WorldWideScience

Sample records for dystrophin-deficiency adam12 overexpression

  1. ADAM12 overexpression does not improve outcome in mice with laminin alpha2-deficient muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Ling T; Shelton, G Diane; Wewer, Ulla M

    2005-01-01

    We have recently shown that overexpression of ADAM12 results in increased muscle regeneration and significantly reduced pathology in mdx, dystrophin deficient mice. In the present study, we tested the effect of overexpressing ADAM12 in dy(W) laminin-deficient mice. dy mice have a very severe...... clinical phenotype and would be expected to benefit greatly from enhanced regeneration. We found that dy(W) mice overexpressing ADAM12 indeed have increased muscle regeneration, as evidenced by increased numbers of muscle fibers expressing fetal myosin. However, overexpression of ADAM12 had no significant...

  2. Compensation for dystrophin-deficiency: ADAM12 overexpression in skeletal muscle results in increased alpha 7 integrin, utrophin and associated glycoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Guo, Ling T

    2003-01-01

    Mouse models for genetic diseases are among the most powerful tools available for developing and testing new treatment strategies. ADAM12 is a disintegrin and metalloprotease, previously demonstrated to significantly alleviate the pathology of mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy...... in humans. More specifically ADAM12 appeared to prevent muscle cell necrosis in the mdx mice as evidenced by morphological analysis and by the reduced levels of serum creatine kinase. In the present study we demonstrated that ADAM12 may compensate for the dystrophin deficiency in mdx mice by increasing...... the expression and redistribution of several components of the muscle cell-adhesion complexes. First, we analyzed transgenic mice that overexpress ADAM12 and found mild myopathic changes and accelerated regeneration following acute injury. We then analyzed changes in gene-expression profiles in mdx/ADAM12...

  3. Transgenic overexpression of ADAM12 suppresses muscle regeneration and aggravates dystrophy in aged mdx mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Wewer, Ulla M

    2007-01-01

    mice (ADAM12(+)) after a knife cut lesion and observed that the regeneration process was significantly impaired. ADAM12 seemed to inhibit the satellite cell response and delay myoblast differentiation. These results discourage long-term therapeutic use of ADAM12. They also point to impaired...... effect of ADAM12 was suggested to be mediated via a membrane-stabilizing up-regulation of utrophin, alpha7B integrin, and dystroglycans. Ectopic ADAM12 expression in normal mouse skeletal muscle also improved regeneration after freeze injury, presumably by the same mechanism. Hence, it was suggested...... overexpressing ADAM12 (ADAM12(+)/mdx mice), even though their utrophin levels were mildly elevated compared with age-matched controls. Thus, membrane stabilization was not sufficient to provide protection during prolonged disease. Consequently, we reinvestigated skeletal muscle regeneration in ADAM12 transgenic...

  4. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frohlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar

    2011-01-01

    that ADAM12 deficiency reduces breast tumor progression in the PyMT model. However, the catalytic activity of ADAM12 appears to be dispensable for its tumor-promoting effect. Interestingly, we demonstrate that ADAM12 endogenously expressed in tumor-associated stroma in the PyMT model does not influence......Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues, but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In the present study, we found...... hypothesized, however, that the tumor-associated stroma may stimulate ADAM12 expression in tumor cells, based on the fact that TGF-ß1 stimulates ADAM12 expression and is a well-known growth factor released from tumor-associated stroma. TGF-ß1 stimulation of ADAM12-negative Lewis lung tumor cells induced ADAM12...

  5. Functional substitution by TAT-utrophin in dystrophin-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Sonnemann

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The loss of dystrophin compromises muscle cell membrane stability and causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy and/or various forms of cardiomyopathy. Increased expression of the dystrophin homolog utrophin by gene delivery or pharmacologic up-regulation has been demonstrated to restore membrane integrity and improve the phenotype in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse. However, the lack of a viable therapy in humans predicates the need to explore alternative methods to combat dystrophin deficiency. We investigated whether systemic administration of recombinant full-length utrophin (Utr or DeltaR4-21 "micro" utrophin (muUtr protein modified with the cell-penetrating TAT protein transduction domain could attenuate the phenotype of mdx mice.Recombinant TAT-Utr and TAT-muUtr proteins were expressed using the baculovirus system and purified using FLAG-affinity chromatography. Age-matched mdx mice received six twice-weekly intraperitoneal injections of either recombinant protein or PBS. Three days after the final injection, mice were analyzed for several phenotypic parameters of dystrophin deficiency. Injected TAT-muUtr transduced all tissues examined, integrated with members of the dystrophin complex, reduced serum levels of creatine kinase (11,290+/-920 U versus 5,950+/-1,120 U; PBS versus TAT, the prevalence of muscle degeneration/regeneration (54%+/-5% versus 37%+/-4% of centrally nucleated fibers; PBS versus TAT, the susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced force drop (72%+/-5% versus 40%+/-8% drop; PBS versus TAT, and increased specific force production (9.7+/-1.1 N/cm(2 versus 12.8+/-0.9 N/cm(2; PBS versus TAT.These results are, to our knowledge, the first to establish the efficacy and feasibility of TAT-utrophin-based constructs as a novel direct protein-replacement therapy for the treatment of skeletal and cardiac muscle diseases caused by loss of dystrophin.

  6. ADAM 12 protease induces adipogenesis in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Xu, Xiufeng; Tajima, Rie

    2002-01-01

    ADAM 12 (meltrin-alpha) is a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. ADAM 12 functions as an active metalloprotease, supports cell adhesion, and has been implicated in myoblast differentiation and fusion. Human ADAM 12 exists in two forms: the prototype membrane-anchored pr......ADAM 12 (meltrin-alpha) is a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. ADAM 12 functions as an active metalloprotease, supports cell adhesion, and has been implicated in myoblast differentiation and fusion. Human ADAM 12 exists in two forms: the prototype membrane......-anchored protein, ADAM 12-L, and a shorter secreted form, ADAM 12-S. Here we report the occurrence of adipocytes in the skeletal muscle of transgenic mice in which overexpression of either form is driven by the muscle creatine kinase promoter. Cells expressing a marker of early adipogenesis were apparent...

  7. Deficiency in Cardiac Dystrophin Affects the Abundance of the α-/β-Dystroglycan Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lohan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Duchenne muscular dystrophy is primarily categorised as a skeletal muscle disease, deficiency in the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin also affects the heart. The central transsarcolemmal linker between the actin membrane cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix is represented by the dystrophin-associated dystroglycans. Chemical cross-linking analysis revealed no significant differences in the dimeric status of the α-/β-dystroglycan subcomplex in the dystrophic mdx heart as compared to normal cardiac tissue. In analogy to skeletal muscle fibres, heart muscle also exhibited a greatly reduced abundance of both dystroglycans in dystrophin-deficient cells. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the degree of reduction in α-dystroglycan is more pronounced in matured mdx skeletal muscle as contrasted to the mdx heart. The fact that the deficiency in dystrophin triggers a similar pathobiochemical response in both types of muscle suggests that the cardiomyopathic complications observed in x-linked muscular dystrophy might be initiated by the loss of the dystrophin-associated surface glycoprotein complex.

  8. Laryngeal Muscles Are Spared in the Dystrophin Deficient "mdx" Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lisa B.; Joseph, Gayle L.; Adkins, Tracey D.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Stemple, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: "Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)" is caused by the loss of the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. The disease leads to severe and progressive skeletal muscle wasting. Interestingly, the disease spares some muscles. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of dystrophin deficiency on 2 intrinsic laryngeal muscles, the…

  9. Functional rescue of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice by a chimeric peptide-PMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haifang; Moulton, Hong M; Betts, Corinne; Merritt, Thomas; Seow, Yiqi; Ashraf, Shirin; Wang, Qingsong; Boutilier, Jordan; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2010-10-01

    Splice modulation using antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) has been shown to yield targeted exon exclusion to restore the open reading frame and generate truncated but partially functional dystrophin protein. This has been successfully demonstrated in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice and in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. However, DMD is a systemic disease; successful therapeutic exploitation of this approach will therefore depend on effective systemic delivery of AOs to all affected tissues. We have previously shown the potential of a muscle-specific/arginine-rich chimeric peptide-phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO) conjugate, but its long-term activity, optimized dosing regimen, capacity for functional correction and safety profile remain to be established. Here, we report the results of this chimeric peptide-PMO conjugate in the mdx mouse using low doses (3 and 6 mg/kg) administered via a 6 biweekly systemic intravenous injection protocol. We show 100% dystrophin-positive fibers and near complete correction of the dystrophin transcript defect in all peripheral muscle groups, with restoration of 50% dystrophin protein over 12 weeks, leading to correction of the DMD pathological phenotype and restoration of muscle function in the absence of detectable toxicity or immune response. Chimeric muscle-specific/cell-penetrating peptides therefore represent highly promising agents for systemic delivery of splice-correcting PMO oligomers for DMD therapy.

  10. Decreased inward rectifier potassium current IK1 in dystrophin-deficient ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi, Lena; Koenig, Xaver; Kubista, Helmut; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2017-03-04

    Kir2.x channels in ventricular cardiomyocytes (most prominently Kir2.1) account for the inward rectifier potassium current I K1 , which controls the resting membrane potential and the final phase of action potential repolarization. Recently it was hypothesized that the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) is important in the regulation of Kir2.x channels. To test this hypothesis, we investigated potential I K1 abnormalities in dystrophin-deficient ventricular cardiomyocytes derived from the hearts of Duchenne muscular dystrophy mouse models. We found that I K1 was substantially diminished in dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes when compared to wild type myocytes. This finding represents the first functional evidence for a significant role of the DAPC in the regulation of Kir2.x channels.

  11. Dystrophin deficiency leads to disturbance of LAMP1-vesicle-associated protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duguez, S.; Duddy, W.; Johnston, H.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy results from loss of the protein dystrophin, which links the intracellular cytoskeletal network with the extracellular matrix, but deficiency in this function does not fully explain the onset or progression of the disease. While some intracellular events involved...... in the degeneration of dystrophin-deficient muscle fibers have been well characterized, changes in their secretory profile are undescribed. To analyze the secretome profile of mdx myotubes independently of myonecrosis, we labeled the proteins of mdx and wild-type myotubes with stable isotope-labeled amino acids...

  12. The Disintegrin and Metalloprotease ADAM12 Is Associated with TGF-β-Induced Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Ruff

    Full Text Available The increased expression of the Disintegrin and Metalloprotease ADAM12 has been associated with human cancers, however its role remain unclear. We have previously reported that ADAM12 expression is induced by the transforming growth factor, TGF-β and promotes TGF-β-dependent signaling through interaction with the type II receptor of TGF-β. Here we explore the implication of ADAM12 in TGF-β-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, a key process in cancer progression. We show that ADAM12 expression is correlated with EMT markers in human breast cancer cell lines and biopsies. Using a non-malignant breast epithelial cell line (MCF10A, we demonstrate that TGF-β-induced EMT increases expression of the membrane-anchored ADAM12L long form. Importantly, ADAM12L overexpression in MCF10A is sufficient to induce loss of cell-cell contact, reorganization of actin cytoskeleton, up-regulation of EMT markers and chemoresistance. These effects are independent of the proteolytic activity but require the cytoplasmic tail and are specific of ADAM12L since overexpression of ADAM12S failed to induce similar changes. We further demonstrate that ADAM12L-dependent EMT is associated with increased phosphorylation of Smad3, Akt and ERK proteins. Conversely, inhibition of TGF-β receptors or ERK activities reverses ADAM12L-induced mesenchymal phenotype. Together our data demonstrate that ADAM12L is associated with EMT and contributes to TGF-β-dependent EMT by favoring both Smad-dependent and Smad-independent pathways.

  13. Overexpression of soluble ADAM33 promotes a hypercontractile phenotype of the airway smooth muscle cell in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yiyuan; Long, Jiaoyue; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Xuemei; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Yang; Lin, Feng; Zhong, Jun; Xu, Rong [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, and Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400030 (China); Mao, Lizheng [Jiangsu Asialand Biomed-Technology Co. Ltd., Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Deng, Linhong, E-mail: dlh@cczu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, and Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400030 (China); Changzhou Key Laboratory of Respiratory Medical Engineering, Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China)

    2016-11-15

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 33 (ADAM33) has been identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma, but details of the causality are not fully understood. We hypothesize that soluble ADAM33 (sADAM33) overexpression can alter the mechanical behaviors of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) via regulation of the cell's contractile phenotype, and thus contributes to airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma. To test this hypothesis, we either overexpressed or knocked down the sADAM33 in rat ASMCs by transfecting the cells with sADAM33 coding sequence or a small interfering RNA (siRNA) that specifically targets the ADAM33 disintegrin domain, and subsequently assessed the cells for stiffness, contractility and traction force, together with the expression level of contractile and proliferative phenotype markers. We also investigated whether these changes were dependent on Rho/ROCK pathway by culturing the ASMCs either in the absence or presence of ROCK inhibitor (H1152). The results showed that the ASMCs with sADAM33 overexpression were stiffer and more contractile, generated greater traction force, exhibited increased expression levels of contractile phenotype markers and markedly enhanced Rho activation. Furthermore these changes were largely attenuated when the cells were cultured in the presence of H-1152. However, the knock-down of ADAM33 seemed insufficient to influence majority of the mechanical behaviors of the ASMCs. Taken together, we demonstrated that sADAM33 overexpression altered the mechanical behaviors of ASMCs in vitro, which was most likely by promoting a hypercontractile phenotype transition of ASMCs through Rho/ROCK pathway. This revelation may establish the previously missing link between ADAM33 expression and AHR, and also provide useful insight for targeting sADAM33 in asthma prevention and therapy. - Highlights: • sADAM33 overexpression enhances the stiffness, traction force and contractility of ASMCs. • sADAM33 overexpression promotes

  14. Overexpression of soluble ADAM33 promotes a hypercontractile phenotype of the airway smooth muscle cell in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Yiyuan; Long, Jiaoyue; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Xuemei; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Yang; Lin, Feng; Zhong, Jun; Xu, Rong; Mao, Lizheng; Deng, Linhong

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 33 (ADAM33) has been identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma, but details of the causality are not fully understood. We hypothesize that soluble ADAM33 (sADAM33) overexpression can alter the mechanical behaviors of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) via regulation of the cell's contractile phenotype, and thus contributes to airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma. To test this hypothesis, we either overexpressed or knocked down the sADAM33 in rat ASMCs by transfecting the cells with sADAM33 coding sequence or a small interfering RNA (siRNA) that specifically targets the ADAM33 disintegrin domain, and subsequently assessed the cells for stiffness, contractility and traction force, together with the expression level of contractile and proliferative phenotype markers. We also investigated whether these changes were dependent on Rho/ROCK pathway by culturing the ASMCs either in the absence or presence of ROCK inhibitor (H1152). The results showed that the ASMCs with sADAM33 overexpression were stiffer and more contractile, generated greater traction force, exhibited increased expression levels of contractile phenotype markers and markedly enhanced Rho activation. Furthermore these changes were largely attenuated when the cells were cultured in the presence of H-1152. However, the knock-down of ADAM33 seemed insufficient to influence majority of the mechanical behaviors of the ASMCs. Taken together, we demonstrated that sADAM33 overexpression altered the mechanical behaviors of ASMCs in vitro, which was most likely by promoting a hypercontractile phenotype transition of ASMCs through Rho/ROCK pathway. This revelation may establish the previously missing link between ADAM33 expression and AHR, and also provide useful insight for targeting sADAM33 in asthma prevention and therapy. - Highlights: • sADAM33 overexpression enhances the stiffness, traction force and contractility of ASMCs. • sADAM33 overexpression promotes a

  15. ADAM12-S stimulates bone growth in transgenic mice by modulating chondrocyte proliferation and maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Rudkjaer, Lise

    2006-01-01

    ADAM12-S transgenic mice exhibit a pronounced increase in the length of bones, such as femur, tibia, and vertebrae. The effect of ADAM12-S on longitudinal bone growth involves the modulation of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation, likely through proteolytic activities and altered cell......: Transgenic mice expressing the secreted form of human ADAM12, ADAM12-S, or a truncated metalloprotease-deficient form of ADAM12-S in the circulation were used to study the effects of ADAM12 on the skeleton. In addition, murine chondrocyte cultures were used to study the effect of ADAM12-S on cell...... studies showed that ADAM12-S inhibits chondrocyte adhesion to fibronectin and collagen type II. CONCLUSIONS: ADAM12-S stimulates bone growth in mice by modulating chondrocyte proliferation and maturation through mechanisms probably involving both metalloprotease and adhesion activities....

  16. 100-fold but not 50-fold dystrophin overexpression aggravates electrocardiographic defects in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongping Yue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophin gene replacement holds the promise of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Supraphysiological expression is a concern for all gene therapy studies. In the case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Chamberlain and colleagues found that 50-fold overexpression did not cause deleterious side effect in skeletal muscle. To determine whether excessive dystrophin expression in the heart is safe, we studied two lines of transgenic mdx mice that selectively expressed a therapeutic minidystrophin gene in the heart at 50-fold and 100-fold of the normal levels. In the line with 50-fold overexpression, minidystrophin showed sarcolemmal localization and electrocardiogram abnormalities were corrected. However, in the line with 100-fold overexpression, we not only detected sarcolemmal minidystrophin expression but also observed accumulation of minidystrophin vesicles in the sarcoplasm. Excessive minidystrophin expression did not correct tachycardia, a characteristic feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Importantly, several electrocardiogram parameters (QT interval, QRS duration and the cardiomyopathy index became worse than that of mdx mice. Our data suggests that the mouse heart can tolerate 50-fold minidystrophin overexpression, but 100-fold overexpression leads to cardiac toxicity.

  17. Erbb2 up-regulation of ADAM12 expression accelerates skin cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Velidi H; Vogel, Kristen; Yanagida, Jodi K; Marwaha, Nitin; Kandel, Amrit; Trempus, Carol; Repertinger, Susan K; Hansen, Laura A

    2015-10-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause severe damage to the skin and is the primary cause of most skin cancer. UV radiation causes DNA damage leading to mutations and also activates the Erbb2/HER2 receptor through indirect mechanisms involving reactive oxygen species. We hypothesized that Erbb2 activation accelerates the malignant progression of UV-induced skin cancer. Following the induction of benign squamous papillomas by UV exposure of v-ras(Ha) transgenic Tg.AC mice, mice were treated topically with the Erbb2 inhibitor AG825 and tumor progression monitored. AG825 treatment reduced tumor volume, increased tumor regression, and delayed the development of malignant squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Progression to malignancy was associated with increased Erbb2 and ADAM12 (A Disintegin And Metalloproteinase 12) transcripts and protein, while inhibition of Erbb2 blocked the increase in ADAM12 message upon malignant progression. Similarly, human SCC and SCC cell lines had increased ADAM12 protein and transcripts when compared to normal controls. To determine whether Erbb2 up-regulation of ADAM12 contributed to malignant progression of skin cancer, Erbb2 expression was modulated in cultured SCC cells using forced over-expression or siRNA targeting, demonstrating up-regulation of ADAM12 by Erbb2. Furthermore, ADAM12 transfection or siRNA targeting revealed that ADAM12 increased both the migration and invasion of cutaneous SCC cells. Collectively, these results suggest Erbb2 up-regulation of ADAM12 as a novel mechanism contributing to the malignant progression of UV-induced skin cancer. Inhibition of Erbb2/HER2 reduced tumor burden, increased tumor regression, and delayed the progression of benign skin tumors to malignant SCC in UV-exposed mice. Inhibition of Erbb2 suppressed the increase in metalloproteinase ADAM12 expression in skin tumors, which in turn increased migration and tumor cell invasiveness. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. ADAM12 induces actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix reorganization during early adipocyte differentiation by regulating beta1 integrin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Sundberg, Christina; Kveiborg, Marie

    2003-01-01

    -100 from cells overexpressing ADAM12 than from control cells. Collectively, these results show that surface expression of ADAM12 impairs the function of beta1 integrins and, consequently, alters the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. These events may be necessary...

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 ablation in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles reduces angiogenesis resulting in impaired growth of regenerated muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Daigo; Nakamura, Akinori; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2011-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of endopeptidases classified into subgroups based on substrate preference in normal physiological processes such as embryonic development and tissue remodeling, as well as in various disease processes via degradation of extracellular matrix components. Among the MMPs, MMP-9 and MMP-2 have been reported to be up-regulated in skeletal muscles in the lethal X-linked muscle disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by loss of dystrophin. A recent study showed that deletion of the MMP9 gene in mdx, a mouse model for DMD, improved skeletal muscle pathology and function; however, the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle is not well known. In this study, we aimed at verifying the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle by using mdx mice with genetic ablation of MMP-2 (mdx/MMP-2(-/-)). We found impairment of regenerated muscle fiber growth with reduction of angiogenesis in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), an important angiogenesis-related factor, decreased in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. MMP-2 had not a critical role in the degradation of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) components such as β-dystroglycan and β-sarcoglycan in the regeneration process of the dystrophic muscle. Accordingly, MMP-2 may be essential for growth of regenerated muscle fibers through VEGF-associated angiogenesis in the dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

  20. Overexpression of the A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase ADAM15 is linked to a Small but Highly Aggressive Subset of Prostate Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Burdelski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase (ADAM family of endopeptidases plays a role in many solid cancers and includes promising targets for anticancer therapies. Deregulation of ADAM15 has been linked to tumor aggressiveness and cell line studies suggest that ADAM15 overexpression may also be implicated in prostate cancer. To evaluate the impact of ADAM15 expression and its relationship with key genomic alterations, a tissue microarray containing 12,427 prostate cancers was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. ADAM15 expression was compared to phenotype, prognosis and molecular features including TMPRSS2:ERG fusion and frequent deletions involving PTEN, 3p, 5q and 6q. Normal prostate epithelium did not show ADAM15 staining. In prostate cancers, negative, weak, moderate, and strong ADAM15 staining was found in 87.7%, 3.7%, 5.6%, and 3.0% of 9826 interpretable tumors. Strong ADAM15 staining was linked to high Gleason grade, advanced pathological tumor stage, positive nodal stage and resection margin. ADAM15 overexpression was also associated with TMPRSS2:ERG fusions and PTEN deletions (P < .0001 but unrelated to deletions of 3p, 5q and 6q. In univariate analysis, high ADAM15 expression was strongly linked to PSA recurrence (P < .0001. However, in multivariate analyses this association was only maintained if the analysis was limited to preoperatively available parameters in ERG-negative cancers. The results of our study demonstrate that ADAM15 is strongly up regulated in a small but highly aggressive fraction of prostate cancers. In these tumors, ADAM15 may represent a suitable drug target. In a preoperative scenario, ADAM15 expression measurement may assist prognosis assessment, either alone or in combination with other markers.

  1. Ataxia and peripheral nerve hypomyelination in ADAM22-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ino Mitsuhiro

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ADAM22 is a member of the ADAM gene family, but the fact that it is expressed only in the nervous systems makes it unique. ADAM22's sequence similarity to other ADAMs suggests it to be an integrin binder and thus to have a role in cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions. To elucidate the physiological functions of ADAM22, we employed gene targeting to generate ADAM22 knockout mice. Results ADAM22-deficient mice were produced in a good accordance with the Mendelian ratio and appeared normal at birth. After one week, severe ataxia was observed, and all homozygotes died before weaning, probably due to convulsions. No major histological abnormalities were detected in the cerebral cortex or cerebellum of the homozygous mutants; however, marked hypomyelination of the peripheral nerves was observed. Conclusion The results of our study demonstrate that ADAM22 is closely involved in the correct functioning of the nervous system. Further analysis of ADAM22 will provide clues to understanding the mechanisms of human diseases such as epileptic seizures and peripheral neuropathy.

  2. Differential gene expression in ADAM10 and mutant ADAM10 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postina Rolf

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease (AD, cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP by the α-secretase ADAM10 prevented amyloid plaque formation, and alleviated cognitive deficits. Furthermore, ADAM10 overexpression increased the cortical synaptogenesis. These results suggest that upregulation of ADAM10 in the brain has beneficial effects on AD pathology. Results To assess the influence of ADAM10 on the gene expression profile in the brain, we performed a microarray analysis using RNA isolated from brains of five months old mice overexpressing either the α-secretase ADAM10, or a dominant-negative mutant (dn of this enzyme. As compared to non-transgenic wild-type mice, in ADAM10 transgenic mice 355 genes, and in dnADAM10 mice 143 genes were found to be differentially expressed. A higher number of genes was differentially regulated in double-transgenic mouse strains additionally expressing the human APP[V717I] mutant. Overexpression of proteolytically active ADAM10 affected several physiological pathways, such as cell communication, nervous system development, neuron projection as well as synaptic transmission. Although ADAM10 has been implicated in Notch and β-catenin signaling, no significant changes in the respective target genes were observed in adult ADAM10 transgenic mice. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed a downregulation of genes coding for the inflammation-associated proteins S100a8 and S100a9 induced by moderate ADAM10 overexpression. Overexpression of the dominant-negative form dnADAM10 led to a significant increase in the expression of the fatty acid-binding protein Fabp7, which also has been found in higher amounts in brains of Down syndrome patients. Conclusion In general, there was only a moderate alteration of gene expression in ADAM10 overexpressing mice. Genes coding for pro-inflammatory or pro-apoptotic proteins were not over-represented among differentially regulated genes. Even a decrease of

  3. Deletion of Galgt2 (B4Galnt2) reduces muscle growth in response to acute injury and increases muscle inflammation and pathology in dystrophin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Singhal, Neha; Serinagaoglu, Yelda; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Joshi, Mandar; Bauer, John A; Janssen, Paulus M L; Martin, Paul T

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic overexpression of Galgt2 (official name B4Galnt2) in skeletal muscle stimulates the glycosylation of α dystroglycan (αDG) and the up-regulation of laminin α2 and dystrophin surrogates known to inhibit muscle pathology in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophy 1A and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Skeletal muscle Galgt2 gene expression is also normally increased in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy compared with the wild-type mice. To assess whether this increased endogenous Galgt2 expression could affect disease, we quantified muscular dystrophy measures in mdx mice deleted for Galgt2 (Galgt2(-/-)mdx). Galgt2(-/-) mdx mice had increased heart and skeletal muscle pathology and inflammation, and also worsened cardiac function, relative to age-matched mdx mice. Deletion of Galgt2 in wild-type mice also slowed skeletal muscle growth in response to acute muscle injury. In each instance where Galgt2 expression was elevated (developing muscle, regenerating muscle, and dystrophic muscle), Galgt2-dependent glycosylation of αDG was also increased. Overexpression of Galgt2 failed to inhibit skeletal muscle pathology in dystroglycan-deficient muscles, in contrast to previous studies in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles. This study demonstrates that Galgt2 gene expression and glycosylation of αDG are dynamically regulated in muscle and that endogenous Galgt2 gene expression can ameliorate the extent of muscle pathology, inflammation, and dysfunction in mdx mice. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Activation of ADAM 12 protease by copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of latent proteases to the active form occurs by various mechanisms characteristic for different protease families. Here we report that the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM 12-S is activated by Cu(II). Copper activation is distinct from the cysteine switch component of latency: elimina......Conversion of latent proteases to the active form occurs by various mechanisms characteristic for different protease families. Here we report that the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM 12-S is activated by Cu(II). Copper activation is distinct from the cysteine switch component of latency......: elimination of the ADAM 12 cysteine switch by a point mutation in the propeptide had no effect on copper activation, whereas mutation of an unpaired cysteine residue in the catalytic domain resulted in a mutant form of ADAM 12-S that was insensitive to copper. This suggests a multi-step activation mechanism...... for ADAM 12 involving both furin cleavage and copper binding....

  5. GRAF1 deficiency blunts sarcolemmal injury repair and exacerbates cardiac and skeletal muscle pathology in dystrophin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Kaitlin C; O'Neill, Thomas J; Cheng, Zhaokang; Dee, Rachel; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Li, Jianbin; Xiao, Xiao; McNally, Elizabeth M; Mack, Christopher P; Taylor, Joan M

    2015-01-01

    The plasma membranes of striated muscle cells are particularly susceptible to rupture as they endure significant mechanical stress and strain during muscle contraction, and studies have shown that defects in membrane repair can contribute to the progression of muscular dystrophy. The synaptotagmin-related protein, dysferlin, has been implicated in mediating rapid membrane repair through its ability to direct intracellular vesicles to sites of membrane injury. However, further work is required to identify the precise molecular mechanisms that govern dysferlin targeting and membrane repair. We previously showed that the bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR)-pleckstrin homology (PH) domain containing Rho-GAP GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase-1 (GRAF1) was dynamically recruited to the tips of fusing myoblasts wherein it promoted membrane merging by facilitating ferlin-dependent capturing of intracellular vesicles. Because acute membrane repair responses involve similar vesicle trafficking complexes/events and because our prior studies in GRAF1-deficient tadpoles revealed a putative role for GRAF1 in maintaining muscle membrane integrity, we postulated that GRAF1 might also play an important role in facilitating dysferlin-dependent plasma membrane repair. We used an in vitro laser-injury model to test whether GRAF1 was necessary for efficient muscle membrane repair. We also generated dystrophin/GRAF1 doubledeficient mice by breeding mdx mice with GRAF1 hypomorphic mice. Evans blue dye uptake and extensive morphometric analyses were used to assess sarcolemmal integrity and related pathologies in cardiac and skeletal muscles isolated from these mice. Herein, we show that GRAF1 is dynamically recruited to damaged skeletal and cardiac muscle plasma membranes and that GRAF1-depleted muscle cells have reduced membrane healing abilities. Moreover, we show that dystrophin depletion exacerbated muscle damage in GRAF1-deficient mice and that mice with dystrophin/GRAF1

  6. ADAM-12 stability in first trimester maternal serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowans, N J; Stamatopoulou, A; Jaakohuhta, S; Spencer, K

    2010-06-01

    Maternal serum A Disintergrin And Metaloprotease-12 (ADAM-12) has been proposed as a marker for prenatal screening of chromosomal abnormalities, pre-eclampsia and other adverse pregnancy outcomes. In this study, we examine the stability of ADAM-12 with time and at different temperatures. Maternal serum and whole blood pools were stored at 30 degrees C, room temperature and refrigerator temperature or subjected to repeated freeze-thaw cycles. ADAM-12 was measured at set time points using an automated DELFIA research assay. Using a 10% change in concentration as a limit of stability, ADAM-12 is stable in serum for less than 15 h at 30 degrees C, less than 20 h at room temperature and for 51 h at refrigerator temperature. ADAM-12 levels are not altered following three - 20 degrees C to room temperature freeze-thaw cycles. The stability of ADAM-12 in whole blood appears similar to that in serum. The findings of this study suggest that ADAM-12 may be unstable under many routine laboratory conditions, and the marker's instability may also be partly responsible for the discrepancies in the literature.

  7. Analysis of membrane proteome and secretome in cells over-expressing ADAM17 using quantitative proteomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, R.; Simabuco, F.M.; Yokoo, S.; Paes Leme, A.F.; Sherman, N.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) protease is involved in proteolytic ectodomain shedding of several membrane-associated proteins and modulation of key cell signaling pathways in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we examined the effect of over-expressing the full length human ADAM17 in membrane and secreted proteins. To this end, we constructed a stable Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cells expressing ADAM17 by tetracycline induction. These cells were grown in Dulbeccos modified Eagles medium containing light lysine, arginine or heavy, L-Arg-13C615N4 and L-Lys -13C615N2 (SILAC: stable isotope labeling with amino acid in cell culture) media and they were treated with an ADAM17 activator, phorbolester (PMA). Controls such as Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cell without PMA treatment and without ADAM17 cloned were cultivated in light medium. The ADAM17 overexpression was induced with tetracycline 500 ng/ml for 24 hours. Cells in a heavy condition were treated with PMA 50 ng/ml for 1 hour and vehicle DMSO was used as control in a light cell condition. The extracellular media were collected, concentrated and used to evaluate the secretome and a cell surface biotinylation-based approach was used to capture cell surface-associated proteins. The biotinylated proteins were eluted with dithiothreitol, alkylated with iodoacetamide and then digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis on an ETD enabled Orbitrap Velos instrument. The results showed different proteins up or down regulated in membrane and secretome analysis which might represent potential molecules involved in signaling or ADAM17 regulation events. (author)

  8. Ex vivo stretch reveals altered mechanical properties of isolated dystrophin-deficient hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Barnabei

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a progressive and fatal disease of muscle wasting caused by loss of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. In the heart, DMD results in progressive cardiomyopathy and dilation of the left ventricle through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Previous reports have shown that loss of dystrophin causes sarcolemmal instability and reduced mechanical compliance of isolated cardiac myocytes. To expand upon these findings, here we have subjected the left ventricles of dystrophin-deficient mdx hearts to mechanical stretch. Unexpectedly, isolated mdx hearts showed increased left ventricular (LV compliance compared to controls during stretch as LV volume was increased above normal end diastolic volume. During LV chamber distention, sarcomere lengths increased similarly in mdx and WT hearts despite greater excursions in volume of mdx hearts. This suggests that the mechanical properties of the intact heart cannot be modeled as a simple extrapolation of findings in single cardiac myocytes. To explain these findings, a model is proposed in which disruption of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex perturbs cell-extracellular matrix contacts and promotes the apparent slippage of myocytes past each other during LV distension. In comparison, similar increases in LV compliance were obtained in isolated hearts from β-sarcoglycan-null and laminin-α(2 mutant mice, but not in dysferlin-null mice, suggesting that increased whole-organ compliance in mdx mice is a specific effect of disrupted cell-extracellular matrix contacts and not a general consequence of cardiomyopathy via membrane defect processes. Collectively, these findings suggest a novel and cell-death independent mechanism for the progressive pathological LV dilation that occurs in DMD.

  9. Cellular roles of ADAM12 in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Couchman, John R

    2008-01-01

    and it is a potential biomarker for breast cancer. It is therefore important to understand ADAM12's functions. Many cellular roles for ADAM12 have been suggested. It is an active metalloprotease, and has been implicated in insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor signaling, through cleavage of IGF-binding proteins......, and in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways, via ectodomain shedding of membrane-tethered EGFR ligands. These proteolytic events may regulate diverse cellular responses, such as altered cell differentiation, proliferation, migration, and invasion. ADAM12 may also regulate cell-cell and cell...... to or from the cell interior. These ADAM12-mediated cellular effects appear to be critical events in both biological and pathological processes. This review presents current knowledge on ADAM12 functions gained from in vitro and in vivo observations, describes ADAM12's role in both normal physiology...

  10. Utrophin Compensates dystrophin Loss during Mouse Spermatogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hung-Chih; Chin, Yu-Feng; Lundy, David J.; Liang, Chung-Tiang; Chi, Ya-Hui; Kuo, Paolin; Hsieh, Patrick C. H.

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the dystrophin gene. The mdx/utrn ?/? mouse, lacking in both dystrophin and its autosomal homologue utrophin, is commonly used to model the clinical symptoms of DMD. Interestingly, these mice are infertile but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear. Using dystrophin deficient mdx mouse and utrophin haplodeficient mdx/utrn +/? mouse models, we demonstrate the contribution of Dp427 (f...

  11. Reduction of the disintegrin and metalloprotease ADAM12 in preeclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laigaard, Jennie; Sørensen, Tina; Placing, Sophie

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The secreted form of ADAM12 is a metalloprotease that may be involved in placental and fetal growth. We examined whether the concentration of ADAM12 in first-trimester maternal serum could be used as a marker for preeclampsia. METHODS: We developed a semiautomated, time-resolved, immu......OBJECTIVES: The secreted form of ADAM12 is a metalloprotease that may be involved in placental and fetal growth. We examined whether the concentration of ADAM12 in first-trimester maternal serum could be used as a marker for preeclampsia. METHODS: We developed a semiautomated, time......-resolved, immunofluorometric assay for the quantification of ADAM12 in serum. The assay detected ADAM12 in a range of 78-1248 microg/L. Serum samples derived from women in the first trimester of a normal pregnancy (n = 324) and from women who later developed preeclampsia during pregnancy (n = 160) were obtained from the First...... Trimester Copenhagen Study. ADAM12 levels were assayed in these serum samples. Serum levels of ADAM12 were converted to multiples of the median (MoM) after log-linear regression of concentration versus gestational age. RESULTS: Serum ADAM12 levels in women who developed preeclampsia during pregnancy had...

  12. Role of dystrophin in airway smooth muscle phenotype, contraction and lung function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Sharma

    Full Text Available Dystrophin links the transmembrane dystrophin-glycoprotein complex to the actin cytoskeleton. We have shown that dystrophin-glycoprotein complex subunits are markers for airway smooth muscle phenotype maturation and together with caveolin-1, play an important role in calcium homeostasis. We tested if dystrophin affects phenotype maturation, tracheal contraction and lung physiology. We used dystrophin deficient Golden Retriever dogs (GRMD and mdx mice vs healthy control animals in our approach. We found significant reduction of contractile protein markers: smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC and calponin and reduced Ca2+ response to contractile agonist in dystrophin deficient cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed reduced stress fibers and number of smMHC positive cells in dystrophin-deficient cells, when compared to control. Immunoblot analysis of Akt1, GSK3β and mTOR phosphorylation further revealed that downstream PI3K signaling, which is essential for phenotype maturation, was suppressed in dystrophin deficient cell cultures. Tracheal rings from mdx mice showed significant reduction in the isometric contraction to methacholine (MCh when compared to genetic control BL10ScSnJ mice (wild-type. In vivo lung function studies using a small animal ventilator revealed a significant reduction in peak airway resistance induced by maximum concentrations of inhaled MCh in mdx mice, while there was no change in other lung function parameters. These data show that the lack of dystrophin is associated with a concomitant suppression of ASM cell phenotype maturation in vitro, ASM contraction ex vivo and lung function in vivo, indicating that a linkage between the DGC and the actin cytoskeleton via dystrophin is a determinant of the phenotype and functional properties of ASM.

  13. Aberrant location of inhibitory synaptic marker proteins in the hippocampus of dystrophin-deficient mice: implications for cognitive impairment in duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Krasowska

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a neuromuscular disease that arises from mutations in the dystrophin-encoding gene. Apart from muscle pathology, cognitive impairment, primarily of developmental origin, is also a significant component of the disorder. Convergent lines of evidence point to an important role for dystrophin in regulating the molecular machinery of central synapses. The clustering of neurotransmitter receptors at inhibitory synapses, thus impacting on synaptic transmission, is of particular significance. However, less is known about the role of dystrophin in influencing the precise expression patterns of proteins located within the pre- and postsynaptic elements of inhibitory synapses. To this end, we exploited molecular markers of inhibitory synapses, interneurons and dystrophin-deficient mouse models to explore the role of dystrophin in determining the stereotypical patterning of inhibitory connectivity within the cellular networks of the hippocampus CA1 region. In tissue from wild-type (WT mice, immunoreactivity of neuroligin2 (NL2, an adhesion molecule expressed exclusively in postsynaptic elements of inhibitory synapses, and the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT, a marker of GABAergic presynaptic elements, were predictably enriched in strata pyramidale and lacunosum moleculare. In acute contrast, NL2 and VGAT immunoreactivity was relatively evenly distributed across all CA1 layers in dystrophin-deficient mice. Similar changes were evident with the cannabinoid receptor 1, vesicular glutamate transporter 3, parvalbumin, somatostatin and the GABAA receptor alpha1 subunit. The data show that in the absence of dystrophin, there is a rearrangement of the molecular machinery, which underlies the precise spatio-temporal pattern of GABAergic synaptic transmission within the CA1 sub-field of the hippocampus.

  14. Over-expression of two different forms of the alpha-secretase ADAM10 affects learning and memory in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ulrich; Hiemke, Christoph; Fahrenholz, Falk; Schroeder, Anja

    2006-12-15

    Members of the ADAM family (adisintegrin and metalloprotease) are the main candidates for physiologically relevant alpha-secretases. The alpha-secretase cleaves in the non-amyloidogenic pathway the amyloid precursor protein within the region of the Abeta peptides preventing their aggregation in the brain. The increase of alpha-secretase activity in the brain provides a plausible strategy to prevent Abeta formation. Concerning this possibility two transgenic mouse lines (FVB/N) have been created: mice over-expressing the bovine form of the alpha-secretase (ADAM10) and mice over-expressing an inactive form of the alpha-secretase (ADAM10-E348A-HA; ADAM10-dn). For behavioral examination a F1 generation of transgenic mice (C57Bl/6 x FVB/N (tg)) was generated and compared to wild type F1 generation (C57Bl/6 x FVB/N). Behavior was characterized in the following tasks: standard open field, enriched open field, elevated plus-maze, and the Morris water maze hidden platform task. Concerning basal activity, exploration, and anxiety, transgenic mice behaved similar to controls. With respect to learning and memory both transgenic lines showed a significant deficit compared to controls. ADAM10 mice however, showed thigmotaxis with passive floating behavior in the Morris water maze indicating differences in motivation, whereas, ADAM10-dn mice displayed an inconspicuous but limited goal-directed search pattern. Thus variation of the enzymatic activity of alpha-secretase ADAM10 alters learning and memory differentially. Nevertheless, it could be concluded that both, ADAM10 and ADAM10-dn mice are suitable control mice for the assessment of alpha-secretase-related effects in animal models of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Molecular profiling of ADAM12 in human bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Reidar; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Rudkjaer, Lise

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have previously found ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloprotease, to be an interesting biomarker for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the gene and protein expression profiles of ADAM12 in different grades and stages of bladder cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: ADAM12...... gene expression was evaluated in tumors from 96 patients with bladder cancer using a customized Affymetrix GeneChip. Gene expression in bladder cancer was validated using reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization. Protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical...... staining on tissue arrays of bladder cancers. The presence and relative amount of ADAM12 in the urine of cancer patients were determined by Western blotting and densitometric measurements, respectively. RESULTS: ADAM12 mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated in bladder cancer, as determined...

  16. Fetal skeletal muscle progenitors have regenerative capacity after intramuscular engraftment in dystrophin deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sakai

    Full Text Available Muscle satellite cells (SCs are stem cells that reside in skeletal muscles and contribute to regeneration upon muscle injury. SCs arise from skeletal muscle progenitors expressing transcription factors Pax3 and/or Pax7 during embryogenesis in mice. However, it is unclear whether these fetal progenitors possess regenerative ability when transplanted in adult muscle. Here we address this question by investigating whether fetal skeletal muscle progenitors (FMPs isolated from Pax3(GFP/+ embryos have the capacity to regenerate muscle after engraftment into Dystrophin-deficient mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The capacity of FMPs to engraft and enter the myogenic program in regenerating muscle was compared with that of SCs derived from adult Pax3(GFP/+ mice. Transplanted FMPs contributed to the reconstitution of damaged myofibers in Dystrophin-deficient mice. However, despite FMPs and SCs having similar myogenic ability in culture, the regenerative ability of FMPs was less than that of SCs in vivo. FMPs that had activated MyoD engrafted more efficiently to regenerate myofibers than MyoD-negative FMPs. Transcriptome and surface marker analyses of these cells suggest the importance of myogenic priming for the efficient myogenic engraftment. Our findings suggest the regenerative capability of FMPs in the context of muscle repair and cell therapy for degenerative muscle disease.

  17. Motor physical therapy affects muscle collagen type I and decreases gait speed in dystrophin-deficient dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís P Gaiad

    Full Text Available Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD is a dystrophin-deficient canine model genetically homologous to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD in humans. Muscular fibrosis secondary to cycles of degeneration/regeneration of dystrophic muscle tissue and muscular weakness leads to biomechanical adaptation that impairs the quality of gait. Physical therapy (PT is one of the supportive therapies available for DMD, however, motor PT approaches have controversial recommendations and there is no consensus regarding the type and intensity of physical therapy. In this study we investigated the effect of physical therapy on gait biomechanics and muscular collagen deposition types I and III in dystrophin-deficient dogs. Two dystrophic dogs (treated dogs-TD underwent a PT protocol of active walking exercise, 3×/week, 40 minutes/day, 12 weeks. Two dystrophic control dogs (CD maintained their routine of activities of daily living. At t0 (pre and t1 (post-physical therapy, collagen type I and III were assessed by immunohistochemistry and gait biomechanics were analyzed. Angular displacement of shoulder, elbow, carpal, hip, stifle and tarsal joint and vertical (Fy, mediolateral (Fz and craniocaudal (Fx ground reaction forces (GRF were assessed. Wilcoxon test was used to verify the difference of biomechanical variables between t0 and t1, considering p<.05. Type I collagen of endomysium suffered the influence of PT, as well as gait speed that had decreased from t0 to t1 (p<.000. The PT protocol employed accelerates morphological alterations on dystrophic muscle and promotes a slower velocity of gait. Control dogs which maintained their routine of activities of daily living seem to have found a better balance between movement and preservation of motor function.

  18. Motor Physical Therapy Affects Muscle Collagen Type I and Decreases Gait Speed in Dystrophin-Deficient Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiad, Thaís P.; Araujo, Karla P. C.; Serrão, Júlio C.; Miglino, Maria A.; Ambrósio, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) is a dystrophin-deficient canine model genetically homologous to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in humans. Muscular fibrosis secondary to cycles of degeneration/regeneration of dystrophic muscle tissue and muscular weakness leads to biomechanical adaptation that impairs the quality of gait. Physical therapy (PT) is one of the supportive therapies available for DMD, however, motor PT approaches have controversial recommendations and there is no consensus regarding the type and intensity of physical therapy. In this study we investigated the effect of physical therapy on gait biomechanics and muscular collagen deposition types I and III in dystrophin-deficient dogs. Two dystrophic dogs (treated dogs-TD) underwent a PT protocol of active walking exercise, 3×/week, 40 minutes/day, 12 weeks. Two dystrophic control dogs (CD) maintained their routine of activities of daily living. At t0 (pre) and t1 (post-physical therapy), collagen type I and III were assessed by immunohistochemistry and gait biomechanics were analyzed. Angular displacement of shoulder, elbow, carpal, hip, stifle and tarsal joint and vertical (Fy), mediolateral (Fz) and craniocaudal (Fx) ground reaction forces (GRF) were assessed. Wilcoxon test was used to verify the difference of biomechanical variables between t0 and t1, considering p<.05. Type I collagen of endomysium suffered the influence of PT, as well as gait speed that had decreased from t0 to t1 (p<.000). The PT protocol employed accelerates morphological alterations on dystrophic muscle and promotes a slower velocity of gait. Control dogs which maintained their routine of activities of daily living seem to have found a better balance between movement and preservation of motor function. PMID:24713872

  19. Catalytic properties of ADAM12 and its domain deletion mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Visse, Robert; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2008-01-01

    of pro, catalytic, disintegrin, cysteine-rich, and EGF domains. Here we present a novel activity of recombinant ADAM12-S and its domain deletion mutants on S-carboxymethylated transferrin (Cm-Tf). Cleavage of Cm-Tf occurred at multiple sites, and N-terminal sequencing showed that the enzyme exhibits...... restricted specificity but a consensus sequence could not be defined as its subsite requirements are promiscuous. Kinetic analysis revealed that the noncatalytic C-terminal domains are important regulators of Cm-Tf activity and that ADAM12-PC consisting of the pro domain and catalytic domain is the most...... active on this substrate. It was also observed that NaCl inhibits ADAM12. Among the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP) examined, the N-terminal domain of TIMP-3 (N-TIMP-3) inhibits ADAM12-S and ADAM12-PC with low nanomolar Ki(app) values while TIMP-2 inhibits them with a slightly lower...

  20. Molecular profiling of ADAM12 in human bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Reidar; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Rudkjaer, Lise

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have previously found ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloprotease, to be an interesting biomarker for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the gene and protein expression profiles of ADAM12 in different grades and stages of bladder cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: ADAM12...... gene expression was evaluated in tumors from 96 patients with bladder cancer using a customized Affymetrix GeneChip. Gene expression in bladder cancer was validated using reverse transcription-PCR, quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization. Protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical...

  1. Human ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) is an active metalloprotease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Gilpin, B J; Engvall, E

    1998-01-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) are a family of multidomain proteins with structural homology to snake venom metalloproteases. We recently described the cloning and sequencing of human ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha). In this report we provide evidence that the metalloprotease domain of ADAM...

  2. Marginal level dystrophin expression improves clinical outcome in a strain of dystrophin/utrophin double knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejia Li

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of all utrophin isoforms in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice results in a strain of utrophin knockout mdx (uko/mdx mice. Uko/mdx mice display severe clinical symptoms and die prematurely as in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD patients. Here we tested the hypothesis that marginal level dystrophin expression may improve the clinical outcome of uko/mdx mice. It is well established that mdx3cv (3cv mice express a near-full length dystrophin protein at ∼5% of the normal level. We crossed utrophin-null mutation to the 3cv background. The resulting uko/3cv mice expressed the same level of dystrophin as 3cv mice but utrophin expression was completely eliminated. Surprisingly, uko/3cv mice showed a much milder phenotype. Compared to uko/mdx mice, uko/3cv mice had significantly higher body weight and stronger specific muscle force. Most importantly, uko/3cv outlived uko/mdx mice by several folds. Our results suggest that a threshold level dystrophin expression may provide vital clinical support in a severely affected DMD mouse model. This finding may hold clinical implications in developing novel DMD therapies.

  3. Defects in mitochondrial ATP synthesis in dystrophin-deficient mdx skeletal muscles may be caused by complex I insufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Rybalka

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is a chronic, progressive and ultimately fatal skeletal muscle wasting disease characterised by sarcolemmal fragility and intracellular Ca2+ dysregulation secondary to the absence of dystrophin. Mounting literature also suggests that the dysfunction of key energy systems within the muscle may contribute to pathological muscle wasting by reducing ATP availability to Ca2+ regulation and fibre regeneration. No study to date has biochemically quantified and contrasted mitochondrial ATP production capacity by dystrophic mitochondria isolated from their pathophysiological environment such to determine whether mitochondria are indeed capable of meeting this heightened cellular ATP demand, or examined the effects of an increasing extramitochondrial Ca2+ environment. Using isolated mitochondria from the diaphragm and tibialis anterior of 12 week-old dystrophin-deficient mdx and healthy control mice (C57BL10/ScSn we have demonstrated severely depressed Complex I-mediated mitochondrial ATP production rate in mdx mitochondria that occurs irrespective of the macronutrient-derivative substrate combination fed into the Kreb's cycle, and, which is partially, but significantly, ameliorated by inhibition of Complex I with rotenone and stimulation of Complex II-mediated ATP-production with succinate. There was no difference in the MAPR response of mdx mitochondria to increasing extramitochondrial Ca2+ load in comparison to controls, and 400 nM extramitochondrial Ca2+ was generally shown to be inhibitory to MAPR in both groups. Our data suggests that DMD pathology is exacerbated by a Complex I deficiency, which may contribute in part to the severe reductions in ATP production previously observed in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

  4. Trafficking of human ADAM 12-L: retention in the trans-Golgi network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Loechel, F; Xu, X

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the trafficking of the membrane-anchored form of human ADAM 12 (ADAM 12-L) fused to a green fluorescence protein tag. Subcellular localization of the protein in transiently transfected cells was determined by fluorescence microscopy and trypsin sensitivity. Full-length ADAM 12...... the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains, but not the Src homology 3 domain (SH3) binding sites. These results raise the possibility that a trafficking checkpoint in the trans-Golgi network is one of the cellular mechanisms for regulation of ADAM 12-L function, by allowing a rapid release of ADAM 12-L...

  5. Dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes derived from human urine: New biologic reagents for drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Guan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to extract somatic cells from a patient and reprogram them to pluripotency opens up new possibilities for personalized medicine. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have been employed to generate beating cardiomyocytes from a patient's skin or blood cells. Here, iPSC methods were used to generate cardiomyocytes starting from the urine of a patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Urine was chosen as a starting material because it contains adult stem cells called urine-derived stem cells (USCs. USCs express the canonical reprogramming factors c-myc and klf4, and possess high telomerase activity. Pluripotency of urine-derived iPSC clones was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and teratoma formation. Urine-derived iPSC clones generated from healthy volunteers and a DMD patient were differentiated into beating cardiomyocytes using a series of small molecules in monolayer culture. Results indicate that cardiomyocytes retain the DMD patient's dystrophin mutation. Physiological assays suggest that dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes possess phenotypic differences from normal cardiomyocytes. These results demonstrate the feasibility of generating cardiomyocytes from a urine sample and that urine-derived cardiomyocytes retain characteristic features that might be further exploited for mechanistic studies and drug discovery.

  6. ADAM 12 cleaves extracellular matrix proteins and correlates with cancer status and stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Roopali; Wewer, Ulla M; Zurakowski, David

    2004-01-01

    -Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Four peptides were identified that spanned the amino acid sequence of ADAM 12. Immunoblot analysis using ADAM 12-specific antibodies detected an approximately 68-k......Da band identified as the mature form of ADAM 12. To characterize catalytic properties of ADAM 12, full-length ADAM 12-S was expressed in COS-7 cells and purified. Substrate specificity studies demonstrated that ADAM 12-S degrades gelatin, type IV collagen, and fibronectin but not type I collagen...... or casein. Gelatinase activity of ADAM 12 was completely abrogated by zinc chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA and was partially inhibited by the hydroxamate inhibitor Marimastat. Endogenous matrix metalloprotease inhibitor TIMP-3 inhibited activity. To validate our initial identification of this enzyme...

  7. Cell-surface metalloprotease ADAM12 is internalized by a clathrin- and Grb2-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Stautz; Leyme, Anthony; Grandal, Michael Vibo

    2012-01-01

    ADAM12 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 12), a member of the ADAMs family of transmembrane proteins, is involved in ectodomain shedding, cell-adhesion and signaling, with important implications in cancer. Therefore, mechanisms that regulate the levels and activity of ADAM12 at the cell-surface ......ADAM12 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 12), a member of the ADAMs family of transmembrane proteins, is involved in ectodomain shedding, cell-adhesion and signaling, with important implications in cancer. Therefore, mechanisms that regulate the levels and activity of ADAM12 at the cell...

  8. ADAM12: a novel first-trimester maternal serum marker for Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laigaard, Jennie; Sørensen, Tina; Fröhlich, Camilla

    2003-01-01

    levels decrease markedly during pregnancy. ADAM12 (A disintegrin and metalloprotease) is an IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 protease and is present in human pregnancy serum. The goal of this study was to determine whether ADAM12 concentration in maternal serum is a useful indicator of foetal health. METHODS: We......OBJECTIVES: The concentration of bioavailable insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I and II is important to foetal growth. It is regulated by insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) 1 through 6. Proteolytic cleavage of IGFBP-3 takes place in human pregnancy serum; accordingly, IGFBP-3 serum...... developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of ADAM12 in serum. The assay range was 42 to 667 micro g/L. Recombinant ADAM12 was used as the standard for calibration. RESULTS: We found that ADAM12 was highly stable in serum. Serum concentration increased from 180 micro g...

  9. A duchenne muscular dystrophy gene hot spot mutation in dystrophin-deficient cavalier king charles spaniels is amenable to exon 51 skipping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma L Walmsley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, which afflicts 1 in 3500 boys, is one of the most common genetic disorders of children. This fatal degenerative condition is caused by an absence or deficiency of dystrophin in striated muscle. Most affected patients have inherited or spontaneous deletions in the dystrophin gene that disrupt the reading frame resulting in unstable truncated products. For these patients, restoration of the reading frame via antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach. The major DMD deletion "hot spot" is found between exons 45 and 53, and skipping exon 51 in particular is predicted to ameliorate the dystrophic phenotype in the greatest number of patients. Currently the mdx mouse is the most widely used animal model of DMD, although its mild phenotype limits its suitability in clinical trials. The Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD model has a severe phenotype, but due to its large size, is expensive to use. Both these models have mutations in regions of the dystrophin gene distant from the commonly mutated DMD "hot spot".Here we describe the severe phenotype, histopathological findings, and molecular analysis of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy (CKCS-MD. The dogs harbour a missense mutation in the 5' donor splice site of exon 50 that results in deletion of exon 50 in mRNA transcripts and a predicted premature truncation of the translated protein. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated skipping of exon 51 in cultured myoblasts from an affected dog restored the reading frame and protein expression.Given the small size of the breed, the amiable temperament and the nature of the mutation, we propose that CKCS-MD is a valuable new model for clinical trials of antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping and other therapeutic approaches for DMD.

  10. The proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole improves the skeletal phenotype in dystrophin deficient mdx mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpana Sali

    Full Text Available In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, loss of the membrane stabilizing protein dystrophin results in myofiber damage. Microinjury to dystrophic myofibers also causes secondary imbalances in sarcolemmic ion permeability and resting membrane potential, which modifies excitation-contraction coupling and increases proinflammatory/apoptotic signaling cascades. Although glucocorticoids remain the standard of care for the treatment of DMD, there is a need to investigate the efficacy of other pharmacological agents targeting the involvement of imbalances in ion flux on dystrophic pathology.We designed a preclinical trial to investigate the effects of lansoprazole (LANZO administration, a proton pump inhibitor, on the dystrophic muscle phenotype in dystrophin deficient (mdx mice. Eight to ten week-old female mice were assigned to one of four treatment groups (n = 12 per group: (1 vehicle control; (2 5 mg/kg/day LANZO; (3 5 mg/kg/day prednisolone; and (4 combined treatment of 5 mg/kg/day prednisolone (PRED and 5 mg/kg/day LANZO. Treatment was administered orally 5 d/wk for 3 months. At the end of the study, behavioral (Digiscan and functional outcomes (grip strength and Rotarod were assessed prior to sacrifice. After sacrifice, body, tissue and organ masses, muscle histology, in vitro muscle force, and creatine kinase levels were measured. Mice in the combined treatment groups displayed significant reductions in the number of degenerating muscle fibers and number of inflammatory foci per muscle field relative to vehicle control. Additionally, mice in the combined treatment group displayed less of a decline in normalized forelimb and hindlimb grip strength and declines in in vitro EDL force after repeated eccentric contractions.Together our findings suggest that combined treatment of LANZO and prednisolone attenuates some components of dystrophic pathology in mdx mice. Our findings warrant future investigation of the clinical efficacy of LANZO and

  11. ADAM15 expression is downregulated in melanoma metastasis compared to primary melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungerer, Christopher; Doberstein, Kai; Buerger, Claudia; Hardt, Katja; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Boehm, Beate; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Dummer, Reinhard; Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Gutwein, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Strong ADAM15 expression is found in normal melanocytes. → ADAM15 expression is significantly downregulated in patients with melanoma metastasis. → TGF-β can downregulate ADAM15 expression in melanoma cells. → Overexpression of ADAM15 in melanoma cells inhibits migration, proliferation and invasion of melanoma cells. → Conclusion: ADAM15 represents an tumor suppressor protein in melanoma. -- Abstract: In a mouse melanoma metastasis model it has been recently shown that ADAM15 overexpression in melanoma cells significantly reduced the number of metastatic nodules on the lung. Unfortunately, the expression of ADAM15 in human melanoma tissue has not been determined so far. In our study, we characterized the expression of ADAM15 in tissue micro-arrays of patients with primary melanoma with melanoma metastasis. ADAM15 was expressed in melanocytes and endothelial cells of benign nevi and melanoma tissue. Importantly, ADAM15 was significantly downregulated in melanoma metastasis compared to primary melanoma. We further demonstrate that IFN-γ and TGF-β downregulate ADAM15 protein levels in melanoma cells. To investigate the role of ADAM15 in melanoma progression, we overexpressed ADAM15 in melanoma cells. Importantly, overexpression of ADAM15 in melanoma cells reduced the migration, invasion and the anchorage dependent and independent cell growth of melanoma cells. In summary, the downregulation of ADAM15 plays an important role in melanoma progression and ADAM15 act as a tumorsuppressor in melanoma.

  12. ADAM15 expression is downregulated in melanoma metastasis compared to primary melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungerer, Christopher; Doberstein, Kai [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, University Hospital Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Buerger, Claudia; Hardt, Katja; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning [Department of Dermatology, Clinic of the Goethe-University, Theodor-Stern-Kai, Frankfurt (Germany); Boehm, Beate [Division of Rheumatology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Pfeilschifter, Josef [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, University Hospital Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Dummer, Reinhard [Department of Pathology, Institute of Surgical Pathology, University Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Mihic-Probst, Daniela [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Gutwein, Paul, E-mail: p.gutwein@med.uni-frankfurt.de [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, University Hospital Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Strong ADAM15 expression is found in normal melanocytes. {yields} ADAM15 expression is significantly downregulated in patients with melanoma metastasis. {yields} TGF-{beta} can downregulate ADAM15 expression in melanoma cells. {yields} Overexpression of ADAM15 in melanoma cells inhibits migration, proliferation and invasion of melanoma cells. {yields} Conclusion: ADAM15 represents an tumor suppressor protein in melanoma. -- Abstract: In a mouse melanoma metastasis model it has been recently shown that ADAM15 overexpression in melanoma cells significantly reduced the number of metastatic nodules on the lung. Unfortunately, the expression of ADAM15 in human melanoma tissue has not been determined so far. In our study, we characterized the expression of ADAM15 in tissue micro-arrays of patients with primary melanoma with melanoma metastasis. ADAM15 was expressed in melanocytes and endothelial cells of benign nevi and melanoma tissue. Importantly, ADAM15 was significantly downregulated in melanoma metastasis compared to primary melanoma. We further demonstrate that IFN-{gamma} and TGF-{beta} downregulate ADAM15 protein levels in melanoma cells. To investigate the role of ADAM15 in melanoma progression, we overexpressed ADAM15 in melanoma cells. Importantly, overexpression of ADAM15 in melanoma cells reduced the migration, invasion and the anchorage dependent and independent cell growth of melanoma cells. In summary, the downregulation of ADAM15 plays an important role in melanoma progression and ADAM15 act as a tumorsuppressor in melanoma.

  13. EMMPRIN and ADAM12 in prostate cancer: preliminary results of a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin Doğru, Elif; Dizdar, Yavuz; Akşit, Ece; Ural, Feyyaz; Şanlı, Öner; Yasasever, Vildan

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM12) play a major role in cancer invasion and metastasis owing to the fact that they are directly related to the cell microenvironment and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. The aim of this study was to search for an answer to the question "whether the determination of EMMPRIN and ADAM12 values especially in urine may be helpful for the early diagnosis of prostate cancer without employing invasive methods" and also to check whether they may be useful for the determination of the patients with high metastasis risk. Peripheral blood and urine from 66 prostate cancer patients (40 local, 20 locally advanced, 6 metastatic) and 14 healthy controls were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Serum EMMPRIN and ADAM12 values of the patients were seen to be statistically higher than the serum EMMPRIN and ADAM12 values of the healthy controls (p=0.01 and p=0.001, respectively). The urine ADAM12 levels were significantly higher in patients (p=0.013). No significant relationships were found between urine EMMPRIN values of the patients and the healthy controls (p>0.05). Positive correlation between urine EMMPRIN-urine ADAM12 tests was found in total patients group (r=0.683, p=0.001). Our preliminary results revealed that serum EMMPRIN and ADAM12 values and urine ADAM12 values may be useful markers in prostate cancer therapy. Due to the high correlation between these two tests, we are of the opinion that the use of urine ADAM12 in clinic may be sufficient and favorable together with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for treatment.

  14. ADAM12 and alpha9beta1 integrin are instrumental in human myogenic cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafuste, Peggy; Sonnet, Corinne; Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2005-01-01

    of alpha9 parallels that of ADAM12 and culminates at time of fusion. alpha9 and ADAM12 coimmunoprecipitate and participate to mpc adhesion. Inhibition of ADAM12/alpha9beta1 integrin interplay, by either ADAM12 antisense oligonucleotides or blocking antibody to alpha9beta1, inhibited overall mpc fusion...

  15. Increased susceptibility of dystrophin-deficient brain to mild hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallis, T.; Rae, C.; Bubb, W.A.; Head, S.I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked disorder resulting from total absence of the 427 kDa protein dystrophin. Dystrophin is normally expressed in the brain mainly in a neuronal subpopulation: cortical pyramidal cells, hippocampal CA1 neurons and cerebellar Purkinje cells. One suggested role for dystrophin is in colocalising mitochondrial creatine kinase with ADP translocase and ATP synthase in mitochondria. Brain tissue slices in the murine model of Duchenne dystrophy, the mdx mouse, have been shown to be more sensitive to hypoxia than control. In this work, we used 13 C NMR to monitor the metabolic response of mdx cortical brain tissue slices to normoxia (95%O 2 /5% CO 2 ) and mild hypoxia (95%air/5% CO 2 ). Under normoxic conditions, mdx cortical slices displayed increased net flux through the Krebs cycle and glutamate/glutamine cycle, consistent with the proposed GABA A lesion which results in decreased inhibitory input. By contrast, mild hypoxia resulted in a significant increase in the total pool size of lactate and decreased net flux of 13 C from [3- 13 C]pyruvate into glutamate C4, GABA C2 and Ala C2, as well as decreased anaplerotic activity as measured by the ratio of Asp C2: Asp C3 label. Mild hypoxia has a significantly greater effect on brain oxidative metabolism in mdx mice, than in control

  16. ADAM 12-S cleaves IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 and is inhibited by TIMP-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Fox, J W; Murphy, G

    2000-01-01

    that it cleaves insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3). This result supports a role for ADAM 12-S in the degradation of IGFBP-3 in the blood of pregnant women. Furthermore, we tested for proteolysis of other members of the IGF binding protein family and found that ADAM 12-S cleaves IGFBP-5......ADAMs are a family of multidomain proteins having proteolytic and cell adhesion activities. We have previously shown that ADAM 12-S, the secreted soluble form of human ADAM 12, is a catalytically active protease. We now describe the purification of full-length recombinant ADAM 12-S and demonstrate...

  17. In silico investigation of ADAM12 effect on TGF-β receptors trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeMeur Nolwenn

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transforming growth factor beta is known to have pleiotropic effects, including differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. However the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. The regulation and effect of TGF-β signaling is complex and highly depends on specific protein context. In liver, we have recently showed that the disintegrin and metalloproteinase ADAM12 interacts with TGF-β receptors and modulates their trafficking among membranes, a crucial point in TGF-β signaling and development of fibrosis. The present study aims to better understand how ADAM12 impacts on TGF-β receptors trafficking and TGF-β signaling. Findings We extracted qualitative biological observations from experimental data and defined a family of models producing a behavior compatible with the presence of ADAM12. We computationally explored the properties of this family of models which allowed us to make novel predictions. We predict that ADAM12 increases TGF-β receptors internalization rate between the cell surface and the endosomal membrane. It also appears that ADAM12 modifies TGF-β signaling shape favoring a permanent response by removing the transient component observed under physiological conditions. Conclusion In this work, confronting differential models with qualitative biological observations, we obtained predictions giving new insights into the role of ADAM12 in TGF-β signaling and hepatic fibrosis process.

