Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaza, Hrishikesh; Barik, Manas R; Reddy, Mamatha M; Mittal, Ruchi; Das, Sujata

    2017-01-01

    Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy (GDLD) is a rare autosomal recessive form of corneal dystrophy characterised by subepithelial and stromal amyloid deposits. It is relatively common in Japan. It usually presents in the first two decades of life with subepithelial nodular lesions that later coalesce to form mulberry-like opacities. Although various surgical modalities have been attempted, recurrence remains a major challenge.

  17. Muscular Dystrophies at Different Ages: Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriana del Rocío Cruz Guzmán

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Common metabolic and endocrine alterations exist across a wide range of muscular dystrophies. Skeletal muscle plays an important role in glucose metabolism and is a major participant in different signaling pathways. Therefore, its damage may lead to different metabolic disruptions. Two of the most important metabolic alterations in muscular dystrophies may be insulin resistance and obesity. However, only insulin resistance has been demonstrated in myotonic dystrophy. In addition, endocrine disturbances such as hypogonadism, low levels of testosterone, and growth hormone have been reported. This eventually will result in consequences such as growth failure and delayed puberty in the case of childhood dystrophies. Other consequences may be reduced male fertility, reduced spermatogenesis, and oligospermia, both in childhood as well as in adult muscular dystrophies. These facts all suggest that there is a need for better comprehension of metabolic and endocrine implications for muscular dystrophies with the purpose of developing improved clinical treatments and/or improvements in the quality of life of patients with dystrophy. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the current knowledge about of metabolic and endocrine alterations in diverse types of dystrophinopathies, which will be divided into two groups: childhood and adult dystrophies which have different age of onset.

  18. Dysphagia is present but mild in myotonic dystrophy type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Ensink; S. Knuijt; Baziel van Engelen; J. van Vliet; A. Tieleman; Bert de Swart

    2009-01-01

    The phenotype of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) shows similarities as well as differences to that of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Dysphagia, a predominant feature in DM1, has not yet been examined in DM2. In a recent nationwide questionnaire survey of gastrointestinal symptoms in DM2, 12 out of

  19. Dysphagia is present but mild in myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, A.A.; Knuijt, S.; Vliet, J. van; Swart, B.J.M. de; Ensink, R.J.H.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The phenotype of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) shows similarities as well as differences to that of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Dysphagia, a predominant feature in DM1, has not yet been examined in DM2. In a recent nationwide questionnaire survey of gastrointestinal symptoms in DM2, 12 out of

  20. Dysphagia is present but mild in myotonic dystrophy type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Bert de; Tieleman, A.; Knuijt, S.; Vliet, J. van; Ensink, R.; Engelen, Baziel van

    2009-01-01

    The phenotype of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) shows similarities as well as differences to that of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Dysphagia, a predominant feature in DM1, has not yet been examined in DM2. In a recent nationwide questionnaire survey of gastrointestinal symptoms in DM2, 12 out of

  1. Resistance training in patients with limb-girdle and becker muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveen, Marie-Louise; Andersen, Søren P; Ingelsrud, Lina H;

    2013-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of strength training in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD).......In this study we investigated the effect of strength training in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD)....

  2. Prenatal exposure to bacterial endotoxin reduces the number of GAD67- and reelin-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus of rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouel, Dominique; Burt, Melissa; Zhang, Ying; Harvey, Louise; Boksa, Patricia

    2012-04-01

    Epidemiological studies implicate prenatal infection as a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia and autism. Subjects with schizophrenia and autism are reported to exhibit reduced levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), a marker for GABA neurons, in various brain regions. Reduced levels of reelin, a secretory glycoprotein present in a subpopulation of GABA neurons, have also been found in these disorders. To test if prenatal infection can cause abnormalities in GAD67 and reelin in the brains of offspring, this study used a rat model of prenatal exposure to the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and assessed numbers of GAD67-immunoreactive (GAD67+) and reelin-immunoreactive (reelin+) neurons in the hippocampus of offspring. In offspring at postnatal day 14 (PD14), GAD67+ cell counts were reduced in the dentate gyrus of the prenatal LPS group compared to prenatal saline controls, while at PD28, GAD67+ cells counts were reduced in the prenatal LPS group in both the dentate gyrus and the CA1. There was a decrease in the number of reelin+ cells in the prenatal LPS offspring compared to controls in the dentate gyrus at PD14. However using Western blotting, no significant effects of prenatal LPS on levels of GAD67 or reelin protein were observed in various brain regions at PD14. These findings support the idea that prenatal infection can cause reductions in postnatal expression of GAD67 and reelin, and in this way, possibly contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia or autism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  3. Skin features in myotonic dystrophy type 1: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanati, A; Giannoni, M; Buratti, L; Cagnetti, C; Giuliodori, K; Ganzetti, G; Silvestrini, M; Provinciali, L; Offidani, A

