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Sample records for dystrophin deficient mdx

  1. Laryngeal Muscles Are Spared in the Dystrophin Deficient "mdx" Mouse

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    Thomas, Lisa B.; Joseph, Gayle L.; Adkins, Tracey D.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Stemple, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: "Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)" is caused by the loss of the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. The disease leads to severe and progressive skeletal muscle wasting. Interestingly, the disease spares some muscles. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of dystrophin deficiency on 2 intrinsic laryngeal muscles, the…

  2. Functional rescue of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice by a chimeric peptide-PMO.

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    Yin, Haifang; Moulton, Hong M; Betts, Corinne; Merritt, Thomas; Seow, Yiqi; Ashraf, Shirin; Wang, Qingsong; Boutilier, Jordan; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2010-10-01

    Splice modulation using antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) has been shown to yield targeted exon exclusion to restore the open reading frame and generate truncated but partially functional dystrophin protein. This has been successfully demonstrated in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice and in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. However, DMD is a systemic disease; successful therapeutic exploitation of this approach will therefore depend on effective systemic delivery of AOs to all affected tissues. We have previously shown the potential of a muscle-specific/arginine-rich chimeric peptide-phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO) conjugate, but its long-term activity, optimized dosing regimen, capacity for functional correction and safety profile remain to be established. Here, we report the results of this chimeric peptide-PMO conjugate in the mdx mouse using low doses (3 and 6 mg/kg) administered via a 6 biweekly systemic intravenous injection protocol. We show 100% dystrophin-positive fibers and near complete correction of the dystrophin transcript defect in all peripheral muscle groups, with restoration of 50% dystrophin protein over 12 weeks, leading to correction of the DMD pathological phenotype and restoration of muscle function in the absence of detectable toxicity or immune response. Chimeric muscle-specific/cell-penetrating peptides therefore represent highly promising agents for systemic delivery of splice-correcting PMO oligomers for DMD therapy.

  3. Proteomic Profiling of the Dystrophin-Deficient mdx Phenocopy of Dystrophinopathy-Associated Cardiomyopathy

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    Ashling Holland

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiorespiratory complications are frequent symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a neuromuscular disorder caused by primary abnormalities in the dystrophin gene. Loss of cardiac dystrophin initially leads to changes in dystrophin-associated glycoproteins and subsequently triggers secondarily sarcolemmal disintegration, fibre necrosis, fibrosis, fatty tissue replacement, and interstitial inflammation. This results in progressive cardiac disease, which is the cause of death in a considerable number of patients afflicted with X-linked muscular dystrophy. In order to better define the molecular pathogenesis of this type of cardiomyopathy, several studies have applied mass spectrometry-based proteomics to determine proteome-wide alterations in dystrophinopathy-associated cardiomyopathy. Proteomic studies included both gel-based and label-free mass spectrometric surveys of dystrophin-deficient heart muscle from the established mdx animal model of dystrophinopathy. Comparative cardiac proteomics revealed novel changes in proteins associated with mitochondrial energy metabolism, glycolysis, signaling, iron binding, antibody response, fibre contraction, basal lamina stabilisation, and cytoskeletal organisation. This review summarizes the importance of studying cardiomyopathy within the field of muscular dystrophy research, outlines key features of the mdx heart and its suitability as a model system for studying cardiac pathogenesis, and discusses the impact of recent proteomic findings for exploring molecular and cellular aspects of cardiac abnormalities in inherited muscular dystrophies.

  4. Metabolic remodeling agents show beneficial effects in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse model

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    Jahnke Vanessa E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic disease involving a severe muscle wasting that is characterized by cycles of muscle degeneration/regeneration and culminates in early death in affected boys. Mitochondria are presumed to be involved in the regulation of myoblast proliferation/differentiation; enhancing mitochondrial activity with exercise mimetics (AMPK and PPAR-delta agonists increases muscle function and inhibits muscle wasting in healthy mice. We therefore asked whether metabolic remodeling agents that increase mitochondrial activity would improve muscle function in mdx mice. Methods Twelve-week-old mdx mice were treated with two different metabolic remodeling agents (GW501516 and AICAR, separately or in combination, for 4 weeks. Extensive systematic behavioral, functional, histological, biochemical, and molecular tests were conducted to assess the drug(s' effects. Results We found a gain in body and muscle weight in all treated mice. Histologic examination showed a decrease in muscle inflammation and in the number of fibers with central nuclei and an increase in fibers with peripheral nuclei, with significantly fewer activated satellite cells and regenerating fibers. Together with an inhibition of FoXO1 signaling, these results indicated that the treatments reduced ongoing muscle damage. Conclusions The three treatments produced significant improvements in disease phenotype, including an increase in overall behavioral activity and significant gains in forelimb and hind limb strength. Our findings suggest that triggering mitochondrial activity with exercise mimetics improves muscle function in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

  5. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 ablation in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles reduces angiogenesis resulting in impaired growth of regenerated muscle fibers.

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    Miyazaki, Daigo; Nakamura, Akinori; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2011-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of endopeptidases classified into subgroups based on substrate preference in normal physiological processes such as embryonic development and tissue remodeling, as well as in various disease processes via degradation of extracellular matrix components. Among the MMPs, MMP-9 and MMP-2 have been reported to be up-regulated in skeletal muscles in the lethal X-linked muscle disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by loss of dystrophin. A recent study showed that deletion of the MMP9 gene in mdx, a mouse model for DMD, improved skeletal muscle pathology and function; however, the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle is not well known. In this study, we aimed at verifying the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle by using mdx mice with genetic ablation of MMP-2 (mdx/MMP-2(-/-)). We found impairment of regenerated muscle fiber growth with reduction of angiogenesis in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), an important angiogenesis-related factor, decreased in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. MMP-2 had not a critical role in the degradation of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) components such as β-dystroglycan and β-sarcoglycan in the regeneration process of the dystrophic muscle. Accordingly, MMP-2 may be essential for growth of regenerated muscle fibers through VEGF-associated angiogenesis in the dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

  6. The proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole improves the skeletal phenotype in dystrophin deficient mdx mice.

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    Arpana Sali

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, loss of the membrane stabilizing protein dystrophin results in myofiber damage. Microinjury to dystrophic myofibers also causes secondary imbalances in sarcolemmic ion permeability and resting membrane potential, which modifies excitation-contraction coupling and increases proinflammatory/apoptotic signaling cascades. Although glucocorticoids remain the standard of care for the treatment of DMD, there is a need to investigate the efficacy of other pharmacological agents targeting the involvement of imbalances in ion flux on dystrophic pathology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We designed a preclinical trial to investigate the effects of lansoprazole (LANZO administration, a proton pump inhibitor, on the dystrophic muscle phenotype in dystrophin deficient (mdx mice. Eight to ten week-old female mice were assigned to one of four treatment groups (n = 12 per group: (1 vehicle control; (2 5 mg/kg/day LANZO; (3 5 mg/kg/day prednisolone; and (4 combined treatment of 5 mg/kg/day prednisolone (PRED and 5 mg/kg/day LANZO. Treatment was administered orally 5 d/wk for 3 months. At the end of the study, behavioral (Digiscan and functional outcomes (grip strength and Rotarod were assessed prior to sacrifice. After sacrifice, body, tissue and organ masses, muscle histology, in vitro muscle force, and creatine kinase levels were measured. Mice in the combined treatment groups displayed significant reductions in the number of degenerating muscle fibers and number of inflammatory foci per muscle field relative to vehicle control. Additionally, mice in the combined treatment group displayed less of a decline in normalized forelimb and hindlimb grip strength and declines in in vitro EDL force after repeated eccentric contractions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together our findings suggest that combined treatment of LANZO and prednisolone attenuates some components of dystrophic pathology in mdx mice. Our findings

  7. Proteasome inhibitor (MG132 rescues Nav1.5 protein content and the cardiac sodium current in dystrophin-deficient mdx5cv mice

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    Jean-Sebastien eRougier

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel, Nav1.5, plays a central role in cardiac excitability and impulse propagation and associates with the dystrophin multiprotein complex (DMC at the lateral membrane of cardiomyocytes. It was previously shown that Nav1.5 protein content and the sodium current (INa were both decreased in cardiomyocytes of dystrophin-deficient mdx5cv mice. In this study, wild-type (WT and mdx5cv mice were treated for 7 days with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (10 µg/Kg/24 h using implanted osmotic mini pumps. MG132 rescued both the total amount of Nav1.5 protein and INa but, unlike in previous studies, de novo expression of dystrophin was not observed in skeletal or cardiac muscle. This study suggests that the reduced expression of Nav1.5 in dystrophin-deficient cells is dependent on proteasomal degradation.

  8. Defects in mitochondrial ATP synthesis in dystrophin-deficient mdx skeletal muscles may be caused by complex I insufficiency.

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    Emma Rybalka

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is a chronic, progressive and ultimately fatal skeletal muscle wasting disease characterised by sarcolemmal fragility and intracellular Ca2+ dysregulation secondary to the absence of dystrophin. Mounting literature also suggests that the dysfunction of key energy systems within the muscle may contribute to pathological muscle wasting by reducing ATP availability to Ca2+ regulation and fibre regeneration. No study to date has biochemically quantified and contrasted mitochondrial ATP production capacity by dystrophic mitochondria isolated from their pathophysiological environment such to determine whether mitochondria are indeed capable of meeting this heightened cellular ATP demand, or examined the effects of an increasing extramitochondrial Ca2+ environment. Using isolated mitochondria from the diaphragm and tibialis anterior of 12 week-old dystrophin-deficient mdx and healthy control mice (C57BL10/ScSn we have demonstrated severely depressed Complex I-mediated mitochondrial ATP production rate in mdx mitochondria that occurs irrespective of the macronutrient-derivative substrate combination fed into the Kreb's cycle, and, which is partially, but significantly, ameliorated by inhibition of Complex I with rotenone and stimulation of Complex II-mediated ATP-production with succinate. There was no difference in the MAPR response of mdx mitochondria to increasing extramitochondrial Ca2+ load in comparison to controls, and 400 nM extramitochondrial Ca2+ was generally shown to be inhibitory to MAPR in both groups. Our data suggests that DMD pathology is exacerbated by a Complex I deficiency, which may contribute in part to the severe reductions in ATP production previously observed in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

  9. Proteomic Profiling of the Dystrophin-Deficient MDX Heart Reveals Drastically Altered Levels of Key Metabolic and Contractile Proteins

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    Caroline Lewis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Duchenne muscular dystrophy is primarily classified as a neuromuscular disease, cardiac complications play an important role in the course of this X-linked inherited disorder. The pathobiochemical steps causing a progressive decline in the dystrophic heart are not well understood. We therefore carried out a fluorescence difference in-gel electrophoretic analysis of 9-month-old dystrophin-deficient versus age-matched normal heart, using the established MDX mouse model of muscular dystrophy-related cardiomyopathy. Out of 2,509 detectable protein spots, 79 2D-spots showed a drastic differential expression pattern, with the concentration of 3 proteins being increased, including nucleoside diphosphate kinase and lamin-A/C, and of 26 protein species being decreased, including ATP synthase, fatty acid binding-protein, isocitrate dehydrogenase, NADH dehydrogenase, porin, peroxiredoxin, adenylate kinase, tropomyosin, actin, and myosin light chains. Hence, the lack of cardiac dystrophin appears to trigger a generally perturbed protein expression pattern in the MDX heart, affecting especially energy metabolism and contractile proteins.

  10. Early right ventricular fibrosis and reduction in biventricular cardiac reserve in the dystrophin-deficient mdx heart.

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    Meyers, Tatyana A; Townsend, DeWayne

    2015-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive disease of striated muscle deterioration. Respiratory and cardiac muscle dysfunction are particularly clinically relevant because they result in the leading causes of death in DMD patients. Despite the clinical and physiological significance of these systems, little has been done to understand the cardiorespiratory interaction in DMD. We show here that prior to the onset of global cardiac dysfunction, dystrophin-deficient mdx mice have increased cardiac fibrosis with the right ventricle being particularly affected. Using a novel biventricular cardiac catheterization technique coupled with cardiac stress testing, we demonstrate that both the right and left ventricles have significant reductions in both systolic and diastolic function in response to dobutamine. Unstimulated cardiac function is relatively normal except for a significant reduction in the ventricular pressure transient duration compared with controls. These biventricular analyses also reveal the absence of a dobutamine-induced increase in isovolumic relaxation in the right ventricle of control hearts. Simultaneous assessment of biventricular pressure demonstrates a dobutamine-dependent enhancement of coupling between the ventricles in control mice, which is absent in mdx mice. Furthermore, studies probing the passive-extension properties of the left ventricle demonstrate that the mdx heart is significantly more compliant compared with age-matched C57BL/10 hearts, which have an age-dependent stiffening that is completely absent from dystrophic hearts. These new results indicate that right ventricular fibrosis is an early indicator of the development of dystrophic cardiomyopathy, suggesting a mechanism by which respiratory insufficiency may accelerate the development of heart failure in DMD.

  11. Early manifestation of alteration in cardiac function in dystrophin deficient mdx mouse using 3D CMR tagging

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    Zhong Jia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is caused by the absence of the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. In DMD patients, dilated cardiomyopathy leading to heart failure may occur during adolescence. However, early cardiac dysfunction is frequently undetected due to physical inactivity and generalized debilitation. The objective of this study is to determine the time course of cardiac functional alterations in mdx mouse, a mouse model of DMD, by evaluating regional ventricular function with CMR tagging. Methods In vivo myocardial function was evaluated by 3D CMR tagging in mdx mice at early (2 months, middle (7 months and late (10 months stages of disease development. Global cardiac function, regional myocardial wall strains, and ventricular torsion were quantified. Myocardial lesions were assessed with Masson's trichrome staining. Results Global contractile indexes were similar between mdx and C57BL/6 mice in each age group. Histology analysis showed that young mdx mice were free of myocardial lesions. Interstitial fibrosis was present in 7 month mdx mice, with further development into patches or transmural lesions at 10 months of age. As a result, 10 month mdx mice showed significantly reduced regional strain and torsion. However, young mdx mice showed an unexpected increase in regional strain and torsion, while 7 month mdx mice displayed similar regional ventricular function as the controls. Conclusion Despite normal global ventricular function, CMR tagging detected a biphasic change in myocardial wall strain and torsion, with an initial increase at young age followed by progressive decrease at older ages. These results suggest that CMR tagging can provide more sensitive measures of functional alterations than global functional indexes in dystrophin-related cardiomyopathies.

  12. Dietary phosphorus overload aggravates the phenotype of the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse.

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    Wada, Eiji; Yoshida, Mizuko; Kojima, Yoriko; Nonaka, Ikuya; Ohashi, Kazuya; Nagata, Yosuke; Shiozuka, Masataka; Date, Munehiro; Higashi, Tetsuo; Nishino, Ichizo; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked disease with no effective treatment. Progressive muscle degeneration, increased macrophage infiltration, and ectopic calcification are characteristic features of the mdx mouse, a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Because dietary phosphorus/phosphate consumption is increasing and adverse effects of phosphate overloading have been reported in several disease conditions, we examined the effects of dietary phosphorus intake in mdx mice phenotypes. On weaning, control and mdx mice were fed diets containing 0.7, 1.0, or 2.0 g phosphorus per 100 g until they were 90 days old. Dystrophic phenotypes were evaluated in cryosections of quadriceps and tibialis anterior muscles, and maximal forces and voluntary activity were measured. Ectopic calcification was analyzed by electron microscopy to determine the cells initially responsible for calcium deposition in skeletal muscle. Dietary phosphorus overload dramatically exacerbated the dystrophic phenotypes of mdx mice by increasing inflammation associated with infiltration of M1 macrophages. In contrast, minimal muscle necrosis and inflammation were observed in exercised mdx mice fed a low-phosphorus diet, suggesting potential beneficial therapeutic effects of lowering dietary phosphorus intake on disease progression. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that dietary phosphorus intake directly affects muscle pathological characteristics of mdx mice. Dietary phosphorus overloading promoted dystrophic disease progression in mdx mice, whereas restricting dietary phosphorus intake improved muscle pathological characteristics and function.

  13. Disodium cromoglycate protects dystrophin-deficient muscle fibers from leakiness.

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    Marques, Maria Julia; Ventura Machado, Rafael; Minatel, Elaine; Santo Neto, Humberto

    2008-01-01

    In dystrophin-deficient fibers of mdx mice and in Duchenne dystrophy, the lack of dystrophin leads to sarcolemma breakdown and muscle degeneration. We verified that cromolyn, a mast-cell stabilizer agent, stabilized dystrophic muscle fibers using Evans blue dye as a marker of sarcolemma leakiness. Mdx mice (n=8; 14 days of age) received daily intraperitoneal injections of cromolyn (50 mg/kg body weight) for 15 days. Untreated mdx mice (n=8) were injected with saline. Cryostat cross-sections of the sternomastoid, tibialis anterior, and diaphragm muscles were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Cromolyn dramatically reduced Evans blue dye-positive fibers in all muscles (P<0.05; Student's t-test) and led to a significant increase in the percentage of fibers with peripheral nuclei. This study supports the protective effects of cromolyn in dystrophic muscles and further indicates its action against muscle fiber leakiness in muscles that are differently affected by the lack of dystrophin.

  14. Overexpression of dystrophin in transgenic mdx mice eliminates dystrophic symptoms without toxicity.

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    Cox, G A; Cole, N M; Matsumura, K; Phelps, S F; Hauschka, S D; Campbell, K P; Faulkner, J A; Chamberlain, J S

    1993-08-19

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD and BMD) are X-linked recessive diseases caused by defective expression of dystrophin. The mdx mouse, an animal model for DMD, has a mutation that eliminates expression of the 427K muscle and brain isoforms of dystrophin. Although these animals do not display overt muscle weakness or impaired movement, the diaphragm muscle of the mdx mouse is severely affected and shows progressive myofibre degeneration and fibrosis which closely resembles the human disease. Here we explore the feasibility of gene therapy for DMD by examining the potential of a full-length dystrophin transgene to correct dystrophic symptoms in mdx mice. We find that expression of dystrophin in muscles of transgenic mdx mice eliminates the morphological and immunohistological symptoms of muscular dystrophy. In addition, overexpression of dystrophin prevents the development of the abnormal mechanical properties associated with dystrophic muscle without causing deleterious side effects. Our results provide functional evidence for the feasibility of gene therapy for DMD.

  15. Dystrophin-Deficient Cardiomyopathy.

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    Kamdar, Forum; Garry, Daniel J

    2016-05-31

    Dystrophinopathies are a group of distinct neuromuscular diseases that result from mutations in the structural cytoskeletal Dystrophin gene. Dystrophinopathies include Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy, as well as DMD and BMD female carriers. The primary presenting symptom in most dystrophinopathies is skeletal muscle weakness. However, cardiac muscle is also a subtype of striated muscle and is similarly affected in many of the muscular dystrophies. Cardiomyopathies associated with dystrophinopathies are an increasingly recognized manifestation of these neuromuscular disorders and contribute significantly to their morbidity and mortality. Recent studies suggest that these patient populations would benefit from cardiovascular therapies, annual cardiovascular imaging studies, and close follow-up with cardiovascular specialists. Moreover, patients with DMD and BMD who develop end-stage heart failure may benefit from the use of advanced therapies. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, cardiac involvement, and treatment of cardiomyopathy in the dystrophic patient. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fetal microchimeric cells in a fetus-treats-its-mother paradigm do not contribute to dystrophin production in serially parous mdx females.

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    Seppanen, Elke Jane; Hodgson, Samantha Susan; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Bou-Gharios, George; Fisk, Nicholas M

    2012-10-10

    Throughout every pregnancy, genetically distinct fetal microchimeric stem/progenitor cells (FMCs) engraft in the mother, persist long after delivery, and may home to damaged maternal tissues. Phenotypically normal fetal lymphoid progenitors have been described to develop in immunodeficient mothers in a fetus-treats-its-mother paradigm. Since stem cells contribute to muscle repair, we assessed this paradigm in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. mdx females were bred serially to either ROSAeGFP males or mdx males to obtain postpartum microchimeras that received either wild-type FMCs or dystrophin-deficient FMCs through serial gestations. To enhance regeneration, notexin was injected into the tibialis anterior of postpartum mice. FMCs were detected by qPCR at a higher frequency in injected compared to noninjected side muscle (P=0.02). However, the number of dystrophin-positive fibers was similar in mothers delivering wild-type compared to mdx pups. In addition, there was no correlation between FMC detection and percentage dystrophin, and no GFP+ve FMCs were identified that expressed dystrophin. In 10/11 animals, GFP+ve FMCs were detected by immunohistochemistry, of which 60% expressed CD45 with 96% outside the basal lamina defining myofiber contours. Finally we confirmed lack of FMC contribution to statellite cells in postpartum mdx females mated with Myf5-LacZ males. We conclude that the FMC contribution to regenerating muscles is insufficient to have a functional impact.

  17. Influence of Botulinumtoxin A on the Expression of Adult MyHC Isoforms in the Masticatory Muscles in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice (Mdx-Mice

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    Ute Ulrike Botzenhart

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most widespread animal model to investigate Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the mdx-mouse. In contrast to humans, phases of muscle degeneration are replaced by regeneration processes; hence there is only a restricted time slot for research. The aim of the study was to investigate if an intramuscular injection of BTX-A is able to break down muscle regeneration and has direct implications on the gene expression of myosin heavy chains in the corresponding treated and untreated muscles. Therefore, paralysis of the right masseter muscle was induced in adult healthy and dystrophic mice by a specific intramuscular injection of BTX-A. After 21 days the mRNA expression and protein content of MyHC isoforms of the right and left masseter, temporal, and the tongue muscle were determined using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot technique. MyHC-IIa and MyHC-I-mRNA expression significantly increased in the paralyzed masseter muscle of control-mice, whereas MyHC-IIb and MyHC-IIx/d-mRNA were decreased. In dystrophic muscles no effect of BTX-A could be detected at the level of MyHC. This study suggests that BTX-A injection is a suitable method to simulate DMD-pathogenesis in healthy mice but further investigations are necessary to fully analyse the BTX-A effect and to generate sustained muscular atrophy in mdx-mice.

  18. Influence of Botulinumtoxin A on the Expression of Adult MyHC Isoforms in the Masticatory Muscles in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice (Mdx-Mice)

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    Todorov, Teodor

    2016-01-01

    The most widespread animal model to investigate Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the mdx-mouse. In contrast to humans, phases of muscle degeneration are replaced by regeneration processes; hence there is only a restricted time slot for research. The aim of the study was to investigate if an intramuscular injection of BTX-A is able to break down muscle regeneration and has direct implications on the gene expression of myosin heavy chains in the corresponding treated and untreated muscles. Therefore, paralysis of the right masseter muscle was induced in adult healthy and dystrophic mice by a specific intramuscular injection of BTX-A. After 21 days the mRNA expression and protein content of MyHC isoforms of the right and left masseter, temporal, and the tongue muscle were determined using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot technique. MyHC-IIa and MyHC-I-mRNA expression significantly increased in the paralyzed masseter muscle of control-mice, whereas MyHC-IIb and MyHC-IIx/d-mRNA were decreased. In dystrophic muscles no effect of BTX-A could be detected at the level of MyHC. This study suggests that BTX-A injection is a suitable method to simulate DMD-pathogenesis in healthy mice but further investigations are necessary to fully analyse the BTX-A effect and to generate sustained muscular atrophy in mdx-mice. PMID:27689088

  19. Preservation of Muscle Force in Mdx3cv Mice Correlates with Low-Level Expression of a Near Full-Length Dystrophin Protein

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The complete absence of dystrophin causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Its restoration by greater than 20% is needed to reduce muscle pathology and improve muscle force. Dystrophin levels lower than 20% are considered therapeutically irrelevant but are associated with a less severe phenotype in certain Becker muscular dystrophy patients. To understand the role of low-level dystrophin expression, we compared muscle force and pathology in mdx3cv and mdx4cv mice. Dystrophin was eliminated in mdx...

  20. Deficiency in Cardiac Dystrophin Affects the Abundance of the α-/β-Dystroglycan Complex

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    James Lohan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Duchenne muscular dystrophy is primarily categorised as a skeletal muscle disease, deficiency in the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin also affects the heart. The central transsarcolemmal linker between the actin membrane cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix is represented by the dystrophin-associated dystroglycans. Chemical cross-linking analysis revealed no significant differences in the dimeric status of the α-/β-dystroglycan subcomplex in the dystrophic mdx heart as compared to normal cardiac tissue. In analogy to skeletal muscle fibres, heart muscle also exhibited a greatly reduced abundance of both dystroglycans in dystrophin-deficient cells. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the degree of reduction in α-dystroglycan is more pronounced in matured mdx skeletal muscle as contrasted to the mdx heart. The fact that the deficiency in dystrophin triggers a similar pathobiochemical response in both types of muscle suggests that the cardiomyopathic complications observed in x-linked muscular dystrophy might be initiated by the loss of the dystrophin-associated surface glycoprotein complex.

  1. Dystrophin deficiency exacerbates skeletal muscle pathology in dysferlin-null mice

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    Han Renzhi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the genes coding for either dystrophin or dysferlin cause distinct forms of muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin links the cytoskeleton to the sarcolemma through direct interaction with β-dystroglycan. This link extends to the extracellular matrix by β-dystroglycan's interaction with α-dystroglycan, which binds extracellular matrix proteins, including laminin α2, agrin and perlecan, that possess laminin globular domains. The absence of dystrophin disrupts this link, leading to compromised muscle sarcolemmal integrity. Dysferlin, on the other hand, plays an important role in the Ca2+-dependent membrane repair of damaged sarcolemma in skeletal muscle. Because dysferlin and dystrophin play different roles in maintaining muscle cell integrity, we hypothesized that disrupting sarcolemmal integrity with dystrophin deficiency would exacerbate the pathology in dysferlin-null mice and allow further characterization of the role of dysferlin in skeletal muscle. Methods To test our hypothesis, we generated dystrophin/dysferlin double-knockout (DKO mice by breeding mdx mice with dysferlin-null mice and analyzed the effects of a combined deficiency of dysferlin and dystrophin on muscle pathology and sarcolemmal integrity. Results The DKO mice exhibited more severe muscle pathology than either mdx mice or dysferlin-null mice, and, importantly, the onset of the muscle pathology occurred much earlier than it did in dysferlin-deficient mice. The DKO mice showed muscle pathology of various skeletal muscles, including the mandible muscles, as well as a greater number of regenerating muscle fibers, higher serum creatine kinase levels and elevated Evans blue dye uptake into skeletal muscles. Lengthening contractions caused similar force deficits, regardless of dysferlin expression. However, the rate of force recovery within 45 minutes following lengthening contractions was hampered in DKO muscles compared to mdx muscles or dysferlin

  2. Concurrent Label-Free Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Dystrophin Isoform Dp427 and the Myofibrosis Marker Collagen in Crude Extracts from mdx-4cv Skeletal Muscles

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    Sandra Murphy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The full-length dystrophin protein isoform of 427 kDa (Dp427, the absence of which represents the principal abnormality in X-linked muscular dystrophy, is difficult to identify and characterize by routine proteomic screening approaches of crude tissue extracts. This is probably related to its large molecular size, its close association with the sarcolemmal membrane, and its existence within a heterogeneous glycoprotein complex. Here, we used a careful extraction procedure to isolate the total protein repertoire from normal versus dystrophic mdx-4cv skeletal muscles, in conjunction with label-free mass spectrometry, and successfully identified Dp427 by proteomic means. In contrast to a considerable number of previous comparative studies of the total skeletal muscle proteome, using whole tissue proteomics we show here for the first time that the reduced expression of this membrane cytoskeletal protein is the most significant alteration in dystrophinopathy. This agrees with the pathobiochemical concept that the almost complete absence of dystrophin is the main defect in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and that the mdx-4cv mouse model of dystrophinopathy exhibits only very few revertant fibers. Significant increases in collagens and associated fibrotic marker proteins, such as fibronectin, biglycan, asporin, decorin, prolargin, mimecan, and lumican were identified in dystrophin-deficient muscles. The up-regulation of collagen in mdx-4cv muscles was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblotting. Thus, this is the first mass spectrometric study of crude tissue extracts that puts the proteomic identification of dystrophin in its proper pathophysiological context.