  18. Voluntary wheel running in dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice: Relationships between exercise parameters and exacerbation of the dystrophic phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Smythe, Gayle M; White, Jason D

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running can potentially be used to exacerbate the disease phenotype in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. While it has been established that voluntary wheel running is highly variable between individuals, the key parameters of wheel running that impact the most on muscle pathology have not been examined in detail. We conducted a 2-week test of voluntary wheel running by mdx mice and the impact of wheel running on disease pathology. There was significant individual variation in the...

  19. ADAM 12 as a second-trimester maternal serum marker in screening for Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Michael; Spencer, Kevin; Laigaard, Jennie

    2007-01-01

    ADAM 12 is a placenta-derived glycoprotein that is involved in growth and differentiation. The maternal serum concentration of ADAM 12 is a potential first-trimester maternal serum marker of Down syndrome (DS). Here we examine the potential of ADAM 12 as a second-trimester maternal serum marker...

  20. Clinical and genetic characterisation of dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy in a family of Miniature Poodle dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Sánchez

    Full Text Available Four full-sibling intact male Miniature Poodles were evaluated at 4-19 months of age. One was clinically normal and three were affected. All affected dogs were reluctant to exercise and had generalised muscle atrophy, a stiff gait and a markedly elevated serum creatine kinase activity. Two affected dogs also showed poor development, learning difficulties and episodes of abnormal behaviour. In these two dogs, investigations into forebrain structural and metabolic diseases were unremarkable; electromyography demonstrated fibrillation potentials and complex repetitive discharges in the infraspinatus, supraspinatus and epaxial muscles. Histopathological, immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses of muscle biopsies were consistent with dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy. DNA samples were obtained from all four full-sibling male Poodles, a healthy female littermate and the dam, which was clinically normal. Whole genome sequencing of one affected dog revealed a >5 Mb deletion on the X chromosome, encompassing the entire DMD gene. The exact deletion breakpoints could not be experimentally ascertained, but we confirmed that this region was deleted in all affected males, but not in the unaffected dogs. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed all three affected males were hemizygous for the mutant X chromosome, while the wildtype chromosome was observed in the unaffected male littermate. The female littermate and the dam were both heterozygous for the mutant chromosome. Forty-four Miniature Poodles from the general population were screened for the mutation and were homozygous for the wildtype chromosome. The finding represents a naturally-occurring mutation causing dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy in the dog.

  1. Targeting ADAM12 in human disease: head, body or tail?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, J; Wewer, U M

    2009-01-01

    ) and insulin-like growth factor receptor signaling. The body of the protein (consisting of the disintegrin, cysteine-rich, and EGF-like domains) is involved in contacts with the extracellular matrix and other cells through interactions with integrins and syndecans. Finally, the tail of the protein (consisting......ADAM12/meltrin alpha is a type I transmembrane multidomain protein involved in tumor progression and other severe diseases, including osteoarthritis, and as such could be considered as a potential drug target. In addition to protease activity, ADAM12 possesses cell binding and cell signaling...... properties. This functional trinity is reflected in the structure of ADAM12, which can be divided into head, body, and tail. The head of the protein (consisting of the pro and catalytic domains) mediates processing of growth factors and cytokines and has been implicated in epidermal growth factor (EGF...

  2. Hierarchy of ADAM12 binding to integrins in tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Fröhlich, Camilla; Nielsen, Christian Kamp

    2005-01-01

    ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) comprise a family of cell surface proteins with protease and cell-binding activities. Using different forms and fragments of ADAM12 as substrates in cell adhesion and spreading assays, we demonstrated that alpha9beta1 integrin is the main receptor for ADA...

  3. Carrier detection of duchenne and becker muscular dystrophy using muscle dystrophin immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acary S. Bulle Oliveira

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available To ascertain whether dystrophin immunohistochemistry could improve DMD/ BMD carrier detection, we analyzed 14 muscle biopsies from 13 DMD and one BMD probable and possible carriers. All women were also evaluated using conventional methods, including genetic analysis, clinical and neurological evaluation, serum CK levels, KMG, and muscle biopsy. In 6 cases, there was a mosaic of dystrophin-positive and dystrophin-deficient fibers that allowed to make the diagnosis of a carrier state. Comparing dystrophin immunohistochemistry to the traditional methods, it was noted that this method is less sensitive than serum CK measuremens, but is more sensitive than EMG and muscle biopsy. The use of dystrophin immunohistochemistry in addition to CK, EMG and muscle biopsy improved the accuracy of carrier detection. This method is also helpful to distinguish manifesting DMD carriers from patients with other neuromuscular diseases like limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy.

  4. Selective inhibition of ADAM12 catalytic activity through engineering of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Jacobsen, Jonas; Lee, Meng-Huee

    2010-01-01

    activity may be of great value therapeutically and as an investigative tool to elucidate its mechanisms of action. We have previously reported the inhibitory profile of TIMPs (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases) against ADAM12, demonstrating in addition to TIMP-3, a unique ADAM-inhibitory activity...... activity of TIMPs against the transmembrane ADAM12-L (full-length ADAM12), verifying the distinctive inhibitory abilities of N-TIMP-2 and engineered N-TIMP-2 mutants in a cellular environment. Taken together, our findings support the idea that a distinctive ADAM12 inhibitor with future therapeutic...

  5. ADAM12 in human liver cancers: TGF-beta-regulated expression in stellate cells is associated with matrix remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Pabic, Hélène; Bonnier, Dominique; Wewer, Ulla M

    2003-01-01

    "A disintegrin and metalloproteinases" (ADAMs) form a family of cell-surface glycoproteins with potential protease and cell-adhesion activities. We have investigated ADAM expression in human liver cancers and their regulation by several cytokines involved in liver injury. Using degenerative RT...... carcinomas (up to 3- and 6-fold, respectively) and liver metastases from colonic carcinomas (up to 40- and 60-fold, respectively). The up-regulation of both ADAM9 and ADAM12 was correlated with an increase in matrix metalloproteinase 2 expression and activity. In conclusion, in liver cancers ADAM9 and ADAM12......-PCR, cDNA encoding sequences for ADAM9 and ADAM12 were identified in human activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Northern blot analyses showed that HSCs, but not hepatocytes, expressed transcripts for ADAM9 messenger RNA (mRNA) and both the long and short forms of ADAM12. This expression...

  6. ADAM12 redistributes and activates MMP-14, resulting in gelatin degradation, reduced apoptosis and increased tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kveiborg, Marie; Hansen, Dorte Stautz

    2013-01-01

    that there is a positive correlation between MMP-14 and ADAM12 expression in human breast cancer. We demonstrated that in 293-VnR and human breast cancer cells expressing ADAM12 at the cell surface, endogenous MMP-14 was recruited to the cell surface, resulting in its activation. Subsequent to this activation, gelatin......Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in particular MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-14, play a key role in various aspects of cancer pathology. Likewise, ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases), including ADAM12, are upregulated in malignant tumors and contribute to the pathology of cancers. Here, we show....... Furthermore, orthotopic implantation of ADAM12-expressing MCF7 cells in nude mice produced tumors with increased levels of activated MMP-14 and confirmed that ADAM12 protects tumor cells against apoptosis, leading to increased tumor progression. In conclusion, our data suggest that a ternary protein complex...

  7. Dystrophin-deficient dogs with reduced myostatin have unequal muscle growth and greater joint contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornegay, Joe N; Bogan, Daniel J; Bogan, Janet R; Dow, Jennifer L; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Liu, Naili; Warsing, Leigh C; Grange, Robert W; Ahn, Mihye; Balog-Alvarez, Cynthia J; Cotten, Steven W; Willis, Monte S; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice; Zhu, Hongtu; Palandra, Joe; Morris, Carl A; Styner, Martin A; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a negative regulator of muscle growth whose inhibition promotes muscle growth and regeneration. Dystrophin-deficient mdx mice in which myostatin is knocked out or inhibited postnatally have a less severe phenotype with greater total mass and strength and less fibrosis and fatty replacement of muscles than mdx mice with wild-type myostatin expression. Dogs with golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) have previously been noted to have increased muscle mass and reduced fibrosis after systemic postnatal myostatin inhibition. Based partly on these results, myostatin inhibitors are in development for use in human muscular dystrophies. However, persisting concerns regarding the effects of long-term and profound myostatin inhibition will not be easily or imminently answered in clinical trials. To address these concerns, we developed a canine (GRippet) model by crossbreeding dystrophin-deficient GRMD dogs with Mstn-heterozygous (Mstn (+/-)) whippets. A total of four GRippets (dystrophic and Mstn (+/-)), three GRMD (dystrophic and Mstn wild-type) dogs, and three non-dystrophic controls from two litters were evaluated. Myostatin messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein levels were downregulated in both GRMD and GRippet dogs. GRippets had more severe postural changes and larger (more restricted) maximal joint flexion angles, apparently due to further exaggeration of disproportionate effects on muscle size. Flexors such as the cranial sartorius were more hypertrophied on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the GRippets, while extensors, including the quadriceps femoris, underwent greater atrophy. Myostatin protein levels negatively correlated with relative cranial sartorius muscle cross-sectional area on MRI, supporting a role in disproportionate muscle size. Activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) expression was higher in dystrophic versus control dogs, consistent with physiologic feedback between myostatin and ActRIIB. However, there was no

  8. Sparing of the dystrophin-deficient cranial sartorius muscle is associated with classical and novel hypertrophy pathways in GRMD dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Peter P; Hoffman, Eric P; Mittal, Priya; Brown, Kristy J; Schatzberg, Scott J; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Wang, Zuyi; Kornegay, Joe N

    2013-11-01

    Both Duchenne and golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) are caused by dystrophin deficiency. The Duchenne muscular dystrophy sartorius muscle and orthologous GRMD cranial sartorius (CS) are relatively spared/hypertrophied. We completed hierarchical clustering studies to define molecular mechanisms contributing to this differential involvement and their role in the GRMD phenotype. GRMD dogs with larger CS muscles had more severe deficits, suggesting that selective hypertrophy could be detrimental. Serial biopsies from the hypertrophied CS and other atrophied muscles were studied in a subset of these dogs. Myostatin showed an age-dependent decrease and an inverse correlation with the degree of GRMD CS hypertrophy. Regulators of myostatin at the protein (AKT1) and miRNA (miR-539 and miR-208b targeting myostatin mRNA) levels were altered in GRMD CS, consistent with down-regulation of myostatin signaling, CS hypertrophy, and functional rescue of this muscle. mRNA and proteomic profiling was used to identify additional candidate genes associated with CS hypertrophy. The top-ranked network included α-dystroglycan and like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase. Proteomics demonstrated increases in myotrophin and spectrin that could promote hypertrophy and cytoskeletal stability, respectively. Our results suggest that multiple pathways, including decreased myostatin and up-regulated miRNAs, α-dystroglycan/like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, spectrin, and myotrophin, contribute to hypertrophy and functional sparing of the CS. These data also underscore the muscle-specific responses to dystrophin deficiency and the potential deleterious effects of differential muscle involvement. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Immobilization of Dystrophin and Laminin α2-Chain Deficient Zebrafish Larvae In Vivo Prevents the Development of Muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Li

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are often caused by genetic alterations in the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex or its extracellular ligands. These structures are associated with the cell membrane and provide mechanical links between the cytoskeleton and the matrix. Mechanical stress is considered a pathological mechanism and muscle immobilization has been shown to be beneficial in some mouse models of muscular dystrophy. The zebrafish enables novel and less complex models to examine the effects of extended immobilization or muscle relaxation in vivo in different dystrophy models. We have examined effects of immobilization in larvae from two zebrafish strains with muscular dystrophy, the Sapje dystrophin-deficient and the Candyfloss laminin α2-chain-deficient strains. Larvae (4 days post fertilization, dpf of both mutants have significantly lower active force in vitro, alterations in the muscle structure with gaps between muscle fibers and altered birefringence patterns compared to their normal siblings. Complete immobilization (18 hrs to 4 dpf was achieved using a small molecular inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction (BTS, 50 μM. This treatment resulted in a significantly weaker active contraction at 4 dpf in both mutated larvae and normal siblings, most likely reflecting a general effect of immobilization on myofibrillogenesis. The immobilization also significantly reduced the structural damage in the mutated strains, showing that muscle activity is an important pathological mechanism. Following one-day washout of BTS, muscle tension partly recovered in the Candyfloss siblings and caused structural damage in these mutants, indicating activity-induced muscle recovery and damage, respectively.

  10. A substrate-optimized electrophoretic mobility shift assay for ADAM12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotzsch, Alexander; Skovgaard, Tine; Buus, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    long been investigated as pharmaceutical drug targets; however, due to lack of potency and in vivo side effects, none of the small-molecule inhibitors discovered so far has made it beyond clinical testing. Ongoing research on novel selective inhibitors of ADAMs requires reliable biochemical assays...... to validate molecular probes from large-scale screening efforts. Here we describe an electrophoretic mobility shift assay for ADAM12 based on the identification of an optimized peptide substrate that is characterized by excellent performance and reproducibility....

  11. A comparative study of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc and cytotoxic T cell (CT carbohydrate expression in normal and dystrophin-deficient dog and human skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Martin

    Full Text Available The expression of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc and the cytotoxic T cell (CT carbohydrate can impact the severity of muscular dystrophy arising from the loss of dystrophin in mdx mice. Here, we describe the expression of these two glycans in skeletal muscles of dogs and humans with or without dystrophin-deficiency. Neu5Gc expression was highly reduced (>95% in muscle from normal golden retriever crosses (GR, n = 3 and from golden retriever with muscular dystrophy (GRMD, n = 5 dogs at multiple ages (3, 6 and 13 months when compared to mouse muscle, however, overall sialic acid expression in GR and GRMD muscles remained high at all ages. Neu5Gc was expressed on only a minority of GRMD satellite cells, CD8⁺ T lymphocytes and macrophages. Human muscle from normal (no evident disease, n = 3, Becker (BMD, n = 3 and Duchenne (DMD, n = 3 muscular dystrophy individuals had absent to very low Neu5Gc staining, but some punctate intracellular muscle staining was present in BMD and DMD muscles. The CT carbohydrate was localized to the neuromuscular junction in GR muscle, while GRMD muscles had increased expression on a subset of myofibers and macrophages. In humans, the CT carbohydrate was ectopically expressed on the sarcolemmal membrane of some BMD muscles, but not normal human or DMD muscles. These data are consistent with the notion that altered Neu5Gc and CT carbohydrate expression may modify disease severity resulting from dystrophin deficiency in dogs and humans.

  12. Evaluation of skeletal and cardiac muscle function after chronic administration of thymosin beta-4 in the dystrophin deficient mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Spurney

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tbeta4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. We studied the effects of chronic administration of Tbeta4 on the skeletal and cardiac muscle of dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Female wild type (C57BL10/ScSnJ and mdx mice, 8-10 weeks old, were treated with 150 microg of Tbeta4 twice a week for 6 months. To promote muscle pathology, mice were exercised for 30 minutes twice a week. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function were assessed via grip strength and high frequency echocardiography. Localization of Tbeta4 and amount of fibrosis were quantified using immunohistochemistry and Gomori's tri-chrome staining, respectively. Mdx mice treated with Tbeta4 showed a significant increase in skeletal muscle regenerating fibers compared to untreated mdx mice. Tbeta4 stained exclusively in the regenerating fibers of mdx mice. Although untreated mdx mice had significantly decreased skeletal muscle strength compared to untreated wild type, there were no significant improvements in mdx mice after treatment. Systolic cardiac function, measured as percent shortening fraction, was decreased in untreated mdx mice compared to untreated wild type and there was no significant difference after treatment in mdx mice. Skeletal and cardiac muscle fibrosis were also significantly increased in untreated mdx mice compared to wild type, but there was no significant improvement in treated mdx mice. In exercised dystrophin deficient mice, chronic administration of Tbeta4 increased the number of regenerating fibers in skeletal muscle and could have a potential role in treatment of skeletal muscle disease in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  13. ADAM12/syndecan-4 signaling promotes beta 1 integrin-dependent cell spreading through protein kinase Calpha and RhoA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Grauslund, Morten

    2002-01-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) comprise a large family of multidomain proteins with cell-binding and metalloprotease activities. The ADAM12 cysteine-rich domain (rADAM12-cys) supports cell attachment using syndecan-4 as a primary cell surface receptor that subsequently triggers beta...

  14. Serum cholinesterases are differentially regulated in normal and dystrophin-deficient mutant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R. Durrant

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The cholinesterases, acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase (pseudocholinesterase, are abundant in the nervous system and in other tissues. The role of acetylcholinesterase in terminating transmitter action in the peripheral and central nervous system is well understood. However, both knowledge of the function(s of the cholinesterases in serum, and of their metabolic and endocrine regulation under normal and pathological conditions, is limited. This study investigates acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase in sera of dystrophin-deficient mdx mutant mice, an animal model for the human Duchenne muscular dystrophy and in control healthy mice. The data show systematic and differential variations in the concentrations of both enzymes in the sera, and specific changes dictated by alteration of hormonal balance in both healthy and dystrophic mice. While acetylcholinesterase in mdx-sera is elevated, butyrylcholinesterase is markedly diminished, resulting in an overall cholinesterase decrease compared to sera of healthy controls. The androgen testosterone (T is a negative modulator of butyrylcholinesterase, but not of acetylcholinesterase, in male mouse sera. T-removal elevated both butyrylcholinesterase activity and the butyrylcholinesterase/acetylcholinesterase ratio in mdx male sera to values resembling those in healthy control male mice. Mechanisms of regulation of the circulating cholinesterases and their impairment in the dystrophic mice are suggested, and clinical implications for diagnosis and treatment are considered.

  15. MicroRNA-486–dependent modulation of DOCK3/PTEN/AKT signaling pathways improves muscular dystrophy–associated symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Matthew S.; Casar, Juan Carlos; Motohashi, Norio; Vieira, Natássia M.; Eisenberg, Iris; Marshall, Jamie L.; Gasperini, Molly J.; Lek, Angela; Myers, Jennifer A.; Estrella, Elicia A.; Kang, Peter B.; Shapiro, Frederic; Rahimov, Fedik; Kawahara, Genri; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, which results in dysfunctional signaling pathways within muscle. Previously, we identified microRNA-486 (miR-486) as a muscle-enriched microRNA that is markedly reduced in the muscles of dystrophin-deficient mice (Dmdmdx-5Cv mice) and in DMD patient muscles. Here, we determined that muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of miR-486 in muscle of Dmdmdx-5Cv mice results in reduced serum creatine kinase levels, improved sarcolemmal integrity, fewer centralized myonuclei, increased myofiber size, and improved muscle physiology and performance. Additionally, we identified dedicator of cytokinesis 3 (DOCK3) as a miR-486 target in skeletal muscle and determined that DOCK3 expression is induced in dystrophic muscles. DOCK3 overexpression in human myotubes modulated PTEN/AKT signaling, which regulates muscle hypertrophy and growth, and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, several components of the PTEN/AKT pathway were markedly modulated by miR-486 in dystrophin-deficient muscle. Skeletal muscle–specific miR-486 overexpression in Dmdmdx-5Cv animals decreased levels of DOCK3, reduced PTEN expression, and subsequently increased levels of phosphorylated AKT, which resulted in an overall beneficial effect. Together, these studies demonstrate that stable overexpression of miR-486 ameliorates the disease progression of dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle. PMID:24789910

  16. Dystrophin Immunity in Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Mendell, Jerry R.; Campbell, Katherine; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Sahenk, Zarife; Shilling, Chris; Lewis, Sarah; Bowles, Dawn; Gray, Steven; Li, Chengwen; Galloway, Gloria; Malik, Vinod; Coley, Brian; Clark, K. Reed; Li, Juan; Xiao, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    We report on delivery of a functional dystrophin transgene to skeletal muscle in six patients with Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin-specific T cells were detected after treatment, providing evidence of transgene expression even when the functional protein was not visualized in skeletal muscle. Circulating dystrophin-specific T cells were unexpectedly detected in two patients before vector treatment. Revertant dystrophin fibers, which expressed functional, truncated dystrophin from th...

  17. Creation of Dystrophin Expressing Chimeric Cells of Myoblast Origin as a Novel Stem Cell Based Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemionow, M; Cwykiel, J; Heydemann, A; Garcia-Martinez, J; Siemionow, K; Szilagyi, E

    2018-04-01

    Over the past decade different stem cell (SC) based approaches were tested to treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a lethal X-linked disorder caused by mutations in dystrophin gene. Despite research efforts, there is no curative therapy for DMD. Allogeneic SC therapies aim to restore dystrophin in the affected muscles; however, they are challenged by rejection and limited engraftment. Thus, there is a need to develop new more efficacious SC therapies. Chimeric Cells (CC), created via ex vivo fusion of donor and recipient cells, represent a promising therapeutic option for tissue regeneration and Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) due to tolerogenic properties that eliminate the need for lifelong immunosuppression. This proof of concept study tested feasibility of myoblast fusion for Dystrophin Expressing. Chimeric Cell (DEC) therapy through in vitro characterization and in vivo assessment of engraftment, survival, and efficacy in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Murine DEC were created via ex vivo fusion of normal (snj) and dystrophin-deficient (mdx) myoblasts using polyethylene glycol. Efficacy of myoblast fusion was confirmed by flow cytometry and dystrophin immunostaining, while proliferative and myogenic differentiation capacity of DEC were assessed in vitro. Therapeutic effect after DEC transplant (0.5 × 10 6 ) into the gastrocnemius muscle (GM) of mdx mice was assessed by muscle functional tests. At 30 days post-transplant dystrophin expression in GM of injected mdx mice increased to 37.27 ± 12.1% and correlated with improvement of muscle strength and function. Our study confirmed feasibility and efficacy of DEC therapy and represents a novel SC based approach for treatment of muscular dystrophies.

  18. Exon skipping and translation in patients with frameshift deletions in the dystrophin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherratt, T.G.; Dubowitz, V.; Sewry, C.A.; Strong, P.N. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (United Kingdom)); Vulliamy, T. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-11-01

    Although many Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have a deletion in the dystrophin gene which disrupts the translational reading frame, they express dystrophin in a small proportion of skeletal muscle fibers ([open quotes]revertant fibers[close quotes]). Antibody studies have shown, indirectly, that dystrophin synthesis in revertant fibers is facilitated by a frame-restoring mechanism; in the present study, the feasibility of mRNA splicing was investigated. Dystrophin transcripts were analyzed in skeletal muscle from individuals possessing revertant fibers and a frameshift deletion in the dystrophin gene. In each case a minor in-frame transcript was detected, in which exons adjacent to those deleted from the genome had been skipped. There appeared to be some correlation between the levels of in-frame transcripts and the predicted translation products. Low levels of alternatively spliced transcripts were also present in normal muscle. The results provide further evidence of exon skipping in the dystrophin gene and indicate that this may be involved in the synthesis of dystrophin by revertant fibers. 44 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Binding of ADAM12, a marker of skeletal muscle regeneration, to the muscle-specific actin-binding protein, alpha -actinin-2, is required for myoblast fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galliano, M F; Huet, C; Frygelius, J

    2000-01-01

    ADAM12 belongs to the transmembrane metalloprotease ADAM ("a disintegrin and metalloprotease") family. ADAM12 has been implicated in muscle cell differentiation and fusion, but its precise function remains unknown. Here, we show that ADAM12 is dramatically up-regulated in regenerated, newly formed...... of differentiation. Using the yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that the muscle-specific alpha-actinin-2 strongly binds to the cytoplasmic tail of ADAM12. In vitro binding assays with GST fusion proteins confirmed the specific interaction. The major binding site for alpha-actinin-2 was mapped to a short sequence...... in a dominant negative fashion by inhibiting fusion of C2C12 cells, whereas expression of a cytosolic ADAM12 lacking the major alpha-actinin-2 binding site had no effect on cell fusion. Our results suggest that interaction of ADAM12 with alpha-actinin-2 is important for ADAM12 function....

  20. Dystrophin Immunity in Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendell, Jerry R.; Campbell, Katherine; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Sahenk, Zarife; Shilling, Chris; Lewis, Sarah; Bowles, Dawn; Gray, Steven; Li, Chengwen; Galloway, Gloria; Malik, Vinod; Coley, Brian; Clark, K. Reed; Li, Juan; Xiao, Xiao; Samulski, Jade; McPhee, Scott W.; Samulski, R. Jude; Walker, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY We report on delivery of a functional dystrophin transgene to skeletal muscle in six patients with Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin-specific T cells were detected after treatment, providing evidence of transgene expression even when the functional protein was not visualized in skeletal muscle. Circulating dystrophin-specific T cells were unexpectedly detected in two patients before vector treatment. Revertant dystrophin fibers, which expressed functional, truncated dystrophin from the deleted endogenous gene after spontaneous in-frame splicing, contained epitopes targeted by the autoreactive T cells. The potential for T-cell immunity to self and nonself dystrophin epitopes should be considered in designing and monitoring experimental therapies for this disease. (Funded by the Muscular Dystrophy Association and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00428935.) PMID:20925545

  1. Dystrophin Expressing Chimeric (DEC) Human Cells Provide a Potential Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemionow, Maria; Cwykiel, Joanna; Heydemann, Ahlke; Garcia, Jesus; Marchese, Enza; Siemionow, Krzysztof; Szilagyi, Erzsebet

    2018-06-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive and lethal disease caused by mutations of the dystrophin gene. Currently no cure exists. Stem cell therapies targeting DMD are challenged by limited engraftment and rejection despite the use of immunosuppression. There is an urgent need to introduce new stem cell-based therapies that exhibit low allogenic profiles and improved cell engraftment. In this proof-of-concept study, we develop and test a new human stem cell-based approach to increase engraftment, limit rejection, and restore dystrophin expression in the mdx/scid mouse model of DMD. We introduce two Dystrophin Expressing Chimeric (DEC) cell lines created by ex vivo fusion of human myoblasts (MB) derived from two normal donors (MB N1 /MB N2 ), and normal and DMD donors (MB N /MB DMD ). The efficacy of fusion was confirmed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy based on donor cell fluorescent labeling (PKH26/PKH67). In vitro, DEC displayed phenotype and genotype of donor parent cells, expressed dystrophin, and maintained proliferation and myogenic differentiation. In vivo, local delivery of both DEC lines (0.5 × 10 6 ) restored dystrophin expression (17.27%±8.05-MB N1 /MB N2 and 23.79%±3.82-MB N /MB DMD ) which correlated with significant improvement of muscle force, contraction and tolerance to fatigue at 90 days after DEC transplant to the gastrocnemius muscles (GM) of dystrophin-deficient mdx/scid mice. This study establishes DEC as a potential therapy for DMD and other types of muscular dystrophies.

  2. Cognitive dysfunction in the dystrophin-deficient mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A reappraisal from sensory to executive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussenot, Rémi; Edeline, Jean-Marc; Le Bec, Benoit; El Massioui, Nicole; Laroche, Serge; Vaillend, Cyrille

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with language disabilities and deficits in learning and memory, leading to intellectual disability in a patient subpopulation. Recent studies suggest the presence of broader deficits affecting information processing, short-term memory and executive functions. While the absence of the full-length dystrophin (Dp427) is a common feature in all patients, variable mutation profiles may additionally alter distinct dystrophin-gene products encoded by separate promoters. However, the nature of the cognitive dysfunctions specifically associated with the loss of distinct brain dystrophins is unclear. Here we show that the loss of the full-length brain dystrophin in mdx mice does not modify the perception and sensorimotor gating of auditory inputs, as assessed using auditory brainstem recordings and prepulse inhibition of startle reflex. In contrast, both acquisition and long-term retention of cued and trace fear memories were impaired in mdx mice, suggesting alteration in a functional circuit including the amygdala. Spatial learning in the water maze revealed reduced path efficiency, suggesting qualitative alteration in mdx mice learning strategy. However, spatial working memory performance and cognitive flexibility challenged in various behavioral paradigms in water and radial-arm mazes were unimpaired. The full-length brain dystrophin therefore appears to play a role during acquisition of associative learning as well as in general processes involved in memory consolidation, but no overt involvement in working memory and/or executive functions could be demonstrated in spatial learning tasks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diseased muscles that lack dystrophin or laminin-α2 have altered compositions and proliferation of mononuclear cell populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Jeffrey

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple types of mononucleate cells reside among the multinucleate myofibers in skeletal muscles and these mononucleate cells function in muscle maintenance and repair. How neuromuscular disease might affect different types of muscle mononucleate cells had not been determined. In this study, therefore, we examined how two neuromuscular diseases, dystrophin-deficiency and laminin-α2-deficiency, altered the proliferation and composition of different subsets of muscle-derived mononucleate cells. Methods We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting combined with bromodeoxyuridine labeling to examine proliferation rates and compositions of mononuclear cells in diseased and healthy mouse skeletal muscle. We prepared mononucleate cells from muscles of mdx (dystrophin-deficient or Lama2-/- (laminin-α2-deficient mice and compared them to cells from healthy control muscles. We enumerated subsets of resident muscle cells based on Sca-1 and CD45 expression patterns and determined the proliferation of each cell subset in vivo by BrdU incorporation. Results We found that the proliferation and composition of the mononucleate cells in dystrophin-deficient and laminin-α2-deficient diseased muscles are different than in healthy muscle. The mdx and Lama2-/- muscles showed similar significant increases in CD45+ cells compared to healthy muscle. Changes in proliferation, however, differed between the two diseases with proliferation increased in mdx and decreased in Lama2-/- muscles compared to healthy muscles. In particular, the most abundant Sca-1-/CD45- subset, which contains muscle precursor cells, had increased proliferation in mdx muscle but decreased proliferation in Lama2-/- muscles. Conclusion The similar increases in CD45+ cells, but opposite changes in proliferation of muscle precursor cells, may underlie aspects of the distinct pathologies in the two diseases.

  4. Black bear parathyroid hormone has greater anabolic effects on trabecular bone in dystrophin-deficient mice than in wild type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sarah K; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Sanders, Jennifer L; Condon, Keith W; Tsai, Chung-Jui; Donahue, Seth W

    2012-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked neuromuscular disease that has deleterious consequences in muscle and bone, leading to decreased mobility, progressive osteoporosis, and premature death. Patients with DMD experience a higher-than-average fracture rate, particularly in the proximal and distal femur and proximal tibia. The dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse is a model of DMD that demonstrates muscle degeneration and fibrosis and osteoporosis. Parathyroid hormone, an effective anabolic agent for post-menopausal and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, has not been explored for DMD. Black bear parathyroid hormone (bbPTH) has been implicated in the maintenance of bone properties during extended periods of disuse (hibernation). We cloned bbPTH and found 9 amino acid residue differences from human PTH. Apoptosis was mitigated and cAMP was activated by bbPTH in osteoblast cultures. We administered 28nmol/kg of bbPTH 1-84 to 4-week old male mdx and wild type mice via daily (5×/week) subcutaneous injection for 6 weeks. Vehicle-treated mdx mice had 44% lower trabecular bone volume fraction than wild type mice. No changes were found in femoral cortical bone geometry or mechanical properties with bbPTH treatment in wild type mice, and only medio-lateral moment of inertia changed with bbPTH treatment in mdx femurs. However, μCT analyses of the trabecular regions of the distal femur and proximal tibia showed marked increases in bone volume fraction with bbPTH treatment, with a greater anabolic response (7-fold increase) in mdx mice than wild type mice (2-fold increase). Trabecular number increased in mdx long bone, but not wild type bone. Additionally, greater osteoblast area and decreased osteoclast area were observed with bbPTH treatment in mdx mice. The heightened response to PTH in mdx bone compared to wild type suggests a link between dystrophin deficiency, altered calcium signaling, and bone. These findings support further investigation of PTH as an anabolic

  5. Dystrophin quantification and clinical correlations in Becker muscular dystrophy: implications for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Karen; Cirak, Sebahattin; Torelli, Silvia; Tasca, Giorgio; Feng, Lucy; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Armaroli, Annarita; Guglieri, Michela; Straathof, Chiara S; Verschuuren, Jan J; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Helderman-van den Enden, Paula; Bushby, Katherine; Straub, Volker; Sewry, Caroline; Ferlini, Alessandra; Ricci, Enzo; Morgan, Jennifer E; Muntoni, Francesco

    2011-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by mutations in the DMD gene that disrupt the open reading frame and prevent the full translation of its protein product, dystrophin. Restoration of the open reading frame and dystrophin production can be achieved by exon skipping using antisense oligonucleotides targeted to splicing elements. This approach aims to transform the Duchenne muscular dystrophy phenotype to that of the milder disorder, Becker muscular dystrophy, typically caused by in-frame dystrophin deletions that allow the production of an internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin. There is ongoing debate regarding the functional properties of the different internally deleted dystrophins produced by exon skipping for different mutations; more insight would be valuable to improve and better predict the outcome of exon skipping clinical trials. To this end, we have characterized the clinical phenotype of 17 patients with Becker muscular dystrophy harbouring in-frame deletions relevant to on-going or planned exon skipping clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and correlated it to the levels of dystrophin, and dystrophin-associated protein expression. The cohort of 17 patients, selected exclusively on the basis of their genotype, included 4 asymptomatic, 12 mild and 1 severe patient. All patients had dystrophin levels of >40% of control and significantly higher dystrophin (P = 0.013), β-dystroglycan (P = 0.025) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (P = 0.034) expression was observed in asymptomatic individuals versus symptomatic patients with Becker muscular dystrophy. Furthermore, grouping the patients by deletion, patients with Becker muscular dystrophy with deletions with an end-point of exon 51 (the skipping of which could rescue the largest group of Duchenne muscular dystrophy deletions) showed significantly higher dystrophin levels (P = 0.034) than those with deletions ending with exon 53. This is the first quantitative study on both

  6. ADAM 12 may be used to reduce the false positive rate of first trimester combined screening for Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Michael; Pihl, Kasper; Hedley, Paula L.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ADAM12 has been shown to be an efficient maternal serum marker for Down syndrome (DS) in the first trimester; but recent studies, using a second generation assay, have not confirmed these findings. We examined the efficiency of a second generation assay for ADAM12. MATERIALS AND METHODS...

  7. Characterization of dystrophin deficient rats: a new model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcher, Thibaut; Lafoux, Aude; Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Thepenier, Virginie; François, Virginie; Le Guiner, Caroline; Goubin, Helicia; Dutilleul, Maéva; Guigand, Lydie; Toumaniantz, Gilles; De Cian, Anne; Boix, Charlotte; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yan; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio; Huchet, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    A few animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are available, large ones such as pigs or dogs being expensive and difficult to handle. Mdx (X-linked muscular dystrophy) mice only partially mimic the human disease, with limited chronic muscular lesions and muscle weakness. Their small size also imposes limitations on analyses. A rat model could represent a useful alternative since rats are small animals but 10 times bigger than mice and could better reflect the lesions and functional abnormalities observed in DMD patients. Two lines of Dmd mutated-rats (Dmdmdx) were generated using TALENs targeting exon 23. Muscles of animals of both lines showed undetectable levels of dystrophin by western blot and less than 5% of dystrophin positive fibers by immunohistochemistry. At 3 months, limb and diaphragm muscles from Dmdmdx rats displayed severe necrosis and regeneration. At 7 months, these muscles also showed severe fibrosis and some adipose tissue infiltration. Dmdmdx rats showed significant reduction in muscle strength and a decrease in spontaneous motor activity. Furthermore, heart morphology was indicative of dilated cardiomyopathy associated histologically with necrotic and fibrotic changes. Echocardiography showed significant concentric remodeling and alteration of diastolic function. In conclusion, Dmdmdx rats represent a new faithful small animal model of DMD.

  8. Muscular dystrophy in a family of Labrador Retrievers with no muscle dystrophin and a mild phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Natassia M; Guo, Ling T; Estrela, Elicia; Kunkel, Louis M; Zatz, Mayana; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-05-01

    Animal models of dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy, most notably canine X-linked muscular dystrophy, play an important role in developing new therapies for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Although the canine disease is a model of the human disease, the variable severity of clinical presentations in the canine may be problematic for pre-clinical trials, but also informative. Here we describe a family of Labrador Retrievers with three generations of male dogs having markedly increased serum creatine kinase activity, absence of membrane dystrophin, but with undetectable clinical signs of muscle weakness. Clinically normal young male Labrador Retriever puppies were evaluated prior to surgical neuter by screening laboratory blood work, including serum creatine kinase activity. Serum creatine kinase activities were markedly increased in the absence of clinical signs of muscle weakness. Evaluation of muscle biopsies confirmed a dystrophic phenotype with both degeneration and regeneration. Further evaluations by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed the absence of muscle dystrophin. Although dystrophin was not identified in the muscles, we did not find any detectable deletions or duplications in the dystrophin gene. Sequencing is now ongoing to search for point mutations. Our findings in this family of Labrador Retriever dogs lend support to the hypothesis that, in exceptional situations, muscle with no dystrophin may be functional. Unlocking the secrets that protect these dogs from a severe clinical myopathy is a great challenge which may have important implications for future treatment of human muscular dystrophies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Detection of new paternal dystrophin gene mutations in isolated cases of dystrophinopathy in females

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegoraro, E.; Wessel, H.B.; Schwartz, L.; Hoffman, E.P. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Schimke, R.N. (Kansas Univ. Medical Center, Kansas City (United States)); Arahata, Kiichi; Hayashi, Yukiko (National Institute of Neurosciences, Tokyo (Japan)); Stern, H. (Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)); Marks, H. (A.I. duPont Institute, Wilmington (United States)); Glasberg, M.R. (Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)) (and others)

    1994-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders and is caused by dystrophin deficiency. The disease is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait; however, recent biochemical and clinical studies have shown that many girls and women with a primary myopathy have an underlying dystrophinopathy, despite a negative family history for Duchenne dystrophy. These isolated female dystrophinopathy patients carried ambiguous diagnoses with presumed autosomal recessive inheritance (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy) prior to biochemical detection of dystrophin abnormalities in their muscle biopsy. It has been assumed that these female dystrophinopathy patients are heterozygous carries who show preferential inactivation of the X chromosome harboring the normal dystrophin gene, although this has been shown for only a few X:autosome translocations and for two cases of discordant monozygotic twin female carriers. Here the authors study X-inactivation patterns of 13 female dystrophinopathy patients - 10 isolated cases and 3 cases with a positive family history for Duchenne dystrophy in males. They show that all cases have skewed X-inactivation patterns in peripheral blood DNA. Of the nine isolated cases informative in the assay, eight showed inheritance of the dystrophin gene mutation from the paternal germ line. Only a single case showed maternal inheritance. The 10-fold higher incidence of paternal transmission of dystrophin gene mutations in these cases is at 30-fold variance with Bayesian predictions and gene mutation rates. Thus, the results suggest some mechanistic interaction between new dystrophin gene mutations, paternal inheritance, and skewed X inactivation. The results provide both empirical risk data and a molecular diagnostic test method, which permit genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of this new category of patients. 58 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Possible influences on the expression of X chromosome-linked dystrophin abnormalities by heterozygosity for autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggs, A.H.; Neumann, P.E.; Anderson, M.S.; Kunkel, L.M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Arahata, Kiichi; Arikawa, Eri; Nonaka, Ikuya (National Inst. of Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-01-15

    Abnormalities of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein of muscle and nerve, are generally considered specific for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. However, several patients have recently been identified with dystrophin deficiency who, before dystrophin testing, were considered to have Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) on the basis of clinical findings. Epidemiologic data suggest that only 1/3,500 males with autosomal recessive FCMD should have abnormal dystrophin. To explain the observation of 3/23 FCMD males with abnormal dystrophin, the authors propose that dystrophin and the FCMD gene product interact and that the earlier onset and greater severity of these patients' phenotype (relative to Duchenne muscular dystrophy) are due to their being heterozygous for the FCMD mutation in addition to being hemizygous for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genotype that is predicted to occur in 1/175,000 Japanese males. This model may help explain the genetic basis for some of the clinical and pathological variability seen among patients with FCMD, and it has potential implications for understanding the inheritance of other autosomal recessive disorders in general. For example, sex ratios for rare autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in proteins that interact with X chromosome-linked gene products may display predictable deviation from 1:1.

  11. Number of discernible colors for color-deficient observers estimated from the MacAdam limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Esther; Martínez-Verdú, Francisco Miguel; Linhares, João Manuel Maciel; Nascimento, Sérgio Miguel Cardoso

    2010-10-01

    We estimated the number of colors perceived by color normal and color-deficient observers when looking at the theoretic limits of object-color stimuli. These limits, the optimal color stimuli, were computed for a color normal observer and CIE standard illuminant D65, and the resultant colors were expressed in the CIELAB and DIN99d color spaces. The corresponding color volumes for abnormal color vision were computed using models simulating for normal trichromatic observers the appearance for dichromats and anomalous trichomats. The number of colors perceived in each case was then computed from the color volumes enclosed by the optimal colors also known as MacAdam limits. It was estimated that dichromats perceive less than 1% of the colors perceived by normal trichromats and that anomalous trichromats perceive 50%-60% for anomalies in the medium-wavelength-sensitive and 60%-70% for anomalies in the long-wavelength-sensitive cones. Complementary estimates obtained similarly for the spectral locus of monochromatic stimuli suggest less impairment for color-deficient observers, a fact that is explained by the two-dimensional nature of the locus.

  12. Proteomic analysis reveals new cardiac-specific dystrophin-associated proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K Johnson

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the expression of dystrophin result in progressive loss of skeletal muscle function and cardiomyopathy leading to early mortality. Interestingly, clinical studies revealed no correlation in disease severity or age of onset between cardiac and skeletal muscles, suggesting that dystrophin may play overlapping yet different roles in these two striated muscles. Since dystrophin serves as a structural and signaling scaffold, functional differences likely arise from tissue-specific protein interactions. To test this, we optimized a proteomics-based approach to purify, identify and compare the interactome of dystrophin between cardiac and skeletal muscles from as little as 50 mg of starting material. We found selective tissue-specific differences in the protein associations of cardiac and skeletal muscle full length dystrophin to syntrophins and dystrobrevins that couple dystrophin to signaling pathways. Importantly, we identified novel cardiac-specific interactions of dystrophin with proteins known to regulate cardiac contraction and to be involved in cardiac disease. Our approach overcomes a major challenge in the muscular dystrophy field of rapidly and consistently identifying bona fide dystrophin-interacting proteins in tissues. In addition, our findings support the existence of cardiac-specific functions of dystrophin and may guide studies into early triggers of cardiac disease in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies.

  13. Metabolic remodeling agents show beneficial effects in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahnke Vanessa E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic disease involving a severe muscle wasting that is characterized by cycles of muscle degeneration/regeneration and culminates in early death in affected boys. Mitochondria are presumed to be involved in the regulation of myoblast proliferation/differentiation; enhancing mitochondrial activity with exercise mimetics (AMPK and PPAR-delta agonists increases muscle function and inhibits muscle wasting in healthy mice. We therefore asked whether metabolic remodeling agents that increase mitochondrial activity would improve muscle function in mdx mice. Methods Twelve-week-old mdx mice were treated with two different metabolic remodeling agents (GW501516 and AICAR, separately or in combination, for 4 weeks. Extensive systematic behavioral, functional, histological, biochemical, and molecular tests were conducted to assess the drug(s' effects. Results We found a gain in body and muscle weight in all treated mice. Histologic examination showed a decrease in muscle inflammation and in the number of fibers with central nuclei and an increase in fibers with peripheral nuclei, with significantly fewer activated satellite cells and regenerating fibers. Together with an inhibition of FoXO1 signaling, these results indicated that the treatments reduced ongoing muscle damage. Conclusions The three treatments produced significant improvements in disease phenotype, including an increase in overall behavioral activity and significant gains in forelimb and hind limb strength. Our findings suggest that triggering mitochondrial activity with exercise mimetics improves muscle function in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

  14. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Young Woo [Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Center, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin [Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won Jin [Dr. Park' s Aesthetic Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong In, E-mail: oncochem@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Soo, E-mail: khsmd@unitel.co.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  15. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Young Woo; Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin; Park, Won Jin; Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong; Lee, Jong In; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. → Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. → hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  16. The role of ADAMs in disease pathophysiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    The ADAMs are a family of multidomain transmembrane and secreted proteins involved in both proteolysis and cell adhesion. Altered expression of specific ADAMs is implicated in the pathophysiology of several diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer\\'s disease, cardiac hypertrophy, asthma and cancer. Of these different diseases, it is in cancer where most research has been carried out. Multiple ADAMs, including ADAM-9, ADAM-10, ADAM-12, ADAM-15 and ADAM-17, have been shown to play a role in either cancer formation or progression. Consistent with these findings, increased expression of specific ADAMs in several cancer types was found to correlate with features of aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Currently, selective ADAM inhibitors against ADAM-10 and ADAM-17 are undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Further work is required in order to establish a causative role for ADAMs in rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer\\'s disease, cardiac hypertrophy and asthma.

  17. Connective tissue growth factor is a substrate of ADAM28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Satsuki; Tanaka, Rena; Shimoda, Masayuki; Onuma, Junko; Fujii, Yutaka; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Okada, Yasunori

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The hyper-variable region in the cysteine-rich domain of ADAM28 binds to C-terminal domain of CTGF. → ADAM28 cleaves CTGF alone and CTGF in the CTGF/VEGF 165 complex. → CTGF digestion by ADAM28 releases biologically active VEGF 165 from the complex. → ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF 165 are commonly co-expressed by carcinoma cells in human breast carcinoma tissues. → These suggest that ADAM28 promotes VEGF 165 -induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by selective CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF 165 complex. -- Abstract: ADAM28, a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) gene family, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and the expression correlates with carcinoma cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. However, information about substrates of ADAM28 is limited. We screened interacting molecules of ADAM28 in human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system and identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Binding of CTGF to proADAM28 was demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid assay and protein binding assay. ADAM28 cleaved CTGF in dose- and time-dependent manners at the Ala 181 -Tyr 182 and Asp 191 -Pro 192 bonds in the hinge region of the molecule. ADAM28 selectively digested CTGF in the complex of CTGF and vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF 165 ), releasing biologically active VEGF 165 from the complex. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF are commonly co-expressed in the breast carcinoma tissues. These data provide the first evidence that CTGF is a novel substrate of ADAM28 and suggest that ADAM28 may promote VEGF 165 -induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by the CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF 165 complex.

  18. Preferred SH3 domain partners of ADAM metalloproteases include shared and ADAM-specific SH3 interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iivari Kleino

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs constitute a protein family essential for extracellular signaling and regulation of cell adhesion. Catalytic activity of ADAMs and their predicted potential for Src-homology 3 (SH3 domain binding show a strong correlation. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of SH3 binding capacity and preferences of the catalytically active ADAMs 8, 9, 10, 12, 15, 17, and 19. Our results revealed several novel interactions, and also confirmed many previously reported ones. Many of the identified SH3 interaction partners were shared by several ADAMs, whereas some were ADAM-specific. Most of the ADAM-interacting SH3 proteins were adapter proteins or kinases, typically associated with sorting and endocytosis. Novel SH3 interactions revealed in this study include TOCA1 and CIP4 as preferred partners of ADAM8, and RIMBP1 as a partner of ADAM19. Our results suggest that common as well as distinct mechanisms are involved in regulation and execution of ADAM signaling, and provide a useful framework for addressing the pathways that connect ADAMs to normal and aberrant cell behavior.

  19. Dystrophin in frameshift deletion patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangopadhyay, S.B.; Ray, P.N.; Worton, R.G.; Sherratt, T.G.; Heckmatt, J.Z.; Dubowitz, V.; Strong, P.N.; Miller, G. (Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)); Shokeir, M. (Univ. Hospital, Saskatchewan (Canada))

    1992-09-01

    In a previous study the authors identified 14 cases with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or its milder variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), with a deletion of exons 3-7, a deletion that would be expected to shift the translational reading frame of the mRNA and give a severe phenotype. They have examined dystrophin and its mRNA from muscle biopsies of seven cases with either mild or intermediate phenotypes. In all cases they detected slightly lower-molecular-weight dystrophin in 12%-15% abundance relative to the normal. By sequencing amplified mRNA they have found that exon 2 is spliced to exon 8, a splice that produces a frameshifted mRNA, and have found no evidence for alternate splicing that might be involved in restoration of dystrophin mRNA reading frame in the patients with a mild phenotype. Other transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms such as cryptic promoter, ribosomal frameshifting, and reinitiation are suggested that might play some role in restoring the reading frame. 34 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  20. Dramatic elevation in urinary amino terminal titin fragment excretion quantified by immunoassay in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and in dystrophin deficient rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alan S; Majchrzak, Mark J; Smith, Courtney M; Gagnon, Robert C; Devidze, Nino; Banks, Glen B; Little, Sean C; Nabbie, Fizal; Bounous, Denise I; DiPiero, Janet; Jacobsen, Leslie K; Bristow, Linda J; Ahlijanian, Michael K; Stimpson, Stephen A

    2017-07-01

    Enzyme-linked and electrochemiluminescence immunoassays were developed for quantification of amino (N-) terminal fragments of the skeletal muscle protein titin (N-ter titin) and qualified for use in detection of urinary N-ter titin excretion. Urine from normal subjects contained a small but measurable level of N-ter titin (1.0 ± 0.4 ng/ml). A 365-fold increase (365.4 ± 65.0, P = 0.0001) in urinary N-ter titin excretion was seen in Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. Urinary N-ter titin was also evaluated in dystrophin deficient rodent models. Mdx mice exhibited low urinary N-ter titin levels at 2 weeks of age followed by a robust and sustained elevation starting at 3 weeks of age, coincident with the development of systemic skeletal muscle damage in this model; fold elevation could not be determined because urinary N-ter titin was not detected in age-matched wild type mice. Levels of serum creatine kinase and serum skeletal muscle troponin I (TnI) were also low at 2 weeks, elevated at later time points and were significantly correlated with urinary N-ter titin excretion in mdx mice. Corticosteroid treatment of mdx mice resulted in improved exercise performance and lowering of both urinary N-ter titin and serum skeletal muscle TnI concentrations. Low urinary N-ter titin levels were detected in wild type rats (3.0 ± 0.6 ng/ml), while Dmd mdx rats exhibited a 556-fold increase (1652.5 ± 405.7 ng/ml, P = 0.002) (both at 5 months of age). These results suggest that urinary N-ter titin is present at low basal concentrations in normal urine and increases dramatically coincident with muscle damage produced by dystrophin deficiency. Urinary N-ter titin has potential as a facile, non-invasive and translational biomarker for DMD. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ralph; Allen, Lindsay H; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2017-01-01

    , subclinical deficiency affects between 2.5% and 26% of the general population depending on the definition used, although the clinical relevance is unclear. B12 deficiency can affect individuals at all ages, but most particularly elderly individuals. Infants, children, adolescents and women of reproductive age...... remain debated. Management depends on B12 supplementation, either via high-dose oral routes or via parenteral administration. This Primer describes the current knowledge surrounding B12 deficiency, and highlights improvements in diagnostic methods as well as shifting concepts about the prevalence, causes...

  2. First-trimester ADAM12 and PAPP-A as markers for intrauterine fetal growth restriction through their roles in the insulin-like growth factor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowans, Nicholas J; Spencer, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    PAPP-A is a marker used as part of the most effective method of screening for chromosomal anomalies in the first trimester. ADAM12 is a recently discovered pregnancy associated member of the ADAM (a multidomain glycoprotein metalloprotease) family. Recently, ADAM12 has been shown as a potential marker for early screening for chromosomal anomalies. Both PAPP-A and ADAM12 have been identified as proteases to insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. In this role, they may have a regulatory function in controlling the amount of free bioactive insulin-like growth factor (IGF). We therefore wish to examine if the levels of either of these proteases are related to various growth related adverse pregnancy outcomes. PAPP-A and ADAM12 were measured in a subset of samples collected at 11 to 14 weeks as part of an OSCAR clinic screening for chromosomal anomalies. Follow-up of pregnancies screened between September 1999 and August 2003 identified 1705 pregnancies with an outcome of intrauterine fetal demise on or after 24 weeks, preterm delivery at 24-34 weeks or 35-36 weeks, very low birthweight (4.5 kg), and birth weight below the 3rd or 5th or 10th centile for gestation. A series of 414 normal outcome pregnancies constituted the control group. Marker levels were adjusted for gestation and maternal weight and the log MoM of the markers were compared using t-test of unequal variance between the control group and the various adverse outcome groups. ADAM12 and PAPP-A concentrations were reduced in low for gestational age birth weights and in all births with weights below 2.5 kg. There was a linear relationship between the severity of the IUGR and the decrease in PAPP-A and ADAM12. In the larger babies, only ADAM12 was found to be significantly increased in babies above the 90th centile of weight for gestation. The results of our study are compatible with the proposed role of ADAM12 and PAPP-A in promoting growth and development by breaking down IGF binding proteins and

  3. Caspase-12 ablation preserves muscle function in the mdx mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorwood, Catherine; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating muscle wasting disease caused by mutations in dystrophin. Several downstream consequences of dystrophin deficiency are triggers of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, including loss of calcium homeostasis, hypoxia and oxidative stress. During ER stress, misfolded proteins accumulate in the ER lumen and the unfolded protein response (UPR) is triggered, leading to adaptation or apoptosis. We hypothesized that ER stress is heightened in dystrophic muscles and contributes to the pathology of DMD. We observed increases in the ER stress markers BiP and cleaved caspase-4 in DMD patient biopsies, compared with controls, and an increase in multiple UPR pathways in muscles of the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse. We then crossed mdx mice with mice null for caspase-12, the murine equivalent of human caspase-4, which are resistant to ER stress. We found that deleting caspase-12 preserved mdx muscle function, resulting in a 75% recovery of both specific force generation and resistance to eccentric contractions. The compensatory hypertrophy normally found in mdx muscles was normalized in the absence of caspase-12; this was found to be due to decreased fibre sizes, and not to a fibre type shift or a decrease in fibrosis. Fibre central nucleation was not significantly altered in the absence of caspase-12, but muscle fibre degeneration found in the mdx mouse was reduced almost to wild-type levels. In conclusion, we have identified heightened ER stress and abnormal UPR signalling as novel contributors to the dystrophic phenotype. Caspase-4 is therefore a potential therapeutic target for DMD. PMID:24879640

  4. Skeletal muscle-specific overexpression of IGFBP-2 promotes a slower muscle phenotype in healthy but not dystrophic mdx mice and does not affect the dystrophic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, Kristy; Martins, Karen Janet Bernice; Chee, Annabel; Trieu, Jennifer; Naim, Timur; Gehrig, Stefan Martin; Baum, Dale Michael; Brenmoehl, Julia; Chau, Luong; Koopman, René; Gregorevic, Paul; Metzger, Friedrich; Hoeflich, Andreas; Lynch, Gordon Stuart

    The insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are thought to modulate cell size and homeostasis via IGF-I-dependent and -independent pathways. There is a considerable dearth of information regarding the function of IGFBPs in skeletal muscle, particularly their role in the pathophysiology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In this study we tested the hypothesis that intramuscular IGFBP-2 overexpression would ameliorate the pathology in mdx dystrophic mice. 4week old male C57Bl/10 and mdx mice received a single intramuscular injection of AAV6-empty or AAV6-IGFBP-2 vector into the tibialis anterior muscle. At 8weeks post-injection the effect of IGFBP-2 overexpression on the structure and function of the injected muscle was assessed. AAV6-mediated IGFBP-2 overexpression in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of 4-week-old C57BL/10 and mdx mice reduced the mass of injected muscle after 8weeks, inducing a slower muscle phenotype in C57BL/10 but not mdx mice. Analysis of inflammatory and fibrotic gene expression revealed no changes between control and IGFBP-2 injected muscles in dystrophic (mdx) mice. Together these results indicate that the IGFBP-2-induced promotion of a slower muscle phenotype is impaired in muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, which contributes to the inability of IGFBP-2 to ameliorate the dystrophic pathology. The findings implicate the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) in the signaling required for this adaptation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Improvement of cardiac contractile function by peptide-based inhibition of NF-κB in the utrophin/dystrophin-deficient murine model of muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guttridge Denis C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an inherited and progressive disease causing striated muscle deterioration. Patients in their twenties generally die from either respiratory or cardiac failure. In order to improve the lifespan and quality of life of DMD patients, it is important to prevent or reverse the progressive loss of contractile function of the heart. Recent studies by our labs have shown that the peptide NBD (Nemo Binding Domain, targeted at blunting Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB signaling, reduces inflammation, enhances myofiber regeneration, and improves contractile deficits in the diaphragm in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Methods To assess whether cardiac function in addition to diaphragm function can be improved, we investigated physiological and histological parameters of cardiac muscle in mice deficient for both dystrophin and its homolog utrophin (double knockout = dko mice treated with NBD peptide. These dko mice show classic pathophysiological hallmarks of heart failure, including myocyte degeneration, an impaired force-frequency response and a severely blunted β-adrenergic response. Cardiac contractile function at baseline and frequencies and pre-loads throughout the in vivo range as well as β-adrenergic reserve was measured in isolated cardiac muscle preparations. In addition, we studied histopathological and inflammatory markers in these mice. Results At baseline conditions, active force development in cardiac muscles from NBD treated dko mice was more than double that of vehicle-treated dko mice. NBD treatment also significantly improved frequency-dependent behavior of the muscles. The increase in force in NBD-treated dko muscles to β-adrenergic stimulation was robustly restored compared to vehicle-treated mice. However, histological features, including collagen content and inflammatory markers were not significantly different between NBD-treated and vehicle-treated dko mice. Conclusions We conclude

  6. The prevalence and correlates of the positive Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (ADAM questionnaire among psychiatric outpatients: a cross-sectional survey of 176 men in a general hospital in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee CP

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chin-Pang Lee,1,2 Yu Chen,2–4 Kun-Hao Jiang,2,4,5 Chun-Lin Chu,1,2,4 Shih-Chieh Hsu,1,2,4 Jiun-Liang Chen,2,4,5 Ching-Yen Chen1,2,41Department of Psychiatry, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan; 2Men’s Health Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 3Department of Urology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan; 4School of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan; 5Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, TaiwanIntroduction: The Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (ADAM questionnaire is widely used to screen for late-onset hypogonadism. The positive response to the ADAM questionnaire (positive ADAM has been associated with depression and poorer quality of life in a number of studies. It is unclear whether there is any value of the ADAM questionnaire in psychiatric populations. In this study, we aimed to determine the utility of the ADAM questionnaire in a convenient sample of male psychiatric outpatients.Methods: One hundred and seventy-six men (mean age: 54.3 years; standard deviation: 10.7 years; range: 40–80 years completed the ADAM questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, and the Aging Males’ Symptoms (AMS scale. Anxiety was defined as a HADS anxiety subscore ≥8; depression as a HADS depression subscore ≥8; and moderate/severe impairment of health-related quality of life (HQoL as AMS ≥37. ADAM, anxiety, and depression was used to model the moderate/severe impairment of HQoL.Results: One hundred and sixty-four (93% men had positive ADAM. Positive ADAM was associated with a lower body mass index (P<0.05 and moderate/severe impairment of HQoL (P<0.001, but was not associated with anxiety or depression (P>0.05. Positive ADAM was associated with five symptoms of the AMS scale: “decline of one’s feeling of general well-being”, “depressive mood”, and three sexual symptoms. In regression analysis, positive ADAM was associated with

  7. The cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12 supports cell adhesion through syndecans and triggers signaling events that lead to beta1 integrin-dependent cell spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, K; Albrechtsen, R; Gilpin, B

    2000-01-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of proteins is involved in a variety of cellular interactions, including cell adhesion and ecto- domain shedding. Here we show that ADAM 12 binds to cell surface syndecans. Three forms of recombinant ADAM 12 were used in these experiments......-dependent manner attach to ADAM 12 via members of the syndecan family. After binding to syndecans, mesenchymal cells spread and form focal adhesions and actin stress fibers. Integrin beta1 was responsible for cell spreading because function-blocking monoclonal antibodies completely inhibited cell spreading......, and chondroblasts lacking beta1 integrin attached but did not spread. These data suggest that mesenchymal cells use syndecans as the initial receptor for the ADAM 12 cysteine-rich domain-mediated cell adhesion, and then the beta1 integrin to induce cell spreading. Interestingly, carcinoma cells attached but did...

  8. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    HaiFang Yin; Prisca Boisguerin; Hong M Moulton; Corinne Betts; Yiqi Seow; Jordan Boutilier; Qingsong Wang; Anthony Walsh; Bernard Lebleu; Matthew JA Wood

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide) and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP) motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs) in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was ...

  9. The sorting protein PACS-2 promotes ErbB signalling by regulating recycling of the metalloproteinase ADAM17

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dombernowsky, Sarah Louise; Samsøe-Petersen, Jacob; Petersen, Camilla Hansson

    2015-01-01

    The metalloproteinase ADAM17 activates ErbB signalling by releasing ligands from the cell surface, a key step underlying epithelial development, growth and tumour progression. However, mechanisms acutely controlling ADAM17 cell-surface availability to modulate the extent of ErbB ligand release....... PACS-2 co-localizes with ADAM17 on early endosomes and PACS-2 knockdown decreases the recycling and stability of internalized ADAM17. Hence, PACS-2 sustains ADAM17 cell-surface activity by diverting ADAM17 away from degradative pathways. Interestingly, Pacs2-deficient mice display significantly reduced...

  10. IL-1beta signals through the EGF receptor and activates Egr-1 through MMP-ADAM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estella Sanchez-Guerrero

    Full Text Available The immediate-early gene Egr-1 controls the inducible expression of many genes implicated in the pathogenesis of a range of vascular disorders, yet our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the rapid expression of this prototypic zinc finger transcription factor is poor. Here we show that Egr-1 expression induced by IL-1beta is dependent on metalloproteinases (MMP and a disintegrin and a metalloproteinase (ADAM. Pharmacologic MMP/ADAM inhibitors and siRNA knockdown prevent IL-1beta induction of Egr-1. Further, IL-1beta activates Egr-1 via the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. This is blocked by EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibition and EGFR knockdown. IL-1beta induction of Egr-1 expression is reduced in murine embryonic fibroblasts (mEFs deficient in ADAM17 despite unbiased expression of EGFR and IL-1RI in ADAM17-deficient and wild-type mEFs. Finally, we show that IL-1beta-inducible wound repair after mechanical injury requires both EGFR and MMP/ADAM. This study reports for the first time that Egr-1 induction by IL-1beta involves EGFR and MMP/ADAM-dependent EGFR phosphorylation.

  11. Myofiber-specific TEAD1 overexpression drives satellite cell hyperplasia and counters pathological effects of dystrophin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Sheryl; Kim, Ju-Ryoung; Low, SiewHui; Tsika, Richard W; Lepper, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    When unperturbed, somatic stem cells are poised to affect immediate tissue restoration upon trauma. Yet, little is known regarding the mechanistic basis controlling initial and homeostatic ‘scaling’ of stem cell pool sizes relative to their target tissues for effective regeneration. Here, we show that TEAD1-expressing skeletal muscle of transgenic mice features a dramatic hyperplasia of muscle stem cells (i.e. satellite cells, SCs) but surprisingly without affecting muscle tissue size. Super-numeral SCs attain a ‘normal’ quiescent state, accelerate regeneration, and maintain regenerative capacity over several injury-induced regeneration bouts. In dystrophic muscle, the TEAD1 transgene also ameliorated the pathology. We further demonstrate that hyperplastic SCs accumulate non-cell-autonomously via signal(s) from the TEAD1-expressing myofiber, suggesting that myofiber-specific TEAD1 overexpression activates a physiological signaling pathway(s) that determines initial and homeostatic SC pool size. We propose that TEAD1 and its downstream effectors are medically relevant targets for enhancing muscle regeneration and ameliorating muscle pathology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15461.001 PMID:27725085

  12. Role of ADAMs in cancer formation and progression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) comprise a family of multidomain transmembrane and secreted proteins. One of their best-established roles is the release of biologically important ligands, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-alpha, and amphiregulin. Because these ligands have been implicated in the formation and progression of tumors, it might be expected that the specific ADAMs involved in their release would also be involved in malignancy. Consistent with this hypothesis, emerging data from model systems suggest that ADAMs, such as ADAM-9, ADAM-12, ADAM-15, and ADAM-17, are causally involved in tumor formation\\/progression. In human cancer, specific ADAMs are up-regulated, with levels generally correlating with parameters of tumor progression and poor outcome. In preclinical models, selective ADAM inhibitors against ADAM-10 and ADAM-17 have been shown to synergize with existing therapies in decreasing tumor growth. The ADAMs are thus a new family of potential targets for the treatment of cancer, especially malignancies that are dependent on human epidermal growth factor receptor ligands or tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

  13. Two Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in ADAM12 Gene Are Associated with Early and Late Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis in Estonian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kerna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate associations of selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in ADAM12 gene with radiographic knee osteoarthritis (rKOA in Estonian population. Methods. The rs3740199, rs1871054, rs1278279, and rs1044122 SNPs in ADAM12 gene were genotyped in 438 subjects (303 women from population-based cohort, aged 32 to 57 (mean 45.4. The rKOA features were evaluated in the tibiofemoral joint (TFJ and patellofemoral joint. Results. The early rKOA was found in 51.4% of investigated subjects (72% women and 12.3% of participants (63% women had advanced stage of diseases. The A allele of synonymous SNP rs1044122 was associated with early rKOA in TFJ, predominantly with the presence of osteophytes in females (OR 1.57; 95% CI 1.08–2.29, . The C allele of intron polymorphism rs1871054 carried risk for advanced rKOA, mostly to osteophyte formation in TFJ in males (OR 3.03; 95% CI 1.11–7.53, . Also the CCAA haplotype of ADAM12 was associated with osteophytosis, again mostly in TFJ in males (. For rs3740199 and rs1278279, no statistically significant associations were observed. Conclusion.  ADAM12 gene variants are related to rKOA risk during the early and late stages of diseases. The genetic risk seems to be predominantly associated with the appearance of osteophytes—a marker of bone remodelling and neochondrogenesis.