    2015-05-01

    Poor data regarding skin involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy, also named Dystrophia Myotonica type 1, have been reported. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and types of skin disorders in adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. Fifty-five patients and one hundred age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were referred to a trained dermatologist for a complete skin examination to check for potential cutaneous hallmarks of disease. No difference in prevalence of preneoplastic, neoplastic, and cutaneous lesions was detected between the two groups. Among morphofunctional, proliferative and inflammatory lesions, focal hyperhidrosis (p Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 significant differences according to sex were found for: early androgenic alopecia, twisted hair and seborrheic dermatitis, whose prevalence was higher in males (p Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. On the other hand, an increased prevalence of morphofunctional, inflammatory, and proliferative diseases involving adnexal structures seems to characterize adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1.

  4. Granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I (GrI) and Reis-Bücklers' corneal dystrophy (R-B). One entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, H U

    1989-12-01

    This paper maintains that Reis-Bücklers' corneal dystrophy and granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I are one and the same disease. Included are some of the technically best photographs of Reis-Bücklers' dystrophy found in the literature, and these are compared with photographs from patients with granular corneal dystrophy examined by the author. It is argued that most of the histological and ultrastructural findings on Reis Bücklers' dystrophy described in the literature are either congruent with what is found in granular corneal dystrophy or unspecific.

  5. Signs and symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy among carriers in the Netherlands : a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, EM; Bakker, E; Ippel, PF; Oosterwijk, JC; Majoor-Krakauer, DF; Leschot, NJ; Van Essen, AJ; Brunner, HG; van der Wouw, PA; Wilde, AAM; de Visser, M

    1999-01-01

    Background Carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) may show muscle weakness or dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies focusing on skeletal-muscle involvement were done before DNA analysis was possible. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a population of definit

  6. Signs and symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy among carriers in the Netherlands : a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, EM; Bakker, E; Ippel, PF; Oosterwijk, JC; Majoor-Krakauer, DF; Leschot, NJ; Van Essen, AJ; Brunner, HG; van der Wouw, PA; Wilde, AAM; de Visser, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    Background Carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) may show muscle weakness or dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies focusing on skeletal-muscle involvement were done before DNA analysis was possible. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a population of

  7. Dropped head congenital muscular dystrophy caused by de novo mutations in LMNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoglu, Pakize; Quizon, Nicolas; Pergande, Matthias; Wang, Haicui; Polat, Ayşe Ipek; Ersen, Ayca; Özer, Erdener; Willkomm, Lena; Hiz Kurul, Semra; Heredia, Raúl; Yis, Uluç; Selcen, Duygu; Çirak, Sebahattin

    2017-04-01

    Dropped head syndrome is an easily recognizable clinical presentation of Lamin A/C-related congenital muscular dystrophy. Patients usually present in the first year of life with profound neck muscle weakness, dropped head, and elevated serum creatine kinase. Two patients exhibited head drop during infancy although they were able to sit independently. Later they developed progressive axial and limb-girdle weakness. Creatine kinase levels were elevated and muscle biopsies of both patients showed severe dystrophic changes. The distinctive clinical hallmark of the dropped head led us to the diagnosis of Lamin A/C-related congenital muscular dystrophy, with a pathogenic de novo mutation p.Glu31del in the head domain of the Lamin A/C gene in both patients. Remarkably, one patient also had a central involvement with white matter changes on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Lamin A/C-related dropped-head syndrome is a rapidly progressive congenital muscular dystrophy and may lead to loss of ambulation, respiratory insufficiency, and cardiac complications. Thus, the genetic diagnosis of dropped-head syndrome as L-CMD and the implicated clinical care protocols are of vital importance for these patients. This disease may be underdiagnosed, as only a few genetically confirmed cases have been reported. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutations in PCYT1A Cause Spondylometaphyseal Dysplasia with Cone-Rod Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Guilherme L.; Baratela, Wagner A.R.; Almeida, Tatiana F.; Lazar, Monize; Afonso, Clara L.; Oyamada, Maria K.; Suzuki, Lisa; Oliveira, Luiz A.N.; Ramos, Ester S.; Kim, Chong A.; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Bertola, Débora R.