  3. Evaluation of skeletal and cardiac muscle function after chronic administration of thymosin beta-4 in the dystrophin deficient mouse.

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    Christopher F Spurney

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tbeta4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. We studied the effects of chronic administration of Tbeta4 on the skeletal and cardiac muscle of dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Female wild type (C57BL10/ScSnJ and mdx mice, 8-10 weeks old, were treated with 150 microg of Tbeta4 twice a week for 6 months. To promote muscle pathology, mice were exercised for 30 minutes twice a week. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function were assessed via grip strength and high frequency echocardiography. Localization of Tbeta4 and amount of fibrosis were quantified using immunohistochemistry and Gomori's tri-chrome staining, respectively. Mdx mice treated with Tbeta4 showed a significant increase in skeletal muscle regenerating fibers compared to untreated mdx mice. Tbeta4 stained exclusively in the regenerating fibers of mdx mice. Although untreated mdx mice had significantly decreased skeletal muscle strength compared to untreated wild type, there were no significant improvements in mdx mice after treatment. Systolic cardiac function, measured as percent shortening fraction, was decreased in untreated mdx mice compared to untreated wild type and there was no significant difference after treatment in mdx mice. Skeletal and cardiac muscle fibrosis were also significantly increased in untreated mdx mice compared to wild type, but there was no significant improvement in treated mdx mice. In exercised dystrophin deficient mice, chronic administration of Tbeta4 increased the number of regenerating fibers in skeletal muscle and could have a potential role in treatment of skeletal muscle disease in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  4. Membrane Sealant Poloxamer P188 Protects Against Isoproterenol Induced Cardiomyopathy in Dystrophin Deficient Mice

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    Sali Arpana

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an increasing cause of death in patients. The absence of dystrophin leads to loss of membrane integrity, cell death and fibrosis in cardiac muscle. Treatment of cardiomyocyte membrane instability could help prevent cardiomyopathy. Methods Three month old female mdx mice were exposed to the β1 receptor agonist isoproterenol subcutaneously and treated with the non-ionic tri-block copolymer Poloxamer P188 (P188 (460 mg/kg/dose i.p. daily. Cardiac function was assessed using high frequency echocardiography. Tissue was evaluated with Evans Blue Dye (EBD and picrosirius red staining. Results BL10 control mice tolerated 30 mg/kg/day of isoproterenol for 4 weeks while death occurred in mdx mice at 30, 15, 10, 5 and 1 mg/kg/day within 24 hours. Mdx mice tolerated a low dose of 0.5 mg/kg/day. Isoproterenol exposed mdx mice showed significantly increased heart rates (p Conclusions This model suggests that chronic intermittent intraperitoneal P188 treatment can prevent isoproterenol induced cardiomyopathy in dystrophin deficient mdx mice.

  5. Ex vivo stretch reveals altered mechanical properties of isolated dystrophin-deficient hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabei, Matthew S; Metzger, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive and fatal disease of muscle wasting caused by loss of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. In the heart, DMD results in progressive cardiomyopathy and dilation of the left ventricle through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Previous reports have shown that loss of dystrophin causes sarcolemmal instability and reduced mechanical compliance of isolated cardiac myocytes. To expand upon these findings, here we have subjected the left ventricles of dystrophin-deficient mdx hearts to mechanical stretch. Unexpectedly, isolated mdx hearts showed increased left ventricular (LV) compliance compared to controls during stretch as LV volume was increased above normal end diastolic volume. During LV chamber distention, sarcomere lengths increased similarly in mdx and WT hearts despite greater excursions in volume of mdx hearts. This suggests that the mechanical properties of the intact heart cannot be modeled as a simple extrapolation of findings in single cardiac myocytes. To explain these findings, a model is proposed in which disruption of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex perturbs cell-extracellular matrix contacts and promotes the apparent slippage of myocytes past each other during LV distension. In comparison, similar increases in LV compliance were obtained in isolated hearts from β-sarcoglycan-null and laminin-α(2) mutant mice, but not in dysferlin-null mice, suggesting that increased whole-organ compliance in mdx mice is a specific effect of disrupted cell-extracellular matrix contacts and not a general consequence of cardiomyopathy via membrane defect processes. Collectively, these findings suggest a novel and cell-death independent mechanism for the progressive pathological LV dilation that occurs in DMD.

  6. Ex vivo stretch reveals altered mechanical properties of isolated dystrophin-deficient hearts.

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    Matthew S Barnabei

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a progressive and fatal disease of muscle wasting caused by loss of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. In the heart, DMD results in progressive cardiomyopathy and dilation of the left ventricle through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Previous reports have shown that loss of dystrophin causes sarcolemmal instability and reduced mechanical compliance of isolated cardiac myocytes. To expand upon these findings, here we have subjected the left ventricles of dystrophin-deficient mdx hearts to mechanical stretch. Unexpectedly, isolated mdx hearts showed increased left ventricular (LV compliance compared to controls during stretch as LV volume was increased above normal end diastolic volume. During LV chamber distention, sarcomere lengths increased similarly in mdx and WT hearts despite greater excursions in volume of mdx hearts. This suggests that the mechanical properties of the intact heart cannot be modeled as a simple extrapolation of findings in single cardiac myocytes. To explain these findings, a model is proposed in which disruption of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex perturbs cell-extracellular matrix contacts and promotes the apparent slippage of myocytes past each other during LV distension. In comparison, similar increases in LV compliance were obtained in isolated hearts from β-sarcoglycan-null and laminin-α(2 mutant mice, but not in dysferlin-null mice, suggesting that increased whole-organ compliance in mdx mice is a specific effect of disrupted cell-extracellular matrix contacts and not a general consequence of cardiomyopathy via membrane defect processes. Collectively, these findings suggest a novel and cell-death independent mechanism for the progressive pathological LV dilation that occurs in DMD.

  7. Compensation for dystrophin-deficiency: ADAM12 overexpression in skeletal muscle results in increased alpha 7 integrin, utrophin and associated glycoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Guo, Ling T;

    2003-01-01

    , and suggested that significant changes in mdx/ADAM12 muscle might occur post-transcriptionally. Indeed, by immunostaining and immunoblotting we found an approximately 2-fold increase in expression, and distinct extrasynaptic localization, of alpha 7B integrin and utrophin, the functional homolog of dystrophin....... The expression of the dystrophin-associated glycoproteins was also increased. In conclusion, these results demonstrate a novel way to alleviate dystrophin deficiency in mice, and may stimulate the development of new approaches to compensate for dystrophin deficiency in animals and humans....

  8. Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in Dystrophin-Deficient Muscle Cells: Effects on Regeneration Capacity, Inflammation Response and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Aline Barbosa; Moraes, Luis Henrique Rapucci; Mizobuti, Daniela Sayuri; Fogaça, Aline Reis; Moraes, Fernanda Dos Santos Rapucci; Hermes, Tulio de Almeida; Pertille, Adriana; Minatel, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated low-level laser therapy (LLLT) effects on some physiological pathways that may lead to muscle damage or regeneration capacity in dystrophin-deficient muscle cells of mdx mice, the experimental model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Primary cultures of mdx skeletal muscle cells were irradiated only one time with laser and analyzed after 24 and 48 hours. The LLLT parameter used was 830 nm wavelengths at 5 J/cm² fluence. The following groups were set up: Ctrl (untreated C57BL/10 primary muscle cells), mdx (untreated mdx primary muscle cells), mdx LA 24 (mdx primary muscle cells - LLLT irradiated and analyzed after 24 h), and mdx LA 48 (mdx primary muscle cells - LLLT irradiated and analyzed after 48 h). The mdx LA 24 and mdx LA 48 groups showed significant increase in cell proliferation, higher diameter in muscle cells and decreased MyoD levels compared to the mdx group. The mdx LA 48 group showed significant increase in Myosin Heavy Chain levels compared to the untreated mdx and mdx LA 24 groups. The mdx LA 24 and mdx LA 48 groups showed significant increase in [Ca2+]i. The mdx group showed significant increase in H2O2 production and 4-HNE levels compared to the Ctrl group and LLLT treatment reduced this increase. GSH levels and GPx, GR and SOD activities increased in the mdx group. Laser treatment reduced the GSH levels and GR and SOD activities in dystrophic muscle cells. The mdx group showed significant increase in the TNF-α and NF-κB levels, which in turn was reduced by the LLLT treatment. Together, these results suggest that the laser treatment improved regenerative capacity and decreased inflammatory response and oxidative stress in dystrophic muscle cells, indicating that LLLT could be a helpful alternative therapy to be associated with other treatment for dystrophinopathies.

  9. Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT in Dystrophin-Deficient Muscle Cells: Effects on Regeneration Capacity, Inflammation Response and Oxidative Stress.

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    Aline Barbosa Macedo

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated low-level laser therapy (LLLT effects on some physiological pathways that may lead to muscle damage or regeneration capacity in dystrophin-deficient muscle cells of mdx mice, the experimental model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Primary cultures of mdx skeletal muscle cells were irradiated only one time with laser and analyzed after 24 and 48 hours. The LLLT parameter used was 830 nm wavelengths at 5 J/cm² fluence. The following groups were set up: Ctrl (untreated C57BL/10 primary muscle cells, mdx (untreated mdx primary muscle cells, mdx LA 24 (mdx primary muscle cells - LLLT irradiated and analyzed after 24 h, and mdx LA 48 (mdx primary muscle cells - LLLT irradiated and analyzed after 48 h. The mdx LA 24 and mdx LA 48 groups showed significant increase in cell proliferation, higher diameter in muscle cells and decreased MyoD levels compared to the mdx group. The mdx LA 48 group showed significant increase in Myosin Heavy Chain levels compared to the untreated mdx and mdx LA 24 groups. The mdx LA 24 and mdx LA 48 groups showed significant increase in [Ca2+]i. The mdx group showed significant increase in H2O2 production and 4-HNE levels compared to the Ctrl group and LLLT treatment reduced this increase. GSH levels and GPx, GR and SOD activities increased in the mdx group. Laser treatment reduced the GSH levels and GR and SOD activities in dystrophic muscle cells. The mdx group showed significant increase in the TNF-α and NF-κB levels, which in turn was reduced by the LLLT treatment. Together, these results suggest that the laser treatment improved regenerative capacity and decreased inflammatory response and oxidative stress in dystrophic muscle cells, indicating that LLLT could be a helpful alternative therapy to be associated with other treatment for dystrophinopathies.

  10. Differential expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in the masticatory muscles of dystrophin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassov, Alexander; Gredes, Tomasz; Gedrange, Tomasz; Lucke, Silke; Morgenstern, Sven; Pavlovic, Dragan; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2011-12-01

    The dystrophin-deficient mouse (mdx) is a homologue animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and is characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness accompanied by changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition. It is likely that the masticatory muscles undergo similar changes. The aim of this study was to examine the masticatory muscles (masseter, temporal, tongue, and soleus) of 100-day-old mdx and control mice (n = 8-10), and the fibre type distribution (by immunohistochemistry) as well as the expression of the corresponding MyHC messenger RNA (mRNA) (protein and mRNA expression, using Western blot or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)). Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis revealed that the masticatory muscles in the control and mdx mice consisted mainly of type 2 fibres, whereas soleus muscle consisted of both type 1 and 2 fibres. In the masseter muscle, the mRNA in mdx mice was not different from that found in the controls. However, the mRNA content of the MyHC-2b isoform in mdx mice was lower in comparison with the controls in the temporal muscle [11.9 versus 36.9 per cent; P muscle (65.7 versus 73.8 per cent; P muscle was lower than in the controls (25.9 versus 30.8 per cent; P muscles of mdx mice may lead to changed fibre type composition. The different MyHC gene expression in mdx mice masticatory muscles may be seen as an adaptive mechanism to muscular dystrophy.

  11. Deletion of Galgt2 (B4Galnt2) Reduces Muscle Growth in Response to Acute Injury and Increases Muscle Inflammation and Pathology in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Singhal, Neha; Serinagaoglu, Yelda; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Joshi, Mandar; Bauer, John A.; Janssen, Paulus M.L.; Martin, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic overexpression of Galgt2 (official name B4Galnt2) in skeletal muscle stimulates the glycosylation of α dystroglycan (αDG) and the up-regulation of laminin α2 and dystrophin surrogates known to inhibit muscle pathology in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophy 1A and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Skeletal muscle Galgt2 gene expression is also normally increased in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy compared with the wild-type mice. To assess whether this increased endogenous Galgt2 expression could affect disease, we quantified muscular dystrophy measures in mdx mice deleted for Galgt2 (Galgt2−/−mdx). Galgt2−/− mdx mice had increased heart and skeletal muscle pathology and inflammation, and also worsened cardiac function, relative to age-matched mdx mice. Deletion of Galgt2 in wild-type mice also slowed skeletal muscle growth in response to acute muscle injury. In each instance where Galgt2 expression was elevated (developing muscle, regenerating muscle, and dystrophic muscle), Galgt2-dependent glycosylation of αDG was also increased. Overexpression of Galgt2 failed to inhibit skeletal muscle pathology in dystroglycan-deficient muscles, in contrast to previous studies in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles. This study demonstrates that Galgt2 gene expression and glycosylation of αDG are dynamically regulated in muscle and that endogenous Galgt2 gene expression can ameliorate the extent of muscle pathology, inflammation, and dysfunction in mdx mice. PMID:26435413

  12. Ultrastructural changes in the interstitial cells of Cajal and gastric dysrhythmias in mice lacking full-length dystrophin (mdx mice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Maria-Giuliana; Zizzo, Maria-Grazia; Zardo, Claudio; Pieri, Laura; Serio, Rosa; Mulè, Flavia; Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria-Simonetta

    2004-05-01

    At least two populations of c-kit positive interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) lie in the gastric wall, one located at the myenteric plexus level has a pace-making function and the other located intramuscularly is intermediary in the neurotransmission and regenerates the slow waves. Both of these ICC sub-types express full-length dystrophin. Mdx mice, an animal model lacking in full-length dystrophin and used to study Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), show gastric dismotilities. The aim of the present study was to verify in mdx mice whether: (i) gastric ICC undergo morphological changes, through immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analyses; and (ii) there are alterations in the electrical activity, using intracellular recording technique. In control mice, ICC sub-types showed heterogeneous ultrastructural features, either intramuscularly or at the myenteric plexus level. In mdx mice, all of the ICC sub-types underwent important changes: coated vesicles were significantly more numerous and caveolae significantly fewer than in control; moreover, cytoskeleton and smooth endoplasmic reticulum were reduced and mitochondria enlarged. c-Kit-positivity and integrity of the ICC networks were maintained. In the circular muscle of normal mice slow waves, which consisted of initial and secondary components, occurred with a regular frequency. In mdx mice, slow waves occurred in a highly dysrhythmic fashion and they lacked a secondary component. We conclude that the lack of the full-length dystrophin is associated with ultrastructural modifications of gastric ICC, most of which can be interpreted as signs of new membrane formation and altered Ca(2+) handling, and with defective generation and regeneration of slow wave activity.

  13. Nanopolymers improve delivery of exon skipping oligonucleotides and concomitant dystrophin expression in skeletal muscle of mdx mice

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    Sirsi Shashank R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exon skipping oligonucleotides (ESOs of 2'O-Methyl (2'OMe and morpholino chemistry have been shown to restore dystrophin expression in muscle fibers from the mdx mouse, and are currently being tested in phase I clinical trials for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD. However, ESOs remain limited in their effectiveness because of an inadequate delivery profile. Synthetic cationic copolymers of poly(ethylene imine (PEI and poly(ethylene glycol (PEG are regarded as effective agents for enhanced delivery of nucleic acids in various applications. Results We examined whether PEG-PEI copolymers can facilitate ESO-mediated dystrophin expression after intramuscular injections into tibialis anterior (TA muscles of mdx mice. We utilized a set of PEG-PEI copolymers containing 2 kDa PEI and either 550 Da or 5 kDa PEG, both of which bind 2'OMe ESOs with high affinity and form stable nanoparticulates with a relatively low surface charge. Three weekly intramuscular injections of 5 μg of ESO complexed with PEI2K-PEG550 copolymers resulted in about 500 dystrophin-positive fibers and about 12% of normal levels of dystrophin expression at 3 weeks after the initial injection, which is significantly greater than for injections of ESO alone, which are known to be almost completely ineffective. In an effort to enhance biocompatibility and cellular uptake, the PEI2K-PEG550 and PEI2K-PEG5K copolymers were functionalized by covalent conjugation with nanogold (NG or adsorbtion of colloidal gold (CG, respectively. Surprisingly, using the same injection and dosing regimen, we found no significant difference in dystrophin expression by Western blot between the NG-PEI2K-PEG550, CG-PEI2K-PEG5K, and non-functionalized PEI2K-PEG550 copolymers. Dose-response experiments using the CG-PEI2K-PEG5K copolymer with total ESO ranging from 3–60 μg yielded a maximum of about 15% dystrophin expression. Further improvements in dystrophin expression up to 20% of normal

  14. Nestin expression in end-stage disease in dystrophin-deficient heart: implications for regeneration from endogenous cardiac stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Suzanne E; Andruszkiewicz, Peter; Chun, Ju Lan; Hong, Jun

    2013-11-01

    Nestin(+) cardiac stem cells differentiate into striated cells following myocardial infarct. Transplantation of exogenous stem cells into myocardium of a murine model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) increased proliferation of endogenous nestin(+) stem cells and resulted in the appearance of nestin(+) striated cells. This correlated with, and may be responsible for, prevention of dilated cardiomyopathy. We examined nestin(+) stem cells in the myocardium of dystrophin/utrophin-deficient (mdx/utrn(-/-)) mice, a model for DMD. We found that 92% of nestin(+) interstitial cells expressed Flk-1, a marker present on cardiac progenitor cells that differentiate into the cardiac lineage, and that a subset expressed Sca-1, present on adult cardiac cells that become cardiomyocytes. Nestin(+) interstitial cells maintained expression of Flk-1 but lost Sca-1 expression with age and were present in lower numbers in dystrophin-deficient heart than in wild-type heart. Unexpectedly, large clusters of nestin(+) striated cells ranging in size from 20 to 250 cells and extending up to 500 μm were present in mdx/utrn(-/-) heart near the end stage of disease. These cells were also present in dystrophin-deficient mdx/utrn(+/-) and mdx heart but not wild-type heart. Nestin(+) striated cells expressed cardiac troponin I, desmin, and Connexin 43 and correlated with proinflammatory CD68(+) macrophages. Elongated nestin(+) interstitial cells with striations were observed that did not express Flk-1 or the late cardiac marker cardiac troponin I but strongly expressed the early cardiac marker desmin. Nestin was also detected in endothelial and smooth muscle cells. These data indicate that new cardiomyocytes form in dystrophic heart, and nestin(+) interstitial cells may generate them in addition to other cells of the cardiac lineage.

  15. Taurine deficiency, synthesis and transport in the mdx mouse model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jessica R; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2015-09-01

    The amino acid taurine is essential for the function of skeletal muscle and administration is proposed as a treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Taurine homeostasis is dependent on multiple processes including absorption of taurine from food, endogenous synthesis from cysteine and reabsorption in the kidney. This study investigates the cause of reported taurine deficiency in the dystrophic mdx mouse model of DMD. Levels of metabolites (taurine, cysteine, cysteine sulfinate and hypotaurine) and proteins (taurine transporter [TauT], cysteine deoxygenase and cysteine sulfinate dehydrogenase) were quantified in juvenile control C57 and dystrophic mdx mice aged 18 days, 4 and 6 weeks. In C57 mice, taurine content was much higher in both liver and plasma at 18 days, and both cysteine and cysteine deoxygenase were increased. As taurine levels decreased in maturing C57 mice, there was increased transport (reabsorption) of taurine in the kidney and muscle. In mdx mice, taurine and cysteine levels were much lower in liver and plasma at 18 days, and in muscle cysteine was low at 18 days, whereas taurine was lower at 4: these changes were associated with perturbations in taurine transport in liver, kidney and muscle and altered metabolism in liver and kidney. These data suggest that the maintenance of adequate body taurine relies on sufficient dietary intake of taurine and cysteine availability and metabolism, as well as retention of taurine by the kidney. This research indicates dystrophin deficiency not only perturbs taurine metabolism in the muscle but also affects taurine metabolism in the liver and kidney, and supports targeting cysteine and taurine deficiency as a potential therapy for DMD. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dystrophin insufficiency causes selective muscle histopathology and loss of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex assembly in pig skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a dystrophin deficiency while Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is caused by a dystrophin insufficiency or expression of a partially functional protein product. Both of these dystrophinopathies are most commonly studied using the mdx mouse and a golden r...

  17. Marginal level dystrophin expression improves clinical outcome in a strain of dystrophin/utrophin double knockout mice.

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    Dejia Li

    Full Text Available Inactivation of all utrophin isoforms in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice results in a strain of utrophin knockout mdx (uko/mdx mice. Uko/mdx mice display severe clinical symptoms and die prematurely as in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD patients. Here we tested the hypothesis that marginal level dystrophin expression may improve the clinical outcome of uko/mdx mice. It is well established that mdx3cv (3cv mice express a near-full length dystrophin protein at ∼5% of the normal level. We crossed utrophin-null mutation to the 3cv background. The resulting uko/3cv mice expressed the same level of dystrophin as 3cv mice but utrophin expression was completely eliminated. Surprisingly, uko/3cv mice showed a much milder phenotype. Compared to uko/mdx mice, uko/3cv mice had significantly higher body weight and stronger specific muscle force. Most importantly, uko/3cv outlived uko/mdx mice by several folds. Our results suggest that a threshold level dystrophin expression may provide vital clinical support in a severely affected DMD mouse model. This finding may hold clinical implications in developing novel DMD therapies.

  18. Dystrophin-deficient dogs with reduced myostatin have unequal muscle growth and greater joint contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornegay, Joe N; Bogan, Daniel J; Bogan, Janet R; Dow, Jennifer L; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Liu, Naili; Warsing, Leigh C; Grange, Robert W; Ahn, Mihye; Balog-Alvarez, Cynthia J; Cotten, Steven W; Willis, Monte S; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice; Zhu, Hongtu; Palandra, Joe; Morris, Carl A; Styner, Martin A; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a negative regulator of muscle growth whose inhibition promotes muscle growth and regeneration. Dystrophin-deficient mdx mice in which myostatin is knocked out or inhibited postnatally have a less severe phenotype with greater total mass and strength and less fibrosis and fatty replacement of muscles than mdx mice with wild-type myostatin expression. Dogs with golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) have previously been noted to have increased muscle mass and reduced fibrosis after systemic postnatal myostatin inhibition. Based partly on these results, myostatin inhibitors are in development for use in human muscular dystrophies. However, persisting concerns regarding the effects of long-term and profound myostatin inhibition will not be easily or imminently answered in clinical trials. To address these concerns, we developed a canine (GRippet) model by crossbreeding dystrophin-deficient GRMD dogs with Mstn-heterozygous (Mstn (+/-)) whippets. A total of four GRippets (dystrophic and Mstn (+/-)), three GRMD (dystrophic and Mstn wild-type) dogs, and three non-dystrophic controls from two litters were evaluated. Myostatin messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein levels were downregulated in both GRMD and GRippet dogs. GRippets had more severe postural changes and larger (more restricted) maximal joint flexion angles, apparently due to further exaggeration of disproportionate effects on muscle size. Flexors such as the cranial sartorius were more hypertrophied on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the GRippets, while extensors, including the quadriceps femoris, underwent greater atrophy. Myostatin protein levels negatively correlated with relative cranial sartorius muscle cross-sectional area on MRI, supporting a role in disproportionate muscle size. Activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) expression was higher in dystrophic versus control dogs, consistent with physiologic feedback between myostatin and ActRIIB. However, there was no

  19. Gentamicin treatment in exercised mdx mice: Identification of dystrophin-sensitive pathways and evaluation of efficacy in work-loaded dystrophic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Annamaria; Nico, Beatrice; Rolland, Jean-François; Cozzoli, Anna; Burdi, Rosa; Mangieri, Domenica; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Liantonio, Antonella; Cippone, Valentina; De Bellis, Michela; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2008-11-01

    Aminoglycosides force read through of premature stop codon mutations and introduce new mutation-specific gene-corrective strategies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A chronic treatment with gentamicin (32 mg/kg/daily i.p., 8-12 weeks) was performed in exercised mdx mice with the dual aim to clarify the dependence on dystrophin of the functional, biochemical and histological alterations present in dystrophic muscle and to verify the long term efficiency of small molecule gene-corrective strategies in work-loaded dystrophic muscle. The treatment counteracted the exercise-induced impairment of in vivo forelimb strength after 6-8 weeks. We observed an increase in dystrophin expression level in all the fibers, although lower than that observed in normal fibers, and found a concomitant recovery of aquaporin-4 at sarcolemma. A significant reduction in centronucleated fibers, in the area of necrosis and in the percentage of nuclear factor-kB-positive nuclei was observed in gastrocnemious muscle of treated animals. Plasma creatine kinase was reduced by 70%. Ex vivo, gentamicin restored membrane ionic conductance in mdx diaphragm and limb muscle fibers. No effects were observed on the altered calcium homeostasis and sarcolemmal calcium permeability, detected by electrophysiological and microspectrofluorimetric approaches. Thus, the maintenance of a partial level of dystrophin is sufficient to reinforce sarcolemmal stability, reducing leakiness, inflammation and fiber damage, while correction of altered calcium homeostasis needs greater expression of dystrophin or direct interventions on the channels involved.

  20. Simultaneous Pathoproteomic Evaluation of the Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex and Secondary Changes in the mdx-4cv Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Murphy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In skeletal muscle, the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex forms a membrane-associated assembly of relatively low abundance, making its detailed proteomic characterization in normal versus dystrophic tissues technically challenging. To overcome this analytical problem, we have enriched the muscle membrane fraction by a minimal differential centrifugation step followed by the comprehensive label-free mass spectrometric analysis of microsomal membrane preparations. This organelle proteomic approach successfully identified dystrophin and its binding partners in normal versus dystrophic hind limb muscles. The introduction of a simple pre-fractionation step enabled the simultaneous proteomic comparison of the reduction in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and secondary changes in the mdx-4cv mouse model of dystrophinopathy in a single analytical run. The proteomic screening of the microsomal fraction from dystrophic hind limb muscle identified the full-length dystrophin isoform Dp427 as the most drastically reduced protein in dystrophinopathy, demonstrating the remarkable analytical power of comparative muscle proteomics. Secondary pathoproteomic expression patterns were established for 281 proteins, including dystrophin-associated proteins and components involved in metabolism, signalling, contraction, ion-regulation, protein folding, the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. Key findings were verified by immunoblotting. Increased levels of the sarcolemmal Na+/K+-ATPase in dystrophic leg muscles were also confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Thus, the reduction of sample complexity in organelle-focused proteomics can be advantageous for the profiling of supramolecular protein complexes in highly intricate systems, such as skeletal muscle tissue.