  14. Expression of FAP, ADAM12, WISP1, and SOX11 is heterogeneous in aggressive fibromatosis and spatially relates to the histologic features of tumor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misemer, Benjamin S; Skubitz, Amy P N; Carlos Manivel, J; Schmechel, Stephen C; Cheng, Edward Y; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Corless, Christopher L; Skubitz, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) represents a group of tumors with a variable and unpredictable clinical course, characterized by a monoclonal proliferation of myofibroblastic cells. The optimal treatment for AF remains unclear. Identification and validation of genes whose expression patterns are associated with AF may elucidate biological mechanisms in AF, and aid treatment selection. This study was designed to examine the protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of four genes, ADAM12, FAP, SOX11, and WISP1, that were found in an earlier study to be uniquely overexpressed in AF compared with normal tissues. Digital image analysis was performed to evaluate inter- and intratumor heterogeneity, and correlate protein expression with histologic features, including a histopathologic assessment of tumor activity, defined by nuclear chromatin density ratio (CDR). AF tumors exhibited marked inter- and intratumor histologic heterogeneity. Pathologic assessment of tumor activity and digital assessment of average nuclear size and CDR were all significantly correlated. IHC revealed protein expression of all four genes. IHC staining for ADAM12, FAP, and WISP1 correlated with CDR and was higher, whereas SOX11 staining was lower in tumors with earlier recurrence following excision. All four proteins were expressed, and the regional variation in tumor activity within and among AF cases was demonstrated. A spatial correlation between protein expression and nuclear morphology was observed. IHC also correlated with the probability of recurrence following excision. These proteins may be involved in AF pathogenesis and the corresponding pathways could serve as potential targets of therapy

  15. The polyproline site in hinge 2 influences the functional capacity of truncated dystrophins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen B Banks

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in dystrophin can lead to Duchenne muscular dystrophy or the more mild form of the disease, Becker muscular dystrophy. The hinge 3 region in the rod domain of dystrophin is particularly prone to deletion mutations. In-frame deletions of hinge 3 are predicted to lead to BMD, however the severity of disease can vary considerably. Here we performed extensive structure-function analyses of truncated dystrophins with modified hinges and spectrin-like repeats in mdx mice. We found that the polyproline site in hinge 2 profoundly influences the functional capacity of a microdystrophin(DeltaR4-R23/DeltaCT with a large deletion in the hinge 3 region. Inclusion of polyproline in microdystrophin(DeltaR4-R23/DeltaCT led to small myofibers (12% smaller than wild-type, Achilles myotendinous disruption, ringed fibers, and aberrant neuromuscular junctions in the mdx gastrocnemius muscles. Replacing hinge 2 of microdystrophin(DeltaR4-R23/DeltaCT with hinge 3 significantly improved the functional capacity to prevent muscle degeneration, increase muscle fiber area, and maintain the junctions. We conclude that the rigid alpha-helical structure of the polyproline site significantly impairs the functional capacity of truncated dystrophins to maintain appropriate connections between the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix.

  16. Dissecting the role of ADAM10 as a mediator of Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hoven, Gisela; Rivas, Amable J; Neukirch, Claudia; Klein, Stefan; Hamm, Christian; Qin, Qianqian; Meyenburg, Martina; Füser, Sabine; Saftig, Paul; Hellmann, Nadja; Postina, Rolf; Husmann, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacterial infections in humans, including life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia and sepsis. Its small membrane-pore-forming α-toxin is considered an important virulence factor. By destroying cell-cell contacts through cleavage of cadherins, the metalloproteinase ADAM10 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10) critically contributes to α-toxin-dependent pathology of experimental S. aureus infections in mice. Moreover, ADAM10 was proposed to be a receptor for α-toxin. However, it is unclear whether the catalytic activity or specific domains of ADAM10 are involved in mediating binding and/or subsequent cytotoxicity of α-toxin. Also, it is not known how α-toxin triggers ADAM10's enzymatic activity, and whether ADAM10 is invariably required for all α-toxin action on cells. In the present study, we show that efficient cleavage of the ADAM10 substrate epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) requires supra-cytotoxic concentrations of α-toxin, leading to significant increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)]; the fall in cellular ATP levels, typically following membrane perforation, became observable at far lower concentrations. Surprisingly, ADAM10 was dispensable for α-toxin-dependent xenophagic targeting of S. aureus, whereas a role for α-toxin attack on the plasma membrane was confirmed. The catalytic site of ADAM10, furin cleavage site, cysteine switch and intracellular domain of ADAM10 were not required for α-toxin binding and subsequent cytotoxicity. In contrast, an essential role for the disintegrin domain and the prodomain emerged. Thus, co-expression of the prodomain with prodomain-deficient ADAM10 reconstituted binding of α-toxin and susceptibility of ADAM10-deficient cells. The results of the present study may help to inform structural analyses of α-toxin-ADAM10 interactions and to design novel strategies to counteract S. aureus α-toxin action. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf

  17. Targeted Exon Skipping to Address “Leaky” Mutations in the Dystrophin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-truncating mutations in the dystrophin gene lead to the progressive muscle wasting disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy, whereas in-frame deletions typically manifest as the milder allelic condition, Becker muscular dystrophy. Antisense oligomer-induced exon skipping can modify dystrophin gene expression so that a disease-associated dystrophin pre-mRNA is processed into a Becker muscular dystrophy-like mature transcript. Despite genomic deletions that may encompass hundreds of kilobases of the gene, some dystrophin mutations appear “leaky”, and low levels of high molecular weight, and presumably semi-functional, dystrophin are produced. A likely causative mechanism is endogenous exon skipping, and Duchenne individuals with higher baseline levels of dystrophin may respond more efficiently to the administration of splice-switching antisense oligomers. We optimized excision of exons 8 and 9 in normal human myoblasts, and evaluated several oligomers in cells from eight Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients with deletions in a known “leaky” region of the dystrophin gene. Inter-patient variation in response to antisense oligomer induced skipping in vitro appeared minimal. We describe oligomers targeting exon 8, that unequivocally increase dystrophin above baseline in vitro, and propose that patients with leaky mutations are ideally suited for participation in antisense oligomer mediated splice-switching clinical studies.

  18. Fisetin suppresses ADAM9 expression and inhibits invasion of glioma cancer cells through increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Min; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Jin-Ming; Jan, Hsun-Jin; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Lin, Shin-Huey; Lai, Chung-Yu

    2015-05-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone) is a naturally occurring flavonoid which is widely distributed in plants. It has been reported to possess some anticancer and anti-invasive capabilities. We set out to explore the effects of fisetin on antimetastatic and its mechanism of action in GBM8401 cells. The results indicated that fisetin exhibited effective inhibition of cell migration and inhibited the invasion of GBM8401 cells under non-cytotoxic concentrations. To identify the potential targets of fisetin, human proteinase antibody array analysis was performed, and the results indicated that the fisetin treatment inhibited the expression of ADAM9 protein and mRNA, which are known to contribute to the progression of glioma cancer. Our results showed that fisetin phosphorylated ERK1/2 in a sustained way that contributed to the inhibited ADAM9 protein and mRNA expression determined by Western blot and RT-PCR. Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 by U0126 or transfection with the siERK plasmid significantly abolished the fisetin-inhibited migration and invasion through activation of the ERK1/2 pathway. In summary, our results suggest that fisetin might be a potential therapeutic agent against human glioma cells based on its capacity to activate ERK1/2 and to inhibit ADAM9 expression.

  19. Atypical B12 Deficiency with Nonresolving Paraesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Haider

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12 deficiency can present with various hematological, gastrointestinal and neurological manifestations. We report a case of elderly female who presented with neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency where the final work-up revealed polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes (POEMS. This case suggests that, although POEMS syndrome is a rare entity, it can present with vitamin-B12 deficiency and thus specific work up for early diagnosis of POEMS should be considered in patients with B12 deficiency unresponsive to therapy.

  20. Heregulin-induced epigenetic regulation of the utrophin-A promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basu, Utpal; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Baby, Santhosh M

    2007-01-01

    Utrophin is the autosomal homolog of dystrophin, the product of the Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus. Utrophin is of therapeutic interest since its over-expression can compensate dystrophin's absence. Utrophin is enriched at neuromuscular junctions due to heregulin-mediated utrophin......-A promoter activation. We demonstrate that heregulin activated MSK1/2 and phosphorylated histone H3 at serine 10 in cultured C2C12 muscle cells, in an ERK-dependent manner. MSK1/2 inhibition suppressed heregulin-mediated utrophin-A activation. MSK1 over-expression potentiated heregulin-mediated utrophin...

  1. Eosinophilia of dystrophin-deficient muscle is promoted by perforin-mediated cytotoxicity by T cell effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, B.; Spencer, M. J.; Nakamura, G.; Tseng-Ong, L.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) contribute to muscle pathology in the dystrophin-null mutant mouse (mdx) model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy through perforin-dependent and perforin-independent mechanisms. We have assessed whether the CTL-mediated pathology includes the promotion of eosinophilia in dystrophic muscle, and thereby provides a secondary mechanism through which CTLs contribute to muscular dystrophy. Quantitative immunohistochemistry confirmed that eosinophilia is a component of the mdx dystrophy. In addition, electron microscopic observations show that eosinophils traverse the basement membrane of mdx muscle fibers and display sites of close apposition of eosinophil and muscle membranes. The close membrane apposition is characterized by impingement of eosinophilic rods of major basic protein into the muscle cell membrane. Transfer of mdx splenocytes and mdx muscle extracts to irradiated C57 mice by intraperitoneal injection resulted in muscle eosinophilia in the recipient mice. Double-mutant mice lacking dystrophin and perforin showed less eosinophilia than was displayed by mdx mice that expressed perforin. Finally, administration of prednisolone, which has been shown previously to reduce the concentration of CTLs in dystrophic muscle, produced a significant reduction in eosinophilia. These findings indicate that eosinophilia is a component of the mdx pathology that is promoted by perforin-dependent cytotoxicity of effector T cells. However, some eosinophilia of mdx muscle is independent of perforin-mediated processes.

  2. Expression of FAP, ADAM12, WISP1, and SOX11 is heterogeneous in aggressive fibromatosis and spatially relates to the histologic features of tumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misemer, Benjamin S; Skubitz, Amy P N; Carlos Manivel, J; Schmechel, Stephen C; Cheng, Edward Y; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Corless, Christopher L; Skubitz, Keith M

    2014-02-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) represents a group of tumors with a variable and unpredictable clinical course, characterized by a monoclonal proliferation of myofibroblastic cells. The optimal treatment for AF remains unclear. Identification and validation of genes whose expression patterns are associated with AF may elucidate biological mechanisms in AF, and aid treatment selection. This study was designed to examine the protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of four genes, ADAM12, FAP, SOX11, and WISP1, that were found in an earlier study to be uniquely overexpressed in AF compared with normal tissues. Digital image analysis was performed to evaluate inter- and intratumor heterogeneity, and correlate protein expression with histologic features, including a histopathologic assessment of tumor activity, defined by nuclear chromatin density ratio (CDR). AF tumors exhibited marked inter- and intratumor histologic heterogeneity. Pathologic assessment of tumor activity and digital assessment of average nuclear size and CDR were all significantly correlated. IHC revealed protein expression of all four genes. IHC staining for ADAM12, FAP, and WISP1 correlated with CDR and was higher, whereas SOX11 staining was lower in tumors with earlier recurrence following excision. All four proteins were expressed, and the regional variation in tumor activity within and among AF cases was demonstrated. A spatial correlation between protein expression and nuclear morphology was observed. IHC also correlated with the probability of recurrence following excision. These proteins may be involved in AF pathogenesis and the corresponding pathways could serve as potential targets of therapy. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  4. Selective Modulation of Integrin-mediated Cell Migration by Distinct ADAM Family MembersV⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Bridges, Lance C.; White, Judith M.

    2005-01-01

    A disintegrin and a metalloprotease (ADAM) family members have been implicated in many biological processes. Although it is recognized that recombinant ADAM disintegrin domains can interact with integrins, little is known about ADAM-integrin interactions in cellular context. Here, we tested whether ADAMs can selectively regulate integrin-mediated cell migration. ADAMs were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells that express defined integrins (α4β1, α5β1, or both), and cell migration on full-length fibronectin or on its α4β1 or α5β1 binding fragments was studied. We found that ADAMs inhibit integrin-mediated cell migration in patterns dictated by the integrin binding profiles of their isolated disintegrin domains. ADAM12 inhibited cell migration mediated by the α4β1 but not the α5β1 integrin. ADAM17 had the reciprocal effect; it inhibited α5β1- but not α4β1-mediated cell migration. ADAM19 and ADAM33 inhibited migration mediated by both α4β1 and α5β1 integrins. A point mutation in the ADAM12 disintegrin loop partially reduced the inhibitory effect of ADAM12 on cell migration on the α4β1 binding fragment of fibronectin, whereas mutations that block metalloprotease activity had no effect. Our results indicate that distinct ADAMs can modulate cell migration mediated by specific integrins in a pattern dictated, at least in part, by their disintegrin domains. PMID:16079176

  5. Dystrophin analysis in carriers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, Edo M.; Ginjaar, Ieke B.; Bakker, Egbert; de Visser, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Associations between clinical phenotype (muscle weakness, dilated cardiomyopathy) and dystrophin abnormalities in muscle tissue among definite carriers of Duchenne (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) were investigated. No associations between dystrophin abnormalities and clinical variables in

  6. A dual inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases, [¹⁸F]FB-ML5, as a molecular probe for non-invasive MMP/ADAM-targeted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak, Nathalie; Castelli, Riccardo; Tuin, Adriaan W; Overkleeft, Herman S; Wisastra, Rosalina; Dekker, Frank J; Prély, Laurette M; Bischoff, Rainer; Bischoff, Rainer P M; van Waarde, Aren; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Elsinga, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    Numerous clinical studies have shown a correlation between increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)/a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) activity and poor outcome of cancer. Various MMP inhibitors (MMPIs) have been developed for therapeutic purposes in oncology. In addition, molecular imaging of MMP/ADAM levels in vivo would allow the diagnosis of tumors. We selected the dual inhibitor of MMPs and ADAMs, ML5, which is a hydroxamate-based inhibitor with affinities for many MMPs and ADAMs. ML5 was radiolabelled with (18)F and the newly obtained radiolabelled inhibitor was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. ML5 was radiolabelled by direct acylation with N-succinimidyl-4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) for PET (positron emission tomography). The resulting radiotracer [(18)F]FB-ML5 was evaluated in vitro in human bronchial epithelium 16HBE cells and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The non-radioactive probe FB-ML5 and native ML5 were tested in a fluorogenic inhibition assay against MMP-2, -9, -12 and ADAM-17. The in vivo kinetics of [(18)F]FB-ML5 were examined in a HT1080 tumor-bearing mouse model. Specificity of probe binding was examined by co-injection of 0 or 2.5mg/kg ML5. ML5 and FB-ML5 showed high affinity for MMP-2, -9, -12 and ADAM-17; indeed IC50 values were respectively 7.4 ± 2.0, 19.5 ± 2.8, 2.0 ± 0.2 and 5.7 ± 2.2 nM and 12.5 ± 3.1, 31.5 ± 13.7, 138.0 ± 10.9 and 24.7 ± 2.8 nM. Radiochemical yield of HPLC-purified [(18)F]FB-ML5 was 13-16% (corrected for decay). Cellular binding of [(18)F]FB-ML5 was reduced by 36.6% and 27.5% in MCF-7 and 16 HBE cells, respectively, after co-incubation with 10 μM of ML5. In microPET scans, HT1080 tumors exhibited a low and homogeneous uptake of the tracer. Tumors of mice injected with [(18)F]FB-ML5 showed a SUVmean of 0.145 ± 0.064 (n=6) which decreased to 0.041 ± 0.027 (n=6) after target blocking (pFB-ML5 demonstrated rather low binding in ADAM-17 overexpressing cell lines. [(18)F]FB-ML5 uptake showed significant

  7. FlipADAM: a potential new SPECT imaging agent for the serotonin transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Julie L.; Deutsch, Eric C. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Oya, Shunichi [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Hank F., E-mail: kunghf@gmail.co [Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Introduction: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the serotonin transporter (SERT) in the brain is a useful tool for examining normal physiological functions and disease states involving the serotonergic system. The goal of this study was to develop an improved SPECT radiotracer with faster kinetics than the current leading SPECT tracer, [{sup 123}I]ADAM, for selective SERT imaging. Methods: The in vitro binding affinities of (2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4'-iodophenylthio)benzenamine) (FlipADAM) (1c), were determined using Hampshire pig kidney cells stably overexpressing the serotonin, norepinephrine (NET) or dopamine transporter (DAT). Localization of [{sup 125}I]FlipADAM (1c) was evaluated through biodistribution and autoradiography in male Sprague Dawley rats, and the specificity of binding was assessed by injecting selective SERT or NET inhibitors prior to [{sup 125}I]FlipADAM (1c). Results: FlipADAM (1c) displayed a high binding affinity for SERT (K{sub i}=1.0 nM) and good selectivity over NET and DAT binding (43-fold and 257-fold, respectively). [{sup 125}I]FlipADAM (1c) successfully penetrated the blood brain barrier, as evidenced by the brain uptake at 2 min (1.75% dose/g). [{sup 125}I]FlipADAM(1c) also had a good target to non-target (hypothalamus/cerebellum) ratio of 3.35 at 60 min post-injection. In autoradiography studies, [{sup 125}I]FlipADAM (1c) showed selective localization in SERT-rich brain regions such as the thalamic nuclei, amygdala, dorsal raphe nuclei and other areas. Conclusion: [{sup 125}I]FlipADAM (1c) exhibited faster clearance from the brain and time to binding equilibrium when compared to [{sup 125}I]2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-phenylthio)-5-iodophenylamine [{sup 125}I]ADAM (1b) and a higher target to non-target ratio when compared to [{sup 125}I]5-iodo-2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-phenylthio)benzyl alcohol [{sup 125}I]IDAM (1a). Therefore, [{sup 123}I]FlipADAM (1c) may be an improved

  8. Comparison of the diagnostic values of circulating steroid hormones, VEGF-A, PIGF, and ADAM12 in women with ectopic pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Shien

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several peripheral proteins that might be useful for detecting the presence of ectopic pregnancy (EP have been evaluated, but none have been proven entirely useful in the clinic. We investigated the presence and the possible changes in circulating molecules that distinguish between normal intrauterine pregnancy (IUP and tubal ectopic pregnancy. Methods Non-pregnant women during the menstrual cycle, women with IUP, and women with tubal EP after informed consent. Serum levels of 17β-estradiol (E2, progesterone (P4, testosterone (T, beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A, placental growth factor (PIGF, and a distintegrin and metalloprotease protein 12 (ADAM12 were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to assess the diagnostic discrimination of EP and gestational age-matched IUP. Results E2, P4, PIGF, and ADAM12 levels increased and β-hCG decreased throughout IUP. E2 and VEGF-A levels were significantly different between women with tubal EP and IUP. However, using a serum β-hCG cut-off of less than 1000 mIU/mL, P4 was significantly lower in women with tubal EP compared to IUP. Although E2 was inversely correlated with VEGF-A in women in the early stages of IUP, E2 was not correlated with VEGF-A in women with EP prior to tubal surgery. There were no significant differences in either PIGF or ADAM12 alone between women with tubal EP or IUP. Although no significant correlations were seen between E2 and PIGF or P4 and ADAM12 in women in the early stages of IUP, E2 was positively correlated with PIGF and P4 was positively correlated with ADAM12 in women with EP prior to tubal surgery. Our studies defined associations but not causality. Conclusions Individual measurements of serum E2 or VEGF-A levels are strongly related to early pregnancy outcomes for women with IUP and EP, and pregnancy-associated E2 and VEGF-A levels provide diagnostic accuracy for the

  9. How common is vitamin B-12 deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Lindsay H

    2009-02-01

    In considering the vitamin B-12 fortification of flour, it is important to know who is at risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency and whether those individuals would benefit from flour fortification. This article reviews current knowledge of the prevalence and causes of vitamin B-12 deficiency and considers whether fortification would improve the status of deficient subgroups of the population. In large surveys in the United States and the United Kingdom, approximately 6% of those aged > or =60 y are vitamin B-12 deficient (plasma vitamin B-12 life. In developing countries, deficiency is much more common, starting in early life and persisting across the life span. Inadequate intake, due to low consumption of animal-source foods, is the main cause of low serum vitamin B-12 in younger adults and likely the main cause in poor populations worldwide; in most studies, serum vitamin B-12 concentration is correlated with intake of this vitamin. In older persons, food-bound cobalamin malabsorption becomes the predominant cause of deficiency, at least in part due to gastric atrophy, but it is likely that most elderly can absorb the vitamin from fortified food. Fortification of flour with vitamin B-12 is likely to improve the status of most persons with low stores of this vitamin. However, intervention studies are still needed to assess efficacy and functional benefits of increasing intake of the amounts likely to be consumed in flour, including in elderly persons with varying degrees of gastric atrophy.

  10. Metabolic dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamics in the utrophin-dystrophin deficient mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghna Pant

    Full Text Available The utrophin-dystrophin deficient (DKO mouse model has been widely used to understand the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. However, it is unclear as to what extent muscle pathology affects metabolism. Therefore, the present study was focused on understanding energy expenditure in the whole animal and in isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle and to determine changes in metabolic enzymes. Our results show that the 8 week-old DKO mice consume higher oxygen relative to activity levels. Interestingly the EDL muscle from DKO mouse consumes higher oxygen per unit integral force, generates less force and performs better in the presence of pyruvate thus mimicking a slow twitch muscle. We also found that the expression of hexokinase 1 and pyruvate kinase M2 was upregulated several fold suggesting increased glycolytic flux. Additionally, there is a dramatic increase in dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp 1 and mitofusin 2 protein levels suggesting increased mitochondrial fission and fusion, a feature associated with increased energy demand and altered mitochondrial dynamics. Collectively our studies point out that the dystrophic disease has caused significant changes in muscle metabolism. To meet the increased energetic demand, upregulation of metabolic enzymes and regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission is observed in the dystrophic muscle. A better understanding of the metabolic demands and the accompanied alterations in the dystrophic muscle can help us design improved intervention therapies along with existing drug treatments for the DMD patients.

  11. Structure of a WW domain-containing fragment of dystrophin complexed with {beta}-dystroglycan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, X.; Poy, F.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Sudol, M.; Eck, M. J.; Biosciences Division; Dana Farber Cancer Inst.; Harvard Medical School; Mount Sinai School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    Dystrophin and {beta}-dystroglycan are components of the dystrophin--glycoprotein complex (DGC), a multimolecular assembly that spans the cell membrane and links the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular basal lamina. Defects in the dystrophin gene are the cause of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. The C-terminal region of dystrophin binds the cytoplasmic tail of {beta}-dystroglycan, in part through the interaction of its WW domain with a proline-rich motif in the tail of {beta}-dystroglycan. Here we report the crystal structure of this portion of dystrophin in complex with the proline-rich binding site in {beta}-dystroglycan. The structure shows that the dystrophin WW domain is embedded in an adjacent helical region that contains two EF-hand-like domains. The {beta}-dystroglycan peptide binds a composite surface formed by the WW domain and one of these EF-hands. Additionally, the structure reveals striking similarities in the mechanisms of proline recognition employed by WW domains and SH3 domains.

  12. TNF-α-Induced microRNAs Control Dystrophin Expression in Becker Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorillo, Alyson A; Heier, Christopher R; Novak, James S; Tully, Christopher B; Brown, Kristy J; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Vila, Maria C; Ngheim, Peter P; Bello, Luca; Kornegay, Joe N; Angelini, Corrado; Partridge, Terence A; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Hoffman, Eric P

    2015-09-08

    The amount and distribution of dystrophin protein in myofibers and muscle is highly variable in Becker muscular dystrophy and in exon-skipping trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we investigate a molecular basis for this variability. In muscle from Becker patients sharing the same exon 45-47 in-frame deletion, dystrophin levels negatively correlate with microRNAs predicted to target dystrophin. Seven microRNAs inhibit dystrophin expression in vitro, and three are validated in vivo (miR-146b/miR-374a/miR-31). microRNAs are expressed in dystrophic myofibers and increase with age and disease severity. In exon-skipping-treated mdx mice, microRNAs are significantly higher in muscles with low dystrophin rescue. TNF-α increases microRNA levels in vitro whereas NFκB inhibition blocks this in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these data show that microRNAs contribute to variable dystrophin levels in muscular dystrophy. Our findings suggest a model where chronic inflammation in distinct microenvironments induces pathological microRNAs, initiating a self-sustaining feedback loop that exacerbates disease progression. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. TNF-α-Induced microRNAs Control Dystrophin Expression in Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson A. Fiorillo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The amount and distribution of dystrophin protein in myofibers and muscle is highly variable in Becker muscular dystrophy and in exon-skipping trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we investigate a molecular basis for this variability. In muscle from Becker patients sharing the same exon 45–47 in-frame deletion, dystrophin levels negatively correlate with microRNAs predicted to target dystrophin. Seven microRNAs inhibit dystrophin expression in vitro, and three are validated in vivo (miR-146b/miR-374a/miR-31. microRNAs are expressed in dystrophic myofibers and increase with age and disease severity. In exon-skipping-treated mdx mice, microRNAs are significantly higher in muscles with low dystrophin rescue. TNF-α increases microRNA levels in vitro whereas NFκB inhibition blocks this in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these data show that microRNAs contribute to variable dystrophin levels in muscular dystrophy. Our findings suggest a model where chronic inflammation in distinct microenvironments induces pathological microRNAs, initiating a self-sustaining feedback loop that exacerbates disease progression.

  14. [Vitamin B12 deficiency: what's new?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braillard, O; Casini, A; Samii, K; Rufenacht, P; Junod, Perron N

    2012-09-26

    Vitamin B12 screening is only recommended among symptomatic patients or in those with risk factors. The main cause of vitamin B12 deficiency is the food cobalamin malabsorption syndrom. Holotranscobalamin is a more reliable marker than cyanocobalamin to confirm vitamin B12 deficiency, but it has not been validated yet in complex situations. An autoimmune gastritis must be excluded in the absence of risk factors but in the presence of a probable deficiency. Oral substitution treatment is effective but requires excellent therapeutic compliance and close follow-up to monitor the response to treatment. It has not yet been studied among patients suffering from severe symptoms, inflammatory bowel disease and ileal resection.

  15. Evolutionary study of vertebrate and invertebrate members of the dystrophin and utrophin gene family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R.G.; Nicholson, L.; Bobrow, M. [Paediatric Research Unit, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Vertebrates express two members of the dystrophin gene family. The prototype, dystrophin, is expressed in muscle and neural tissue, and is defective in the human disorders Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD, BMD). The dystrophin homologue utrophin is more generally expressed but has not yet been associated with a genetic disorder. The function of neither protein is clear. A comparison of human utrophin with the known dystrophins (human, mouse, chicken, Torpedo) suggests that dystrophin and utrophin diverged before the vertebrate radiation. We have used reverse-transcript PCR (RT-PCR) directed by degenerate primers to characterize dystrophin and utrophin transcripts from a range of vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Our results suggest that the duplication leading to distinct dystrophin and utrophin genes occurred close to the point of divergence of urochordates from the cephalochordate-vertebrate lineage. This divergence may have occurred to fulfill a novel role which arose at this point, or may reflect a need for separate regulation of the neuromuscular and other functions of the ancient dystrophin. Our data include sequences of the first non-human utrophins to be characterized, and show these to be substantially more divergent than their cognate dystrophins. In addition, our results provide a large body of information regarding the tolerance of amino acid positions in the cysteine-rich and C-terminal domains to substitution. This will aid the interpretations of DMD and BMD missense mutations in these regions.

  16. Recombinant disintegrin domain of ADAM15 inhibits the proliferation and migration of Bel-7402 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Y.; Chu, M.; Du, F.F.; Lei, J.Y.; Chen, Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Gong, X.H.; Ma, X.; Jin, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •rhddADAM15 inhibited the proliferation and migration of Bel-7402 cells. •rhddADAM15 inhibited growth and metastasis of Bel-7402 cells in zebrafish xenograft. •rhddADAM15 induced apoptosis in Bel-7402 cells and somatic cells of zebrafish. •Cell-cycle in Bel-7402 cells showed a partial G 2 /S arrest. •Activity of caspases 8, 9 and 3 was increased in rhddADAM15-treated Bel-7402 cells. -- Abstract: ADAM15 (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 15), a transmembrane protein containing seven domains, interacts with some integrins via its disintegrin domain and overexpresses in many solid tumors. In this study, the effect of the recombinant human disintegrin domain (rhddADAM15) on the proliferation and migration of Bel-7402 cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo in zebrafish xenografts. rhddADAM15 (4 μM) severely inhibited the proliferation and migration of Bel-7402 cells, inducing a partial G 2 /S arrest and morphological nucleus changes of apoptosis. Moreover, the activity of caspases 8, 9 and 3 in Bel-7402 cells was increased. In addition, the zebrafish was used as a model for apoptosis-induction and tumor-xenograft. rhddADAM15 (1 pM) inhibited the growth and metastasis of Bel-7402 cell xenografts in zebrafish and a lower concentration (0.1 pM) induced severe apoptosis in the somatic cells of zebrafish. In conclusion, our data identified rhddADAM15 as a potent inhibitor of tumor growth and metastasis, making it a promising tool for use in anticancer treatment

  17. Recombinant disintegrin domain of ADAM15 inhibits the proliferation and migration of Bel-7402 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y. [Key Laboratory of Industrial Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jiangnan University, 1800 Lihu Rd., Wuxi, Jiangsu 214122 (China); Chu, M. [Key Laboratory of Industrial Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Jiangnan University, 1800 Lihu Rd., Wuxi, Jiangsu 214122 (China); Du, F.F.; Lei, J.Y.; Chen, Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Gong, X.H.; Ma, X. [Key Laboratory of Industrial Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jiangnan University, 1800 Lihu Rd., Wuxi, Jiangsu 214122 (China); Jin, J., E-mail: jinjian31@126.com [Key Laboratory of Industrial Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jiangnan University, 1800 Lihu Rd., Wuxi, Jiangsu 214122 (China)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •rhddADAM15 inhibited the proliferation and migration of Bel-7402 cells. •rhddADAM15 inhibited growth and metastasis of Bel-7402 cells in zebrafish xenograft. •rhddADAM15 induced apoptosis in Bel-7402 cells and somatic cells of zebrafish. •Cell-cycle in Bel-7402 cells showed a partial G{sub 2}/S arrest. •Activity of caspases 8, 9 and 3 was increased in rhddADAM15-treated Bel-7402 cells. -- Abstract: ADAM15 (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 15), a transmembrane protein containing seven domains, interacts with some integrins via its disintegrin domain and overexpresses in many solid tumors. In this study, the effect of the recombinant human disintegrin domain (rhddADAM15) on the proliferation and migration of Bel-7402 cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo in zebrafish xenografts. rhddADAM15 (4 μM) severely inhibited the proliferation and migration of Bel-7402 cells, inducing a partial G{sub 2}/S arrest and morphological nucleus changes of apoptosis. Moreover, the activity of caspases 8, 9 and 3 in Bel-7402 cells was increased. In addition, the zebrafish was used as a model for apoptosis-induction and tumor-xenograft. rhddADAM15 (1 pM) inhibited the growth and metastasis of Bel-7402 cell xenografts in zebrafish and a lower concentration (0.1 pM) induced severe apoptosis in the somatic cells of zebrafish. In conclusion, our data identified rhddADAM15 as a potent inhibitor of tumor growth and metastasis, making it a promising tool for use in anticancer treatment.

  18. Fetal microchimeric cells in a fetus-treats-its-mother paradigm do not contribute to dystrophin production in serially parous mdx females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppanen, Elke Jane; Hodgson, Samantha Susan; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Bou-Gharios, George; Fisk, Nicholas M

    2012-10-10

    Throughout every pregnancy, genetically distinct fetal microchimeric stem/progenitor cells (FMCs) engraft in the mother, persist long after delivery, and may home to damaged maternal tissues. Phenotypically normal fetal lymphoid progenitors have been described to develop in immunodeficient mothers in a fetus-treats-its-mother paradigm. Since stem cells contribute to muscle repair, we assessed this paradigm in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. mdx females were bred serially to either ROSAeGFP males or mdx males to obtain postpartum microchimeras that received either wild-type FMCs or dystrophin-deficient FMCs through serial gestations. To enhance regeneration, notexin was injected into the tibialis anterior of postpartum mice. FMCs were detected by qPCR at a higher frequency in injected compared to noninjected side muscle (P=0.02). However, the number of dystrophin-positive fibers was similar in mothers delivering wild-type compared to mdx pups. In addition, there was no correlation between FMC detection and percentage dystrophin, and no GFP+ve FMCs were identified that expressed dystrophin. In 10/11 animals, GFP+ve FMCs were detected by immunohistochemistry, of which 60% expressed CD45 with 96% outside the basal lamina defining myofiber contours. Finally we confirmed lack of FMC contribution to statellite cells in postpartum mdx females mated with Myf5-LacZ males. We conclude that the FMC contribution to regenerating muscles is insufficient to have a functional impact.

  19. Voluntary wheel running in dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice: Relationships between exercise parameters and exacerbation of the dystrophic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, Gayle M; White, Jason D

    2011-12-18

    Voluntary wheel running can potentially be used to exacerbate the disease phenotype in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. While it has been established that voluntary wheel running is highly variable between individuals, the key parameters of wheel running that impact the most on muscle pathology have not been examined in detail. We conducted a 2-week test of voluntary wheel running by mdx mice and the impact of wheel running on disease pathology. There was significant individual variation in the average daily distance (ranging from 0.003 ± 0.005 km to 4.48 ± 0.96 km), culminating in a wide range (0.040 km to 67.24 km) of total cumulative distances run by individuals. There was also variation in the number and length of run/rest cycles per night, and the average running rate. Correlation analyses demonstrated that in the quadriceps muscle, a low number of high distance run/rest cycles was the most consistent indicator for increased tissue damage. The amount of rest time between running bouts was a key factor associated with gastrocnemius damage. These data emphasize the need for detailed analysis of individual running performance, consideration of the length of wheel exposure time, and the selection of appropriate muscle groups for analysis, when applying the use of voluntary wheel running to disease exacerbation and/or pre-clinical testing of the efficacy of therapeutic agents in the mdx mouse.

  20. Computational study of the human dystrophin repeats: interaction properties and molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baptiste Legrand

    Full Text Available Dystrophin is a large protein involved in the rare genetic disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. It functions as a mechanical linker between the cytoskeleton and the sarcolemma, and is able to resist shear stresses during muscle activity. In all, 75% of the dystrophin molecule consists of a large central rod domain made up of 24 repeat units that share high structural homology with spectrin-like repeats. However, in the absence of any high-resolution structure of these repeats, the molecular basis of dystrophin central domain's functions has not yet been deciphered. In this context, we have performed a computational study of the whole dystrophin central rod domain based on the rational homology modeling of successive and overlapping tandem repeats and the analysis of their surface properties. Each tandem repeat has very specific surface properties that make it unique. However, the repeats share enough electrostatic-surface similarities to be grouped into four separate clusters. Molecular dynamics simulations of four representative tandem repeats reveal specific flexibility or bending properties depending on the repeat sequence. We thus suggest that the dystrophin central rod domain is constituted of seven biologically relevant sub-domains. Our results provide evidence for the role of the dystrophin central rod domain as a scaffold platform with a wide range of surface features and biophysical properties allowing it to interact with its various known partners such as proteins and membrane lipids. This new integrative view is strongly supported by the previous experimental works that investigated the isolated domains and the observed heterogeneity of the severity of dystrophin related pathologies, especially Becker muscular dystrophy.

  1. PENETAPAN ‘ADAM WALI NIKAH OLEH PEJABAT KUA DI KOTA SEMARANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokhmadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is result of the study that describes the determination concept of adam wali nikah by officials of the Religious Affairs Office (KUA in Semarang, on marriage guardian of an ineligible woman, that because of the bride’s birth is less than six months from her parents’ marriage. Having determined adam marriage guardians’ status, then KUA establishes that the marriage guardian is delegated to KUA officials in each region of Semarang. As for the basis used by those who determine the delegation for the reason of deficient condition of marriage guardians for a female to the KUA is the use of the legal basis contained in adam marriage guardians’ determination in the letter of Director General Guidance and Pilgrimage Affairs Number: D/ED/PW.01/03/1992, in which its position is under the Marriage Legislation No. 1 of 1974 and the Islamic Law Compilation (KHI.

  2. ADAM and ADAMTS Family Proteins and Snake Venom Metalloproteinases: A Structural Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichi Takeda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM family proteins constitute a major class of membrane-anchored multidomain proteinases that are responsible for the shedding of cell-surface protein ectodomains, including the latent forms of growth factors, cytokines, receptors and other molecules. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs are major components in most viper venoms. SVMPs are primarily responsible for hemorrhagic activity and may also interfere with the hemostatic system in envenomed animals. SVMPs are phylogenetically most closely related to ADAMs and, together with ADAMs and related ADAM with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS family proteinases, constitute adamalysins/reprolysins or the M12B clan (MEROPS database of metalloproteinases. Although the catalytic domain structure is topologically similar to that of other metalloproteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases, the M12B proteinases have a modular structure with multiple non-catalytic ancillary domains that are not found in other proteinases. Notably, crystallographic studies revealed that, in addition to the conserved metalloproteinase domain, M12B members share a hallmark cysteine-rich domain designated as the “ADAM_CR” domain. Despite their name, ADAMTSs lack disintegrin-like structures and instead comprise two ADAM_CR domains. This review highlights the current state of our knowledge on the three-dimensional structures of M12B proteinases, focusing on their unique domains that may collaboratively participate in directing these proteinases to specific substrates.

  3. ADAM17 is associated with EMMPRIN and predicts poor prognosis in patients with uterine cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Ying, Mingang; Chen, Guilin; Lin, Ang; Xie, Yunqing; Ohara, Noriyuki; Zhou, Dongmei

    2014-08-01

    Metalloproteinase activities of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17), amphiregulin (AREG), extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in tumor biology. In patients with uterine cervical carcinoma, the expression and prognostic significance of ADAM17 remain to be fully elucidated. The expression of ADAM17, AREG, EMMPRIN, phospho-epidermal growth factor receptor (p-EGFR), phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), MMP-2, and MMP-9 was assessed by immunohistochemistry and/or Western blotting from cervical carcinoma cell lines, SiHa and HeLa cells, and cervical carcinoma tissues. AREG activity was measured by ELISA assay. The correlation of ADAM17, AREG, EMMPRIN, and MMP-9 expression with patients' survival rates was assessed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. RNA interference (RNAi) experiment was performed using small interfering mRNA to ADAM17 and EMMPRIN. ADAM17, EMMPRIN, and MMP-9 protein content was overexpressed in cervical carcinoma tissues compared with normal cervical tissues (P EMMPRIN, and MMP-9 was significantly associated with stages, lymph node metastasis, differentiation, and parametrium invasion (P EMMPRIN, and MMP-9 was significantly correlated with short progression-free survival and overall survival (P EMMPRIN, p-EGFR, p-ERK, MMP-2, and MMP-9 proteins in SiHa and HeLa cells. ELISA assay revealed that AREG activity was stimulated by ADAM17 and was reversed by ADAM17 RNAi in SiHa and HeLa cells. Our data suggest that the increased expression of ADAM17 in cervical cancer is significantly associated with aggressive progression and poor prognosis. ADAM17 may be a molecular marker for predicting the progression and prognosis in cervical cancer.

  4. John Bertram Adams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stafford, G.H.

    1986-01-01

    This is the biography of a man obviously much liked and respected. It gives some personal details but is mainly concerned with his scientific work and achievements on major projects. Thus, some background information on those projects is also given as a context to the work of John Adams. The biography is written in sections; early years, the creation of CERN, Adams at CERN 1953-61, Adams and thermonuclear research 1958-69, (which includes his Directorship of the Culham Laboratory), Adams and the Ministry of Technology 1965-66, member for research of the UK Atomic Energy Authority 1966-69, Adams at CERN 1969-84 (as Director General of the SPS, as Executive Director-General of CERN 1979-81 and work at CERN up to 1984). (UK)

  5. Sarcospan: a small protein with large potential for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purification of the proteins associated with dystrophin, the gene product responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, led to the discovery of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Sarcospan, a 25-kDa transmembrane protein, was the last component to be identified and its function in skeletal muscle has been elusive. This review will focus on progress over the last decade revealing that sarcospan is an important regulator of muscle cell adhesion, strength, and regeneration. Investigations using several transgenic mouse models demonstrate that overexpression of sarcospan in the mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy ameliorates pathology and restores muscle cell binding to laminin. Sarcospan improves cell surface expression of the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes as well as α7β1 integrin, which are the three major laminin-binding complexes in muscle. Utrophin and α7β1 integrin compensate for the loss of dystrophin and the finding that sarcospan increases their abundance at the extra-synaptic sarcolemma supports the use of sarcospan as a therapeutic target. Newly discovered phenotypes in sarcospan-deficient mice, including a reduction in specific force output and increased drop in force in the diaphragm muscle, result from decreased utrophin and dystrophin expression and further reveal sarcospan’s role in determining abundance of these complexes. Dystrophin protein levels and the specific force output of the diaphragm muscle are further reduced upon genetic removal of α7 integrin (Itga7) in SSPN-deficient mice, demonstrating that interactions between integrin and sarcospan are critical for maintenance of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and force production of the diaphragm muscle. Sarcospan is a major regulator of Akt signaling pathways and sarcospan-deficiency significantly impairs muscle regeneration, a process that is dependent on Akt activation. Intriguingly, sarcospan regulates glycosylation of a specific subpopulation of

  6. Ex vivo gene editing of the dystrophin gene in muscle stem cells mediated by peptide nucleic acid single stranded oligodeoxynucleotides induces stable expression of dystrophin in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nik-Ahd, Farnoosh; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which result in the complete absence of dystrophin protein throughout the body. Gene correction strategies hold promise to treating DMD. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated the ability of peptide nucleic acid single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (PNA-ssODNs) to permanently correct single-point mutations at the genomic level. In this study, we show that PNA-ssODNs can target and correct muscle satellite cells (SCs), a population of stem cells capable of self-renewing and differentiating into muscle fibers. When transplanted into skeletal muscles, SCs transfected with correcting PNA-ssODNs were able to engraft and to restore dystrophin expression. The number of dystrophin-positive fibers was shown to significantly increase over time. Expression was confirmed to be the result of the activation of a subpopulation of SCs that had undergone repair as demonstrated by immunofluorescence analyses of engrafted muscles using antibodies specific to full-length dystrophin transcripts and by genomic DNA analysis of dystrophin-positive fibers. Furthermore, the increase in dystrophin expression detected over time resulted in a significant improvement in muscle morphology. The ability of transplanted cells to return into quiescence and to activate upon demand was confirmed in all engrafted muscles following injury. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using gene editing strategies to target and correct SCs and further establish the therapeutic potential of this approach to permanently restore dystrophin expression into muscle of DMD patients. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  7. The ADAMs family of proteases: new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for cancer?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, Michael J

    2011-06-09

    Abstract The ADAMs are transmembrane proteins implicated in proteolysis and cell adhesion. Forty gene members of the family have been identified, of which 21 are believed to be functional in humans. As proteases, their main substrates are the ectodomains of other transmembrane proteins. These substrates include precursor forms of growth factors, cytokines, growth factor receptors, cytokine receptors and several different types of adhesion molecules. Although altered expression of specific ADAMs has been implicated in different diseases, their best-documented role is in cancer formation and progression. ADAMs shown to play a role in cancer include ADAM9, ADAM10, ADAM12, ADAM15 and ADAM17. Two of the ADAMs, i.e., ADAM10 and 17 appear to promote cancer progression by releasing HER\\/EGFR ligands. The released ligands activate HER\\/EGFR signalling that culminates in increased cell proliferation, migration and survival. Consistent with a causative role in cancer, several ADAMs are emerging as potential cancer biomarkers for aiding cancer diagnosis and predicting patient outcome. Furthermore, a number of selective ADAM inhibitors, especially against ADAM10 and ADAM17, have been shown to have anti-cancer effects. At least one of these inhibitors is now undergoing clinical trials in patients with breast cancer.

  8. High Prevalence of Vitamin B12 Deficiency and No Folate Deficiency in Young Children in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette N. Ng’eno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many children in low- and middle-income countries may have inadequate intake of vitamin B12 and folate; data confirming these inadequacies are limited. We used biochemical, demographic, behavioral and anthropometric data to describe the folate and vitamin B12 concentrations among six- to 23-month-old Nepalese children. Vitamin B12 (serum B12 < 150 pmol/L and folate deficiencies (red blood cell (RBC folate < 226.5 nmol/L were assessed. We used logistic regression to identify predictors of vitamin B12 deficiency. The vitamin B12 geometric mean was 186 pmol/L; 30.2% of children were deficient. The mean RBC folate concentration was 13,612 nmol/L; there was no deficiency. Factors associated with vitamin B12 deficiency included: (a age six to 11 months (adjusted odds ratio (aOR 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.18, 1.92 or 12–17 months (aOR 1.38; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.72 compared to 18–23 months; (b being stunted (aOR 1.24; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.50 compared to not being stunted; (c and not eating animal-source foods (aOR 1.85; 95% CI: 1.42, 2.41 compared to eating animal-source foods the previous day. There was a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, but no folate deficiency. Improving early feeding practices, including the consumption of rich sources of vitamin B12, such as animal-source foods and fortified foods, may help decrease deficiency.

  9. First trimester maternal serum PAPP-A, beta-hCG and ADAM12 in prediction of small-for-gestational-age fetuses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kasper; Larsen, Torben; Krebs, Lone

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the ability of predicting fetuses being small-for-gestational-age (SGA) at delivery with the maternal serum markers pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A), beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta-hCG) and A disintegrin and metalloprotease 12 (ADAM12) in first...... trimester. METHODS: In all,36 cases being SGA (birth weight gestational age...

  10. Gastric emptying in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagci, Muenci; Yamac, Kadri; Acar, Kadir; Haznedar, Rauf; Cingi, Elif; Kitapci, Mehmet

    2002-01-01

    The clinical presentation of patients with vitamin B 12 deficiency varies in a spectrum ranging from haematological disorders to neuropsychiatric diseases. In rare cases, orthostatic hypotension, impotence, constipation and urinary retention have been attributed to autonomic nervous system dysfunction due to vitamin B 12 deficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin B 12 deficiency on autonomic nervous system function by studying gastric emptying times (T 1/2 ). Twenty patients with newly diagnosed vitamin B 12 deficiency and 12 control patients with gastritis and normal vitamin B 12 levels were enrolled in this study. Gastroduodenoscopy, endoscopic biopsy, histopathological evaluation of the biopsy specimens and radionuclide gastric emptying studies were performed. After vitamin B 12 replacement therapy for 3 months, radionuclide gastric emptying studies were repeated. Mean gastric emptying T 1/2 in patients before and after treatment and in controls were 103.83±48.80 min, 90.00±17.29 min and 74.55±8.52 min, respectively. The difference in mean gastric emptying T 1/2 between patients before treatment and controls was statistically significant (P 12 treatment (P 1/2 was somewhat shorter. There were no positive or negative correlations between gastric emptying T 1/2 and the following parameters: haemoglobin, vitamin B 12 level and Helicobacter pylori positivity. In conclusion, gastric emptying T 1/2 was prolonged in patients with vitamin B 12 deficiency and this prolongation was not corrected after vitamin B 12 replacement therapy. Although autonomic nervous system dysfunction due to vitamin B 12 deficiency rarely gives rise to clinical manifestations, latent dysfunction demonstrated by laboratory tests seems to be a frequent phenomenon. The level of vitamin B 12 does not correlate with the degree of autonomic nervous system dysfunction measured by radionuclide gastric emptying studies. (orig.)

  11. Screening of point mutations by multiple SSCP analysis in the dystrophin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasa, A.; Baiget, M.; Gallano, P. [Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    1994-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked neuromuscular disorder. The population frequency of DMD is one in approximately 3500 boys, of which one third is thought to be a new mutant. The DMD gene is the largest known to date, spanning over 2,3 Mb in band Xp21.2; 79 exons are transcribed into a 14 Kb mRNA coding for a protein of 427 kD which has been named dystrophin. It has been shown that about 65% of affected boys have a gene deletion with a wide variation in localization and size. The remaining affected individuals who have no detectable deletions or duplications would probably carry more subtle mutations that are difficult to detect. These mutations occur in several different exons and seem to be unique to single patients. Their identification represents a formidable goal because of the large size and complexity of the dystrophin gene. SSCP is a very efficient method for the detection of point mutations if the parameters that affect the separation of the strands are optimized for a particular DNA fragment. The multiple SSCP allows the simultaneous study of several exons, and implies the use of different conditions because no single set of conditions will be optimal for all fragments. Seventy-eight DMD patients with no deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene were selected for the multiple SSCP analysis. Genomic DNA from these patients was amplified using the primers described for the diagnosis procedure (muscle promoter and exons 3, 8, 12, 16, 17, 19, 32, 45, 48 and 51). We have observed different mobility shifts in bands corresponding to exons 8, 12, 43 and 51. In exons 17 and 45, altered electrophoretic patterns were found in different samples identifying polymorphisms already described.

  12. Phase 2a study of ataluren-mediated dystrophin production in patients with nonsense mutation Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Finkel

    Full Text Available Approximately 13% of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD have a nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene, resulting in a premature stop codon in the corresponding mRNA and failure to generate a functional protein. Ataluren (PTC124 enables ribosomal readthrough of premature stop codons, leading to production of full-length, functional proteins.This Phase 2a open-label, sequential dose-ranging trial recruited 38 boys with nonsense mutation DMD. The first cohort (n = 6 received ataluren three times per day at morning, midday, and evening doses of 4, 4, and 8 mg/kg; the second cohort (n = 20 was dosed at 10, 10, 20 mg/kg; and the third cohort (n = 12 was dosed at 20, 20, 40 mg/kg. Treatment duration was 28 days. Change in full-length dystrophin expression, as assessed by immunostaining in pre- and post-treatment muscle biopsy specimens, was the primary endpoint.Twenty three of 38 (61% subjects demonstrated increases in post-treatment dystrophin expression in a quantitative analysis assessing the ratio of dystrophin/spectrin. A qualitative analysis also showed positive changes in dystrophin expression. Expression was not associated with nonsense mutation type or exon location. Ataluren trough plasma concentrations active in the mdx mouse model were consistently achieved at the mid- and high- dose levels in participants. Ataluren was generally well tolerated.Ataluren showed activity and safety in this short-term study, supporting evaluation of ataluren 10, 10, 20 mg/kg and 20, 20, 40 mg/kg in a Phase 2b, double-blind, long-term study in nonsense mutation DMD.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00264888.

  13. Mismatched single stranded antisense oligonucleotides can induce efficient dystrophin splice switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kole Ryszard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense oligomer induced exon skipping aims to reduce the severity of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by redirecting splicing during pre-RNA processing such that the causative mutation is by-passed and a shorter but partially functional Becker muscular dystrophy-like dystrophin isoform is produced. Normal exons are generally targeted to restore the dystrophin reading frame however, an appreciable subset of dystrophin mutations are intra-exonic and therefore have the potential to compromise oligomer efficiency, necessitating personalised oligomer design for some patients. Although antisense oligomers are easily personalised, it remains unclear whether all patient polymorphisms within antisense oligomer target sequences will require the costly process of producing and validating patient specific compounds. Methods Here we report preclinical testing of a panel of splice switching antisense oligomers, designed to excise exon 25 from the dystrophin transcript, in normal and dystrophic patient cells. These patient cells harbour a single base insertion in exon 25 that lies within the target sequence of an oligomer shown to be effective at removing exon 25. Results It was anticipated that such a mutation would compromise oligomer binding and efficiency. However, we show that, despite the mismatch an oligomer, designed and optimised to excise exon 25 from the normal dystrophin mRNA, removes the mutated exon 25 more efficiently than the mutation-specific oligomer. Conclusion This raises the possibility that mismatched AOs could still be therapeutically applicable in some cases, negating the necessity to produce patient-specific compounds.

  14. Nanopolymers improve delivery of exon skipping oligonucleotides and concomitant dystrophin expression in skeletal muscle of mdx mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirsi Shashank R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exon skipping oligonucleotides (ESOs of 2'O-Methyl (2'OMe and morpholino chemistry have been shown to restore dystrophin expression in muscle fibers from the mdx mouse, and are currently being tested in phase I clinical trials for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD. However, ESOs remain limited in their effectiveness because of an inadequate delivery profile. Synthetic cationic copolymers of poly(ethylene imine (PEI and poly(ethylene glycol (PEG are regarded as effective agents for enhanced delivery of nucleic acids in various applications. Results We examined whether PEG-PEI copolymers can facilitate ESO-mediated dystrophin expression after intramuscular injections into tibialis anterior (TA muscles of mdx mice. We utilized a set of PEG-PEI copolymers containing 2 kDa PEI and either 550 Da or 5 kDa PEG, both of which bind 2'OMe ESOs with high affinity and form stable nanoparticulates with a relatively low surface charge. Three weekly intramuscular injections of 5 μg of ESO complexed with PEI2K-PEG550 copolymers resulted in about 500 dystrophin-positive fibers and about 12% of normal levels of dystrophin expression at 3 weeks after the initial injection, which is significantly greater than for injections of ESO alone, which are known to be almost completely ineffective. In an effort to enhance biocompatibility and cellular uptake, the PEI2K-PEG550 and PEI2K-PEG5K copolymers were functionalized by covalent conjugation with nanogold (NG or adsorbtion of colloidal gold (CG, respectively. Surprisingly, using the same injection and dosing regimen, we found no significant difference in dystrophin expression by Western blot between the NG-PEI2K-PEG550, CG-PEI2K-PEG5K, and non-functionalized PEI2K-PEG550 copolymers. Dose-response experiments using the CG-PEI2K-PEG5K copolymer with total ESO ranging from 3–60 μg yielded a maximum of about 15% dystrophin expression. Further improvements in dystrophin expression up to 20% of normal

  15. Ectodomain shedding of Limbic System-Associated Membrane Protein (LSAMP) by ADAM Metallopeptidases promotes neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ricardo L; Ferraro, Gino B; Girouard, Marie-Pier; Fournier, Alyson E

    2017-08-11

    IgLONs are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion proteins implicated in the process of neuronal outgrowth, cell adhesion and subdomain target recognition. IgLONs form homophilic and heterophilic complexes on the cell surface that repress or promote growth depending on the neuronal population, the developmental stage and surface repertoire of IgLON family members. In the present study, we identified a metalloproteinase-dependent mechanism necessary to promote growth in embryonic dorsal root ganglion cells (DRGs). Treatment of embryonic DRG neurons with pan-metalloproteinase inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3, or an inhibitor of ADAM Metallopeptidase Domain 10 (ADAM10) reduces outgrowth from DRG neurons indicating that metalloproteinase activity is important for outgrowth. The IgLON family members Neurotrimin (NTM) and Limbic System-Associated Membrane Protein (LSAMP) were identified as ADAM10 substrates that are shed from the cell surface of DRG neurons. Overexpression of LSAMP and NTM suppresses outgrowth from DRG neurons. Furthermore, LSAMP loss of function decreases the outgrowth sensitivity to an ADAM10 inhibitor. Together our findings support a role for ADAM-dependent shedding of cell surface LSAMP in promoting outgrowth from DRG neurons.

  16. Lhermitte's sign and vitamin B12 deficiency: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Haratz, Salo; Zavala, Jorge; Munhoz, Renato Puppi; Scola, Rosana Hermínia; Werneck, Lineu César

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Lhermitte's sign, a classical neurological sign, is a rare manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. The aim here was to report on a case of an elderly patient with vitamin B12 deficiency whose first clinical manifestation was the presence of Lhermitte's sign. CASE REPORT: We describe an elderly patient with vitamin B12 deficiency who presented cognitive dysfunction, peripheral polyneuropathy and sensory ataxia, and whose first clinical manifestation was the presence of ...

  17. Analysis of Dystrophin Gene Deletions by Multiplex PCR in Moroccan Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziza Sbiti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD and BMD are X-linked diseases resulting from a defect in the dystrophin gene located on Xp21. DMD is the most frequent neuromuscular disease in humans (1/3500 male newborn. Deletions in the dystrophin gene represent 65% of mutations in DMD/BMD patients. We have analyzed DNA from 72 Moroccan patients with DMD/BMD using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR to screen for exon deletions within the dystrophin gene, and to estimate the frequency of these abnormalities. We found dystrophin gene deletions in 37 cases. Therefore the frequency in Moroccan DMD/BMD patients is about 51.3%. All deletions were clustered in the two known hot-spots regions, and in 81% of cases deletions were detected in the region from exon 43 to exon 52. These findings are comparable to those reported in other studies. It is important to note that in our population, we can first search for deletions of DMD gene in the most frequently deleted exons determined by this study. This may facilitate the molecular diagnosis of DMD and BMD in our country.

  18. Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Relation to Functional Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather E. Rasmussen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to assess whether symptoms, functional measures, and reported disabilities were associated with vitamin B12 (B12 deficiency when defined in three ways. Participants, aged 60 or more years of age, in 1999–2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES were categorized in relation to three previously used definitions of B12 deficiency: (1 serum B12 20 μmol/L; and (3 serum B12 0.21 μmol/L. Functional measures of peripheral neuropathy, balance, cognitive function, gait speed, along with self-reported disability (including activities of daily living were examined with standardized instruments by trained NHANES interviewers and technicians. Individuals identified as B12 deficient by definition 2 were more likely to manifest peripheral neuropathy OR (odds (95% confidence intervals, p value: 9.70 (2.24, 42.07, 0.004 and report greater total disability, 19.61 (6.22, 61.86 0.0001 after adjustments for age, sex, race, serum creatinine, and ferritin concentrations, smoking, diabetes, and peripheral artery disease. Smaller, but significantly increased, odds of peripheral neuropathy and total disability were also observed when definition 3 was applied. Functional measures and reported disabilities were associated with B12 deficiency definitions that include B12 biomarkers (homocysteine or methylmalonic acid. Further study of these definitions is needed to alert clinicians of possible subclinical B12 deficiency because functional decline amongst older adults may be correctable if the individual is B12 replete.

  19. ADAMS - Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Cheol Gi

    2003-06-01

    This book introduces ADAMS, which is composed of 20 modules ; stamping mechanism, ADAMS introduction, GUI overview failing stone project motion one DOF pendulum inclined plane lift mechanism I mechanism II mechanism III suspension subsystem suspension-steering system spring-damper I spring-damper II hatchback I hatchback II hatchback III cam-rocker-valve target practice recommended practice and switch mechanism workshop.

  20. MdATG18a overexpression improves tolerance to nitrogen deficiency and regulates anthocyanin accumulation through increased autophagy in transgenic apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xun; Jia, Xin; Huo, Liuqing; Che, Runmin; Gong, Xiaoqing; Wang, Ping; Ma, Fengwang

    2018-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) availability is an essential factor for plant growth. Recycling and remobilization of N have strong impacts on crop yield and quality under N deficiency. Autophagy is a critical nutrient-recycling process that facilitates remobilization under starvation. We previously showed that an important AuTophaGy (ATG) protein from apple, MdATG18a, has a positive role in drought tolerance. In this study, we explored its biological role in response to low-N. Overexpression of MdATG18a in both Arabidopsis and apple improved tolerance to N-depletion and caused a greater accumulation of anthocyanin. The increased anthocyanin concentration in transgenic apple was possibly due to up-regulating flavonoid biosynthetic and regulatory genes (MdCHI, MdCHS, MdANS, MdPAL, MdUFGT, and MdMYB1) and higher soluble sugars concentration. MdATG18a overexpression enhanced starch degradation with up-regulating amylase gene (MdAM1) and up-regulated sugar metabolism related genes (MdSS1, MdHXKs, MdFK1, and MdNINVs). Furthermore, MdATG18a functioned in nitrate uptake and assimilation by up-regulating nitrate reductase MdNIA2 and 3 high-affinity nitrate transporters MdNRT2.1/2.4/2.5. MdATG18a overexpression also elevated other important MdATG genes expression and autophagosomes formation under N-depletion, which play key contributions to above changes. Together, these results demonstrate that overexpression of MdATG18a enhances tolerance to N-deficiencies and plays positive roles in anthocyanin biosynthesis through greater autophagic activity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Increased abundance of ADAM9 transcripts in the blood is associated with tissue damage [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darawan Rinchai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain family have emerged as critical regulators of cell-cell signaling during development and homeostasis. ADAM9 is consistently overexpressed in various human cancers, and has been shown to play an important role in tumorigenesis. However, little is known about the involvement of ADAM9 during immune-mediated processes. Results: Mining of an extensive compendium of transcriptomic datasets identified important gaps in knowledge regarding the possible role of ADAM9 in immunological homeostasis and inflammation: 1 The abundance of ADAM9 transcripts in the blood was increased in patients with acute infection but, 2 changed very little after in vitro exposure to a wide range of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. 3 Furthermore it was found to increase significantly in subjects as a result of tissue injury or tissue remodeling, in absence of infectious processes. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that ADAM9 may constitute a valuable biomarker for the assessment of tissue damage, especially in clinical situations where other inflammatory markers are confounded by infectious processes.

  2. A Translational Pathway Toward a Clinical Trial Using the Second-Generation AAV Micro-Dystrophin Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    mune system a few weeks later. It is now clear that the gene delivery vehicle (AAV virus capsid), cargo (transgene), or the protein produced from the...Ideally, delivery of a full-length dystrophin cDNA will yield the production of a full- length dystrophin protein and the maximum pro- tection of...investigational new drug (IND) application can be filed for a gene therapy trial with systemic delivery of dystrophin? Dr. Duan: A number of IND

  3. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janghra, Narinder; Morgan, Jennifer E; Sewry, Caroline A; Wilson, Francis X; Davies, Kay E; Muntoni, Francesco; Tinsley, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ -sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these tools to quantify

  4. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinder Janghra

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ -sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these

  5. Use of epitope libraries to identify exon-specific monoclonal antibodies for characterization of altered dystrophins in muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen thi Man; Morris, G.E. (North East Wales Inst., Clwyd (United Kingdom))

    1993-06-01

    The majority of mutations in Xp21-linked muscular dystrophy (MD) can be identified by PCR or Southern blotting, as deletions or duplications of groups of exons in the dystrophin gene, but it is not always possible to predict how much altered dystrophin, if any, will be produced. Use of exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on muscle biopsies from MD patients can, in principle, provide information on both the amount of altered dystrophin produced and, when dystrophin is present, the nature of the genetic deletion or point mutation. For this purpose, mAbs which recognize regions of dystrophin encoded by known exons and whose binding is unaffected by the absence of adjacent exons are required. To map mAbs to specific exons, random [open quotes]libraries[close quotes] of expressed dystrophin fragments were created by cloning DNAseI digestion fragments of a 4.3-kb dystrophin cDNA into a pTEX expression vector. The libraries were then used to locate the epitopes recognized by 48 mAbs to fragments of 25--60 amino acids within the 1,434-amino-acid dystrophin fragment used to produce the antibodies. This is sufficiently detailed to allow further refinement by using synthetic peptides and, in many cases, to identify the exon in the DMD (Duchenne MD) gene which encodes the epitope. To illustrate their use in dystrophin analysis, a Duchenne patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 42 and 43 makes a truncated dystrophin encoded by exons 1--41, and the authors now show that this can be detected in the sarcolemma by mAbs up to and including those specific for exon 41 epitopes but not by mAbs specific for exon 43 or later epitopes. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. [Clinical features of patients with Becker muscular dystrophy and deletions of the rod domain of dystrophin gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanyun; Zhu, Yuling; Yang, Juan; Li, Yaqin; Sun, Jiangwen; Zhan, Yixin; Zhang, Cheng

    2018-02-10

    OBJECTIVE To explore the clinical features of patients carrying deletions of the rod domain of the dystrophin gene. METHODS Clinical data of 12 Chinese patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and such deletions was reviewed. RESULTS Most patients complained of muscle weakness of lower limbs. Two patients had muscle cramps, one had increased creatine kinase (CK) level, and one had dilated cardiomyopathy. CONCLUSION Compared with DMD, the clinical features of BMD are much more variable, particularly for those carrying deletions of the rod domain of the dystrophin gene. Muscular weakness may not be the sole complaint of BMD. The diagnosis of BMD cannot be excluded by moderately elevated CK. For male patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, the possibility of BMD should be considered.

  7. Dual AAV Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy with a 7-kb Mini-Dystrophin Gene in the Canine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodippili, Kasun; Hakim, Chady H; Pan, Xiufang; Yang, Hsiao T; Yue, Yongping; Zhang, Yadong; Shin, Jin-Hong; Yang, N Nora; Duan, Dongsheng

    2018-03-01

    Dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) technology was developed in 2000 to double the packaging capacity of the AAV vector. The proof of principle has been demonstrated in various mouse models. Yet, pivotal evidence is lacking in large animal models of human diseases. Here we report expression of a 7-kb canine ΔH2-R15 mini-dystrophin gene using a pair of dual AAV vectors in the canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The ΔH2-R15 minigene is by far the most potent synthetic dystrophin gene engineered for DMD gene therapy. We packaged minigene dual vectors in Y731F tyrosine-modified AAV-9 and delivered to the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle of a 12-month-old affected dog at the dose of 2 × 10 13 viral genome particles/vector/muscle. Widespread mini-dystrophin expression was observed 2 months after gene transfer. The missing dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex was restored. Treatment also reduced muscle degeneration and fibrosis and improved myofiber size distribution. Importantly, dual AAV therapy greatly protected the muscle from eccentric contraction-induced force loss. Our data provide the first clear evidence that dual AAV therapy can be translated to a diseased large mammal. Further development of dual AAV technology may lead to effective therapies for DMD and many other diseases in human patients.