    2014-01-01

    Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia with cone-rod dystrophy is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by severe short stature, progressive lower-limb bowing, flattened vertebral bodies, metaphyseal involvement, and visual impairment caused by cone-rod dystrophy. Whole-exome sequencing of four individuals affected by this disorder from two Brazilian families identified two previously unreported homozygous mutations in PCYT1A. This gene encodes the alpha isoform of the phosphate cytidylyltransferase 1 choline enzyme, which is responsible for converting phosphocholine into cytidine diphosphate-choline, a key intermediate step in the phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis pathway. A different enzymatic defect in this pathway has been previously associated with a muscular dystrophy with mitochondrial structural abnormalities that does not have cartilage and/or bone or retinal involvement. Thus, the deregulation of the phosphatidylcholine pathway may play a role in multiple genetic diseases in humans, and further studies are necessary to uncover its precise pathogenic mechanisms and the entirety of its phenotypic spectrum. PMID:24387991

  9. Porcine Zygote Injection with Cas9/sgRNA Results in DMD-Modified Pig with Muscle Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hao Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophinopathy, including Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD and Becker muscle dystrophy (BMD is an incurable X-linked hereditary muscle dystrophy caused by a mutation in the DMD gene in coding dystrophin. Advances in further understanding DMD/BMD for therapy are expected. Studies on mdx mice and dogs with muscle dystrophy provide limited insight into DMD disease mechanisms and therapeutic testing because of the different pathological manifestations. Miniature pigs share similar physiology and anatomy with humans and are thus an excellent animal model of human disease. Here, we successfully achieved precise DMD targeting in Chinese Diannan miniature pigs by co-injecting zygotes with Cas9 mRNA and sgRNA targeting DMD. Two piglets were obtained after embryo transfer, one of piglets was identified as DMD-modified individual via traditional cloning, sequencing and T7EN1 cleavage assay. An examination of targeting rates in the DMD-modified piglet revealed that sgRNA:Cas9-mediated on-target mosaic mutations were 70% and 60% of dystrophin alleles in skeletal and smooth muscle, respectively. Meanwhile, no detectable off-target mutations were found, highlighting the high specificity of genetic modification using CRISPR/Cas9. The DMD-modified piglet exhibited degenerative and disordered phenotypes in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and declining thickness of smooth muscle in the stomach and intestine. In conclusion, we successfully generated myopathy animal model by modifying the DMD via CRISPR/Cas9 system in a miniature pig.

  10. Porcine Zygote Injection with Cas9/sgRNA Results in DMD-Modified Pig with Muscle Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Hao; Zhao, Heng; Qing, Yu-Bo; Pan, Wei-Rong; Jia, Bao-Yu; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Huang, Xing-Xu; Wei, Hong-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophinopathy, including Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscle dystrophy (BMD) is an incurable X-linked hereditary muscle dystrophy caused by a mutation in the DMD gene in coding dystrophin. Advances in further understanding DMD/BMD for therapy are expected. Studies on mdx mice and dogs with muscle dystrophy provide limited insight into DMD disease mechanisms and therapeutic testing because of the different pathological manifestations. Miniature pigs share similar physiology and anatomy with humans and are thus an excellent animal model of human disease. Here, we successfully achieved precise DMD targeting in Chinese Diannan miniature pigs by co-injecting zygotes with Cas9 mRNA and sgRNA targeting DMD. Two piglets were obtained after embryo transfer, one of piglets was identified as DMD-modified individual via traditional cloning, sequencing and T7EN1 cleavage assay. An examination of targeting rates in the DMD-modified piglet revealed that sgRNA:Cas9-mediated on-target mosaic mutations were 70% and 60% of dystrophin alleles in skeletal and smooth muscle, respectively. Meanwhile, no detectable off-target mutations were found, highlighting the high specificity of genetic modification using CRISPR/Cas9. The DMD-modified piglet exhibited degenerative and disordered phenotypes in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and declining thickness of smooth muscle in the stomach and intestine. In conclusion, we successfully generated myopathy animal model by modifying the DMD via CRISPR/Cas9 system in a miniature pig. PMID:27735844