  1. Black bear parathyroid hormone has greater anabolic effects on trabecular bone in dystrophin-deficient mice than in wild type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sarah K; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Sanders, Jennifer L; Condon, Keith W; Tsai, Chung-Jui; Donahue, Seth W

    2012-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked neuromuscular disease that has deleterious consequences in muscle and bone, leading to decreased mobility, progressive osteoporosis, and premature death. Patients with DMD experience a higher-than-average fracture rate, particularly in the proximal and distal femur and proximal tibia. The dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse is a model of DMD that demonstrates muscle degeneration and fibrosis and osteoporosis. Parathyroid hormone, an effective anabolic agent for post-menopausal and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, has not been explored for DMD. Black bear parathyroid hormone (bbPTH) has been implicated in the maintenance of bone properties during extended periods of disuse (hibernation). We cloned bbPTH and found 9 amino acid residue differences from human PTH. Apoptosis was mitigated and cAMP was activated by bbPTH in osteoblast cultures. We administered 28nmol/kg of bbPTH 1-84 to 4-week old male mdx and wild type mice via daily (5×/week) subcutaneous injection for 6 weeks. Vehicle-treated mdx mice had 44% lower trabecular bone volume fraction than wild type mice. No changes were found in femoral cortical bone geometry or mechanical properties with bbPTH treatment in wild type mice, and only medio-lateral moment of inertia changed with bbPTH treatment in mdx femurs. However, μCT analyses of the trabecular regions of the distal femur and proximal tibia showed marked increases in bone volume fraction with bbPTH treatment, with a greater anabolic response (7-fold increase) in mdx mice than wild type mice (2-fold increase). Trabecular number increased in mdx long bone, but not wild type bone. Additionally, greater osteoblast area and decreased osteoclast area were observed with bbPTH treatment in mdx mice. The heightened response to PTH in mdx bone compared to wild type suggests a link between dystrophin deficiency, altered calcium signaling, and bone. These findings support further investigation of PTH as an anabolic

  2. Myogenic reprogramming of bone marrow derived cells in a W⁴¹Dmd(mdx deficient mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Walsh

    Full Text Available Lack of expression of dystrophin leads to degeneration of muscle fibers and infiltration of connective and adipose tissue. Cell transplantation therapy has been proposed as a treatment for intractable muscle degenerative disorders. Several reports have demonstrated the ability of bone-marrow derived cells (BMDC to contribute to non-haematopoietic tissues including epithelium, heart, liver, skeletal muscle and brain following transplantation by means of fusion and reprogramming. A key issue is the extent to which fusion and reprogramming can occur in vivo, particularly under conditions of myogenic deterioration.To investigate the therapeutic potential of bone marrow transplantation in monogenetic myopathy, green fluorescent protein-positive (GFP+ bone marrow cells were transplanted into non-irradiated c-kit receptor-deficient (W⁴¹ mdx mice. This model allows BMDC reconstitution in the absence of irradiation induced myeloablation. We provide the first report of BMDC fusion in a W⁴¹Dmd(mdx deficient mouse model.In the absence of irradiation induced injury, few GFP+ cardiomyocytes and muscle fibres were detected 24 weeks post BMT. It was expected that the frequency of fusion in the hearts of W⁴¹Dmd(mdx mice would be similar to frequencies observed in infarcted mice. Although, it is clear from this study that individual cardiomyocytes with monogenetic deficiencies can be rescued by fusion, it is as clear that in the absence of irradiation, the formation of stable and reprogrammed fusion hybrids occurs, with the current techniques, at very low levels in non-irradiated recipients.

  3. Lack of dystrophin leads to the selective loss of superior cervical ganglion neurons projecting to muscular targets in genetically dystrophic mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefano, M Egle; Leone, Lucia; Lombardi, Loredana; Paggi, Paola

    2005-12-01

    Autonomic imbalance is a pathological aspect of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we show that the sympathetic superior cervical ganglion (SCG) of mdx mice, which lack dystrophin (Dp427), has 36% fewer neurons than that of wild-type animals. Cell loss occurs around P10 and affects those neurons innervating muscular targets (heart and iris), which, differently from the submandibular gland (non-muscular target), are precociously damaged by the lack of Dp427. In addition, although we reveal altered axonal defasciculation in the submandibular gland and reduced terminal sprouting in all SCG target organs, poor adrenergic innervation is observed only in the heart and iris. These alterations, detected as early as P5, when neuronal loss has not yet occurred, suggest that in mdx mice the absence of Dp427 directly impairs the axonal growth and terminal sprouting of sympathetic neurons. However, when these intrinsic alterations combine with structural and/or functional damages of muscular targets, neuronal death occurs.

  4. Morphological changes in the trigemino-rubral pathway in dystrophic (mdx) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Magali Luci; Tokunaga, Heloisa Helena Vieira Olyntho; Souccar, Caden; Schoorlemmer, Guus H M; Lapa, Rita de Cássia Ribeiro da Silva

    2007-04-12

    The lack of dystrophin that causes Duchenne muscle disease affects not only the muscles but also the central nervous system. Dystrophin-deficient mdx mice present changes in several brain fiber systems. We compared the projections from the trigeminal sensory nuclear complex to the red nucleus in control and mdx mice using retrograde tracers. Injection of 200 nL 2% fluorogold into the red nucleus caused labeling in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus, the principal sensory nucleus and the oral, interpolar, and caudal subnuclei of the spinal trigeminal nucleus in both control and mdx mice. Injection of latex microbeads labeled with rhodamine and fluorescein gave results similar to those seen with fluorogold. The number of labeled neurons in the trigeminal sensory nuclear complex was significantly reduced in mdx mice. In the oral subnucleus of the spinal trigeminal nucleus this reduction was 50%. These results indicate that the trigemino-rubral pathway is reduced in dystrophin-deficient mice.

  5. Eosinophilia of dystrophin-deficient muscle is promoted by perforin-mediated cytotoxicity by T cell effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, B.; Spencer, M. J.; Nakamura, G.; Tseng-Ong, L.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) contribute to muscle pathology in the dystrophin-null mutant mouse (mdx) model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy through perforin-dependent and perforin-independent mechanisms. We have assessed whether the CTL-mediated pathology includes the promotion of eosinophilia in dystrophic muscle, and thereby provides a secondary mechanism through which CTLs contribute to muscular dystrophy. Quantitative immunohistochemistry confirmed that eosinophilia is a component of the mdx dystrophy. In addition, electron microscopic observations show that eosinophils traverse the basement membrane of mdx muscle fibers and display sites of close apposition of eosinophil and muscle membranes. The close membrane apposition is characterized by impingement of eosinophilic rods of major basic protein into the muscle cell membrane. Transfer of mdx splenocytes and mdx muscle extracts to irradiated C57 mice by intraperitoneal injection resulted in muscle eosinophilia in the recipient mice. Double-mutant mice lacking dystrophin and perforin showed less eosinophilia than was displayed by mdx mice that expressed perforin. Finally, administration of prednisolone, which has been shown previously to reduce the concentration of CTLs in dystrophic muscle, produced a significant reduction in eosinophilia. These findings indicate that eosinophilia is a component of the mdx pathology that is promoted by perforin-dependent cytotoxicity of effector T cells. However, some eosinophilia of mdx muscle is independent of perforin-mediated processes.

  6. Increased constitutive nitric oxide production by whole body periodic acceleration ameliorates alterations in cardiomyocytes associated with utrophin/dystrophin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jose R; Kolster, Juan; Zhang, Rui; Adams, Jose

    2017-07-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) cardiomyopathy is a progressive lethal disease caused by the lack of the dystrophin protein in the heart. The most widely used animal model of DMD is the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse; however, these mice exhibit a mild dystrophic phenotype with heart failure only late in life. In contrast, mice deficient for both dystrophin and utrophin (mdx/utrn(-/-), or dKO) can be used to model severe DMD cardiomyopathy where pathophysiological indicators of heart failure are detectable by 8-10weeks of age. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule involved in vital functions of regulating rhythm, contractility, and microcirculation of the heart, and constitutive NO production affects the function of proteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling. In this study, we explored the efficacy of enhancing NO production as a therapeutic strategy for treating DMD cardiomyopathy using the dKO mouse model of DMD. Specifically, NO production was induced via whole body periodic acceleration (pGz), a novel non-pharmacologic intervention which enhances NO synthase (NOS) activity through sinusoidal motion of the body in a headward-footward direction, introducing pulsatile shear stress to the vascular endothelium and cardiomyocyte plasma membrane. Male dKO mice were randomized at 8weeks of age to receive daily pGz (480cpm, Gz±3.0m/s(2), 1h/d) for 4weeks or no treatment, and a separate age-matched group of WT animals (pGz-treated and untreated) served as non-diseased controls. At the conclusion of the protocol, cardiomyocytes from untreated dKO animals had, respectively, 4.3-fold and 3.5-fold higher diastolic resting concentration of Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]d) and Na(+) ([Na(+)]d) compared to WT, while pGz treatment significantly reduced these levels. For dKO cardiomyocytes, pGz treatment also improved the depressed contractile function, decreased oxidative stress, blunted the elevation in calpain activity, and mitigated the abnormal increase in [Ca

  7. Disruption of action potential and calcium signaling properties in malformed myofibers from dystrophin-deficient mice.

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    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Pratt, Stephen J P; Garcia-Pelagio, Karla P; Schneider, Martin F; Lovering, Richard M

    2015-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and severe muscular dystrophy, is caused by the absence of dystrophin. Muscle weakness and fragility (i.e., increased susceptibility to damage) are presumably due to structural instability of the myofiber cytoskeleton, but recent studies suggest that the increased presence of malformed/branched myofibers in dystrophic muscle may also play a role. We have previously studied myofiber morphology in healthy wild-type (WT) and dystrophic (MDX) skeletal muscle. Here, we examined myofiber excitability using high-speed confocal microscopy and the voltage-sensitive indicator di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (di-8-ANEPPS) to assess the action potential (AP) properties. We also examined AP-induced Ca(2+) transients using high-speed confocal microscopy with rhod-2, and assessed sarcolemma fragility using elastimetry. AP recordings showed an increased width and time to peak in malformed MDX myofibers compared to normal myofibers from both WT and MDX, but no significant change in AP amplitude. Malformed MDX myofibers also exhibited reduced AP-induced Ca(2+) transients, with a further Ca(2+) transient reduction in the branches of malformed MDX myofibers. Mechanical studies indicated an increased sarcolemma deformability and instability in malformed MDX myofibers. The data suggest that malformed myofibers are functionally different from myofibers with normal morphology. The differences seen in AP properties and Ca(2+) signals suggest changes in excitability and remodeling of the global Ca(2+) signal, both of which could underlie reported weakness in dystrophic muscle. The biomechanical changes in the sarcolemma support the notion that malformed myofibers are more susceptible to damage. The high prevalence of malformed myofibers in dystrophic muscle may contribute to the progressive strength loss and fragility seen in dystrophic muscles. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley

  8. Dystrophin and utrophin influence fiber type composition and post-synaptic membrane structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, J A; Townsend, E R; Squire, S E; Potter, A C; Chamberlain, J S; Davies, K E

    2000-05-22

    The X-linked muscle wasting disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by the lack of dystrophin in muscle. Protein structure predictions, patient mutations, in vitro binding studies and transgenic and knockout mice suggest that dystrophin plays a mechanical role in skeletal muscle, linking the subsarcolemmal cytoskeleton with the extracellular matrix through its direct interaction with the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC). Although a signaling role for dystrophin has been postulated, definitive data have been lacking. To identify potential non-mechanical roles of dystrophin, we tested the ability of various truncated dystrophin transgenes to prevent any of the skeletal muscle abnormalities associated with the double knockout mouse deficient for both dystrophin and the dystrophin-related protein utrophin. We show that restoration of the DAPC with Dp71 does not prevent the structural abnormalities of the post-synaptic membrane or the abnormal oxidative properties of utrophin/dystrophin-deficient muscle. In marked contrast, a dystrophin protein lacking the cysteine-rich domain, which is unable to prevent dystrophy in the mdx mouse, is able to ameliorate these abnormalities in utrophin/dystrophin-deficient mice. These experiments provide the first direct evidence that in addition to a mechanical role and relocalization of the DAPC, dystrophin and utrophin are able to alter both structural and biochemical properties of skeletal muscle. In addition, these mice provide unique insights into skeletal muscle fiber type composition.

  9. A duchenne muscular dystrophy gene hot spot mutation in dystrophin-deficient cavalier king charles spaniels is amenable to exon 51 skipping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma L Walmsley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, which afflicts 1 in 3500 boys, is one of the most common genetic disorders of children. This fatal degenerative condition is caused by an absence or deficiency of dystrophin in striated muscle. Most affected patients have inherited or spontaneous deletions in the dystrophin gene that disrupt the reading frame resulting in unstable truncated products. For these patients, restoration of the reading frame via antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach. The major DMD deletion "hot spot" is found between exons 45 and 53, and skipping exon 51 in particular is predicted to ameliorate the dystrophic phenotype in the greatest number of patients. Currently the mdx mouse is the most widely used animal model of DMD, although its mild phenotype limits its suitability in clinical trials. The Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD model has a severe phenotype, but due to its large size, is expensive to use. Both these models have mutations in regions of the dystrophin gene distant from the commonly mutated DMD "hot spot". METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe the severe phenotype, histopathological findings, and molecular analysis of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy (CKCS-MD. The dogs harbour a missense mutation in the 5' donor splice site of exon 50 that results in deletion of exon 50 in mRNA transcripts and a predicted premature truncation of the translated protein. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated skipping of exon 51 in cultured myoblasts from an affected dog restored the reading frame and protein expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Given the small size of the breed, the amiable temperament and the nature of the mutation, we propose that CKCS-MD is a valuable new model for clinical trials of antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping and other therapeutic approaches for DMD.

  10. Role of dystrophin in airway smooth muscle phenotype, contraction and lung function.

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    Pawan Sharma

    Full Text Available Dystrophin links the transmembrane dystrophin-glycoprotein complex to the actin cytoskeleton. We have shown that dystrophin-glycoprotein complex subunits are markers for airway smooth muscle phenotype maturation and together with caveolin-1, play an important role in calcium homeostasis. We tested if dystrophin affects phenotype maturation, tracheal contraction and lung physiology. We used dystrophin deficient Golden Retriever dogs (GRMD and mdx mice vs healthy control animals in our approach. We found significant reduction of contractile protein markers: smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC and calponin and reduced Ca2+ response to contractile agonist in dystrophin deficient cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed reduced stress fibers and number of smMHC positive cells in dystrophin-deficient cells, when compared to control. Immunoblot analysis of Akt1, GSK3β and mTOR phosphorylation further revealed that downstream PI3K signaling, which is essential for phenotype maturation, was suppressed in dystrophin deficient cell cultures. Tracheal rings from mdx mice showed significant reduction in the isometric contraction to methacholine (MCh when compared to genetic control BL10ScSnJ mice (wild-type. In vivo lung function studies using a small animal ventilator revealed a significant reduction in peak airway resistance induced by maximum concentrations of inhaled MCh in mdx mice, while there was no change in other lung function parameters. These data show that the lack of dystrophin is associated with a concomitant suppression of ASM cell phenotype maturation in vitro, ASM contraction ex vivo and lung function in vivo, indicating that a linkage between the DGC and the actin cytoskeleton via dystrophin is a determinant of the phenotype and functional properties of ASM.

  11. Decreased inward rectifier potassium current IK1 in dystrophin-deficient ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi, Lena; Koenig, Xaver; Kubista, Helmut; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2017-03-04

    Kir2.x channels in ventricular cardiomyocytes (most prominently Kir2.1) account for the inward rectifier potassium current IK1, which controls the resting membrane potential and the final phase of action potential repolarization. Recently it was hypothesized that the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) is important in the regulation of Kir2.x channels. To test this hypothesis, we investigated potential IK1 abnormalities in dystrophin-deficient ventricular cardiomyocytes derived from the hearts of Duchenne muscular dystrophy mouse models. We found that IK1 was substantially diminished in dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes when compared to wild type myocytes. This finding represents the first functional evidence for a significant role of the DAPC in the regulation of Kir2.x channels.

  12. ADAM12 alleviates the skeletal muscle pathology in mdx dystrophic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronqvist, Pauliina; Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Albrechtsen, Reidar;

    2002-01-01

    we examined the role of the transmembrane ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloprotease, which is normally associated with development and regeneration of skeletal muscle. We demonstrate that ADAM12 overexpression in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mice alleviated the muscle pathology in these animals...

  13. Dystrophin deficiency leads to disturbance of LAMP1-vesicle-associated protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duguez, S.; Duddy, W.; Johnston, H.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy results from loss of the protein dystrophin, which links the intracellular cytoskeletal network with the extracellular matrix, but deficiency in this function does not fully explain the onset or progression of the disease. While some intracellular events involved...... of new potential therapeutic targets....

  14. Characterization of dystrophin deficient rats: a new model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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    Thibaut Larcher

    Full Text Available A few animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD are available, large ones such as pigs or dogs being expensive and difficult to handle. Mdx (X-linked muscular dystrophy mice only partially mimic the human disease, with limited chronic muscular lesions and muscle weakness. Their small size also imposes limitations on analyses. A rat model could represent a useful alternative since rats are small animals but 10 times bigger than mice and could better reflect the lesions and functional abnormalities observed in DMD patients. Two lines of Dmd mutated-rats (Dmdmdx were generated using TALENs targeting exon 23. Muscles of animals of both lines showed undetectable levels of dystrophin by western blot and less than 5% of dystrophin positive fibers by immunohistochemistry. At 3 months, limb and diaphragm muscles from Dmdmdx rats displayed severe necrosis and regeneration. At 7 months, these muscles also showed severe fibrosis and some adipose tissue infiltration. Dmdmdx rats showed significant reduction in muscle strength and a decrease in spontaneous motor activity. Furthermore, heart morphology was indicative of dilated cardiomyopathy associated histologically with necrotic and fibrotic changes. Echocardiography showed significant concentric remodeling and alteration of diastolic function. In conclusion, Dmdmdx rats represent a new faithful small animal model of DMD.

  15. Characterization of dystrophin deficient rats: a new model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcher, Thibaut; Lafoux, Aude; Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Thepenier, Virginie; François, Virginie; Le Guiner, Caroline; Goubin, Helicia; Dutilleul, Maéva; Guigand, Lydie; Toumaniantz, Gilles; De Cian, Anne; Boix, Charlotte; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yan; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio; Huchet, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    A few animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are available, large ones such as pigs or dogs being expensive and difficult to handle. Mdx (X-linked muscular dystrophy) mice only partially mimic the human disease, with limited chronic muscular lesions and muscle weakness. Their small size also imposes limitations on analyses. A rat model could represent a useful alternative since rats are small animals but 10 times bigger than mice and could better reflect the lesions and functional abnormalities observed in DMD patients. Two lines of Dmd mutated-rats (Dmdmdx) were generated using TALENs targeting exon 23. Muscles of animals of both lines showed undetectable levels of dystrophin by western blot and less than 5% of dystrophin positive fibers by immunohistochemistry. At 3 months, limb and diaphragm muscles from Dmdmdx rats displayed severe necrosis and regeneration. At 7 months, these muscles also showed severe fibrosis and some adipose tissue infiltration. Dmdmdx rats showed significant reduction in muscle strength and a decrease in spontaneous motor activity. Furthermore, heart morphology was indicative of dilated cardiomyopathy associated histologically with necrotic and fibrotic changes. Echocardiography showed significant concentric remodeling and alteration of diastolic function. In conclusion, Dmdmdx rats represent a new faithful small animal model of DMD.

  16. Upregulation of the creatine synthetic pathway in skeletal muscles of mature mdx mice.

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    McClure, Warren C; Rabon, Rick E; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Tseng, Brian S

    2007-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular human disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. The mdx mouse lacks dystrophin protein, yet does not exhibit the debilitating DMD phenotype. Investigating compensatory mechanisms in the mdx mouse may shed new insights into modifying DMD pathogenesis. This study targets two metabolic genes, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) and arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) which are required for creatine synthesis. We show that GAMT and AGAT mRNA are up-regulated 5.4- and 1.9-fold respectively in adult mdx muscle compared to C57. In addition, GAMT protein expression is up-regulated at least 2.5-fold in five different muscles of mdx vs. control. Furthermore, we find GAMT immunoreactivity in up to 80% of mature mdx muscle fibers in addition to small regenerating fibers and rare revertants; while GAMT immunoreactivity is equal to background levels in all muscle fibers of mature C57 mice. The up-regulation of the creatine synthetic pathway may help maintain muscle creatine levels and limit cellular energy failure in leaky mdx skeletal muscles. These results may help better understand the mild phenotype of the mdx mouse and may offer new treatment horizons for DMD.

  17. Efecto del aceite esencial de Citrus aurantium l. en la regeneración muscular en ratones mdx

    OpenAIRE

    Tome de Souza, Paula Aiello [UNESP; Marques, Maria Julia; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko; Michelin Matheus, Selma Maria

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe X-linked recessive disorder characterized by the progressive loss of muscular strength. Mdx mutant mice show a marked deficiency in dystrophin, which was related to muscle membrane stability. The aim of this study was to verify the possible protective anti-inflammatory effect of citrus oil on mdx muscle fibers. Thus, adult male and female mdx mice (014/06-CEEA) were divided into control and citrus-treated. After 60 days of treatment, one ml of blo...

  18. Delivery of AAV2/9-microdystrophin genes incorporating helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the C-terminal domain of dystrophin improves muscle pathology and restores the level of α1-syntrophin and α-dystrobrevin in skeletal muscles of mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Taeyoung; Malerba, Alberto; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Trollet, Capucine; Boldrin, Luisa; Ferry, Arnaud; Popplewell, Linda; Foster, Helen; Foster, Keith; Dickson, George

    2011-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe X-linked inherited muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been extensively used to deliver genes efficiently for dystrophin expression in skeletal muscles. To overcome limited packaging capacity of AAV vectors (damage in the mdx mice compared with MD1. These results suggest that the incorporation of helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the CT domain of dystrophin to the microdystrophins will substantially improve their efficiency in restoring muscle function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  19. The artificial gene Jazz, a transcriptional regulator of utrophin, corrects the dystrophic pathology in mdx mice.

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    Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Corbi, Nicoletta; Strimpakos, Georgios; Onori, Annalisa; Luvisetto, Siro; Severini, Cinzia; Guglielmotti, Angelo; Batassa, Enrico Maria; Pisani, Cinzia; Floridi, Aristide; Benassi, Barbara; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Magrelli, Armando; Mattei, Elisabetta; Passananti, Claudio

    2010-03-01

    The absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin results in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The utrophin protein is the best candidate for dystrophin replacement in DMD patients. To obtain therapeutic levels of utrophin expression in dystrophic muscle, we developed an alternative strategy based on the use of artificial zinc finger transcription factors (ZF ATFs). The ZF ATF 'Jazz' was recently engineered and tested in vivo by generating a transgenic mouse specifically expressing Jazz at the muscular level. To validate the ZF ATF technology for DMD treatment we generated a second mouse model by crossing Jazz-transgenic mice with dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Here, we show that the artificial Jazz protein restores sarcolemmal integrity and prevents the development of the dystrophic disease in mdx mice. This exclusive animal model establishes the notion that utrophin-based therapy for DMD can be efficiently developed using ZF ATF technology and candidates Jazz as a novel therapeutic molecule for DMD therapy.

  20. Improvement of cardiac contractile function by peptide-based inhibition of NF-κB in the utrophin/dystrophin-deficient murine model of muscular dystrophy

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    Guttridge Denis C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an inherited and progressive disease causing striated muscle deterioration. Patients in their twenties generally die from either respiratory or cardiac failure. In order to improve the lifespan and quality of life of DMD patients, it is important to prevent or reverse the progressive loss of contractile function of the heart. Recent studies by our labs have shown that the peptide NBD (Nemo Binding Domain, targeted at blunting Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB signaling, reduces inflammation, enhances myofiber regeneration, and improves contractile deficits in the diaphragm in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Methods To assess whether cardiac function in addition to diaphragm function can be improved, we investigated physiological and histological parameters of cardiac muscle in mice deficient for both dystrophin and its homolog utrophin (double knockout = dko mice treated with NBD peptide. These dko mice show classic pathophysiological hallmarks of heart failure, including myocyte degeneration, an impaired force-frequency response and a severely blunted β-adrenergic response. Cardiac contractile function at baseline and frequencies and pre-loads throughout the in vivo range as well as β-adrenergic reserve was measured in isolated cardiac muscle preparations. In addition, we studied histopathological and inflammatory markers in these mice. Results At baseline conditions, active force development in cardiac muscles from NBD treated dko mice was more than double that of vehicle-treated dko mice. NBD treatment also significantly improved frequency-dependent behavior of the muscles. The increase in force in NBD-treated dko muscles to β-adrenergic stimulation was robustly restored compared to vehicle-treated mice. However, histological features, including collagen content and inflammatory markers were not significantly different between NBD-treated and vehicle-treated dko mice. Conclusions We conclude

  1. Effect of Dystrophin Deficiency on Selected Intrinsic Laryngeal Muscles of the "mdx" Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Lisa T.; Stemple, Joseph C.; Andreatta, Richard D.; Harrison, Anne L.; Andrade, Francisco H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Intrinsic laryngeal muscles (ILM) show biological differences from the broader class of skeletal muscles. Yet most research regarding ILM specialization has been completed on a few muscles, most notably the thyroarytenoid and posterior cricoarytenoid. Little information exists regarding the biology of other ILM. Early evidence suggests…

  2. Mechanical, biochemical and morphometric alterations in the femur of mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Wilson Romero; Bertran, Celso Aparecido; Matsumura, Cintia Yuri; Santo-Neto, Humberto; Camilli, José Angelo

    2011-02-01

    The bone tissue abnormalities observed in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy are frequently attributed to muscle weakness. In this condition, bones receive fewer mechanical stimuli, compromising the process of bone modeling. In the present study we hypothesize that other factors inherent to the disease might be associated with bone tissue impairment, irrespective of the presence of muscle impairment. Mdx mice lack dystrophin and present cycles of muscle degeneration/regeneration that become more intense in the third week of life. As observed in humans with muscular dystrophy, bone tissue abnormalities were found in mdx mice during more intense muscle degeneration due to age. Under these circumstances, muscle deficit is probably one of the factors promoting these changes. To test our hypothesis, we investigated the changes that occur in the femur of mdx mice at 21 days of age when muscle damage is still not significant. The mechanical (structural and material) and biochemical properties and morphometric characteristics of the femur of mdx and control animals were evaluated. The results demonstrated a lower strength, stiffness and energy absorption capacity in mdx femurs. Higher values for structural (load and stiffness) and material (stress, elastic modulus and toughness) properties were observed in the control group. Mdx femurs were shorter and were characterized by a smaller cortical area and thickness and a smaller area of epiphyseal trabecular bone. The hydroxyproline content was similar in the two groups, but there was a significant difference in the Ca/P ratios. Thermogravimetry showed a higher mineral matrix content in cortical bone of control animals. In conclusion, femurs of mdx mice presented impaired mechanical and biochemical properties as well as changes in collagen organization in the extracellular matrix. Thus, mdx mice developed femoral osteopenia even in the absence of significant muscle fiber degeneration. This weakness of the mdx femur is

  3. Fetal skeletal muscle progenitors have regenerative capacity after intramuscular engraftment in dystrophin deficient mice.

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    Hiroshi Sakai

    Full Text Available Muscle satellite cells (SCs are stem cells that reside in skeletal muscles and contribute to regeneration upon muscle injury. SCs arise from skeletal muscle progenitors expressing transcription factors Pax3 and/or Pax7 during embryogenesis in mice. However, it is unclear whether these fetal progenitors possess regenerative ability when transplanted in adult muscle. Here we address this question by investigating whether fetal skeletal muscle progenitors (FMPs isolated from Pax3(GFP/+ embryos have the capacity to regenerate muscle after engraftment into Dystrophin-deficient mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The capacity of FMPs to engraft and enter the myogenic program in regenerating muscle was compared with that of SCs derived from adult Pax3(GFP/+ mice. Transplanted FMPs contributed to the reconstitution of damaged myofibers in Dystrophin-deficient mice. However, despite FMPs and SCs having similar myogenic ability in culture, the regenerative ability of FMPs was less than that of SCs in vivo. FMPs that had activated MyoD engrafted more efficiently to regenerate myofibers than MyoD-negative FMPs. Transcriptome and surface marker analyses of these cells suggest the importance of myogenic priming for the efficient myogenic engraftment. Our findings suggest the regenerative capability of FMPs in the context of muscle repair and cell therapy for degenerative muscle disease.

  4. Effective exon skipping and dystrophin restoration by 2'-o-methoxyethyl antisense oligonucleotide in dystrophin-deficient mice.

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    Lu Yang

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotide (AO-mediated exon-skipping therapy is one of the most promising therapeutic strategies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD and several AO chemistries have been rigorously investigated. In this report, we focused on the effect of 2'-O-methoxyethyl oligonucleotides (MOE on exon skipping in cultured mdx myoblasts and mice. Efficient dose-dependent skipping of targeted exon 23 was achieved in myoblasts with MOE AOs of different lengths and backbone chemistries. Furthermore, we established that 25-mer MOE phosphorothioate (PS AOs provided the greatest exon-skipping efficacy. When compared with 2'O methyl phosphorothioate (2'OmePS AOs, 25-mer MOE (PS AOs also showed higher exon-skipping activity in vitro and in mdx mice after intramuscular injections. Characterization of uptake in vitro corroborated with exon-skipping results, suggesting that increased uptake of 25-mer MOE PS AOs might partly contribute to the difference in exon-skipping activity observed in vitro and in mdx mice. Our findings demonstrate the substantial potential for MOE PS AOs as an alternative option for the treatment of DMD.