  8. Concurrent Label-Free Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Dystrophin Isoform Dp427 and the Myofibrosis Marker Collagen in Crude Extracts from mdx-4cv Skeletal Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sandra; Zweyer, Margit; Mundegar, Rustam R.; Henry, Michael; Meleady, Paula; Swandulla, Dieter; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2015-01-01

    The full-length dystrophin protein isoform of 427 kDa (Dp427), the absence of which represents the principal abnormality in X-linked muscular dystrophy, is difficult to identify and characterize by routine proteomic screening approaches of crude tissue extracts. This is probably related to its large molecular size, its close association with the sarcolemmal membrane, and its existence within a heterogeneous glycoprotein complex. Here, we used a careful extraction procedure to isolate the total protein repertoire from normal versus dystrophic mdx-4cv skeletal muscles, in conjunction with label-free mass spectrometry, and successfully identified Dp427 by proteomic means. In contrast to a considerable number of previous comparative studies of the total skeletal muscle proteome, using whole tissue proteomics we show here for the first time that the reduced expression of this membrane cytoskeletal protein is the most significant alteration in dystrophinopathy. This agrees with the pathobiochemical concept that the almost complete absence of dystrophin is the main defect in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and that the mdx-4cv mouse model of dystrophinopathy exhibits only very few revertant fibers. Significant increases in collagens and associated fibrotic marker proteins, such as fibronectin, biglycan, asporin, decorin, prolargin, mimecan, and lumican were identified in dystrophin-deficient muscles. The up-regulation of collagen in mdx-4cv muscles was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblotting. Thus, this is the first mass spectrometric study of crude tissue extracts that puts the proteomic identification of dystrophin in its proper pathophysiological context. PMID:28248273

  9. Gastric emptying in patients with vitamin B{sub 12} deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagci, Muenci; Yamac, Kadri; Acar, Kadir; Haznedar, Rauf [Department of Hematology, Gazi Medical School (Turkey); Cingi, Elif; Kitapci, Mehmet [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Gazi Medical School (Turkey)

    2002-09-01

    The clinical presentation of patients with vitamin B{sub 12} deficiency varies in a spectrum ranging from haematological disorders to neuropsychiatric diseases. In rare cases, orthostatic hypotension, impotence, constipation and urinary retention have been attributed to autonomic nervous system dysfunction due to vitamin B{sub 12} deficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin B{sub 12} deficiency on autonomic nervous system function by studying gastric emptying times (T{sub 1/2}). Twenty patients with newly diagnosed vitamin B{sub 12} deficiency and 12 control patients with gastritis and normal vitamin B{sub 12} levels were enrolled in this study. Gastroduodenoscopy, endoscopic biopsy, histopathological evaluation of the biopsy specimens and radionuclide gastric emptying studies were performed. After vitamin B{sub 12} replacement therapy for 3 months, radionuclide gastric emptying studies were repeated. Mean gastric emptying T{sub 1/2} in patients before and after treatment and in controls were 103.83{+-}48.80 min, 90.00{+-}17.29 min and 74.55{+-}8.52 min, respectively. The difference in mean gastric emptying T{sub 1/2} between patients before treatment and controls was statistically significant (P<0.01). The statistically significant difference persisted after vitamin B{sub 12} treatment (P<0.05), though mean gastric emptying T{sub 1/2} was somewhat shorter. There were no positive or negative correlations between gastric emptying T{sub 1/2} and the following parameters: haemoglobin, vitamin B{sub 12} level and Helicobacter pylori positivity. In conclusion, gastric emptying T{sub 1/2} was prolonged in patients with vitamin B{sub 12} deficiency and this prolongation was not corrected after vitamin B{sub 12} replacement therapy. Although autonomic nervous system dysfunction due to vitamin B{sub 12} deficiency rarely gives rise to clinical manifestations, latent dysfunction demonstrated by laboratory tests seems to be a frequent phenomenon

  10. Ansel Adams: early works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throckmorton, Jodi

    2010-02-01

    Ansel Adams (1902-1984), photographer, musician, naturalist, explorer, critic, and teacher, was a giant in the field of landscape photography. In his images of the unspoiled Western landscape, he strove to capture the sublime: the transcendentalist concept that nature can generate the experience of awe for the viewer. Many viewers are familiar with the heroic, high-contrast prints on high-gloss paper that Adams made to order beginning in the 1970s; much less well known are the intimate prints that the artist crafted earlier in his career. This exhibition focuses on these masterful small prints from the 1920s into the 1950s. During this time period, Adams's printing style changed dramatically. The painterly, soft-focus, warm-toned style of the Parmelian Prints of the High Sierras from the 1920s evolved into the sharp-focus style of the f/64 school of photography that Adams co-founded in the 1930s with Edward Weston and Imogen Cunningham. After World War II, Adams opted for a cooler, higher-contrast look for his prints. Throughout the various styles in which he chose to work, Adams explored the power of nature and succeeded in establishing landscape photography as a legitimate form of modern art.

  11. Targeted Exon Skipping to Correct Exon Duplications in the Dystrophin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kane L Greer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe muscle-wasting disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that ablate functional protein expression. Although exonic deletions are the most common Duchenne muscular dystrophy lesion, duplications account for 10–15% of reported disease-causing mutations, and exon 2 is the most commonly duplicated exon. Here, we describe the in vitro evaluation of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers coupled to a cell-penetrating peptide and 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, using three distinct strategies to reframe the dystrophin transcript in patient cells carrying an exon 2 duplication. Differences in exon-skipping efficiencies in vitro were observed between oligomer analogues of the same sequence, with the phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer coupled to a cell-penetrating peptide proving the most effective. Differences in exon 2 excision efficiency between normal and exon 2 duplication cells, were apparent, indicating that exon context influences oligomer-induced splice switching. Skipping of a single copy of exon 2 was induced in the cells carrying an exon 2 duplication, the simplest strategy to restore the reading frame and generate a normal dystrophin transcript. In contrast, multiexon skipping of exons 2–7 to generate a Becker muscular dystrophy-like dystrophin transcript was more challenging and could only be induced efficiently with the phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer chemistry.

  12. Consecutive analysis of mutation spectrum in the dystrophin gene of 507 Korean boys with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy in a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Anna; Seong, Moon-Woo; Lim, Byung Chan; Lee, Hwa Jeen; Byeon, Jung Hye; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Soo Yeon; Choi, Sun Ah; Wong, Ai-Lynn; Lee, Jeongho; Kim, Jon Soo; Ryu, Hye Won; Lee, Jin Sook; Kim, Hunmin; Hwang, Hee; Choi, Ji Eun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Young Seung; Hong, Ki Ho; Park, Seungman; Cho, Sung Im; Lee, Seung Jun; Park, Hyunwoong; Seo, Soo Hyun; Park, Sung Sup; Chae, Jong Hee

    2017-05-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are allelic X-linked recessive muscle diseases caused by mutations in the large and complex dystrophin gene. We analyzed the dystrophin gene in 507 Korean DMD/BMD patients by multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification and direct sequencing. Overall, 117 different deletions, 48 duplications, and 90 pathogenic sequence variations, including 30 novel variations, were identified. Deletions and duplications accounted for 65.4% and 13.3% of Korean dystrophinopathy, respectively, suggesting that the incidence of large rearrangements in dystrophin is similar among different ethnic groups. We also detected sequence variations in >100 probands. The small variations were dispersed across the whole gene, and 12.3% were nonsense mutations. Precise genetic characterization in patients with DMD/BMD is timely and important for implementing nationwide registration systems and future molecular therapeutic trials in Korea and globally. Muscle Nerve 55: 727-734, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares Bello, Carlos; Capitão, Ricardo Miguel; Sequeira Duarte, João; Azinheira, Jorge; Vasconcelos, Carlos

    2017-10-31

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common disease, affecting up to 13.1% of the Portuguese population. In addition to the known micro and macrovascular complications, drug side effects constitute a major concern, leading to changes in the treatment guidelines, which favor safety over efficacy. Metformin is the first-line pharmacological treatment for most patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus; however, it has been associated with vitamin B12 deficiency in up to 30% of treated patients. The authors describe the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in a diabetic population and explore the possible underlying factors. Retrospective, observational study. Clinical and laboratory data of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients whose vitamin B12 status was evaluated in the last decade (2005 - 2016) were analyzed. Patients with known malabsorptive syndromes or having undergone bariatric surgery were excluded from the study. Statistical analysis of the data was done and the results were considered statistically significant at p values 2.2 years and 11 ± 10.4 years of type 2 diabetes mellitus duration. These patients had a high prevalence of complications: diabetic renal disease 47.7%, neuropathy 9.2%, retinopathy 14.9%, coronary artery disease 8.4%, cerebrovascular disease 10.9%, and peripheral arterial disease 5.5%. Vitamin B12 deficiency (21.4% of the population and this subgroup was older (68.4 vs 65.8 years, p = 0.006), had a longer type 2 diabetes mellitus duration (13.35 vs 10.36 years; p = 0.001), higher prevalence of retinopathy (20.9% vs 13.3%; p = 0.005) and thyroid dysfunction (34% vs 23.7%; p = 0.002). Vitamin B12 deficiency was also more frequent in patients treated with metformin (24.7% vs 15.8%; p = 0.017), antiplatelet agents (25.4% vs 16.2%, p 26.8% vs 18.2%; p = 0.001). After adjustment for possible confounders, the variables associated with B12 deficiency were: metformin, hypothyroidism, age and type 2 diabetes mellitus duration. Despite the retrospective design

  14. Vitamin B12 deficiency: Characterization of psychometrics and MRI morphometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yen-Hsuan; Huang, Ching-Feng; Lo, Chung-Ping; Wang, Tzu-Lan; Tu, Min-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is essential for the integrity of the central nervous system. However, performances in different cognitive domains relevant to vitamin B12 deficiency remain to be detailed. To date, there have been limited studies that examined the relationships between cognitions and structural neuroimaging in a single cohort of low-vitamin B12 status. The present study aimed to depict psychometrics and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) morphometrics among patients with vitamin B12 deficiency, and to examine their inter-relations. We compared 34 consecutive patients with vitamin B12 deficiency (serum level ≤ 250 pg/ml) to 34 demographically matched controls by their cognitive performances and morphometric indices of brain MRI. The correlations between psychometrics and morphometrics were analyzed. The vitamin B12 deficiency group had lower scores than the controls on total scores of Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI) (both P psychometric and morphometric indices, pronounced correlations between bicaudate ratio and long-term memory, mental manipulation, orientation, language, and verbal fluency were noted (all P < 0.01). Vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with a global cognition decline with language, orientation, and mental manipulation selectively impaired. Preferential atrophy in frontal regions is the main neuroimaging feature. Although the frontal ratio highlights the relevant atrophy among patients, the bicaudate ratio might be the best index on the basis of its strong association with global cognition and related cognitive domains, implying dysfunction of fronto-subcortical circuits as the fundamental pathogenesis related to vitamin B12 deficiency.

  15. Early dystrophin loss is coincident with the transition of compensated cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda P Prado

    Full Text Available Hypertension causes cardiac hypertrophy, one of the most important risk factors for heart failure (HF. Despite the importance of cardiac hypertrophy as a risk factor for the development of HF, not all hypertrophied hearts will ultimately fail. Alterations of cytoskeletal and sarcolemma-associated proteins are considered markers cardiac remodeling during HF. Dystrophin provides mechanical stability to the plasma membrane through its interactions with the actin cytoskeleton and, indirectly, to extracellular matrix proteins. This study was undertaken to evaluate dystrophin and calpain-1 in the transition from compensated cardiac hypertrophy to HF. Wistar rats were subjected to abdominal aorta constriction and killed at 30, 60 and 90 days post surgery (dps. Cardiac function and blood pressure were evaluated. The hearts were collected and Western blotting and immunofluorescence performed for dystrophin, calpain-1, alpha-fodrin and calpastatin. Statistical analyses were performed and considered significant when p<0.05. After 90 dps, 70% of the animals showed hypertrophic hearts (HH and 30% hypertrophic+dilated hearts (HD. Systolic and diastolic functions were preserved at 30 and 60 dps, however, decreased in the HD group. Blood pressure, cardiomyocyte diameter and collagen content were increased at all time points. Dystrophin expression was lightly increased at 30 and 60 dps and HH group. HD group showed decreased expression of dystrophin and calpastatin and increased expression of calpain-1 and alpha-fodrin fragments. The first signals of dystrophin reduction were observed as early as 60 dps. In conclusion, some hearts present a distinct molecular pattern at an early stage of the disease; this pattern could provide an opportunity to identify these failure-prone hearts during the development of the cardiac disease. We showed that decreased expression of dystrophin and increased expression of calpains are coincident and could work as possible

  16. Fuzzy modeling for Vitamin B12 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbik, A.M.; van Loon, S.L.M.; Boer, A.K.; Kaymak, U.; Scharnhorst, V.; Carvalho, J.; Lesot, M.J.; Kaymak, U.; Vieira, S.; Bouchon-Meunier, B.; Yager, R.

    2016-01-01

    Blood vitamin B12 levels are not representative for actual vitamin B12 status in tissue. Instead plasma methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels can be measured because MMA concentrations increase relatively early in the course of vitamin B12 deficiency. However, MMA levels in plasma may also be increased

  17. ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells in human normal tissues and protects from C1q-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamae, Yuka; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ohara, Kentaro; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Kazuno, Saiko; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Ochiai, Hiroki; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-05-01

    ADAM28 (disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28), which was originally reported to be lymphocyte-specific, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and plays a key role in cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. We studied ADAM28 expression in human normal tissues and examined its biological function. By using antibodies specific to ADAM28, ADAM28 was immunolocalized mainly to epithelial cells in several tissues, including epididymis, bronchus and stomach, whereas lymphocytes in lymph nodes and spleen were negligibly immunostained. RT-PCR, immunoblotting and ELISA analyses confirmed the expression in these tissues, and low or negligible expression by lymphocytes was found in the lymph node and spleen. C1q was identified as a candidate ADAM28-binding protein from a human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system, and specific binding was demonstrated by binding assays, immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. C1q treatment of normal bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B and NHBE cells, both of which showed low-level expression of ADAM28, caused apoptosis through activation of p38 and caspase-3, and cell death with autophagy through accumulation of LC3-II and autophagosomes, respectively. C1q-induced cell death was attenuated by treatment of the cells with antibodies against the C1q receptor gC1qR/p33 or cC1qR/calreticulin. Treatment of C1q with recombinant ADAM28 prior to addition to culture media reduced C1q-induced cell death, and knockdown of ADAM28 using siRNAs increased cell death. These data demonstrate that ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells of several normal organs, and suggest that ADAM28 plays a role in cell survival by suppression of C1q-induced cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial cells. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: Application to point mutation and carrier detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, T.W.; Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.; Sedra, M.S.; Western, L.M.; Bartolo, C.; Mendell, J.R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Moxley, R.T. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, the authors identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. The authors conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Prevalence of Vitamin B12 and Folate Deficiencies and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 2Faculty of Dentistry, International Branch, 3Department of Internal Medicine & Endocrine and ... Keywords: Vitamin B12 deficiency, Folate deficiency, Homocysteinemia, Elderly population ... gastritis, intestinal malabsorption, pancreatic.

  20. Mass spectrometry reveals thioredoxin-1 as a new partner of ADAM17 that can modulate its sheddase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragao, A.Z.B.; Simabuco, F.M.; Smetana, J.H.C.; Yokoo, S.; Paes Leme, A.F.; Rodrigues, E.; Mercadante, A.Z.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: ADAMs are a family of membrane-associated metalloproteinases with a complex multi-domain structure: a metalloproteinase domain, a disintegrin domain, a cysteine-rich region, an epidermal growth factor-like repeat, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic tail. These proteases are responsible for shedding the ectodomains of cell surface proteins, modulating regulatory mechanisms. Many ADAMs are highly associated with tumorigenesis and tumor progression. The aim of this study is identify novel binding partners that can modulate ADAM17 activation via cytoplasmatic domain. We performed the cloning and overexpression of the ADAM17 cytoplasmic tail in HEK-293 cell line and the ligands were determined by LC-MS/MS after proteins immunoprecipitation (IP) with anti-FLAG M2 Affinity Gel (Sigma). Thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) and others ligands were identified at least in two independent experiments, and this binding is independent of phosphorylation. The IP of Trx-1 was confirmed by Western blot, furthermore Trx-1 immunolocalized with full length ADAM17-HA and cytoplasmic tail-FLAG recombinant proteins in HEK293 and HeLa cells. Trx-1 is part of the system peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase, one of the mechanisms by which cells maintain the reduced cellular environment, inactivating the reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigate whether ADAM17 activity is modulate by Trx-1 on AP reporter assay that was performed using HEK293 and SCC-9 cells transfected stably with HB-EGF-AP in co-transfection with transient recombinant Trx-1-HA. The results indicate that Trx-1 can modulate negatively the activity or maturation of ADAM17 in presence of PMA, which is known to increase ROS. In summary, this study identifies Trx-1 and suggest that this protein can modulate ADAM17 activity in normal and tumorigenic cells lines. (author)

  1. Mass spectrometry reveals thioredoxin-1 as a new partner of ADAM17 that can modulate its sheddase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragao, A.Z.B.; Simabuco, F.M.; Smetana, J.H.C. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Yokoo, S.; Paes Leme, A.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Rodrigues, E.; Mercadante, A.Z. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: ADAMs are a family of membrane-associated metalloproteinases with a complex multi-domain structure: a metalloproteinase domain, a disintegrin domain, a cysteine-rich region, an epidermal growth factor-like repeat, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic tail. These proteases are responsible for shedding the ectodomains of cell surface proteins, modulating regulatory mechanisms. Many ADAMs are highly associated with tumorigenesis and tumor progression. The aim of this study is identify novel binding partners that can modulate ADAM17 activation via cytoplasmatic domain. We performed the cloning and overexpression of the ADAM17 cytoplasmic tail in HEK-293 cell line and the ligands were determined by LC-MS/MS after proteins immunoprecipitation (IP) with anti-FLAG M2 Affinity Gel (Sigma). Thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) and others ligands were identified at least in two independent experiments, and this binding is independent of phosphorylation. The IP of Trx-1 was confirmed by Western blot, furthermore Trx-1 immunolocalized with full length ADAM17-HA and cytoplasmic tail-FLAG recombinant proteins in HEK293 and HeLa cells. Trx-1 is part of the system peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase, one of the mechanisms by which cells maintain the reduced cellular environment, inactivating the reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigate whether ADAM17 activity is modulate by Trx-1 on AP reporter assay that was performed using HEK293 and SCC-9 cells transfected stably with HB-EGF-AP in co-transfection with transient recombinant Trx-1-HA. The results indicate that Trx-1 can modulate negatively the activity or maturation of ADAM17 in presence of PMA, which is known to increase ROS. In summary, this study identifies Trx-1 and suggest that this protein can modulate ADAM17 activity in normal and tumorigenic cells lines. (author)

  2. Multiple Species Comparison of Cardiac Troponin T and Dystrophin: Unravelling the DNA behind Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Jennifer; Loughna, Siobhan; Rutland, Catrin Sian

    2017-07-07

    Animals have frequently been used as models for human disorders and mutations. Following advances in genetic testing and treatment options, and the decreasing cost of these technologies in the clinic, mutations in both companion and commercial animals are now being investigated. A recent review highlighted the genes associated with both human and non-human dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac troponin T and dystrophin were observed to be associated with both human and turkey (troponin T) and canine (dystrophin) dilated cardiomyopathies. This review gives an overview of the work carried out in cardiac troponin T and dystrophin to date in both human and animal dilated cardiomyopathy.

  3. Evaluation of point mutations in dystrophin gene in Iranian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    5Department of Biology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad ... Dystrophin protein is found ... Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy; neuromuscular disorder; point mutation. ..... modern diagnostic techniques to a large cohort.

  4. A sensitive, reproducible and objective immunofluorescence analysis method of dystrophin in individual fibers in samples from patients with duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Beekman

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is characterized by the absence or reduced levels of dystrophin expression on the inner surface of the sarcolemmal membrane of muscle fibers. Clinical development of therapeutic approaches aiming to increase dystrophin levels requires sensitive and reproducible measurement of differences in dystrophin expression in muscle biopsies of treated patients with DMD. This, however, poses a technical challenge due to intra- and inter-donor variance in the occurrence of revertant fibers and low trace dystrophin expression throughout the biopsies. We have developed an immunofluorescence and semi-automated image analysis method that measures the sarcolemmal dystrophin intensity per individual fiber for the entire fiber population in a muscle biopsy. Cross-sections of muscle co-stained for dystrophin and spectrin have been imaged by confocal microscopy, and image analysis was performed using Definiens software. Dystrophin intensity has been measured in the sarcolemmal mask of spectrin for each individual muscle fiber and multiple membrane intensity parameters (mean, maximum, quantiles per fiber were calculated. A histogram can depict the distribution of dystrophin intensities for the fiber population in the biopsy. This method was tested by measuring dystrophin in DMD, Becker muscular dystrophy, and healthy muscle samples. Analysis of duplicate or quadruplicate sections of DMD biopsies on the same or multiple days, by different operators, or using different antibodies, was shown to be objective and reproducible (inter-assay precision, CV 2-17% and intra-assay precision, CV 2-10%. Moreover, the method was sufficiently sensitive to detect consistently small differences in dystrophin between two biopsies from a patient with DMD before and after treatment with an investigational compound.

  5. Gentamicin treatment in exercised mdx mice: Identification of dystrophin-sensitive pathways and evaluation of efficacy in work-loaded dystrophic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Annamaria; Nico, Beatrice; Rolland, Jean-François; Cozzoli, Anna; Burdi, Rosa; Mangieri, Domenica; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Liantonio, Antonella; Cippone, Valentina; De Bellis, Michela; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2008-11-01

    Aminoglycosides force read through of premature stop codon mutations and introduce new mutation-specific gene-corrective strategies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A chronic treatment with gentamicin (32 mg/kg/daily i.p., 8-12 weeks) was performed in exercised mdx mice with the dual aim to clarify the dependence on dystrophin of the functional, biochemical and histological alterations present in dystrophic muscle and to verify the long term efficiency of small molecule gene-corrective strategies in work-loaded dystrophic muscle. The treatment counteracted the exercise-induced impairment of in vivo forelimb strength after 6-8 weeks. We observed an increase in dystrophin expression level in all the fibers, although lower than that observed in normal fibers, and found a concomitant recovery of aquaporin-4 at sarcolemma. A significant reduction in centronucleated fibers, in the area of necrosis and in the percentage of nuclear factor-kB-positive nuclei was observed in gastrocnemious muscle of treated animals. Plasma creatine kinase was reduced by 70%. Ex vivo, gentamicin restored membrane ionic conductance in mdx diaphragm and limb muscle fibers. No effects were observed on the altered calcium homeostasis and sarcolemmal calcium permeability, detected by electrophysiological and microspectrofluorimetric approaches. Thus, the maintenance of a partial level of dystrophin is sufficient to reinforce sarcolemmal stability, reducing leakiness, inflammation and fiber damage, while correction of altered calcium homeostasis needs greater expression of dystrophin or direct interventions on the channels involved.

  6. Multiple Species Comparison of Cardiac Troponin T and Dystrophin: Unravelling the DNA behind Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer England

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Animals have frequently been used as models for human disorders and mutations. Following advances in genetic testing and treatment options, and the decreasing cost of these technologies in the clinic, mutations in both companion and commercial animals are now being investigated. A recent review highlighted the genes associated with both human and non-human dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac troponin T and dystrophin were observed to be associated with both human and turkey (troponin T and canine (dystrophin dilated cardiomyopathies. This review gives an overview of the work carried out in cardiac troponin T and dystrophin to date in both human and animal dilated cardiomyopathy.

  7. Comparative Analysis of Vertebrate Dystrophin Loci Indicate Intron Gigantism as a Common Feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, Uberto; Elgar, Greg; Cagliani, Rachele; Riva, Laura; Comi, Giacomo P.; Bresolin, Nereo; Bardoni, Alessandra; Sironi, Manuela

    2003-01-01

    The human DMD gene is the largest known to date, spanning > 2000 kb on the X chromosome. The gene size is mainly accounted for by huge intronic regions. We sequenced 190 kb of Fugu rubripes (pufferfish) genomic DNA corresponding to the complete dystrophin gene (FrDMD) and provide the first report of gene structure and sequence comparison among dystrophin genomic sequences from different vertebrate organisms. Almost all intron positions and phases are conserved between FrDMD and its mammalian counterparts, and the predicted protein product of the Fugu gene displays 55% identity and 71% similarity to human dystrophin. In analogy to the human gene, FrDMD presents several-fold longer than average intronic regions. Analysis of intron sequences of the human and murine genes revealed that they are extremely conserved in size and that a similar fraction of total intron length is represented by repetitive elements; moreover, our data indicate that intron expansion through repeat accumulation in the two orthologs is the result of independent insertional events. The hypothesis that intron length might be functionally relevant to the DMD gene regulation is proposed and substantiated by the finding that dystrophin intron gigantism is common to the three vertebrate genes. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org.] PMID:12727896

  8. What's an Adam's Apple? (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español What's an Adam's Apple? KidsHealth / For Kids / What's an Adam's Apple? Print You're at the high school baseball ... the throat. This is what's called an Adam's apple. Everyone's larynx grows during puberty, but a girl's ...

  9. Skeletal Muscle Differentiation on a Chip Shows Human Donor Mesoangioblasts' Efficiency in Restoring Dystrophin in a Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serena, Elena; Zatti, Susi; Zoso, Alice; Lo Verso, Francesca; Tedesco, F Saverio; Cossu, Giulio; Elvassore, Nicola

    2016-12-01

    : Restoration of the protein dystrophin on muscle membrane is the goal of many research lines aimed at curing Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Results of ongoing preclinical and clinical trials suggest that partial restoration of dystrophin might be sufficient to significantly reduce muscle damage. Different myogenic progenitors are candidates for cell therapy of muscular dystrophies, but only satellite cells and pericytes have already entered clinical experimentation. This study aimed to provide in vitro quantitative evidence of the ability of mesoangioblasts to restore dystrophin, in terms of protein accumulation and distribution, within myotubes derived from DMD patients, using a microengineered model. We designed an ad hoc experimental strategy to miniaturize on a chip the standard process of muscle regeneration independent of variables such as inflammation and fibrosis. It is based on the coculture, at different ratios, of human dystrophin-positive myogenic progenitors and dystrophin-negative myoblasts in a substrate with muscle-like physiological stiffness and cell micropatterns. Results showed that both healthy myoblasts and mesoangioblasts restored dystrophin expression in DMD myotubes. However, mesoangioblasts showed unexpected efficiency with respect to myoblasts in dystrophin production in terms of the amount of protein produced (40% vs. 15%) and length of the dystrophin membrane domain (210-240 µm vs. 40-70 µm). These results show that our microscaled in vitro model of human DMD skeletal muscle validated previous in vivo preclinical work and may be used to predict efficacy of new methods aimed at enhancing dystrophin accumulation and distribution before they are tested in vivo, reducing time, costs, and variability of clinical experimentation. This study aimed to provide in vitro quantitative evidence of the ability of human mesoangioblasts to restore dystrophin, in terms of protein accumulation and distribution, within myotubes derived from

  10. The influence of low dystrophin levels on disease pathology in mouse models for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, Maaike van

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most prevalent neuromuscular disorder, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that prevent synthesis of dystrophin. Fibers that lack dystrophin are sensitive to exercise-induced damage, resulting in progressive muscle wasting, loss of ambulation and premature

  11. CTT1 overexpression increases the replicative lifespan of MMS-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae deficient in KSP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Hua-Zhen; Zhou, Tao; Hong, Xiao-Shan; Cui, Hong-Jing; Jiang, Zhi-Wen; Chen, Hui-Ji; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Liu, Xin-Guang

    2017-06-01

    Ksplp is a nuclear-localized Ser/Thr kinase that is not essential for the vegetative growth of yeast. A global gene function analysis in yeast suggested that Ksplp was involved in the oxidative stress response; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we showed that KSP1-deficient yeast cells exhibit hypersensitivity to the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulphonate (MMS), and treatment of the KSP1-deficient strain with MMS could trigger abnormal mitochondrial membrane potential and up-regulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In addition, the mRNA expression level of the catalase gene CTT1 (which encodes cytosolic catalase) and total catalase activity were strongly down-regulated in the KSP1-deleted strain compared with those in wild-type cells. Moreover, the KSP1 deficiency also leads to a shortened replicative lifespan, which could be restored by the increased expression of CTT1. On the other hand, KSP1-overexpressed (KSP1OX) yeast cells exhibited increased resistance towards MMS, an effect that was, at least in part, CTT1 independent. Collectively, these findings highlight the involvement of Ksplp in the DNA damage response and implicate Ksplp as a modulator of the replicative lifespan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Internal architecture of the proximal femur--Adam's or Adams' arch? Historical mystery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartonícek, J

    2002-12-01

    The designation 'Adam Bogen' describing the thick medial cortex of the femoral neck is an incorrect term. This arch was described by Robert Adams (1795-1871), an outstanding Irish anatomist and surgeon. He was famous mainly for his book on gout and the description of disorders of cardiac rhythm, the so-called Adams-Stokes syndrome. He published his original description in the today unfortunately almost forgotten Cyclopaedia of Anatomy and Physiology, Vol. II (London, Longman, 1836-1839). The main editor of this monumental six-volume work was the famous anatomist and surgeon R.B.Todd. This book represents a significant source of information on diseases and injuries of the great joints (shoulder, elbow, wrist, knee, ankle).

  13. Characterization of a human cell line stably over-expressing the candidate oncogene, dual specificity phosphatase 12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Cain

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of chromosomal rearrangements within primary tumors has been influential in the identification of novel oncogenes. Identification of the "driver" gene(s within cancer-derived amplicons is, however, hampered by the fact that most amplicons contain many gene products. Amplification of 1q21-1q23 is strongly associated with liposarcomas and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization narrowed down the likely candidate oncogenes to two: the activating transcription factor 6 (atf6 and the dual specificity phosphatase 12 (dusp12. While atf6 is an established transcriptional regulator of the unfolded protein response, the potential role of dusp12 in cancer remains uncharacterized.To evaluate the oncogenic potential of dusp12, we established stable cell lines that ectopically over-express dusp12 in isolation and determined whether this cell line acquired properties frequently associated with transformed cells. Here, we demonstrate that cells over-expressing dusp12 display increased cell motility and resistance to apoptosis. Additionally, over-expression of dusp12 promoted increased expression of the c-met proto-oncogene and the collagen and laminin receptor intergrin alpha 1 (itga1 which is implicated in metastasis.Collectively, these results suggest that dusp12 is oncologically relevant and exposes a potential association between dusp12 and established oncogenes that could be therapeutically targeted.

  14. Immobilization and therapeutic passive stretching generate thickening and increase the expression of laminin and dystrophin in skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cação-Benedini, L.O.; Ribeiro, P.G.; Prado, C.M.; Chesca, D.L.; Mattiello-Sverzut, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix and costamere proteins transmit the concentric, isometric, and eccentric forces produced by active muscle contraction. The expression of these proteins after application of passive tension stimuli to muscle remains unknown. This study investigated the expression of laminin and dystrophin in the soleus muscle of rats immobilized with the right ankle in plantar flexion for 10 days and subsequent remobilization, either by isolated free movement in a cage or associated with passive stretching for up to 10 days. The intensity of the macrophage response was also evaluated. One hundred and twenty-eight female Wistar rats were divided into 8 groups: free for 10 days; immobilized for 10 days; immobilized/free for 1, 3, or 10 days; or immobilized/stretched/free for 1, 3, or 10 days. After the experimental procedures, muscle tissue was processed for immunofluorescence (dystrophin/laminin/CD68) and Western blot analysis (dystrophin/laminin). Immobilization increased the expression of dystrophin and laminin but did not alter the number of macrophages in the muscle. In the stretched muscle groups, there was an increase in dystrophin and the number of macrophages after 3 days compared with the other groups; dystrophin showed a discontinuous labeling pattern, and laminin was found in the intracellular space. The amount of laminin was increased in the muscles treated by immobilization followed by free movement for 10 days. In the initial stages of postimmobilization (1 and 3 days), an exacerbated macrophage response and an increase of dystrophin suggested that the therapeutic stretching technique induced additional stress in the muscle fibers and costameres

  15. Immobilization and therapeutic passive stretching generate thickening and increase the expression of laminin and dystrophin in skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cação-Benedini, L.O.; Ribeiro, P.G. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor, Departamento de Biomecânica, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Biomecânica, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Prado, C.M.; Chesca, D.L. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Patologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Mattiello-Sverzut, A.C. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor, Departamento de Biomecânica, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Biomecânica, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-05-09

    Extracellular matrix and costamere proteins transmit the concentric, isometric, and eccentric forces produced by active muscle contraction. The expression of these proteins after application of passive tension stimuli to muscle remains unknown. This study investigated the expression of laminin and dystrophin in the soleus muscle of rats immobilized with the right ankle in plantar flexion for 10 days and subsequent remobilization, either by isolated free movement in a cage or associated with passive stretching for up to 10 days. The intensity of the macrophage response was also evaluated. One hundred and twenty-eight female Wistar rats were divided into 8 groups: free for 10 days; immobilized for 10 days; immobilized/free for 1, 3, or 10 days; or immobilized/stretched/free for 1, 3, or 10 days. After the experimental procedures, muscle tissue was processed for immunofluorescence (dystrophin/laminin/CD68) and Western blot analysis (dystrophin/laminin). Immobilization increased the expression of dystrophin and laminin but did not alter the number of macrophages in the muscle. In the stretched muscle groups, there was an increase in dystrophin and the number of macrophages after 3 days compared with the other groups; dystrophin showed a discontinuous labeling pattern, and laminin was found in the intracellular space. The amount of laminin was increased in the muscles treated by immobilization followed by free movement for 10 days. In the initial stages of postimmobilization (1 and 3 days), an exacerbated macrophage response and an increase of dystrophin suggested that the therapeutic stretching technique induced additional stress in the muscle fibers and costameres.

  16. Mouse models of two missense mutations in actin-binding domain 1 of dystrophin associated with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Jackie L; Talsness, Dana M; Lindsay, Angus; Arpke, Robert W; Chatterton, Paul D; Nelson, D'anna M; Chamberlain, Christopher M; Olthoff, John T; Belanto, Joseph J; McCourt, Preston M; Kyba, Michael; Lowe, Dawn A; Ervasti, James M

    2018-02-01

    Missense mutations in the dystrophin protein can cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) through an undefined pathomechanism. In vitro studies suggest that missense mutations in the N-terminal actin-binding domain (ABD1) cause protein instability, and cultured myoblast studies reveal decreased expression levels that can be restored to wild-type with proteasome inhibitors. To further elucidate the pathophysiology of missense dystrophin in vivo, we generated two transgenic mdx mouse lines expressing L54R or L172H mutant dystrophin, which correspond to missense mutations identified in human patients with DMD or BMD, respectively. Our biochemical, histologic and physiologic analysis of the L54R and L172H mice show decreased levels of dystrophin which are proportional to the phenotypic severity. Proteasome inhibitors were ineffective in both the L54R and L172H mice, yet mice homozygous for the L172H transgene were able to express even higher levels of dystrophin which caused further improvements in muscle histology and physiology. Given that missense dystrophin is likely being degraded by the proteasome but whole body proteasome inhibition was not possible, we screened for ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes involved in targeting dystrophin to the proteasome. A myoblast cell line expressing L54R mutant dystrophin was screened with an siRNA library targeting E1, E2 and E3 ligases which identified Amn1, FBXO33, Zfand5 and Trim75. Our study establishes new mouse models of dystrophinopathy and identifies candidate E3 ligases that may specifically regulate dystrophin protein turnover in vivo. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Haye H; Comin-Colet, Josep; Klip, Ijsbrand T; Enjuanes, Cristina; Grote Beverborg, Niels; Voors, Adriaan A; Banasiak, Waldemar; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Bruguera, Jordi; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A; van der Meer, Peter

    2015-02-01

    To determine the prevalence, clinical correlates and the effects on outcome of vitamin B12 and folic acid levels in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). We studied an international pooled cohort comprising 610 patients with chronic HF. The main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. Mean age of the patients was 68±12 years and median serum N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide level was 1801 pg/mL (IQR 705-4335). Thirteen per cent of the patients had an LVEF >45%. Vitamin B12 deficiency (serum level <200 pg/mL), folate deficiency (serum level <4.0 ng/mL) and iron deficiency (serum ferritin level <100 µg/L, or 100-299 µg/L with a transferrin saturation <20%) were present in 5%, 4% and 58% of the patients, respectively. No significant correlation between mean corpuscular volume and vitamin B12, folic acid or ferritin levels was observed. Lower folate levels were associated with an impaired health-related quality of life (p=0.029). During a median follow-up of 2.10 years (1.31-3.60 years), 254 subjects died. In multivariable proportional hazard models, vitamin B12 and folic acid levels were not associated with prognosis. Vitamin B12 and folate deficiency are relatively rare in patients with chronic HF. Since no significant association was observed between mean corpuscular volume and neither vitamin B12 nor folic acid levels, this cellular index should be used with caution in the differential diagnosis of anaemia in patients with chronic HF. In contrast to iron deficiency, vitamin B12 and folic acid levels were not related to prognosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, T.W.; Bartolo, C.; Pearl, D.K. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5` and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened {approximately} 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3` of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3` mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications. 71 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Dystroglycan and muscular dystrophies related to the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandra, Francesca; Bozzi, Manuela; Bianchi, Marzia; Pavoni, Ernesto; Giardina, Bruno; Brancaccio, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    Dystroglycan (DG) is an adhesion molecule composed of two subunits, alpha and beta, that are produced by the post-translational cleavage of a single precursor molecule. DG is a pivotal component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), which connects the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle and many other tissues. Some muscular dystrophies are caused by mutations of DGC components, such as dystrophin, sarcoglycan or laminin-2, or also of DGC-associated molecules, such as caveolin-3. DG-null mice died during early embriogenesis and no neuromuscular diseases directly associated to genetic abnormalities of DG were identified so far. However, DG plays a crucial role for muscle integrity since its targeting at the sarcolemma is often perturbed in DGC-related neuromuscular disorders.

  20. The disintegrin and metalloproteinase ADAM12 contributes to TGF-beta signaling through interaction with the type II receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atfi, Azeddine; Dumont, Emmanuelle; Colland, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) regulates a wide variety of biological processes through two types of Ser/Thr transmembrane receptors: the TGF-beta type I receptor and the TGF-beta type II receptor (TbetaRII). Upon ligand binding, TGF-beta type I receptor activated by TbetaRII propagat......RII protein presumably by suppressing the association of TbetaRII with Smad7. These results define ADAM12 as a new partner of TbetaRII that facilitates its trafficking to early endosomes in which activation of the Smad pathway is initiated....

  1. Assessment of the structural and functional impact of in-frame mutations of the DMD gene, using the tools included in the eDystrophin online database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Aurélie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dystrophin is a large essential protein of skeletal and heart muscle. It is a filamentous scaffolding protein with numerous binding domains. Mutations in the DMD gene, which encodes dystrophin, mostly result in the deletion of one or several exons and cause Duchenne (DMD and Becker (BMD muscular dystrophies. The most common DMD mutations are frameshift mutations resulting in an absence of dystrophin from tissues. In-frame DMD mutations are less frequent and result in a protein with partial wild-type dystrophin function. The aim of this study was to highlight structural and functional modifications of dystrophin caused by in-frame mutations. Methods and results We developed a dedicated database for dystrophin, the eDystrophin database. It contains 209 different non frame-shifting mutations found in 945 patients from a French cohort and previous studies. Bioinformatics tools provide models of the three-dimensional structure of the protein at deletion sites, making it possible to determine whether the mutated protein retains the typical filamentous structure of dystrophin. An analysis of the structure of mutated dystrophin molecules showed that hybrid repeats were reconstituted at the deletion site in some cases. These hybrid repeats harbored the typical triple coiled-coil structure of native repeats, which may be correlated with better function in muscle cells. Conclusion This new database focuses on the dystrophin protein and its modification due to in-frame deletions in BMD patients. The observation of hybrid repeat reconstitution in some cases provides insight into phenotype-genotype correlations in dystrophin diseases and possible strategies for gene therapy. The eDystrophin database is freely available: http://edystrophin.genouest.org/.

  2. Novel dystrophin mutations revealed by analysis of dystrophin mRNA: alternative splicing suppresses the phenotypic effect of a nonsense mutation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fajkusová, L.; Lukáš, Z.; Tvrdíková, M.; Kuhrová, V.; Hájek, J.; Fajkus, Jiří

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2001), s. 133-138 ISSN 0960-8966 R&D Projects: GA MZd IZ3700; GA MZd NM19; GA MZd NA5227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : Duchenne muscular dystrophy * Becker muscular dystrophy * dystrophin mRNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.547, year: 2001

  3. The Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award Lecture: Importance of metzincin proteases in trophoblast biology and placental development: a focus on ADAM12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghababaei, Mahroo; Beristain, Alexander G

    2015-04-01

    Placental development is a highly regulated process requiring signals from both fetal and maternal uterine compartments. Within this complex system, trophoblasts, placental cells of epithelial lineage, form the maternal-fetal interface controlling nutrient, gas and waste exchange. The commitment of progenitor villous cytotrophoblasts to differentiate into diverse trophoblast subsets is a fundamental process in placental development. Differentiation of trophoblasts into invasive stromal- and vascular-remodeling subtypes is essential for uterine arterial remodeling and placental function. Inadequate placentation, characterized by defects in trophoblast differentiation, may underlie the earliest cellular events driving pregnancy disorders such as preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction. Molecularly, invasive trophoblasts acquire characteristics defined by profound alterations in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, cytoskeletal reorganization and production of proteolytic factors. To date, most studies have investigated the importance of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their ability to efficiently remodel components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, it is now becoming clear that besides MMPs, other related proteases regulate trophoblast invasion via mechanisms other than ECM turnover. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of trophoblast invasion by members of the metzincin family of metalloproteinases. Specifically, we will discuss the emerging roles that A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinases (ADAMs) play in placental development, with a particular focus on the ADAM subtype, ADAM12. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Becker muscular dystrophy severity is linked to the structure of dystrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Aurélie; Raguénès-Nicol, Céline; Ben Yaou, Rabah; Ameziane-Le Hir, Sarah; Chéron, Angélique; Vié, Véronique; Claustres, Mireille; Leturcq, France; Delalande, Olivier; Hubert, Jean-François; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie; Giudice, Emmanuel; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth

    2015-03-01

    In-frame exon deletions of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produce internally truncated proteins that typically lead to Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), a milder allelic disorder of DMD. We hypothesized that differences in the structure of mutant dystrophin may be responsible for the clinical heterogeneity observed in Becker patients and we studied four prevalent in-frame exon deletions, i.e. Δ45-47, Δ45-48, Δ45-49 and Δ45-51. Molecular homology modelling revealed that the proteins corresponding to deletions Δ45-48 and Δ45-51 displayed a similar structure (hybrid repeat) than the wild-type dystrophin, whereas deletions Δ45-47 and Δ45-49 lead to proteins with an unrelated structure (fractional repeat). All four proteins in vitro expressed in a fragment encoding repeats 16-21 were folded in α-helices and remained highly stable. Refolding dynamics were slowed and molecular surface hydrophobicity were higher in fractional repeat containing Δ45-47 and Δ45-49 deletions compared with hybrid repeat containing Δ45-48 and Δ45-51 deletions. By retrospectively collecting data for a series of French BMD patients, we showed that the age of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) onset was delayed by 11 and 14 years in Δ45-48 and Δ45-49 compared with Δ45-47 patients, respectively. A clear trend toward earlier wheelchair dependency (minimum of 11 years) was also observed in Δ45-47 and Δ45-49 patients compared with Δ45-48 patients. Muscle dystrophin levels were moderately reduced in most patients without clear correlation with the deletion type. Disease progression in BMD patients appears to be dependent on the deletion itself and associated with a specific structure of dystrophin at the deletion site. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Prevalence of Vitamin B12 deficiency in patients of type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Our study demonstrated significantly high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in patients treated with metformin with significant effect of dose and duration of metformin use on B12 levels. Physicians must recognize this important fact and screen diabetics on metformin therapy for underlying B12 deficiency.

  6. Lance-adams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jun-Hwa; Park, Jong Moon; Kim, A Ram; Shin, Hee Suk; Lee, Eun Shin; Oh, Min-Kyun; Yoon, Chul Ho

    2012-08-01

    It is not common for a patient who survives cardiac arrest to experience significant neurologic impairment such as acute and chronic post-hypoxic myoclonus, known as Lance-Adams syndrome. This syndrome is predominantly characterized by myoclonus that starts days to weeks after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients who regained consciousness. Although several cases of LAS were reported, the decisive treatment method has not been established. We report a 43 year old man with Lance-Adams syndrome who showed long-term improvement through treatment with anti-myoclonic agents and participation in a rehabilitation program.

  7. Deletion of Dystrophin In-Frame Exon 5 Leads to a Severe Phenotype: Guidance for Exon Skipping Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Yon Charles Toh

    Full Text Available Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy severity depends upon the nature and location of the DMD gene lesion and generally correlates with the dystrophin open reading frame. However, there are striking exceptions where an in-frame genomic deletion leads to severe pathology or protein-truncating mutations (nonsense or frame-shifting indels manifest as mild disease. Exceptions to the dystrophin reading frame rule are usually resolved after molecular diagnosis on muscle RNA. We report a moderate/severe Becker muscular dystrophy patient with an in-frame genomic deletion of DMD exon 5. This mutation has been reported by others as resulting in Duchenne or Intermediate muscular dystrophy, and the loss of this in-frame exon in one patient led to multiple splicing events, including omission of exon 6, that disrupts the open reading frame and is consistent with a severe phenotype. The patient described has a deletion of dystrophin exon 5 that does not compromise recognition of exon 6, and although the deletion does not disrupt the reading frame, his clinical presentation is more severe than would be expected for classical Becker muscular dystrophy. We suggest that the dystrophin isoform lacking the actin-binding sequence encoded by exon 5 is compromised, reflected by the phenotype resulting from induction of this dystrophin isoform in mouse muscle in vivo. Hence, exon skipping to address DMD-causing mutations within DMD exon 5 may not yield an isoform that confers marked clinical benefit. Additional studies will be required to determine whether multi-exon skipping strategies could yield more functional dystrophin isoforms, since some BMD patients with larger in-frame deletions in this region have been reported with mild phenotypes.

  8. Evaluation of vitamin B 12 deficiency in various clinical condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, J.A.; Alam, J.M.; Kazmi, T.; Waseem, S.; Hussain, A.; Arif, S.; Shaheen, R.; Sultana, I.

    2010-01-01

    Low levels of vitamin B 12 have been associated with several clinical conditions. However no single symptom or group of symptoms can be made responsible. Reported causes of deficiency among older population are hematologic or neurological, followed by gastrointestinal and possibly vascular symptoms. The present prospective observational study was, hence, initiated to evaluate the underlying clinical condition or symptoms associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. The study was prospective observational and carried out on 121 patients (males, n=63 and females, n=58) for the period from January 1, 2004 to January 24, 2007. Age ranges were between 16 - 70 years, and categorized as > 60 yrs and < 60 years. All blood parameters were analyzed by standardized methods on automated analyzers. The deficiency was found to be more prevalent in males and increased from 52.06% to 58.10% in individuals with vitamin B12 <150 pg/ml. Mal nourishment was noted among the most subjects and weakness and anemia were frequent clinical findings (35.55%, n=43, 14%, n=51). Other clinical conditions were neuropsychiatric. Whereas less frequent findings were paraesthesia and gastrointestinal symptoms. Hypertension was more prevalent in vitamin B12 deficient individuals followed by diabetes, dementia, stroke, ischemic heart disease and Parkinson's disease. (author)

  9. Studying the role of dystrophin-associated proteins in influencing Becker muscular dystrophy disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergen, J C; Wokke, B H A; Hulsker, M A; Verschuuren, J J G M; Aartsma-Rus, A M

    2015-03-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy is characterized by a variable disease course. Many factors have been implicated to contribute to this diversity, among which the expression of several components of the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex. Together with dystrophin, most of these proteins anchor the muscle fiber cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix, thus protecting the muscle from contraction induced injury, while nNOS is primarily involved in inducing vasodilation during muscle contraction, enabling adequate muscle oxygenation. In the current study, we investigated the role of three components of the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex (beta-dystroglycan, gamma-sarcoglycan and nNOS) and the dystrophin homologue utrophin on disease severity in Becker patients. Strength measurements, data about disease course and fresh muscle biopsies of the anterior tibial muscle were obtained from 24 Becker patients aged 19 to 66. The designation of Becker muscular dystrophy in this study was based on the mutation and not on the clinical severity. Contrary to previous studies, we were unable to find a relationship between expression of nNOS, beta-dystroglycan and gamma-sarcoglycan at the sarcolemma and disease severity, as measured by muscle strength in five muscle groups and age at reaching several disease milestones. Unexpectedly, we found an inverse correlation between utrophin expression at the sarcolemma and age at reaching disease milestones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Intellectual Ability in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Dystrophin Gene Mutation Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasic Milic V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common form of muscular dystrophy during childhood. Mutations in dystrophin (DMD gene are also recognized as a cause of cognitive impairment. We aimed to determine the association between intelligence level and mutation location in DMD genes in Serbian patients with DMD. Forty-one male patients with DMD, aged 3 to 16 years, were recruited at the Clinic for Neurology and Psychiatry for Children and Youth in Belgrade, Serbia. All patients had defined DMD gene deletions or duplications [multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification (MLPA, polymerase chain reaction (PCR] and cognitive status assessment (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Brunet-Lezine scale, Vineland-Doll scale. In 37 patients with an estimated full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ, six (16.22% had borderline intelligence (70dystrophin isoforms and when mutations in the 5’-untranslated region (5’UTR of Dp140 (exons 45-50 were assigned to affect only Dp427 and Dp260. Mutations affecting Dp140 and Dp71/Dp40 have been associated with more frequent and more severe cognitive impairment. Finally, the same classification of mutations explained the greater proportion of FSIQ variability associated with cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms. In conclusion, cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms increases the risk of intellectual impairment in DMD and characterizing the genotype can define necessity of early cognitive interventions in DMD patients.

  11. Myoblots: dystrophin quantification by in-cell western assay for a streamlined development of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Del-Yerro, E; Garcia-Jimenez, I; Mamchaoui, K; Arechavala-Gomeza, V

    2017-10-31

    New therapies for neuromuscular disorders are often mutation specific and require to be studied in patient's cell cultures. In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) dystrophin restoration drugs are being developed but as muscle cell cultures from DMD patients are scarce and do not grow or differentiate well, only a limited number of candidate drugs are tested. Moreover, dystrophin quantification by western blotting requires a large number of cultured cells; so fewer compounds are as thoroughly screened as is desirable. We aimed to develop a quantitative assessment tool using fewer cells to contribute in the study of dystrophin and to identify better drug candidates. An 'in-cell western' assay is a quantitative immunofluorescence assay performed in cell culture microplates that allows protein quantification directly in culture, allowing a higher number of experimental repeats and throughput. We have optimized the assay ('myoblot') to be applied to the study of differentiated myoblast cultures. After an exhaustive optimization of the technique to adapt it to the growth and differentiation rates of our cultures and the low intrinsic expression of our proteins of interests, our myoblot protocol allows the quantification of dystrophin and other muscle-associated proteins in muscle cell cultures. We are able to distinguish accurately between the different sets of patients based on their dystrophin expression and detect dystrophin restoration after treatment. We expect that this new tool to quantify muscle proteins in DMD and other muscle disorders will aid in their diagnosis and in the development of new therapies. © 2017 British Neuropathological Society.

  12. Gene therapies that restore dystrophin expression for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Hamm, Jacqueline N.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common inherited genetic diseases and is caused by mutations to the DMD gene that encodes the dystrophin protein. Recent advances in genome editing and gene therapy offer hope for the development of potential therapeutics. Truncated versions of the DMD gene can be delivered to the affected tissues with viral vectors and show promising results in a variety of animal models. Genome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been used to restore dystrophin expression by deleting one or more exons of the DMD gene in patient cells and in a mouse model that led to functional improvement of muscle strength. Exon skipping with oligonucleotides has been successful in several animal models and evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Next-generation oligonucleotide formulations offer significant promise to build on these results. All these approaches to restoring dystrophin expression are encouraging, but many hurdles remain. This review summarizes the current state of these technologies and summarizes considerations for their future development. PMID:27542949

  13. Characterization of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy using monoclonal antibodies against a deletion-prone region of dystrophin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, L.T.; Man, Nguyen Thi; Morris, G.E. [Wales Institute, Clwyd (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-08-28

    We have produced a new panel of 20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against a region of the dystrophin protein corresponding to a deletion-prone region of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene (exons 45-50). We show that immunohistochemistry or Western blotting with these {open_quotes}exon-specific{close_quotes} mAbs can provide a valuable addition to Southern blotting or PCR methods for the accurate identification of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. The antibodies were mapped to the following exons: exon 45 (2 mAbs), exon 46 (6), exon 47 (1), exons 47/48 (4), exons 48-50 (6), and exon 50 (1). PCR amplification of single exons or groups of exons was used both to produce specific dystrophin immunogens and to map the mAbs obtained. PCR-mediated mutagenesis was also used to identify regions of dystrophin important for mAb binding. Because the mAbs can be used to characterize the dystrophin produced by individual muscle fibres, they will also be useful for studying {open_quotes}revertant{close_quotes} fibres in Duchenne muscle and for monitoring the results of myoblast therapy trials in MD patients with deletions in this region of the dystrophin gene. 27 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. John Adams and his times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaldi, E.

    1986-01-01

    In this first John Adams' Memorial Lecture, an outline is given of his work, especially from the beginning of CERN in 1952 until his death in 1984. The historical survey covers John Adams' technical and managerial contributions to the development of CERN and its accelerators, as well as to fusion research in Britain and Europe. Exemplified by his role as member and president of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA), Adams' interest in international co-operation is also stressed. In the spirit of this great European, arguments are given for CERN to continue to be the first-rate high-energy physics laboratory which it has been in the past. (orig.)

  15. Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Tavares Bello

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Further studies are needed to identify the risk factors for the B12 deficit. The recognition of these variables will contribute to optimize the screening and prevention of the B12 deficiency in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  16. Impact of Heat Shock Protein A 12B Overexpression on Spinal Astrocyte Survival Against Oxygen-Glucose-Serum Deprivation/Restoration in Primary Cultured Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xun; Ma, Yuan; Yang, Li-Bin; Cheng, Jing-Ming; Yang, Tao; Fan, Ke-Xia; Li, Yun-Ming; Liu, En-Yu; Cheng, Lin; Huang, Hai-Dong; Gu, Jian-Wen; Kuang, Yong-Qin

    2016-08-01

    Heat shock protein A 12B (HSPA12B) is a newly discovered member of the heat shock protein 70 family. Preclinical evidence indicates that HSPA12B helps protect the brain from ischemic injury, although its specific function remains unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether HSPA12B overexpression can protect astrocytes from oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation/restoration (OGD/R) injury. We analyzed the effects of HSPA12B overexpression on spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury and spinal astrocyte survival. After ischemia-reperfusion injury, we found that HSPA12B overexpression decreased spinal cord water content and infarct volume. MTT assay showed that HSPA12B overexpression increased astrocyte survival after OGD/R treatment. Flow cytometry results showed a marked inhibition of OGD/R-induced astrocyte apoptosis. Western blot assay showed that HSPA12B overexpression significantly increased regulatory protein B-cell lymphocyte 2 (Bcl-2) levels, whereas it decreased expression of the Bax protein, which forms a heterodimer with Bcl-2. Measurements of the level of activation of caspase-3 by Caspase-Glo®3/7 Assay kit showed that HSPA12B overexpression markedly inhibited caspase-3 activation. Notably, we demonstrated that the effects of HSPA12B on spinal astrocyte survival depended on activation of the PI3K/Akt signal pathway. These findings indicate that HSPA12B protects against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury and may represent a potential treatment target.

  17. Dual exon skipping in myostatin and dystrophin for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ommen Gert Jan B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myostatin is a potent muscle growth inhibitor that belongs to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β family. Mutations leading to non functional myostatin have been associated with hypermuscularity in several organisms. By contrast, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is characterized by a loss of muscle fibers and impaired regeneration. In this study, we aim to knockdown myostatin by means of exon skipping, a technique which has been successfully applied to reframe the genetic defect of dystrophin gene in DMD patients. Methods We targeted myostatin exon 2 using antisense oligonucleotides (AON in healthy and DMD-derived myotubes cultures. We assessed the exon skipping level, transcriptional expression of myostatin and its target genes, and combined myostatin and several dystrophin AONs. These AONs were also applied in the mdx mice models via intramuscular injections. Results Myostatin AON induced exon 2 skipping in cell cultures and to a lower extent in the mdx mice. It was accompanied by decrease in myostatin mRNA and enhanced MYOG and MYF5 expression. Furthermore, combination of myostatin and dystrophin AONs induced simultaneous skipping of both genes. Conclusions We conclude that two AONs can be used to target two different genes, MSTN and DMD, in a straightforward manner. Targeting multiple ligands of TGF-beta family will be more promising as adjuvant therapies for DMD.

  18. Vitamin B12 Deficiency Presenting as Pancytopenia in Pregnancy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idris N

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12 deficiency is a well-known cause of megaloblastic anaemia and pancytopenia. However, the incidence in pregnancy is rarely reported. We present a case of a 32-year old multigravid woman who was diagnosed with megaloblastic anaemia since 22 weeks gestation and progressed to develop severe pancytopenia at 30 weeks gestation. she was also diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency related to dietary and sociocultural habits. Folate and iron levels were normal throughout pregnancy. treatment with parenteral cyano-cobalamin resulted in sustained improvement of haematological parameters. the pregnancy was carried to term and the baby was born weighing 2,050gm but otherwise well at birth and had normal developmental milestones thereafter. this case illustrates the clinical presentation of maternal vitamin B12 deficiency and demonstrates the importance of detecting and treating maternal vitamin B12 deficiency during pregnancy in at-risk patients. Failure to diagnose and institute treatment carries significant risks to both mother and child. oral vitamin B12 supplementation should be considered for patients who are strict vegetarians or consume very little animal products.

  19. Overexpression of MfPIP2-7 from Medicago falcata promotes cold tolerance and growth under NO3 (-) deficiency in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Chunliu; Wang, Ting; Guo, Zhenfei; Lu, Shaoyun

    2016-06-14

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), which belong to aquaporins (AQPs) superfamily, are subdivided into two groups, PIP1 and PIP2, based on sequence similarity. Several PIP2s function as water channels, while PIP1s have low or no water channel activity, but have a role in water permeability through interacting with PIP2. A cold responsive PIP2 named as MfPIP2-7 was isolated from Medicago falcata (hereafter falcata), a forage legume with great cold tolerance, and transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing MfPIP2-7 were analyzed in tolerance to multiple stresses including freezing, chilling, and nitrate reduction in this study. MfPIP2-7 transcript was induced by 4 to 12 h of cold treatment and 2 h of abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. Pretreatment with inhibitor of ABA synthesis blocked the cold induced MfPIP2-7 transcript, indicating that ABA was involved in cold induced transcription of MfPIP2-7 in falcata. Overexpression of MfPIP2-7 resulted in enhanced tolerance to freezing, chilling and NO3 (-) deficiency in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants as compared with the wild type. Moreover, MfPIP2-7 was demonstrated to facilitate H2O2 diffusion in yeast. Higher transcript levels of several stress responsive genes, such as NtERD10B, NtERD10C, NtDREB1, and 2, and nitrate reductase (NR) encoding genes (NtNIA1, and NtNIA2) were observed in transgenic plants as compared with the wild type with dependence upon H2O2. In addition, NR activity was increased in transgenic plants, which led to alterations in free amino acid components and concentrations. The results suggest that MfPIP2-7 plays an important role in plant tolerance to freezing, chilling, and NO3 (-) deficiency by promoted H2O2 diffusion that in turn up-regulates expression of NIAs and multiple stress responsive genes.

  20. ADAM9 Is a Novel Product of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roychaudhuri, Robin; Hergrueter, Anja H; Polverino, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    A disintegrin and a metalloproteinase domain (ADAM) 9 is known to be expressed by monocytes and macrophages. In this study, we report that ADAM9 is also a product of human and murine polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). ADAM9 is not synthesized de novo by circulating PMNs. Rather, ADAM9 protein...

  1. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haifang; Boisguerin, Prisca; Moulton, Hong M; Betts, Corinne; Seow, Yiqi; Boutilier, Jordan; Wang, Qingsong; Walsh, Anthony; Lebleu, Bernard; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2013-09-24

    We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide) and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP) motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs) in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO) and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO) were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO), further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO) was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e124; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013

  2. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HaiFang Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO, further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies.

  3. B12 deficiency increases with age in hospitalized patients: a study on 14,904 samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mézière, Anthony; Audureau, Etienne; Vairelles, Stéphane; Krypciak, Sébastien; Dicko, Michèle; Monié, Marguerite; Giraudier, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    Cobalamin deficiency is responsible for hematological, neurological, neurocognitive, and neuropsychiatric impairments and is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, particularly in the elderly people. In order to determine B12 status in old inpatients, a total number of 14,904 hospitalized patients in whom B12 measurements were performed in five hospitals in the Paris metropolitan area were included from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011. The aims of the study were to determine whether age had an impact on B12 and folate deficiencies and to evaluate correlations between B12 and biological parameters-folate, hemoglobin, mean cell volume, homocystein (tHcy)-and age. Patients were aged 70.3±19.5 years. Low B12 concentration ( 17 µmol/L), 20.4% had low folate concentration (folate 17 µmol/L), and 4.7% of patients were both functional B12 and folate deficient. The B12 or folate deficient patients had lower mean cell volume level than nondeficient patients. Increase in mean cell volume and tHcy concentrations with age and decrease in B12, folate, and hemoglobin levels with age were observed. Frequency of functional B12 deficiency was 9.6% in patients aged 30-60 years and 14.2% in patients over 90 years. Frequency of functional folate deficiency was 9.5% in 30-60 years and 12.1% in >90 years. In inpatients, functional B12 deficiency and functional folate deficiency increase with age and are not associated with anemia or macrocytosis. False vitamin B deficiencies are frequent. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Adam Smith’s contribution to secularisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrus Simons

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examined several crucial themes in Adam Smith’s philosophy with the purpose of highlighting and assessing his contribution to the secularisation of Western society. The article, written from the perspective of reformational philosophy, begins with a brief biography and sketch of Adam Smith’s influence on modern society, followed by a summary of Ponti Venter’s view on Smith. This sets the scene for a discussion of Adam Smith’s project, his method of tackling it, and his views on systems, philosophy of history and the concept of philosophy.

  5. ADAM: Analyzer for Dialectal Arabic Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Salloum

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While Modern Standard Arabic (MSA has many resources, Arabic Dialects, the primarily spoken local varieties of Arabic, are quite impoverished in this regard. In this article, we present ADAM (Analyzer for Dialectal Arabic Morphology. ADAM is a poor man’s solution to quickly develop morphological analyzers for dialectal Arabic. ADAM has roughly half the out-of-vocabulary rate of a state-of-the-art MSA analyzer and is comparable in its recall performance to an Egyptian dialectal morphological analyzer that took years and expensive resources to build.

  6. Complete restoration of multiple dystrophin isoforms in genetically corrected Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient–derived cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susi Zatti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD–associated cardiac diseases are emerging as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in DMD patients, and many therapies for treatment of skeletal muscle failed to improve cardiac function. The reprogramming of patients' somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells, combined with technologies for correcting the genetic defect, possesses great potential for the development of new treatments for genetic diseases. In this study, we obtained human cardiomyocytes from DMD patient–derived, induced pluripotent stem cells genetically corrected with a human artificial chromosome carrying the whole dystrophin genomic sequence. Stimulation by cytokines was combined with cell culturing on hydrogel with physiological stiffness, allowing an adhesion-dependent maturation and a proper dystrophin expression. The obtained cardiomyocytes showed remarkable sarcomeric organization of cardiac troponin T and α-actinin, expressed cardiac-specific markers, and displayed electrically induced calcium transients lasting less than 1 second. We demonstrated that the human artificial chromosome carrying the whole dystrophin genomic sequence is stably maintained throughout the cardiac differentiation process and that multiple promoters of the dystrophin gene are properly activated, driving expression of different isoforms. These dystrophic cardiomyocytes can be a valuable source for in vitro modeling of DMD-associated cardiac disease. Furthermore, the derivation of genetically corrected, patient-specific cardiomyocytes represents a step toward the development of innovative cell and gene therapy approaches for DMD.

  7. Receptor-interacting Protein 140 Overexpression Promotes Neuro-2a Neuronal Differentiation by ERK1/2 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal neuronal differentiation plays an important role in central nervous system (CNS development abnormalities such as Down syndrome (DS, a disorder that results directly from overexpression of genes in trisomic cells. Receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140 is significantly upregulated in DS brains, suggesting its involvement in DS CNS development abnormalities. However, the role of RIP140 in neuronal differentiation is still not clear. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of RIP140 overexpression on the differentiation of neuro-2a (N2a neuroblastoma cells, in vitro. Methods: Stably RIP140-overexpressing N2a (N2a-RIP140 cells were used as a neurodevelopmental model, and were constructed by lipofection and overexpression validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Retinoic acid (RA was used to stimulate N2a differentiation. Combining the expression of Tuj1 at the mRNA and protein levels, the percentage of cells baring neurites, and the number of neurites per cell body was semi-quantified to determine the effect of RIP140 on differentiation of N2a cells. Furthermore, western blot and the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 were used to identify the specific signaling pathway by which RIP140 induces differentiation of N2a cells. Statistical significance of the differences between groups was determined by one-way analysis of variance followed by the Dunnett test. Results: Compared to untransfected N2a cells RIPl40 expression in N2a-RIP140 cells was remarkably upregulated at both the mRNA and protein levels. N2a-RIP140 cells had a significantly increased percentage of cells baring neurites, and numbers of neurites per cell, as compared to N2a cells, in the absence and presence of RA (P < 0.05. In addition, Tuj1, a neuronal biomarker, was strongly upregulated in N2a-RIP140 cells (P < 0.05 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2 levels in N2a-RIP140 cells were dramatically increased, while differentiation was

  8. Is vitamin B12 deficiency a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in vegetarians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Roman

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in cardiovascular disease development among vegetarians. Vegetarians have a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Deficiency of this vitamin is associated with a variety of atherogenic processes that are mainly, but not exclusively, due to vitamin B12 deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. Each 5-μmol/L increase above 10 μmol/L of serum homocysteine is associated with a 20% increased risk of circulatory health problems. Mean homocysteine concentration >10 μmol/L among vegetarians was reported in 32 of 34 reports. Macrocytosis associated with vitamin B12 deficiency is also associated with fatal and non-fatal coronary disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, and other circulatory health problems. Compared with non-vegetarians, vegetarians have an improved profile of the traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, including serum lipids, blood pressure, serum glucose concentration, and weight status. However, not all studies that assessed cardiovascular disease incidence among vegetarians reported a protective effect. Among studies that did show a lower prevalence of circulatory health problems, the effect was not as pronounced as expected, which may be a result of poor vitamin B12 status due to a vegetarian diet. Vitamin B12 deficiency may negate the cardiovascular disease prevention benefits of vegetarian diets. In order to further reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, vegetarians should be advised to use vitamin B12 supplements. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Single Cell Analysis of Dystrophin and SRY Gene by Using Whole Genome Amplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晨明; 金帆; 黄荷凤; 陶冶; 叶英辉

    2001-01-01

    Objective To develop a reliable and sensitive method for detection of sex and multiloci of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene in single cell Materials & methods Whole genome of single cell were amplified by using 15-base random primers (primer extension preamplification, PEP), then a small aliquot of PEP product were analyzed by using locus-specific nest PCR amplification. The procedure was evaluated by detection dystrophin exons 8, 17, 19, 44, 45, 48 and human testis-determining gene (SRY)in single lymphocytes from known sources and single blastomeres from the couples with no family history of DMD.Results The amplification efficiency rate of six dystrophin exons from single lymphocytes and single blastomeres were 97. 2% (175/180) and 100% (60/60) respectively.Results of SRY showed that 100% (15/15) amplification in single male-derived lymphocytes and 0% (0/15) amplification in single female-derived lymphocytes. Conclusion The technique of single cell PEP-nest PCR for dystrophin exons 8, 17,19, 44, 45, 48 and SRY is highly specifc. PEP-nest PCR is suitable for Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of DMD at single cell level.