  11. Porcine Zygote Injection with Cas9/sgRNA Results in DMD-Modified Pig with Muscle Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Hao; Zhao, Heng; Qing, Yu-Bo; Pan, Wei-Rong; Jia, Bao-Yu; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Huang, Xing-Xu; Wei, Hong-Jiang

    2016-10-09

    Dystrophinopathy, including Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscle dystrophy (BMD) is an incurable X-linked hereditary muscle dystrophy caused by a mutation in the DMD gene in coding dystrophin. Advances in further understanding DMD/BMD for therapy are expected. Studies on mdx mice and dogs with muscle dystrophy provide limited insight into DMD disease mechanisms and therapeutic testing because of the different pathological manifestations. Miniature pigs share similar physiology and anatomy with humans and are thus an excellent animal model of human disease. Here, we successfully achieved precise DMD targeting in Chinese Diannan miniature pigs by co-injecting zygotes with Cas9 mRNA and sgRNA targeting DMD. Two piglets were obtained after embryo transfer, one of piglets was identified as DMD-modified individual via traditional cloning, sequencing and T7EN1 cleavage assay. An examination of targeting rates in the DMD-modified piglet revealed that sgRNA:Cas9-mediated on-target mosaic mutations were 70% and 60% of dystrophin alleles in skeletal and smooth muscle, respectively. Meanwhile, no detectable off-target mutations were found, highlighting the high specificity of genetic modification using CRISPR/Cas9. The DMD-modified piglet exhibited degenerative and disordered phenotypes in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and declining thickness of smooth muscle in the stomach and intestine. In conclusion, we successfully generated myopathy animal model by modifying the DMD via CRISPR/Cas9 system in a miniature pig.

  12. Noncoding RNAs: Emerging Players in Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Falcone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fascinating world of noncoding RNAs has recently come to light, thanks to the development of powerful sequencing technologies, revealing a variety of RNA molecules playing important regulatory functions in most, if not all, cellular processes. Many noncoding RNAs have been implicated in regulatory networks that are determinant for skeletal muscle differentiation and disease. In this review, we outline the noncoding RNAs involved in physiological mechanisms of myogenesis and those that appear dysregulated in muscle dystrophies, also discussing their potential use as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  13. Muscle phenotypic variability in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2 G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paim, Julia F; Cotta, Ana; Vargas, Antonio P; Navarro, Monica M; Valicek, Jaquelin; Carvalho, Elmano; da-Cunha, Antonio L; Plentz, Estevão; Braz, Shelida V; Takata, Reinaldo I; Almeida, Camila F; Vainzof, Mariz

    2013-06-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 G (LGMD2G) is caused by mutations in the telethonin gene. Only few families were described presenting this disease, and they are mainly Brazilians. Here, we identified one additional case carrying the same common c.157C > T mutation in the telethonin gene but with an atypical histopathological muscle pattern. In a female patient with a long duration of symptoms (46 years), muscle biopsy showed, in addition to telethonin deficiency, the presence of nemaline rods, type 1 fiber predominance, nuclear internalization, lobulated fibers, and mitochondrial paracrystalline inclusions. Her first clinical signs were identified at 8 years old, which include tiptoe walking, left lower limb deformity, and frequent falls. Ambulation loss occurred at 41 years old, and now, at 54 years old, she presented pelvic girdle atrophy, winging scapula, foot deformity with incapacity to perform ankle dorsiflexion, and absent tendon reflexes. The presence of nemaline bodies could be a secondary phenomenon, possibly associated with focal Z-line abnormalities of a long-standing disease. However, these new histopathological findings, characteristic of congenital myopathies, expand muscle phenotypic variability of telethoninopathy.

  14. Novel mutations in two Saudi patients with congenital retinal dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leen Abu Safieh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To report novel mutations in two Saudi children with clinical features of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA and Alström syndrome. Case reports. Case 1 was a child with phenotypic features of LCA including oculodigital sign, bilateral enophthalmos, nystagmus, pale disc, and retinal changes. Direct sequencing of the coding sequence of GUCY2D revealed a missense mutation affecting highly conserved position (c. 743C > T; p.S248 L. Case 2 describes a girl with marked nystagmus, photophobia, and retinal changes in both eyes with short and stubby fingers tapering at the distal phalanges. The electroretinograms were nonrecordable in each eye. She had a hearing aid in the left ear, mid-facial hypoplasia, bilateral enophthalmos, and insulin dependent diabetes. Mutation screening of candidates genes revealed a pathogenic mutation in ALMS1 gene (c. 8441C > A, p.S2814*. Two novel mutations causing phenotypic LCA and Alström syndrome in Saudi patients from consanguineous families expand the genotypic spectrum of congenital retinal dystrophies