  5. Non-Invasive MRI and Spectroscopy of mdx Mice Reveal Temporal Changes in Dystrophic Muscle Imaging and in Energy Deficits

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    Heier, Christopher R.; Guerron, Alfredo D.; Korotcov, Alexandru; Lin, Stephen; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Fricke, Stanley; Sze, Raymond W.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Wang, Paul; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic disruption of dystrophin protein expression results in repeated muscle injury and chronic inflammation. Magnetic resonance imaging shows promise as a surrogate outcome measure in both DMD and rehabilitation medicine that is capable of predicting clinical benefit years in advance of functional outcome measures. The mdx mouse reproduces the dystrophin deficiency that causes DMD and is routinely used for preclinical drug testing. There is a need to develop sensitive, non-invasive outcome measures in the mdx model that can be readily translatable to human clinical trials. Here we report the use of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy techniques for the non-invasive monitoring of muscle damage in mdx mice. Using these techniques, we studied dystrophic mdx muscle in mice from 6 to 12 weeks of age, examining both the peak disease phase and natural recovery phase of the mdx disease course. T2 and fat-suppressed imaging revealed significant levels of tissue with elevated signal intensity in mdx hindlimb muscles at all ages; spectroscopy revealed a significant deficiency of energy metabolites in 6-week-old mdx mice. As the mdx mice progressed from the peak disease stage to the recovery stage of disease, each of these phenotypes was either eliminated or reduced, and the cross-sectional area of the mdx muscle was significantly increased when compared to that of wild-type mice. Histology indicates that hyper-intense MRI foci correspond to areas of dystrophic lesions containing inflammation as well as regenerating, degenerating and hypertrophied myofibers. Statistical sample size calculations provide several robust measures with the ability to detect intervention effects using small numbers of animals. These data establish a framework for further imaging or preclinical studies, and they support the development of MRI as a sensitive, non-invasive outcome measure for muscular dystrophy. PMID:25390038

  6. Comparative proteomic profiling of soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, Steven; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Zhang, Yaxin; Winkler, Claudia K; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is due to genetic abnormalities in the dystrophin gene and represents one of the most frequent genetic childhood diseases. In the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse model of dystrophinopathy, different subtypes of skeletal muscles are affected to a varying degree albeit the same single base substitution within exon 23 of the dystrophin gene. Thus, to determine potential muscle subtype-specific differences in secondary alterations due to a deficiency in dystrophin, in this study, we carried out a comparative histological and proteomic survey of mdx muscles. We intentionally included the skeletal muscles that are often used for studying the pathomechanism of muscular dystrophy. Histological examinations revealed a significantly higher degree of central nucleation in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles compared with the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. Muscular hypertrophy of 20-25% was likewise only observed in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice, but not in the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. For proteomic analysis, muscle protein extracts were separated by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Proteins with a significant change in their expression were identified by mass spectrometry. Proteomic profiling established an altered abundance of 24, 17, 19 and 5 protein species in the dystrophin-deficient soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscle, respectively. The key proteomic findings were verified by immunoblot analysis. The identified proteins are involved in the contraction-relaxation cycle, metabolite transport, muscle metabolism and the cellular stress response. Thus, histological and proteomic profiling of muscle subtypes from mdx mice indicated that distinct skeletal muscles are differentially affected by the loss of the membrane cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Varying degrees of perturbed protein

  7. Skeletal muscle-specific ablation of gamma(cyto-actin does not exacerbate the mdx phenotype.

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    Kurt W Prins

    Full Text Available We previously documented a ten-fold increase in gamma(cyto-actin expression in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle and hypothesized that increased gamma(cyto-actin expression may participate in an adaptive cytoskeletal remodeling response. To explore whether increased gamma(cyto-actin fortifies the cortical cytoskeleton in dystrophic skeletal muscle, we generated double knockout mice lacking both dystrophin and gamma(cyto-actin specifically in skeletal muscle (ms-DKO. Surprisingly, dystrophin-deficient mdx and ms-DKO mice presented with comparable levels of myofiber necrosis, membrane instability, and deficits in muscle function. The lack of an exacerbated phenotype in ms-DKO mice suggests gamma(cyto-actin and dystrophin function in a common pathway. Finally, because both mdx and ms-DKO skeletal muscle showed similar levels of utrophin expression and presented with identical dystrophies, we conclude utrophin can partially compensate for the loss of dystrophin independent of a gamma(cyto-actin-utrophin interaction.

  8. Expression of full-length utrophin prevents muscular dystrophy in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, J; Deconinck, N; Fisher, R; Kahn, D; Phelps, S; Gillis, J M; Davies, K

    1998-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, progressive muscle wasting disease caused by a loss of sarcolemmal bound dystrophin, which results in the death of the muscle fiber leading to the gradual depletion of skeletal muscle. The molecular structure of dystrophin is very similar to that of the related protein utrophin. Utrophin is found in all tissues and is confined to the neuromuscular and myotendinous junctions in mature muscle. Sarcolemmal localization of a truncated utrophin transgene in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse significantly improves the dystrophic muscle phenotype. Therefore, up-regulation of utrophin by drug therapy is a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of DMD. Here we demonstrate that expression of full-length utrophin in mdx mice prevents the development of muscular dystrophy. We assessed muscle morphology, fiber regeneration and mechanical properties (force development and resistance to stretch) of mdx and transgenic mdx skeletal and diaphragm muscle. The utrophin levels required in muscle are significantly less than the normal endogenous utrophin levels seen in lung and kidney, and we provide evidence that the pathology depends on the amount of utrophin expression. These results also have important implications for DMD therapies in which utrophin replacement is achieved by delivery using exogenous vectors.

  9. The passive mechanical properties of the extensor digitorum longus muscle are compromised in 2- to 20-mo-old mdx mice.

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    Hakim, Chady H; Grange, Robert W; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-06-01

    Muscle rigidity and myotendinous junction (MTJ) deficiency contribute to immobilization in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a lethal disease caused by the absence of dystrophin. However, little is known about the muscle passive properties and MTJ strength in a diseased muscle. Here, we hypothesize that dystrophin-deficient muscle pathology renders skeletal muscle stiffer and MTJ weaker. To test our hypothesis, we examined the passive properties of an intact noncontracting muscle-tendon unit in mdx mice, a mouse model for DMD. The extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle-tendon preparations of 2-, 6-, 14-, and 20-mo-old mdx and normal control mice were strained stepwisely from 110% to 160% of the muscle optimal length. The stress-strain response and failure position were analyzed. In support of our hypothesis, the mdx EDL preparation consistently developed higher stress before muscle failure. Postfailure stresses decreased dramatically in mdx but not normal preparations. Further, mdx showed a significantly faster stress relaxation rate. Consistent with stress-strain assay results, we observed significantly higher fibrosis in mdx muscle. In 2- and 6-mo-old mdx and 20-mo-old BL10 mice failure occurred within the muscle (2- to 14-mo-old BL10 preparations did not fail). Interestingly, in ≥14-mo-old mdx mice the failure site shifted toward the MTJ. Electron microscopy revealed substantial MTJ degeneration in aged but not young mdx mice. In summary, our results suggest that the passive properties of the EDL muscle and the strength of MTJ are compromised in mdx in an age-dependent manner. These findings offer new insights in studying DMD pathogenesis and developing novel therapies.

  10. Dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes derived from human urine: New biologic reagents for drug discovery

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    Xuan Guan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to extract somatic cells from a patient and reprogram them to pluripotency opens up new possibilities for personalized medicine. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have been employed to generate beating cardiomyocytes from a patient's skin or blood cells. Here, iPSC methods were used to generate cardiomyocytes starting from the urine of a patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Urine was chosen as a starting material because it contains adult stem cells called urine-derived stem cells (USCs. USCs express the canonical reprogramming factors c-myc and klf4, and possess high telomerase activity. Pluripotency of urine-derived iPSC clones was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and teratoma formation. Urine-derived iPSC clones generated from healthy volunteers and a DMD patient were differentiated into beating cardiomyocytes using a series of small molecules in monolayer culture. Results indicate that cardiomyocytes retain the DMD patient's dystrophin mutation. Physiological assays suggest that dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes possess phenotypic differences from normal cardiomyocytes. These results demonstrate the feasibility of generating cardiomyocytes from a urine sample and that urine-derived cardiomyocytes retain characteristic features that might be further exploited for mechanistic studies and drug discovery.

  11. Profiling of Age-Related Changes in the Tibialis Anterior Muscle Proteome of the mdx Mouse Model of Dystrophinopathy

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    Steven Carberry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available X-linked muscular dystrophy is a highly progressive disease of childhood and characterized by primary genetic abnormalities in the dystrophin gene. Senescent mdx specimens were used for a large-scale survey of potential age-related alterations in the dystrophic phenotype, because the established mdx animal model of dystrophinopathy exhibits progressive deterioration of muscle tissue with age. Since the mdx tibialis anterior muscle is a frequently used model system in muscular dystrophy research, we employed this particular muscle to determine global changes in the dystrophic skeletal muscle proteome. The comparison of mdx mice aged 8 weeks versus 22 months by mass-spectrometry-based proteomics revealed altered expression levels in 8 distinct protein species. Increased levels were shown for carbonic anhydrase, aldolase, and electron transferring flavoprotein, while the expressions of pyruvate kinase, myosin, tropomyosin, and the small heat shock protein Hsp27 were found to be reduced in aged muscle. Immunoblotting confirmed age-dependent changes in the density of key muscle proteins in mdx muscle. Thus, segmental necrosis in mdx tibialis anterior muscle appears to trigger age-related protein perturbations due to dystrophin deficiency. The identification of novel indicators of progressive muscular dystrophy might be useful for the establishment of a muscle subtype-specific biomarker signature of dystrophinopathy.

  12. A comparative study of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc and cytotoxic T cell (CT carbohydrate expression in normal and dystrophin-deficient dog and human skeletal muscle.

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    Paul T Martin

    Full Text Available The expression of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc and the cytotoxic T cell (CT carbohydrate can impact the severity of muscular dystrophy arising from the loss of dystrophin in mdx mice. Here, we describe the expression of these two glycans in skeletal muscles of dogs and humans with or without dystrophin-deficiency. Neu5Gc expression was highly reduced (>95% in muscle from normal golden retriever crosses (GR, n = 3 and from golden retriever with muscular dystrophy (GRMD, n = 5 dogs at multiple ages (3, 6 and 13 months when compared to mouse muscle, however, overall sialic acid expression in GR and GRMD muscles remained high at all ages. Neu5Gc was expressed on only a minority of GRMD satellite cells, CD8⁺ T lymphocytes and macrophages. Human muscle from normal (no evident disease, n = 3, Becker (BMD, n = 3 and Duchenne (DMD, n = 3 muscular dystrophy individuals had absent to very low Neu5Gc staining, but some punctate intracellular muscle staining was present in BMD and DMD muscles. The CT carbohydrate was localized to the neuromuscular junction in GR muscle, while GRMD muscles had increased expression on a subset of myofibers and macrophages. In humans, the CT carbohydrate was ectopically expressed on the sarcolemmal membrane of some BMD muscles, but not normal human or DMD muscles. These data are consistent with the notion that altered Neu5Gc and CT carbohydrate expression may modify disease severity resulting from dystrophin deficiency in dogs and humans.

  13. A comparative study of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and cytotoxic T cell (CT) carbohydrate expression in normal and dystrophin-deficient dog and human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul T; Golden, Bethannie; Okerblom, Jonathan; Camboni, Marybeth; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Xu, Rui; Varki, Ajit; Flanigan, Kevin M; Kornegay, Joe N

    2014-01-01

    The expression of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and the cytotoxic T cell (CT) carbohydrate can impact the severity of muscular dystrophy arising from the loss of dystrophin in mdx mice. Here, we describe the expression of these two glycans in skeletal muscles of dogs and humans with or without dystrophin-deficiency. Neu5Gc expression was highly reduced (>95%) in muscle from normal golden retriever crosses (GR, n = 3) and from golden retriever with muscular dystrophy (GRMD, n = 5) dogs at multiple ages (3, 6 and 13 months) when compared to mouse muscle, however, overall sialic acid expression in GR and GRMD muscles remained high at all ages. Neu5Gc was expressed on only a minority of GRMD satellite cells, CD8⁺ T lymphocytes and macrophages. Human muscle from normal (no evident disease, n = 3), Becker (BMD, n = 3) and Duchenne (DMD, n = 3) muscular dystrophy individuals had absent to very low Neu5Gc staining, but some punctate intracellular muscle staining was present in BMD and DMD muscles. The CT carbohydrate was localized to the neuromuscular junction in GR muscle, while GRMD muscles had increased expression on a subset of myofibers and macrophages. In humans, the CT carbohydrate was ectopically expressed on the sarcolemmal membrane of some BMD muscles, but not normal human or DMD muscles. These data are consistent with the notion that altered Neu5Gc and CT carbohydrate expression may modify disease severity resulting from dystrophin deficiency in dogs and humans.

  14. ADAM12 overexpression does not improve outcome in mice with laminin alpha2-deficient muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Ling T; Shelton, G Diane; Wewer, Ulla M

    2005-01-01

    We have recently shown that overexpression of ADAM12 results in increased muscle regeneration and significantly reduced pathology in mdx, dystrophin deficient mice. In the present study, we tested the effect of overexpressing ADAM12 in dy(W) laminin-deficient mice. dy mice have a very severe clin...

  15. A marginal level of dystrophin partially ameliorates hindlimb muscle passive mechanical properties in dystrophin-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Duan, Dongsheng

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether a minimal level of dystrophin expression improves the passive mechanical properties of skeletal muscle in the murine Duchenne muscular dystrophy model. We compared the elastic and viscous properties of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) in mdx3cv and mdx4cv mice at 6, 14, and 20 months of age. Both strains are on the C57Bl/6 background, and both lose the full-length dystrophin protein. Interestingly, mdx3cv mice express a near full-length dystrophin at ≈ 5% of the normal level. We found that the stress-strain profile and the stress relaxation rate of the EDL in mdx3cv mice were partially preserved in all age groups compared with age-matched mdx4cv mice. Our results suggest that a low level of dystrophin expression may treat muscle stiffness in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Comparative Label-Free Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Mildly versus Severely Affected mdx Mouse Skeletal Muscles Identifies Annexin, Lamin, and Vimentin as Universal Dystrophic Markers

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    Ashling Holland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary deficiency in the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin results in complex changes in dystrophic muscles. In order to compare the degree of secondary alterations in differently affected subtypes of skeletal muscles, we have conducted a global analysis of proteome-wide changes in various dystrophin-deficient muscles. In contrast to the highly degenerative mdx diaphragm muscle, which showed considerable alterations in 35 distinct proteins, the spectrum of mildly to moderately dystrophic skeletal muscles, including interosseus, flexor digitorum brevis, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus muscle, exhibited a smaller number of changed proteins. Compensatory mechanisms and/or cellular variances may be responsible for differing secondary changes in individual mdx muscles. Label-free mass spectrometry established altered expression levels for diaphragm proteins associated with contraction, energy metabolism, the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix and the cellular stress response. Comparative immunoblotting verified the differences in the degree of secondary changes in dystrophin-deficient muscles and showed that the up-regulation of molecular chaperones, the compensatory increase in proteins of the intermediate filaments, the fibrosis-related increase in collagen levels and the pathophysiological decrease in calcium binding proteins is more pronounced in mdx diaphragm as compared to the less severely affected mdx leg muscles. Annexin, lamin, and vimentin were identified as universal dystrophic markers.

  17. Longitudinal ambulatory measurements of gait abnormality in dystrophin-deficient dogs

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    Voit Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to measure the gait abnormalities in GRMD (Golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs during growth and disease progression using an ambulatory gait analyzer (3D-accelerometers as a possible tool to assess the effects of a therapeutic intervention. Methods Six healthy and twelve GRMD dogs were evaluated twice monthly, from the age of two to nine months. The evolution of each gait variable previously shown to be modified in control and dystrophin-deficient adults was assessed using two-ways variance analysis (age, clinical status with repeated measurements. A principal component analysis (PCA was applied to perfect multivariate data interpretation. Results Speed, stride length, total power and force significantly already decreased (p Conclusion The gait variables measured by the accelerometers were sensitive to early detect and follow the gait disorders and mirrored the heterogeneity of clinical presentations, giving sense to monitor gait in GRMD dogs during progression of the disease and pre-clinical therapeutic trials.

  18. Loss of nNOS inhibits compensatory muscle hypertrophy and exacerbates inflammation and eccentric contraction-induced damage in mdx mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehner, Stanley C.; Reed, Sarah M.; Anderson, Kendra N.; Huang, Paul L.; Percival, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Approaches targeting nitric oxide (NO) signaling show promise as therapies for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. However, the mechanisms by which NO benefits dystrophin-deficient muscle remain unclear, but may involve nNOSβ, a newly discovered enzymatic source of NO in skeletal muscle. Here we investigate the impact of dystrophin deficiency on nNOSβ and use mdx mice engineered to lack nNOSμ and nNOSβ to discern how the loss of nNOS impacts dystrophic skeletal muscle pathology. In mdx muscle, nNOSβ was mislocalized and its association with the Golgi complex was reduced. nNOS depletion from mdx mice prevented compensatory skeletal muscle cell hypertrophy, decreased myofiber central nucleation and increased focal macrophage cell infiltration, indicating exacerbated dystrophic muscle damage. Reductions in muscle integrity in nNOS-null mdx mice were accompanied by decreases in specific force and increased susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced muscle damage compared with mdx controls. Unexpectedly, muscle fatigue was unaffected by nNOS depletion, revealing a novel latent compensatory mechanism for the loss of nNOS in mdx mice. Together with previous studies, these data suggest that localization of both nNOSμ and nNOSβ is disrupted by dystrophin deficiency. They also indicate that nNOS has a more complex role as a modifier of dystrophic pathology and broader therapeutic potential than previously recognized. Importantly, these findings also suggest nNOSβ as a new drug target and provide a new conceptual framework for understanding nNOS signaling and the benefits of NO therapies in dystrophinopathies. PMID:25214536

  19. 2′-O-Methyl RNA/Ethylene-Bridged Nucleic Acid Chimera Antisense Oligonucleotides to Induce Dystrophin Exon 45 Skipping

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    Tomoko Lee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a fatal muscle-wasting disease characterized by dystrophin deficiency from mutations in the dystrophin gene. Antisense oligonucleotide (AO-mediated exon skipping targets restoration of the dystrophin reading frame to allow production of an internally deleted dystrophin protein with functional benefit for DMD patients who have out-of-frame deletions. After accelerated US approval of eteplirsen (Exondys 51, which targets dystrophin exon 51 for skipping, efforts are now focused on targeting other exons. For improved clinical benefits, this strategy requires more studies of the delivery method and modification of nucleic acids. We studied a nucleotide with a 2′-O,4′-C-ethylene-bridged nucleic acid (ENA, which shows high nuclease resistance and high affinity for complementary RNA strands. Here, we describe the process of developing a 2′-O-methyl RNA(2′-OMeRNA/ENA chimera AO to induce dystrophin exon 45 skipping. One 18-mer 2′-OMeRNA/ENA chimera (AO85 had the most potent activity for inducing exon 45 skipping in cultured myotubes. AO85 was administered to mdx mice without significant side effects. AO85 transfection into cultured myotubes from 13 DMD patients induced exon 45 skipping in all samples at different levels and dystrophin expression in 11 patients. These results suggest the possible efficacy of AO-mediated exon skipping changes in individual patients and highlight the 2′-OMeRNA/ENA chimera AO as a potential fundamental treatment for DMD.

  20. SERCA2a gene transfer improves electrocardiographic performance in aged mdx mice

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    Hajjar Roger

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiomyocyte calcium overloading has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD heart disease. The cardiac isoform of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA2a plays a major role in removing cytosolic calcium during heart muscle relaxation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that SERCA2a over-expression may mitigate electrocardiography (ECG abnormalities in old female mdx mice, a murine model of DMD cardiomyopathy. Methods 1 × 1012 viral genome particles/mouse of adeno-associated virus serotype-9 (AAV-9 SERCA2a vector was delivered to 12-m-old female mdx mice (N = 5 via a single bolus tail vein injection. AAV transduction and the ECG profile were examined eight months later. Results The vector genome was detected in the hearts of all AAV-injected mdx mice. Immunofluorescence staining and western blot confirmed SERCA2a over-expression in the mdx heart. Untreated mdx mice showed characteristic tachycardia, PR interval reduction and QT interval prolongation. AAV-9 SERCA2a treatment corrected these ECG abnormalities. Conclusions Our results suggest that AAV SERCA2a therapy may hold great promise in treating dystrophin-deficient heart disease.

  1. Proteomics reveals drastic increase of extracellular matrix proteins collagen and dermatopontin in the aged mdx diaphragm model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, Steven; Zweyer, Margit; Swandulla, Dieter; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2012-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal genetic disease of childhood caused by primary abnormalities in the gene coding for the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. The mdx mouse is an established animal model of various aspects of X-linked muscular dystrophy and is widely used for studying fundamental mechanisms of dystrophinopathy and testing novel therapeutic approaches to treat one of the most frequent gender-specific diseases in humans. In order to determine global changes in the muscle proteome with the progressive deterioration of mdx tissue with age, we have characterized diaphragm muscle from mdx mice at three ages (8-weeks, 12-months and 22-months) using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Altered expression levels in diaphragm of 8-week vs. 22-month mice were shown to occur in 11 muscle-associated proteins. Aging in the mdx diaphragm seems to be associated with a drastic increase in the extracellular matrix proteins, collagen and dermatopontin, the molecular chaperone αB-crystallin, and the intermediate filament protein vimentin, suggesting increased accumulation of connective tissue, an enhanced cellular stress response and compensatory stabilization of the weakened membrane cytoskeleton. These proteomic findings establish the aged mdx diaphragm as an excellent model system for studying secondary effects of dystrophin deficiency in skeletal muscle tissue.

  2. Constitutive properties, not molecular adaptations, mediate extraocular muscle sparing in dystrophic mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John D; Merriam, Anita P; Khanna, Sangeeta; Andrade, Francisco H; Richmonds, Chelliah R; Leahy, Patrick; Cheng, Georgiana; Karathanasis, Paraskevi; Zhou, Xiaohua; Kusner, Linda L; Adams, Marvin E; Willem, Michael; Mayer, Ulrike; Kaminski, Henry J

    2003-05-01

    Extraocular muscle (EOM) is spared in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we tested putative EOM sparing mechanisms predicted from existing dystrophinopathy models. Data show that mdx mouse EOM contains dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC)-competent and DGC-deficient myofibers distributed in a fiber type-specific pattern. Up-regulation of a dystrophin homologue, utrophin, mediates selective DGC retention. Counter to the DGC mechanical hypothesis, an intact DGC is not a precondition for EOM sarcolemmal integrity, and active adaptation at the level of calcium homeostasis is not mechanistic in protection. A partial, fiber type-specific retention of antiischemic nitric oxide to vascular smooth muscle signaling is not a factor in EOM sparing, because mice deficient in dystrophin and alpha-syntrophin, which localizes neuronal nitric oxide synthase to the sarcolemma, have normal EOMs. Moreover, an alternative transmembrane protein, alpha7beta1 integrin, does not appear to substitute for the DGC in EOM. Finally, genomewide expression profiling showed that EOM does not actively adapt to dystrophinopathy but identified candidate genes for the constitutive protection of mdx EOM. Taken together, data emphasize the conditional nature of dystrophinopathy and the potential importance of nonmechanical DGC roles and support the hypothesis that broad, constitutive structural cell signaling, and/or biochemical differences between EOM and other skeletal muscles are determinants of differential disease responsiveness.

  3. Immobilization of Dystrophin and Laminin α2-Chain Deficient Zebrafish Larvae In Vivo Prevents the Development of Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Arner, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are often caused by genetic alterations in the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex or its extracellular ligands. These structures are associated with the cell membrane and provide mechanical links between the cytoskeleton and the matrix. Mechanical stress is considered a pathological mechanism and muscle immobilization has been shown to be beneficial in some mouse models of muscular dystrophy. The zebrafish enables novel and less complex models to examine the effects of extended immobilization or muscle relaxation in vivo in different dystrophy models. We have examined effects of immobilization in larvae from two zebrafish strains with muscular dystrophy, the Sapje dystrophin-deficient and the Candyfloss laminin α2-chain-deficient strains. Larvae (4 days post fertilization, dpf) of both mutants have significantly lower active force in vitro, alterations in the muscle structure with gaps between muscle fibers and altered birefringence patterns compared to their normal siblings. Complete immobilization (18 hrs to 4 dpf) was achieved using a small molecular inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction (BTS, 50 μM). This treatment resulted in a significantly weaker active contraction at 4 dpf in both mutated larvae and normal siblings, most likely reflecting a general effect of immobilization on myofibrillogenesis. The immobilization also significantly reduced the structural damage in the mutated strains, showing that muscle activity is an important pathological mechanism. Following one-day washout of BTS, muscle tension partly recovered in the Candyfloss siblings and caused structural damage in these mutants, indicating activity-induced muscle recovery and damage, respectively.

  4. Immobilization of Dystrophin and Laminin α2-Chain Deficient Zebrafish Larvae In Vivo Prevents the Development of Muscular Dystrophy.

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    Mei Li

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are often caused by genetic alterations in the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex or its extracellular ligands. These structures are associated with the cell membrane and provide mechanical links between the cytoskeleton and the matrix. Mechanical stress is considered a pathological mechanism and muscle immobilization has been shown to be beneficial in some mouse models of muscular dystrophy. The zebrafish enables novel and less complex models to examine the effects of extended immobilization or muscle relaxation in vivo in different dystrophy models. We have examined effects of immobilization in larvae from two zebrafish strains with muscular dystrophy, the Sapje dystrophin-deficient and the Candyfloss laminin α2-chain-deficient strains. Larvae (4 days post fertilization, dpf of both mutants have significantly lower active force in vitro, alterations in the muscle structure with gaps between muscle fibers and altered birefringence patterns compared to their normal siblings. Complete immobilization (18 hrs to 4 dpf was achieved using a small molecular inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction (BTS, 50 μM. This treatment resulted in a significantly weaker active contraction at 4 dpf in both mutated larvae and normal siblings, most likely reflecting a general effect of immobilization on myofibrillogenesis. The immobilization also significantly reduced the structural damage in the mutated strains, showing that muscle activity is an important pathological mechanism. Following one-day washout of BTS, muscle tension partly recovered in the Candyfloss siblings and caused structural damage in these mutants, indicating activity-induced muscle recovery and damage, respectively.

  5. Aberrant location of inhibitory synaptic marker proteins in the hippocampus of dystrophin-deficient mice: implications for cognitive impairment in duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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    Elżbieta Krasowska

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a neuromuscular disease that arises from mutations in the dystrophin-encoding gene. Apart from muscle pathology, cognitive impairment, primarily of developmental origin, is also a significant component of the disorder. Convergent lines of evidence point to an important role for dystrophin in regulating the molecular machinery of central synapses. The clustering of neurotransmitter receptors at inhibitory synapses, thus impacting on synaptic transmission, is of particular significance. However, less is known about the role of dystrophin in influencing the precise expression patterns of proteins located within the pre- and postsynaptic elements of inhibitory synapses. To this end, we exploited molecular markers of inhibitory synapses, interneurons and dystrophin-deficient mouse models to explore the role of dystrophin in determining the stereotypical patterning of inhibitory connectivity within the cellular networks of the hippocampus CA1 region. In tissue from wild-type (WT mice, immunoreactivity of neuroligin2 (NL2, an adhesion molecule expressed exclusively in postsynaptic elements of inhibitory synapses, and the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT, a marker of GABAergic presynaptic elements, were predictably enriched in strata pyramidale and lacunosum moleculare. In acute contrast, NL2 and VGAT immunoreactivity was relatively evenly distributed across all CA1 layers in dystrophin-deficient mice. Similar changes were evident with the cannabinoid receptor 1, vesicular glutamate transporter 3, parvalbumin, somatostatin and the GABAA receptor alpha1 subunit. The data show that in the absence of dystrophin, there is a rearrangement of the molecular machinery, which underlies the precise spatio-temporal pattern of GABAergic synaptic transmission within the CA1 sub-field of the hippocampus.