  10. Screening of Dystrophin Gene Deletions in Egyptian Patients with DMD/BMD Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila K. Effat

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD are allelic disorders caused by mutations within the dystrophin gene. Our study has identified 100 Egyptian families collected from the Human Genetics Clinic, National Research Center, Cairo. All cases were subjected to complete clinical evaluation pedigree analysis, electromyography studies, estimation of serum creatine phosphokinase enzyme (CPK levels and DNA analysis. Multiplex PCR using 18 pairs of specific primers were used for screening of deletion mutations within the dystrophin gene. A frequency of 55% among the families. Sixty per cent of detected deletions involved multiple exons spanning the major or the minor hot spot of the dystrophin gene. The remainder 40% which mainly involved exon 45. Comparing these findings with frequencies of other countries it was found that our figures fall within the reported range of 40%– for deletions. The distribution of deletions in our study and other different studies was variable and specific ethnic differences do not apparently account for specific deletions. In addition this study concluded that employment of the 18 exon analysis is a cost effective and a highly accurate (97% to launch a nationwide program.

  11. An Adamic incarnational Christological framework as a theological approach for African contextual ministry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magezi, Vhumani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many African Christian thinkers and writers are responding to the foreignness of Christ in African Christianity by treating Christ under the traditional African ancestral category. However, it is our contention that the designation of the ancestral category to Christ has a tendency of diminishing the actuality of Christ as God incarnate and encouraging syncretism in African Christianity. Given this, this paper proposes and formulates an Adamic incarnational Christological model as an alternative response to the foreignness of Christ in African Christianity. In employing the anhypostastic and enhypostastic principles, we demonstrate that Jesus Christ is not a foreigner to African Christians, since the human nature he assumed in the incarnation is a general human nature which embraces all humankind. In establishing the Adam-Christ relationship in Romans 5:12-21 and 1 Corinthians 15:21-22, we advance Adam as a biblical-theological category in enhancing the relevance of Christ to Africans. It is from this perspective that our Adamic incarnational Christological model proposes that in the incarnation, God in Christ fully identified with all mankind as the New Adam, acting from the ontological depth of his divine-human existence to save African Christians from sin and all its consequences, including death and opposing spiritual forces. Thus, our own model underscores the relevance of Christ to African Christians by emphasizing Christs complete solidarity with all humanity as the New Adam.

  12. ADAM (Affordable Desktop Application Manager): a Unix desktop application manager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebana, M.; Marquina, M.; Ramos, R.

    1996-01-01

    ADAM stands for Affordable Desktop Application Manager. It is a GUI developed at CERN with the aim to ease access to applications. The motivation to develop ADAM came from the unavailability of environments like COSE/CDE and their heavy resource consumption. ADAM has proven to be user friendly: new users are able to customize it to their needs in few minutes. Groups of users may share through ADAM a common application environment. ADAM also integrates the Unix and the PC world. PC users can excess Unix applications in the same way as their usual Windows applications. This paper describes all the ADAM features, how they are used at CERN Public Services, and the future plans for ADAM. (author)

  13. Activation of PKA, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 by gonadotropins in cumulus cells is critical for induction of EGF-like factor and TACE/ADAM17 gene expression during in vitro maturation of porcine COCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Yasuhisa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives During ovulation, it has been shown that LH stimulus induces the expression of numerous genes via PKA, p38 MAPK, PI3K and ERK1/2 in cumulus cells and granulosa cells. Our recent study showed that EGF-like factor and its protease (TACE/ADAM17 are required for the activation of EGF receptor (EGFR, cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs. In the present study, we investigated which signaling pathways are involved in the gene expression of EGF-like factor and in Tace/Adam17 expression in cumulus cells of porcine COC during in vitro maturation. Methods Areg, Ereg, Tace/Adam17, Has2, Tnfaip6 and Ptgs2 mRNA expressions were detected in cumulus cells of porcine COCs by RT-PCR. Protein level of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in cultured cumulus cells was analyzed by westernblotting. COCs were visualized using a phase-contrast microscope. Results When COCs were cultured with FSH and LH up to 2.5 h, Areg, Ereg and Tace/Adam17 mRNA were expressed in cumulus cells of COCs. Areg, Ereg and Tace/Adam17 gene expressions were not suppressed by PI3K inhibitor (LY294002, whereas PKA inhibitor (H89, p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580 and MEK inhibitor (U0126 significantly suppressed these gene expressions. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and the gene expression of Has2, Tnfaip6 and Ptgs2 were also suppressed by H89, SB203580 and U0126, however, these negative effects were overcome by the addition of EGF to the medium, but not in the U0126 treatment group. Conclusion The results showed that PKA, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 positively controlled the expression of EGF-like factor and TACE/ADMA17, the latter of which impacts the cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation of porcine COCs via the EGFR-ERK1/2 pathway in cumulus cells.

  14. ADAM-17 is a poor prognostic indicator for patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma and is regulated by FoxM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiaodong; Yu, Wenlong; Qian, Jianxin; Chen, Ying; Wei, Peilian; Fang, Wenzheng; Yu, Guanzhen

    2018-05-18

    A-disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are members of a family of multidomain transmembrane and secreted proteins. Specific ADAMs are upregulated in human cancers and correlated with tumor progression and poor outcome, but rarely studied in human hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC). This study aimed to explore the expression profiles of ADAMs and their potential underlying mechanisms promoting cancer progression. mRNA expression of ADAM-9, - 10, - 11, - 12, - 15, - 17, - 28, and - 33 was analyzed in human hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC) samples. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis was used to detect the expression of ADAM-10, - 17, - 28, and FoxM1 in HC. The regulation of ADAM-17 by FoxM1 and their functional study was investigated in vivo and in vitro. ADAM-10, - 17, and - 28 were upregulated in tumors compared with matched non-cancerous tissues. IHC analysis revealed increased expression of ADAM-10, - 17, and - 28 in HC cells, and ADAM17 seems to be an independent prognostic factor. ADAM-17 is regulated by FoxM1. A decrease in the expression of ADAM-17 by silencing FoxM1 led to an inhibition of cell proliferation, tumor growth, and the production of tumor necrosis factor α. IHC analysis showed co-expression of FoxM1 and ADAM-17 in HC specimens. The findings of the present study show an important role of the cross-talk among FoxM1, ADAM-17, and TNFa in HC development and progression.

  15. Overexpression of let-7a increases neurotoxicity in a PC12 cell model of Alzheimer's disease via regulating autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huizi; Li, Lan; Cui, Chen; Zhao, Zihui; Song, Guijun

    2017-10-01

    Increased deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) protein is one of the typical characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidence has demonstrated that the microRNA let-7 family, which is highly expressed in the central nervous system, participates in the regulation of pathologic processes of AD. In the present study, the effect of let-7a overexpression on Aβ1-40-induced neurotoxicity was evaluated in PC12 and SK-N-SH cells. The results indicated that overexpression of let-7a enhanced the neurotoxicity induced by Aβ1-40 in PC12 and SK-N-SH cells. In addition, the apoptosis induced by Aβ1-40 in PC12 and SK-N-SH cells was increased by let-7a overexpression. Furthermore, Aβ1-40 treatment increased the protein levels of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3) and beclin-1 and increased the LC3 II/I ratio. The mRNA expression levels of beclin-1, autophagy protein 5 (Atg-5) and Atg-7 were also increased by Aβ1-40 treatment in PC12 cells. Let-7a overexpression further upregulated the above autophagy-related markers. Furthermore, the protein level of p62 was increased by Aβ1-40 treatment, and this was further enhanced by let-7a overexpression. Finally, the present results demonstrated that the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway was involved in the autophagy regulation by let-7a. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that the neurotoxicity induced by Aβ1-40 is augmented by let-7a overexpression via regulation of autophagy, and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway also serves a function in this process.

  16. A general review on vitamin B12 deficiency with focus on the situation in Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qutob, M. S.; Takruri, H. R.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin B 12 (cobalamin) is an essential nutrient that is only obtained from foods of animal origin, such as meat, eggs and dairy products. Vitamin B 12 plays an important role in DNA synthesis and neurological function. Thus its deficiency can lead to several neurological symptoms such as memory loss, dizziness and in severe cases may lead to dementia. Many factors can cause or lead to vitamin B-1 2 deficiency. Among these are malabsorption, several gastron intestinal problems (i.e. celiac disease, Crobn's disease) and gastrointestinal surgeries. diagnosis of vitamin B-1 2 status depends commonly on serum vitamin B 12 which is nonspecific tool for the deficiency. Other more specific tests, which reflect true deficiency, include serum and urine methylmalonic aci de, total serum homocysteine and serum holotranscobalamin. Vitamin B 12 deficiency is a worldwide public health problem; epidemiological studies showed that its prevalence in industrialized countries ranges from 5-60% of the population depending on the used cutoff point of cobalamin level. In Jordan, many reports were published on vitamin B 12 deficiency. However, these reports gave different results of its prevalence ranging from 16-48% depending on the serum vitamin B 12 cutoff point used. A recent study showed a prevalence of true deficiency of 32.7% based on measuring both serum vitamin B 12 level and plasma methylmalonic acid. (authors).

  17. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from USS CHARLES F. ADAMS from 1989-12-01 to 1989-12-13 (NODC Accession 9000014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data in this accession was collected in Greenland Sea from ship C.F. Adams between December 1-13, 1989. The real time data of water temperature at varying depth...

  18. The Relationship of Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Red Cell Distribution Width-Platelet Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigar Yilmaz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to investigate the relationship between vitamin B12 deficiency and red cell distribution widthplatelet ratio (RPR, and the variations in the parameters on vitamin B12 treatment. Methods: One hundred fifty-four patients with untreated vitamin B12 deficiency (56% men, mean age: 50 ± 12.7 years (untreated group, 86 patients with vitamin B12 deficiency (62% men, mean age: 42 ± 20.7 years on vitamin B12 treatment (treated group, and 92 age- and sex-matched control group (54% men, mean age: 45 ± 15.1 years were included in the study. Hematological parameters were evaluated by the method of laser-based flow cytometric impedance, using an automated blood cell counter (ABX Pentra 120 Hematology Blood Analyzer. Results: RPR was significantly reduced in treated group compared with untreated group (4.88 ± 1.06; 6.13 ± 1.27; p0.05. Conclusion: We proposed that vitamin B12 deficiency has effects on RPR and supplementation with vitamin B12 corrects the RPR levels. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (3: 211-215

  19. Data file of a deep proteome analysis of the prefrontal cortex in aged mice with progranulin deficiency or neuronal overexpression of progranulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidler, Juliana; Hardt, Stefanie; Wittig, Ilka; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2016-12-01

    Progranulin deficiency is associated with neurodegeneration in humans and in mice. The mechanisms likely involve progranulin-promoted removal of protein waste via autophagy. We performed a deep proteomic screen of the pre-frontal cortex in aged (13-15 months) female progranulin-deficient mice (GRN -/- ) and mice with inducible neuron-specific overexpression of progranulin (SLICK-GRN-OE) versus the respective control mice. Proteins were extracted and analyzed per liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) on a Thermo Scientific™ Q Exactive Plus equipped with an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography unit and a Nanospray Flex Ion-Source. Full Scan MS-data were acquired using Xcalibur and raw files were analyzed using the proteomics software Max Quant. The mouse reference proteome set from uniprot (June 2015) was used to identify peptides and proteins. The DiB data file is a reduced MaxQuant output and includes peptide and protein identification, accession numbers, protein and gene names, sequence coverage and label free quantification (LFQ) values of each sample. Differences in protein expression in genotypes are presented in "Progranulin overexpression in sensory neurons attenuates neuropathic pain in mice: Role of autophagy" (C. Altmann, S. Hardt, C. Fischer, J. Heidler, H.Y. Lim, A. Haussler, B. Albuquerque, B. Zimmer, C. Moser, C. Behrends, F. Koentgen, I. Wittig, M.H. Schmidt, A.M. Clement, T. Deller, I. Tegeder, 2016) [1].

  20. Data file of a deep proteome analysis of the prefrontal cortex in aged mice with progranulin deficiency or neuronal overexpression of progranulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Heidler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Progranulin deficiency is associated with neurodegeneration in humans and in mice. The mechanisms likely involve progranulin-promoted removal of protein waste via autophagy. We performed a deep proteomic screen of the pre-frontal cortex in aged (13–15 months female progranulin-deficient mice (GRN−/− and mice with inducible neuron-specific overexpression of progranulin (SLICK-GRN-OE versus the respective control mice. Proteins were extracted and analyzed per liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS on a Thermo Scientific™ Q Exactive Plus equipped with an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography unit and a Nanospray Flex Ion-Source. Full Scan MS-data were acquired using Xcalibur and raw files were analyzed using the proteomics software Max Quant. The mouse reference proteome set from uniprot (June 2015 was used to identify peptides and proteins. The DiB data file is a reduced MaxQuant output and includes peptide and protein identification, accession numbers, protein and gene names, sequence coverage and label free quantification (LFQ values of each sample. Differences in protein expression in genotypes are presented in "Progranulin overexpression in sensory neurons attenuates neuropathic pain in mice: Role of autophagy" (C. Altmann, S. Hardt, C. Fischer, J. Heidler, H.Y. Lim, A. Haussler, B. Albuquerque, B. Zimmer, C. Moser, C. Behrends, F. Koentgen, I. Wittig, M.H. Schmidt, A.M. Clement, T. Deller, I. Tegeder, 2016 [1].

  1. mRNA and microRNA transcriptomics analyses in a murine model of dystrophin loss and therapeutic restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Roberts

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a pediatric, X-linked, progressive muscle-wasting disorder caused by loss of function mutations affecting the gene encoding the dystrophin protein. While the primary genetic insult in DMD is well described, many details of the molecular and cellular pathologies that follow dystrophin loss are incompletely understood. To investigate gene expression in dystrophic muscle we have applied mRNA and microRNA (miRNA microarray technology to the mdx mouse model of DMD. This study was designed to generate a complete description of gene expression changes associated with dystrophic pathology and the response to an experimental therapy which restores dystrophin protein function. These datasets have enabled (1 the determination of gene expression changes associated with dystrophic pathology, (2 identification of differentially expressed genes that are restored towards wild-type levels after therapeutic dystrophin rescue, (3 investigation of the correlation between mRNA and protein expression (determined by parallel mass spectrometry proteomics analysis, and (4 prediction of pathology associated miRNA-target interactions. Here we describe in detail how the data were generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in Human Molecular Genetics with PMID 26385637. The data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO with the accession number GSE64420.

  2. Becker muscular dystrophy due to an intronic splicing mutation inducing a dual dystrophin transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todeschini, Alice; Gualandi, Francesca; Trabanelli, Cecilia; Armaroli, Annarita; Ravani, Anna; Fanin, Marina; Rota, Silvia; Bello, Luca; Ferlini, Alessandra; Pegoraro, Elena; Padovani, Alessandro; Filosto, Massimiliano

    2016-10-01

    We describe a 29-year-old patient who complained of left thigh muscle weakness since he was 23 and of moderate proximal weakness of both lower limbs with difficulty in climbing stairs and running since he was 27. Mild weakness of iliopsoas and quadriceps muscles and muscle atrophy of both the distal forearm and thigh were observed upon clinical examination. He harboured a novel c.1150-3C>G substitution in the DMD gene, affecting the intron 10 acceptor splice site and causing exon 11 skipping and an out-of-frame transcript. However, protein of normal molecular weight but in reduced amounts was observed on Western Blot analysis. Reverse transcription analysis on muscle RNA showed production, via alternative splicing, of a transcript missing exon 11 as well as a low abundant full-length transcript which is enough to avoid the severe Duchenne phenotype. Our study showed that a reduced amount of full length dystrophin leads to a mild form of Becker muscular dystrophy. These results confirm earlier findings that low amounts of dystrophin can be associated with a milder phenotype, which is promising for therapies aiming at dystrophin restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Adam8 Limits the Development of Allergic Airway Inflammation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolle, Martin D.; Nakajima, Takahiro; Hergrueter, Anja; Gupta, Kushagra; Polverino, Francesca; Craig, Vanessa J.; Fyfe, Susanne E.; Zahid, Muhammad; Permaul, Perdita; Cernadas, Manuela; Montano, Gilbert; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Sholl, Lynette; Kobzik, Lester; Israel, Elliot; Owen, Caroline A.

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether a disintegrin and a metalloproteinase-8 (Adam8) regulates allergic airway inflammation (AAI) and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR), we compared AAI and AHR in wild type (WT) versus Adam8−/− mice in different genetic backgrounds sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite protein extract (HDM). OVA- and HDM-treated Adam8−/− mice had higher lung leukocyte counts, more airway mucus metaplasia, greater lung levels of some TH2 cytokines, and higher methacholine-induced increases in central airway resistance than allergen-treated WT mice. Studies of OVA-treated Adam8 bone marrow chimeric mice confirmed that leukocyte-derived Adam8 predominantly mediated Adam8’s anti-inflammatory activities in murine airways. Airway eosinophils and macrophages both expressed Adam8 in WT mice with AAI. Adam8 limited AAI and AHR in mice by reducing leukocyte survival because: 1) Adam8−/− mice with AAI had fewer apoptotic eosinophils and macrophages in their airways than WT mice with AAI; and 2) Adam8−/− macrophages and eosinophils had reduced rates of apoptosis compared with WT leukocytes when the intrinsic (but not the extrinsic) apoptosis pathway was triggered in the cells in vitro. ADAM8 was robustly expressed by airway granulocytes in lung sections from human asthma patients but, surprisingly, airway macrophages had less ADAM8 staining than airway eosinophils. Thus, ADAM8 has anti-inflammatory activities during AAI in mice by activating the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in myeloid leukocytes. Strategies that increase ADAM8 levels in myeloid leukocytes may have therapeutic efficacy in asthma. PMID:23670189

  4. The Metalloproteinase ADAM28 Promotes Metabolic Dysfunction in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshini Herat

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are major causes of morbidity and mortality globally. The current study builds upon our previous association studies highlighting that A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 28 (ADAM28 appears to be implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. Our novel study characterised the expression of ADAM28 in mice with the metabolic syndrome and used molecular inhibition approaches to investigate the functional role of ADAM28 in the pathogenesis of high fat diet-induced obesity. We identified that ADAM28 mRNA and protein expression was markedly increased in the livers of mice with the metabolic syndrome. In addition, noradrenaline, the major neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system, results in elevated Adam28 mRNA expression in human monocytes. Downregulation of ADAM28 with siRNA technology resulted in a lack of weight gain, promotion of insulin sensitivity/glucose tolerance and decreased liver tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α levels in our diet-induced obesity mouse model as well as reduced blood urea nitrogen, alkaline phosphatase and aspartate aminotransferase. In addition, we show that ADAM28 knock-out mice also displayed reduced body weight, elevated high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and reductions in blood urea nitrogen, alkaline phosphatase, and aspartate aminotransferase. The results of this study provide important insights into the pathogenic role of the metalloproteinase ADAM28 in the metabolic syndrome and suggests that downregulation of ADAM28 may be a potential therapeutic strategy in the metabolic syndrome.

  5. ADAMS/WT advanced development - version 1.4 and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, A.S.; Depauw, T.R. [Mechanical Dynamics, Inc., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    ADAMS/WT is an wind-turbine-specific shell for the general-purpose mechanical system simulation package ADAMS5. It was developed under the guidance of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to give engineers and analysts in the wind turbine community access to the analytical power of ADAMS, without having to become expert in its particular technology. The 1.4 version of ADAMS/WT is the most recent upgrade to the package, incorporating the most up-to-date version of the AeroDyn aerodynamic forcing subroutines from the University of Utah. It is also the first version to be made available on the Windows/NT platform. In version 1.4, ADAMS/WT has been significantly improved throughout and runs much faster. Automatic generation of standardized output has been added. The documentation has been extensively augmented with more detailed descriptions, more figures and more examples. ADAMS/WT remains the most powerful analytical tool available for horizontal-axis wind turbine development. 10 figs.

  6. Identification of binding peptides of the ADAM15 disintegrin domain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    ADAM15 disintegrin domain (RADD) that could inhibit melanoma cell adhesion by using Escherichia coli. Second, four specific binding peptides (peptides A, B, C, and D) were selected using a phage display 12-mer peptide library. The screening protocol involved 4 rounds of positive panning on RADD and 2 rounds of ...

  7. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as an acute confusional state: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... occurred following parenteral vitamin B12 replacement therapy. Conclusion: This case report highlights one of the neuro-psychiatric presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency .... and Occupational Health Abstract No:.

  8. Conservation and divergence of ADAM family proteins in the Xenopus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Anoop

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the disintegrin metalloproteinase (ADAM family play important roles in cellular and developmental processes through their functions as proteases and/or binding partners for other proteins. The amphibian Xenopus has long been used as a model for early vertebrate development, but genome-wide analyses for large gene families were not possible until the recent completion of the X. tropicalis genome sequence and the availability of large scale expression sequence tag (EST databases. In this study we carried out a systematic analysis of the X. tropicalis genome and uncovered several interesting features of ADAM genes in this species. Results Based on the X. tropicalis genome sequence and EST databases, we identified Xenopus orthologues of mammalian ADAMs and obtained full-length cDNA clones for these genes. The deduced protein sequences, synteny and exon-intron boundaries are conserved between most human and X. tropicalis orthologues. The alternative splicing patterns of certain Xenopus ADAM genes, such as adams 22 and 28, are similar to those of their mammalian orthologues. However, we were unable to identify an orthologue for ADAM7 or 8. The Xenopus orthologue of ADAM15, an active metalloproteinase in mammals, does not contain the conserved zinc-binding motif and is hence considered proteolytically inactive. We also found evidence for gain of ADAM genes in Xenopus as compared to other species. There is a homologue of ADAM10 in Xenopus that is missing in most mammals. Furthermore, a single scaffold of X. tropicalis genome contains four genes encoding ADAM28 homologues, suggesting genome duplication in this region. Conclusions Our genome-wide analysis of ADAM genes in X. tropicalis revealed both conservation and evolutionary divergence of these genes in this amphibian species. On the one hand, all ADAMs implicated in normal development and health in other species are conserved in X. tropicalis. On the other hand, some

  9. Duchenne muscular dystrophy diagnosed by dystrophin gene deletion test: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathod Kishor G, Dawre Rahul M, Kamble Milind B,Tambe Saleem H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an X-linked recessive disease affecting 1 in 3600—6000 live male births. A muscle biopsy is not necessary if a genetic diagnosis is secured first, particularly as some families might view the procedure as traumatic. DMD occurs as a result of mutations (mainly deletions in the dystrophin gene (DMD; locus Xp21.2. Mutations lead to an absence of or defect in the protein dystrophin, which results in progressive muscle degeneration leading to loss of independent ambulation. Ninety percent of out frame mutations result in DMD, while 90% of in-frame mutations result in BMD. Electron microscopy is not required to confirm DMD. Genetic testing is mandatory irrespective of biopsy results. But the muscle biopsy is not required if the diagnosis is secured first by genetic testing.

  10. α-Syntrophin is involved in the survival signaling pathway in myoblasts under menadione-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong-A; Choi, Su Jin; Moon, Jae Yun; Kim, Hye Sun

    2016-05-15

    Dystrophin-deficient muscle is known to be more vulnerable to oxidative stress, but not much is known about the signaling pathway(s) responsible for this phenomenon. α-Syntrophin, a component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, can function as a scaffold protein because of its multiple protein interaction domains. In this study, we investigated the role of α-syntrophin in C2 myoblasts under menadione-induced oxidative stress. We found that the protein level of α-syntrophin was elevated when cells were exposed to menadione. To investigate the function of α-syntrophin during oxidative stress, we established α-syntrophin-overexpressing and knockdown cell lines. The α-syntrophin-overexpressing cells were resistant to the menadione-induced oxidative stress. In addition, survival signalings such as protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation and the Bcl-2/BAX ratio were increased in these cells. On the other hand, apoptotic signals such as cleavage of caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) were increased in the α-syntrophin knockdown cells. Furthermore, Ca(2+)influx, which is known to increase when cells are exposed to oxidative stress, decreased in the α-syntrophin-overexpressing cells, but increased in the knockdown cells. These results suggest that α-syntrophin plays a pivotal role in the survival pathway triggered by menadione-induced oxidative stress in cultured myoblasts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The molecular basis of aminoacylase 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Anke; Christensen, Ernst; Schwenger, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    deficiency have not been characterized so far. This has prompted us to approach expression studies of all mutations known to occur in aminoacylase 1 deficient individuals in a human cell line (HEK293), thus providing the authentic human machinery for posttranslational modifications. Mutations were inserted...... using site directed mutagenesis and aminoacylase 1 enzyme activity was assessed in cells overexpressing aminoacylase 1, using mainly the natural high affinity substrate N-acetyl methionine. Overexpression of the wild type enzyme in HEK293 cells resulted in an approximately 50-fold increase...

  12. Control of ADAM17 activity by regulation of its cellular localisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Inken; Lokau, Juliane; Korpys, Yvonne; Oldefest, Mirja; Flynn, Charlotte M.; Künzel, Ulrike; Garbers, Christoph; Freeman, Matthew; Grötzinger, Joachim; Düsterhöft, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    An important, irreversible step in many signalling pathways is the shedding of membrane-anchored proteins. A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase (ADAM) 17 is one of the major sheddases involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including regeneration, differentiation, and cancer progression. This central role in signalling implies that ADAM17 activity has to be tightly regulated, including at the level of localisation. Most mature ADAM17 is localised intracellularly, with only a small amount at the cell surface. We found that ADAM17 is constitutively internalised by clathrin-coated pits and that physiological stimulators such as GPCR ligands induce ADAM17-mediated shedding, but do not alter the cell-surface abundance of the protease. In contrast, the PKC-activating phorbol ester PMA, often used as a strong inducer of ADAM17, causes not only proteolysis by ADAM17 but also a rapid increase of the mature protease at the cell surface. This is followed by internalisation and subsequent degradation of the protease. Eventually, this leads to a substantial downregulation of mature ADAM17. Our results therefore imply that physiological activation of ADAM17 does not rely on its relocalisation, but that PMA-induced PKC activity drastically dysregulates the localisation of ADAM17. PMID:27731361

  13. Vitamin B12 deficiency - a major cause of megaloblastic anaemia in patients attending a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, S.P.; Kakepoto, G.N.; Iqbal, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    Folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies have been known to cause megaloblastic anaemia. Since the deficiencies of these two vitamins are very common in Pakistani population, it would be imperative to investigate their role in causing megaloblastic anaemia. The objective of this study was to find out the contribution of folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies in causing megaloblastic anaemia in our patient population. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, clinical records of 220 patients (101 females and 119 males with an age range of 1 - 80 years) who presented themselves with macrocytic anaemia at the Aga Khan University Hospital were collected. Data pertaining to complete blood count and serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were analysed. Results: The mean haemoglobin (Hb) level was 6.8 +- 0.2 gm/dl. Sixty-nine percent of the patients had severe anaemia (Hb<8 gm/dl). Mean +- SEM values of haemoglobin, serum folate and serum B12 were not significantly different between males and females (Hb 6.4 +- 0.3 gm/dl vs 6.3 +- 0.3 gm/dl; folate 6.9 +- 0.8 mu g/ml vs 7.8 +- 1 mu g/ml; B12 259 +- 65 mu g/ml vs 225 +- 45 mu g/ml, respectively). Linear regression analysis showed that serum folate was inversely related with the mean corpuscular volume (MCV, p=0.04). Spearman's correlation analysis indicated an inverse mild association between MCV and serum folate (correlation coefficient= -0.18). Folate deficiency was 43.4%, while vitamin B12 deficiency was 78.5% in these patients. Seventy-one percent of folate-deficient patients had vitamin B12 deficiency as well, while 26.1% of patients with B12 deficiency had a co-occurrence of folate deficiency. Conclusion: Vitamin B12 deficiency appears to be the major factor leading to megaloblastic anaemia in our study population. Inadequate dietary intake, over-cooking of our food and poor absorption might be contributing to high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in this population. (author)

  14. ADAM10 regulates Notch function in intestinal stem cells of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Hwai; VanDussen, Kelli L; Sawey, Eric T; Wade, Alex W; Kasper, Chelsea; Rakshit, Sabita; Bhatt, Riha G; Stoeck, Alex; Maillard, Ivan; Crawford, Howard C; Samuelson, Linda C; Dempsey, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10) is a cell surface sheddase that regulates physiologic processes, including Notch signaling. ADAM10 is expressed in all intestinal epithelial cell types, but the requirement for ADAM10 signaling in crypt homeostasis is not well defined. We analyzed intestinal tissues from mice with constitutive (Vil-Cre;Adam10(f/f) mice) and conditional (Vil-CreER;Adam10(f/f) and Leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCR5 [Lgr5]-CreER;Adam10(f/f) mice) deletion of ADAM10. We performed cell lineage-tracing experiments in mice that expressed a gain-of-function allele of Notch in the intestine (Rosa26(NICD)), or mice with intestine-specific disruption of Notch (Rosa26(DN-MAML)), to examine the effects of ADAM10 deletion on cell fate specification and intestinal stem cell maintenance. Loss of ADAM10 from developing and adult intestine caused lethality associated with altered intestinal morphology, reduced progenitor cell proliferation, and increased secretory cell differentiation. ADAM10 deletion led to the replacement of intestinal cell progenitors with 2 distinct, post-mitotic, secretory cell lineages: intermediate-like (Paneth/goblet) and enteroendocrine cells. Based on analysis of Rosa26(NICD) and Rosa26(DN-MAML) mice, we determined that ADAM10 controls these cell fate decisions by regulating Notch signaling. Cell lineage-tracing experiments showed that ADAM10 is required for survival of Lgr5(+) crypt-based columnar cells. Our findings indicate that Notch-activated stem cells have a competitive advantage for occupation of the stem cell niche. ADAM10 acts in a cell autonomous manner within the intestinal crypt compartment to regulate Notch signaling. This process is required for progenitor cell lineage specification and crypt-based columnar cell maintenance. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A case report: Becker muscular dystrophy presenting with epilepsy and dysgnosia induced by duplication mutation of Dystrophin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jing; Feng, Jia-Chun; Zhu, Dan; Yu, Xue-Fan

    2016-12-12

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), a genetic disorder of X-linked recessive inheritance, typically presents with gradually progressive muscle weakness. The condition is caused by mutations of Dystrophin gene located at Xp21.2. Epilepsy is an infrequent manifestation of BMD, while cases of BMD with dysgnosia are extremely rare. We describe a 9-year-old boy with BMD, who presented with epilepsy and dysgnosia. Serum creatine kinase level was markedly elevated (3665 U/L). Wechsler intelligence tests showed a low intelligence quotient (IQ = 65). Electromyogram showed slight myogenic changes and skeletal muscle biopsy revealed muscular dystrophy. Immunohistochemical staining showed partial positivity of sarcolemma for dystrophin-N. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification revealed a duplication mutation in exons 37-44 in the Dystrophin gene. The present case report helps to better understand the clinical and genetic features of BMD.

  16. Use of capillary Western immunoassay (Wes) for quantification of dystrophin levels in skeletal muscle of healthy controls and individuals with Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekman, Chantal; Janson, Anneke A; Baghat, Aabed; van Deutekom, Judith C; Datson, Nicole A

    2018-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a neuromuscular disease characterized by progressive weakness of the skeletal and cardiac muscles. This X-linked disorder is caused by open reading frame disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, resulting in strong reduction or complete absence of dystrophin protein. In order to use dystrophin as a supportive or even surrogate biomarker in clinical studies on investigational drugs aiming at correcting the primary cause of the disease, the ability to reliably quantify dystrophin expression in muscle biopsies of DMD patients pre- and post-treatment is essential. Here we demonstrate the application of the ProteinSimple capillary immunoassay (Wes) method, a gel- and blot-free method requiring less sample, antibody and time to run than conventional Western blot assay. We optimized dystrophin quantification by Wes using 2 different antibodies and found it to be highly sensitive, reproducible and quantitative over a large dynamic range. Using a healthy control muscle sample as a reference and α-actinin as a protein loading/muscle content control, a panel of skeletal muscle samples consisting of 31 healthy controls, 25 Becker Muscle dystrophy (BMD) and 17 DMD samples was subjected to Wes analysis. In healthy controls dystrophin levels varied 3 to 5-fold between the highest and lowest muscle samples, with the reference sample representing the average of all 31 samples. In BMD muscle samples dystrophin levels ranged from 10% to 90%, with an average of 33% of the healthy muscle average, while for the DMD samples the average dystrophin level was 1.3%, ranging from 0.7% to 7% of the healthy muscle average. In conclusion, Wes is a suitable, efficient and reliable method for quantification of dystrophin expression as a biomarker in DMD clinical drug development.

  17. [Neurological signs due to isolated vitamin B12 deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Estrada, K M; Cadabal Rodriguez, T; Miguens Blanco, I; García Méndez, L

    2013-01-01

    Isolated vitamin B12 deficiency is a common condition in elderly patients but uncommon in patients younger than 30 years, with an average age of onset between 60 and 70 years. This is because the dietary cobalamin, which is normally split by enzymes in meat in the presence of hydrochloric acid and pepsin in the stomach, is not released in the stomachs of elderly patients, usually due to achlorhydria. Although the body may be unable to release cobalamin it does retain the ability to absorb vitamin B12 in its crystalline form, which is present in multivitamin preparations. Other causes are due to drugs that suppress gastric acid production. Neurological signs of vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in patients with a normal haematocrit and red cell indices. They include paresthesia, loss of sensation and strength in the limbs, and ataxia. Reflexes may be slowed down or increased. Romberg and Babinsky signs may be positive, and vibration and position sensitivity often decreases. Behavoural disorders range from irritability and memory loss to severe dementia. The symptoms often do not fully respond to treatment. A case is presented of an isolated vitamin B12 deficiency in 27 year-old female patient who was seen in primary health care. During anamnesis she mentioned low back pain, to which she attributed the loss of strength and tenderness in the right side of the body, as well as the slow and progressive onset of accompanied headache for the previous 4 days. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Dual pathology as a result of spinal stenosis and vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mohammed Shakil; Rasul, Zurqa; Sell, Philip

    2011-12-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can confound the clinical assessment of patients presenting with features of spinal disorders. Speciality practice within spinal surgery may lead the clinician to a focus upon spinal explanations for symptoms and that belief may be reinforced by supporting imaging. In the presence of mainly sensory symptoms consideration and exclusion of non surgical causes needs to occur. This study aimed at identifying the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency; the presence of dual pathology on imaging performed; the implementation of replacement therapy and their subsequent clinical response as perceived by patients. This was performed through a retrospective review of patients presenting to specialist spine out-patient clinics over a 4-year period via access to pathology reports followed by a telephone survey. 457 patients were investigated of which 8.5% were vitamin B12 deficient. 70% of patients had repeat levels and 31% continued to be deficient. 26% of these patients were not placed on any supplemental therapy. 72% of patients on treatment had self perceived improved outcomes as compared with 55% not on treatment. 73% of patients underwent MRI/CT imaging. 59% of which had evidence of spinal stenosis. In older patients with sensory symptoms, the coexistence of B12 deficiency should be considered. Detection of deficiency with consequent treatment results in better global outcomes than no treatment. Unless the correct blood test is done, the pathology will remain undetected, and patients may continue with their primary symptoms despite high-risk spinal surgical procedures.

  19. Metabolic engineering of mannitol production in Lactococcus lactis: influence of overexpression of mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase in different genetic backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisselink, H Wouter; Mars, Astrid E; van der Meer, Pieter; Eggink, Gerrit; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2004-07-01

    To obtain a mannitol-producing Lactococcus lactis strain, the mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (mtlD) from Lactobacillus plantarum was overexpressed in a wild-type strain, a lactate dehydrogenase(LDH)-deficient strain, and a strain with reduced phosphofructokinase activity. High-performance liquid chromatography and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that small amounts (<1%) of mannitol were formed by growing cells of mtlD-overexpressing LDH-deficient and phosphofructokinase-reduced strains, whereas resting cells of the LDH-deficient transformant converted 25% of glucose into mannitol. Moreover, the formed mannitol was not reutilized upon glucose depletion. Of the metabolic-engineering strategies investigated in this work, mtlD-overexpressing LDH-deficient L. lactis seemed to be the most promising strain for mannitol production.

  20. The human serum metabolome of vitamin B-12 deficiency and repletion, and associations with neurological function

    Science.gov (United States)

    We characterize the human serum metabolome in sub-clinical vitamin B-12 (B-12) deficiency and repletion. A pre-post treatment study provided one injection of 10 mg B-12 to 27 community-dwelling elderly Chileans with B-12 deficiency evaluated with serum B-12, plasma homocysteine, methylmalonic acid a...

  1. Detection of vitamin B12 deficiency in older people by measuring vitamin B12 or the active fraction of vitamin B12, holotranscobalamin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Robert; Sherliker, Paul; Hin, Harold

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impaired vitamin B(12) function and decreased vitamin B(12) status have been associated with neurological and cognitive impairment. Current assays analyze total vitamin B(12) concentration, only a small percentage of which is metabolically active. Concentrations of this active component......, carried on holotranscobalamin (holoTC), may be of greater relevance than total vitamin B(12). METHODS: We compared the utility of serum holoTC with conventional vitamin B(12) for detection of vitamin B(12) deficiency in a population-based study of older people, using increased methylmalonic acid (MMA......) concentrations as a marker of metabolic vitamin B(12) deficiency in the overall population (n = 2403) and in subsets with normal (n = 1651) and abnormal (n = 752) renal function. RESULTS: Among all participants, 6% had definite (MMA >0.75 micromol/L) and 16% had probable (MMA >0.45 micromol/L) metabolic vitamin...

  2. The shedding activity of ADAM17 is sequestered in lipid rafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, Edwige; Canault, Matthias; Rebsomen, Laure; Bonardo, Bernadette; Juhan-Vague, Irene; Nalbone, Gilles; Peiretti, Franck

    2006-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) converting enzyme (ADAM17) is a metalloprotease-disintegrin responsible for the cleavage of several biologically active transmembrane proteins. However, the substrate specificity of ADAM17 and the regulation of its shedding activity are still poorly understood. Here, we report that during its transport through the Golgi apparatus, ADAM17 is included in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) where its prodomain is cleaved by furin. Consequently, ADAM17 shedding activity is sequestered in lipid rafts, which is confirmed by the fact that metalloproteinase inhibition increases the proportion of ADAM17 substrates (TNF and its receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2) in lipid rafts. Membrane cholesterol depletion increases the ADAM17-dependent shedding of these substrates demonstrating the importance of lipid rafts in the control of this process. Furthermore, ADAM17 substrates are present in different proportions in lipid rafts, suggesting that the entry of each of these substrates in these particular membrane microdomains is specifically regulated. Our data support the idea that one of the mechanisms regulating ADAM17 substrate cleavage involves protein partitioning in lipid rafts

  3. Neuronal differentiation modulates the dystrophin Dp71d binding to the nuclear matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Munoz, Rafael; Villarreal-Silva, Marcela; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Garcia-Sierra, Francisco; Mondragon, Monica; Mondragon, Ricardo; Cerna, Joel; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2008-01-01

    The function of dystrophin Dp71 in neuronal cells remains unknown. To approach this issue, we have selected the PC12 neuronal cell line. These cells express both a Dp71f cytoplasmic variant and a Dp71d nuclear isoform. In this study, we demonstrated by electron and confocal microscopy analyses of in situ nuclear matrices and Western blotting evaluation of cell extracts that Dp71d associates with the nuclear matrix. Interestingly, this binding is modulated during NGF-induced neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells with a twofold increment in the differentiated cells, compared to control cells. Also, distribution of Dp71d along the periphery of the nuclear matrix observed in the undifferentiated cells is replaced by intense fluorescent foci localized in Center of the nucleoskeletal structure. In summary, we revealed that Dp71d is a dynamic component of nuclear matrix that might participate in the nuclear modeling occurring during neuronal differentiation

  4. HISTORIA ECONÓMICA: El padre de la economia: Adam Smith

    OpenAIRE

    Accensi Martínez, Maria Cinta

    2016-01-01

    Peer-reviewed Artículo que describe una pequeña bibliografía del padre de la economía Adam Smith Article que descriu una petita bibliografia sobre el pare de l'economia Adam Smith. This article include a brief bibliography about Adam Smith.

  5. Modulation of splicing of the preceding intron by antisense oligonucleotide complementary to intra-exon sequence deleted in dystrophin Kobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeshima, Y.; Matuso, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, H. [Kobe Univ. School of Medicine and Science (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    Molecular analysis of dystrophin Kobe showed that exon 19 of the dystrophin gene bearing a 52 bp deletion was skipped during splicing, although the known consensus sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} splice site of exon 19 were maintained. These data suggest that the deleted sequence of exon 19 may function as a cis-acting factor for exact splicing for the upstream intron. To investigate this potential role, an in vitro splicing system using dystrophin precursors was established. A two-exon precursor containing exon 18, truncated intron 18, and exon 19 was accurately spliced. However, splicing of intron 18 was dramatically inhibited when wild exon 19 was replaced with mutated exon 19. Even though the length of exon 19 was restored to normal by replacing the deleted sequence with other sequence, splicing of intron 18 was not fully reactivated. Characteristically, splicing of intron 18 was inactivated more markedly when the replaced sequence contained less polypurine stretches. These data suggested that modification of the exon sequence would result in a splicing abnormality. Antisense 31 mer 2`-O-methyl ribonucleotide was targeted against 5{prime} end of deleted region of exon 19 to modulate splicing of the mRNA precursor. Splicing of intron 18 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is the first in vitro evidence to show splicing of dystrophin pre-mRNA can be managed by antisense oligonucleotides. These experiments represent an approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore the function of a defective dystrophin gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by inducing skipping of certain exons during splicing.

  6. Vitamin B12 deficiency results in severe oxidative stress, leading to memory retention impairment in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bito, Tomohiro; Misaki, Taihei; Yabuta, Yukinori; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Fumio

    2017-04-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in various human diseases and conditions, such as a neurodegeneration, which is the major symptom of vitamin B 12 deficiency, although the underlying disease mechanisms associated with vitamin B 12 deficiency are poorly understood. Vitamin B 12 deficiency was found to significantly increase cellular H 2 O 2 and NO content in Caenorhabditis elegans and significantly decrease low molecular antioxidant [reduced glutathione (GSH) and L-ascorbic acid] levels and antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase and catalase) activities, indicating that vitamin B 12 deficiency induces severe oxidative stress leading to oxidative damage of various cellular components in worms. An NaCl chemotaxis associative learning assay indicated that vitamin B 12 deficiency did not affect learning ability but impaired memory retention ability, which decreased to approximately 58% of the control value. When worms were treated with 1mmol/L GSH, L-ascorbic acid, or vitamin E for three generations during vitamin B 12 deficiency, cellular malondialdehyde content as an index of oxidative stress decreased to the control level, but the impairment of memory retention ability was not completely reversed (up to approximately 50%). These results suggest that memory retention impairment formed during vitamin B 12 deficiency is partially attributable to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF A CRIMPING DEVICE WITH MULTIPLE CAMS USING MSC ADAMS II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Popescu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Through the present paper, the author presents the results of the dynamic analysis with MSC ADAMS of the mechanism with a crimping device with 12 tightening cams, designed and used in the technological process of assembly of the indigenous electrical detonators. In this sense, the mechanism with multiple cams is considered a mechanical system and is treated as an assembly of rigid bodies connected by mechanical connections and elastic elements. For shaping and simulation of the mechanism with multiple cams using ADAMS program, the author got through the following stages: construction of the pattern, its testing and simulation, validation, finishing, parametrization, optimization of the pattern.

  8. Prevalence of iron, folate, and vitamin B12 deficiencies in 20 to 49 years old women: Ensanut 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Villalpando, Salvador; Mejía-Rodríguez, Fabiola; Cuevas-Nasu, Lucía; Gaona-Pineda, Elsa Berenice; Rangel-Baltazar, Eduardo; Zambrano-Mujica, Norma

    2015-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of iron, folate, and B12 deficiencies in Mexican women of reproductive age from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (Ensanut) 2012. Data came from a national probabilistic survey, representative from rural and urban areas, and different age groups. Blood samples were obtained from 4 263, 20 to 49 years old women for serum ferritin, vitamin B12 and serum folate concentrations. The prevalence of deficiencies, was assessed using adjusted logistic regression models. The deficiency of folate was 1.9% (95%CI 1.3-2.8), B12 deficiency was 8.5% (95%CI 6.7-10.1) and iron deficiency was 29.4% (95%CI 26.5-32.2). No differences were found when compared with 2006, 24.8% (95%CI 22.3-27.2). The vitamin B12 deficiency is still a problem for women of reproductive age and their offspring in Mexico, while folate deficiency disappeared as a problem. Iron deficiency needs prevention and fortification strategies.

  9. Roles of ADAM13-regulated Wnt activity in early Xenopus eye development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shuo; Xu, Guofeng; Bridges, Lance C.; Williams, Phoebe; Nakayama, Takuya; Shah, Anoop; Grainger, Robert M.; White, Judith M.; DeSimone, Douglas W.

    2012-01-01

    Pericellular proteolysis by ADAM family metalloproteinases has been widely implicated in cell signaling and development. We recently found that Xenopus ADAM13, an ADAM metalloproteinase, is required for activation of canonical Wnt signaling during cranial neural crest (CNC) induction by regulating a novel crosstalk between Wnt and ephrin B (EfnB) signaling pathways (Wei et al., 2010b). In the present study we show that the metalloproteinase activity of ADAM13 also plays important roles in eye development in X. tropicalis. Knockdown of ADAM13 results in reduced expression of eye field markers pax6 and rx1, as well as that of the pan-neural marker sox2. Activation of canonical Wnt signaling or inhibition of forward EfnB signaling rescues the eye defects caused by loss of ADAM13, suggesting that ADAM13 functions through regulation of the EfnB-Wnt pathway interaction. Downstream of Wnt, the head inducer Cerberus was identified as an effector that mediates ADAM13 function in early eye field formation. Furthermore, ectopic expression of the Wnt target gene snail2 restores cerberus expression and rescues the eye defects caused by ADAM13 knockdown. Together these data suggest an important role of ADAM13-regulated Wnt activity in eye development in Xenopus. PMID:22227340

  10. Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Persons with Intellectual Disability in a Vegetarian Residential Care Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Morad

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency among intellectually disabled persons in a vegetarian remedial community in Israel. In this community, 47 individuals with intellectual disability (ID live in 7 enlarged families in a kibbutz style agricultural setting. These 47 individuals and 17 of their caregivers were screened for vitamin B12 deficiency. There were 25.5% of the disabled vs. 11.8% of the caregivers found to have levels of vitamin B12 lower than 157 pg/ml. It is concluded that persons with ID in this vegetarian residential care community seemed to be at a higher risk for vitamin B12 deficiency.

  11. Targeting artificial transcription factors to the utrophin A promoter: effects on dystrophic pathology and muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yifan; Tian, Chai; Danialou, Gawiyou; Gilbert, Rénald; Petrof, Basil J; Karpati, George; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2008-12-12

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by a genetic defect in the dystrophin gene. The absence of dystrophin results in muscle fiber necrosis and regeneration, leading to progressive muscle fiber loss. Utrophin is a close analogue of dystrophin. A substantial, ectopic expression of utrophin in the extrasynaptic sarcolemma of dystrophin-deficient muscle fibers can prevent deleterious effects of dystrophin deficiency. An alternative approach for the extrasynaptic up-regulation of utrophin involves the augmentation of utrophin transcription via the endogenous utrophin A promoter using custom-designed transcriptional activator proteins with zinc finger (ZFP) motifs. We tested a panel of custom-designed ZFP for their ability to activate the utrophin A promoter. Expression of one such ZFP efficiently increased, in a time-dependent manner, utrophin transcript and protein levels both in vitro and in vivo. In dystrophic mouse (mdx) muscles, administration of adenoviral vectors expressing this ZFP led to significant enhancement of muscle function with decreased necrosis, restoration of the dystrophin-associated proteins, and improved resistance to eccentric contractions. These studies provide evidence that specifically designed ZFPs can act as strong transcriptional activators of the utrophin A promoter. These may thus serve as attractive therapeutic agents for dystrophin deficiency states such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  12. Chronic transgenerational vitamin B12 deficiency of severe and moderate magnitudes modulates adiposity-probable underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shampa; Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Muralikrishna, Bojanapalli; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Raghunath, Manchala

    2017-05-06

    We have demonstrated previously that severe but not moderate vitamin B12 deficiency altered body composition and induced adiposity in female C57BL/6 mice. This study aims to elucidate the effects of chronic transgenerational dietary vitamin B12 restriction on body composition and various biochemical parameters in the F1 generation offspring of our mouse models of severe and moderate vitamin B12 deficiency established earlier. Female weanling C57BL/6 mice received, ad libitum, for 4 weeks a (i) control diet, (ii) vitamin B12-restricted diet with pectin as dietary fiber (severely deficient diet), or (iii) vitamin B12-restricted diet with cellulose as dietary fiber (moderately deficient diet) and then mated with control males. The offspring of control and severely deficient dams continued on the respective diets of their mothers. Few moderately deficient dams were rehabilitated to control diet from parturition and their pups were weaned to control diet. Also, some offspring born to moderately B12 deficient dams were weaned to control diet, while others continued on the same diet as their mothers. Various parameters were determined in the F1 offspring after 12 and 36 weeks of feeding. The results indicate that both severe and moderate maternal vitamin B12 restrictions were associated with accelerated catch-up growth, increased body fat percentage, visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia, fasting hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in the F1 offspring. Inflammation, increased glucocorticoid and oxidative stress and poor antioxidant defence probably underlie these adverse effects. Rehabilitation from parturition but not weaning was beneficial in delaying the onset of the adverse outcomes in the offspring. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(3):400-414, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. ADAM28 localizes to HLA-G+ trophoblasts and promotes column cell outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, L C; Le, H T; Mara, D L; Beristain, A G

    2017-07-01

    Trophoblast progenitor cell differentiation towards the extravillous trophoblast (EVT) lineage initiates within proximal regions of anchoring columns of first trimester placental villi. While molecular processes controlling the initial stages of progenitor cell differentiation along the EVT pathway have been described, much remains unknown about factors important in distal column cell differentiation into invasive EVTs. ADAMs are proteases that regulate growth factor signaling, cell-matrix adhesion, and matrix proteolysis, and thus impact many processes relevant in placentation. Global gene expression studies identified the ADAM subtype, ADAM28, to be highly expressed in EVT-like trophoblasts, suggesting that it may play a role in EVT function. This study aims to test the functional importance of ADAM28 in column cell outgrowth and maintenance. ADAM28 mRNA levels and protein localization were determined by qPCR and immunofluorescence microscopy analyses in purified placental villi cell populations and tissues. ADAM28 function in trophoblast column outgrowth was examined using ADAM28-targetting siRNAs in Matrigel-imbedded placental explant cultures. Within placental villi, ADAM28 mRNA levels were highest in HLA-G + column trophoblasts, and consistent with this, ADAM28 was preferentially localized to HLA-G + trophoblasts within distal anchoring columns and decidual tissue. siRNA-directed loss of ADAM28 impaired trophoblast column outgrowth and resulted in increased apoptosis in matrix-invading trophoblasts. Our findings suggest that ADAM28 promotes column outgrowth by providing survival cues within anchoring column cells. This study also provides insight into a possible role for ADAM28 in driving differentiation of column trophoblasts into invasive HLA-G + EVT subsets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of iron, folate, and vitamin B12 deficiencies in 20 to 49 years old women: Ensanut 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Shamah-Levy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe the prevalence of iron, folate, and B12 deficiencies in Mexican women of reproductive age from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (Ensanut 2012.Materials and methods. Data came from a  ationalprobabilistic survey, representative from rural and urban areas,and different age groups. Blood samples were obtained from 4 263, 20 to 49 years old women for serum ferritin, vitamin B12 and serum folate oncentrations. The prevalence of deficiencies, was assessed using adjusted logistic regression models. Results. The deficiency of folate was 1.9% (95%CI1.3-2.8, B12 deficiency was 8.5% (95%CI 6.7-10.1 and iron deficiency was 29.4% (95%CI 26.5-32.2. No differences were found when compared with 2006, 24.8% (95%CI 22.3-27.2.Conclusions. The vitamin B12 deficiency is still a problem for women of reproductive age and their offspring in Mexico,while folate deficiency disappeared as a problem. Iron deficiency needs prevention and fortification strategies.

  15. Adhalin, the 50 kD dystrophin associated protein, is not the locus for severe childhood autosomal recessive dystrophy (SCARMD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, E.M.; Selig, S.; Kunkel, L.M. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in the carboxyl-terminus in dystrophin are normally sufficient to produce severely dystrophic muscle. This portion of dystrophin binds a complex of dystrophin-associated glycoproteins (DAGs). The genes encoding these DAGs are candidate genes for causing neuromuscular disease. Immunoreactivity for adhalin, the 50 kD DAG, is absent in muscle biopsies from patients with SCARMD, a form of dystrophy clinically similar Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Prior linkage analysis in SCARMD families revealed that the disease gene segregates with markers on chromosome 13. To determine the molecular role that adhalin may play in SCARMD, human cDNA and genomic sequences were isolated. Primers were designed based on predicted areas of conservation in rabbit adhalin and used in RT-PCR with human skeletal and cardiac muscle. RT-PCR products were confirmed by sequence as human adhalin and then used as probes for screening human cDNA and genomic libraries. Human and rabbit adhalin are 90% identical, and among the cDNAs, a novel splice form of adhalin was seen which may encode part of the 35 kD component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. To our surprise, only human/rodent hybrids containing human chromosome 17 amplified adhalin sequences in a PCR analysis. FISH analysis with three overlapping genomic sequences confirmed the chromosome 17 location and further delineated the map position to 17q21. Therefore, adhalin is excluded as the gene causing SCARMD.

  16. White centered retinal hemorrhages in vitamin b(12) deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehetner, Claus; Bechrakis, Nikolaos E

    2011-05-01

    To report a case of severe vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia presenting with white centered retinal hemorrhages. Interventional case report. A 40-year-old man, general practitioner himself, presented with a 1-day history of diminished left visual acuity and a drop-shaped central scotoma. The corrected visual acuities were 20/20, OD and 20/100, OS. Ophthalmic examination revealed bilaterally pale tarsal conjunctiva, discretely icteric bulbar conjunctiva and disseminated white centered intraretinal hemorrhages with foveal involvement. OCT imaging through these lesions revealed a retinal thickening caused by a sub-ILM accumulation of hyperreflective and inhomogeneous deposits within the nerve fiber layer. Immediate laboratory work-up showed severe megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B(12) deficiency requiring erythrocyte transfusions. Most reports of white centered retinal hemorrhages have been described in patients with leukemic retinopathy and bacterial endocarditis. It is interesting that this case of vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia retinopathy has a clinically indistinguishable fundus appearance. This is probably due to the common pathology of capillary disruption and subsequent hemostatic fibrin plug formation. In megaloblastic anemia, direct anoxia results in endothelial dysfunction. The loss of impermeability allows extrusion of whole blood and subsequent diffusion from the disrupted site throughout and above the nerve fiber layer. Therefore the biomicroscopic pattern of white centered hemorrhages observed in anemic retinopathy is most likely due to the clot formation as the reparative sequence after capillary rupture.

  17. White Centered Retinal Hemorrhages in Vitamin B12 Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Zehetner

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To report a case of severe vitamin B12 deficiency anemia presenting with white centered retinal hemorrhages. Methods: Interventional case report. Results: A 40-year-old man, general practitioner himself, presented with a 1-day history of diminished left visual acuity and a drop-shaped central scotoma. The corrected visual acuities were 20/20, OD and 20/100, OS. Ophthalmic examination revealed bilaterally pale tarsal conjunctiva, discretely icteric bulbar conjunctiva and disseminated white centered intraretinal hemorrhages with foveal involvement. OCT imaging through these lesions revealed a retinal thickening caused by a sub-ILM accumulation of hyperreflective and inhomogeneous deposits within the nerve fiber layer. Immediate laboratory work-up showed severe megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency requiring erythrocyte transfusions. Discussion: Most reports of white centered retinal hemorrhages have been described in patients with leukemic retinopathy and bacterial endocarditis. It is interesting that this case of vitamin B12 deficiency anemia retinopathy has a clinically indistinguishable fundus appearance. This is probably due to the common pathology of capillary disruption and subsequent hemostatic fibrin plug formation. In megaloblastic anemia, direct anoxia results in endothelial dysfunction. The loss of impermeability allows extrusion of whole blood and subsequent diffusion from the disrupted site throughout and above the nerve fiber layer. Therefore the biomicroscopic pattern of white centered hemorrhages observed in anemic retinopathy is most likely due to the clot formation as the reparative sequence after capillary rupture.

  18. Contribution of oxidative stress to pathology in diaphragm and limb muscles with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hee; Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Thompson, LaDora V; Lawler, John M

    2013-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative skeletal muscle disease that makes walking and breathing difficult. DMD is caused by an X-linked (Xp21) mutation in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a scaffolding protein located in the sarcolemmal cytoskeleton, important in maintaining structural integrity and regulating muscle cell (muscle fiber) growth and repair. Dystrophin deficiency in mouse models (e.g., mdx mouse) destabilizes the interface between muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix, resulting in profound damage, inflammation, and weakness in diaphragm and limb muscles. While the link between dystrophin deficiency with inflammation and pathology is multi-factorial, elevated oxidative stress has been proposed as a central mediator. Unfortunately, the use of non-specific antioxidant scavengers in mouse and human studies has led to inconsistent results, obscuring our understanding of the importance of redox signaling in pathology of muscular dystrophy. However, recent studies with more mechanistic approaches in mdx mice suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase and nuclear factor-kappaB are important in amplifying dystrophin-deficient muscle pathology. Therefore, more targeted antioxidant therapeutics may ameliorate damage and weakness in human population, thus promoting better muscle function and quality of life. This review will focus upon the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency in diaphragm and limb muscle primarily in mouse models, with a rationale for development of targeted therapeutic antioxidants in DMD patients.

  19. Long-term rescue of dystrophin expression and improvement in muscle pathology and function in dystrophic mdx mice by peptide-conjugated morpholino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Lu, Peijuan; Cloer, Caryn; Shaban, Mona; Grewal, Snimar; Milazi, Stephanie; Shah, Sapana N; Moulton, Hong M; Lu, Qi Long

    2012-08-01

    Exon skipping is capable of correcting frameshift and nonsense mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Phase 2 clinical trials in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands have reported induction of dystrophin expression in muscle of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients by systemic administration of both phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO) and 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate. Peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino offers significantly higher efficiency than phosphorodiamidate morpholino, with the ability to induce near-normal levels of dystrophin, and restores function in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. We examined 1-year systemic efficacy of peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino targeting exon 23 in dystrophic mdx mice. The LD(50) of peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino was determined to be approximately 85 mg/kg. The half-life of dystrophin expression was approximately 2 months in skeletal muscle, but shorter in cardiac muscle. Biweekly injection of 6 mg/kg peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino produced >20% dystrophin expression in all skeletal muscles and ≤5% in cardiac muscle, with improvement in muscle function and pathology and reduction in levels of serum creatine kinase. Monthly injections of 30 mg/kg peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino restored dystrophin to >50% normal levels in skeletal muscle, and 15% in cardiac muscle. This was associated with greatly reduced serum creatine kinase levels, near-normal histology, and functional improvement of skeletal muscle. Our results demonstrate for the first time that regular 1-year administration of peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino can be safely applied to achieve significant therapeutic effects in an animal model. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. ADAMS executive and operating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    The ADAMS Executive and Operating System, a multitasking environment under which a variety of data reduction, display and utility programs are executed, a system which provides a high level of isolation between programs allowing them to be developed and modified independently, is described. The Airborne Data Analysis/Monitor System (ADAMS) was developed to provide a real time data monitoring and analysis capability onboard Boeing commercial airplanes during flight testing. It inputs sensor data from an airplane performance data by applying transforms to the collected sensor data, and presents this data to test personnel via various display media. Current utilization and future development are addressed.

  1. Simultaneous Pathoproteomic Evaluation of the Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex and Secondary Changes in the mdx-4cv Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Murphy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In skeletal muscle, the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex forms a membrane-associated assembly of relatively low abundance, making its detailed proteomic characterization in normal versus dystrophic tissues technically challenging. To overcome this analytical problem, we have enriched the muscle membrane fraction by a minimal differential centrifugation step followed by the comprehensive label-free mass spectrometric analysis of microsomal membrane preparations. This organelle proteomic approach successfully identified dystrophin and its binding partners in normal versus dystrophic hind limb muscles. The introduction of a simple pre-fractionation step enabled the simultaneous proteomic comparison of the reduction in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and secondary changes in the mdx-4cv mouse model of dystrophinopathy in a single analytical run. The proteomic screening of the microsomal fraction from dystrophic hind limb muscle identified the full-length dystrophin isoform Dp427 as the most drastically reduced protein in dystrophinopathy, demonstrating the remarkable analytical power of comparative muscle proteomics. Secondary pathoproteomic expression patterns were established for 281 proteins, including dystrophin-associated proteins and components involved in metabolism, signalling, contraction, ion-regulation, protein folding, the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. Key findings were verified by immunoblotting. Increased levels of the sarcolemmal Na+/K+-ATPase in dystrophic leg muscles were also confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Thus, the reduction of sample complexity in organelle-focused proteomics can be advantageous for the profiling of supramolecular protein complexes in highly intricate systems, such as skeletal muscle tissue.

  2. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as an acute confusional state: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: We report a case of a 44 year old female patient referred to the haematology unit with vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as an acute confusional state or delirium. Total resolution of the psychiatric symptoms occurred following parenteral vitamin B12 replacement therapy. Conclusion: This case report highlights one ...

  3. Alpha-Secretase ADAM10 Regulation: Insights into Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peron, Rafaela; Vatanabe, Izabela Pereira; Manzine, Patricia Regina; Camins, Antoni

    2018-01-01

    ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) is a family of widely expressed, transmembrane and secreted proteins of approximately 750 amino acids in length with functions in cell adhesion and proteolytic processing of the ectodomains of diverse cell-surface receptors and signaling molecules. ADAM10 is the main α-secretase that cleaves APP (amyloid precursor protein) in the non-amyloidogenic pathway inhibiting the formation of β-amyloid peptide, whose accumulation and aggregation leads to neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). ADAM10 is a membrane-anchored metalloprotease that sheds, besides APP, the ectodomain of a large variety of cell-surface proteins including cytokines, adhesion molecules and notch. APP cleavage by ADAM10 results in the production of an APP-derived fragment, sAPPα, which is neuroprotective. As increased ADAM10 activity protects the brain from β-amyloid deposition in AD, this strategy has been proved to be effective in treating neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. Here, we describe the physiological mechanisms regulating ADAM10 expression at different levels, aiming to propose strategies for AD treatment. We report in this review on the physiological regulation of ADAM10 at the transcriptional level, by epigenetic factors, miRNAs and/or translational and post-translational levels. In addition, we describe the conditions that can change ADAM10 expression in vitro and in vivo, and discuss how this knowledge may help in AD treatment. Regulation of ADAM10 is achieved by multiple mechanisms that include transcriptional, translational and post-translational strategies, which we will summarize in this review. PMID:29382156

  4. The roles of ADAM33, ADAM28, IL-13 and IL-4 in the development of lung injuries in children with lethal non-pandemic acute infectious pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurakiades, Emanuele; Costa, Victor Horácio; Raboni, Sonia Mara; de Almeida, Vivian Rafaela Telli; Larsen, Kelly Susana Kunze; Kohler, Juliana Nemetz; Gozzo, Priscilla do Carmo; Klassen, Giseli; Manica, Graciele C M; de Noronha, Lucia

    2014-12-01

    ADAM28, ADAM33, IL-13, IL-4 and other cytokines (IL-6 and IL-10) seem to play important roles in the persistence and maintenance of acute inflammatory processes that ultimately lead to lung remodeling and pulmonary fibrosis, which may be responsible for the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with non-pandemic acute viral pneumonias in childhood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of ADAM33, ADAM28, IL4, IL6, IL10 and IL13 in the development of inflammation and alveolar fibrosis due to lethal acute respiratory infections of the lower airway in a pediatric population, especially in those with viral etiology. For this study, 193 cases were selected, and samples from the cases were processed for viral antigen detection by immunohistochemistry and then separated into two groups: virus-positive (n=68) and virus-negative (n=125). Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess the presence of metalloproteinases (ADAM33 and ADAM28) and inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-13, IL-6, IL-10) in the alveolar septa. The virus-positive group showed stronger immunolabeling for ADAM33, ADAM28, IL-4 and IL-13 (pplay important roles in pulmonary inflammatory reactions elicited against etiological viral agents. In addition, these mediators may affect the process of lung remodeling and the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interdependence of laminin-mediated clustering of lipid rafts and the dystrophin complex in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Geoffroy; Tham, Daniel Kai Long; Moukhles, Hakima

    2009-07-17

    Astrocyte endfeet surrounding blood vessels are active domains involved in water and potassium ion transport crucial to the maintenance of water and potassium ion homeostasis in brain. A growing body of evidence points to a role for dystroglycan and its interaction with perivascular laminin in the targeting of the dystrophin complex and the water-permeable channel, aquaporin 4 (AQP4), at astrocyte endfeet. However, the mechanisms underlying such compartmentalization remain poorly understood. In the present study we found that AQP4 resided in Triton X-100-insoluble fraction, whereas dystroglycan was recovered in the soluble fraction in astrocytes. Cholesterol depletion resulted in the translocation of a pool of AQP4 to the soluble fraction indicating that its distribution is indeed associated with cholesterol-rich membrane domains. Upon laminin treatment AQP4 and the dystrophin complex, including dystroglycan, reorganized into laminin-associated clusters enriched for the lipid raft markers GM1 and flotillin-1 but not caveolin-1. Reduced diffusion rates of GM1 in the laminin-induced clusters were indicative of the reorganization of raft components in these domains. In addition, both cholesterol depletion and dystroglycan silencing reduced the number and area of laminin-induced clusters of GM1, AQP4, and dystroglycan. These findings demonstrate the interdependence between laminin binding to dystroglycan and GM1-containing lipid raft reorganization and provide novel insight into the dystrophin complex regulation of AQP4 polarization in astrocytes.