  15. Expression of GAD67 mRNA on epliptic rats kindled by electical amygdala%杏仁核点燃癫痫鼠GAD67 mRNA的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林卫红; 张淑琴; 孟红梅; 寇玉红; 崔俐

    2001-01-01

    目的 探讨大鼠杏仁核点燃癫痫后脑组织谷氨酸脱羧酶(GAD)mRNA的表达及其在癫痫发作后表达变化的意义. 方法 通过建立与人类癫痫发生、形成具有高度相似性的杏仁核点燃大鼠癫痫模型, 采用原位杂交技术检测癫痫鼠颞叶及海马组织不同点燃时程GAD67 mRNA表达.结果 点燃后1d,GAD67 mRNA表达增多并且表达信号增强,至7d时达高峰,以后表达逐渐下降,但在点燃后49d,表达仍高于正常,与对照组及手术对照组相比有统计学差异. 结论 在慢性癫痫发作中,GABA能神经元的活性增强,考虑是由于癫痫过程中兴奋性增强,引起GABA能神经元抑制功能代偿性增加的结果 .即癫痫发作后GABA能神经元介入的抑制功能代偿性增加的,这可能是机体内源性抗癫痫机制增强的一种反应.

  16. Gene therapy into photoreceptors and Müller glial cells restores retinal structure and function in CRB1 retinitis pigmentosa mouse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellissier, Lucie P; Quinn, Peter M; Alves, C Henrique; Vos, Rogier M; Klooster, Jan; Flannery, John G; Heimel, J Alexander; Wijnholds, J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Crumbs-homologue-1 (CRB1) gene lead to severe recessive inherited retinal dystrophies. Gene transfer therapy is the most promising cure for retinal dystrophies and has primarily been applied for recessive null conditions via a viral gene expression vector transferring a cDNA encodin

  17. Paleomagnetism of Late Paleozoic series in Morocco and Argentina: implications for GAD Hypothesis and Pangea reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, J.; Oufi, O.; Rapalini, A.; Courtillot, V. E.

    2003-12-01

    The configuration of Pangea during the upper Paleozoic is still strongly debated: the APWP for Gondwana and Laurussia should fit in the GAD hypothesis when Pangea is reconstructed using marine data. But they appear to be significantly distinct, by as much as 15° for certain periods. Motion between the two blocks has been proposed (B Pangea of Irving) but is geologically problematic. Erroneous age assignments, magnetic overprints, insufficient demagnetization, problems with the recording of geomagnetic field in sediments (f.i. flattening) and finally non-dipole contributions have all been invoked to reconcile apparently discrepant poles. In this talk, we investigate the geometry of the geomagnetic field during the Late Carboniferous-Early Triassic period (320-240 Ma). As a starting point, we use two recent surveys in Morocco and Argentina, which provide paleomagnetic tests and good age control that were missing in most previous studies and yield respectively paleolatitude data close to the equator and mid/high latitudes. Using a compilation of poles from the GPMDB, we analyze the positions of mean poles for mid-northern and southern, and equatorial latitudes, searching for the distinctive antisymmetrical pattern expected for a dipole with an octupole contribution. We also discuss the main causes of errors, such as the occurrence of lithospheric deformation, which induces important rotations at various scales, particularly in future rift or mountain zones (Colorado, South of France, South American cordilleras, east of Australia, etc.). Even when using only sampling sites close to the Paleo-equator (which minimizes any octupolar effect), the APWP of Gondwana remains offset from that of Laurussia. The plate configuration inferred is a classical A Pangea reconstruction at about 260 Ma, but data do not rule out the possibility of a B Pangea before 270 Ma, which would account for a large number of geological constraints. In contradiction with recently proposed persistent

  18. Increased GAD67 mRNA expression in cerebellar interneurons in autism: implications for Purkinje cell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Jane; Soghomonian, Jean-Jacques; Blatt, Gene J