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibition improves proliferation and engraftment of myogenic cells in dystrophic muscle of mdx mice.

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    Sajedah M Hindi

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD caused by loss of cytoskeletal protein dystrophin is a devastating disorder of skeletal muscle. Primary deficiency of dystrophin leads to several secondary pathological changes including fiber degeneration and regeneration, extracellular matrix breakdown, inflammation, and fibrosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a group of extracellular proteases that are involved in tissue remodeling, inflammation, and development of interstitial fibrosis in many disease states. We have recently reported that the inhibition of MMP-9 improves myopathy and augments myofiber regeneration in mdx mice (a mouse model of DMD. However, the mechanisms by which MMP-9 regulates disease progression in mdx mice remain less understood. In this report, we demonstrate that the inhibition of MMP-9 augments the proliferation of satellite cells in dystrophic muscle. MMP-9 inhibition also causes significant reduction in percentage of M1 macrophages with concomitant increase in the proportion of promyogenic M2 macrophages in mdx mice. Moreover, inhibition of MMP-9 increases the expression of Notch ligands and receptors, and Notch target genes in skeletal muscle of mdx mice. Furthermore, our results show that while MMP-9 inhibition augments the expression of components of canonical Wnt signaling, it reduces the expression of genes whose products are involved in activation of non-canonical Wnt signaling in mdx mice. Finally, the inhibition of MMP-9 was found to dramatically improve the engraftment of transplanted myoblasts in skeletal muscle of mdx mice. Collectively, our study suggests that the inhibition of MMP-9 is a promising approach to stimulate myofiber regeneration and improving engraftment of muscle progenitor cells in dystrophic muscle.

  7. Fast skeletal myofibers of mdx mouse, model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, express connexin hemichannels that lead to apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea, Luis A; Puebla, Carlos; Cisterna, Bruno A; Escamilla, Rosalba; Vargas, Aníbal A; Frank, Marina; Martínez-Montero, Paloma; Prior, Carmen; Molano, Jesús; Esteban-Rodríguez, Isabel; Pascual, Ignacio; Gallano, Pía; Lorenzo, Gustavo; Pian, Héctor; Barrio, Luis C; Willecke, Klaus; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscles of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) show numerous alterations including inflammation, apoptosis, and necrosis of myofibers. However, the molecular mechanism that explains these changes remains largely unknown. Here, the involvement of hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx HCs) was evaluated in skeletal muscle of mdx mouse model of DMD. Fast myofibers of mdx mice were found to express three connexins (39, 43 and 45) and high sarcolemma permeability, which was absent in myofibers of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice (deficient in skeletal muscle Cx43/Cx45 expression). These myofibers did not show elevated basal intracellular free Ca(2+) levels, immunoreactivity to phosphorylated p65 (active NF-κB), eNOS and annexin V/active Caspase 3 (marker of apoptosis) but presented dystrophin immunoreactivity. Moreover, muscles of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice exhibited partial decrease of necrotic features (big cells and high creatine kinase levels). Accordingly, these muscles showed similar macrophage infiltration as control mdx muscles. Nonetheless, the hanging test performance of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice was significantly better than that of control mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice. All three Cxs found in skeletal muscles of mdx mice were also detected in fast myofibers of biopsy specimens from patients with muscular dystrophy. Thus, reduction of Cx expression and/or function of Cx HCs may be potential therapeutic approaches to abrogate myofiber apoptosis in DMD.

  8. Characterization of 65 epitope-specific dystrophin monoclonal antibodies in canine and murine models of duchenne muscular dystrophy by immunostaining and western blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodippili, Kasun; Vince, Lauren; Shin, Jin-Hong; Yue, Yongping; Morris, Glenn E; McIntosh, Mark A; Duan, Dongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Epitope-specific monoclonal antibodies can provide unique insights for studying cellular proteins. Dystrophin is one of the largest cytoskeleton proteins encoded by 79 exons. The absence of dystrophin results in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Over the last two decades, dozens of exon-specific human dystrophin monoclonal antibodies have been developed and successfully used for DMD diagnosis. Unfortunately, the majority of these antibodies have not been thoroughly characterized in dystrophin-deficient dogs, an outstanding large animal model for translational research. To fill the gap, we performed a comprehensive study on 65 dystrophin monoclonal antibodies in normal and dystrophic dogs (heart and skeletal muscle) by immunofluorescence staining and western blot. For comparison, we also included striated muscles from normal BL10 and dystrophin-null mdx mice. Our analysis revealed distinctive species, tissue and assay-dependent recognition patterns of different antibodies. Importantly, we identified 15 antibodies that can consistently detect full-length canine dystrophin in both immunostaining and western blot. Our results will serve as an important reference for studying DMD in the canine model.

  9. Dysfunctional muscle and liver glycogen metabolism in mdx dystrophic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I Stapleton

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a severe, genetic muscle wasting disorder characterised by progressive muscle weakness. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (dmd gene resulting in very low levels or a complete absence of the dystrophin protein, a key structural element of muscle fibres which is responsible for the proper transmission of force. In the absence of dystrophin, muscle fibres become damaged easily during contraction resulting in their degeneration. DMD patients and mdx mice (an animal model of DMD exhibit altered metabolic disturbances that cannot be attributed to the loss of dystrophin directly. We tested the hypothesis that glycogen metabolism is defective in mdx dystrophic mice.Dystrophic mdx mice had increased skeletal muscle glycogen (79%, (P<0.01. Skeletal muscle glycogen synthesis is initiated by glycogenin, the expression of which was increased by 50% in mdx mice (P<0.0001. Glycogen synthase activity was 12% higher (P<0.05 but glycogen branching enzyme activity was 70% lower (P<0.01 in mdx compared with wild-type mice. The rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen breakdown, glycogen phosphorylase, had 62% lower activity (P<0.01 in mdx mice resulting from a 24% reduction in PKA activity (P<0.01. In mdx mice glycogen debranching enzyme expression was 50% higher (P<0.001 together with starch-binding domain protein 1 (219% higher; P<0.01. In addition, mdx mice were glucose intolerant (P<0.01 and had 30% less liver glycogen (P<0.05 compared with control mice. Subsequent analysis of the enzymes dysregulated in skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism in mdx mice identified reduced glycogenin protein expression (46% less; P<0.05 as a possible cause of this phenotype.We identified that mdx mice were glucose intolerant, and had increased skeletal muscle glycogen but reduced amounts of liver glycogen.

  10. Transgenic overexpression of ADAM12 suppresses muscle regeneration and aggravates dystrophy in aged mdx mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Wewer, Ulla M;

    2007-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are characterized by insufficient restoration and gradual replacement of the skeletal muscle by fat and connective tissue. ADAM12 has previously been shown to alleviate the pathology of young dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The observed...... effect of ADAM12 was suggested to be mediated via a membrane-stabilizing up-regulation of utrophin, alpha7B integrin, and dystroglycans. Ectopic ADAM12 expression in normal mouse skeletal muscle also improved regeneration after freeze injury, presumably by the same mechanism. Hence, it was suggested...... overexpressing ADAM12 (ADAM12(+)/mdx mice), even though their utrophin levels were mildly elevated compared with age-matched controls. Thus, membrane stabilization was not sufficient to provide protection during prolonged disease. Consequently, we reinvestigated skeletal muscle regeneration in ADAM12 transgenic...

  11. Motor physical therapy affects muscle collagen type I and decreases gait speed in dystrophin-deficient dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís P Gaiad

    Full Text Available Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD is a dystrophin-deficient canine model genetically homologous to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD in humans. Muscular fibrosis secondary to cycles of degeneration/regeneration of dystrophic muscle tissue and muscular weakness leads to biomechanical adaptation that impairs the quality of gait. Physical therapy (PT is one of the supportive therapies available for DMD, however, motor PT approaches have controversial recommendations and there is no consensus regarding the type and intensity of physical therapy. In this study we investigated the effect of physical therapy on gait biomechanics and muscular collagen deposition types I and III in dystrophin-deficient dogs. Two dystrophic dogs (treated dogs-TD underwent a PT protocol of active walking exercise, 3×/week, 40 minutes/day, 12 weeks. Two dystrophic control dogs (CD maintained their routine of activities of daily living. At t0 (pre and t1 (post-physical therapy, collagen type I and III were assessed by immunohistochemistry and gait biomechanics were analyzed. Angular displacement of shoulder, elbow, carpal, hip, stifle and tarsal joint and vertical (Fy, mediolateral (Fz and craniocaudal (Fx ground reaction forces (GRF were assessed. Wilcoxon test was used to verify the difference of biomechanical variables between t0 and t1, considering p<.05. Type I collagen of endomysium suffered the influence of PT, as well as gait speed that had decreased from t0 to t1 (p<.000. The PT protocol employed accelerates morphological alterations on dystrophic muscle and promotes a slower velocity of gait. Control dogs which maintained their routine of activities of daily living seem to have found a better balance between movement and preservation of motor function.

  12. Sparing of the dystrophin-deficient cranial sartorius muscle is associated with classical and novel hypertrophy pathways in GRMD dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Peter P; Hoffman, Eric P; Mittal, Priya; Brown, Kristy J; Schatzberg, Scott J; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Wang, Zuyi; Kornegay, Joe N

    2013-11-01

    Both Duchenne and golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) are caused by dystrophin deficiency. The Duchenne muscular dystrophy sartorius muscle and orthologous GRMD cranial sartorius (CS) are relatively spared/hypertrophied. We completed hierarchical clustering studies to define molecular mechanisms contributing to this differential involvement and their role in the GRMD phenotype. GRMD dogs with larger CS muscles had more severe deficits, suggesting that selective hypertrophy could be detrimental. Serial biopsies from the hypertrophied CS and other atrophied muscles were studied in a subset of these dogs. Myostatin showed an age-dependent decrease and an inverse correlation with the degree of GRMD CS hypertrophy. Regulators of myostatin at the protein (AKT1) and miRNA (miR-539 and miR-208b targeting myostatin mRNA) levels were altered in GRMD CS, consistent with down-regulation of myostatin signaling, CS hypertrophy, and functional rescue of this muscle. mRNA and proteomic profiling was used to identify additional candidate genes associated with CS hypertrophy. The top-ranked network included α-dystroglycan and like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase. Proteomics demonstrated increases in myotrophin and spectrin that could promote hypertrophy and cytoskeletal stability, respectively. Our results suggest that multiple pathways, including decreased myostatin and up-regulated miRNAs, α-dystroglycan/like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, spectrin, and myotrophin, contribute to hypertrophy and functional sparing of the CS. These data also underscore the muscle-specific responses to dystrophin deficiency and the potential deleterious effects of differential muscle involvement. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Diaphragm degeneration and cardiac structure in mdx mouse: potential clinical implications for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbin, Isabel Cristina Chagas; Pereira, Juliano Alves; Bersan Rovere, Matheus; de Oliveira Moreira, Drielen; Marques, Maria Julia; Santo Neto, Humberto

    2016-05-01

    We examined the effects of exercise on diaphragm degeneration and cardiomyopathy in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Mdx mice (11 months of age) were exercised (swimming) for 2 months to worsen diaphragm degeneration. Control mdx mice were kept sedentary. Morphological evaluation demonstrated increased fibrosis in the diaphragm of exercised mdx mice (33.3 ± 6.0% area of fibrosis) compared with control mdx mice (20.9 ± 1.7% area of fibrosis). Increased (26%) activity of MMP-2, a marker of fibrosis, was detected in the diaphragms from exercised mdx mice. Morphological evaluation of the heart demonstrated a 45% increase in fibrosis in the right ventricle (8.3 ± 0.6% in sedentary vs. 12.0 ± 0.6% of fibrosis in exercised) and in the left ventricle (35% increase) in the exercised mdx mice. The density of inflammatory cells-degenerating cardiomyocytes increased 95% in the right ventricle (2.3 ± 0.6 in sedentary vs. 4.5 ± 0.8 in exercised) and 71% in the left ventricle (1.4 ± 0.6 sedentary vs. 2.4 ± 0.5 exercised). The levels of both active MMP-2 and the pro-fibrotic factor transforming growth factor beta were elevated in the hearts of exercised compared with sedentary mdx mice. The wall thickness to lumen diameter ratio of the pulmonary trunk was significantly increased in the exercised mdx mice (0.11 ± 0.04 in sedentary vs. 0.28 ± 0.12 in exercised), as was the thickness of the right ventricle wall, which suggests the occurrence of pulmonary hypertension in those animals. It is suggested that diaphragm degeneration is a main contributor to right ventricle dystrophic pathology. These findings may be relevant for future interventional studies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy-associated cardiomyopathy.

  14. Differential expression of genes involved in the calcium homeostasis in masticatory muscles of MDX mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert-Keil, C H; Gredes, T; Lucke, S; Botzenhart, U; Dominiak, M; Gedrange, T

    2014-04-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and its murine model, mdx, are characterized by Ca(2+) induced muscle damage and muscle weakness followed by distorted dentofacial morphology. In both, DMD patients and in mdx mice, could be proven so far that only the extraocular muscles (EOM) are not affected by muscular dystrophy. The EOMs are protected against calcium overload by enhanced expression of genes involved in the Ca(2+) homeostasis. We could recently demonstrate that masticatory muscles of mdx mice are differentially affected by muscle dystrophy. The dystrophic masseter and temporalis shows muscle histology comparable to all other skeletal muscles in this animal model, whereas dystrophic tongue muscles seem to develop a milder phenotype. Due to this fact it is to hypothesize that an altered Ca(2+) homeostasis seems to underlie the mdx masticatory muscle pathology. Aim of this study was to examine the mRNA and protein levels of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases SERCA1 and SERCA2, the plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases Atp2b1 and Atp2b4, the sodium/calcium exchanger NCX1, the ryanodine receptor 1, parvalbumin, sarcolipin, phospholamban and the L-type Ca(2+) channel alpha-1 subunit (Cacna1s) in Musculus masseter, temporalis, and tongue of 100 day old control and mdx mice. In mdx masseter muscle significant increased mRNA levels of NCX1 and Cacna1s were found compared to control mice. In contrast, the mRNA amount of RYR1 was significant reduced in mdx temporalis muscle, whereas ATP2b4 was significant increased. In mdx tongue a down-regulation of the ATP2b1, sarcolipin and parvalbumin mRNA expression was found, whereas the phospholamban mRNA level was significantly increased compared to controls. These data were verified by western blot analyses. Our findings revealed that mdx masticatory muscles showed an unequally altered expression of genes involved in the Ca(2+) homeostasis that can support the differences in masticatory muscles response to dystrophin deficiency.

  15. Mutation types and aging differently affect revertant fiber expansion in dystrophic mdx and mdx52 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Echigoya

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, one of the most common and lethal genetic disorders, and the mdx mouse myopathies are caused by a lack of dystrophin protein. These dystrophic muscles contain sporadic clusters of dystrophin-expressing revertant fibers (RFs, as detected by immunohistochemistry. RFs are known to arise from muscle precursor cells with spontaneous exon skipping (alternative splicing and clonally expand in size with increasing age through the process of muscle degeneration/regeneration. The expansion of revertant clusters is thought to represent the cumulative history of muscle regeneration and proliferation of such precursor cells. However, the precise mechanisms by which RFs arise and expand are poorly understood. Here, to test the effects of mutation types and aging on RF expansion and muscle regeneration, we examined the number of RFs in mdx mice (containing a nonsense mutation in exon 23 and mdx52 mice (containing deletion mutation of exon 52 with the same C57BL/6 background at 2, 6, 12, and 18months of age. Mdx mice displayed a significantly higher number of RFs compared to mdx52 mice in all age groups, suggesting that revertant fiber expansion largely depends on the type of mutation and/or location in the gene. A significant increase in the expression and clustering levels of RFs was found beginning at 6months of age in mdx mice compared with mdx52 mice. In contrast to the significant expansion of RFs with increasing age, the number of centrally nucleated fibers and embryonic myosin heavy chain-positive fibers (indicative of cumulative and current muscle regeneration, respectively decreased with age in both mouse strains. These results suggest that mutation types and aging differently affect revertant fiber expansion in mdx and mdx52 mice.

  16. Utrophin A is essential in mediating the functional adaptations of mdx mouse muscle following chronic AMPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rewashdy, Hasanen; Ljubicic, Vladimir; Lin, Wei; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Jasmin, Bernard J

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the absence of dystrophin along muscle fibers. An attractive therapeutic avenue for DMD consists in the upregulation of utrophin A, a protein with high sequence identity and functional redundancy with dystrophin. Recent work has shown that pharmacological interventions that induce a muscle fiber shift toward a slower, more oxidative phenotype with increased expression of utrophin A confer morphological and functional improvements in mdx mice. Whether such improvements result from the increased expression of utrophin A per se or are linked to other beneficial adaptations associated with the slow, oxidative phenotype remain to be established. To address this central issue, we capitalized on the use of double knockout (dKO) mice, which are mdx mice also deficient in utrophin. We first compared expression of signaling molecules and markers of the slow, oxidative phenotype in muscles of mdx versus dKO mice and found that both strains exhibit similar phenotypes. Chronic activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase with 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside (AICAR) resulted in expression of a slower, more oxidative phenotype in both mdx and dKO mice. In mdx mice, this fiber type shift was accompanied by clear functional improvements that included reductions in central nucleation, IgM sarcoplasmic penetration and sarcolemmal damage resulting from eccentric contractions, as well as in increased grip strength. These important morphological and functional adaptations were not seen in AICAR-treated dKO mice. Our findings show the central role of utrophin A in mediating the functional benefits associated with expression of a slower, more oxidative phenotype in dystrophic animals.

  17. Deficiency of syntrophin, dystroglycan, and merosin in a female infant with a congenital muscular dystrophy phenotype lacking cysteine-rich and C-terminal domains of dystrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, N; Ohya, K; Chiba, S; Matsuo, M; Patria, S Y; Matsumura, K

    1997-08-01

    Primary deficiency of merosin is the cause of the classic form of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) accompanied by brain white matter abnormalities. We report a female infant with dystrophinopathy who was deficient in merosin in skeletal muscle. The patient had a phenotype of typical CMD and white matter abnormalities on brain MRI. Merosin was greatly reduced in the biopsied skeletal muscle. However, the expression of dystroglycan and syntrophin was also greatly reduced, and the immunoreactivity for the antibodies against the cysteine-rich/C-terminal domains of dystrophin was absent in the sarcolemma. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis of the dystrophin gene revealed a complete lack of exons 71 through 74. In skeletal muscle, only the mutant gene was expressed. These results suggest that the patient is a symptomatic Duchenne muscular dystrophy carrier with skewed X-inactivation. This patient illustrates for the first time that a dystrophin abnormality can cause a secondary deficiency of merosin in dystrophinopathy. The reduction of merosin may account for the clinical phenotype of CMD and correlate with the white matter abnormalities in our patient.

  18. Dystrophin/α1-syntrophin scaffold regulated PLC/PKC-dependent store-operated calcium entry in myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Jessica; Harisseh, Rania; Harnois, Thomas; Magaud, Christophe; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Déliot, Nadine; Constantin, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    In skeletal muscles from patient suffering of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and from mdx mice, the absence of the cytoskeleton protein dystrophin has been shown to be essential for maintaining a normal calcium influx. We showed that a TRPC store-dependent cation influx is increased by loss of dystrophin or a scaffolding protein α1-syntrophin, however the mechanisms of this calcium mishandling are incompletely understood. First of all, we confirmed that TRPC1 but also STIM1 and Orai1 are supporting the store-operated cation entry which is enhanced in dystrophin-deficient myotubes. Next, we demonstrated that inhibition of PLC or PKC in dystrophin-deficient myotubes restores elevated cation entry to normal levels similarly to enforced minidystrophin expression. In addition, silencing α1-syntrophin also increased cation influx in a PLC/PKC dependent pathway. We also showed that α1-syntrophin and PLCβ are part of a same protein complex reinforcing the idea of their inter-relation in calcium influx regulation. This elevated cation entry was decreased to normal levels by chelating intracellular free calcium with BAPTA-AM. Double treatments with BAPTA-AM and PLC or PKC inhibitors suggested that the elevation of cation influx by PLC/PKC pathway is dependent on cytosolic calcium. All these results demonstrate an involvement in dystrophin-deficient myotubes of a specific calcium/PKC/PLC pathway in elevation of store-operated cation influx supported by the STIM1/Orai1/TRPC1 proteins, which is normally regulated by the α1-syntrophin/dystrophin scaffold.

  19. Metabolic dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamics in the utrophin-dystrophin deficient mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghna Pant

    Full Text Available The utrophin-dystrophin deficient (DKO mouse model has been widely used to understand the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. However, it is unclear as to what extent muscle pathology affects metabolism. Therefore, the present study was focused on understanding energy expenditure in the whole animal and in isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle and to determine changes in metabolic enzymes. Our results show that the 8 week-old DKO mice consume higher oxygen relative to activity levels. Interestingly the EDL muscle from DKO mouse consumes higher oxygen per unit integral force, generates less force and performs better in the presence of pyruvate thus mimicking a slow twitch muscle. We also found that the expression of hexokinase 1 and pyruvate kinase M2 was upregulated several fold suggesting increased glycolytic flux. Additionally, there is a dramatic increase in dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp 1 and mitofusin 2 protein levels suggesting increased mitochondrial fission and fusion, a feature associated with increased energy demand and altered mitochondrial dynamics. Collectively our studies point out that the dystrophic disease has caused significant changes in muscle metabolism. To meet the increased energetic demand, upregulation of metabolic enzymes and regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission is observed in the dystrophic muscle. A better understanding of the metabolic demands and the accompanied alterations in the dystrophic muscle can help us design improved intervention therapies along with existing drug treatments for the DMD patients.

  20. Gender differences in contractile and passive properties of mdx extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Duan, Dongsheng

    2012-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe, muscle-wasting disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The mdx mouse is the first and perhaps the most commonly used animal model for study of DMD. Both male and female mdx mice are used. However, it is not completely clear whether gender influences contraction and the passive mechanical properties of mdx skeletal muscle. We compared isometric tetanic forces and passive forces of the extensor digitorum longus muscle between male and female mdx mice. At age 6 months, female mdx mice showed better-preserved specific tetanic force. Interestingly, at 20 months of age, female mdx muscle appeared stiffer. Our results suggest that gender may profoundly influence physiological measurement outcomes in mdx mice. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Activity of Krebs cycle enzymes in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comim, Clarissa M; Hoepers, Andreza; Ventura, Letícia; Freiberger, Viviane; Dominguini, Diogo; Mina, Francielle; Mendonça, Bruna P; Scaini, Giselli; Vainzof, Mariz; Streck, Emílio L; Quevedo, João

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative disease of skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscles caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. More recently, brain involvement has been verified. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may underlie the pathophysiology of DMD. In this study we evaluate Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the cerebral cortex, diaphragm, and quadriceps muscles of mdx mice. Cortex, diaphragm, and quadriceps tissues from male dystrophic mdx and control mice were used. We observed increased malate dehydrogenase activity in the cortex; increased malate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in the diaphragm; and increased citrate synthase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase activities in the quadriceps of mdx mice. This study showed increased activity of Krebs cycle enzymes in cortex, quadriceps, and diaphragm in mdx mice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The Dietary Supplement Protandim® Decreases Plasma Osteopontin and Improves Markers of Oxidative Stress in Muscular Dystrophy Mdx Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Muddasir; McClure, Warren C.; Arevalo, Nicole L.; Rabon, Rick E.; Mohr, Benjamin; Bose, Swapan K.; McCord, Joe M.; Tseng, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic options for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and lethal neuromuscular disorder in children, remain elusive. Oxidative damage is implicated as a pertinent factor involved in its pathogenesis. Protandim® is an over-the-counter supplement with the ability to induce antioxidant enzymes. In this study we investigated whether Protandim® provided benefit using surrogate markers and functional measures in the dystrophin-deficient (mdx)mouse model of DMD. Male 3-week-old mdx mice were randomized into two treatment groups: control (receiving standard rodent chow) and Protandim®-supplemented standard rodent chow. The diets were continued for 6-week and 6-month studies. The endpoints included the oxidative stress marker thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), plasma osteopontin (OPN), plasma paraoxonase (PON1) activity, H&E histology, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of leg muscle and motor functional measurements. The Protandim® chow diet in mdx mice for 6 months was safe and well tolerated. After 6 months of Protandim®, a 48% average decrease in plasma TBARS was seen; 0.92 nmol/mg protein in controls versus 0.48 nmol/mg protein in the Protandim® group (p = .006). At 6 months, plasma OPN was decreased by 57% (p = .001) in the Protandim®-treated mice. Protandim® increased the plasma antioxidant enzyme PON1 activity by 35% (p = .018). After 6 months, the mdx mice with Protandim® showed 38% less MRI signal abnormality (p = .07) than mice on control diet. In this 6-month mdx mouse study, Protandim® did not significantly alter motor function nor histological criteria. PMID:20740052

  3. The Dietary Supplement Protandim Decreases Plasma Osteopontin and Improves Markers of Oxidative Stress in Muscular Dystrophy Mdx Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Muddasir; McClure, Warren C; Arevalo, Nicole L; Rabon, Rick E; Mohr, Benjamin; Bose, Swapan K; McCord, Joe M; Tseng, Brian S

    2010-06-01

    Therapeutic options for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and lethal neuromuscular disorder in children, remain elusive. Oxidative damage is implicated as a pertinent factor involved in its pathogenesis. Protandim((R)) is an over-the-counter supplement with the ability to induce antioxidant enzymes. In this study we investigated whether Protandim((R)) provided benefit using surrogate markers and functional measures in the dystrophin-deficient (mdx)mouse model of DMD. Male 3-week-old mdx mice were randomized into two treatment groups: control (receiving standard rodent chow) and Protandim((R))-supplemented standard rodent chow. The diets were continued for 6-week and 6-month studies. The endpoints included the oxidative stress marker thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), plasma osteopontin (OPN), plasma paraoxonase (PON1) activity, H&E histology, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of leg muscle and motor functional measurements. The Protandim((R)) chow diet in mdx mice for 6 months was safe and well tolerated. After 6 months of Protandim((R)), a 48% average decrease in plasma TBARS was seen; 0.92 nmol/mg protein in controls versus 0.48 nmol/mg protein in the Protandim((R)) group (p = .006). At 6 months, plasma OPN was decreased by 57% (p = .001) in the Protandim((R))-treated mice. Protandim((R)) increased the plasma antioxidant enzyme PON1 activity by 35% (p = .018). After 6 months, the mdx mice with Protandim((R)) showed 38% less MRI signal abnormality (p = .07) than mice on control diet. In this 6-month mdx mouse study, Protandim((R)) did not significantly alter motor function nor histological criteria.

  4. Low intensity training of mdx mice reduces carbonylation and increases expression levels of proteins involved in energy metabolism and muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyzewicz, Janek; Tanihata, Jun; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Ito, Naoki; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-05-01

    High intensity training induces muscle damage in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, an animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, low intensity training (LIT) rescues the mdx phenotype and even reduces the level of protein carbonylation, a marker of oxidative damage. Until now, beneficial effects of LIT were mainly assessed at the physiological level. We investigated the effects of LIT at the molecular level on 8-week-old wild-type and mdx muscle using 2D Western blot and protein-protein interaction analysis. We found that the fast isoforms of troponin T and myosin binding protein C as well as glycogen phosphorylase were overcarbonylated and downregulated in mdx muscle. Some of the mitochondrial enzymes of the citric acid cycle were overcarbonylated, whereas some proteins of the respiratory chain were downregulated. Of functional importance, ATP synthase was only partially assembled, as revealed by Blue Native PAGE analysis. LIT decreased the carbonylation level and increased the expression of fast isoforms of troponin T and of myosin binding protein C, and glycogen phosphorylase. In addition, it increased the expression of aconitate hydratase and NADH dehydrogenase, and fully restored the ATP synthase complex. Our study demonstrates that the benefits of LIT are associated with lowered oxidative damage as revealed by carbonylation and higher expression of proteins involved in energy metabolism and muscle contraction. Potentially, these results will help to design therapies for DMD based on exercise mimicking drugs.