  6. Electroporation Enhanced Effect of Dystrophin Splice Switching PNA Oligomers in Normal and Dystrophic Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Camilla Brolin; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Hojman, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    for improvement of in vivo cellular availability, we have investigated the effect of electrotransfer upon intramuscular (i.m.) PNA administration in vivo. Antisense PNA targeting exon 23 of the murine dystrophin gene was administered by i.m. injection to the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of normal NMRI......Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a synthetic DNA mimic that has shown potential for discovery of novel splice switching antisense drugs. However, in vivo cellular delivery has been a limiting factor for development, and only few successful studies have been reported. As a possible modality...... switching was detected at the RNA level up to 4 weeks after a single-dose treatment. In dystrophic muscles of the MDX mouse, electroporation increased the number of dystrophin-positive fibers about 2.5-fold at 2 weeks after a single PNA administration compared to injection only. In conclusion, we find...

  7. Tissue distribution of the dystrophin-related gene product and expression in the mdx and dy mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, D.R.; Marsden, R.F.; Bloomfield, J.F.; Davies, K.E. (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (England)); Morris, G.E.; Ellis, J.M. (North East Wales Inst., Deeside, Wales (England)); Fairbrother, U.; Edwards, Y.H. (Univ. College London (England)); Slater, C.P. (Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle-upon-Tyne (England)); Parry, D.J. (Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1991-04-15

    The authors have previously reported a dystrophin-related locus (DMDL for Duchenne muscular dystrophy-like) on human chromosome 6 that maps close to the dy mutation on mouse chromosome 10. Here they show that this gene is expressed in a wide range of tissues at varying levels. The transcript is particularly abundant in several human fetal tissues, including heart, placenta, and intestine. Studies with antisera raised against a DMDL fusion protein identify a 400,000 M{sub r} protein in all mouse tissues tested, including those of mdx and dy mice. Unlike the dystrophin gene, the DMDL gene transcript is not differentially spliced at the 3{prime} end in either fetal muscle or brain.

  8. Comparison of manual and automated quantification methods of 123I-ADAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauppinen, T.; Keski-Rahkonen, A.; Sihvola, E.; Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital

    2005-01-01

    123 I-ADAM is a novel radioligand for imaging of the brain serotonin transporters (SERTs). Traditionally, the analysis of brain receptor studies has been based on observer-dependent manual region of interest definitions and visual interpretation. Our aim was to create a template for automated image registrations and volume of interest (VOI) quantification and to show that an automated quantification method of 123 I-ADAM is more repeatable than the manual method. Patients, methods: A template and a predefined VOI map was created from 123 I-ADAM scans done for healthy volunteers (n=15). Scans of another group of healthy persons (HS, n=12) and patients with bulimia nervosa (BN, n=10) were automatically fitted to the template and specific binding ratios (SBRs) were calculated by using the VOI map. Manual VOI definitions were done for the HS and BN groups by both one and two observers. The repeatability of the automated method was evaluated by using the BN group. Results: For the manual method, the interobserver coefficient of repeatability was 0.61 for the HS group and 1.00 for the BN group. The intra-observer coefficient of repeatability for the BN group was 0.70. For the automated method, the coefficient of repeatability was 0.13 for SBRs in midbrain. Conclusion: An automated quantification gives valuable information in addition to visual interpretation decreasing also the total image handling time and giving clear advantages for research work. An automated method for analysing 123 I-ADAM binding to the brain SERT gives repeatable results for fitting the studies to the template and for calculating SBRs, and could therefore replace manual methods. (orig.)

  9. SERCA2a gene transfer improves electrocardiographic performance in aged mdx mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajjar Roger

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiomyocyte calcium overloading has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD heart disease. The cardiac isoform of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA2a plays a major role in removing cytosolic calcium during heart muscle relaxation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that SERCA2a over-expression may mitigate electrocardiography (ECG abnormalities in old female mdx mice, a murine model of DMD cardiomyopathy. Methods 1 × 1012 viral genome particles/mouse of adeno-associated virus serotype-9 (AAV-9 SERCA2a vector was delivered to 12-m-old female mdx mice (N = 5 via a single bolus tail vein injection. AAV transduction and the ECG profile were examined eight months later. Results The vector genome was detected in the hearts of all AAV-injected mdx mice. Immunofluorescence staining and western blot confirmed SERCA2a over-expression in the mdx heart. Untreated mdx mice showed characteristic tachycardia, PR interval reduction and QT interval prolongation. AAV-9 SERCA2a treatment corrected these ECG abnormalities. Conclusions Our results suggest that AAV SERCA2a therapy may hold great promise in treating dystrophin-deficient heart disease.

  10. Protein truncation test: analysis of two novel point mutations at the carboxy-terminus of the human dystrophin gene associated with mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffery, S; Lenk, U; Roberts, R G; Coubes, C; Demaille, J; Claustres, M

    1995-01-01

    Approximately one-third of the mutations responsible for Duchenne muscular dytrophy (DMD) do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. Methods for intensive mutation screening have recently been applied to this immense gene, which resulted in the identification of a number of point mutations in DMD patients, mostly translation-terminating mutations. A number of data raised the possibility that the C-terminal region of dystrophin might be involved in some cases of mental retardation associated with DMD. Using single-strand conformation analysis of products amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR-SSCA) to screen the terminal domains of the dystrophin gene (exons 60-79) of 20 unrelated patients with DMD or BMD, we detected two novel point mutations in two mentally retarded DMD patients: a 1-bp deletion in exon 70 (10334delC) and a 5' splice donor site alteration in intron 69 (10294 + 1G-->T). Both mutations should result in a premature translation termination of dystrophin. The possible effects on the reading frame were analyzed by the study of reverse transcripts amplified from peripheral blood lymphocytes mRNA and by the protein truncation test.

  11. FANCD2 Maintains Fork Stability in BRCA1/2-Deficient Tumors and Promotes Alternative End-Joining DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeina Kais

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1/2 proteins function in homologous recombination (HR-mediated DNA repair and cooperate with Fanconi anemia (FA proteins to maintain genomic integrity through replication fork stabilization. Loss of BRCA1/2 proteins results in DNA repair deficiency and replicative stress, leading to genomic instability and enhanced sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Recent studies have shown that BRCA1/2-deficient tumors upregulate Polθ-mediated alternative end-joining (alt-EJ repair as a survival mechanism. Whether other mechanisms maintain genomic integrity upon loss of BRCA1/2 proteins is currently unknown. Here we show that BRCA1/2-deficient tumors also upregulate FANCD2 activity. FANCD2 is required for fork protection and fork restart in BRCA1/2-deficient tumors. Moreover, FANCD2 promotes Polθ recruitment at sites of damage and alt-EJ repair. Finally, loss of FANCD2 in BRCA1/2-deficient tumors enhances cell death. These results reveal a synthetic lethal relationship between FANCD2 and BRCA1/2, and they identify FANCD2 as a central player orchestrating DNA repair pathway choice at the replication fork.

  12. Isolated cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in G93A SOD1 mice overexpressing CCS protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Marjatta; Leary, Scot C; Romain, Nadine; Pierrel, Fabien; Winge, Dennis R; Haller, Ronald G; Elliott, Jeffrey L

    2008-05-02

    G93A SOD1 transgenic mice overexpressing CCS protein develop an accelerated disease course that is associated with enhanced mitochondrial pathology and increased mitochondrial localization of mutant SOD1. Because these results suggest an effect of mutant SOD1 on mitochondrial function, we assessed the enzymatic activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in the spinal cords of CCS/G93A SOD1 and control mice. CCS/G93A SOD1 mouse spinal cord demonstrates a 55% loss of complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) activity compared with spinal cord from age-matched non-transgenic or G93A SOD1 mice. In contrast, CCS/G93A SOD1 spinal cord shows no reduction in the activities of complex I, II, or III. Blue native gel analysis further demonstrates a marked reduction in the levels of complex IV but not of complex I, II, III, or V in spinal cords of CCS/G93A SOD1 mice compared with non-transgenic, G93A SOD1, or CCS/WT SOD1 controls. With SDS-PAGE analysis, spinal cords from CCS/G93A SOD1 mice showed significant decreases in the levels of two structural subunits of cytochrome c oxidase, COX1 and COX5b, relative to controls. In contrast, CCS/G93A SOD1 mouse spinal cord showed no reduction in levels of selected subunits from complexes I, II, III, or V. Heme A analyses of spinal cord further support the existence of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in CCS/G93A SOD1 mice. Collectively, these results establish that CCS/G93A SOD1 mice manifest an isolated complex IV deficiency which may underlie a substantial part of mutant SOD1-induced mitochondrial cytopathy.

  13. ADAM10 is essential for cranial neural crest-derived maxillofacial bone development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Yu, E-mail: tanyu2048@163.com; Fu, Runqing, E-mail: furunqing@sjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Jiaqiang, E-mail: liujqmj@163.com; Wu, Yong, E-mail: wyonger@gmail.com; Wang, Bo, E-mail: wb228@126.com; Jiang, Ning, E-mail: 179639060@qq.com; Nie, Ping, E-mail: nieping1011@sina.com; Cao, Haifeng, E-mail: 0412chf@163.com; Yang, Zhi, E-mail: wcums1981@163.com; Fang, Bing, E-mail: fangbing@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-07-08

    Growth disorders of the craniofacial bones may lead to craniofacial deformities. The majority of maxillofacial bones are derived from cranial neural crest cells via intramembranous bone formation. Any interruption of the craniofacial skeleton development process might lead to craniofacial malformation. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 plays an essential role in organ development and tissue integrity in different organs. However, little is known about its function in craniofacial bone formation. Therefore, we investigated the role of ADAM10 in the developing craniofacial skeleton, particularly during typical mandibular bone development. First, we showed that ADAM10 was expressed in a specific area of the craniofacial bone and that the expression pattern dynamically changed during normal mouse craniofacial development. Then, we crossed wnt1-cre transgenic mice with adam10-flox mice to generate ADAM10 conditional knockout mice. The stereomicroscopic, radiographic, and von Kossa staining results showed that conditional knockout of ADAM10 in cranial neural crest cells led to embryonic death, craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that impaired mineralization could be triggered by decreased osteoblast differentiation, increased cell death. Overall, these findings show that ADAM10 plays an essential role in craniofacial bone development. -- Highlights: •We firstly reported that ADAM10 was essentially involved in maxillofacial bone development. •ADAM10 cKO mice present craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. •Impaired osteoblast differentiation,proliferation and apoptosis underlie the bone deformity.

  14. ADAM10 is essential for cranial neural crest-derived maxillofacial bone development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Yu; Fu, Runqing; Liu, Jiaqiang; Wu, Yong; Wang, Bo; Jiang, Ning; Nie, Ping; Cao, Haifeng; Yang, Zhi; Fang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Growth disorders of the craniofacial bones may lead to craniofacial deformities. The majority of maxillofacial bones are derived from cranial neural crest cells via intramembranous bone formation. Any interruption of the craniofacial skeleton development process might lead to craniofacial malformation. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 plays an essential role in organ development and tissue integrity in different organs. However, little is known about its function in craniofacial bone formation. Therefore, we investigated the role of ADAM10 in the developing craniofacial skeleton, particularly during typical mandibular bone development. First, we showed that ADAM10 was expressed in a specific area of the craniofacial bone and that the expression pattern dynamically changed during normal mouse craniofacial development. Then, we crossed wnt1-cre transgenic mice with adam10-flox mice to generate ADAM10 conditional knockout mice. The stereomicroscopic, radiographic, and von Kossa staining results showed that conditional knockout of ADAM10 in cranial neural crest cells led to embryonic death, craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that impaired mineralization could be triggered by decreased osteoblast differentiation, increased cell death. Overall, these findings show that ADAM10 plays an essential role in craniofacial bone development. -- Highlights: •We firstly reported that ADAM10 was essentially involved in maxillofacial bone development. •ADAM10 cKO mice present craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. •Impaired osteoblast differentiation,proliferation and apoptosis underlie the bone deformity.

  15. Restoration of half the normal dystrophin sequence in a double-deletion Duchenne muscular dystrophy family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoop, R.C.; Schwartz, L.S.; Hoffman, E.P. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Russo, L.S. [Univ. of Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Riconda, D.L. [Orlando Regional Medical Center, Orlando, FL (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Two male cousins with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were found to have different maternal dystrophin gene haplotypes and different deletion mutations. One propositus showed two noncontiguous deletions-one in the 5{prime}, proximal deletional hotspot region, and the other in the 3{prime}, more distal deletional hotspot region. The second propositus showed only the 5{prime} deletion. Using multiple fluorescent exon dosage and fluorescent multiplex CA repeat linkage analyses, the authors show that the mother of each propositus carries both deletions on the same grandmaternal X chromosome. This paradox is explained by a single recombinational event between the 2 deleted regions of one of the carrier`s dystrophin genes, giving rise to a son with a partially {open_quotes}repaired{close_quotes} gene retaining only the 5{prime} deletion. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Mathematical modeling of glutathione status in type 2 diabetics with vitamin B12 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun eKaramshetty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in vitamin B12 and glutathione (GSH are associated with anumber of diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus. We tested newly diag-nosed Indian diabetic patients for correlation between their vitamin B12 andGSH, and found it to be weak. Here we seek to examine the theoreticaldependence of GSH on vitamin B12 with a mathematical model of 1-carbonmetabolism due to Reed and co-workers. We study the methionine cycleof the Reed-Nijhout model by developing a simple ‘stylized model’ that cap-tures its essential topology and whose kinetics are analytically tractable. Theanalysis shows – somewhat counter-intuitively – that the flux responsible forthe homeostasis of homocysteine is, in fact, peripheral to the methioninecycle. Elevation of homocysteine arises from reduced activity of methioninesynthase, a vitamin B12-dependent enzyme, however, this does not increaseGSH biosynthesis. The model suggests that the lack of vitamin B12–GSHcorrelation is explained by suppression of activity in the trans-sulfurationpathway that limits the synthesis of cysteine and GSH from homocysteine.We hypothesize this ‘cysteine-block’ is an essential consequence of vitaminB12 deficiency. It can be clinically relevant to appreciate that these secondaryeffects of vitamin B12 deficiency could be central to its pathophysiology.

  17. Vitamin B12 deficiency might be related to sarcopenia in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Esra Ates; Soysal, Pinar; Aydin, Ali Ekrem; Dokuzlar, Ozge; Kocyigit, Suleyman Emre; Isik, Ahmet Turan

    2017-09-01

    Sarcopenia and dynapenia are related to repeated falls, mobility restriction, depression, frailty, increased mortality and morbidity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between vitamin B12 deficiency and sarcopenia in older adults. 403 patients, who attended to outpatient clinic and underwent comprehensive geriatric assessment, were included study. All cases' skeletal muscle mass (SMM), walking speed and hand grip strength were recorded by bioimpedance, 4meter walking test and hand dynamometer respectively. The diagnosis of sarcopenia was defined according to the criteria of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. Sarcopenia was accepted low SMM with low handgrip strength or low physical performance. Dynapenia was defined as handgrip strength sarcopenia and dynapenia was 24.8% and 32.0%, respectively. In the patients with sarcopenia, mean age, osteoporosis and frailty were higher, and MMSE, and instrumental ADL scores were lower than the patients without sarcopenia (psarcopenia and dynapenia were 31.6% and 35.4%, respectively, in patients with vitamin B12 levels Sarcopenia, which results in lots of negative clinical outcomes in older adults, might be related to vitamin B12 deficiency. Therefore, these patients should be periodically examined for vitamin B12 deficiency due to the potential negative clinical outcomes such as sarcopenia in older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with geographical latitude and solar radiation in the older population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Sebastián; Benavente, David; Alvo, Miriam; de Pablo, Paola; Ferro, Charles J

    2014-11-01

    Vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency are common in the older and are associated with several conditions including anaemia, cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment and cancer. Evidence from in vitro studies suggests that solar radiation can degrade both vitamins in the skin. Chile is the longest country in the world running perfectly North-South making it an ideal place to study potential associations of latitude and solar radiation on vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency. The objective was to examine the association between vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiencies and latitude. Plasma samples were collected from Chileans aged 65+ years (n=1013) living across the whole country and assayed for vitamin B12 and folic acid concentrations as part of the Chilean Health Survey 2009-2010, which is a national representative sample study. Overall, the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency was 11.3%, with the prevalence in the North of the country being significantly greater than in the Central and South zones (19.1%,10.5%, and 5.7%, respectively; Psolar radiation (OR 1.203 [95% confidence intervals 1.119-1.294], Psolar radiation. Although degradation by solar radiation might explain this observation, further work is required to establish the potential mechanisms. In countries that routinely fortify food with folic acid, efforts to identify vitamin B12 deficiency might be more cost-efficiently targeted in areas closest to the Equator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Roles of ADAM13-regulated Wnt activity in early Xenopus eye development

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Shuo; Xu, Guofeng; Bridges, Lance C.; Williams, Phoebe; Nakayama, Takuya; Shah, Anoop; Grainger, Robert M.; White, Judith M.; DeSimone, Douglas W.

    2011-01-01

    Pericellular proteolysis by ADAM family metalloproteinases has been widely implicated in cell signaling and development. We recently found that Xenopus ADAM13, an ADAM metalloproteinase, is required for activation of canonical Wnt signaling during cranial neural crest (CNC) induction by regulating a novel crosstalk between Wnt and ephrin B (EfnB) signaling pathways (Wei et al., 2010b). In the present study we show that the metalloproteinase activity of ADAM13 also plays important roles in eye...

  20. Lance-Adams Syndrome in the Pretargeted Temperature Management Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Brin; Sutter, Raoul; Kaplan, Peter W

    2017-03-01

    Acute posthypoxic myoclonus portends a poor prognosis. Another form of posthypoxic myoclonus, Lance-Adams syndrome, is associated with a better outcome. Differentiating these two entities is important in prognostication and guiding further medical intervention. This can be difficult in the acute setting after hypoxic brain injury but the use of neurophysiologic studies may be helpful. In this article, we present a case of a patient who presented after pulseless electrical activity arrest, underwent targeted temperature management and subsequently developed Lance-Adams syndrome. The neurologic and electroencephalographic findings in Lance-Adams syndrome are discussed with an updated review.

  1. Vitamin B12 Deficiency and the Role of Gender: A Cross-Sectional Study of a Large Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Ili; Cohen, Eytan; Goldberg, Elad; Krause, Ilan

    2018-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with hematological, neurological, and cardiovascular consequences. Epidemiologic data on these related illnesses indicate gender differences. A cross-sectional study was designed to examine gender differences in vitamin B12 deficiency among a healthy population. Data from healthy individuals aged 18-65, who were provided with a routine medical evaluation during 2000-2014, were retrieved from the medical charts. Individuals with background illnesses and those who had used medications or nutritional supplements were excluded. Vitamin B12 deficiency was defined by 2 cutoff values (206 and 140 pmol/L). The multivariate analysis was adjusted for age, body mass index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, hyperhomocysteinemia, folate deficiency, albumin, and transferrin saturation. Sensitivity analyses were implemented by excluding individuals with anemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, or folate deficiency and by age stratification. In all, 7,963 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Serum vitamin B12 mean levels were 312.36 and 284.31 pmol/L for women and men respectively (p variations are therefore hypothesized to play a role. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. PAX2 regulates ADAM10 expression and mediates anchorage-independent cell growth of melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Boyoung Lee

    Full Text Available PAX transcription factors play an important role during development and carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated PAX2 protein levels in melanocytes and melanoma cells by Western Blot and immunofluorescence analysis and characterized the role of PAX2 in the pathogenesis of melanoma. In vitro we found weak PAX2 protein expression in keratinocytes and melanocytes. Compared to melanocytes increased PAX2 protein levels were detectable in melanoma cell lines. Interestingly, in tissue sections of melanoma patients nuclear PAX2 expression strongly correlated with nuclear atypia and the degree of prominent nucleoli, indicating an association of PAX2 with a more atypical cellular phenotype. In addition, with chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, PAX2 overexpression and PAX2 siRNA we present compelling evidence that PAX2 can regulate ADAM10 expression, a metalloproteinase known to play important roles in melanoma metastasis. In human tissue samples we found co-expression of PAX2 and ADAM10 in melanocytes of benign nevi and in melanoma cells of patients with malignant melanoma. Importantly, the downregulation of PAX2 by specific siRNA inhibited the anchorage independent cell growth and decreased the migratory and invasive capacity of melanoma cells. Furthermore, the downregulation of PAX2 abrogated the chemoresistance of melanoma cells against cisplatin, indicating that PAX2 expression mediates cell survival and plays important roles during melanoma progression.

  3. A brief critique of the Adam-Gibbs entropy model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.; Hecksher, Tina; Niss, Kristine

    2009-01-01

    This paper critically discusses the entropy model proposed by Adam and Gibbs in 1965 for the dramatic temperature dependence of glass-forming liquids' average relaxation time, which is one of the most influential models during the last four decades. We discuss the Adam-Gibbs model's theoretical...

  4. Harald Velner - insener üle poole sajandi / Harald-Adam Velner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Velner, Harald-Adam, 1923-2012

    2008-01-01

    Harald-Adam Velner on Eesti Inseneride Liidu esimene taasiseseisvumisjärgne president. Lisaks Liis Seili lühiartikkel Harald-Adam Velneri isast August Velnerist: Teedeinsenerist isa juhtis inseneride ühendust enne sõda

  5. Taking Charge: Walter Sydney Adams and the Mount Wilson Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brashear, R.

    2004-12-01

    The growing preeminence of American observational astronomy in the first half of the 20th century is a well-known story and much credit is given to George Ellery Hale and his skill as an observatory-building entrepreneur. But a key figure who has yet to be discussed in great detail is Walter Sydney Adams (1876-1956), Hale's Assistant Director at Mount Wilson Observatory. Due to Hale's illnesses, Adams was Acting Director for much of Hale's tenure, and he became the second Director of Mount Wilson from 1923 to 1946. Behind his New England reserve Adams was instrumental in the growth of Mount Wilson and thus American astronomy in general. Adams was hand-picked by Hale to take charge of stellar spectroscopy work at Yerkes and Mount Wilson and the younger astronomer showed tremendous loyalty to Hale and Hale's vision throughout his career. As Adams assumed the leadership role at Mount Wilson he concentrated on making the observatory a place where researchers worked with great freedom but maintain a high level of cooperation. This paper will concentrate on Adams's early years and look at his growing relationship with Hale and how he came to be the central figure in the early history of Mount Wilson as both a solar and stellar observatory. His education, his years at Dartmouth and Yerkes (including his unfortunate encounter with epsilon Leonis), and his formative years on Mount Wilson are all important in learning how he shaped the direction of Mount Wilson and the development of American astronomy in the first half of the 20th century. This latter history cannot be complete until we bring Adams into better focus.

  6. Deletion of exon 26 of the dystrophin gene is associated with a mild Becker muscular dystrophy phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten; Vissing, John

    2011-01-01

    With the possible introduction of exon skipping therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, it has become increasingly important to know the role of each exon of the dystrophin gene to protein expression, and thus the phenotype. In this report, we present two related men with an unusually mild BMD...... calf hypertrophy was noted. Creatine kinase was normal or raised maximally to 500 U/l. The muscle biopsy was myopathic with increased fiber size variation and many internal nuclei, but no dystrophy. No comorbidity was found. In both cases, western blot showed a reduced dystrophin band. Genetic...... skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This report also shows that BMD may present with a normal CK....

  7. Reversible Vitamin B12 Deficiency Presenting with Acute Dementia, Paraparesis, and Normal Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani Almoallim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12 is essential for neurological function and its deficiency is associated with many neuropsychiatric disorders. We report the case of a previously healthy 53-year-old male patient presenting with delirium and multiple neurological findings. Complete blood analysis indicated megaloblastic anemia. All infectious causes were excluded owing to negative cultures (blood and urine. Tests for human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, and toxoplasma were also negative. Metabolic workup showed severe vitamin B12 deficiency, decreased reticulocyte count, and increased direct bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase. Intramuscular injection of cobalamin was started, and the patient showed significant improvement.

  8. ADAM-17 regulates endothelial cell morphology, proliferation, and in vitro angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeoz, Pal; Goeoz, Monika; Baldys, Aleksander; Hoffman, Stanley

    2009-01-01

    Modulation of angiogenesis is a promising approach for treating a wide variety of human diseases including ischemic heart disease and cancer. In this study, we show that ADAM-17 is an important regulator of several key steps during angiogenesis. Knocking down ADAM-17 expression using lentivirus-delivered siRNA in HUVECs inhibited cell proliferation and the ability of cells to form close contact in two-dimensional cultures. Similarly, ADAM-17 depletion inhibited the ability of HUVECs to form capillary-like networks on top of three-dimensional Matrigel as well as in co-culture with fibroblasts within a three-dimensional scaffold. In mechanistic studies, both baseline and VEGF-induced MMP-2 activation and Matrigel invasion were inhibited by ADAM-17 depletion. Based on our findings we propose that ADAM-17 is part of a novel pro-angiogenic pathway leading to MMP-2 activation and vessel formation.

  9. John Adams's Montesquieuean Moment: Enlightened Historicism in the Discourses on Davila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    At the outset of the French Revolution John Adams penned a series of Discourses of Davila, philosophical ruminations on the sixteenth-century French Wars of Religion. Recent historians have read these Discourses in terms of Adams's Machiavellianism-his conviction that men's passions lead to violence, if unrestrained. But this reading overlooks the extent to which Adams intended his Discourses as a particular investigation into the French nation's character, and into whether the revolutionaries could lay claim to a native, French tradition of mixed constitutional government. Situating the Discourses vis-à-vis Adams's contemporaneous reading of Montesquieu, this article argues for an underappreciated historicist dimension to his thought.

  10. Identification of small molecule and genetic modulators of AON-induced dystrophin exon skipping by high-throughput screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A O'Leary

    Full Text Available One therapeutic approach to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD recently entering clinical trials aims to convert DMD phenotypes to that of a milder disease variant, Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD, by employing antisense oligonucleotides (AONs targeting splice sites, to induce exon skipping and restore partial dystrophin function. In order to search for small molecule and genetic modulators of AON-dependent and independent exon skipping, we screened approximately 10,000 known small molecule drugs, >17,000 cDNA clones, and >2,000 kinase- targeted siRNAs against a 5.6 kb luciferase minigene construct, encompassing exon 71 to exon 73 of human dystrophin. As a result, we identified several enhancers of exon skipping, acting on both the reporter construct as well as endogenous dystrophin in mdx cells. Multiple mechanisms of action were identified, including histone deacetylase inhibition, tubulin modulation and pre-mRNA processing. Among others, the nucleolar protein NOL8 and staufen RNA binding protein homolog 2 (Stau2 were found to induce endogenous exon skipping in mdx cells in an AON-dependent fashion. An unexpected but recurrent theme observed in our screening efforts was the apparent link between the inhibition of cell cycle progression and the induction of exon skipping.

  11. Comparison of manual and automated quantification methods of {sup 123}I-ADAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauppinen, T. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center; Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Division of Nuclear Medicine; Koskela, A.; Ahonen, A. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Division of Nuclear Medicine; Diemling, M. [Hermes Medical Solutions, Stockholm (Sweden); Keski-Rahkonen, A.; Sihvola, E. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Public Health; Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Psychiatry

    2005-07-01

    {sup 123}I-ADAM is a novel radioligand for imaging of the brain serotonin transporters (SERTs). Traditionally, the analysis of brain receptor studies has been based on observer-dependent manual region of interest definitions and visual interpretation. Our aim was to create a template for automated image registrations and volume of interest (VOI) quantification and to show that an automated quantification method of {sup 123}I-ADAM is more repeatable than the manual method. Patients, methods: A template and a predefined VOI map was created from {sup 123}I-ADAM scans done for healthy volunteers (n=15). Scans of another group of healthy persons (HS, n=12) and patients with bulimia nervosa (BN, n=10) were automatically fitted to the template and specific binding ratios (SBRs) were calculated by using the VOI map. Manual VOI definitions were done for the HS and BN groups by both one and two observers. The repeatability of the automated method was evaluated by using the BN group. Results: For the manual method, the interobserver coefficient of repeatability was 0.61 for the HS group and 1.00 for the BN group. The intra-observer coefficient of repeatability for the BN group was 0.70. For the automated method, the coefficient of repeatability was 0.13 for SBRs in midbrain. Conclusion: An automated quantification gives valuable information in addition to visual interpretation decreasing also the total image handling time and giving clear advantages for research work. An automated method for analysing {sup 123}I-ADAM binding to the brain SERT gives repeatable results for fitting the studies to the template and for calculating SBRs, and could therefore replace manual methods. (orig.)

  12. Adam Smith, Market and Social Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchet, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Adam Smith (1723-1790) provided us with a remarkable synthesis of the economic and political ideas of his time and developed a conceptual system to analyse social interactions that mattered for the wealth of nations. He proposed a radically different roadmap for the future development of the soci......Adam Smith (1723-1790) provided us with a remarkable synthesis of the economic and political ideas of his time and developed a conceptual system to analyse social interactions that mattered for the wealth of nations. He proposed a radically different roadmap for the future development...... of the society he lived in. The fact that his original analyses were rooted in a given historical context and were founded on a well thought-through conceptual system should not be ignored. The galvanising effect of the dribs and drabs of Adam Smith ideas that have been bandied about are a long way from...... the powerful insights imbued in the original ideas. Putting those back into context, looking into how Smith proceeded then, trying to update his observations, might help us to be more attentive to the market changes and social challenges of our times....

  13. Subacute combined spinal cord degeneration and pancytopenia secondary to severe vitamin B12 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Cabrerizo-García

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Decreased vitamin B12 concentration does not usually result in clinical or hematological abnormalities. Subacute combined spinal cord degeneration and pancytopenia are two serious and rarely displayed consequences that appear in severe deficits. CASE REPORT: We present the case of a patient with subacute combined spinal cord degeneration and pancytopenia secondary to severe and sustained vitamin B12 deficiency. Such cases are rare nowadays and have potentially fatal consequences. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin B12 deficiency should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis in cases of blood disorders or severe neurological symptoms. Early diagnosis and treatment can avoid irreversible consequences.

  14. Sensory Neuronopathy Revealing Severe Vitamin B12 Deficiency in a Patient with Anorexia Nervosa: An Often-Forgotten Reversible Cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Franques

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12 (B12 deficiency is known to be associated with various neurological manifestations. Although central manifestations such as dementia or subacute combined degeneration are the most classic, neurological manifestations also include sensory neuropathies. However, B12 deficiency is still rarely integrated as a potential cause of sensory neuronopathy. Moreover, as many medical conditions can falsely normalize serum B12 levels even in the context of a real B12 deficiency, some cases may easily remain underdiagnosed. We report the illustrating case of an anorexic patient with sensory neuronopathy and consistently normal serum B12 levels. After all classical causes of sensory neuronopathy were ruled out, her clinical and electrophysiological conditions first worsened after folate administration, but finally improved dramatically after B12 administration. B12 deficiency should be systematically part of the etiologic workup of sensory neuronopathy, especially in a high risk context such as anorexia nervosa.

  15. STUDI KOMPARATIF KONSEP KETUHANAN ISLAM DAN AGAMA ADAM PADA KOMUNITAS SAMIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rosyid

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: One of the problems that disturb the harmony between religious communities is a lack of understanding of the majority (mainstream religion about the local religion, and vice versa. This article aims to develop such inter-religious understanding by comparing between Islam and the religion of Adam, a local religion of Samin community. The comparative study was made within the scope of the concept of God in both religions. This study found that the understanding between Islam the religion of Adam about the concept of God is essential in common. God called Allah (in Islam and Yai (in the religion of Adam are equally perceived as condescendent, an only single power, and the Almighty. Both communities also share Adam as the first man in the world. So, it is not proportional if the public ridicule Samin community with atheist stigma.Abstrak: Salah satu problem yang mengganggu keharmonisan antar komunitas beragama adalah kurangnya pemahaman pemeluk agama mayoritas (mainstream di suatu negara tentang agama lokal, dan demikian pula sebaliknya. Artikel ini bertujuan untuk membangun kesalingpahaman antar pemeluk agama itu dengan melakukan kaji banding antara agama Islam dengan agama Adam, sebuah agama lokal komunitas Samin. Kaji banding itu dilakukan dalam lingkup konsep ketuhanan dalam dua agama itu. Kajian ini menemukan bahwa pemahaman antara Islam dengan agama Adam tentang konsep Tuhan memiliki kesamaan secara esensial. Tuhan yang disebut dengan Allah (dalam Islam dan Yai (dalam agama Adam sama-sama dipersepsikan sebagai tempat berlindung, kekuatan tunggal, dan Zat Yang Maha segala-galanya. Kedua komunitas juga sama dalam memandang Adam sebagai manusia yang pertama di dunia. Dengan adanya pemahaman itu maka tidak proporsional lagi jika publik mengolok-olok komunitas Samin dengan stigma ateis.

  16. Nonmechanical Roles of Dystrophin and Associated Proteins in Exercise, Neuromuscular Junctions, and Brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Nichols

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC is an important structural unit in skeletal muscle that connects the cytoskeleton (f-actin of a muscle fiber to the extracellular matrix (ECM. Several muscular dystrophies, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Becker muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophies (dystroglycanopathies, and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (sarcoglycanopathies, are caused by mutations in the different DGC components. Although many early studies indicated DGC plays a crucial mechanical role in maintaining the structural integrity of skeletal muscle, recent studies identified novel roles of DGC. Beyond a mechanical role, these DGC members play important signaling roles and act as a scaffold for various signaling pathways. For example, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, which is localized at the muscle membrane by DGC members (dystrophin and syntrophins, plays an important role in the regulation of the blood flow during exercise. DGC also plays important roles at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ and in the brain. In this review, we will focus on recently identified roles of DGC particularly in exercise and the brain.

  17. The SPECT tracer [123I]ADAM binds selectively to serotonin transporters: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy young men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giessen, Elsmarieke van de; Booij, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The tracer 123 I-2-([2-({dimethylamino}methyl)phenyl]thio)-5-iodophenylamine ([ 123 I]ADAM) has been developed to image serotonin transporters (SERTs) with SPECT. Preclinical studies have shown that [ 123 I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs. Moreover, initial human studies have shown that [ 123 I]ADAM binding could be blocked by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). However, in humans it has not been proven that [ 123 I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs. We examined the in vivo availability of SERTs in 12 healthy young volunteers 5 h after bolus injection of [ 123 I]ADAM. To evaluate the selectivity of binding, four participants were pretreated (double-blinded design) with placebo, four with paroxetine (20 mg) and four with the dopamine/norepinephrine blocker methylphenidate (20 mg). SPECT studies were performed on a brain-dedicated system (Neurofocus), and the SPECT images were coregistered with individual MR scans of the brain. ADAM binding in SERT-rich brain areas and cerebellar cortex (representing non-specific binding) was assessed by drawing regions of interest (ROIs) on the individual MR images. Specific to non-specific ratios were used as the outcome measure. We found that specific to non-specific ratios were statistically significantly lower in paroxetine-pretreated participants than in placebo- or methylphenidate-pretreated participants. No such difference was found between groups pretreated with placebo or methylphenidate. Our preliminary findings suggest that [ 123 I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs in human brain. (orig.)

  18. ADAM10 missense mutations potentiate β-amyloid accumulation by impairing prodomain chaperone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Jaehong; Choi, Se Hoon; Romano, Donna M; Gannon, Moira A; Lesinski, Andrea N; Kim, Doo Yeon; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2013-10-16

    The generation of Aβ, the main component of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD), is precluded by α-secretase cleavage within the Aβ domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). We identified two rare mutations (Q170H and R181G) in the prodomain of the metalloprotease, ADAM10, that cosegregate with late-onset AD (LOAD). Here, we addressed the pathogenicity of these mutations in transgenic mice expressing human ADAM10 in brain. In Tg2576 AD mice, both mutations attenuated α-secretase activity of ADAM10 and shifted APP processing toward β-secretase-mediated cleavage, while enhancing Aβ plaque load and reactive gliosis. We also demonstrated ADAM10 expression potentiates adult hippocampal neurogenesis, which is reduced by the LOAD mutations. Mechanistically, both LOAD mutations impaired the molecular chaperone activity of ADAM10 prodomain. Collectively, these findings suggest that diminished α-secretase activity, owing to LOAD ADAM10 prodomain mutations, leads to AD-related pathology, strongly supporting ADAM10 as a promising therapeutic target for this devastating disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Lowering Asymmetric Dimethylarginine (ADMA on Vascular Pathology in Atherosclerotic ApoE-Deficient Mice with Reduced Renal Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Jacobi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work was to study the impact of the endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA and its degrading enzyme, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH1, on atherosclerosis in subtotally nephrectomized (SNX ApoE-deficient mice. Male DDAH1 transgenic mice (TG, n = 39 and C57Bl/6J wild-type littermates (WT, n = 27 with or without the deletion of the ApoE gene underwent SNX at the age of eight weeks. Animals were sacrificed at 12 months of age, and blood chemistry, as well as the extent of atherosclerosis within the entire aorta were analyzed. Sham treated (no renal mass reduction ApoE-competent DDAH1 transgenic and wild-type littermates (n = 11 served as a control group. Overexpression of DDAH1 was associated with significantly lower ADMA levels in all treatment groups. Surprisingly, SNX mice did not exhibit higher ADMA levels compared to sham treated control mice. Furthermore, the degree of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice with SNX was similar in mice with or without overexpression of DDAH1. Overexpression of the ADMA degrading enzyme, DDAH1, did not ameliorate atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient SNX mice. Furthermore, SNX in mice had no impact on ADMA levels, suggesting a minor role of this molecule in chronic kidney disease (CKD in this mouse model.

  20. Adam Smith and the Invisible Hand: From Metaphor to Myth

    OpenAIRE

    Gavin Kennedy

    2009-01-01

    Adam Smith and the ‘invisible hand’ are nearly synonymous in modern economic thinking. Adam Smith is strongly associated with the invisible hand, understood as a general rule that people in realising their self-interests unintentionally benefit the public good. The attribution to Smith is challengeable. Adam Smith’s use of the metaphor was much more modest; it was re-invented in the 1930s and 1940s onwards to bolster mathematical treatments of capitalism (Samuelson, Friedman) and to sup...

  1. Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on the ADAM10 intracellular domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endsley, Mark A.; Somasunderam, Anoma D.; Li, Guangyu; Oezguen, Numan; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Murray, James L.; Rubin, Donald H.; Hodge, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we showed that ADAM10 is necessary for HIV-1 replication in primary human macrophages and immortalized cell lines. Silencing ADAM10 expression interrupted the HIV-1 life cycle prior to nuclear translocation of viral cDNA. Furthermore, our data indicated that HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase, which proteolytically processes ADAM10. Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits HIV-1 replication between reverse transcription and nuclear entry. Here, we show that ADAM10 expression also supports replication in CD4 + T lymphocytes. The intracellular domain (ICD) of ADAM10 associates with the HIV-1 pre-integration complex (PIC) in the cytoplasm and immunoprecipitates and co-localizes with HIV-1 integrase, a key component of PIC. Taken together, our data support a model whereby ADAM15/γ-secretase processing of ADAM10 releases the ICD, which then incorporates into HIV-1 PIC to facilitate nuclear trafficking. Thus, these studies suggest ADAM10 as a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting HIV-1 prior to nuclear entry. - Highlights: • Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on ADAM10. • ADAM10 associates with HIV-1 integrase in the pre-integration complex. • HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase. • Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits nuclear import of viral cDNA. • ADAM10 is important for HIV-1 replication in human macrophages and CD4 + T lymphocytes

  2. Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on the ADAM10 intracellular domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endsley, Mark A., E-mail: maendsle@utmb.edu [Department Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Somasunderam, Anoma D., E-mail: asomasun@utmb.edu [Department Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Li, Guangyu, E-mail: LIG001@mail.etsu.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States); Oezguen, Numan, E-mail: numan.oezguen@bcm.edu [Department of Pathology and Immunology, Microbiome Center, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa, E-mail: Varatharasa.Thiviyanathan@uth.tmc.edu [Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Murray, James L., E-mail: jmurray100@yahoo.com [GeneTAG Technology, Inc., 3155 Northwoods Place, Norcross, GA 30071 (United States); Rubin, Donald H., E-mail: don.h.rubin@vanderbilt.edu [Research Medicine, VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, 1310 24th Ave. South, Nashville, TN 37212 (United States); Departments of Medicine, Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Ave South, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Hodge, Thomas W., E-mail: twhodge3@gmail.com [Pre-clinical and Antiviral Research, Tamir Biotechnology, Inc., 12625 High Bluff Dr., Suite 113, San Diego, CA 92130 (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    Previously, we showed that ADAM10 is necessary for HIV-1 replication in primary human macrophages and immortalized cell lines. Silencing ADAM10 expression interrupted the HIV-1 life cycle prior to nuclear translocation of viral cDNA. Furthermore, our data indicated that HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase, which proteolytically processes ADAM10. Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits HIV-1 replication between reverse transcription and nuclear entry. Here, we show that ADAM10 expression also supports replication in CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes. The intracellular domain (ICD) of ADAM10 associates with the HIV-1 pre-integration complex (PIC) in the cytoplasm and immunoprecipitates and co-localizes with HIV-1 integrase, a key component of PIC. Taken together, our data support a model whereby ADAM15/γ-secretase processing of ADAM10 releases the ICD, which then incorporates into HIV-1 PIC to facilitate nuclear trafficking. Thus, these studies suggest ADAM10 as a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting HIV-1 prior to nuclear entry. - Highlights: • Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on ADAM10. • ADAM10 associates with HIV-1 integrase in the pre-integration complex. • HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase. • Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits nuclear import of viral cDNA. • ADAM10 is important for HIV-1 replication in human macrophages and CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes.

  3. Fisiopatologia da deficiência de vitamina B12 e seu diagnóstico laboratorial

    OpenAIRE

    Paniz,Clóvis; Grotto,Denise; Schmitt,Gabriela Cristina; Valentini,Juliana; Schott,Karen Lílian; Pomblum,Valdeci Juarez; Garcia,Solange Cristina

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: A vitamina B12 é hidrossolúvel, não-sintetizada pelo organismo humano, presente em alimentos de origem animal. Sua deficiência é muito freqüente entre idosos, vegetarianos e indivíduos que adotam baixa dieta protéica ou apresentam problemas de absorção gastrintestinal. FISIOPATOLOGIA: A deficiência de vitamina B12 leva a transtornos hematológicos, neurológicos e cardiovasculares, principalmente, por interferir no metabolismo da homocisteína (Hcy) e nas reações de metilação do orga...

  4. Bordism, stable homotopy and adams spectral sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Kochman, Stanley O

    1996-01-01

    This book is a compilation of lecture notes that were prepared for the graduate course "Adams Spectral Sequences and Stable Homotopy Theory" given at The Fields Institute during the fall of 1995. The aim of this volume is to prepare students with a knowledge of elementary algebraic topology to study recent developments in stable homotopy theory, such as the nilpotence and periodicity theorems. Suitable as a text for an intermediate course in algebraic topology, this book provides a direct exposition of the basic concepts of bordism, characteristic classes, Adams spectral sequences, Brown-Peter

  5. The ADaptation and Anticipation Model (ADAM) of sensorimotor synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, M. C. (Marieke); Keller, Peter E.

    2013-01-01

    A constantly changing environment requires precise yet flexible timing of movements. Sensorimotor synchronization (SMS)—the temporal coordination of an action with events in a predictable external rhythm—is a fundamental human skill that contributes to optimal sensory-motor control in daily life. A large body of research related to SMS has focused on adaptive error correction mechanisms that support the synchronization of periodic movements (e.g., finger taps) with events in regular pacing sequences. The results of recent studies additionally highlight the importance of anticipatory mechanisms that support temporal prediction in the context of SMS with sequences that contain tempo changes. To investigate the role of adaptation and anticipatory mechanisms in SMS we introduce ADAM: an ADaptation and Anticipation Model. ADAM combines reactive error correction processes (adaptation) with predictive temporal extrapolation processes (anticipation) inspired by the computational neuroscience concept of internal models. The combination of simulations and experimental manipulations based on ADAM creates a novel and promising approach for exploring adaptation and anticipation in SMS. The current paper describes the conceptual basis and architecture of ADAM. PMID:23772211

  6. Relatively low proportion of dystrophin gene deletions in Israeili Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shomrat, R.; Gluck, E.; Legum, C.; Shiloh, Y. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)

    1994-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the X-linked dystrophin gene. The most common mutations in western populations are deletions that are spread non-randomly throughout the gene. Molecular analysis of the dystrophin gene structure by hybridization of the full length cDNA to Southern blots and by PCR in 62 unrelated Israeli male DMD/BMD patients showed deletions in 23 (37%). This proportion is significantly lower than that found in European and North American populations (55-65%). Seventy-eight percent of the deletions were confined to exons 44-52, half of these exons 44-45, and the remaining 22% to exons 1 and 19. There was no correlation between the size of the deletion and the severity of the disease. All the deletions causing frameshift resulted in the DMD phenotypes. 43 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Adams Predictor-Corrector Systems for Solving Fuzzy Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dequan Shang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A predictor-corrector algorithm and an improved predictor-corrector (IPC algorithm based on Adams method are proposed to solve first-order differential equations with fuzzy initial condition. These algorithms are generated by updating the Adams predictor-corrector method and their convergence is also analyzed. Finally, the proposed methods are illustrated by solving an example.

  8. Responses to Deficiencies and Suggestions, AIHA Site Assessment July 12-14, 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Jack T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Harding, Ruth N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-11

    These are the responses to the deficiencies and suggestions found during the American Industrial Hygiene Association external site assessment carried out July 12-14, 2016 in the Analytical Services and Instrumentation Division Analytical Laboratory.

  9. Improved γ-linolenic acid production in Mucor circinelloides by homologous overexpressing of delta-12 and delta-6 desaturases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Luan, Xiao; Zhang, Huaiyuan; Garre, Victoriano; Song, Yuanda; Ratledge, Colin

    2017-06-21

    γ-Linolenic acid (GLA) is important because of its nutritional value and medicinal applications. Although the biosynthetic pathways of some plant and microbial GLA have been deciphered, current understanding of the correlation between desaturases and GLA synthesis in oleaginous fungi is incomplete. In previous work, we found that a large amount of oleic acid (OA) had not been converted to linoleic acid (LA) or GLA in Mucor circinelloides CBS 277.49, which may be due to inadequate activities of the delta-12 or delta-6 desaturases, and thus leading to the accumulation of OA and LA. Thus, it is necessary to explore the main contributing factor during the process of GLA biosynthesis in M. circinelloides. To enhance GLA production in M. circinelloides, homologous overexpression of delta-12 and two delta-6 desaturases (named delta-6-1 and delta-6-2, respectively) were analyzed. When delta-6 desaturase were overexpressed in M. circinelloides, up to 43% GLA was produced in the total fatty acids, and the yield of GLA reached 180 mg/l, which were, respectively, 38 and 33% higher than the control strain. These findings revealed that delta-6 desaturase (especially for delta-6-1 desaturase) plays an important role in GLA synthesis by M. circinelloides. The strain overexpressing delta-6-1 desaturase may have potential application in microbial GLA production.

  10. ADAM10 mediates trastuzumab resistance and is correlated with survival in HER2 positive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldinger, Katharina; Generali, Daniele; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Gijsen, Merel; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho; Strina, Carla; Cappelletti, Mariarosa; Andreis, Daniele; Li, Ji-Liang; Bridges, Esther; Turley, Helen; Leek, Russell; Roxanis, Ioannis; Capala, Jacek; Murphy, Gillian; Harris, Adrian L.; Kong, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Trastuzumab prolongs survival in HER2 positive breast cancer patients. However, resistance remains a challenge. We have previously shown that ADAM17 plays a key role in maintaining HER2 phosphorylation during trastuzumab treatment. Beside ADAM17, ADAM10 is the other well characterized ADAM protease responsible for HER ligand shedding. Therefore, we studied the role of ADAM10 in relation to trastuzumab treatment and resistance in HER2 positive breast cancer. ADAM10 expression was assessed in HER2 positive breast cancer cell lines and xenograft mice treated with trastuzumab. Trastuzumab treatment increased ADAM10 levels in HER2 positive breast cancer cells (p≤0.001 in BT474; p≤0.01 in SKBR3) and in vivo (p≤0.0001) compared to control, correlating with a decrease in PKB phosphorylation. ADAM10 inhibition or knockdown enhanced trastuzumab response in naïve and trastuzumab resistant breast cancer cells. Trastuzumab monotherapy upregulated ADAM10 (p≤0.05); and higher pre-treatment ADAM10 levels correlated with decreased clinical response (p≤0.05) at day 21 in HER2 positive breast cancer patients undergoing a trastuzumab treatment window study. Higher ADAM10 levels correlated with poorer relapse-free survival (p≤0.01) in a cohort of HER2 positive breast cancer patients. Our studies implicate a role of ADAM10 in acquired resistance to trastuzumab and establish ADAM10 as a therapeutic target and a potential biomarker for HER2 positive breast cancer patients. PMID:24952873

  11. Structural Basis for Regulated Proteolysis by the α-Secretase ADAM10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegar, Tom C M; Killingsworth, Lauren B; Saha, Nayanendu; Meyer, Peter A; Patra, Dhabaleswar; Zimmerman, Brandon; Janes, Peter W; Rubinstein, Eric; Nikolov, Dimitar B; Skiniotis, Georgios; Kruse, Andrew C; Blacklow, Stephen C

    2017-12-14

    Cleavage of membrane-anchored proteins by ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) endopeptidases plays a key role in a wide variety of biological signal transduction and protein turnover processes. Among ADAM family members, ADAM10 stands out as particularly important because it is both responsible for regulated proteolysis of Notch receptors and catalyzes the non-amyloidogenic α-secretase cleavage of the Alzheimer's precursor protein (APP). We present here the X-ray crystal structure of the ADAM10 ectodomain, which, together with biochemical and cellular studies, reveals how access to the enzyme active site is regulated. The enzyme adopts an unanticipated architecture in which the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain partially occludes the enzyme active site, preventing unfettered substrate access. Binding of a modulatory antibody to the cysteine-rich domain liberates the catalytic domain from autoinhibition, enhancing enzymatic activity toward a peptide substrate. Together, these studies reveal a mechanism for regulation of ADAM activity and offer a roadmap for its modulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Research on Goods and the Ship Interaction Based on ADAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Fangzhen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The equivalent method of the relative movement goods on board is discussed in details. This method is to establish dynamic model based on moving trajectory of gravity-center for goods and to take rigid body geometric model with the trajectory as constraints in ADAMS. The difference of simulation methods for the different goods in carrier rolling is compared. The interact of relative moving objects with bulk carrier is discussed by using the ADAMS model. It is verified that the ballast water can maintain the ship’s stability by means of the ADAMS model.

  13. Synthesis and immunostimulating properties of novel adamant-1-yl tripeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribić, Rosana; Habjanec, Lidija; Vranešić, Branka; Frkanec, Ruža; Tomić, Srđanka

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare L- and D-(adamant-1-yl)-Gly-L-Ala-D-isoGln peptides in order to study their adjuvant (immunostimulating) activities. Adjuvant activity of adamant-1-yl tripeptides was tested in the mouse model using ovalbumin as an antigen and in comparison to the peptidoglycan monomer (PGM; β-D-GlcNAc-(1→4)-D-MurNAc-L-Ala-D-isoGln-mesoDAP(εNH(2) )-D-Ala-D-Ala) and structurally related adamant-2-yl tripeptides. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  14. Optimization of Peptide Nucleic Acid Antisense Oligonucleotides for Local and Systemic Dystrophin Splice Correction in the mdx Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, HaiFang; Betts, Corinne; Saleh, Amer F; Ivanova, Gabriela D; Lee, Hyunil; Seow, Yiqi; Kim, Dalsoo; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew JA

    2010-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) have the capacity to alter the processing of pre-mRNA transcripts in order to correct the function of aberrant disease-related genes. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle degenerative disease that arises from mutations in the DMD gene leading to an absence of dystrophin protein. AOs have been shown to restore the expression of functional dystrophin via splice correction by intramuscular and systemic delivery in animal models of DMD and in DMD patients via intramuscular administration. Major challenges in developing this splice correction therapy are to optimize AO chemistry and to develop more effective systemic AO delivery. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) AOs are an alternative AO chemistry with favorable in vivo biochemical properties and splice correcting abilities. Here, we show long-term splice correction of the DMD gene in mdx mice following intramuscular PNA delivery and effective splice correction in aged mdx mice. Further, we report detailed optimization of systemic PNA delivery dose regimens and PNA AO lengths to yield splice correction, with 25-mer PNA AOs providing the greatest splice correcting efficacy, restoring dystrophin protein in multiple peripheral muscle groups. PNA AOs therefore provide an attractive candidate AO chemistry for DMD exon skipping therapy. PMID:20068555

  15. A phase 1/2a follistatin gene therapy trial for becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendell, Jerry R; Sahenk, Zarife; Malik, Vinod; Gomez, Ana M; Flanigan, Kevin M; Lowes, Linda P; Alfano, Lindsay N; Berry, Katherine; Meadows, Eric; Lewis, Sarah; Braun, Lyndsey; Shontz, Kim; Rouhana, Maria; Clark, Kelly Reed; Rosales, Xiomara Q; Al-Zaidy, Samiah; Govoni, Alessandra; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Hogan, Mark J; Kaspar, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a variant of dystrophin deficiency resulting from DMD gene mutations. Phenotype is variable with loss of ambulation in late teenage or late mid-life years. There is currently no treatment for this condition. In this BMD proof-of-principle clinical trial, a potent myostatin antagonist, follistatin (FS), was used to inhibit the myostatin pathway. Extensive preclinical studies, using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver follistatin, demonstrated an increase in strength. For this trial, we used the alternatively spliced FS344 to avoid potential binding to off target sites. AAV1.CMV.FS344 was delivered to six BMD patients by direct bilateral intramuscular quadriceps injections. Cohort 1 included three subjects receiving 3 × 10(11) vg/kg/leg. The distance walked on the 6MWT was the primary outcome measure. Patients 01 and 02 improved 58 meters (m) and 125 m, respectively. Patient 03 showed no change. In Cohort 2, Patients 05 and 06 received 6 × 10(11) vg/kg/leg with improved 6MWT by 108 m and 29 m, whereas, Patient 04 showed no improvement. No adverse effects were encountered. Histological changes corroborated benefit showing reduced endomysial fibrosis, reduced central nucleation, more normal fiber size distribution with muscle hypertrophy, especially at high dose. The results are encouraging for treatment of dystrophin-deficient muscle diseases.

  16. Thioredoxin-1 Negatively Modulates ADAM17 Activity Through Direct Binding and Indirect Reductive Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Daniela C; E Costa, Rute A P; Kawahara, Rebeca; Yokoo, Sami; Aragão, Annelize Z; Domingues, Romênia R; Pauletti, Bianca A; Honorato, Rodrigo V; Fattori, Juliana; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Oliveira, Paulo S L; Consonni, Silvio R; Fernandes, Denise; Laurindo, Francisco; Hansen, Hinrich P; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2018-02-27

    A disintegrin and metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17) modulates signaling events by releasing surface protein ectodomains such as TNFa and the EGFR-ligands. We have previously characterized cytoplasmic thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) as a partner of ADAM17 cytoplasmic domain. Still, the mechanism of ADAM17 regulation by Trx-1 is unknown, and it has become of paramount importance to assess the degree of influence that Trx-1 has on metalloproteinase ADAM17. Combining discovery and targeted proteomic approaches, we uncovered that Trx-1 negatively regulates ADAM17 by direct and indirect effect. We performed cell-based assays with synthetic peptides and site-directed mutagenesis, and we demonstrated that the interaction interface of Trx-1 and ADAM17 is important for the negative regulation of ADAM17 activity. However, both Trx-1 K72A and catalytic site mutant Trx-1 C32/35S rescued ADAM17 activity, although the interaction with Trx-1 C32/35S was unaffected, suggesting an indirect effect of Trx-1. We confirmed that the Trx-1 C32/35S mutant showed diminished reductive capacity, explaining this indirect effect on increasing ADAM17 activity through oxidant levels. Interestingly, Trx-1 K72A mutant showed similar oxidant levels to Trx-1 C32/35S , even though its catalytic site was preserved. We further demonstrated that the general reactive oxygen species inhibitor, Nacetylcysteine (NAC), maintained the regulation of ADAM17 dependent of Trx-1 reductase activity levels; whereas the electron transport chain modulator, rotenone, abolished Trx-1 effect on ADAM17 activity. We show for the first time that the mechanism of ADAM17 regulation, Trx-1 dependent, can be by direct interaction and indirect effect, bringing new insights into the cross-talk between isomerases and mammalian metalloproteinases. This unexpected Trx-1 K72A behavior was due to more dimer formation and, consequently, the reduction of its Trx-1 reductase activity, evaluated through dimer verification, by gel filtration and mass

  17. Expression, purification and insights into structure and folding of the ADAM22 pro domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Peter; Jacobsen, Jonas; Nielbo, Steen

    2008-01-01

    . To understand the functions of human ADAM pro domains and to determine three-dimensional structures, we have screened promising targets for expression and purification properties when using Escherichia coli as the host. The pro domain of ADAM22 (ADAM22-P) expressed in E. coli was folded, as determined by CD...... and NMR spectroscopy. An ADAM22-P fragment encoding residues 26-199 could be expressed in high amounts, remained soluble above 1 mM, and was suitable for structural studies by NMR spectroscopy. CD spectroscopy and predictions suggest that the secondary structure in ADAM22-P consists of beta...

  18. The Failed Educations of John Stuart Mill and Henry Adams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Robert

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes and contrasts Mill's "Autobiography" and Adams'"The Education of Henry Adams" in order to present two approaches to the nature of education and of failure. Maintains that their perspectives may serve as catalysts and cautions for contemporary theories of education and its utility and relevance. (CAM)

  19. Adam Michnik: kriisis Euroopat ohustab rahvuslik egoism / Adam Michnik ; interv. Külli-Riin Tigasson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Michnik, Adam, 1946-

    2009-01-01

    Poola suurima kvaliteetlehe Gazeta Wyborczka petoimetaja Adam Michnik vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad 2008. aastal alanud majanduskriisi, protektsionismi ja egoismi levikut, Ida-Euroopas levinud poliitilise ja majandusliku mudeli ümber hindamist, ladinaameerikalikku putinismi ja antikommunistlikku autoritaarsust ning trükiajakirjanduse tulevikku internetiajastul. Vt. samas: Elulugu

  20. Overexpression of α-catenin increases osteoblastic differentiation in mouse mesenchymal C3H10T1/2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dohee; Yang, Jae-Yeon; Shin, Chan Soo

    2009-01-01

    α- and β-Catenin link cadherins to the actin-based cytoskeleton at adherens junctions and regulate cell-cell adhesion. Although roles of cadherins and canonical Wnt-/β-catenin-signaling in osteoblastic differentiation have been extensively studied, the role of α-catenin is not known. Murine embryonic mesenchymal stem cells, C3H10T1/2 cells, were transduced with retrovirus encoding α-catenin (MSCV-α-catenin-HA-GFP). In the presence of Wnt-3A conditioned medium or osteogenic medium (β-glycerol phosphate and ascorbic acid), cells overexpressing α-catenin showed enhanced osteoblastic differentiation as measured by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and ALP activity assay compared to cells transduced with empty virus (MSCV-GFP). In addition, mRNA expression of osteocalcin and Runx2 was significantly increased compared to control. Cell aggregation assay revealed that α-catenin overexpression has significantly increased cell-cell aggregation. However, cellular β-catenin levels (total, cytoplasmic-nuclear ratio) and β-catenin-TCF/LEF transcriptional activity did not change by overexpression of α-catenin. Knock-down of α-catenin using siRNA decreased osteoblastic differentiation as measured by ALP assay. These results suggest that α-catenin overexpression increases osteoblastic differentiation by increasing cell-cell adhesion rather than Wnt-/β-catenin-signaling.

  1. Recreational Nitrous Oxide Abuse-Induced Vitamin B12 Deficiency in a Patient Presenting with Hyperpigmentation of the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Ta Chiang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12 deficiency causes skin hyperpigmentation, subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord, and megaloblastic anemia. Although vitamin B12 deficiency rarely occurs in well-nourished, healthy, young people, nitrous oxide (N2O intoxication is an important cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in this cohort. N2O, a colorless gas used as an anesthetic since the late 19th century because of its euphoric and analgesic qualities, is now used as a recreational drug and is available via the Internet and at clubs. Here, we describe the case of a 29-year-old woman presenting with skin hyperpigmentation as her only initial symptom after N2O abuse for approximately 2 years. N2O intoxication-induced vitamin B12 deficiency was diagnosed based on the skin pigmentation that had manifested over the dorsa of her fingers, toes, and trunk, coupled with myeloneuropathy of the posterior and lateral columns, a low serum vitamin B12 level, an elevated serum homocysteine level, and the N2O exposure revealed while establishing the patient's history. Symptoms improved significantly with vitamin B12 treatment. We recommend that dermatologists consider N2O intoxication-induced vitamin B12 deficiency as a potential cause of skin hyperpigmentation and myeloneuropathy of the posterior and lateral columns in young, otherwise healthy patients. Failure to recognize this presentation may result in inappropriate treatment, thus affecting patients' clinical outcomes.

  2. The Arabidopsis mutant iop1 exhibits induced over-expression of the plant defensin gene PDF1.2 and enhanced pathogen resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninckx, I.A.M.A.; Eggermont, K.; Schenk, P.M.; Ackerveken, van den G.; Cammue, B.P.A.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Jasmonate and ethylene are concomitantly involved in the induction of the Arabidopsis plant defensin gene PDF1.2. To define genes in the signal transduction pathway leading to the induction of PDF1.2, we screened for mutants with induced over-expression of a β-glucuronidase reporter, under the

  3. Sepse por Salmonella associada à deficiência do receptor da Interleucina-12 (IL-12Rb1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Beatriz Tavares Costa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: descrever caso clínico de uma criança que desenvolveu septicemia por Salmonella enteritidis, sendo diagnosticada imunodeficiência primária. DESCRIÇÃO: paciente masculino, de um ano e 9 meses, com febre e lesões de pele há 50 dias, internado com lesão perilabial ulcerada com secreção purulenta, lesão ulcerada friável em língua, lesões ulcerocrostosas em membros, pneumonia bilateral com derrame pleural e choque séptico, sendo diagnosticado Salmonella enteritidis como agente etiológico. A identificação desta bactéria direcionou a investigação para a síndrome MIM. O diagnóstico de deficiência do receptor da interleucina-12 (IL-12Rbeta1 foi confirmado através da dosagem de IL-12 e do interferon (IFN-gama produzido pelas células do paciente em meio de cultura. O resultado demonstrou ausência de produção de IL-12 e do IFN-gama mesmo após estímulo adequado. COMENTÁRIOS: a identificação da Salmonella enteritidis como agente etiológico de septicemia sugere uma disfunção do sistema imunológico. Foi realizada avaliação laboratorial das imunidades humoral, celular e inata. Após avaliação laboratorial direcionada para síndrome MIM, foi confirmada a deficiência do receptor da Interleucina-12 (IL-12Rbeta1. O uso do IFN-gama é recomendado nos casos graves, assim como o tratamento de suporte e o aconselhamento genético.

  4. Another Distortion of Adam Smith: The Case of the "Invisible Hand"

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Meeropol

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses a major omission in the way textbook writers and journalists utilize Adam Smith’s concept of the “invisible hand” to make Adam Smith an intellectual precursor of modern neo-liberal economic policy. Specifically, the paper addresses the use of the concept of the “invisible hand” by Adam Smith to address two major issues in the debate over neo-liberal policy: the international flow of capital and its role in the location of investment projects and the inequality in the dist...

  5. Deletion of exon 26 of the dystrophin gene is associated with a mild Becker muscular dystrophy phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten; Vissing, John

    2011-01-01

    With the possible introduction of exon skipping therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, it has become increasingly important to know the role of each exon of the dystrophin gene to protein expression, and thus the phenotype. In this report, we present two related men with an unusually mild BMD...... skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This report also shows that BMD may present with a normal CK....... associated with an exon 26 deletion. The proband, a 23-year-old man, had slightly delayed motor milestones, walking 1 1/2 years old. He had no complaints of muscle weakness, but had muscle pain. Clinical examination revealed no muscle wasting or loss of power, but his CK was 1500-7000 U/l. Muscle biopsy...

  6. Ultrasonographic evaluation to diagnose hepatic lipidosis in Egyptian Zaraibi goats with vitamin B12 deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Sabry A. El-Khodery; Hussein S. Hussein; Mohamed E. El-Boshy; Medhat N. Nassif

    2011-01-01

    As little is known about the ultrasonographic features of hepatic lipidosis (white liver disease) in goats, this study was undertaken to evaluate the use of ultrasound for the diagnosis of hepatic lipidosis associated with vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) deficiency in Egyptian Zaraibi goats. A total of 38 goats (28 with weight loss, diarrhoea and anaemia and 10 clinically healthy) were studied. Twenty-one goats were demonstrated to have cobalt and cyanocobalamin deficiency (0.33 ± 0.12 μmol/l an...

  7. Precise correction of the dystrophin gene in duchenne muscular dystrophy patient induced pluripotent stem cells by TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei Lisa; Fujimoto, Naoko; Sasakawa, Noriko; Shirai, Saya; Ohkame, Tokiko; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Tanaka, Michihiro; Amano, Naoki; Watanabe, Akira; Sakurai, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yamanaka, Shinya; Hotta, Akitsu

    2015-01-13

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle-degenerative disease caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. Genetic correction of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by TALENs or CRISPR-Cas9 holds promise for DMD gene therapy; however, the safety of such nuclease treatment must be determined. Using a unique k-mer database, we systematically identified a unique target region that reduces off-target sites. To restore the dystrophin protein, we performed three correction methods (exon skipping, frameshifting, and exon knockin) in DMD-patient-derived iPSCs, and found that exon knockin was the most effective approach. We further investigated the genomic integrity by karyotyping, copy number variation array, and exome sequencing to identify clones with a minimal mutation load. Finally, we differentiated the corrected iPSCs toward skeletal muscle cells and successfully detected the expression of full-length dystrophin protein. These results provide an important framework for developing iPSC-based gene therapy for genetic disorders using programmable nucleases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ADAM disintegrin-like domain recognition by the lymphocyte integrins α4β1 and α4β7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Lance C.; Sheppard, Dean; Bowditch, Ron D.