    2008-02-15

    It has been widely reported that in autism, the number of Purkinje cells (PCs) is decreased, and recently, decreased expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) mRNA in Purkinje cells also has been observed. However, the autism literature has not addressed key GABAergic inputs into Purkinje cells. Inhibitory basket and stellate cell interneurons in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex provide direct key GABAergic input into Purkinje cells and could potently influence the output of Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nuclei. We investigated the capacity for interneuronal synthesis of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) in both types of interneurons that innervate the remaining PCs in the posterolateral cerebellar hemisphere in autism. The level of GAD67 mRNA, one of the isoforms of the key synthesizing enzymes for GABA, was quantified at the single-cell level using in situ hybridization in brains of autistic and aged-matched controls. The National Institutes of Health imaging system showed that expression of GAD67 mRNA in basket cells was significantly up-regulated, by 28%, in eight autistic brains compared with that in eight control brains (mean +/- SEM pixels per cell, 1.03 +/- 0.05 versus 0.69 +/- 0.05, respectively; P levels, but this did not reach significance. The results suggest that basket cells likely provide increased GABAergic feed-forward inhibition to PCs in autism, directly affecting PC output to target neurons in the dentate nucleus and potentially disrupting its modulatory role in key motor and/or cognitive behaviors in autistic individuals.

  19. Number and regional distribution of GAD65 mRNA-expressing interneurons in the rat hippocampal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czéh, B; Abrahám, Hajnalka; Tahtakran, Siroun; Houser, Carolyn R; Seress, L

    2013-12-01

    In rodent models for neuropsychiatric disorders reduced number of hippocampal interneurons have been reported, but the total number of GABAergic neurons in the normal rat hippocampus is yet unknown. We used in situ hybridization method to label the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and counted the number of GAD65 mRNA-expressing neurons along the entire septo-temporal axis of the hippocampus. We found that 2/3 of the interneurons were in Ammon's horn (61,590) and 1/3 in the dentate gyrus (28,000). We observed the following numbers in Ammon's horn: CA3 area 33,400, CA2 area 4,190, CA1 area 24,000 and in the dentate gyrus: 6,000 in the molecular and 9,000 in the granule cell layers and 13,000 in the hilus. GAD65 mRNA-expressing neurons were significantly more numerous in dorsal than in ventral hippocampus. The ratio between interneurons and principal cells was lowest in the granule cell layer (0.9%) and highest in hilus (21%). In Ammon's horn this ratio was constant being 13% in CA3 and 8% in CA1-2 areas. In the entire hippocampal formation, the interneuron/principal cell ratio was 6%, with a significant difference between Ammon's horn (9.5%) and the dentate gyrus (2.8%) including the hilus. Such low ratios could suggest that even a limited loss of GABAergic neurons in the hippocampus may have a considerable functional impact.

  20. Early development of GABAergic cells of the retina in sharks: an immunohistochemical study with GABA and GAD antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Candal, Eva; Carrera, Iván; Anadón, Ramón; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel

    2008-09-01

    We studied the ontogeny and organization of GABAergic cells in the retina of two elasmobranches, the lesser-spotted dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula) and the brown shyshark (Haploblepharus fuscus) by using immunohistochemistry for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Both antibodies revealed the same pattern of immunoreactivity and both species showed similar organization of GABAergic cells. GABAergic cells were first detected in neural retina of embryos at stage 26, which showed a neuroepithelial appearance without any layering. In stages 27-29 the retina showed similar organization but the number of neuroblastic GABAergic cells increased. When layering became apparent in the central retina (stage-30 embryos), GABAergic cells mainly appeared organized in the outer and inner retina, and GABAergic processes and fibres were seen in the primordial inner plexiform layer (IPL), optic fibre layer and optic nerve stalk. In stage-32 embryos, layering was completed in the central retina, where immunoreactivity appeared in perikarya of the horizontal cell layer, inner nuclear layer and ganglion cell layer, and in numerous processes coursing in the IPL, optic fibre layer and optic nerve. From stage 32 to hatching (stage 34), the layered retina extends from centre-to-periphery, recapitulating that observed in the central retina at earlier stages. In adults, GABA/GAD immunoreactivity disappears from the horizontal cell layer except in the marginal retina. Our results indicate that the source of GABA in the shark retina can be explained by its synthesis by GAD. Such synthesis precedes layering and synaptogenesis, thus supporting a developmental role for GABA in addition to act as neurotransmitter and neuromodulator.