  5. Immobilization of Dystrophin and Laminin α2-Chain Deficient Zebrafish Larvae In Vivo Prevents the Development of Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are often caused by genetic alterations in the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex or its extracellular ligands. These structures are associated with the cell membrane and provide mechanical links between the cytoskeleton and the matrix. Mechanical stress is considered a pathological mechanism and muscle immobilization has been shown to be beneficial in some mouse models of muscular dystrophy. The zebrafish enables novel and less complex models to examine the effects of exten...

  6. Utrophins compensate for Dp71 absence in mdx3cv in adhered platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Mondragón, Ricardo; Candelario, Aurora; García-Sierra, Francisco; Mornet, Dominique; Rendón, Alvaro; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila

    2008-01-01

    Platelet adhesion is a critical step due to its hemostatic role in stopping bleeding after vascular damage. Short dystrophins are the most abundant dmd gene products in nonmuscle tissues, and in association with cytoskeleton proteins contribute to their intrinsic function; while utrophins are dystrophin-homologous related family proteins with structural and functional similarities. We previously demonstrated the presence of Dp71 isoforms, utrophins, and various dystrophin-associated proteins and their participation in cytoskeleton re-organization, filopodia and lamellipodia extension, and in centralizing cytoplasmic granules during the adhesion process of human platelets. To evaluate the morphologic changes and actin-based structures of mdx(3cv) platelets during the adhesion process, we compared the topographic distribution of Dp71d/Dp71Delta110(m) and dystrophin-associated protein in adhered platelets from dystrophic mdx(3cv) mouse. By confocal microscopy, we showed that absence of Dp71 isoforms in platelets from this animal model disrupted dystrophin-associated protein expression and distribution without modifying the platelet morphology displayed during the glass-adhesion process. By immunoprecipitation assays, we proved that up-regulated utrophins were associated with dystrophin-associated proteins to conform the dystrophin-associated protein complex corresponding to utrophins, which might compensate for Dp71 absence in mdx(3cv) platelets.

  7. ADAM12 alleviates the skeletal muscle pathology in mdx dystrophic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronqvist, Pauliina; Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Albrechtsen, Reidar;

    2002-01-01

    we examined the role of the transmembrane ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloprotease, which is normally associated with development and regeneration of skeletal muscle. We demonstrate that ADAM12 overexpression in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mice alleviated the muscle pathology in these animals......Muscular dystrophy is characterized by muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration and replacement of muscle fibers by connective tissue. New therapeutic strategies directed toward various forms of muscular dystrophy are needed to preserve muscle mass and promote regeneration. In this study......, as evidenced by less muscle cell necrosis and inflammation, lower levels of serum creatine kinase, and less uptake of Evans Blue dye into muscle fibers. These studies demonstrate that ADAM12 directly or indirectly contributes to muscle cell regeneration, stability, and survival....

  8. Levels of α7 integrin and laminin-α2 are increased following prednisone treatment in the mdx mouse and GRMD dog models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuebbles, Ryan D; Sarathy, Apurva; Kornegay, Joe N; Burkin, Dean J

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disease for which there is no cure and limited treatment options. Prednisone is currently the first line treatment option for DMD and studies have demonstrated that it improves muscle strength. Although prednisone has been used for the treatment of DMD for decades, the mechanism of action of this drug remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that the α7β1 integrin is a major modifier of disease progression in mouse models of DMD and is therefore a target for drug-based therapies. In this study we examined whether prednisone increased α7β1 integrin levels in mdx mouse and GRMD dog models and myogenic cells from humans with DMD. Our results show that prednisone promotes an increase in α7 integrin protein in cultured myogenic cells and in the muscle of mdx and GRMD animal models of DMD. The prednisone-mediated increase in α7 integrin was associated with increased laminin-α2 in prednisone-treated dystrophin-deficient muscle. Together, our results suggest that prednisone acts in part through increased merosin in the muscle basal lamina and through sarcolemmal stabilization of α7β1 integrin in dystrophin-deficient muscle. These results indicate that therapies that target an increase in muscle α7β1 integrin, its signaling pathways and/or laminin could be therapeutic in DMD.

  9. Levels of α7 integrin and laminin-α2 are increased following prednisone treatment in the mdx mouse and GRMD dog models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan D. Wuebbles

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a fatal neuromuscular disease for which there is no cure and limited treatment options. Prednisone is currently the first line treatment option for DMD and studies have demonstrated that it improves muscle strength. Although prednisone has been used for the treatment of DMD for decades, the mechanism of action of this drug remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that the α7β1 integrin is a major modifier of disease progression in mouse models of DMD and is therefore a target for drug-based therapies. In this study we examined whether prednisone increased α7β1 integrin levels in mdx mouse and GRMD dog models and myogenic cells from humans with DMD. Our results show that prednisone promotes an increase in α7 integrin protein in cultured myogenic cells and in the muscle of mdx and GRMD animal models of DMD. The prednisone-mediated increase in α7 integrin was associated with increased laminin-α2 in prednisone-treated dystrophin-deficient muscle. Together, our results suggest that prednisone acts in part through increased merosin in the muscle basal lamina and through sarcolemmal stabilization of α7β1 integrin in dystrophin-deficient muscle. These results indicate that therapies that target an increase in muscle α7β1 integrin, its signaling pathways and/or laminin could be therapeutic in DMD.

  10. The use of urinary and kidney SILAM proteomics to monitor kidney response to high dose morpholino oligonucleotides in the mdx mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiping Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides (PMO are used as a promising exon-skipping gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. One potential complication of high dose PMO therapy is its transient accumulation in the kidneys. Therefore new urinary biomarkers are needed to monitor this treatment. Here, we carried out a pilot proteomic profiling study using stable isotope labeling in mammals (SILAM strategy to identify new biomarkers to monitor the effect of PMO on the kidneys of the dystrophin deficient mouse model for DMD (mdx-23. We first assessed the baseline renal status of the mdx-23 mouse compared to the wild type (C57BL10 mouse, and then followed the renal outcome of mdx-23 mouse treated with a single high dose intravenous PMO injection (800 mg/kg. Surprisingly, untreated mdx-23 mice showed evidence of renal injury at baseline, which was manifested by albuminuria, increased urine output, and changes in established urinary biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI. The PMO treatment induced further transient renal injury, which peaked at 7 days, and returned to almost the baseline status at 30 days post-treatment. In the kidney, the SILAM approach followed by western blot validation identified changes in Meprin A subunit alpha at day 2, then returned to normal levels at days 7 and 30 after PMO injection. In the urine, SILAM approach identified an increase in Clusterin and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase 1 as potential candidates to monitor the transient renal accumulation of PMO. These results, which were confirmed by Western blots or ELISA, demonstrate the value of the SILAM approach to identify new candidate biomarkers of renal injury in mdx-23 mice treated with high dose PMO.

  11. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HaiFang Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO, further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies.

  12. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haifang; Boisguerin, Prisca; Moulton, Hong M; Betts, Corinne; Seow, Yiqi; Boutilier, Jordan; Wang, Qingsong; Walsh, Anthony; Lebleu, Bernard; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2013-09-24

    We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide) and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP) motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs) in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO) and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO) were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO), further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO) was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e124; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013

  13. Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in two animal models of dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomotto, Jean; Pertl, Cordula; Borrel, Caroline; Walter, Maggie C; Bulst, Stefanie; Johnsen, Bob; Baillie, David L; Lochmüller, Hanns; Thirion, Christian; Ségalat, Laurent

    2009-11-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is an inherited muscle degeneration disease for which there is still no efficient treatment. However, compounds active on the disease may already exist among approved drugs but are difficult to identify in the absence of cellular models. We used the Caenorhabditis elegans animal model to screen a collection of 1000 already approved compounds. Two of the most active hits obtained were methazolamide and dichlorphenamide, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors widely used in human therapy. In C. elegans, these drugs were shown to interact with CAH-4, a putative carbonic anhydrase. The therapeutic efficacy of these compounds was further validated in long-term experiments on mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Mice were treated for 120 days with food containing methazolamide or dichlorphenamide at two doses each. Musculus tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles were histologically analyzed and isometric muscle force was measured in M. extensor digitorum longus. Both substances increased the tetanic muscle force in the treated M. extensor digitorum longus muscle group, dichlorphenamide increased the force significantly by 30%, but both drugs failed to increase resistance of muscle fibres to eccentric contractions. Histological analysis revealed a reduction of centrally nucleated fibers in M. tibialis anterior and diaphragm in the treated groups. These studies further demonstrated that a C. elegans-based screen coupled with a mouse model validation strategy can lead to the identification of potential pharmacological agents for rare diseases.

  14. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the Mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the diet...

  15. Quantification of the mechanical behavior of carotid arteries from wild-type, dystrophin-deficient, and sarcoglycan-δ knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Rudolph L.; Dye, Wendy W.; Wilson, Emily; Humphrey, Jay D.

    2008-01-01

    As patients with muscular dystrophy live longer because of improved clinical care, they will become increasingly susceptible to many of the cardiovascular diseases that affect the general population. There is, therefore, a pressing need to better understand both the biology and the mechanics of the arterial wall in these patients. In this paper, we use nonlinear constitutive relations to model, for the first time, the biaxial mechanical behavior of carotid arteries from two common mouse models of muscular dystrophy (dystrophin deficient and sarcoglycan-delta null) and wild-type controls. It is shown that a structurally motivated four-fiber family stress-strain relation describes the passive behavior of all three genotypes better than does a commonly used phenomenological exponential model, and that a Rachev-Hayashi model describes the mechanical contribution of smooth muscle contraction under basal tone. Because structurally motivated constitutive relations can be extended easily to model adaptations to altered hemodynamics, results from this study represent an important step toward the ultimate goal of understanding better the mechanobiology and pathophysiology of arteries in muscular dystrophy. PMID:18842267

  16. Alterations in Notch signalling in skeletal muscles from mdx and dko dystrophic mice and patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jarrod E; Trieu, Jennifer; Chee, Annabel; Naim, Timur; Gehrig, Stefan M; Lamon, Séverine; Angelini, Corrado; Russell, Aaron P; Lynch, Gordon S

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? The Notch signalling pathway plays an important role in muscle regeneration, and activation of the pathway has been shown to enhance muscle regeneration in aged mice. It is unknown whether Notch activation will have a similarly beneficial effect on muscle regeneration in the context of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). What is the main finding and its importance? Although expression of Notch signalling components is altered in both mouse models of DMD and in human DMD patients, activation of the Notch signalling pathway does not confer any functional benefit on muscles from dystrophic mice, suggesting that other signalling pathways may be more fruitful targets for manipulation in treating DMD. Abstract In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), muscle damage and impaired regeneration lead to progressive muscle wasting, weakness and premature death. The Notch signalling pathway represents a central regulator of gene expression and is critical for cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic signalling during all stages of embryonic muscle development. Notch activation improves muscle regeneration in aged mice, but its potential to restore regeneration and function in muscular dystrophy is unknown. We performed a comprehensive examination of several genes involved in Notch signalling in muscles from dystrophin-deficient mdx and dko (utrophin- and dystrophin-null) mice and DMD patients. A reduction of Notch1 and Hes1 mRNA in tibialis anterior muscles of dko mice and quadriceps muscles of DMD patients and a reduction of Hes1 mRNA in the diaphragm of the mdx mice were observed, with other targets being inconsistent across species. Activation and inhibition of Notch signalling, followed by measures of muscle regeneration and function, were performed in the mouse models of DMD. Notch activation had no effect on functional regeneration in C57BL/10, mdx or dko mice. Notch inhibition significantly depressed the

  17. DMD transcript imbalance determines dystrophin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitali, Pietro; van den Bergen, Janneke C; Verhaart, Ingrid E C; Wokke, Beatrijs; Janson, Anneke A M; van den Eijnde, Rani; den Dunnen, Johan T; Laros, Jeroen F J; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2013-12-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by out-of-frame and in-frame mutations, respectively, in the dystrophin encoding DMD gene. Molecular therapies targeting the precursor-mRNA are in clinical trials and show promising results. These approaches will depend on the stability and expression levels of dystrophin mRNA in skeletal muscles and heart. We report that the DMD gene is more highly expressed in heart than in skeletal muscles, in mice and humans. The transcript mutated in the mdx mouse model shows a 5' to 3' imbalance compared with that of its wild-type counterpart and reading frame restoration via antisense-mediated exon skipping does not correct this event. We also report significant transcript instability in 22 patients with Becker dystrophy, clarifying the fact that transcript imbalance is not caused by premature nonsense mutations. Finally, we demonstrate that transcript stability, rather than transcriptional rate, is an important determinant of dystrophin protein levels in patients with Becker dystrophy. We suggest that the availability of the complete transcript is a key factor to determine protein abundance and thus will influence the outcome of mRNA-targeting therapies.

  18. Expression of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex at the skeletal muscle sarcolemma in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Lei; Chao-ping HU; Wang, Yi; Shui-zhen ZHOU; Shi, Yi-Yun; Xi-hua LI

    2015-01-01

    Background  Eccentric exercise or high tension exercise could cause damage to skeletal muscle structure, resulting in deficiency of dystrophin and secondary loss of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) from the sarcolemma, which indicated that down-regulation of dystrophin was one of the key points of skeletal muscle injury from eccentric exercise. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations of DMD gene, resulting in the absence of dystrophin, which means that skeletal muscles o...

  19. Skeletal muscle fibrosis in the mdx/utrn+/- mouse validates its suitability as a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutpell, Kelly M; Hrinivich, William T; Hoffman, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Various therapeutic approaches have been studied for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), but none of these approaches have led to significant long-term effects in patients. One reason for this observed inefficacy may be the use of inappropriate animal models for the testing of therapeutic agents. The mdx mouse is the most widely used murine model of DMD, yet it does not model the fibrotic progression observed in patients. Other murine models of DMD are available that lack one or both alleles of utrophin, a functional analog of dystrophin. The aim of this study was to compare fibrosis and myofiber damage in the mdx, mdx/utrn+/- and double knockout (dko) mouse models. We used Masson's trichrome stain and percentage of centrally-nucleated myofibers as indicators of fibrosis and myofiber regeneration, respectively, to assess disease progression in diaphragm and gastrocnemius muscles harvested from young and aged wild-type, mdx, mdx/utrn+/- and dko mice. Our results indicated that eight week-old gastrocnemius muscles of both mdx/utrn+/- and dko hind limb developed fibrosis whereas age-matched mdx gastrocnemius muscle did not (p = 0.002). The amount of collagen found in the mdx/utrn+/- diaphragm was significantly higher than that found in the corresponding diaphragm muscles of wild-type animals, but not of mdx animals (p = 0.0003). Aged mdx/utrn+/- mice developed fibrosis in both diaphragm and gastrocnemius muscles compared to wild-type controls (p = 0.003). Mdx diaphragm was fibrotic in aged mice as well (p = 0.0235), whereas the gastrocnemius muscle in these animals was not fibrotic. We did not measure a significant difference in collagen staining between wild-type and mdx gastrocnemius muscles. The results of this study support previous reports that the moderately-affected mdx/utrn+/- mouse is a better model of DMD, and we show here that this difference is apparent by 2 months of age.

  20. Mechanical and morphological aspects of the calcaneal tendon of mdx mice at 21 days of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Wilson Romero; Tomiosso, Tatiana Carla; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Camilli, José Angelo

    2013-10-01

    A relationship between compromised muscles and other tissues has been demonstrated in mdx mouse, an animal model studied for understanding of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The hypothesis is that changes in the calcaneal tendon of mdx mice occur previous to the onset of rigorous and most marked episodes of muscle degeneration, which start suddenly after 21 days of life. Thus, this study aimed to identify possible alterations in the calcaneal tendon of mdx mouse at 21 days of age. Control and mdx tendons were submitted to mechanical tensile testing, quantification of hydroxyproline, and staining with toluidine blue and picrosirius red. Hydroxyproline content was similar between mdx and control groups. The control tendon presented higher mechanical strength (load, stress, and elastic modulus) and its morphological analysis showed a larger number of round fibroblasts, nuclei with well-decondensed chromatin, and slightly metachromatic well-stained cytoplasmic material, different from that observed in mdx tendons. The results suggest that the absence of dystrophin in mdx mouse can provoke directly or indirectly alterations in the mechanical properties and morphology of the calcaneal tendon. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Prevention of exercised induced cardiomyopathy following Pip-PMO treatment in dystrophic mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Corinne A; Saleh, Amer F; Carr, Carolyn A; Hammond, Suzan M; Coenen-Stass, Anna M L; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Varela, Miguel A; Roberts, Thomas C; Clarke, Kieran; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-03-11

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene. In addition to skeletal muscle wasting, DMD patients develop cardiomyopathy, which significantly contributes to mortality. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are a promising DMD therapy, restoring functional dystrophin protein by exon skipping. However, a major limitation with current AOs is the absence of dystrophin correction in heart. Pip peptide-AOs demonstrate high activity in cardiac muscle. To determine their therapeutic value, dystrophic mdx mice were subject to forced exercise to model the DMD cardiac phenotype. Repeated peptide-AO treatments resulted in high levels of cardiac dystrophin protein, which prevented the exercised induced progression of cardiomyopathy, normalising heart size as well as stabilising other cardiac parameters. Treated mice also exhibited significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis and improved sarcolemmal integrity. This work demonstrates that high levels of cardiac dystrophin restored by Pip peptide-AOs prevents further deterioration of cardiomyopathy and pathology following exercise in dystrophic DMD mice.

  2. Heregulin ameliorates the dystrophic phenotype in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krag, Thomas O B; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Jensen, Claus J; Fischer, M Dominik; Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Javazon, Elisabeth H; Flake, Alan W; Edvinsson, Lars; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2004-09-21

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disease caused by absence of dystrophin. Utrophin is a chromosome 6-encoded dystrophin-related protein (DRP), sharing functional motifs with dystrophin. Utrophin's ability to compensate for dystrophin during development and when transgenically overexpressed has provided an important impetus for identifying activators of utrophin expression. The utrophin promoter A is transcriptionally regulated in part by heregulin-mediated, extracellular signal-related kinase-dependent activation of the GABP(alpha/beta) transcription factor complex. Therefore, this pathway offers a potential mechanism to modulate utrophin expression in muscle. We tested the ability of heregulin to improve the dystrophic phenotype in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Intraperitoneal injections of a small peptide encoding the epidermal growth factor-like region of heregulin ectodomain for 3 months in vivo resulted in up-regulation of utrophin, a marked improvement in the mechanical properties of muscle as evidenced by resistance to eccentric contraction mediated damage, and a reduction of muscle pathology. The amelioration of dystrophic phenotype by heregulin-mediated utrophin up-regulation offers a pharmacological therapeutic modality and obviates many of the toxicity and delivery issues associated with viral vector-based gene therapy for DMD.

  3. Parental source effect of inherited mutations in the dystrophin gene of mice and men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, W.; Grimm, T.; Mueller, C.R. [Institute of Human Genetics, Wuerburg (Germany); Bittner, R. [Institute of Anatomy, Wein (Australia)

    1994-09-01

    Skewed X-inactivation has been suspected the genetic cause for some manifesting female carriers of BMD and DMD. To test whether a parental source effect on the protein expression of the dystrophin gene exists, we have set up backcrosses of mdx mice to wild type strains, enabling us to study the effect of the well-defined origin of the mutation on the dystrophin expression. In skeletal muscle sections the immunohistological staining patterns of dystrophin antibodies were showing a significant difference in the proportion of dystrophin positive versus negative fibers, suggesting a lower expression of paternally inherited mdx mutations. These data are in concordance with the pyruvate kinase (PK) levels in the serum: PK levels were much higher when the mutation was of maternal origin as compared to PK levels in paternally derived mutations. In order to test this {open_quotes}paternal source effect{close_quotes} in humans, we checked obligatory carriers of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) for the origin of their mutations. Creatin kinase (CK) levels in 21 carriers with maternally derived mutations were compared to CK values from 8 heterozygotes with mutations of paternal origin: CK (mat) = 140.3 IU/1 versus CK (pat) = 48.6 IU/I. The difference is statistically significant at the 5% level. These observations suggest either a differential X-inactivation or an imprinting of the dystrophin gene in mice and men.

  4. Fibrosis and inflammation are greater in muscles of beta-sarcoglycan-null mouse than mdx mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibertini, Sara; Zanotti, Simona; Savadori, Paolo; Curcio, Maurizio; Saredi, Simona; Salerno, Franco; Andreetta, Francesca; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Mora, Marina

    2014-05-01

    The Sgcb-null mouse, with knocked-down β-sarcoglycan, develops severe muscular dystrophy as in type 2E human limb girdle muscular dystrophy. The mdx mouse, lacking dystrophin, is the most used model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Unlike DMD, the mdx mouse has mild clinical features and shows little fibrosis in limb muscles. To characterize ECM protein deposition and the progression of muscle fibrosis, we evaluated protein and transcript levels of collagens I, III and VI, decorin, and TGF-β1, in quadriceps and diaphragm, at 2, 4, 8, 12, 26, and 52 weeks in Sgcb-null mice, and protein levels at 12, 26, and 52 weeks in mdx mice. In Sgcb-null mice, severe morphological disruption was present from 4 weeks in both quadriceps and diaphragm, and included conspicuous deposition of extracellular matrix components. Histopathological features of Sgcb-null mouse muscles were similar to those of age-matched mdx muscles at all ages examined, but, in the Sgcb-null mouse, the extent of connective tissue deposition was generally greater than mdx. Furthermore, in the Sgcb-null mouse, the amount of all three collagen isoforms increased steadily, while, in the mdx, they remained stable. We also found that, at 12 weeks, macrophages were significantly more numerous in mildly inflamed areas of Sgcb-null quadriceps compared to mdx quadriceps (but not in highly inflamed regions), while, in the diaphragm, macrophages did not differ significantly between the two models, in either region. Osteopontin mRNA was also significantly greater at 12 weeks in laser-dissected highly inflamed areas of the Sgcb-null quadriceps compared to the mdx quadriceps. TGF-β1 was present in areas of degeneration-regeneration, but levels were highly variable and in general did not differ significantly between the two models and controls. The roles of the various subtypes of macrophages in muscle repair and fibrosis in the two models require further study. The Sgcb-null mouse, which develops early fibrosis

  5. Dystrophin, utrophin and {beta}-dystroglycan expression in skeletal muscle from patients with Becker muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawajiri, Masakazu; Mitsui, Takao; Kawai, Hisaomi [Univ. of Tokushima (Japan)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    The precise localization and semiquantitative correlation of dystrophin, utrophin and {beta}-dystroglycan expression on the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle cells obtained from patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was studied using three types of double immunofluorescence. Staining intensity was measured using a confocal laser microscope. Each of these proteins was identified at the same locus on the sarcolemma. The staining intensities of dystrophin and utrophin were approximately reciprocal at sarcolemmal sites where dystrophin expression was obviously observed. The staining intensity of {beta}-dystroglycan was strong in areas where dystrophin staining was also strong and utrophin expression was weak. Quantitative analysis revealed that the staining intensity of {beta}-dystroglycan minus that of dystrophin approximated the staining intensity of utrophin, indicating that the sum of dystrophin and utrophin expression corresponds to that of {beta}-dystroglycan. These results suggest that utrophin may compensate for dystrophin deficiency found in BMD by binding to {beta}-dystroglycan. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Caveolin-1, caveolin-3 and VEGF expression in the masticatory muscles of mdx mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Spassov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and murine X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx, its murine model, are characterized by muscle damage and muscle weakness associated with inflammation and new vessel formation. Caveolins, dystrophin-associated proteins, are involved in the pathogenesis of DMD, because increased numbers of caveolae are found in DMD and mdx hindlimb muscles. Caveolae influence angiogenesis due to their content of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors. Orofacial muscles in mdx mice undergo muscle necrosis followed by muscle regeneration. To ascertain the role of caveolins and VEGF in the pathogenesis of dystrophic masticatory muscles, we examined the expression of caveolin-1 (cav-1, caveolin-3 (cav-3 and VEGF in control and mdx mice. In mdx masticatory muscles, no changes in transcript and protein levels of VEGF were found, whereas cav-1 and cav-3 expression was increased. Using immunohistochemistry, a strong sarcolemmal staining of caveolin-3 in regenerated muscle fibers was found. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry with the caveolin-1 antibody showed an increase in the amount of blood vessels in areas with regenerating muscle fibers. Dystrophic masticatory muscles showed changes comparable to those of hindlimb muscles in the expression of cav-1 and cav-3. The angiogenesis seems to be unaffected in the jaw muscles of mdx mice. We speculate that the increased caveolin expression could cause extensive and efficient muscle regeneration. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 2, pp. 291–298

  7. Chemical and mechanistic toxicology evaluation of exon skipping phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazani, Peter; Ness, Kirk P Van; Weller, Doreen L; Poage, Duane; Nelson, Keith; Shrewsbury, And Stephen B

    2011-05-01

    AVI-4658 is a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) designed to induce skipping of dystrophin exon 51 and restore its expression in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Preclinically, restoration of dystrophin in the dystrophic mdx mouse model requires skipping of exon 23, achieved with the mouse-specific PMO, AVI-4225. Herein, we report the potential toxicological consequences of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration in mdx mice using AVI-4225. We also evaluated the toxicological effects of AVI-4658 in both mdx and wild-type mice. In both studies, animals were dosed once weekly for 12 weeks up to the maximum feasible dose of 960 mg/kg per injection. Both AVI-4658 and AVI-4225 were well-tolerated at all doses. Findings in AVI-4225-treated animals were generally limited to mild renal tubular basophilia/vacuolation, without any significant changes in renal function and with evidence of reversing. No toxicity associated with the mechanism of action of AVI-4225 in a dystrophic animal was observed.

  8. Rescue of dystrophic skeletal muscle by PGC-1α involves a fast to slow fiber type shift in the mdx mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua T Selsby

    Full Text Available Increased utrophin expression is known to reduce pathology in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscles. Transgenic over-expression of PGC-1α has been shown to increase levels of utrophin mRNA and improve the histology of mdx muscles. Other reports have shown that PGC-1α signaling can lead to increased oxidative capacity and a fast to slow fiber type shift. Given that it has been shown that slow fibers produce and maintain more utrophin than fast skeletal muscle fibers, we hypothesized that over-expression of PGC-1α in post-natal mdx mice would increase utrophin levels via a fiber type shift, resulting in more slow, oxidative fibers that are also more resistant to contraction-induced damage. To test this hypothesis, neonatal mdx mice were injected with recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV driving expression of PGC-1α. PGC-1α over-expression resulted in increased utrophin and type I myosin heavy chain expression as well as elevated mitochondrial protein expression. Muscles were shown to be more resistant to contraction-induced damage and more fatigue resistant. Sirt-1 was increased while p38 activation and NRF-1 were reduced in PGC-1α over-expressing muscle when compared to control. We also evaluated if the use a pharmacological PGC-1α pathway activator, resveratrol, could drive the same physiological changes. Resveratrol administration (100 mg/kg/day resulted in improved fatigue resistance, but did not achieve significant increases in utrophin expression. These data suggest that the PGC-1α pathway is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

  9. Lengthening-contractions in isolated myocardium impact force development and worsen cardiac contractile function in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Delfín, Dawn A; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A; Janssen, Paul M L

    2011-02-01

    Lengthening-contractions exert eccentric stress on myofibers in normal myocardium. In congestive heart failure caused by a variety of diseases, the impact of lengthening-contractions of myocardium likely becomes more prevalent and severe. The present study introduces a method to investigate the role of stretching imposed by repetitive lengthening-contractions in myocardium under near-physiological conditions. By exerting various stretch-release ramps while the muscle is contracting, consecutive lengthening-contractions and their potential detrimental effect on cardiac function can be studied. We tested our model and hypothesis in age-matched (young and adult) mdx and wild-type mouse right ventricular trabeculae. These linear and ultrathin muscles possess all major cardiac cell types, and their contractile behavior very closely mimics that of the whole myocardium. In the first group of experiments, 10 lengthening-contractions at various magnitudes of stretch were performed in trabeculae from 10-wk-old mdx and wild-type mice. In the second group, 100 lengthening-contractions at various magnitudes were conducted in trabeculae from 10- and 20-wk-old mice. The peak isometric active developed tension (F(dev), in mN/mm(2)) and kinetic parameters time to peak tension (TTP, in ms) and time from peak tension to half-relaxation (RT50, in ms) were measured. Our results indicate lengthening-contractions significantly impact contractile behavior, and that dystrophin-deficient myocardium in mdx mice is significantly more susceptible to these damaging lengthening-contractions. The results indicate that lengthening-contractions in intact myocardium can be used in vitro to study this emerging contributor to cardiomyopathy.