    2004-01-01

    The ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of proteins possess both proteolytic and adhesive domains. We have established previously that the disintegrin domain of ADAM28, an ADAM expressed by human lymphocytes, is recognized by the integrin α4β1. The present study characterizes the integrin binding properties of the disintegrin-like domains of human ADAM7, ADAM28 and ADAM33 with the integrins α4β1, α4β7 and α9β1. Cell-adhesion assays demonstrated that, similar to ADAM28, the ADAM7 disintegrin domain supported α4β1-dependent Jurkat cell adhesion, whereas the ADAM33 disintegrin domain did not. The lymphocyte integrin α4β7 was also found to recognize both disintegrin domains of ADAM7 and ADAM28, but not of ADAM33. This is the first demonstration that mammalian disintegrins are capable of interacting with α4β7. All three disintegrin domains supported α9β1-dependent cell adhesion. Recognition by both α4β1 and α4β7 of ADAM7 and ADAM28 was activation-dependent, requiring either the presence of Mn2+ or an activating monoclonal antibody for cell attachment. Charge-to-alanine mutagenesis experiments revealed that the same residues within an individual ADAM disintegrin domain function in recognizing multiple integrins. However, the residues within a specific region of each ADAM disintegrin-like domain required for integrin binding were distinct. These results establish that ADAM7 and ADAM28 are recognized by the leucocyte integrins α4β1, α4β7 and α9β1. ADAM33 exclusively supported only α9β1-dependent adhesion. PMID:15504110

  9. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-03-26

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a restrictive vegan diet with little to no intake of animal products or other fortified foods. The child was diagnosed with presumed vitamin B12 deficiency and was treated with intramuscular B12 injections. Neurological symptoms resolved promptly within several days after starting therapy. This case underlines the importance of assessing nutritional status in the evaluation of neurological dysfunction in the pediatric patient.

  10. ADAM disintegrin-like domain recognition by the lymphocyte integrins α4β1 and α4β7

    OpenAIRE

    Bridges, Lance C.; Sheppard, Dean; Bowditch, Ron D.

    2005-01-01

    The ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of proteins possess both proteolytic and adhesive domains. We have established previously that the disintegrin domain of ADAM28, an ADAM expressed by human lymphocytes, is recognized by the integrin α4β1. The present study characterizes the integrin binding properties of the disintegrin-like domains of human ADAM7, ADAM28 and ADAM33 with the integrins α4β1, α4β7 and α9β1. Cell-adhesion assays demonstrated that, similar to ADAM28, the ADAM7 d...

  11. TGFβ induces proHB-EGF shedding and EGFR transactivation through ADAM activation in gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebi, Masahide; Kataoka, Hiromi; Shimura, Takaya; Kubota, Eiji; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Mizushima, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Mabuchi, Motoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Tanida, Satoshi; Kamiya, Takeshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Joh, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → TGFβ induces EGFR transactivation through proHB-EGF shedding by activated ADAM members in gastric cancer cells. → TGFβ induces nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF cleaved by ADAM members. → TGFβ enhances cell growth by EGFR transactivation and HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and ADAM inhibitors block these effects. → Silencing of ADAM17 also blocks EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and cancer cell growth by TGFβ. → ADAM17 may play a crucial role in this TGFβ-HB-EGF signal transduction. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) is known to potently inhibit cell growth. Loss of responsiveness to TGFβ inhibition on cell growth is a hallmark of many types of cancer, yet its mechanism is not fully understood. Membrane-anchored heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) ectodomain is cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) members and is implicated in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. Recently, nuclear translocation of the C-terminal fragment (CTF) of pro-HB-EGF was found to induce cell growth. We investigated the association between TGFβ and HB-EGF signal transduction via ADAM activation. Materials and methods: The CCK-8 assay in two gastric cancer cell lines was used to determine the effect for cell growth by TGFβ. The effect of two ADAM inhibitors was also evaluated. Induction of EGFR phosphorylation by TGFβ was analyzed and the effect of the ADAM inhibitors was also examined. Nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF by shedding through ADAM activated by TGFβ was also analyzed. EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation, and cell growth were examined under the condition of ADAM17 knockdown. Result: TGFβ-induced EGFR phosphorylation of which ADAM inhibitors were able to inhibit. TGFβ induced shedding of proHB-EGF allowing HB-EGF-CTF to translocate to the nucleus. ADAM inhibitors blocked this nuclear translocation. TGF

  12. Calmodulin overexpression does not alter Cav1.2 function or oligomerization state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Felix; Tolia, Alexandra; Arant, Ryan; Kim, Eun Young; Isacoff, Ehud; Minor, Daniel L

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between calmodulin (CaM) and voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(v)s) are crucial for Ca(v) activity-dependent feedback modulation. We recently reported an X-ray structure that shows two Ca(2+)/CaM molecules bound to the Ca(v)1.2 C terminal tail, one at the PreIQ region and one at the IQ domain. Surprisingly, the asymmetric unit of the crystal showed a dimer in which Ca(2+)/CaM bridged two PreIQ helixes to form a 4:2 Ca(2+)/CaM:Ca(v) C-terminal tail assembly. Contrary to previous proposals based on a similar crystallographic dimer, extensive biochemical analysis together with subunit counting experiments of full-length channels in live cell membranes failed to find evidence for multimers that would be compatible with the 4:2 crossbridged complex. Here, we examine this possibility further. We find that CaM over-expression has no functional effect on Ca(v)1.2 inactivation or on the stoichiometry of full-length Ca(v)1.2. These data provide further support for the monomeric Ca(v)1.2 stoichiometry. Analysis of the electrostatic surfaces of the 2:1 Ca(2+)/CaM:Ca(V) C-terminal tail assembly reveals notable patches of electronegativity. These could influence various forms of channel modulation by interacting with positively charged elements from other intracellular channel domains.

  13. Association of Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Use of Reverse Osmosis Processed Water for Drinking: A Cross-Sectional Study from Western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ekant Surendra; Sheth, Sanket Pranjivan; Ganjiwale, Jaishree Deepak

    2016-05-01

    Prevalence of Vitamin B12 deficiency has increased in community in recent time. Possibility is raised for new and yet unidentified factors being associated with this increased prevalence. One of these factors frequently questioned is use of Reverse Osmosis (RO) processed water for drinking. We aimed to study association of use of RO processed water for drinking with Vitamin B12 deficiency. This cross-sectional study was done at tertiary care centre of Western India. Total 250 participants were recruited after excluding those participants with known factors responsible for Vitamin B12 deficiency. Information about gender, type of diet, milk intake and duration, dairy product intake, use of RO water and Vitamin B12 level was collected. Total 70 (28%) participants out of 250 were having Vitamin B12 deficiency. Forty (50.6%) of 79 participants using RO water were Vitamin B12 deficient against 30 (17.5%) of 171 using other sources. Logistic regression analysis showed independent association between use of RO water and Vitamin B12 deficiency. Although association of male gender, milk quantity of less than 100 ml per day and duration of RO water intake with occurrence of Vitamin B12 deficiency was found statistically significant in univariate analysis, logistic regression analysis did not show significant association. Use of RO processed drinking water was associated with Vitamin B12 deficiency. This being cross- sectional study, further longitudinal studies with large sample size and taking confounding factors into consideration, are required to establish this association.

  14. The SPECT tracer [{sup 123}I]ADAM binds selectively to serotonin transporters: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy young men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giessen, Elsmarieke van de [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Graduate School Neurosciences Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Booij, Jan [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Graduate School Neurosciences Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, F2-236, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    The tracer {sup 123}I-2-([2-({l_brace}dimethylamino{r_brace}methyl)phenyl]thio)-5-iodophenylamine ([{sup 123}I]ADAM) has been developed to image serotonin transporters (SERTs) with SPECT. Preclinical studies have shown that [{sup 123}I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs. Moreover, initial human studies have shown that [{sup 123}I]ADAM binding could be blocked by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). However, in humans it has not been proven that [{sup 123}I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs. We examined the in vivo availability of SERTs in 12 healthy young volunteers 5 h after bolus injection of [{sup 123}I]ADAM. To evaluate the selectivity of binding, four participants were pretreated (double-blinded design) with placebo, four with paroxetine (20 mg) and four with the dopamine/norepinephrine blocker methylphenidate (20 mg). SPECT studies were performed on a brain-dedicated system (Neurofocus), and the SPECT images were coregistered with individual MR scans of the brain. ADAM binding in SERT-rich brain areas and cerebellar cortex (representing non-specific binding) was assessed by drawing regions of interest (ROIs) on the individual MR images. Specific to non-specific ratios were used as the outcome measure. We found that specific to non-specific ratios were statistically significantly lower in paroxetine-pretreated participants than in placebo- or methylphenidate-pretreated participants. No such difference was found between groups pretreated with placebo or methylphenidate. Our preliminary findings suggest that [{sup 123}I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs in human brain. (orig.)

  15. Dystrophin is required for the normal function of the cardio-protective K(ATP channel in cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Graciotti

    Full Text Available Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients often develop a cardiomyopathy for which the pathogenesis is still unknown. We have employed the murine animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (mdx, which develops a cardiomyopathy that includes some characteristics of the human disease, to study the molecular basis of this pathology. Here we show that the mdx mouse heart has defects consistent with alteration in compounds that regulate energy homeostasis including a marked decrease in creatine-phosphate (PC. In addition, the mdx heart is more susceptible to anoxia than controls. Since the cardio-protective ATP sensitive potassium channel (K(ATP complex and PC have been shown to interact we investigated whether deficits in PC levels correlate with other molecular events including K(ATP ion channel complex presence, its functionality and interaction with dystrophin. We found that this channel complex is present in the dystrophic cardiac cell membrane but its ability to sense a drop in the intracellular ATP concentration and consequently open is compromised by the absence of dystrophin. We further demonstrate that the creatine kinase muscle isoform (CKm is displaced from the plasma membrane of the mdx cardiac cells. Considering that CKm is a determinant of K(ATP channel complex function we hypothesize that dystrophin acts as a scaffolding protein organizing the K(ATP channel complex and the enzymes necessary for its correct functioning. Therefore, the lack of proper functioning of the cardio-protective K(ATP system in the mdx cardiomyocytes may be part of the mechanism contributing to development of cardiac disease in dystrophic patients.

  16. In vivo myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion and nuclear reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Yasuyuki; Vagnozzi, Ronald J; Millay, Douglas P

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge regarding cellular fusion and nuclear reprogramming may aid in cell therapy strategies for skeletal muscle diseases. An issue with cell therapy approaches to restore dystrophin expression in muscular dystrophy is obtaining a sufficient quantity of cells that normally fuse with muscle. Here we conferred fusogenic activity without transdifferentiation to multiple non-muscle cell types and tested dystrophin restoration in mouse models of muscular dystrophy. We previously demonstrated that myomaker, a skeletal muscle-specific transmembrane protein necessary for myoblast fusion, is sufficient to fuse 10T 1/2 fibroblasts to myoblasts in vitro. Whether myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion is functional in vivo and whether the newly introduced nonmuscle nuclei undergoes nuclear reprogramming has not been investigated. We showed that mesenchymal stromal cells, cortical bone stem cells, and tail-tip fibroblasts fuse to skeletal muscle when they express myomaker. These cells restored dystrophin expression in a fraction of dystrophin-deficient myotubes after fusion in vitro. However, dystrophin restoration was not detected in vivo although nuclear reprogramming of the muscle-specific myosin light chain promoter did occur. Despite the lack of detectable dystrophin reprogramming by immunostaining, this study indicated that myomaker could be used in nonmuscle cells to induce fusion with muscle in vivo, thereby providing a platform to deliver therapeutic material.-Mitani, Y., Vagnozzi, R. J., Millay, D. P. In vivo myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion and nuclear reprogramming. © FASEB.

  17. Microautoradiography of [123I]ADAM in mice treated with fluoxetine and serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, X.-X.; Chen, J.-C.; Liu, R.-S.; Wey, S.-P.; Lee, J.-S.; Chen, C.-C.; Fu, Y.-K.; Ting, Gann; Hwang, J.-J.

    2004-01-01

    A radiopharmaceutical, 123 I-labeled 2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine ([ 123 I]ADAM), has been developed recently for evaluation of how serotonin transporters (SERT) function in the brain. However, the detailed biodistribution and specific binding in certain brain areas are not well investigated. In this study, both phosphor plate imaging and microautoradiography were applied to explore the binding characteristics of [ 123 I]ADAM in SERT neurons. The effect of two psychotropics and one narcotic on the binding of [ 123 I]ADAM to SERT was also studied. Fluoxetine and desipramine, both are psychotropics and specific SERT ligands and decreased the affinity of [ 123 I]ADAM, while p-chloroamphetamine (PCA), a narcotic, destroyed most of serotonergic neurons, as well as reducing the concentration of serotonin and the number of SERT in the brain as shown by the biodistribution of [ 123 I]ADAM. Significant and selective accumulation of [ 123 I]ADAM in the areas from midbrain to brain stem in normal mice with maximum target-to-background ratio was found at 90 minutes postinjection. A rapid clearance of [ 131 I]ADAM at 120 minutes postinjection was found in the CA1, CA3 and ThN brain areas. In addition, the inhibition effect on binding ability of [ 123 I]ADAM to SERT by the psychotropics and the narcotic was found to have the order of: PCA > fluoxetine > desipramine

  18. [Effects of ADAM28 on biological functions of human dental pulp stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zheng; Liu, Hong-chen; E, Ling-ling; Wang, Yi; Wang, Dong-sheng

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the effects of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28 (ADAM28) on proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of human dental pulp stem cells (HDPSCs) and the possible mechanism. Firstly, HDPSCs were isolated and cultured in vitro and identified. ADAM28 eukaryotic expression plasmid was constructed via gene rebuilt technique and transfected into HDPSCs. Then MTT chromatometry, enzyme dynamics and flow cytometry (FCM) techniques were performed to detect the effects of ADAM28 on biological characteristics of HDPSCs. Immunocytochemical and image analysis techniques were used to determine the influence of ADAM28 on HDPSCs expressing dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteopontin (OPN). Statistical significance was assessed by the Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK) test with SPSS 13.0 software package. ADAM28 eukaryotic plasmid was constructed and transfected into HDPSCs for 48 hours successfully. In ADAM28 eukaryotic plasmid group, proliferation activity and index of HDPSCs were lower than those of pcDNA3.1(+) group and untransfected group significantly.Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) secretion level and percentage of apoptotic cells went up remarkly. Significant difference was detected between eukaryotic plasmid group and other groups (P<0.05). The expression level of DSPP in HDPSCs elevated significantly (P<0.05). ADAM28 could inhibit HDPSCs proliferation, promote ALP secretion activity and DSPP expression in HDPSCs and induce HDPSCs apoptosis significantly.

  19. ADAM33 gene silencing by promoter hypermethylation as a molecular marker in breast invasive lobular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Souza Emanuel M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ADAM33 protein is a member of the family of transmembrane glycoproteins composed of multidomains. ADAM family members have different activities, such as proteolysis and adhesion, making them good candidates to mediate the extracellular matrix remodelling and changes in cellular adhesion that characterise certain pathologies and cancer development. It was reported that one family member, ADAM23, is down-regulated by promoter hypermethylation. This seems to correlate with tumour progression and metastasis in breast cancer. In this study, we explored the involvement of ADAM33, another ADAM family member, in breast cancer. Methods First, we analysed ADAM33 expression in breast tumour cell lines by RT-PCR and western blotting. We also used 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5azadCR treatment and DNA bisulphite sequencing to study the promoter methylation of ADAM33 in breast tumour cell lines. We evaluated ADAM33 methylation in primary tumour samples by methylation specific PCR (MSP. Finally, ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation was correlated with clinicopathological data using the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Results The expression analysis of ADAM33 in breast tumour cell lines by RT-PCR revealed gene silencing in 65% of tumour cell lines. The corresponding lack of ADAM33 protein was confirmed by western blotting. We also used 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dCR demethylation and bisulphite sequencing methodologies to confirm that gene silencing is due to ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation. Using MSP, we detected ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation in 40% of primary breast tumour samples. The correlation between methylation pattern and patient's clinicopathological data was not significantly associated with histological grade; tumour stage (TNM; tumour size; ER, PR or ERBB2 status; lymph node status; metastasis or recurrence. Methylation frequency in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC was 76.2% compared with 25.5% in invasive ductal carcinoma

  20. ADAM33 gene silencing by promoter hypermethylation as a molecular marker in breast invasive lobular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seniski, Gerusa G; Zanata, Silvio M; Costa, Fabrício F; Klassen, Giseli; Camargo, Anamaria A; Ierardi, Daniela F; Ramos, Edneia AS; Grochoski, Mariana; Ribeiro, Enilze SF; Cavalli, Iglenir J; Pedrosa, Fabio O; Souza, Emanuel M de

    2009-01-01

    ADAM33 protein is a member of the family of transmembrane glycoproteins composed of multidomains. ADAM family members have different activities, such as proteolysis and adhesion, making them good candidates to mediate the extracellular matrix remodelling and changes in cellular adhesion that characterise certain pathologies and cancer development. It was reported that one family member, ADAM23, is down-regulated by promoter hypermethylation. This seems to correlate with tumour progression and metastasis in breast cancer. In this study, we explored the involvement of ADAM33, another ADAM family member, in breast cancer. First, we analysed ADAM33 expression in breast tumour cell lines by RT-PCR and western blotting. We also used 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5azadCR) treatment and DNA bisulphite sequencing to study the promoter methylation of ADAM33 in breast tumour cell lines. We evaluated ADAM33 methylation in primary tumour samples by methylation specific PCR (MSP). Finally, ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation was correlated with clinicopathological data using the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. The expression analysis of ADAM33 in breast tumour cell lines by RT-PCR revealed gene silencing in 65% of tumour cell lines. The corresponding lack of ADAM33 protein was confirmed by western blotting. We also used 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dCR) demethylation and bisulphite sequencing methodologies to confirm that gene silencing is due to ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation. Using MSP, we detected ADAM33 promoter hypermethylation in 40% of primary breast tumour samples. The correlation between methylation pattern and patient's clinicopathological data was not significantly associated with histological grade; tumour stage (TNM); tumour size; ER, PR or ERBB2 status; lymph node status; metastasis or recurrence. Methylation frequency in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) was 76.2% compared with 25.5% in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and this difference was

  1. From Adam Swift to Adam Smith: How the "Invisible Hand" Overcomes Middle Class Hypocrisy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, James

    2007-01-01

    This paper challenges Richard Pring's suggestion that parents using private education may be undermining the desire for social justice and equality, using recent arguments of Adam Swift as a springboard. Swift's position on the banning of private schools, which uses a Rawlsian "veil of ignorance" argument, is explored, and it is suggested that, if…

  2. The diagnosis of Androgenic Deficiency of the Aging Male and the paths of male sexual desire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Tramontano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the diagnosis of Androgenic Deficiency of the Aging Male (ADAM and the controversies and disputes over it, based on the re-medicalization of sexuality. The analysis is based on interviews with urologists and endocrinologists, and the different approaches of these two medical specialties elucidate divergent conceptions of body and sexuality present in the biomedical knowledge, and the struggle for hegemony in the scientific field. By comparing the meanings attributed to ADAM and to another male sexual dysfunction, the Erectile Dysfunction (ED, we intend to reflect about the difficulties inherent in the biological reduction of sexuality and the reiteration of gender norms in the medical discourse concerning the male body and sexuality.

  3. Immunohistochemical alterations of dystrophin in congenital muscular dystrophy Alterações imuno-hístoquímicas da distrofina na distrofia muscular congênita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lineu Cesar Werneck

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available The dystrophin distribution in the plasma muscle membrane using immunohystochemistry was studied in 22 children with congenital muscular dystrophy. The dystrophin was detected by immunofluorescence in muscle biopsy through a polyclonal antibody. All the cases had patchy interruptions of the fluorescence in the plasma membrane. A large patchy interruption of the sarcolemma was found in 17 cases, small interruption in 12, and a combination of large and small patchy discontinuity in 7. Small gaps around the fiber like a rosary were found in 15 cases. The frequency of these abnormalities ranged cases from: all fibers in 5 cases, frequent in 8, occasional in 5, and rare in 4. Five cases had total absence of immunofluorescence. These results suggest that the dystrophin expression is abnormal in this group of children and that this type of abnormalities can not be differentiated from early Becker muscular dystrophy nor childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy through immunohystochemistry alone.Foi estudada a distribuição da distrofina na membrana plasmática das fibras musculares em 22 crianças com distrofia muscular congênita, através de técnicas de imuno-histoquímica. A distrofina foi identificada nas biópsias musculares processadas a fresco, por técnicas de imunofluorescência utilizando anticorpos policlonais. Todos os casos tinham interrupções da imunofluorescência na membrana plasmática. Em 17 elas eram grandes, em 12 eram pequenas e em 7 eram de ambos os tipos. Fibras com interrupções pequenas e constantes, como um rosário, foram vistas em 15 casos. Essas anormalidades estavam presentes em todas as fibras em 5 casos, eram frequentes em 8, ocasionais em 5 e raras em 4. Cinco casos mostraram fibras sem distrofina. Esses dados sugerem que a expressão da distrofina é anormal nesse grupo de crianças. Essas anormalidades podem também ser encontradas em casos precoces de distrofia muscular de Becker e distrofia autoss

  4. Direct Rehydrogenation of LiBH4 from H-Deficient Li2B12H12−x

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yigang Yan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Li2B12H12 is commonly considered as a boron sink hindering the reversible hydrogen sorption of LiBH4. Recently, in the dehydrogenation process of LiBH4 an amorphous H-deficient Li2B12H12−x phase was observed. In the present study, we investigate the rehydrogenation properties of Li2B12H12−x to form LiBH4. With addition of nanostructured cobalt boride in a 1:1 mass ratio, the rehydrogenation properties of Li2B12H12−x are improved, where LiBH4 forms under milder conditions (e.g., 400 °C, 100 bar H2 with a yield of 68%. The active catalytic species in the reversible sorption reaction is suggested to be nonmetallic CoxB (x = 1 based on 11B MAS NMR experiments and its role has been discussed.

  5. Cobalt-vitamin B12 deficiency and the activity of methylmalonyl CoA mutase and methionine synthase in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, D G; Young, P B; Kennedy, S; Scott, J M; Molloy, A M; Weir, D G; Price, J

    1995-01-01

    Cobalt deficiency was induced in cattle by feeding two groups of animals either a basal diet that was very low in Co (12.9-17.6 micrograms Co per kg), or the same diet supplemented with cobalt, for a total of 64 weeks. Vitamin B12 deficiency was induced, as judged by hepatic concentrations of vitamin B12 and plasma concentrations of MMA. However, the activity of holo-methylmalonyl CoA mutase was significantly reduced only in brain. This was reflected in very minor alterations in the tissue concentrations of branched chain- and odd numbered-fatty acids. The activity of holo-methionine synthase was significantly reduced in liver and brain, but there were no consequent alterations in the concentrations of phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. This study confirms that cattle are less susceptible to the effects of cobalt deficiency than sheep, and concludes that prolonged cobalt deficiency had little significant effect on tissue metabolism.

  6. A study of clinical profile of vitamin B 12 deficiency with special reference to dermatologic manifestations in a Tertiary Care Hospital in sub-Himalayan Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Sen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin B 12 deficiency is thought to be uncommon in the eastern parts of India including Bengal and the eastern states as compared to the northern and southern parts of India. The importance of cutaneous features in relation to vitamin B 12 deficiency is not well described in literature. Aim: To know the clinical profile of vitamin B 12 deficiency in this region and to find out if there is any relationship between dermatologic manifestations with vitamin B 12 deficiency. Materials and Methods: All symptomatic patients of anemia requiring blood transfusions who had either raised mean corpuscular volume (MCV or bicytopenia/pancytopenia on complete blood count or were symptomatic in the form of skin hyperpigmentation were screened for vitamin B 12 deficiency. Results: Twenty-five patients were tested for vitamin B 12 deficiency. Of them 19 patients were found to be having vitamin B 12 deficiency. Conclusions: Vitamin B 12 deficiency is not uncommon in the eastern parts of India, contrasting the previous thoughts that it was uncommon in this area, though larger studies are required to know it better. This study included only those requiring blood transfusions, thus a much higher prevalence is expected in this area. Patients with vitamin B 12 deficiency do present with severe anemia requiring blood transfusions and often have skin hyperpigmentation.

  7. Delivery of AAV2/9-microdystrophin genes incorporating helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the C-terminal domain of dystrophin improves muscle pathology and restores the level of α1-syntrophin and α-dystrobrevin in skeletal muscles of mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Taeyoung; Malerba, Alberto; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Trollet, Capucine; Boldrin, Luisa; Ferry, Arnaud; Popplewell, Linda; Foster, Helen; Foster, Keith; Dickson, George

    2011-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe X-linked inherited muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been extensively used to deliver genes efficiently for dystrophin expression in skeletal muscles. To overcome limited packaging capacity of AAV vectors (pathology of dystrophic mdx mice. However, the CT domain of dystrophin is thought to recruit part of the dystrophin-associated protein complex, which acts as a mediator of signaling between extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton in muscle fibers. In this study, we extended the ΔR4-23/ΔCT microdystrophin by incorporating helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the CT domain of dystrophin (MD2), which contains the α1-syntrophin and α-dystrobrevin binding sites. Intramuscular injection of AAV2/9 expressing CT domain-extended microdystrophin showed efficient dystrophin expression in tibialis anterior muscles of mdx mice. The presence of the CT domain of dystrophin in MD2 increased the recruitment of α1-syntrophin and α-dystrobrevin at the sarcolemma and significantly improved the muscle resistance to lengthening contraction-induced muscle damage in the mdx mice compared with MD1. These results suggest that the incorporation of helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the CT domain of dystrophin to the microdystrophins will substantially improve their efficiency in restoring muscle function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  8. Brain Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of dystrophin disorders in the CNS function of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, an animal model of DMD, is reviewed at the University of New South Wales, University of Sydney, Australia.

  9. High prevalence of mild hyperhomocysteinemia and folate, B/sub 12/ and B/sub 6/ deficiencies in an urban population in Karachi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakub, M.; Iqbal, M.P.; Kakepoto, G.N.; Rafique, G.; Memon, Y.; Azam, I.; Mehboobali, N.; Parveen, S.

    2010-01-01

    To find out the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia, and deficiencies of folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 in an urban population in Karachi, Pakistan. Methodology: In a pre and post experimental study, eight hundred and seventy-two apparently healthy adults (aged 18-60 years; 355 males and 517 females) were recruited from a low-income urban locality in East of Karachi from February 2006 to March 2007. Fasting venous blood was obtained. Serum was analyzed for folate and vitamin B12. Plasma was analyzed for pyridoxal phosphate (PLP, co enzymic form of B6) and total homocysteine. A group of vitamin-deficient individuals (n=194) was given 3-week supplementation with folic acid (5mg/ day), methylcobalamin (0.5mg/day) and pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6, 50 mg/day). After supplementation, serum/plasma levels of folate, vitamin B12, PLP and homocysteine were again determined. Prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia (>15 mu mol/l) was 32%. Similarly percent values of folate deficiency (<3.5ng/ml), vitamin B6 deficiency (PLP<20 nmol/l) and vitamin B12 deficiency (<200pg/ml) in the study population were 27.5%, 33.7% and 9.74%, respectively. Hyperhomocysteinemia was associated with male sex, folate deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency [OR (95%CI), 8.3(5.7-12.1); 2.5(1.76-3.58); 2.6(1.5-4.5), respectively]. A 3-week supplementation with folic acid, methylcobalamin and pyridoxine hydrochloride in vitamin deficient subjects decreased plasma homocysteine levels by 37%. High prevalence estimates of folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin B6 deficiencies appear to be the major determinants of hyperhomocysteinemia in a low income general population in Karachi. (author)

  10. MicroRNA-147b regulates vascular endothelial barrier function by targeting ADAM15 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Chatterjee

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloproteinase15 (ADAM15 has been shown to be upregulated and mediate endothelial hyperpermeability during inflammation and sepsis. This molecule contains multiple functional domains with the ability to modulate diverse cellular processes including cell adhesion, extracellular matrix degradation, and ectodomain shedding of transmembrane proteins. These characteristics make ADAM15 an attractive therapeutic target in various diseases. The lack of pharmacological inhibitors specific to ADAM15 prompted our efforts to identify biological or molecular tools to alter its expression for further studying its function and therapeutic implications. The goal of this study was to determine if ADAM15-targeting microRNAs altered ADAM15-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction during septic challenge by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. An in silico analysis followed by luciferase reporter assay in human vascular endothelial cells identified miR-147b with the ability to target the 3' UTR of ADAM15. Transfection with a miR-147b mimic led to decreased total, as well as cell surface expression of ADAM15 in endothelial cells, while miR-147b antagomir produced an opposite effect. Functionally, LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, evidenced by a reduction in transendothelial electric resistance and increase in albumin flux across endothelial monolayers, was attenuated in cells treated with miR-147b mimics. In contrast, miR-147b antagomir exerted a permeability-increasing effect in vascular endothelial cells similar to that caused by LPS. Taken together, these data suggest the potential role of miR147b in regulating endothelial barrier function by targeting ADAM15 expression.

  11. Transgenic banana plants overexpressing a native plasma membrane aquaporin MusaPIP1;2 display high tolerance levels to different abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, Shareena; Shekhawat, Upendra K S; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

    2013-10-01

    Water transport across cellular membranes is regulated by a family of water channel proteins known as aquaporins (AQPs). As most abiotic stresses like suboptimal temperatures, drought or salinity result in cellular dehydration, it is imperative to study the cause-effect relationship between AQPs and the cellular consequences of abiotic stress stimuli. Although plant cells have a high isoform diversity of AQPs, the individual and integrated roles of individual AQPs in optimal and suboptimal physiological conditions remain unclear. Herein, we have identified a plasma membrane intrinsic protein gene (MusaPIP1;2) from banana and characterized it by overexpression in transgenic banana plants. Cellular localization assay performed using MusaPIP1;2::GFP fusion protein indicated that MusaPIP1;2 translocated to plasma membrane in transformed banana cells. Transgenic banana plants overexpressing MusaPIP1;2 constitutively displayed better abiotic stress survival characteristics. The transgenic lines had lower malondialdehyde levels, elevated proline and relative water content and higher photosynthetic efficiency as compared to equivalent controls under different abiotic stress conditions. Greenhouse-maintained hardened transgenic plants showed faster recovery towards normal growth and development after cessation of abiotic stress stimuli, thereby underlining the importance of these plants in actual environmental conditions wherein the stress stimuli is often transient but severe. Further, transgenic plants where the overexpression of MusaPIP1;2 was made conditional by tagging it with a stress-inducible native dehydrin promoter also showed similar stress tolerance characteristics in in vitro and in vivo assays. Plants developed in this study could potentially enable banana cultivation in areas where adverse environmental conditions hitherto preclude commercial banana cultivation. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons

  12. Homocysteine and vitamin B 12 status and iron deficiency anemia in female university students from Gaza Strip, Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Mohammed Sirdah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nutritional deficiencies are very significant to the overall health of humans at all ages and for both genders, yet in infants, children and women of childbearing age these deficiencies can seriously affect growth and development. The present work is aimed to assess homocysteine and vitamin B12 status in females with iron deficiency anemia from the Gaza Strip.METHODS: Venous blood samples were randomly collected from 240 female university students (18-22 years old and parameters of the complete blood count, serum ferritin, homocysteine and vitamin B12 were measured. Statistical analysis included the t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA using the IBM SPSS software (version 18. Statistical significance was set for p-values <0.05.RESULTS: The results revealed that 20.4% of the students have iron deficiency anemia. The mean serum vitamin B12 level in females with iron deficiency anemia (212.9 ± 62.8 pg/mL was significantly lower than in normal controls (286.9 ± 57.1 pg/mL and subjects with microcytic anemia and normal ferritin (256.7 ± 71.1 pg/mL. Significantly higher serum homocysteine levels were reported in the iron deficiency anemia group (27.0 ± 4.6 µmol/L compared to normal controls (15.5 ± 2.9 µmol/L and in subjects with microcytic anemia and normal ferritin (18.1 ± 2.7 µmol/L. Statistically significant negative correlations were reported for serum homocysteine with serum ferritin, vitamin B12, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels.CONCLUSION: Important associations were found between serum homocysteine and markers of iron deficiency. Monitoring homocysteine levels might be essential to understand the development of different clinical conditions including anemia. It seems necessary to conduct prospective trials to determine whether treating anemia ameliorates homocysteine levels.

  13. Reimagining a solitary landscape: Tracing communities of care in Exodus 1-2 and the film Shirley Adams

    OpenAIRE

    van der Walt, Charlene; Terblanche, Judith

    2016-01-01

    The 2009 film, Shirley Adams, directed by the South African director, Oliver Hermanus, depicts Shirley as the lone caregiver to her son, a victim of gang violence on the Cape Flats (South Africa) which rendered him physically disabled and emotionally scared. The film is used as a lens to explore the inter sectionality of poverty, violence, gender, class, race, and disability within the South African society. The film's intimate portrayal of Shirley in her efforts to care for her son leaves th...

  14. Cut loose and run: The complex role of ADAM proteases during neural crest cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfandari, Dominique; Taneyhill, Lisa A

    2018-02-24

    ADAM metalloproteases have been shown to play critical roles during development. In this review, we will describe functional evidence that implicates ADAM proteins during the genesis, migration and differentiation of neural crest cells. We will restrict our analysis to the transmembrane ADAMs as other reviews have addressed the role of extracellular metalloproteases (Christian et al. [2013] Critical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 48:544-560). This review will describe advances that have been obtained mainly through the use of two vertebrate model systems, the frog, and avian embryos. The role of the principal substrates of ADAMs, the cadherins, has been extensively described in other reviews, most recently in (Cousin [1997] Mechanisms of Development 148:79-88; Taneyhill and Schiffmacher [2017] Genesis, 55). The function of ADAMs in the migration of other cell types, including the immune system, wound healing and cancer has been described previously in (Dreymueller et al. [2017] Mediators of Inflammation 2017: 9621724). Our goal is to illustrate both the importance of ADAMs in controlling neural crest behavior and how neural crest cells have helped us understand the molecular interactions, substrates, and functions of ADAM proteins in vivo. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A Four-Step Block Hybrid Adams-Moulton Methods For The Solution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines application of the Adam-Moulton's Method and proposes a modified self-starting continuous formula Called hybrid Adams-Moulton methods for the case k=4. It allows evaluation at both grid and off grid points to obtain the discrete schemes used in the block methods. The order, error constant and ...

  16. Current Translational Research and Murine Models For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Mutations in the DMD gene result in the absence of dystrophin, a protein required for muscle strength and stability. Currently, there is no cure for DMD. Since murine models are relatively easy to genetically manipulate, cost effective, and easily reproducible due to their short generation time, they have helped to elucidate the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency and to assess therapies for treating DMD. Recently, several murine models have been developed by our group and others to be more representative of the human DMD mutation types and phenotypes. For instance, mdx mice on a DBA/2 genetic background, developed by Fukada et al., have lower regenerative capacity and exhibit very severe phenotype. Cmah-deficient mdx mice display an accelerated disease onset and severe cardiac phenotype due to differences in glycosylation between humans and mice. Other novel murine models include mdx52, which harbors a deletion mutation in exon 52, a hot spot region in humans, and dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), which displays a severe dystrophic phenotype due the absence of utrophin, a dystrophin homolog. This paper reviews the pathological manifestations and recent therapeutic developments in murine models of DMD such as standard mdx (C57BL/10), mdx on C57BL/6 background (C57BL/6-mdx), mdx52, dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), mdxβgeo, Dmd-null, humanized DMD (hDMD), mdx on DBA/2 background (DBA/2-mdx), Cmah-mdx, and mdx/mTRKO murine models. PMID:27854202

  17. TGF{beta} induces proHB-EGF shedding and EGFR transactivation through ADAM activation in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebi, Masahide [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Hiromi, E-mail: hkataoka@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Shimura, Takaya; Kubota, Eiji; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Mizushima, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Mabuchi, Motoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Tanida, Satoshi; Kamiya, Takeshi [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Higashiyama, Shigeki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Ehime (Japan); Joh, Takashi [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan)

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} TGF{beta} induces EGFR transactivation through proHB-EGF shedding by activated ADAM members in gastric cancer cells. {yields} TGF{beta} induces nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF cleaved by ADAM members. {yields} TGF{beta} enhances cell growth by EGFR transactivation and HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and ADAM inhibitors block these effects. {yields} Silencing of ADAM17 also blocks EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and cancer cell growth by TGF{beta}. {yields} ADAM17 may play a crucial role in this TGF{beta}-HB-EGF signal transduction. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF{beta}) is known to potently inhibit cell growth. Loss of responsiveness to TGF{beta} inhibition on cell growth is a hallmark of many types of cancer, yet its mechanism is not fully understood. Membrane-anchored heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) ectodomain is cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) members and is implicated in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. Recently, nuclear translocation of the C-terminal fragment (CTF) of pro-HB-EGF was found to induce cell growth. We investigated the association between TGF{beta} and HB-EGF signal transduction via ADAM activation. Materials and methods: The CCK-8 assay in two gastric cancer cell lines was used to determine the effect for cell growth by TGF{beta}. The effect of two ADAM inhibitors was also evaluated. Induction of EGFR phosphorylation by TGF{beta} was analyzed and the effect of the ADAM inhibitors was also examined. Nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF by shedding through ADAM activated by TGF{beta} was also analyzed. EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation, and cell growth were examined under the condition of ADAM17 knockdown. Result: TGF{beta}-induced EGFR phosphorylation of which ADAM inhibitors were able to inhibit. TGF{beta} induced shedding of proHB-EGF allowing HB-EGF-CTF to

  18. Cosmosiin Increases ADAM10 Expression via Mechanisms Involving 5’UTR and PI3K Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Min

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The α-secretase “a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein” (ADAM10 is involved in the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP. Upregulation of ADAM10 precludes the generation of neurotoxic β-amyloid protein (Aβ and represents a plausible therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In this study, we explored compounds that can potentially promote the expression of ADAM10. Therefore, we performed high-throughput small-molecule screening in SH-SY5Y (human neuroblastoma cells that stably express a luciferase reporter gene driven by the ADAM10 promoter, including a portion of its 5’-untranslated region (5’UTR. This has led to the discovery of cosmosiin (apigenin 7-O-β-glucoside. Here, we report that in human cell lines (SH-SY5Y and HEK293, cosmosiin proportionally increased the levels of the immature and mature forms of the ADAM10 protein without altering its mRNA level. This effect was attenuated by translation inhibitors or by deleting the 5’UTR of ADAM10, suggesting that a translational mechanism was responsible for the increased levels of ADAM10. Luciferase deletion assays revealed that the first 144 nucleotides of the 5’UTR were necessary for mediating the cosmosiin-induced enhancement of ADAM10 expression in SH-SY5Y cells. Cosmosiin failed to increase the levels of the ADAM10 protein in murine cells, which lack native expression of the ADAM10 transcript containing the identified 5’UTR element. The potential signaling pathway may involve phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K because pharmacological inhibition of PI3K attenuated the effect of cosmosiin on the expression of the ADAM10 protein. Finally, cosmosiin attenuated Aβ generation because the levels of Aβ40/42 in HEK-APP cells were significantly reduced after cosmosiin treatment. Collectively, we found that the first 144 nucleotides of the ADAM10 5’UTR, and PI3K signaling, are involved in cosmosiin-induced enhancement of the expression

  19. Clinical features of Candidiasis in patients with inherited interleukin 12 receptor β1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouederni, Monia; Sanal, Ozden; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Tezcan, Ilhan; Dogu, Figen; Sologuren, Ithaisa; Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Keser, Melike; Tanir, Gonul; Nieuwhof, Chris; Colino, Elena; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Levy, Jacov; Kutukculer, Necil; Aytekin, Caner; Herrera-Ramos, Estefanía; Bhatti, Micah; Karaca, Neslihan; Barbouche, Ridha; Broides, Arnon; Goudouris, Ekaterini; Franco, José Luis; Parvaneh, Nima; Reisli, Ismail; Strickler, Alexis; Shcherbina, Anna; Somer, Ayper; Segal, Anthony; Angel-Moreno, Alfonso; Lezana-Fernandez, José Luis; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Bobadilla-Del Valle, Miriam; Kachboura, Salem; Sentongo, Timothy; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Rodríguez-Gallego, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 12Rβ1 (IL-12Rβ1)-deficient patients are prone to clinical disease caused by mycobacteria, Salmonella, and other intramacrophagic pathogens, probably because of impaired interleukin 12-dependent interferon γ production. About 25% of patients also display mucocutaneous candidiasis, probably owing to impaired interleukin 23-dependent interleukin 17 immunity. The clinical features and outcome of candidiasis in these patients have not been described before, to our knowledge. We report here the clinical signs of candidiasis in 35 patients with IL-12Rβ1 deficiency. Most (n = 71) of the 76 episodes of candidiasis were mucocutaneous. Isolated oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) was the most common presentation (59 episodes, 34 patients) and was recurrent or persistent in 26 patients. Esophageal candidiasis (n = 7) was associated with proven OPC in 2 episodes, and cutaneous candidiasis (n = 2) with OPC in 1 patient, whereas isolated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC; n = 3) was not. Five episodes of proven invasive candidiasis were documented in 4 patients; 1 of these episodes was community acquired in the absence of any other comorbid condition. The first episode of candidiasis occurred earlier in life (median age±standard deviation, 1.5 ± 7.87 years) than infections with environmental mycobacteria (4.29 ± 11.9 years), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4 ± 3.12 years), or Salmonella species (4.58 ± 4.17 years) or other rare infections (3 ± 11.67 years). Candidiasis was the first documented infection in 19 of the 35 patients, despite the vaccination of 10 of these 19 patients with live bacille Calmette-Guérin. Patients who are deficient in IL-12Rβ1 may have candidiasis, usually mucocutaneous, which is frequently recurrent or persistent. Candidiasis may be the first clinical manifestation in these patients.

  20. Clinical Features of Candidiasis in Patients With Inherited Interleukin 12 Receptor β1 Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouederni, Monia; Sanal, Ozden; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Tezcan, Ilhan; Dogu, Figen; Sologuren, Ithaisa; Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Keser, Melike; Tanir, Gonul; Nieuwhof, Chris; Colino, Elena; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Levy, Jacov; Kutukculer, Necil; Aytekin, Caner; Herrera-Ramos, Estefanía; Bhatti, Micah; Karaca, Neslihan; Barbouche, Ridha; Broides, Arnon; Goudouris, Ekaterini; Franco, José Luis; Parvaneh, Nima; Reisli, Ismail; Strickler, Alexis; Shcherbina, Anna; Somer, Ayper; Segal, Anthony; Angel-Moreno, Alfonso; Lezana-Fernandez, José Luis; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Bobadilla-Del Valle, Miriam; Kachboura, Salem; Sentongo, Timothy; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Rodríguez-Gallego, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background. Interleukin 12Rβ1 (IL-12Rβ1)–deficient patients are prone to clinical disease caused by mycobacteria, Salmonella, and other intramacrophagic pathogens, probably because of impaired interleukin 12–dependent interferon γ production. About 25% of patients also display mucocutaneous candidiasis, probably owing to impaired interleukin 23–dependent interleukin 17 immunity. The clinical features and outcome of candidiasis in these patients have not been described before, to our knowledge. We report here the clinical signs of candidiasis in 35 patients with IL-12Rβ1 deficiency. Results. Most (n = 71) of the 76 episodes of candidiasis were mucocutaneous. Isolated oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) was the most common presentation (59 episodes, 34 patients) and was recurrent or persistent in 26 patients. Esophageal candidiasis (n = 7) was associated with proven OPC in 2 episodes, and cutaneous candidiasis (n = 2) with OPC in 1 patient, whereas isolated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC; n = 3) was not. Five episodes of proven invasive candidiasis were documented in 4 patients; 1 of these episodes was community acquired in the absence of any other comorbid condition. The first episode of candidiasis occurred earlier in life (median age±standard deviation, 1.5 ± 7.87 years) than infections with environmental mycobacteria (4.29 ± 11.9 years), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4 ± 3.12 years), or Salmonella species (4.58 ± 4.17 years) or other rare infections (3 ± 11.67 years). Candidiasis was the first documented infection in 19 of the 35 patients, despite the vaccination of 10 of these 19 patients with live bacille Calmette-Guérin. Conclusions. Patients who are deficient in IL-12Rβ1 may have candidiasis, usually mucocutaneous, which is frequently recurrent or persistent. Candidiasis may be the first clinical manifestation in these patients. PMID:24186907

  1. Prevalence of Vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency in HIV-positive patients and its association with neuropsychiatric symptoms and immunological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Prabha M R; Chowta, Mukta N; Ramapuram, John T; Rao, Satish; Udupa, Karthik; Acharya, Sahana Devdas

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of micronutrients is prevalent even before the development of symptoms of HIV disease and is associated with accelerated HIV disease progression. This study evaluates the prevalence of folate and Vitamin B 12 deficiency in HIV-positive patients with or without tuberculosis (TB) and its association with neuropsychiatric symptoms and immunological response. Cross-sectional, observational study in an outpatient setting. Four groups of HIV-positive patients with TB (Group I), HIV-positive patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms (Group II), HIV-positive patients without neuropsychiatric symptoms or TB (Group III), and HIV-negative controls with neuropsychiatric symptoms (Group IV). Vitamin B 12 and folate estimation was done using carbonyl metallo-immunoassay method. ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney, Pearson's correlation. The prevalence of folic acid deficiency was 27.1% in the Group I, 31.9% in the Group II, 23.4% in the Group III, and 32% in the Group IV being higher in patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms in both HIV and non-HIV patients. The prevalence of Vitamin B 12 deficiency was 18.8% in Group I, 9.1% in Group II, 4.8% in Group III, and 16.7% in Group IV. The patients with folate deficiency had more severe depression and anxiety. Nearly, 30% of the HIV patients had a folic acid deficiency, and about 10% of the HIV patients had Vitamin B 12 deficiency. The folate deficiency was highest among neuropsychiatric patients with or without HIV infection and Vitamin B 12 deficiency was higher among HIV patients with TB.

  2. Identification of a novel first exon in the human dystrophin gene and of a new promoter located more than 500 kb upstream of the nearest known promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagawa, H.; Nishio, H.; Takeshima, Y. [Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The dystrophin gene, which is muted in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies, is the largest known human gene. Five alternative promoters have been characterized until now. Here we show that a novel dystrophin isoform with a different first exon can be produced through transcription initiation at a previously-unidentified alternative promoter. The case study presented is that of patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who had a deletion extending from 5{prime} end of the dystrophin gene to exon 2, including all promoters previously mapped in the 5{prime} part of the gene. Transcripts from lymphoblastoid cells were found to contain sequences corresponding to exon 3, indicating the presence of new promoter upstream of this exon. The nucleotide sequence of amplified cDNA corresponding to the 5{prime} end of the new transcript indicated that the 5{prime} end of exon 3 was extended by 9 codons, only the last (most 3{prime}) of which codes for methionine. The genomic nucleotide sequence upstream from the new exon, as determined using inverse polymerase chain reaction, revealed the presence of sequences similar to a TATA box, an octamer motif and an MEF-2 element. The identified promoter/exon did not map to intron 2, as might have been expected, but to a position more than 500 kb upstream of the most 5{prime} of the previously-identified promoters, thereby adding 500 kb to the dystrophin gene. The sequence of part of the new promoter region is very similar to that of certain medium reiteration frequency repetitive sequences. These findings may help us understand the molecular evolution of the dystrophin gene.

  3. Microautoradiography of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in mice treated with fluoxetine and serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, X.-X.; Chen, J.-C.; Liu, R.-S.; Wey, S.-P.; Lee, J.-S.; Chen, C.-C.; Fu, Y.-K.; Ting, Gann; Hwang, J.-J. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw

    2004-07-01

    A radiopharmaceutical, {sup 123}I-labeled 2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine ([{sup 123}I]ADAM), has been developed recently for evaluation of how serotonin transporters (SERT) function in the brain. However, the detailed biodistribution and specific binding in certain brain areas are not well investigated. In this study, both phosphor plate imaging and microautoradiography were applied to explore the binding characteristics of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in SERT neurons. The effect of two psychotropics and one narcotic on the binding of [{sup 123}I]ADAM to SERT was also studied. Fluoxetine and desipramine, both are psychotropics and specific SERT ligands and decreased the affinity of [{sup 123}I]ADAM, while p-chloroamphetamine (PCA), a narcotic, destroyed most of serotonergic neurons, as well as reducing the concentration of serotonin and the number of SERT in the brain as shown by the biodistribution of [{sup 123}I]ADAM. Significant and selective accumulation of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in the areas from midbrain to brain stem in normal mice with maximum target-to-background ratio was found at 90 minutes postinjection. A rapid clearance of [{sup 131}I]ADAM at 120 minutes postinjection was found in the CA1, CA3 and ThN brain areas. In addition, the inhibition effect on binding ability of [{sup 123}I]ADAM to SERT by the psychotropics and the narcotic was found to have the order of: PCA > fluoxetine > desipramine.

  4. Dual AAV therapy ameliorates exercise-induced muscle injury and functional ischemia in murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yadong; Yue, Yongping; Li, Liang; Hakim, Chady H; Zhang, Keqing; Thomas, Gail D; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-09-15

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) membrane delocalization contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by promoting functional muscle ischemia and exacerbating muscle injury during exercise. We have previously shown that supra-physiological expression of nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin restores normal blood flow regulation and prevents functional ischemia in transgenic mdx mice, a DMD model. A critical next issue is whether systemic dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy can restore nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin expression and mitigate muscle activity-related functional ischemia and injury. Here, we performed systemic gene transfer in mdx and mdx4cv mice using a pair of dual AAV vectors that expressed a 6 kb nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin gene. Vectors were packaged in tyrosine mutant AAV-9 and co-injected (5 × 10(12) viral genome particles/vector/mouse) via the tail vein to 1-month-old dystrophin-null mice. Four months later, we observed 30-50% mini-dystrophin positive myofibers in limb muscles. Treatment ameliorated histopathology, increased muscle force and protected against eccentric contraction-induced injury. Importantly, dual AAV therapy successfully prevented chronic exercise-induced muscle force drop. Doppler hemodynamic assay further showed that therapy attenuated adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle. Our results suggest that partial transduction can still ameliorate nNOS delocalization-associated functional deficiency. Further evaluation of nNOS binding mini-dystrophin dual AAV vectors is warranted in dystrophic dogs and eventually in human patients.

  5. Eclipsing Aestheticism: Western Landscape Photography After Ansel Adams

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Bien que l’héritage photographique d’Ansel Adams (1902-84) reste incontestable dans la culture de masse, dans les musées et parmi les collectionneurs, la nature de cet héritage fait débat parmi les artistes contemporains, les chercheurs et les théoriciens de la photographie. Pour certains, à la fin du 20ème siècle, les paysages typiques de Adams représentant l’Ouest américain au milieu du siècle désignaient une connivence secrète avec l’expansion américaine vers l’ouest durant la guerre froid...

  6. Progranulin overexpression in sensory neurons attenuates neuropathic pain in mice: Role of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Christine; Hardt, Stefanie; Fischer, Caroline; Heidler, Juliana; Lim, Hee-Young; Häussler, Annett; Albuquerque, Boris; Zimmer, Béla; Möser, Christine; Behrends, Christian; Koentgen, Frank; Wittig, Ilka; Schmidt, Mirko H H; Clement, Albrecht M; Deller, Thomas; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2016-12-01

    Peripheral or central nerve injury is a frequent cause of chronic pain and the mechanisms are not fully understood. Using newly generated transgenic mice we show that progranulin overexpression in sensory neurons attenuates neuropathic pain after sciatic nerve injury and accelerates nerve healing. A yeast-2-hybrid screen revealed putative interactions of progranulin with autophagy-related proteins, ATG12 and ATG4b. This was supported by colocalization and proteomic studies showing regulations of ATG13 and ATG4b and other members of the autophagy network, lysosomal proteins and proteins involved in endocytosis. The association of progranulin with the autophagic pathway was functionally confirmed in primary sensory neurons. Autophagy and survival were impaired in progranulin-deficient neurons and improved in progranulin overexpressing neurons. Nerve injury in vivo caused an accumulation of LC3b-EGFP positive bodies in neurons of the dorsal root ganglia and nerves suggesting an impairment of autophagic flux. Overexpression of progranulin in these neurons was associated with a reduction of the stress marker ATF3, fewer protein aggregates in the injured nerve and enhanced stump healing. At the behavioral level, further inhibition of the autophagic flux by hydroxychloroquine intensified cold and heat nociception after sciatic nerve injury and offset the pain protection provided by progranulin. We infer that progranulin may assist in removal of protein waste and thereby helps to resolve neuropathic pain after nerve injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Intervention effects of Zuoguiwan containing serum on osteoblast through ERK1/2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in models with kidney-Yang-deficiency, kidney-Yin-deficiency osteoporosis syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Hua; Xin, Jing; Fan, Lian-Xia; Yin, Hua

    2017-10-01

    To clarify the effects of Zuoguiwan containing serum on osteoblast proliferation and alkaline phosphatase(ALP) expression and its effects on the expression of β-catenin, ERK1, ERK2 mRNA and protein of osteoblast through ERK1/2, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in models with osteoporosis(OP) kidney-Yang-deficiency, osteoporosis(OP) kidney-Yin-deficiency syndrome. Rat osteoporosis models were established by ovariectomy surgery, and 10 weeks after surgery, hydrocortisone was injected and thyroxine was administered by intragastric administration to establish OP kidney-Yang-deficiency rat model, and OP kidney-Yin-deficiency rat model. Osteoblasts were obtained from 24 h newborn rat skull and were identified by alkaline phosphatase and alizarin red staining. Zuoguiwan containing serum of OP, OP kidney-Yang-deficiency, and OP kidney-Yin-deficiency, as well as the blank serum were used to intervene the osteoblast, and the cells proliferation was detected by MTS. ELISA assay was used to detect ALP expression. RT-PCR assay was used to detect the mRNA expression of ERK1, ERK2, β-catenin and protein expression levels were detected by Western blot. The results showed that Zuoguiwan containing serum in OP kidney-Yin-deficiency model had stronger effect than OP kidney-Yang-deficiency in promoting osteoblast proliferation, ALP expression, osteoblast ERK1/2, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway related factors β-catenin, ERK1, ERK2 mRNA and protein expression levels. This was consistent with the TCM theory of "Zuoguiwan nourishes kidney Yin", providing a scientific basis for the clinical and dialectical treatment of osteoporosis. Zuoguiwan could regulate the proliferation and differentiation of bone cells by ERK1/2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which may be one of the mechanisms of Zuoguiwan for the prevention of osteoporosis. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  8. Adam Smith's bougeois virtues in competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, T.; Graafland, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Whether or not capitalism is compatible with ethics is a long standing dispute. We take up an approach to virtue ethics inspired by Adam Smith and consider how market competition influences the virtues most associated with modern commercial society. Up to a point, competition nurtures and supports

  9. PITX2 Enhances the Regenerative Potential of Dystrophic Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Daniel; Hernández-Torres, Francisco; Lozano-Velasco, Estefanía; Rodriguez-Outeiriño, Lara; Carvajal, Alejandra; Creus, Carlota; Franco, Diego; Aránega, Amelia Eva

    2018-04-10

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), one of the most lethal genetic disorders, involves progressive muscle degeneration resulting from the absence of DYSTROPHIN. Lack of DYSTROPHIN expression in DMD has critical consequences in muscle satellite stem cells including a reduced capacity to generate myogenic precursors. Here, we demonstrate that the c-isoform of PITX2 transcription factor modifies the myogenic potential of dystrophic-deficient satellite cells. We further show that PITX2c enhances the regenerative capability of mouse DYSTROPHIN-deficient satellite cells by increasing cell proliferation and the number of myogenic committed cells, but importantly also increasing dystrophin-positive (revertant) myofibers by regulating miR-31. These PITX2-mediated effects finally lead to improved muscle function in dystrophic (DMD/mdx) mice. Our studies reveal a critical role for PITX2 in skeletal muscle repair and may help to develop therapeutic strategies for muscular disorders. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. MBS Analysis Of Kinetic Structures Using ADAMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2009-01-01

    The present paper considers multibody system (MBS) analysis of kinetic structures using the software package ADAMS. Deployable, foldable, expandable and reconfigurable kinetic structures can provide a change in the geometric morphology of the envelope by contributing to making it adaptable to e.......g. changing external climate factors, in order to improve the indoor climate performance of the building. The derivation of equations of motion for such spatial mechanical systems is a challenging issue in scientific community. However, with new symbolic tools one can automatically derive equations in so......-called multibody system (MBS) formalism. The present paper considers MBS modeling of kinetic architectural structures using the software packages ADAMS. As a result, it is found that symbolic MBS simulation tools facilitate a useful evaluation environment for MBS users during a design phase of responsive kinetic...

  11. New Dystrophin/Dystroglycan interactors control neuron behavior in Drosophila eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishko Valentyna M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC is a large multi-component complex that is well known for its function in muscle tissue. When the main components of the DGC, Dystrophin (Dys and Dystroglycan (Dg are affected cognitive impairment and mental retardation in addition to muscle degeneration can occur. Previously we performed an array of genetic screens using a Drosophila model for muscular dystrophy in order to find novel DGC interactors aiming to elucidate the signaling role(s in which the complex is involved. Since the function of the DGC in the brain and nervous system has not been fully defined, we have here continued to analyze the DGC modifiers' function in the developing Drosophila brain and eye. Results Given that disruption of Dys and Dg leads to improper photoreceptor axon projections into the lamina and eye neuron elongation defects during development, we have determined the function of previously screened components and their genetic interaction with the DGC in this tissue. Our study first found that mutations in chif, CG34400, Nrk, Lis1, capt and Cam cause improper axon path-finding and loss of SP2353, Grh, Nrk, capt, CG34400, vimar, Lis1 and Cam cause shortened rhabdomere lengths. We determined that Nrk, mbl, capt and Cam genetically interact with Dys and/or Dg in these processes. It is notable that most of the neuronal DGC interacting components encountered are involved in regulation of actin dynamics. Conclusions Our data indicate possible DGC involvement in the process of cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons. The identification of new components that interact with the DGC not only helps to dissect the mechanism of axon guidance and eye neuron differentiation but also provides a great opportunity for understanding the signaling mechanisms by which the cell surface receptor Dg communicates via Dys with the actin cytoskeleton.

  12. A novel point mutation (G[sup [minus]1] to T) in a 5[prime] splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, Yoko; Nishio, Hisahide; Kitoh, Yoshihiko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Narita, Naoko; Wada, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Matsuo, Masafumi (Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. The authors now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5[prime] splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5[prime] splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G[sup [minus]1]-to-T mutation at the 5[prime] splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  13. The role of metalloproteinase ADAM17 in regulating ICOS ligand-mediated humoral immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marczynska, Joanna; Ozga, Aleksandra; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    results in spleen and lymph node enlargement, as well as increased levels of Ag-specific class-switched Ig production following immunization with OVA together with anti-CD40 mAbs and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid. Moreover, we demonstrate that the costimulatory ligand ICOS ligand (ICOSL) is selectively...... downregulated on the surface of B cells in an ADAM17-specific manner, although it is not proteolitically processed by recombinant ADAM17 in vitro. Finally, we show that higher cell surface levels of ICOSL in ADAM17(ex/ex) mice may contribute to the development of excessive Ab responses. Therefore, our data...... suggest a functional link between ADAM17 and ICOSL in controlling adaptive immune responses....

  14. MLPA based detection of mutations in the dystrophin gene of 180 Polish families with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimowski, Janusz G; Massalska, Diana; Holding, Mariola; Jadczak, Sylwia; Fidziańska, Elżbieta; Lusakowska, Anna; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Kamińska, Anna; Zaremba, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) is a recessive, X-linked disorder caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. Deletions account for approximately 60-65% of mutations, duplications for 5-10%. The remaining cases are mainly point mutations. According to Monaco theory clinical form of the disease depends on maintaining or disrupting the reading frame. The purpose of the study was to determine frequency and location of deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene, to determine the compliance between maintaining/disrupting the reading frame and clinical form of the disease and to check the effectiveness of MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) in the detection of these mutations in hemizygous patients and heterozygous female carriers. The material is composed of combined results of molecular diagnosis carried out in years 2009-2012 in 180 unrelated patients referred with the diagnosis of DMD/BMD tested by use of MLPA. We identified 110 deletions, 22 duplication (in one patient two different duplications were detected) and 2 point mutations. Deletions involved mainly exons 45-54 and 3-21, whereas most duplications involved exons 3-18. The compliance with Monaco theory was 95% for deletions and 76% for duplications. Most of mutations in the dystrophin gene were localized in the hot spots - different for deletions and duplications. MLPA enabled their quick identification, exact localization and determination whether or not they maintained or disrupted the reading frame. MLPA was also effective in detection of deletions and duplications in female carriers. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. Severe but Not Moderate Vitamin B12 Deficiency Impairs Lipid Profile, Induces Adiposity, and Leads to Adverse Gestational Outcome in Female C57BL/6 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shampa; Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Raghunath, Manchala

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is widely prevalent in women of childbearing age, especially in developing countries. In the present study, through dietary restriction, we have established mouse models of severe and moderate vitamin B12 deficiencies to elucidate the impact on body composition, biochemical parameters, and reproductive performance. Female weanling C57BL/6 mice were fed for 4 weeks: (a) control AIN-76A diet, (b) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with pectin as dietary fiber (severe deficiency group, as pectin inhibits vitamin B12 absorption), or (c) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with cellulose as dietary fiber (moderate deficiency group as cellulose does not interfere with vitamin B12 absorption). After confirming deficiency, the mice were mated with male colony mice and maintained on their respective diets throughout pregnancy, lactation, and thereafter till 12 weeks. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency increased body fat% significantly, induced adiposity and altered lipid profile. Pregnant dams of both the deficient groups developed anemia. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency decreased the percentage of conception and litter size, pups were small-for-gestational-age and had significantly lower body weight at birth as well as weaning. Most of the offspring born to severely deficient dams died within 24 h of birth. Stress markers and adipocytokines were elevated in severe deficiency with concomitant decrease in antioxidant defense. The results show that severe but not moderate vitamin B12 restriction had profound impact on the physiology of C57BL/6 mice. Oxidative and corticosteroid stress, inflammation and poor antioxidant defense seem to be the probable underlying mechanisms mediating the deleterious effects.

  16. Severe but not moderate vitamin B12 deficiency impairs lipid profile, induces adiposity and leads to adverse gestational outcome in female C57BL/6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shampa eGhosh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12 deficiency is widely prevalent in women of childbearing age especially in developing countries. In the present study, through dietary restriction, we have established mouse models of severe and moderate vitamin B12 deficiencies to elucidate the impact on body composition, biochemical parameters and reproductive performance. Female weanling C57BL/6 mice were fed for four weeks, (a control AIN-76A diet, (b vitamin B12 restricted AIN-76A diet with pectin as dietary fiber (severe deficiency group, as pectin inhibits vitamin B12 absorption or (c vitamin B12 restricted AIN-76A diet with cellulose as dietary fiber (moderate deficiency group as cellulose does not interfere with vitamin B12 absorption. After confirming deficiency, the mice were mated with male colony mice and maintained on their respective diets throughout pregnancy, lactation and thereafter till 12 weeks. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency increased body fat % significantly, induced adiposity and altered lipid profile. Pregnant dams of both the deficient groups developed anemia. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency decreased the percentage of conception and litter size, pups were small-for-gestational-age and had significantly lower body weight at birth as well as weaning. Most of the offspring born to severely deficient dams died within 24 hours of birth. Stress markers and adipocytokines were elevated in severe deficiency with concomitant decrease in antioxidant defense. The results show that severe but not moderate vitamin B12 restriction had profound impact on the physiology of C57BL/6 mice. Oxidative and corticosteroid stress, inflammation and poor antioxidant defense seem to be the probable underlying mechanisms mediating the deleterious effects.

  17. Electroporation Enhanced Effect of Dystrophin Splice Switching PNA Oligomers in Normal and Dystrophic Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Brolin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptide nucleic acid (PNA is a synthetic DNA mimic that has shown potential for discovery of novel splice switching antisense drugs. However, in vivo cellular delivery has been a limiting factor for development, and only few successful studies have been reported. As a possible modality for improvement of in vivo cellular availability, we have investigated the effect of electrotransfer upon intramuscular (i.m. PNA administration in vivo. Antisense PNA targeting exon 23 of the murine dystrophin gene was administered by i.m. injection to the tibialis anterior (TA muscle of normal NMRI and dystrophic mdx mice with or without electroporation. At low, single PNA doses (1.5, 3, or 10 µg/TA, electroporation augmented the antisense exon skipping induced by an unmodified PNA by twofold to fourfold in healthy mouse muscle with optimized electric parameters, measured after 7 days. The PNA splice switching was detected at the RNA level up to 4 weeks after a single-dose treatment. In dystrophic muscles of the MDX mouse, electroporation increased the number of dystrophin-positive fibers about 2.5-fold at 2 weeks after a single PNA administration compared to injection only. In conclusion, we find that electroporation can enhance PNA antisense effects in muscle tissue.