  10. MDX with SSAS 2012 cookbook

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    Li, Sherry

    2013-01-01

    This book is written in a recipe-based style packed full of practical tips and techniques to help you analyse multidimensional data stored in SSAS 2012 cubes. If you need to master MDX queries in SSAS, then this book is for you!If you are a Microsoft SQL Server Analysis Services developer and want to improve your solutions using MDX, then this book is for you. This book is also an essential resource for report developers who need to access the multidimensional cubes through the MDX language. The book assumes you have some basic working knowledge of MDX and a basic understanding of dimensional

  11. Muscular dystrophy in the mdx mouse is a severe myopathy compounded by hypotrophy, hypertrophy and hyperplasia.

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    Duddy, William; Duguez, Stephanie; Johnston, Helen; Cohen, Tatiana V; Phadke, Aditi; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Gnocchi, Viola; Low, SiewHui; Partridge, Terence

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical testing of potential therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is conducted predominantly of the mdx mouse. But lack of a detailed quantitative description of the pathology of this animal limits our ability to evaluate the effectiveness of putative therapies or their relevance to DMD. Accordingly, we have measured the main cellular components of muscle growth and regeneration over the period of postnatal growth and early pathology in mdx and wild-type (WT) mice; phalloidin binding is used as a measure of fibre size, myonuclear counts and BrdU labelling as records of myogenic activity. We confirm a two-phase postnatal growth pattern in WT muscle: first, increase in myonuclear number over weeks 1 to 3, then expansion of myonuclear domain. Mdx muscle growth lags behind that of WT prior to overt signs of pathology. Fibres are smaller, with fewer myonuclei and smaller myonuclear domains. Moreover, satellite cells are more readily detached from mdx than WT muscle fibres. At 3 weeks, mdx muscles enter a phase of florid myonecrosis, accompanied by concurrent regeneration of an intensity that results in complete replacement of pre-existing muscle over the succeeding 3 to 4 weeks. Both WT and mdx muscles attain maximum size by 12 to 14 weeks, mdx muscle fibres being up to 50% larger than those of WT as they become increasingly branched. Mdx muscle fibres also become hypernucleated, containing twice as many myonuclei per sarcoplasmic volume, as those of WT, the excess corresponding to the number of centrally placed myonuclei. The best-known consequence of lack of dystrophin that is common to DMD and the mdx mouse is the conspicuous necrosis and regeneration of muscle fibres. We present protocols for measuring this in terms both of loss of muscle nuclei previously labelled with BrdU and of the intensity of myonuclear labelling with BrdU administered during the regeneration period. Both measurements can be used to assess the efficacy of putative

  12. Electrotransfer of the full-length dog dystrophin into mouse and dystrophic dog muscles.

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    Pichavant, Christophe; Chapdelaine, Pierre; Cerri, Daniel G; Bizario, Joao C S; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2010-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disease characterized by the absence of dystrophin (427 kDa). An approach to eventually restore this protein in patients with DMD is to introduce into their muscles a plasmid encoding dystrophin cDNA. Because the phenotype of the dystrophic dog is closer to the human phenotype than is the mdx mouse phenotype, we have studied the electrotransfer of a plasmid carrying the full-length dog dystrophin (FLDYS(dog)) in dystrophic dog muscle. To achieve this nonviral delivery, the FLDYS(dog) cDNA was cloned in two plasmids containing either a cytomegalovirus or a muscle creatine kinase promoter. In both cases, our results showed that the electrotransfer of these large plasmids (∼17 kb) into mouse muscle allowed FLDYS(dog) expression in the treated muscle. The electrotransfer of pCMV.FLDYS(dog) in a dystrophic dog muscle also led to the expression of dystrophin. In conclusion, introduction of the full-length dog dystrophin cDNA by electrotransfer into dystrophic dog muscle is a potential approach to restore dystrophin in patients with DMD. However, the electrotransfer procedure should be improved before applying it to humans.

  13. TNF-α-Induced microRNAs Control Dystrophin Expression in Becker Muscular Dystrophy

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    Alyson A. Fiorillo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The amount and distribution of dystrophin protein in myofibers and muscle is highly variable in Becker muscular dystrophy and in exon-skipping trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we investigate a molecular basis for this variability. In muscle from Becker patients sharing the same exon 45–47 in-frame deletion, dystrophin levels negatively correlate with microRNAs predicted to target dystrophin. Seven microRNAs inhibit dystrophin expression in vitro, and three are validated in vivo (miR-146b/miR-374a/miR-31. microRNAs are expressed in dystrophic myofibers and increase with age and disease severity. In exon-skipping-treated mdx mice, microRNAs are significantly higher in muscles with low dystrophin rescue. TNF-α increases microRNA levels in vitro whereas NFκB inhibition blocks this in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these data show that microRNAs contribute to variable dystrophin levels in muscular dystrophy. Our findings suggest a model where chronic inflammation in distinct microenvironments induces pathological microRNAs, initiating a self-sustaining feedback loop that exacerbates disease progression.

  14. The polyproline site in hinge 2 influences the functional capacity of truncated dystrophins.

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    Glen B Banks

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in dystrophin can lead to Duchenne muscular dystrophy or the more mild form of the disease, Becker muscular dystrophy. The hinge 3 region in the rod domain of dystrophin is particularly prone to deletion mutations. In-frame deletions of hinge 3 are predicted to lead to BMD, however the severity of disease can vary considerably. Here we performed extensive structure-function analyses of truncated dystrophins with modified hinges and spectrin-like repeats in mdx mice. We found that the polyproline site in hinge 2 profoundly influences the functional capacity of a microdystrophin(DeltaR4-R23/DeltaCT with a large deletion in the hinge 3 region. Inclusion of polyproline in microdystrophin(DeltaR4-R23/DeltaCT led to small myofibers (12% smaller than wild-type, Achilles myotendinous disruption, ringed fibers, and aberrant neuromuscular junctions in the mdx gastrocnemius muscles. Replacing hinge 2 of microdystrophin(DeltaR4-R23/DeltaCT with hinge 3 significantly improved the functional capacity to prevent muscle degeneration, increase muscle fiber area, and maintain the junctions. We conclude that the rigid alpha-helical structure of the polyproline site significantly impairs the functional capacity of truncated dystrophins to maintain appropriate connections between the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix.

  15. The sarcoglycan-sarcospan complex localization in mouse retina is independent from dystrophins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Patrice; Estrada, Francisco-Javier; Bordais, Agnès; Mornet, Dominique; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Vargas, Haydeé Rosas; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M.; Rendon, Alvaro

    2005-01-01

    The sarcoglycan–sarcospan (SG–SSPN) complex is part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that has been extensively characterized in muscle. To establish the framework for functional studies of sarcoglycans in retina here, we quantified sarcoglycans mRNA levels with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and performed immunohistochemistry to determine their cellular and subcellular distribution. We showed that the β-, δ-, γ-, ε-sarcoglycans and sarcospan are expressed in mouse retina. They are localized predominantly in the outer and the inner limiting membranes, probably in the Müller cells and also in the ganglion cells axons where the expression of dystrophins have never been reported. We also investigated the status of the sarcoglycans in the retina of mdx3cv mutant mice for all Duchene Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) gene products. The absence of dystrophin did not produce any change in the sarcoglycan–sarcospan components expression and distribution. PMID:15993965

  16. Comparative study of myocytes from normal and mdx mice iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Cao, Jiqing; Liu, Qiang; Qin, Jie; Kong, Jie; Wang, Yanyun; Li, Yaqin; Geng, Jia; Li, Qiuling; Yang, Liqing; Xiang, Andy Peng; Zhang, Cheng

    2012-02-01

    Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) have been derived from various techniques and show great potential for therapy of human diseases. Furthermore, the iPS technique can be used to provide cell models to explore pathological mechanisms of many human diseases in vitro, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is a severe recessive X-linked form of muscular dystrophy without effective treatment. In this study, we try to determine whether there are different characteristics of myocytes from mdx iPS cells and C57BL/10 iPS cells. Our results showed that both of mdx and C57BL/10 cells could be induced into iPS cells in vitro, whereas colony-forming ability of mdx iPS cells was much weaker than that of C57BL/10 iPS cells. Meanwhile, mdx iPS cells could be induced to differentiate into myocytes, whereas their differentiation efficiency was much lower than that of C57BL/10 iPS cells. And, the number of apoptotic cells in differentiated myocytes from mdx iPS cells was significantly higher than that from C57BL/10 iPS cells. More importantly, treatment of a pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD) produced a significant decrease in apoptotic cells. This study might add some insight to the biology study of dystrophin gene.

  17. Intrinsic laryngeal muscles are spared from myonecrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Maria Julia; Ferretti, Renato; Vomero, Viviane Urbini; Minatel, Elaine; Neto, Humberto Santo

    2007-03-01

    Intrinsic laryngeal muscles share many anatomical and physiological properties with extraocular muscles, which are unaffected in both Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mdx mice. We hypothesized that intrinsic laryngeal muscles are spared from myonecrosis in mdx mice and may serve as an additional tool to understand the mechanisms of muscle sparing in dystrophinopathy. Intrinsic laryngeal muscles and tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of adult and aged mdx and control C57Bl/10 mice were investigated. The percentage of central nucleated fibers, as a sign of muscle fibers that had undergone injury and regeneration, and myofiber labeling with Evans blue dye, as a marker of myofiber damage, were studied. Except for the cricothyroid muscle, none of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles from adult and old mdx mice showed signs of myofiber damage or Evans blue dye labeling, and all appeared to be normal. Central nucleation was readily visible in the TA of the same mdx mice. A significant increase in the percentage of central nucleated fibers was observed in adult cricothyroid muscle compared to the other intrinsic laryngeal muscles, which worsened with age. Thus, we have shown that the intrinsic laryngeal muscles are spared from the lack of dystrophin and may serve as a useful model to study the mechanisms of muscle sparing in dystrophinopathy.

  18. Corticortophin releasing factor 2 receptor agonist treatment significantly slows disease progression in mdx mice

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    Stevens Paula J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy results from mutation of the dystrophin gene, causing skeletal and cardiac muscle loss of function. The mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy is widely utilized to evaluate the potential of therapeutic regimens to modulate the loss of skeletal muscle function associated with dystrophin mutation. Importantly, progressive loss of diaphragm function is the most consistent striated muscle effect observed in the mdx mouse model, which is the same as in patients suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Methods Using the mdx mouse model, we have evaluated the effect that corticotrophin releasing factor 2 receptor (CRF2R agonist treatment has on diaphragm function, morphology and gene expression. Results We have observed that treatment with the potent CRF2R-selective agonist PG-873637 prevents the progressive loss of diaphragm specific force observed during aging of mdx mice. In addition, the combination of PG-873637 with glucocorticoids not only prevents the loss of diaphragm specific force over time, but also results in recovery of specific force. Pathological analysis of CRF2R agonist-treated diaphragm muscle demonstrates that treatment reduces fibrosis, immune cell infiltration, and muscle architectural disruption. Gene expression analysis of CRF2R-treated diaphragm muscle showed multiple gene expression changes including globally decreased immune cell-related gene expression, decreased extracellular matrix gene expression, increased metabolism-related gene expression, and, surprisingly, modulation of circadian rhythm gene expression. Conclusion Together, these data demonstrate that CRF2R activation can prevent the progressive degeneration of diaphragm muscle associated with dystrophin gene mutation.

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of dystrophin RNAi knockdown reveals a central role for dystrophin in muscle differentiation and contractile apparatus organization

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    Graham Ian R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a fatal muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. DMD has a complex and as yet incompletely defined molecular pathophysiology hindering development of effective ameliorative approaches. Transcriptomic studies so far conducted on dystrophic cells and tissues suffer from non-specific changes and background noise due to heterogeneous comparisons and secondary pathologies. A study design in which a perfectly matched control cell population is used as reference for transcriptomic studies will give a much more specific insight into the effects of dystrophin deficiency and DMD pathophysiology. Results Using RNA interference (RNAi to knock down dystrophin in myotubes from C57BL10 mice, we created a homogenous model to study the transcriptome of dystrophin-deficient myotubes. We noted significant differences in the global gene expression pattern between these myotubes and their matched control cultures. In particular, categorical analyses of the dysregulated genes demonstrated significant enrichment of molecules associated with the components of muscle cell contractile unit, ion channels, metabolic pathways and kinases. Additionally, some of the dysregulated genes could potentially explain conditions and endophenotypes associated with dystrophin deficiency, such as dysregulation of calcium homeostasis (Pvalb and Casq1, or cardiomyopathy (Obscurin, Tcap. In addition to be validated by qPCR, our data gains another level of validity by affirmatively reproducing several independent studies conducted previously at genes and/or protein levels in vivo and in vitro. Conclusion Our results suggest that in striated muscles, dystrophin is involved in orchestrating proper development and organization of myofibers as contractile units, depicting a novel pathophysiology for DMD where the absence of dystrophin results in maldeveloped myofibers prone to physical stress and damage

  20. Dystrophin is required for the normal function of the cardio-protective K(ATP channel in cardiomyocytes.

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    Laura Graciotti

    Full Text Available Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients often develop a cardiomyopathy for which the pathogenesis is still unknown. We have employed the murine animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (mdx, which develops a cardiomyopathy that includes some characteristics of the human disease, to study the molecular basis of this pathology. Here we show that the mdx mouse heart has defects consistent with alteration in compounds that regulate energy homeostasis including a marked decrease in creatine-phosphate (PC. In addition, the mdx heart is more susceptible to anoxia than controls. Since the cardio-protective ATP sensitive potassium channel (K(ATP complex and PC have been shown to interact we investigated whether deficits in PC levels correlate with other molecular events including K(ATP ion channel complex presence, its functionality and interaction with dystrophin. We found that this channel complex is present in the dystrophic cardiac cell membrane but its ability to sense a drop in the intracellular ATP concentration and consequently open is compromised by the absence of dystrophin. We further demonstrate that the creatine kinase muscle isoform (CKm is displaced from the plasma membrane of the mdx cardiac cells. Considering that CKm is a determinant of K(ATP channel complex function we hypothesize that dystrophin acts as a scaffolding protein organizing the K(ATP channel complex and the enzymes necessary for its correct functioning. Therefore, the lack of proper functioning of the cardio-protective K(ATP system in the mdx cardiomyocytes may be part of the mechanism contributing to development of cardiac disease in dystrophic patients.

  1. Novel adeno-associated viral vector delivering the utrophin gene regulator jazz counteracts dystrophic pathology in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strimpakos, Georgios; Corbi, Nicoletta; Pisani, Cinzia; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Onori, Annalisa; Luvisetto, Siro; Severini, Cinzia; Gabanella, Francesca; Monaco, Lucia; Mattei, Elisabetta; Passananti, Claudio

    2014-09-01

    Over-expression of the dystrophin-related gene utrophin represents a promising therapeutic strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The strategy is based on the ability of utrophin to functionally replace defective dystrophin. We developed the artificial zinc finger transcription factor "Jazz" that up-regulates both the human and mouse utrophin promoter. We observed a significant recovery of muscle strength in dystrophic Jazz-transgenic mdx mice. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of an experimental gene therapy based on the systemic delivery of Jazz gene in mdx mice by adeno-associated virus (AAV). AAV serotype 8 was chosen on the basis of its high affinity for skeletal muscle. Muscle-specific expression of the therapeutic Jazz gene was enhanced by adding the muscle α-actin promoter to the AAV vector (mAAV). Injection of mAAV8-Jazz viral preparations into mdx mice resulted in muscle-specific Jazz expression coupled with up-regulation of the utrophin gene. We show a significant recovery from the dystrophic phenotype in mAAV8-Jazz-treated mdx mice. Histological and physiological analysis revealed a reduction of fiber necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration associated with functional recovery in muscle contractile force. The combination of ZF-ATF technology with the AAV delivery can open a new avenue to obtain a therapeutic strategy for treatment of DMD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dual exon skipping in myostatin and dystrophin for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

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    van Ommen Gert Jan B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myostatin is a potent muscle growth inhibitor that belongs to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β family. Mutations leading to non functional myostatin have been associated with hypermuscularity in several organisms. By contrast, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is characterized by a loss of muscle fibers and impaired regeneration. In this study, we aim to knockdown myostatin by means of exon skipping, a technique which has been successfully applied to reframe the genetic defect of dystrophin gene in DMD patients. Methods We targeted myostatin exon 2 using antisense oligonucleotides (AON in healthy and DMD-derived myotubes cultures. We assessed the exon skipping level, transcriptional expression of myostatin and its target genes, and combined myostatin and several dystrophin AONs. These AONs were also applied in the mdx mice models via intramuscular injections. Results Myostatin AON induced exon 2 skipping in cell cultures and to a lower extent in the mdx mice. It was accompanied by decrease in myostatin mRNA and enhanced MYOG and MYF5 expression. Furthermore, combination of myostatin and dystrophin AONs induced simultaneous skipping of both genes. Conclusions We conclude that two AONs can be used to target two different genes, MSTN and DMD, in a straightforward manner. Targeting multiple ligands of TGF-beta family will be more promising as adjuvant therapies for DMD.

  3. Revertant fibers in the mdx murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an age- and muscle-related reappraisal.

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    Sarah R Pigozzo

    Full Text Available Muscles in Duchenne dystrophy patients are characterized by the absence of dystrophin, yet transverse sections show a small percentage of fibers (termed "revertant fibers" positive for dystrophin expression. This phenomenon, whose biological bases have not been fully elucidated, is present also in the murine and canine models of DMD and can confound the evaluation of therapeutic approaches. We analyzed 11 different muscles in a cohort of 40 mdx mice, the most commonly model used in pre-clinical studies, belonging to four age groups; such number of animals allowed us to perform solid ANOVA statistical analysis. We assessed the average number of dystrophin-positive fibers, both absolute and normalized for muscle size, and the correlation between their formation and the ageing process. Our results indicate that various muscles develop different numbers of revertant fibers, with different time trends; besides, they suggest that the biological mechanism(s behind dystrophin re-expression might not be limited to the early development phases but could actually continue during adulthood. Importantly, such finding was seen also in cardiac muscle, a fact that does not fit into the current hypothesis of the clonal origin of "revertant" myonuclei from satellite cells. This work represents the largest, statistically significant analysis of revertant fibers in mdx mice so far, which can now be used as a reference point for improving the evaluation of therapeutic approaches for DMD. At the same time, it provides new clues about the formation of revertant fibers/cardiomyocytes in dystrophic skeletal and cardiac muscle.

  4. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the mdx mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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    Hannah G Radley-Crabb

    Full Text Available The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the dietary requirements for these macronutrients at different stages of the disease, are not well-understood. This study used juvenile (4- to 5- wk-old and adult (12- to 14-wk-old male dystrophic C57BL/10ScSn-mdx/J and age-matched C57BL/10ScSn/J control male mice to measure total and resting energy expenditure, food intake, spontaneous activity, body composition, whole body protein turnover, and muscle protein synthesis rates. In juvenile mdx mice that have extensive muscle damage, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were higher than in age-matched controls. Adaptations in food intake and decreased activity were insufficient to meet the increased energy and protein needs of juvenile mdx mice and resulted in stunted growth. In (non-growing adult mdx mice with less severe dystropathology, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were also higher than in age-matched controls. Food intake was sufficient to meet their protein and energy needs, but insufficient to result in fat deposition. These data show that dystropathology impacts the protein and energy needs of mdx mice and that tailored dietary interventions are necessary to redress this imbalance. If not met, the resultant imbalance blunts growth, and may limit the benefits of therapies designed to protect and repair dystrophic muscles.

  5. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the mdx mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Marini, Juan C; Sosa, Horacio A; Castillo, Liliana I; Grounds, Miranda D; Fiorotto, Marta L

    2014-01-01

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the dietary requirements for these macronutrients at different stages of the disease, are not well-understood. This study used juvenile (4- to 5- wk-old) and adult (12- to 14-wk-old) male dystrophic C57BL/10ScSn-mdx/J and age-matched C57BL/10ScSn/J control male mice to measure total and resting energy expenditure, food intake, spontaneous activity, body composition, whole body protein turnover, and muscle protein synthesis rates. In juvenile mdx mice that have extensive muscle damage, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were higher than in age-matched controls. Adaptations in food intake and decreased activity were insufficient to meet the increased energy and protein needs of juvenile mdx mice and resulted in stunted growth. In (non-growing) adult mdx mice with less severe dystropathology, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were also higher than in age-matched controls. Food intake was sufficient to meet their protein and energy needs, but insufficient to result in fat deposition. These data show that dystropathology impacts the protein and energy needs of mdx mice and that tailored dietary interventions are necessary to redress this imbalance. If not met, the resultant imbalance blunts growth, and may limit the benefits of therapies designed to protect and repair dystrophic muscles.

  6. Parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons are increased in the dorsal hippocampus of the dystrophic mdx mouse.

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    Del Tongo, Claudia; Carretta, Donatella; Fulgenzi, Gianluca; Catini, Claudio; Minciacchi, Diego

    2009-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by variable alterations of the dystrophin gene and by muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We postulated an association between cognitive impairment and architectural changes of the hippocampal GABAergic system. We investigated a major subpopulation of GABAergic neurons, the parvalbumin-immunopositive (PV-I) cells, in the dorsal hippocampus of the mdx mouse, an acknowledged model of DMD. PV-I neurons were quantified and their distribution was compared in CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus in wild-type and mdx mice. The cell morphology and topography of PV-I neurons were maintained. Conversely, the number of PV-I neurons was significantly increased in the mdx mouse. The percent increase of PV-I neurons was from 45% for CA2, up to 125% for the dentate gyrus. In addition, the increased parvalbumin content in the mdx hippocampus was confirmed by Western blot. A change in the hippocampus processing abilities is the expected functional counterpart of the modification displayed by PV-I GABAergic neurons. Altered hippocampal functionality can be responsible for part of the cognitive impairment in DMD.

  7. Muscle Structure Influences Utrophin Expression in mdx Mice

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    Banks, Glen B.; Combs, Ariana C.; Odom, Guy L.; Bloch, Robert J.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. To examine the influence of muscle structure on the pathogenesis of DMD we generated mdx4cv:desmin double knockout (dko) mice. The dko male mice died of apparent cardiorespiratory failure at a median age of 76 days compared to 609 days for the desmin−/− mice. An ∼2.5 fold increase in utrophin expression in the dko skeletal muscles prevented necrosis in ∼91% of 1a, 2a and 2d/x fiber-types. In contrast, utrophin expression was reduced in the extrasynaptic sarcolemma of the dko fast 2b fibers leading to increased membrane fragility and dystrophic pathology. Despite lacking extrasynaptic utrophin, the dko fast 2b fibers were less dystrophic than the mdx4cv fast 2b fibers suggesting utrophin-independent mechanisms were also contributing to the reduced dystrophic pathology. We found no overt change in the regenerative capacity of muscle stem cells when comparing the wild-type, desmin−/−, mdx4cv and dko gastrocnemius muscles injured with notexin. Utrophin could form costameric striations with α-sarcomeric actin in the dko to maintain the integrity of the membrane, but the lack of restoration of the NODS (nNOS, α-dystrobrevin 1 and 2, α1-syntrophin) complex and desmin coincided with profound changes to the sarcomere alignment in the diaphragm, deposition of collagen between the myofibers, and impaired diaphragm function. We conclude that the dko mice may provide new insights into the structural mechanisms that influence endogenous utrophin expression that are pertinent for developing a therapy for DMD. PMID:24922526

  8. Carrier detection of duchenne and becker muscular dystrophy using muscle dystrophin immunohistochemistry

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    Acary S. Bulle Oliveira

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available To ascertain whether dystrophin immunohistochemistry could improve DMD/ BMD carrier detection, we analyzed 14 muscle biopsies from 13 DMD and one BMD probable and possible carriers. All women were also evaluated using conventional methods, including genetic analysis, clinical and neurological evaluation, serum CK levels, KMG, and muscle biopsy. In 6 cases, there was a mosaic of dystrophin-positive and dystrophin-deficient fibers that allowed to make the diagnosis of a carrier state. Comparing dystrophin immunohistochemistry to the traditional methods, it was noted that this method is less sensitive than serum CK measuremens, but is more sensitive than EMG and muscle biopsy. The use of dystrophin immunohistochemistry in addition to CK, EMG and muscle biopsy improved the accuracy of carrier detection. This method is also helpful to distinguish manifesting DMD carriers from patients with other neuromuscular diseases like limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy.

  9. Nifedipine treatment reduces resting calcium concentration, oxidative and apoptotic gene expression, and improves muscle function in dystrophic mdx mice.

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    Altamirano, Francisco; Valladares, Denisse; Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Casas, Mariana; López, Jose R; Allen, Paul D; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked genetic disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. DMD is characterized in humans and in mdx mice by a severe and progressive destruction of muscle fibers, inflammation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and cell death. In mdx muscle fibers, we have shown that basal ATP release is increased and that extracellular ATP stimulation is pro-apoptotic. In normal fibers, depolarization-induced ATP release is blocked by nifedipine, leading us to study the potential therapeutic effect of nifedipine in mdx muscles and its relation with extracellular ATP signaling. Acute exposure to nifedipine (10 µM) decreased [Ca(2+)]r, NF-κB activity and iNOS expression in mdx myotubes. In addition, 6-week-old mdx mice were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of nifedipine, 1 mg/Kg for 1 week. This treatment lowered the [Ca(2+)]r measured in vivo in the mdx vastus lateralis. We demonstrated that extracellular ATP levels were higher in adult mdx flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers and can be significantly reduced after 1 week of treatment with nifedipine. Interestingly, acute treatment of mdx FDB fibers with apyrase, an enzyme that completely degrades extracellular ATP to AMP, reduced [Ca(2+)]r to a similar extent as was seen in FDB fibers after 1-week of nifedipine treatment. Moreover, we demonstrated that nifedipine treatment reduced mRNA levels of pro-oxidative/nitrosative (iNOS and gp91(phox)/p47(phox) NOX2 subunits) and pro-apoptotic (Bax) genes in mdx diaphragm muscles and lowered serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. In addition, nifedipine treatment increased muscle strength assessed by the inverted grip-hanging test and exercise tolerance measured with forced swimming test in mdx mice. We hypothesize that nifedipine reduces basal ATP release, thereby decreasing purinergic receptor activation, which in turn reduces [Ca(2+)]r in mdx skeletal muscle cells. The results in this work open new perspectives

  10. Nifedipine treatment reduces resting calcium concentration, oxidative and apoptotic gene expression, and improves muscle function in dystrophic mdx mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Altamirano

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a recessive X-linked genetic disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. DMD is characterized in humans and in mdx mice by a severe and progressive destruction of muscle fibers, inflammation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and cell death. In mdx muscle fibers, we have shown that basal ATP release is increased and that extracellular ATP stimulation is pro-apoptotic. In normal fibers, depolarization-induced ATP release is blocked by nifedipine, leading us to study the potential therapeutic effect of nifedipine in mdx muscles and its relation with extracellular ATP signaling. Acute exposure to nifedipine (10 µM decreased [Ca(2+]r, NF-κB activity and iNOS expression in mdx myotubes. In addition, 6-week-old mdx mice were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of nifedipine, 1 mg/Kg for 1 week. This treatment lowered the [Ca(2+]r measured in vivo in the mdx vastus lateralis. We demonstrated that extracellular ATP levels were higher in adult mdx flexor digitorum brevis (FDB fibers and can be significantly reduced after 1 week of treatment with nifedipine. Interestingly, acute treatment of mdx FDB fibers with apyrase, an enzyme that completely degrades extracellular ATP to AMP, reduced [Ca(2+]r to a similar extent as was seen in FDB fibers after 1-week of nifedipine treatment. Moreover, we demonstrated that nifedipine treatment reduced mRNA levels of pro-oxidative/nitrosative (iNOS and gp91(phox/p47(phox NOX2 subunits and pro-apoptotic (Bax genes in mdx diaphragm muscles and lowered serum creatine kinase (CK levels. In addition, nifedipine treatment increased muscle strength assessed by the inverted grip-hanging test and exercise tolerance measured with forced swimming test in mdx mice. We hypothesize that nifedipine reduces basal ATP release, thereby decreasing purinergic receptor activation, which in turn reduces [Ca(2+]r in mdx skeletal muscle cells. The results in this work open new

  11. Genetic silencing of Nrf2 enhances X-ROS in dysferlin-deficient muscle

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    Ponvijay eKombairaju

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a critical disease modifier in the muscular dystrophies. Recently, we discovered a pathway by which mechanical stretch activates NADPH Oxidase 2 (NoX2 dependent ROS generation (X-ROS. Our work in dystrophic skeletal muscle revealed that X-ROS is excessive in dystrophin-deficient (mdx skeletal muscle and contributes to muscle injury susceptibility, a hallmark of the dystrophic process. We also observed widespread alterations in expression of genes associated with the X-ROS pathway and redox homeostasis in muscles from both Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and mdx mice. As nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 plays an essential role in the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in redox homeostasis, we hypothesized that Nrf2 deficiency may contribute to enhanced X-ROS signaling by reducing redox buffering. To directly test the effect of diminished Nrf2 activity, Nrf2 was genetically silenced in the A/J model of dysferlinopathy - a model with a mild histopathologic and functional phenotype. Nrf2-deficient A/J mice exhibited significant muscle-specific functional deficits, histopathologic abnormalities, and dramatically enhanced X-ROS compared to control A/J and WT mice, both with functional Nrf2. Having identified that reduced Nrf2 activity is a negative disease modifier, we propose that strategies targeting Nrf2 activation may address the generalized reduction in redox homeostasis to halt or slow dystrophic progression.