  18. Surface expression and limited proteolysis of ADAM10 are increased by a dominant negative inhibitor of dynamin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slack Barbara E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amyloid precursor protein (APP is cleaved by β- and γ-secretases to generate toxic amyloid β (Aβ peptides. Alternatively, α-secretases cleave APP within the Aβ domain, precluding Aβ formation and releasing the soluble ectodomain, sAPPα. We previously showed that inhibition of the GTPase dynamin reduced APP internalization and increased release of sAPPα, apparently by prolonging the interaction between APP and α-secretases at the plasma membrane. This was accompanied by a reduction in Aβ generation. In the present study, we investigated whether surface expression of the α-secretase ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease10 is also regulated by dynamin-dependent endocytosis. Results Transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK cells stably expressing M3 muscarinic receptors with a dominant negative dynamin I mutant (dyn I K44A, increased surface expression of both immature, and mature, catalytically active forms of co-expressed ADAM10. Surface levels of ADAM10 were unaffected by activation of protein kinase C (PKC or M3 receptors, indicating that receptor-coupled shedding of the ADAM substrate APP is unlikely to be mediated by inhibition of ADAM10 endocytosis in this cell line. Dyn I K44A strongly increased the formation of a C-terminal fragment of ADAM10, consistent with earlier reports that the ADAM10 ectodomain is itself a target for sheddases. The abundance of this fragment was increased in the presence of a γ-secretase inhibitor, but was not affected by M3 receptor activation. The dynamin mutant did not affect the distribution of ADAM10 and its C-terminal fragment between raft and non-raft membrane compartments. Conclusions Surface expression and limited proteolysis of ADAM10 are regulated by dynamin-dependent endocytosis, but are unaffected by activation of signaling pathways that upregulate shedding of ADAM substrates such as APP. Modulation of ADAM10 internalization could affect cellular behavior in two

  19. Adam Podin ja pan-evangeelne vaimulaad / Toivo Pilli

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pilli, Toivo, 1962-

    2013-01-01

    Adam Podini elust ja tööst: Keila baptistikoguduse vaimulikuna, vanglamisjonäri ja pidalitõbiste abistajana, baptistide teoloogilise seminari direktorina, Evangeelse Alliansi kontaktisikuna Eestis

  20. NGF-Dependent neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells overexpressing the Src homology 2-domain protein shb requires activation of the Rap1 pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, L.; Annerén, C.; Reedquist, K. A.; Bos, J. L.; Welsh, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain adaptor protein Shb has been shown to transmit NGF- and FGF-2-dependent differentiation signals in PC12 cells. To study if this involves signaling through the small GTPase Rap1, Rap1 activity was assessed in Shb-overexpressing PC12 cells. We demonstrate that NGF and

  1. Growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... 2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  2. Association between ADAM metallopeptidase domain 33 gene polymorphism and risk of childhood asthma: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, F J; Zou, L Y; Tong, D M; Lu, X Y; Li, J; Deng, C B

    2017-08-31

    This study aimed to investigate the association between ADAM metallopeptidase domain 33 (ADAM33) gene polymorphisms and the risk of childhood asthma. The relevant studies about the relationship between ADAM33 gene polymorphisms and childhood asthma were searched from electronic databases and the deadline of retrieval was May 2016. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ADAM33 (rs511898, rs2280092, rs3918396, rs528557, rs2853209, rs44707, rs2280091 and rs2280089) were analyzed based on several models including the allele, codominant, recessive and dominant models. The results showed that the ADAM33 rs2280091 polymorphism in all four genetic models was associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma. Positive associations were also found between the polymorphisms rs2280090, rs2787094, rs44707 and rs528557 and childhood asthma in some genetic models. This meta-analysis suggested that ADAM33 polymorphisms rs2280091, rs2280090, rs2787094, rs44707 and rs528557 were significantly associated with a high risk of childhood asthma.

  3. ADAM: A computer program to simulate selective-breeding schemes for animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L D; Sørensen, A C; Henryon, M

    2009-01-01

    ADAM is a computer program that models selective breeding schemes for animals using stochastic simulation. The program simulates a population of animals and traces the genetic changes in the population under different selective breeding scenarios. It caters to different population structures......, genetic models, selection strategies, and mating designs. ADAM can be used to evaluate breeding schemes and generate genetic data to test statistical tools...

  4. Sarcospan integration into laminin-binding adhesion complexes that ameliorate muscular dystrophy requires utrophin and α7 integrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Oh, Jennifer; Chou, Eric; Lee, Joy A.; Holmberg, Johan; Burkin, Dean J.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that result in loss of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex, a laminin receptor that connects the myofiber to its surrounding extracellular matrix. Utrophin, a dystrophin ortholog that is normally localized to the neuromuscular junction, is naturally upregulated in DMD muscle, which partially compensates for the loss of dystrophin. Transgenic overexpression of utrophin causes broad sarcolemma localization of utrophin, restoration of laminin binding and amelioration of disease in the mdx mouse model of DMD. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of sarcospan, a dystrophin- and utrophin-binding protein, ameliorates mdx muscular dystrophy. Sarcospan boosts levels of utrophin to therapeutic levels at the sarcolemma, where attachment to laminin is restored. However, understanding the compensatory mechanism is complicated by concomitant upregulation of α7β1 integrin, which also binds laminin. Similar to the effects of utrophin, transgenic overexpression of α7 integrin prevents DMD disease in mice and is accompanied by increased abundance of utrophin around the extra-synaptic sarcolemma. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying sarcospan ‘rescue’ of muscular dystrophy, we created double-knockout mice to test the contributions of utrophin or α7 integrin. We show that sarcospan-mediated amelioration of muscular dystrophy in DMD mice is dependent on the presence of both utrophin and α7β1 integrin, even when they are individually expressed at therapeutic levels. Furthermore, we found that association of sarcospan into laminin-binding complexes is dependent on utrophin and α7β1 integrin. PMID:25504048

  5. Adaptive gene regulation in the Striatum of RGS9-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Busse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RGS9-deficient mice show drug-induced dyskinesia but normal locomotor activity under unchallenged conditions. RESULTS: Genes related to Ca2+ signaling and their functions were regulated in RGS9-deficient mice. CONCLUSION: Changes in Ca2+ signaling that compensate for RGS9 loss-of-function can explain the normal locomotor activity in RGS9-deficient mice under unchallenged conditions. SIGNIFICANCE: Identified signaling components may represent novel targets in antidyskinetic therapy. The long splice variant of the regulator of G-protein signaling 9 (RGS9-2 is enriched in striatal medium spiny neurons and dampens dopamine D2 receptor signaling. Lack of RGS9-2 can promote while its overexpression prevents drug-induced dyskinesia. Other animal models of drug-induced dyskinesia rather pointed towards overactivity of dopamine receptor-mediated signaling. To evaluate changes in signaling pathways mRNA expression levels were determined and compared in wild-type and RGS9-deficient mice. Unexpectedly, expression levels of dopamine receptors were unchanged in RGS9-deficient mice, while several genes related to Ca2+ signaling and long-term depression were differentially expressed when compared to wild type animals. Detailed investigations at the protein level revealed hyperphosphorylation of DARPP32 at Thr34 and of ERK1/2 in striata of RGS9-deficient mice. Whole cell patch clamp recordings showed that spontaneous synaptic events are increased (frequency and size in RGS9-deficient mice while long-term depression is reduced in acute brain slices. These changes are compatible with a Ca2+-induced potentiation of dopamine receptor signaling which may contribute to the drug-induced dyskinesia in RGS9-deficient mice.

  6. Vitamin B12 deficiency evaluation and treatment in severe dry eye disease with neuropathic ocular pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Serkan; Ozer, Murat Atabey; Akdemir, Mehmet Orçun

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to understand the effect of vitamin B12 deficiency on neuropathic ocular pain (NOP) and symptoms in patients with dry eye disease (DED). Patients with severe DED (without receiving topical artificial tears treatment) and ocular pain were enrolled (n = 90). Patients with severe DED and vitamin B12 deficiency (group 1, n = 45) received parenteral vitamin B12 supplement + topical treatment (artificial tears treatment + cyclosporine), and patients with severe DED and normal serum vitamin B12 level (group 2, n = 45) received only topical treatment (artificial tears treatment + cyclosporine). Patients were evaluated by the ocular surface disease index (OSDI) questionnaire, 3rd question (have you experienced painful or sore eyes during last week?) score of OSDI as a pain determiner and pain frequency measure), tear break up time (TBUT), and Schirmer's type 1 test. We compared the groups' OSDI, TBUT, and Schirmer's test recordings at the first visit and after 12 weeks retrospectively. The OSDI score, 3rd OSDI question score, TBUT, and Schirmer's test results improved after 12 weeks (p treatment. The mean score changes between the groups were not statistically significant; however, the decrease in the OSDI questionnaire score (-30.80 ±5.24) and 3rd OSDI question score (-2.82 ±0.53) were remarkable in group 1 (Table 2). The mean TBUT increase was +7.98 ±2.90 s and Schirmer's test result increase was +12.16 ±2.01 mm in group 1. The mean TBUT increase was +6.18 ±1.49 s and Schirmer's test result increase was +6.71 ±1.47 mm in group 2. These findings indicate that vitamin B12 deficiency is related with NOP. It may be important to consider measuring the serum vitamin B12 level in patients with severe DED presenting with resistant ocular pain despite taking topical treatment.

  7. Persistent Dystrophin Protein Restoration 90 Days after a Course of Intraperitoneally Administered Naked 2′OMePS AON and ZM2 NP-AON Complexes in mdx Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bassi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the exon-skipping approach has obtained proof of concept in animal models, myogenic cell cultures, and following local and systemic administration in Duchenne patients. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that low doses (7.5 mg/Kg/week of 2′-O-methyl-phosphorothioate antisense oligoribonucleotides (AONs adsorbed onto ZM2 nanoparticles provoke widespread dystrophin restoration 7 days after intraperitoneal treatment in mdx mice. In this study, we went on to test whether this dystrophin restoration was still measurable 90 days from the end of the same treatment. Interestingly, we found that both western blot and immunohistochemical analysis (up to 7% positive fibres were still able to detect dystrophin protein in the skeletal muscles of ZM2-AON-treated mice at this time, and the level of exon-23 skipping could still be assessed by RT real-time PCR (up to 10% of skipping percentage. In contrast, the protein was undetectable by western blot analysis in the skeletal muscles of mdx mice treated with an identical dose of naked AON, and the percentage of dystrophin-positive fibres and exon-23 skipping were reminiscent of those of untreated mdx mice. Our data therefore demonstrate the long-term residual efficacy of this systemic low-dose treatment and confirm the protective effect nanoparticles exert on AON molecules.

  8. Prevalence and demographic factors associated with vitamin A deficiency in Colombian children aged 12-59 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, Javier; Meneses-Echavéz, José F; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2014-11-01

    To examine the sociodemographic factors associated with subclinical vitamin A deficiency in a representative sample of Colombian children. Subjects and methods A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted of data from the 2010 National Nutrition Survey of Colombia (ENSIN 2010) on 4,279 children aged 12 to 59 months. Plasma vitamin A levels were measured using high resolution liquid chromatography (HRLC), and sociodemographic factors (sex, age, ethnicity, SISBEN score, and geographic region) were collected using a structured survey. Prevalence rates and associations were established using a multivariate regression model. Vitamin A levels ranged from 7.5-93.7 μg/dL (mean=26.2; 95% CI, 25.9 to 26.5μg/dL). Vitamin A levels less than 20 μg/dL (subclinical deficiency) were found in 24.3% of children. Children belonging to ethnic groups of African ascent, those living in the Orinoquia and Amazonia regions, and those aged 12-23 months had the greatest subclinical vitamin A deficiencies (29.5%, 31.1%, and 27.6% respectively. Regression models showed that age ranging from 12 and 23 months (OR 1.32; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.73), a SISBEN score 1 (OR 1.66; 95% CI, 1.18 to 2.34), an African ascent (OR 1.35; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.74), and living in the Orinoquia and Amazonia regions (OR 2.38; 95% CI, 1.62 to 3.51) were factors associated to subclinical vitamin A deficiency. The study population shows a high prevalence of subclinical vitamin A deficiency, and comprehensive interventions involving nutritional and educational components are therefore recommended. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Hypomethylation of serum blood clot DNA, but not plasma EDTA-blood cell pellet DNA, from vitamin B12-deficient subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eoin P Quinlivan

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12, a co-factor in methyl-group transfer, is important in maintaining DNA (deoxycytidine methylation. Using two independent assays we examined the effect of vitamin B12-deficiency (plasma vitamin B12<148 pmol/L on DNA methylation in women of childbearing age. Coagulated blood clot DNA from vitamin B12-deficient women had significantly (p<0.001 lower percentage deoxycytidine methylation (3.23±0.66%; n = 248 and greater [3 H]methyl-acceptance (42,859±9,699 cpm; n = 17 than DNA from B12-replete women (4.44±0.18%; n = 128 and 26,049±2,814 cpm; n = 11 [correlation between assays: r = -0.8538; p<0.001; n = 28]. In contrast, uncoagulated EDTA-blood cell pellet DNA from vitamin B12-deficient and B12-replete women exhibited similar percentage methylation (4.45±0.15%; n = 77 vs. 4.47±0.15%; n = 47 and [3 H]methyl-acceptance (27,378±4,094 cpm; n = 17 vs. 26,610±2,292 cpm; n = 11. Therefore, in simultaneously collected paired blood samples, vitamin B12-deficiency was associated with decreased DNA methylation only in coagulated samples. These findings highlight the importance of sample collection methods in epigenetic studies, and the potential impact biological processes can have on DNA methylation during collection.

  10. 2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine (ADAM): an improved serotonin transporter ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Shunichi; Choi, S.-R.; Hou, Catherine; Mu Mu; Kung, M.-P.; Acton, Paul D.; Siciliano, Michael; Kung, Hank F.

    2000-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERT) are target-sites for commonly used antidepressants, such as fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and so on. Imaging of these sites in the living human brain may provide an important tool to evaluate the mechanisms of action as well as to monitor the treatment of depressed patients. Synthesis and characterization of an improved SERT imaging agent, ADAM (2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine)(7) was achieved. The new compound, ADAM(7), displayed an extremely potent binding affinity toward SERT (K i =0.013 nM, in membrane preparations of LLC-PK 1 -cloned cell lines expressing the specific monoamine transporter). ADAM(7) also showed more than 1,000-fold selectivity for SERT over norepinephrine transporter (NET) and dopamine transporter (DAT) (K i =699 and 840 nM, for NET and DAT, respectively). The radiolabeled compound [ 125 I]ADAM(7) showed an excellent brain uptake in rats (1.41% dose at 2 min post intravenous [IV] injection), and consistently displayed the highest uptake (between 60-240 min post IV injection) in hypothalamus, a region with the highest density of SERT. The specific uptake of [ 125 I]ADAM(7) in the hypothalamus exhibited the highest target-to-nontarget ratio ([hypothalamus - cerebellum]/cerebellum was 3.97 at 120 min post IV injection). The preliminary imaging study of [ 123 I]ADAM in the brain of a baboon by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at 180-240 min post IV injection indicated a specific uptake in midbrain region rich in SERT. These data suggest that the new ligand [ 123 I]ADAM(7) may be useful for SPECT imaging of SERT binding sites in the human brain

  11. At læse Adam Smith er både befriende og irriterende

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen Nepper

    2014-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Adam Smith: "Teorien om de moralske følelser", oversat af Claus Bratt Østergaard, udg. på Informations Forlag......Anmeldelse af Adam Smith: "Teorien om de moralske følelser", oversat af Claus Bratt Østergaard, udg. på Informations Forlag...

  12. Mood disorder with mixed, psychotic features due to vitamin b12 deficiency in an adolescent: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Reports of psychiatric disorders due to its deficiency mostly focus on middle aged and elderly patients. Here we report a case of vitamin B 12 deficiency in a 16-year old, male adolescent who presented with mixed mood disorder symptoms with psychotic features. Chief complaints were “irritability, regressive behavior, apathy, crying and truancy” which lasted for a year. Premorbid personality was unremarkable with no substance use/exposure or infections. No stressors were present. The patient was not vegetarian. Past medical history and family history was normal. Neurological examination revealed glossitis, ataxia, rigidity in both shoulders, cog-wheel rigidity in the left elbow, bilateral problems of coordination in cerebellar examination, reduced swinging of the arms and masked face. Romberg’s sign was present. Laboratory evaluations were normal. Endoscopy and biopsy revealed atrophy of the gastric mucosa with Helicobacter Pylori colonization. Schilling test was suggestive of malabsorbtion. He was diagnosed with Mood disorder with Mixed, Psychotic Features due to Vitamin B12 Deficiency and risperidone 0.5 mg/day and intramuscular vitamin B12 500 mcg/day were started along with referral for treatment of Helicobacter pylori. A visit on the second week revealed no psychotic features. Romberg’s sign was negative and cerebellar tests were normal. Extrapyramidal symptoms were reduced while Vitamin B12 levels were elevated. Risperidone was stopped and parenteral Vitamin B12 treatment was continued with monthly injections for 3 months. Follow-up endoscopy and biopsy at the first month demonstrated eradication of H. pylori. He was followed monthly for another 6 months and psychiatric symptoms did not recur at the time of last evaluation. Despite limitations, this case may underline the observation that mood disorders with psychotic features

  13. Dysregulation of the ADAM17/Notch signalling pathways in endometriosis: from oxidative stress to fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Foruria, Iñaki; Santulli, Pietro; Chouzenoux, Sandrine; Carmona, Francisco; Chapron, Charles; Batteux, Frédéric

    2017-07-01

    Is oxidative stress associated with the A disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAM) metallopeptidase domain 17 (ADAM17)/Notch signalling pathway and fibrosis in the development of endometriosis? Oxidative stress is correlated with hyperactivation of the ADAM17/Notch signalling pathway and a consequent increase in fibrosis in patients with endometriosis. It is nowadays accepted that oxidative stress plays an important role in the onset and progression of endometriosis. Oxidative stress is able to induce the synthesis of some members of the 'ADAM' family, such as ADAM17. ADAM17/Notch signalling is dysregulated in other profibrotic and inflammatory diseases. This was a prospective laboratory study conducted in a tertiary-care university hospital between January 2011 and April 2013. We investigated non-pregnant, younger than 42-year-old patients (n = 202) during surgery for a benign gynaecological condition. After complete surgical exploration of the abdominopelvic cavity, 121 women with histologically proven endometriosis and 81 endometriosis-free control women were enrolled. Peritoneal fluid (PF) samples were obtained from all the study participants during surgery in order to detect advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) and metalloproteinase activity of ADAM17. Stromal cells from endometrial specimens (n = 8) were obtained from endometrium of control patients (Cs), and from eutopic (Es) and ectopic (Ps) endometrium of patients with deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) (n = 8). ADAM17, Notch and the fibrosis markers α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and type-I collagen were assessed using immunoblotting in all the endometrial samples obtained. Additionally, fibrosis was assessed after using Notch cleavage inhibitors (DAPT and FLI-06). Notch and fibrosis were also evaluated after stimulation of stromal endometrial cells with ADAM17 purified protein, increasing concentrations of H2O2 and primary cell culture supernatants. Patients with DIE presented higher PF AOPP

  14. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  15. Short (16-mer locked nucleic acid splice-switching oligonucleotides restore dystrophin production in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy myotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Borges Pires

    Full Text Available Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides (SSOs offer great potential for RNA-targeting therapies, and two SSO drugs have been recently approved for treating Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD and Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA. Despite promising results, new developments are still needed for more efficient chemistries and delivery systems. Locked nucleic acid (LNA is a chemically modified nucleic acid that presents several attractive properties, such as high melting temperature when bound to RNA, potent biological activity, high stability and low toxicity in vivo. Here, we designed a series of LNA-based SSOs complementary to two sequences of the human dystrophin exon 51 that are most evolutionary conserved and evaluated their ability to induce exon skipping upon transfection into myoblasts derived from a DMD patient. We show that 16-mers with 60% of LNA modification efficiently induce exon skipping and restore synthesis of a truncated dystrophin isoform that localizes to the plasma membrane of patient-derived myotubes differentiated in culture. In sum, this study underscores the value of short LNA-modified SSOs for therapeutic applications.

  16. Quantitative analysis of the dystrophin gene by real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimovic Nela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD are severe X-linked neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Our aim was to optimize a quantitative real-time PCR method based on SYBR® Green I chemistry for routine diagnostics of DMD/BMD deletion carriers. Twenty female relatives of DMD/BMD patients with previously detected partial gene deletions were studied. The relative quantity of the target exons was calculated by a comparative threshold cycle method (ΔΔCt. The carrier status of all subjects was successfully determined. The gene dosage ratio for non-carriers was 1.07±0.20, and for carriers 0.56±0.11. This assay proved to be simple, rapid, reliable and cost-effective.

  17. [Vitamin deficiencies in breastfed children due to maternal dietary deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollee, L.A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Dietary deficiencies of vitamin B12 and vitamin D during pregnancy and lactation may result in health problems in exclusively breastfed infants. Vitamin-B12 deficiency in these infants results in irritability, anorexia and failure to thrive during the first 4-8 months of life. Severe and permanent

  18. Folate and Vitamin B12 Deficiency Among Non-pregnant Women of Childbearing-Age in Guatemala 2009-2010: Prevalence and Identification of Vulnerable Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Jorge; Lopez-Pazos, Eunice; Dowling, Nicole F; Pfeiffer, Christine M; Mulinare, Joe; Vellozzi, Claudia; Zhang, Mindy; Lavoie, Donna J; Molina, Roberto; Ramirez, Nicte; Reeve, Mary-Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Information on folate and vitamin B12 deficiency rates in Guatemala is essential to evaluate the current fortification program. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies among women of childbearing age (WCBA) in Guatemala and to identify vulnerable populations at greater risk for nutrient deficiency. A multistage cluster probability study was designed with national and regional representation of nonpregnant WCBA (15-49 years of age). Primary data collection was carried out in 2009-2010. Demographic and health information was collected through face-to-face interviews. Blood samples were collected from 1473 WCBA for serum and red blood cell (RBC) folate and serum vitamin B12. Biochemical concentrations were normalized using geometric means. Prevalence rate ratios were estimated to assess relative differences among different socioeconomic and cultural groups including ethnicity, age, education level, wealth index and rural versus urban locality. National prevalence estimates for deficient serum [Guatemala, folate deficiency was more prevalent among indigenous rural and urban poor populations. Vitamin B12 deficiency was widespread among WCBA. Our results suggest the ongoing need to monitor existing fortification programs, in particular regarding its reach to vulnerable populations.

  19. Overexpression of the mitochondrial methyltransferase TFB1M in the mouse does not impact mitoribosomal methylation status or hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Seungmin; Rose, Simon; Metodiev, Metodi D

    2015-01-01

    maternally inherited traits. The pathophysiology induced by mtDNA mutations has traditionally been attributed to deficient oxidative phosphorylation, which causes energy crisis with functional impairment of multiple cellular processes. In contrast, it was recently reported that signaling induced......Mitochondrial dysfunction is a well-established cause of sensorineural deafness, but the pathophysiological events are poorly understood. Non-syndromic deafness and predisposition to aminoglycoside-induced deafness can be caused by specific mutations in the 12S rRNA gene of mtDNA and are thus...... by 'hypermethylation' of two conserved adenosines of 12S rRNA in the mitoribosome is of key pathophysiological importance in sensorineural deafness. In support for this concept, it was reported that overexpression of the essential mitochondrial methyltransferase TFB1M in the mouse was sufficient to induce...

  20. 2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine (ADAM): an improved serotonin transporter ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oya, Shunichi; Choi, S.-R.; Hou, Catherine; Mu Mu; Kung, M.-P.; Acton, Paul D.; Siciliano, Michael; Kung, Hank F. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2000-04-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERT) are target-sites for commonly used antidepressants, such as fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and so on. Imaging of these sites in the living human brain may provide an important tool to evaluate the mechanisms of action as well as to monitor the treatment of depressed patients. Synthesis and characterization of an improved SERT imaging agent, ADAM (2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine)(7) was achieved. The new compound, ADAM(7), displayed an extremely potent binding affinity toward SERT (K{sub i}=0.013 nM, in membrane preparations of LLC-PK{sub 1}-cloned cell lines expressing the specific monoamine transporter). ADAM(7) also showed more than 1,000-fold selectivity for SERT over norepinephrine transporter (NET) and dopamine transporter (DAT) (K{sub i}=699 and 840 nM, for NET and DAT, respectively). The radiolabeled compound [{sup 125}I]ADAM(7) showed an excellent brain uptake in rats (1.41% dose at 2 min post intravenous [IV] injection), and consistently displayed the highest uptake (between 60-240 min post IV injection) in hypothalamus, a region with the highest density of SERT. The specific uptake of [{sup 125}I]ADAM(7) in the hypothalamus exhibited the highest target-to-nontarget ratio ([hypothalamus - cerebellum]/cerebellum was 3.97 at 120 min post IV injection). The preliminary imaging study of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in the brain of a baboon by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at 180-240 min post IV injection indicated a specific uptake in midbrain region rich in SERT. These data suggest that the new ligand [{sup 123}I]ADAM(7) may be useful for SPECT imaging of SERT binding sites in the human brain.

  1. Dr Adam Zamenhof (1888-1940) and his insight into ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincewicz, Andrzej; Sulkowska, Mariola; Lieberman, E James; Bakunowicz-Lazarczyk, Alina; Sulkowski, Stanislaw

    2009-02-01

    Adam Zamenhof was greatly influenced by his father, Ludwik Zamenhof, who designed the international language Esperanto. Like his father, he became an ophthalmologist and joined the Esperanto movement. He published in the field of ophthalmology and was soon chosen as head of an ophthalmology department. He subsequently became Chief of the Orthodox Jewish Hospital at Czystem in Warsaw. He was active in the leadership of the Bialystok-Warsaw Chamber of Medical Doctors. He perished in the Nazi Holocaust (Shoah) but all Zamenhof's ideals that Adam served as a doctor and social activist remain still alive.

  2. Mielopatia por deficiência de vitamina B12 apresentando-se como mielite transversa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcellos Luiz Felipe Rocha

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available As manifestações neurológicas associadas à deficiência de vitamina B12 incluem polineuropatia, mielopatia, demência e neuropatia óptica. O diagnóstico laboratorial é feito através da dosagem sérica de cianocobalamina ou homocisteína e da excreção urinária de ácido metilmalônico. No estudo anatomopatológico observa-se na microscopia a destruição da mielina e de axônios vistos na substância branca. A região mais comumente afetada é o cordão posterior cervical e/ou torácico. O acometimento da coluna lateral é raro, ocorrendo em casos graves e avançados. O tratamento consiste na reposição de vitamina B12 e a resposta depende da gravidade do quadro e do tempo transcorrido entre o inicio dos sintomas e inicio do tratamento. Relatamos o caso de um paciente que apresentou, como manifestação de deficiência de vitamina B12, mielite transversa. O estudo morfológico da medula demonstrou comprometimento dos tractos cortico-espinhais lateral e anterior, da coluna dorsal e ainda do tracto espino-talâmico.

  3. J. B. Adams Acting Director-General

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    After the tragic death of Prof. C. J. Bakker, the Council of CERN held an emergency meeting on May 3, 1960. Following this session, Mr. F. de Rose, President of the Council of the European Organization for Nuclear Research, announced the appointment of Mr. J. B. Adams, Director of the PS division to the post of acting Director-General.

  4. An activated form of ADAM10 is tumor selective and regulates cancer stem-like cells and tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Nayanendu; Eissman, Moritz F.; Xu, Kai; Llerena, Carmen; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Ding, Bi-Sen; Cao, Zhongwei; Rafii, Shahin; Ernst, Matthias; Scott, Andrew M.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Lackmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane metalloprotease ADAM10 sheds a range of cell surface proteins, including ligands and receptors of the Notch, Eph, and erbB families, thereby activating signaling pathways critical for tumor initiation and maintenance. ADAM10 is thus a promising therapeutic target. Although widely expressed, its activity is normally tightly regulated. We now report prevalence of an active form of ADAM10 in tumors compared with normal tissues, in mouse models and humans, identified by our conformation-specific antibody mAb 8C7. Structure/function experiments indicate mAb 8C7 binds an active conformation dependent on disulfide isomerization and oxidative conditions, common in tumors. Moreover, this active ADAM10 form marks cancer stem-like cells with active Notch signaling, known to mediate chemoresistance. Importantly, specific targeting of active ADAM10 with 8C7 inhibits Notch activity and tumor growth in mouse models, particularly regrowth after chemotherapy. Our results indicate targeted inhibition of active ADAM10 as a potential therapy for ADAM10-dependent tumor development and drug resistance. PMID:27503072

  5. Telomerase-Deficient Mice Exhibit Bone Loss Owing to Defects in Osteoblasts and Increased Osteoclastogenesis by Inflammatory Microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, H.; Abdallah, B. M.; Ditzel, N.

    2011-01-01

    Telomere shortening owing to telomerase deficiency leads to accelerated senescence of human skeletal (mesenchymal) stem cells (MSCs) in vitro, whereas overexpression leads to telomere elongation, extended life span, and enhanced bone formation. To study the role of telomere shortening in vivo, we...... studied the phenotype of telomerase-deficient mice (Terc(-/-)).Terc(-/-) mice exhibited accelerated age-related bone loss starting at 3 months of age and during 12 months of follow-up revealed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometric (DXA) scanning and by micro-computed tomography (mu CT). Bone...... histomorphometry revealed decreased mineralized surface and bone-formation rate as well as increased osteoclast number and size in Terc(-/-) mice. Also, serum total deoxypyridinoline (tDPD) was increased in Terc(-/-) mice. MSCs and osteoprogenitors isolated from Terc(-l-) mice exhibited intrinsic defects...

  6. Preclinical pharmacological study on I-ADAM as a serotonin transporter ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chunying; Lu Chunxiong; Jiang Quanfu; Zou Meifen; Chen Zhengping; Wang Songpei; Li Xiaomin; Zhang Tongxing; Zhu Junqing; Lin Xiangtong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the new ligand: I-2-( (22( (dimethylamino) methyl) phenyl) thio)-5- iodophenylamine (ADAM) as a serotonin imaging agent. Methods: Biological evaluations were performed in rats and mice. Results: Biodistribution studies in rats showed that the initial uptake of 131 I-ADAM in the brain was high (1.087%ID/organ at 2 min postinjection), and consistently displayed the highest binding (between 60-240 min postinjection) in hypothalamus, a region with the highest density of serotonin transporter (SERT). The specific binding [(TPCB)-1] of 131 I-ADAM in hypothalamus was 2.94, 3.03 and 3.09 at 60, 120 and 240 min postinjection, respectively. The (TPCB)-1 was significantly blocked by pretreatment with Paroxetine, which is known as a serotonin site reuptake inhibitor, while another nonselective competing drug, Ketanserin, showed no blocking effect. The rat brain autoradiography and analysis showed that there was high 131 I-ADAM uptake in hypothalamus, the ratio of hypothalamus/cerebellum was significantly reduced from 7.94 ± 0.39 to 1.30 ± 0.56 by pretreatment with Paroxetine at 60 min postinjection. Blood clearance kinetics was studied in rats, and the initial half-life of 13.79 min and late half-life of 357.14 min were obtained. The kinetic equation was: C=3.6147·e -0.0725t + 1.0413 e -0.0028t . The thyroid uptake was 0.009 and 1.421% ID/organ at 2 min and 120 min postinjection, respectively, suggesting that in vivo deiodination maybe the major route of metabolism. Toxicity trial showed that the dose per kilogram administered to mice was 1000 times greater than that to human beings, assuming a body-weight of 50 kg. Conclusion: These data suggest that 131 I-ADAM may be useful for SPECT imaging of SERT binding sits in the brain. (authors)

  7. Potential late-onset Alzheimer's disease-associated mutations in the ADAM10 gene attenuate {alpha}-secretase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minji; Suh, Jaehong; Romano, Donna; Truong, Mimy H; Mullin, Kristina; Hooli, Basavaraj; Norton, David; Tesco, Giuseppina; Elliott, Kathy; Wagner, Steven L; Moir, Robert D; Becker, K David; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2009-10-15

    ADAM10, a member of a disintegrin and metalloprotease family, is an alpha-secretase capable of anti-amyloidogenic proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein. Here, we present evidence for genetic association of ADAM10 with Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as two rare potentially disease-associated non-synonymous mutations, Q170H and R181G, in the ADAM10 prodomain. These mutations were found in 11 of 16 affected individuals (average onset age 69.5 years) from seven late-onset AD families. Each mutation was also found in one unaffected subject implying incomplete penetrance. Functionally, both mutations significantly attenuated alpha-secretase activity of ADAM10 (>70% decrease), and elevated Abeta levels (1.5-3.5-fold) in cell-based studies. In summary, we provide the first evidence of ADAM10 as a candidate AD susceptibility gene, and report two potentially pathogenic mutations with incomplete penetrance for late-onset familial AD.

  8. Multiple species comparison of cardiac troponin T and dystrophin: unravelling the DNA behind dilated cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    England, Jennifer; Loughna, Siobhan; Rutland, Catrin S.

    2017-01-01

    Animals have frequently been used as models for human disorders and mutations. Following advances in genetic testing and treatment options, and the decreasing cost of these technologies in the clinic, mutations in both companion and commercial animals are now being investigated. A recent review highlighted the genes associated with both human and non-human dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac troponin T and dystrophin were observed to be associated with both human and turkey (troponin T) and canin...

  9. Loss of ADAM9 expression impairs β1 integrin endocytosis, focal adhesion formation and cancer cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Kasper J; Schwarz, Jeanette; Sahgal, Pranshu

    2018-01-01

    knockdown increases β1 integrin levels through mechanisms that are independent of its protease activity. In ADAM9-silenced cells, adhesion to collagen and fibronectin is reduced, suggesting an altered function of the accumulated integrins. Mechanistically, ADAM9 co-immunoprecipitates with β1 integrin......, and both internalization and subsequent degradation of β1 integrin are significantly decreased in ADAM9-silenced cells, with no effect on β1 integrin recycling. Accordingly, the formation of focal adhesions and actin stress fibres in ADAM9-silenced cells is altered, possibly explaining the reduction...

  10. SERUM VITAMIN B12, IRON AND FOLIC ACID DEFICIENCIES IN OBESE INDIVIDUALS SUBMITTED TO DIFFERENT BARIATRIC TECHNIQUES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rafaella de Andrade; Malta, Flávia Monteiro França; Correia, Maria Flora Ferreira Sampaio Carvalho; Burgos, Maria Goretti Pessoa de Araújo

    Different surgical techniques to combat obesity combine malabsorption with restrictive procedures and can lead to metabolic problems, such as micronutrient deficiencies. Assess vitamin B12, iron and folic acid deficiencies associated with the lifestyle of obese individuals having been submitted to different bariatric techniques. A retrospective analysis was performed using the electronic charts of patients submitted to bariatric surgery involving adjustable gastric banding and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass at the São João Hospital Center in the city of Porto, Portugal, between 2005 and 2010. The following data were collected: surgical technique, sex, age, marital status, serum concentrations of vitamin B12, iron and folic acid and postoperative lifestyle. A 5% significance level was used for the statistical analysis (pmicronutrientes. Avaliar a deficiência de vitamina B12, ferro e ácido fólico e fatores associados ao estilo de vida de obesos submetidos a diferentes técnicas cirúrgicas. Análise retrospectiva dos prontuários eletrônicos de pacientes submetidos à cirurgia bariátrica pelas técnicas de banda gástrica ajustável e bypass gástrico em Y-de-Roux, no Centro Hospitalar de São João, E.P.E., Porto - Portugal, no período de 2005-2010. Foram coletadas: técnica cirúrgica, sexo, idade, estado civil, concentrações séricas de vitamina B12, ferro e ácido fólico e o estilo de vida no pós-operatório. Para análise estatística foi utilizado nível de significância de 5% (pmicronutrientes foram detectadas após o bypass gástrico. A deficiência de micronutriente mais prevalente foi a de ferro (21,3%), seguida da vitamina B12 (16,9%) e do ácido fólico (4,5%). A ingestão de bebida alcoólica de leve-moderada, a adesão à dieta e o uso de polivitamínicos reduziu a frequência, mas não evitou a carência de micronutrientes. A deficiência de vitamina B12, ferro e ácido fólico foi observada durante o primeiro e o segundo anos após as duas t

  11. CA 15-3 predicting breast cancer relapse: beware of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassy, Elie El; Ghor, Maya Al; Kattan, Joseph

    2018-05-10

    A sustained increase of cancer antigen 15-3 serum levels was found in a 54-year-old woman treated 2 years ago for early stage breast cancer, without any evidence of cancer recurrence. The patient thereafter developed severe megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency. Supplementation with B12 to reverse the anemia led to the normalization of the cancer antigen 15-3 serum levels. As such, with the limited understanding of molecular biology, the integrative approach of clinical history, physical examination, and diagnostic imaging remain pivotal in the management of cancer patients.

  12. Gender Ideology in The Diary Of Adam And Eve by Mark Twain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramita Ayuningtyas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to show that behind the new version of Genesis by Mark Twain in his novel The Diary of Adam and Eve, there are some patriarchal principles that appear in it. It can be seen from the characterizations of Adam and Eve. By using some concepts from feminism and also focusing on the context of the novel, the analysis shows that patriarchal stereotypes about gender are applied in constructing the characters of Adam and Eve. Not only the content, but the form of the diary is also analyzed with the same method, and the same result is found. Therefore, it can be concluded that in spite of his progressiveness, Mark Twain still held patriarchal values in re-interpreting the tale of human creation.   

  13. Retorika in Adam Small se "Kanna hy kô hystoe" | van Zyl | Tydskrif ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adam Small, Kanna and 'that moral moment' This essay revisits Adam Small's best known play Kanna hy kô hystoe (“Kanna he comes home”, 1965) in order to evaluate its relevance for contemporary readers and audiences. The text, considered one of the classics of Afrikaans literature, is analysed from a rhetorical point of ...

  14. A Conversation with Adam Heller

    OpenAIRE

    Heller, A; Cairns, EJ

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved. Adam Heller, Ernest Cockrell Sr. Chair in Engineering Emeritus of the John J. McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, recalls his childhood in the Holocaust and his contributions to science and technology that earned him the US National Medal of Technology and Innovation in a conversation with Elton J. Cairns, Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr....

  15. XOPÓS = Chorós : the dance of Adam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isar, Nicoletta

    is contained in the very title of the book: “the Dance of Adam.” This dance alone gives ontological meaning to the Byzantine subject, to the whole Byzantine ¿¿¿¿¿¿¿a. In this choral equation, Adam stands for the humanity all-embracing. The book reads ¿¿¿¿¿ from an interdisciplinary perspective, incorporating....... The originality of Isar’s Chorography stands in unveiling and enforcing an important paradigm (¿¿¿¿¿) in the Byzantine studies, which has deep roots in ancient practices. However, the Byzantine ¿¿¿¿¿ reflects a unique ontology, a new vision of the mode of being, creation and imagination in Byzantium. Its ontology...

  16. Folate and Vitamin B12 Deficiency Among Nonpregnant Women of Childbearing Age in Guatemala 2009–2010: Prevalence and Identification of Vulnerable Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Jorge; Lopez-Pazos, Eunice; Dowling, Nicole F.; Pfeiffer, Christine M.; Mulinare, Joe; Vellozzi, Claudia; Zhang, Mindy; Lavoie, Donna J; Molina, Roberto; Ramirez, Nicte; Reeve, Mary-Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Information on folate and vitamin B12 deficiency rates in Guatemala is essential to evaluate the current fortification program. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies among women of childbearing age (WCBA) in Guatemala and to identify vulnerable populations at greater risk for nutrient deficiency. Methods A multistage cluster probability study was designed with national and regional representation of nonpregnant WCBA (15–49 years of age). Primary data collection was carried out in 2009–2010. Demographic and health information was collected through face-to-face interviews. Blood samples were collected from 1,473 WCBA for serum and red blood cell (RBC) folate and serum vitamin B12. Biochemical concentrations were normalized using geometric means. Prevalence rate ratios were estimated to assess relative differences among different socioeconomic and cultural groups including ethnicity, age, education level, wealth index and rural versus urban locality. Results National prevalence estimates for deficient serum (Guatemala, folate deficiency was more prevalent among indigenous rural and urban poor populations. Vitamin B12 deficiency was widespread among WCBA. Our results suggest the ongoing need to monitor existing fortification programs, in particular regarding its reach to vulnerable populations. PMID:26002178

  17. Brief Report: Childhood Disintegrative Disorder as a Likely Manifestation of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Savita; Subodh, B. N.; Parakh, Preeti; Lahariya, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Childhood disintegrative disorder is a rare disorder, characterized by regression of acquired skills after a period of normal development. The case of childhood disintegrative disorder presented here was found to have vitamin B12 deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia on extensive evaluation to find a probable cause for regression. This case…

  18. Potential late-onset Alzheimer's disease-associated mutations in the ADAM10 gene attenuate α-secretase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minji; Suh, Jaehong; Romano, Donna; Truong, Mimy H.; Mullin, Kristina; Hooli, Basavaraj; Norton, David; Tesco, Giuseppina; Elliott, Kathy; Wagner, Steven L.; Moir, Robert D.; Becker, K. David; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2009-01-01

    ADAM10, a member of a disintegrin and metalloprotease family, is an α-secretase capable of anti-amyloidogenic proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein. Here, we present evidence for genetic association of ADAM10 with Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as two rare potentially disease-associated non-synonymous mutations, Q170H and R181G, in the ADAM10 prodomain. These mutations were found in 11 of 16 affected individuals (average onset age 69.5 years) from seven late-onset AD families. Each mutation was also found in one unaffected subject implying incomplete penetrance. Functionally, both mutations significantly attenuated α-secretase activity of ADAM10 (>70% decrease), and elevated Aβ levels (1.5–3.5-fold) in cell-based studies. In summary, we provide the first evidence of ADAM10 as a candidate AD susceptibility gene, and report two potentially pathogenic mutations with incomplete penetrance for late-onset familial AD. PMID:19608551

  19. ADAM13 Induces Cranial Neural Crest by Cleaving Class B Ephrins and Regulating Wnt Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shuo; Xu, Guofeng; Bridges, Lance C.; Williams, Phoebe; White, Judith M.; DeSimone, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The cranial neural crest (CNC) are multipotent embryonic cells that contribute to craniofacial structures and other cells and tissues of the vertebrate head. During embryogenesis, CNC is induced at the neural plate boundary through the interplay of several major signaling pathways. Here we report that the metalloproteinase activity of ADAM13 is required for early induction of CNC in Xenopus. In both cultured cells and X. tropicalis embryos, membrane-bound Ephrins (Efns) B1 and B2 were identified as substrates for ADAM13. ADAM13 upregulates canonical Wnt signaling and early expression of the transcription factor snail2, whereas EfnB1 inhibits the canonical Wnt pathway and snail2 expression. We propose that by cleaving class B Efns, ADAM13 promotes canonical Wnt signaling and early CNC induction. PMID:20708595

  20. Effects of [123I]ADAM, a serotonin transporter radiopharmaceutical, on pregnant Sprague–Dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, K.W.; Lin, M.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Chen, H.Y.; Chen, C.C.; Fu, Y.K.

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin transport abnormalities are implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. [ 123 I]ADAM ([ 123 I]-2-([2-({dimethylamino}methyl)phenyl]thio)-5-iodophenylamine) is a novel radiotracer that targets serotonin transporters. We assessed the toxicity of [ 123 I]ADAM (18.5 MBq) administered in early- and late-phases (8 and 14 day postfertilization, respectively) of pregnancy. The mortality, clinical status, and gross necropsy were measured in pregnant rats, and the fertility index was measured in rat offspring (weight, clinical observations). We found no dosing-related clinical signs. In conclusion, [ 123 I]ADAM was not toxic in an animal pregnancy model.

  1. Smith, Adam (1723-90)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchet, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Adam Smith is often said to have been the founder of the science of economics and the father of liberalism in the sphere of economics. In fact he was neither. He lived at a turning point in western economic and political history, one that was littered with disruptive developments. He came up...... with a masterful synthesis of the economic knowledge of his period and emphasized both the relative autonomy of these phenomena and their importance in terms of generating wealth from, and in the interests of, everyone. Nevertheless, Smith never denied the moral foundation of economic behavior....

  2. Adam Smith, Religion, and Tuition Tax Credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kern

    1983-01-01

    Examines tuition tax credit programs in framework of Adam Smith's ideas on the economic impact of established churches. Finds that tuition tax credits would amount to state expenditures to relieve the financial burden of parochial school parents and would allow churches to invest commercially to maintain their charitable functions. (JW)

  3. Adam Smith : Systematic Philosopher and Public Thinker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schliesser, E.

    2017-01-01

    This book treats Adam Smith as a systematic philosopher. Smith was a giant of the Scottish Enlightenment with polymath interests. The book explores Smith’s economics and ethics in light of his other commitments on the nature of knowledge, the theory of emotions, the theory of mind, his account of

  4. Paradise Lost: Difference between Adam and Eve’s Lament on Leaving Paradise - A Contrastive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Torres Servín

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The difference between Adam and Eve’s lament on leaving Paradise in Milton’s Paradise Lost is striking in its contrastive content and depth. This paper analyzes the difference that exists between the feelings and spiritual attitudes that Adam and Eve express on the occasion when they are informed by the angel Michael that they have to abandon the Garden of Eden. It is a comparison of their lament in order to understand the contrast of the two attitudes that Milton wove in the tapestry that Paradise Lost is. The paper also explores male and female roles in Paradise Lost and concludes that Adam and Eve are equal yet different, that difference being the cause of their contrastive ways of expressing their sorrow. Adam and Eve manifest two contrastive worldviews in opposition, one spiritual (heavenly, and the other material (earthly.

  5. A BanI RFLP at a deletion hotspot in the human dystrophin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, A P; Mountford, R [St. Mary' s Hospital, Manchester (England)

    1990-01-25

    Cf56a is a 0.9 kb EcoRI fragment of dystrophin cDNA in pUC13. Cf56a is identical to Kunkel's cDNA probe 8. Constant bands of 14.4, 11.0, 8.1, 6.2 and 1.3 kb correspond to exons I, N, L, N and K respectively. The polymorphic band is exon J (exon 48, 1.2+3.9 kb HindIII bands). This exon is deleted in 25% of all Duchenne/Becker dystrophy boys. Therefore this RFLP is useful for determining carrier status of at-risk females by showing heterozygosity or apparent non-maternity.

  6. Long-Term Efficacy of Systemic Multiexon Skipping Targeting Dystrophin Exons 45–55 With a Cocktail of Vivo-Morpholinos in Mdx52 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Echigoya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense-mediated exon skipping, which can restore the reading frame, is a most promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Remaining challenges include the limited applicability to patients and unclear function of truncated dystrophin proteins. Multiexon skipping targeting exons 45–55 at the mutation hotspot of the dystrophin gene could overcome both of these challenges. Previously, we described the feasibility of exons 45–55 skipping with a cocktail of Vivo-Morpholinos in vivo; however, the long-term efficacy and safety of Vivo-Morpholinos remains to be determined. In this study, we examined the efficacy and toxicity of exons 45–55 skipping by intravenous injections of 6 mg/kg 10-Vivo-Morpholino cocktail (0.6 mg/kg each vPMO every 2 weeks for 18 weeks to dystrophic exon-52 knockout (mdx52 mice. Systemic skipping of the entire exons 45–55 region was induced, and the Western blot analysis exhibited the restoration of 5–27% of normal levels of dystrophin protein in skeletal muscles, accompanied by improvements in histopathology and muscle strength. No obvious immune response and renal and hepatic toxicity were detected at the end-point of the treatment. We demonstrate our new regimen with the 10-Vivo-Morpholino cocktail is effective and safe for long-term repeated systemic administration in the dystrophic mouse model.

  7. Galectin-12 in Cellular Differentiation, Apoptosis and Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Galectin-12 is a member of a family of mammalian lectins characterized by their affinity for β-galactosides and consensus amino acid sequences. The protein structure consists of a single polypeptide chain containing two carbohydrate-recognition domains joined by a linker region. Galectin-12 is predominantly expressed in adipose tissue, but is also detected in macrophages and other leukocytes. Downregulation of galectin-12 in mouse 3T3-L1 cells impairs their differentiation into adipocytes. Conversely, overexpression of galectin-12 in vitro induces cell cycle arrest in G1 and apoptosis. Upregulation of galectin-12 and initiation of G1 cell cycle arrest are associated with driving pre-adipocytes toward terminal differentiation. Galectin-12 deficiency increases insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in obese animals. Galectin-12 inhibits macrophage polarization to the M2 population, enhancing inflammation and decreasing insulin sensitivity in adipocytes. Galectin-12 also affects myeloid differentiation, which is associated with chemotherapy resistance. In addition to highlighting the above-mentioned aspects, this review also discusses the potential clinical applications of modulating the function of galectin-12.

  8. Adam Smith and the Rhetoric of Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael G.

    Historians of rhetoric have generally accepted the view that Adam Smith rejected the principles of classical rhetoric. However, while there can be no doubt that Smith greatly truncated the five classical arts of rhetoric (invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery) by reducing his concerns largely to style and arrangement, he did not…

  9. Persuasion in Romans 5:12–21 | Snyman | HTS Teologiese Studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is argued that the pericope, Romans 5:12–21, forms an integral part of Paul's rhetorical strategy, aimed at persuading his audience in Rome to share his views on the contrast between Adam and Christ: Adam's sin brought death into the world, but faith in Christ brings eternal life. In the process of persuasion, Paul uses ...

  10. Dual Myostatin and Dystrophin Exon Skipping by Morpholino Nucleic Acid Oligomers Conjugated to a Cell-penetrating Peptide Is a Promising Therapeutic Strategy for the Treatment of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Malerba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The knockdown of myostatin, a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass may have important implications in disease conditions accompanied by muscle mass loss like cancer, HIV/AIDS, sarcopenia, muscle atrophy, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. In DMD patients, where major muscle loss has occurred due to a lack of dystrophin, the therapeutic restoration of dystrophin expression alone in older patients may not be sufficient to restore the functionality of the muscles. We recently demonstrated that phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs can be used to re-direct myostatin splicing and promote the expression of an out-of-frame transcript so reducing the amount of the synthesized myostatin protein. Furthermore, the systemic administration of the same PMO conjugated to an octaguanidine moiety (Vivo-PMO led to a significant increase in the mass of soleus muscle of treated mice. Here, we have further optimized the use of Vivo-PMO in normal mice and also tested the efficacy of the same PMO conjugated to an arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide (B-PMO. Similar experiments conducted in mdx dystrophic mice showed that B-PMO targeting myostatin is able to significantly increase the tibialis anterior (TA muscle weight and when coadministered with a B-PMO targeting the dystrophin exon 23, it does not have a detrimental interaction. This study confirms that myostatin knockdown by exon skipping is a potential therapeutic strategy to counteract muscle wasting conditions and dual myostatin and dystrophin skipping has potential as a therapy for DMD.

  11. Gamma-sarcoglycan is required for the response of archvillin to mechanical stimulation in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinazzola, Janelle M.; Smith, Tara C.; Liu, Min; Luna, Elizabeth J.; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of gamma-sarcoglycan (γ-SG) induces muscle degeneration and signaling defects in response to mechanical load, and its absence is common to both Duchenne and limb girdle muscular dystrophies. Growing evidence suggests that aberrant signaling contributes to the disease pathology; however, the mechanisms of γ-SG-mediated mechanical signaling are poorly understood. To uncover γ-SG signaling pathway components, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and identified the muscle-specific protein archvillin as a γ-SG and dystrophin interacting protein. Archvillin protein and message levels were significantly upregulated at the sarcolemma of murine γ-SG-null (gsg−/−) muscle but delocalized in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscle. Similar elevation of archvillin protein was observed in human quadriceps muscle lacking γ-SG. Reintroduction of γ-SG in gsg−/− muscle by rAAV injection restored archvillin levels to that of control C57 muscle. In situ eccentric contraction of tibialis anterior (TA) muscles from C57 mice caused ERK1/2 phosphorylation, nuclear activation of P-ERK1/2 and stimulus-dependent archvillin association with P-ERK1/2. In contrast, TA muscles from gsg−/− and mdx mice exhibited heightened P-ERK1/2 and increased nuclear P-ERK1/2 localization following eccentric contractions, but the archvillin–P-ERK1/2 association was completely ablated. These results position archvillin as a mechanically sensitive component of the dystrophin complex and demonstrate that signaling defects caused by loss of γ-SG occur both at the sarcolemma and in the nucleus. PMID:25605665

  12. Matrix-Dependent Regulation of AKT in Hepsin-Overexpressing PC3 Prostate Cancer Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig-Blaich, Stephanie M; Kacprzyk, Lukasz A; Eismann, Thorsten; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Kruse, Petra; Winkler, Eva; Strauss, Wolfgang S L; Hibst, Raimund; Steiner, Rudolf; Schrader, Mark; Mertens, Daniel; Sültmann, Holger; Wittig, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The serine-protease hepsin is one of the most prominently overexpressed genes in human prostate carcinoma. Forced expression of the enzyme in mice prostates is associated with matrix degradation, invasive growth, and prostate cancer progression. Conversely, hepsin overexpression in metastatic prostate cancer cell lines was reported to induce cell cycle arrest and reduction of invasive growth in vitro. We used a system for doxycycline (dox)-inducible target gene expression in metastasis-derived PC3 cells to analyze the effects of hepsin in a quantitative manner. Loss of viability and adhesion correlated with hepsin expression levels during anchorage-dependent but not anchorage-independent growth. Full expression of hepsin led to cell death and detachment and was specifically associated with reduced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, which was restored by growth on matrix derived from RWPE1 normal prostatic epithelial cells. In the chorioallantoic membrane xenograft model, hepsin overexpression in PC3 cells reduced the viability of tumors but did not suppress invasive growth. The data presented here provide evidence that elevated levels of hepsin interfere with cell adhesion and viability in the background of prostate cancer as well as other tissue types, the details of which depend on the microenvironment provided. Our findings suggest that overexpression of the enzyme in prostate carcinogenesis must be spatially and temporally restricted for the efficient development of tumors and metastases. PMID:21750652

  13. Haplotypes in the Dystrophin DNA Segment Point to a Mosaic Origin of Modern Human Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Ziętkiewicz, Ewa; Yotova, Vania; Gehl, Dominik; Wambach, Tina; Arrieta, Isabel; Batzer, Mark; Cole, David E.C.; Hechtman, Peter; Kaplan, Feige; Modiano, David; Moisan, Jean-Paul; Michalski, Roman; Labuda, Damian

    2003-01-01

    Although Africa has played a central role in human evolutionary history, certain studies have suggested that not all contemporary human genetic diversity is of recent African origin. We investigated 35 simple polymorphic sites and one Tn microsatellite in an 8-kb segment of the dystrophin gene. We found 86 haplotypes in 1,343 chromosomes from around the world. Although a classical out-of-Africa topology was observed in trees based on the variant frequencies, the tree of haplotype sequences re...

  14. Association of ADAM33 gene polymorphisms with adult-onset ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-19

    nucleotide ... Introduction. Asthma is a complex disease thought to arise from inter- ... The ADAM33 protein har- .... morphisms in patients and healthy controls are provided in ..... Nonetheless, meta-analyses encompassing data from.

  15. Restoring balance to B cells in ADA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luning Prak, Eline T

    2012-06-01

    It is paradoxical that immunodeficiency disorders are associated with autoimmunity. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, a cause of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), is a case in point. In this issue of the JCI, Sauer and colleagues investigate the B cell defects in ADA-deficient patients. They demonstrate that ADA patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy had B cell tolerance checkpoint defects. Remarkably, gene therapy with a retrovirus that expresses ADA resulted in the apparent correction of these defects, with normalization of peripheral B cell autoantibody frequencies. In vitro, agents that either block ADA or overexpress adenosine resulted in altered B cell receptor and TLR signaling. Collectively, these data implicate a B cell-intrinsic mechanism for alterations in B cell tolerance in the setting of partial ADA deficiency that is corrected by gene therapy.

  16. Identification and Function of a Novel Candidate Gene for Asthma:ADAM 33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Holloway

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a complex disorder of inflammation and remodelling largely restricted to the conducting airways. It is a disorder where there are major genetics and environmental factors that interact together to initiate and propagate the disease into a chronic relapsing disorder. Until recently the genetic factors involved in disease pathogenesis have been restricted to variants in known molecules involved in the inflammatory or remodelling pathways. In this review evidence is presented for a new susceptibility gene for asthma, ADAM 33, that was identified by positional cloning. It is suggested that ADAM 33 plays a key role in predisposing to reduced lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness characteristic of asthma. Through an understanding of the disease-related SNPs(in ADAM 33it may be possible, not only to identify a gene based diagnostic test, but also to focus attention on developing a new treatment that reverses remodelling changes.

  17. 50 Years of synchrotrons Adams' Memorial lecture

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, J D; CERN. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    Fifty years ago Frank Goward of the Atomic Energy Research Establishment Group at Malvern converted a small American betatron to make the worldÕs first synchrotron. At the same time Marcus Oliphant was planning to build at Birmingham a large proton machine with a ring magnet and variable magnetic field. Ideas for this had come to him during night-shifts tending the electromagnetic separators at Oak Ridge during the war. Some seven years later, in 1953, a group gathered together in Geneva to build the PS. A major contributor to the design work which had made this possible was John Adams. An account of some of the achievements in these eventful years will be presented. CERN has built nine synchrotrons/colliders and two temporary test rings. Eight machines are still running. The review will start with the PS, the first proton synchrotron based on the alternating gradient principle invented in 1952 at BNL. The design work of the PS team, under the enlightened leadership of J.B. Adams, and the construction of the...

  18. EVA 1 - ADAM 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decken, C.B. von der; Fedders, H.; Hoehlein, B.

    1980-01-01

    The supplying of industry and households with heat is a central problem in our economy. The crisis background of oil supply renders a long-term secured heat supply with nuclear power plants a discussible alternative. The district heating in the form of hot water, which is heated in power plants and supplied to the consumer via district heating pipeline networks, however, is limited due to the unavoidable heat losses. To bridge long distances between the heat source and consumer and to maintain the heat at a high temperature level, there are distinct advantages in using the EVA-ADAM principle of long-distance energy transport. (orig.) [de

  19. Overexpression of the transporters AtZIP1 and AtMTP1 in cassava changes zinc accumulation and partitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana eGaitan-Solis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Zinc deficiency in humans is a serious problem worldwide with an estimated one third of populations at risk for insufficient zinc in diet which leads to impairment of cognitive abilities and immune system function. The goal of this research was to increase the bioavailable zinc in the edible portion of cassava roots to improve the overall zinc nutrition of populations that rely on cassava as a dietary staple. To increase zinc concentrations, two A. thaliana genes coding for ZIP1 and MTP1 were overexpressed with a tuber-specific or constitutive promoter. Eighteen transgenic events from four constructs, out of a total of 73 events generated, showed significantly higher zinc concentrations in the edible portion of the storage root compared to the non-transgenic controls. The zinc content in the transgenic lines ranged from 4 - 73 mg/Kg Dry Weight (DW as compared to the non-transgenic control which contained 8 mg/Kg. Striking changes in whole plant phenotype such as smaller plant size and chlorotic leaves were observed in transgenic lines that over accumulated zinc. In a confined field trial five transgenic events grown for 12 months showed a range of zinc concentrations from 18 – 217 mg/Kg DW. Although the overexpression of zinc transporters was successful in increasing the zinc concentrations in 25% of the transgenic lines generated, it also resulted in a decrease in plant and tuber size and overall yield due to what appears to be zinc deficiency in the aerial parts of the plant.

  20. Small heterodimer partner overexpression partially protects against liver tumor development in farnesoid X receptor knockout mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guodong; Kong, Bo; Zhu, Yan; Zhan, Le; Williams, Jessica A.; Tawfik, Ossama; Kassel, Karen M.; Luyendyk, James P.; Wang, Li; Guo, Grace L.

    2013-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, Nr1h4) and small heterodimer partner (SHP, Nr0b2) are nuclear receptors that are critical to liver homeostasis. Induction of SHP serves as a major mechanism of FXR in suppressing gene expression. Both FXR −/− and SHP −/− mice develop spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SHP is one of the most strongly induced genes by FXR in the liver and is a tumor suppressor, therefore, we hypothesized that deficiency of SHP contributes to HCC development in the livers of FXR −/− mice and therefore, increased SHP expression in FXR −/− mice reduces liver tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, we generated FXR −/− mice with overexpression of SHP in hepatocytes (FXR −/− /SHP Tg ) and determined the contribution of SHP in HCC development in FXR −/− mice. Hepatocyte-specific SHP overexpression did not affect liver tumor incidence or size in FXR −/− mice. However, SHP overexpression led to a lower grade of dysplasia, reduced indicator cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. All tumor-bearing mice had increased serum bile acid levels and IL-6 levels, which was associated with activation of hepatic STAT3. In conclusion, SHP partially protects FXR −/− mice from HCC formation by reducing tumor malignancy. However, disrupted bile acid homeostasis by FXR deficiency leads to inflammation and injury, which ultimately results in uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in the liver. - Highlights: • SHP does not prevent HCC incidence nor size in FXR KO mice but reduces malignancy. • Increased SHP promotes apoptosis. • Bile acids and inflammation maybe critical for HCC formation with FXR deficiency

  1. Professor Adam Stalony-Dobrzański - the Master and the Teacher of Jerzy Nowosielski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Szmajda

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available When analyzing the history of Polish religious art of the XX century, we can affirm that the entire creative work of Adam Stalony-Dobrzański, professor at Kraków Academy of Fine Arts, remains in the shadow of the artistic output of Prof. Jerzy Nowosielski, his student and follower. Jerzy Nowosielski had a noticeable impact on the interest in the problems of the sacred in modern painting. The follower of Prof. Adam Stalony-Dobrzański was inspired by the art and the spirituality of Eastern Christianity. Prof. Jerzy Nowosielski filled some kind of a void in Polish religious art in the period of its evident crisis. Prof. Jerzy Nowosielski together with Prof. Adam Stalony-Dobrzański created polychrome frescoes of numerous religious buildings. The styling and the artistic accomplishments of Prof. Adam Stalony-Dobrzański are unknown for the wide audience which makes an evident gap in the history of Polish art. Polychrome frescoes and stainedglass windows can be seen in interiors of Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant temples. The creative work of the Kraków artist is an example of the great and highly authentic vision of the sacred, which was stronger than communist censorship. The concept of Adam Stalony-Dobrzański’s art is not based on his theoretical conclusions but only on the analysis of correspondence of the artist with the then Metropolitan Archbishop of Kraków Karol Wojtyła - now St. Pope JohnPaul II. The topic of their letters was the issues of modern art and religious art, in particular the attempt to define a way in which art should be developed to meet the current needs of the Church. In contrast to the master, Prof. Adam Stalony-Dobrzański, his follower Prof. Jerzy Nowosielski has left ample commentary on his artwork. Prof. Adam Stalony-Dobrzański was rather a practitioner than a theoretician. Thus the fact of how great an impact he had on the character and the artwork of Jerzy Nowosielski is puzzling. In the first half of the

  2. Somatic mosaicism of a point mutation in the dystrophin gene in a patient presenting with an asymmetrical muscle weakness and contractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helderman-van den Enden, A. T. J. M.; Ginjaar, H. B.; Kneppers, A. L. J.; Bakker, E.; Breuning, M. H.; de Visser, M.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a patient with somatic mosaicism of a point mutation in the dystrophin gene causing benign muscular dystrophy with an unusual asymmetrical distribution of muscle weakness and contractures. To our knowledge this is the first patient with asymmetrical weakness and contractures in an

  3. Sir John Adams - His Legacy to the World of Particle Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    John Adams acquired an unrivalled reputation for his leading part in designing and constructing the PS in CERN’s early days. In 1968, and after several years heading a fusion laboratory in the UK, he came back to Geneva to pilot the SPS project to approval and then to direct its construction. At the time of his untimely death in 1984 he had built Europe’s two largest proton accelerators at CERN. He went on, during the second of his terms as DG, to lay the groundwork for the proton-antiproton collider which led to the discovery of the intermediate vector boson. How did someone without any formal academic qualification achieve this? What was the magic behind his leadership? How did he achieve political success with the Member States of CERN in turning the almost hopeless quest for approval of the SPS to CERN’s advantage? How did he view his US counterpart, R. R. Wilson? The speaker, who worked many years alongside Adams, will discuss these questions and speculate on how Sir John Adams might have viewed t...

  4. Tuning a Le Mans Car Suspension in ADAMS

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Berman, R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An ADAMS model of South Africa’s first ever Le Mans car was developed and used to tune the suspension parameters. Validation of the model is to be done by comparing simulation results to those obtained in track testing. The suspension parameters...

  5. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency in a 15-year-old boy: presentation with haemolysis and pancytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Ebru Yılmaz; Keskin, Mahmut

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy on a vegetarian diet presented with severe macrocytic anaemia (haemoglobin, 5.1 g/dL; mean corpuscular volume, 116 fL) in addition to leucopenia and thrombocytopaenia (pancytopenia), icterus secondary to haemolysis and splenomegaly. Laboratory investigations revealed severe vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency. Following cobalamin replacement therapy, the patient reported increased well-being, including appetite and weight gain, and his icterus resolved. In the follow-up laboratory examinations, leucocyte and platelet counts in addition to serum bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase levels normalised. At the end of 2 months, laboratory findings, including haemoglobin level, were all within the normal range. We present this case as a reminder that severe vitamin B12 deficiency may present with findings mimicking acute leukaemia (pancytopenia and splenomegaly) and findings suggestive of pseudothrombotic microangiopathy. PMID:25976204

  6. Comparison Virtual Landing Gear Drop Test for Commuter Aircraft Utilize MSC ADAMS And Solidworks Motion Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Dony; Istiyanto, Jos; Agus Sumarsono, Danardono

    2018-04-01

    Loads at main landing gear while touchdown impact is function of aircraft weight and ground reaction load factor. In regulation states ground reaction load factor at Vsink = 3.05 m/s is below 3. Contact/impact force from simulation using MSC ADAMS is 94680 N, while using Solidworks Motion Analysis is 97691 N. The difference between MSC ADAMS and Solidworks Motion Analysis is 3.08%. The ground reaction load factor in MSC ADAMS is 2.78 while in Solidworks Motion Analysis is 2.87.

  7. Program for the evaluation of TL-brick dating: 'ADAM-1-EVA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotna, V.; Kubelik, M.; Musilek, L.

    2000-01-01

    Although the evaluation of the TL-mean date has presented very little diversity since first published, the error evaluation has prompted a lot of discussion. Particularly the physical, chemical, statistical and mathematical differences as reflected in the specifics of the evaluation of the individual random and systematic errors in ceramic and brick dating are undervalued in literature. The construction of an automated TL-Reader (ADAM-1) at the Czech Technical University in Prague was taken as an opportunity to create a whole new software package for the evaluation ('EVA') of TL-dates. ADAM-1 is designed primarily for brick dating, using the fine-grain technique. The philosophy of data processing is similar to that applied by the Berlin group in their research of Venetian Villas. The program was developed using Delphi, as it is user-friendlier than pure Pascal, offers a strong graphic platform and allows flexibility in data management. This was important, as the program was conceived to either interact directly with ADAM-1, or to be operated independently for data evaluation and management. The software package consists of two discrete yet combinable components: one for the calculation of the TL mean date, using all raw data obtained from ADAM-1 and peripheral measurements; the other for the evaluation of systematic, random and context errors of individual samples and sample groups. All steps in the calculations are also graphically available, e.g. glow curves, plateau test, TL vs. dose dependence and charts summarising the results of all calculations for an individual sample and a given context. (author)

  8. HER2 amplification, <