  12. Electroporation Enhanced Effect of Dystrophin Splice Switching PNA Oligomers in Normal and Dystrophic Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Camilla Brolin; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Hojman, Pernille;

    2015-01-01

    and dystrophic mdx mice with or without electroporation. At low, single PNA doses (1.5, 3, or 10 µg/TA), electroporation augmented the antisense exon skipping induced by an unmodified PNA by twofold to fourfold in healthy mouse muscle with optimized electric parameters, measured after 7 days. The PNA splice...... switching was detected at the RNA level up to 4 weeks after a single-dose treatment. In dystrophic muscles of the MDX mouse, electroporation increased the number of dystrophin-positive fibers about 2.5-fold at 2 weeks after a single PNA administration compared to injection only. In conclusion, we find...... that electroporation can enhance PNA antisense effects in muscle tissue....

  13. The Dynamics of Compound, Transcript, and Protein Effects After Treatment With 2OMePS Antisense Oligonucleotides in mdx Mice

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    Ingrid E C Verhaart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense-mediated exon skipping is currently in clinical development for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD to amend the consequences of the underlying genetic defect and restore dystrophin expression. Due to turnover of compound, transcript, and protein, chronic treatment with effector molecules (antisense oligonucleotides will be required. To investigate the dynamics and persistence of antisense 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, exon skipping, and dystrophin expression after dosing was concluded, mdx mice were treated subcutaneously for 8 weeks with 100 mg/kg oligonucleotides twice weekly. Thereafter, mice were sacrificed at different time points after the final injection (36 hours–24 weeks. Oligonucleotide half-life was longer in heart (~65 days compared with that in skeletal muscle, liver, and kidney (~35 days. Exon skipping half-lives varied between 33 and 53 days, whereas dystrophin protein showed a long half-life (>100 days. Oligonucleotide and exon-skipping levels peaked in the first week and declined thereafter. By contrast, dystrophin expression peaked after 3–8 weeks and then slowly declined, remaining detectable after 24 weeks. Concordance between levels of oligonucleotides, exon skipping, and proteins was observed, except in heart, wherein high oligonucleotide levels but low exon skipping and dystrophin expression were seen. Overall, these results enhance our understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligos used for the treatment of DMD.

  14. Therapeutic effects of exon skipping and losartan on skeletal muscle of mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Park, Jin-Kyu; Hwang, Meeyul; Kwon, Soon-Hak; Tremblay, Jacques P; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-08-01

    Various attempts have been made to find treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. Exon skipping is one of the promising technologies for DMD treatment by restoring dystropin protein, which is one of the muscle components. It is well known that losartan, an angiotensin II type1 receptor blocker, promotes muscle regeneration and differentiation by lowering the level of transforming growth factor-beta1 signaling. In this study, we illustrated the combined effects of exon skipping and losartan on skeletal muscle of mdx mice. We supplied mdx mice with losartan for 2 weeks before exon skipping treatment. The losartan with the exon skipping group showed less expression of myf5 than the losartan treated group. Also the losartan with exon skipping group recovered normal muscle architecture, in contrast to the losartan group which still showed many central nuclei. However, the exon skipping efficiency and the restoration of dystrophin protein were lower in the losartan with exon skipping group compared to the exon skipping group. We reveal that losartan promotes muscle regeneration and shortens the time taken to restore normal muscle structure when combined with exon skipping. However, combined treatment of exon skipping and losartan decreases the restoration of dystrophin protein meaning decrease of exon skipping efficiency.

  15. Therapeutic effects of mouse adipose-derived stem cells and losartan in the skeletal muscle of injured mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Joo; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Hwang, Meeyul; Kim, Choong-Yong; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are an attractive source of cells for stem cell therapy. Losartan has been reported to improve ASC transplantation in injured mouse muscles. In the present study, we investigated whether the combined treatment of losartan and ASCs in the injured muscles of mdx mice improves regeneration. The combined treatment of ASCs and losartan remarkably improved muscle regeneration and induced muscle hypertrophy. In addition, ASCs and losartan treatment downregulated transforming growth factor-β and inhibited muscle fibrosis. We observed cells coexpressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and dystrophin in the muscle samples of mice transplanted with GFP-positive ASCs. In the coculture in vitro experiment, we also observed that the GFP ASCs differentiated into dystrophin-expressing myotubes. The present study shows that the combination of transplanted ASCs and treatment with losartan ameliorated muscle fibrosis and improved muscle regeneration in injured mdx mice. Thus, we suggest that combined treatment with losartan and ASCs could help to improve muscle regeneration in the muscles of injured patients, including DMD patients.

  16. Identification of small molecule and genetic modulators of AON-induced dystrophin exon skipping by high-throughput screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A O'Leary

    Full Text Available One therapeutic approach to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD recently entering clinical trials aims to convert DMD phenotypes to that of a milder disease variant, Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD, by employing antisense oligonucleotides (AONs targeting splice sites, to induce exon skipping and restore partial dystrophin function. In order to search for small molecule and genetic modulators of AON-dependent and independent exon skipping, we screened approximately 10,000 known small molecule drugs, >17,000 cDNA clones, and >2,000 kinase- targeted siRNAs against a 5.6 kb luciferase minigene construct, encompassing exon 71 to exon 73 of human dystrophin. As a result, we identified several enhancers of exon skipping, acting on both the reporter construct as well as endogenous dystrophin in mdx cells. Multiple mechanisms of action were identified, including histone deacetylase inhibition, tubulin modulation and pre-mRNA processing. Among others, the nucleolar protein NOL8 and staufen RNA binding protein homolog 2 (Stau2 were found to induce endogenous exon skipping in mdx cells in an AON-dependent fashion. An unexpected but recurrent theme observed in our screening efforts was the apparent link between the inhibition of cell cycle progression and the induction of exon skipping.

  17. Molecular hydrogen alleviates motor deficits and muscle degeneration in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Satoru; Ito, Mikako; Fukami, Mayu; Hashimoto, Miki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Ohno, Kinji

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating muscle disease caused by a mutation in DMD encoding dystrophin. Oxidative stress accounts for dystrophic muscle pathologies in DMD. We examined the effects of molecular hydrogen in mdx mice, a model animal for DMD. The pregnant mother started to take supersaturated hydrogen water (>5 ppm) ad libitum from E15.5 up to weaning of the offspring. The mdx mice took supersaturated hydrogen water from weaning until age 10 or 24 weeks when they were sacrificed. Hydrogen water prevented abnormal body mass gain that is commonly observed in mdx mice. Hydrogen improved the spontaneous running distance that was estimated by a counter-equipped running-wheel, and extended the duration on the rota-rod. Plasma creatine kinase activities were decreased by hydrogen at ages 10 and 24 weeks. Hydrogen also decreased the number of central nuclei of muscle fibers at ages 10 and 24 weeks, and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine in gastrocnemius muscle at age 24 weeks. Additionally, hydrogen tended to increase protein expressions of antioxidant glutathione peroxidase 1, as well as anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, in skeletal muscle at age 10 weeks. Although molecular mechanisms of the diverse effects of hydrogen remain to be elucidated, hydrogen potentially improves muscular dystrophy in DMD patients.

  18. mRNA and microRNA transcriptomics analyses in a murine model of dystrophin loss and therapeutic restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Roberts

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a pediatric, X-linked, progressive muscle-wasting disorder caused by loss of function mutations affecting the gene encoding the dystrophin protein. While the primary genetic insult in DMD is well described, many details of the molecular and cellular pathologies that follow dystrophin loss are incompletely understood. To investigate gene expression in dystrophic muscle we have applied mRNA and microRNA (miRNA microarray technology to the mdx mouse model of DMD. This study was designed to generate a complete description of gene expression changes associated with dystrophic pathology and the response to an experimental therapy which restores dystrophin protein function. These datasets have enabled (1 the determination of gene expression changes associated with dystrophic pathology, (2 identification of differentially expressed genes that are restored towards wild-type levels after therapeutic dystrophin rescue, (3 investigation of the correlation between mRNA and protein expression (determined by parallel mass spectrometry proteomics analysis, and (4 prediction of pathology associated miRNA-target interactions. Here we describe in detail how the data were generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in Human Molecular Genetics with PMID 26385637. The data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO with the accession number GSE64420.

  19. Importância do camundongo mdx na fisiopatologia da distrofia muscular de Duchenne The importance of mdx mouse in the pathophysiology of Duchenne's muscular distrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Lopes Seixas

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available O camundongo mdx desenvolve distrofia muscular recessiva ligada ao cromossoma X (locus Xp21.1 e não expressa distrofina. Embora não apresente intensa fibrose do tecido muscular e acúmulo de tecido adiposo, é considerado o modelo animal mais adequado da distrofia muscular de Duchenne. As alterações estruturais no tecido muscular associadas à mionecrose e presença do infiltrado inflamatório com predomínio de linfócitos e monócitos/macrófagos sugerem uma participação do sistema imunológico nesta miopatia. Além disso a modulação na expressão dos componentes da matriz extracelular no microambiente muscular nas várias fases da doença (início, mionecrose, regeneração indicam um papel importante do conjuntivo no direcionamento das células inflamatórias para o foco da lesão muscular. O camundongo mdx coloca-se como um excelente modelo para o estudo dos mecanismos patogenéticos da mionecrose e regeneração na distrofia muscular de Duchenne, possibilitando inclusive o desenvolvimento de estratégias terapêuticas mais adequadas.The mdx mouse develop an X-linked recessive muscular dystrophy (locus Xp21.1 and lack dystrophin expression. Despite showing less intense myofibrosis and scarce deposition of fatty tissue, mdx mice are considered an adequate animal model for studies on the pathogenesis of Duchenne-type muscular dystrophy. Marked histological alterations in the muscular tissues associated to myonecrosis and inflammatory mononuclear cell infiltrate (lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages suggest a participation of the immune system in this myopathy. Modulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM components in the muscular tissue during all phases (onset, myonecrosis and regeneration of disease, indicate an important role for the ECM driving inflammatory cells to the foci of lesion. Therefore mdx mice should be regarded as an important tool for studies on pathogenetic mechanisms of Duchenne-type muscular dystrophy. Such

  20. Peptide conjugation of 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides enhances cardiac uptake and exon skipping in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirka, Silvana M G; Heemskerk, Hans; Tanganyika-de Winter, Christa L; Muilwijk, Daan; Pang, Kar Him; de Visser, Peter C; Janson, Anneke; Karnaoukh, Tatyana G; Vermue, Rick; 't Hoen, Peter A C; van Deutekom, Judith C T; Aguilera, Begoña; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2014-02-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy that is currently being tested in various clinical trials. This approach is based on restoring the open reading frame of dystrophin transcripts resulting in shorter but partially functional dystrophin proteins as found in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy. After systemic administration, a large proportion of AONs ends up in the liver and kidneys. Therefore, enhancing AON uptake by skeletal and cardiac muscle would improve the AONs' therapeutic effect. For phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer, AONs use nonspecific positively charged cell penetrating peptides to enhance efficacy. However, this is challenging for negatively charged 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligomer. Therefore, we screened a 7-mer phage display peptide library to identify muscle and heart homing peptides in vivo in the mdx mouse model and found a promising candidate peptide capable of binding muscle cells in vitro and in vivo. Upon systemic administration in dystrophic mdx mice, conjugation of a 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate AON to this peptide indeed improved uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and resulted in higher exon skipping levels with a significant difference in heart and diaphragm. Based on these results, peptide conjugation represents an interesting strategy to enhance the therapeutic effect of exon skipping with 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate AONs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  1. Increased resting intracellular calcium modulates NF-κB-dependent inducible nitric-oxide synthase gene expression in dystrophic mdx skeletal myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, Francisco; López, Jose R; Henríquez, Carlos; Molinski, Tadeusz; Allen, Paul D; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2012-06-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by dystrophin mutations, characterized by chronic inflammation and severe muscle wasting. Dystrophic muscles exhibit activated immune cell infiltrates, up-regulated inflammatory gene expression, and increased NF-κB activity, but the contribution of the skeletal muscle cell to this process has been unclear. The aim of this work was to study the pathways that contribute to the increased resting calcium ([Ca(2+)](rest)) observed in mdx myotubes and its possible link with up-regulation of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory gene expression in dystrophic muscle cells. [Ca(2+)](rest) was higher in mdx than in WT myotubes (308 ± 6 versus 113 ± 2 nm, p < 0.001). In mdx myotubes, both the inhibition of Ca(2+) entry (low Ca(2+) solution, Ca(2+)-free solution, and Gd(3+)) and blockade of either ryanodine receptors or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors reduced [Ca(2+)](rest). Basal activity of NF-κB was significantly up-regulated in mdx versus WT myotubes. There was an increased transcriptional activity and p65 nuclear localization, which could be reversed when [Ca(2+)](rest) was reduced. Levels of mRNA for TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 were similar in WT and mdx myotubes, whereas inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was increased 5-fold. Reducing [Ca(2+)](rest) using different strategies reduced iNOS gene expression presumably as a result of decreased activation of NF-κB. We propose that NF-κB, modulated by increased [Ca(2+)](rest), is constitutively active in mdx myotubes, and this mechanism can account for iNOS overexpression and the increase in reactive nitrogen species that promote damage in dystrophic skeletal muscle cells.

  2. Preclinical studies in the mdx mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consalvi, Silvia; Mozzetta, Chiara; Bettica, Paolo; Germani, Massimiliano; Fiorentini, Francesco; Del Bene, Francesca; Rocchetti, Maurizio; Leoni, Flavio; Monzani, Valmen; Mascagni, Paolo; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Saccone, Valentina

    2013-05-20

    Previous work has established the existence of dystrophin-nitric oxide (NO) signaling to histone deacetylases (HDACs) that is deregulated in dystrophic muscles. As such, pharmacological interventions that target HDACs (that is, HDAC inhibitors) are of potential therapeutic interest for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In this study, we explored the effectiveness of long-term treatment with different doses of the HDAC inhibitor givinostat in mdx mice--the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). This study identified an efficacy for recovering functional and histological parameters within a window between 5 and 10 mg/kg/d of givinostat, with evident reduction of the beneficial effects with 1 mg/kg/d dosage. The long-term (3.5 months) exposure of 1.5-month-old mdx mice to optimal concentrations of givinostat promoted the formation of muscles with increased cross-sectional area and reduced fibrotic scars and fatty infiltration, leading to an overall improvement of endurance performance in treadmill tests and increased membrane stability. Interestingly, a reduced inflammatory infiltrate was observed in muscles of mdx mice exposed to 5 and 10 mg/kg/d of givinostat. A parallel pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis confirmed the relationship between the effective doses of givinostat and the drug distribution in muscles and blood of treated mice. These findings provide the preclinical basis for an immediate translation of givinostat into clinical studies with DMD patients.

  3. Phase 2a study of ataluren-mediated dystrophin production in patients with nonsense mutation Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Finkel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 13% of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD have a nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene, resulting in a premature stop codon in the corresponding mRNA and failure to generate a functional protein. Ataluren (PTC124 enables ribosomal readthrough of premature stop codons, leading to production of full-length, functional proteins. METHODS: This Phase 2a open-label, sequential dose-ranging trial recruited 38 boys with nonsense mutation DMD. The first cohort (n = 6 received ataluren three times per day at morning, midday, and evening doses of 4, 4, and 8 mg/kg; the second cohort (n = 20 was dosed at 10, 10, 20 mg/kg; and the third cohort (n = 12 was dosed at 20, 20, 40 mg/kg. Treatment duration was 28 days. Change in full-length dystrophin expression, as assessed by immunostaining in pre- and post-treatment muscle biopsy specimens, was the primary endpoint. FINDINGS: Twenty three of 38 (61% subjects demonstrated increases in post-treatment dystrophin expression in a quantitative analysis assessing the ratio of dystrophin/spectrin. A qualitative analysis also showed positive changes in dystrophin expression. Expression was not associated with nonsense mutation type or exon location. Ataluren trough plasma concentrations active in the mdx mouse model were consistently achieved at the mid- and high- dose levels in participants. Ataluren was generally well tolerated. INTERPRETATION: Ataluren showed activity and safety in this short-term study, supporting evaluation of ataluren 10, 10, 20 mg/kg and 20, 20, 40 mg/kg in a Phase 2b, double-blind, long-term study in nonsense mutation DMD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00264888.

  4. Phase 2a study of ataluren-mediated dystrophin production in patients with nonsense mutation Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Richard S; Flanigan, Kevin M; Wong, Brenda; Bönnemann, Carsten; Sampson, Jacinda; Sweeney, H Lee; Reha, Allen; Northcutt, Valerie J; Elfring, Gary; Barth, Jay; Peltz, Stuart W

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 13% of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene, resulting in a premature stop codon in the corresponding mRNA and failure to generate a functional protein. Ataluren (PTC124) enables ribosomal readthrough of premature stop codons, leading to production of full-length, functional proteins. This Phase 2a open-label, sequential dose-ranging trial recruited 38 boys with nonsense mutation DMD. The first cohort (n = 6) received ataluren three times per day at morning, midday, and evening doses of 4, 4, and 8 mg/kg; the second cohort (n = 20) was dosed at 10, 10, 20 mg/kg; and the third cohort (n = 12) was dosed at 20, 20, 40 mg/kg. Treatment duration was 28 days. Change in full-length dystrophin expression, as assessed by immunostaining in pre- and post-treatment muscle biopsy specimens, was the primary endpoint. Twenty three of 38 (61%) subjects demonstrated increases in post-treatment dystrophin expression in a quantitative analysis assessing the ratio of dystrophin/spectrin. A qualitative analysis also showed positive changes in dystrophin expression. Expression was not associated with nonsense mutation type or exon location. Ataluren trough plasma concentrations active in the mdx mouse model were consistently achieved at the mid- and high- dose levels in participants. Ataluren was generally well tolerated. Ataluren showed activity and safety in this short-term study, supporting evaluation of ataluren 10, 10, 20 mg/kg and 20, 20, 40 mg/kg in a Phase 2b, double-blind, long-term study in nonsense mutation DMD. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00264888.

  5. Dystrophin expression in muscle stem cells regulates their polarity and asymmetric division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Nicolas A; Wang, Yu Xin; von Maltzahn, Julia; Pasut, Alessandra; Bentzinger, C Florian; Brun, Caroline E; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Dystrophin is expressed in differentiated myofibers, in which it is required for sarcolemmal integrity, and loss-of-function mutations in the gene that encodes it result in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a disease characterized by progressive and severe skeletal muscle degeneration. Here we found that dystrophin is also highly expressed in activated muscle stem cells (also known as satellite cells), in which it associates with the serine-threonine kinase Mark2 (also known as Par1b), an important regulator of cell polarity. In the absence of dystrophin, expression of Mark2 protein is downregulated, resulting in the inability to localize the cell polarity regulator Pard3 to the opposite side of the cell. Consequently, the number of asymmetric divisions is strikingly reduced in dystrophin-deficient satellite cells, which also display a loss of polarity, abnormal division patterns (including centrosome amplification), impaired mitotic spindle orientation and prolonged cell divisions. Altogether, these intrinsic defects strongly reduce the generation of myogenic progenitors that are needed for proper muscle regeneration. Therefore, we conclude that dystrophin has an essential role in the regulation of satellite cell polarity and asymmetric division. Our findings indicate that muscle wasting in DMD not only is caused by myofiber fragility, but also is exacerbated by impaired regeneration owing to intrinsic satellite cell dysfunction.

  6. Plantarflexion Contracture in the mdx Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlich, Michael W.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Call, Jarrod A.; Dorsey, Lisa L.; Lowe, Dawn A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Contractures are a major clinical issue for patients with muscular dystrophies. However, it is unknown whether contractures are present in the widely used mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to develop methods to measure muscle contractures in mice, to determine whether plantarflexion contractures are present in mdx mice, and to analyze the composition of the major muscles involved. Design Hindlimbs of eight wild type and six mdx mice were assessed every 2 wks during the course of a 12-wk study. Assessments included range of motion and in vivo torques about the ankle. At the end of the study, mice were euthanized, and muscles were analyzed for composition. Results The mdx mice had ~10 degrees less dorsiflexion, increased passive torque moving the ankle into dorsiflexion, and an increased passive-to-active torque ratio relative to wild type mice. Gastrocnemius muscle composition alterations included increased wet mass, decreased protein content, and increased collagen. Conclusions The results indicate that mdx mice have plantarflexion contractures similar to those seen in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In future studies, these measures can be used to assess strategies to slow the progression of contractures that occur with muscular dystrophies. PMID:21403594

  7. Muscle-specific CRISPR/Cas9 dystrophin gene editing ameliorates pathophysiology in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Niclas E; Hall, John K; Odom, Guy L; Phelps, Michael P; Andrus, Colin R; Hawkins, R David; Hauschka, Stephen D; Chamberlain, Joel R; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2017-02-14

    Gene replacement therapies utilizing adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors hold great promise for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A related approach uses AAV vectors to edit specific regions of the DMD gene using CRISPR/Cas9. Here we develop multiple approaches for editing the mutation in dystrophic mdx(4cv) mice using single and dual AAV vector delivery of a muscle-specific Cas9 cassette together with single-guide RNA cassettes and, in one approach, a dystrophin homology region to fully correct the mutation. Muscle-restricted Cas9 expression enables direct editing of the mutation, multi-exon deletion or complete gene correction via homologous recombination in myogenic cells. Treated muscles express dystrophin in up to 70% of the myogenic area and increased force generation following intramuscular delivery. Furthermore, systemic administration of the vectors results in widespread expression of dystrophin in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated muscle-specific gene editing has significant potential for therapy of neuromuscular disorders.

  8. Instant MDX queries for SQL Server 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Emond, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. This short, focused guide is a great way to get stated with writing MDX queries. New developers can use this book as a reference for how to use functions and the syntax of a query as well as how to use Calculated Members and Named Sets.This book is great for new developers who want to learn the MDX query language from scratch and install SQL Server 2012 with Analysis Services

  9. Exon exchange approach to repair Duchenne dystrophin transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Lorain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trans-splicing strategies for mRNA repair involve engineered transcripts designed to anneal target mRNAs in order to interfere with their natural splicing, giving rise to mRNA chimeras where endogenous mutated exons have been replaced by exogenous replacement sequences. A number of trans-splicing molecules have already been proposed for replacing either the 5' or the 3' part of transcripts to be repaired. Here, we show the feasibility of RNA surgery by using a double trans-splicing approach allowing the specific substitution of a given mutated exon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a target we used a minigene encoding a fragment of the mdx dystrophin gene enclosing the mutated exon (exon 23. This minigene was cotransfected with a variety of exon exchange constructions, differing in their annealing domains. We obtained accurate and efficient replacement of exon 23 in the mRNA target. Adding up a downstream intronic splice enhancer DISE in the exon exchange molecule enhanced drastically its efficiency up to 25-45% of repair depending on the construction in use. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate the possibility to fix up mutated exons, refurbish deleted exons and introduce protein motifs, while keeping natural untranslated sequences, which are essential for mRNA stability and translation regulation. Conversely to the well-known exon skipping, exon exchange has the advantage to be compatible with almost any type of mutations and more generally to a wide range of genetic conditions. In particular, it allows addressing disorders caused by dominant mutations.

  10. Severe mechanical dysfunction in pharyngeal muscle from adult mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attal, P; Lambert, F; Marchand-Adam, S; Bobin, S; Pourny, J C; Chemla, D; Lecarpentier, Y; Coirault, C

    2000-07-01

    The mdx mouse is a widely used animal model of human muscular dystrophy. Although diaphragm muscle exhibits severe muscle weakness throughout the life of the animal, the limb muscle function of mdx mice spontaneously recovers by 6 mo of age. Pharyngeal dilator muscles such as sternohyoid (SH) contribute to upper airway patency during breathing. We hypothesized that SH muscle function was impaired in 6-mo-old mdx mice. Mechanical properties and myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition were investigated in isolated SH from 6-mo-old control (C, n = 10) and mdx (n = 10) mice. As compared with C, peak tetanic tension (Pmax) and maximum shortening velocity were 50% and 16% lower in mdx mice (p mechanical power was lower in mdx than in C (19.0 +/- 3.2 versus 57.4 +/- 5.1 mW g(-)(1), p muscular dystrophy.

  11. Adipose-derived stem cells enhance myogenic differentiation in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy via paracrine signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-qing Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells have been shown to promote peripheral nerve regeneration through the paracrine secretion of neurotrophic factors. However, it is unclear whether these cells can promote myogenic differentiation in muscular dystrophy. Adipose-derived stem cells (6 × 10 6 were injected into the gastrocnemius muscle of mdx mice at various sites. Dystrophin expression was found in the muscle fibers. Phosphorylation levels of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, eIF-4E binding protein 1 and S6 kinase 1 were increased, and the Akt/mTOR pathway was activated. Simultaneously, myogenin levels were increased, whereas cleaved caspase 3 and vimentin levels were decreased. Necrosis and fibrosis were reduced in the muscle fibers. These findings suggest that adipose-derived stem cells promote the regeneration and survival of muscle cells by inhibiting apoptosis and fibrosis, thereby alleviating muscle damage in muscular dystrophy.

  12. Adipose-derived stem cells enhance myogenic differentiation in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophyvia paracrine signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-qing Cao; Jie Kong; Cheng Zhang; Ying-yin Liang; Ya-qin Li; Hui-li Zhang; Yu-ling Zhu; Jia Geng; Li-qing Yang; Shan-wei Feng; Juan Yang

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells have been shown to promote peripheral nerve regeneration through the paracrine secretion of neurotrophic factors. However, it is unclear whether these cells can promote myogenic differentiation in muscular dystrophy. Adipose-derived stem cells (6 × 106) were injected into the gastrocnemius muscle of mdx mice at various sites. Dystrophin expression was found in the muscle ifbers. Phosphorylation levels of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), eIF-4E binding protein 1 and S6 kinase 1 were increased, and the Akt/mTOR pathway was activated. Simultaneously, myogenin levels were increased, whereas cleaved caspase 3 and vimentin levels were decreased. Necrosis and ifbrosis were reduced in the muscle ifbers. hTese ifndings suggest that adipose-derived stem cells promote the re-generation and survival of muscle cells by inhibiting apoptosis and ifbrosis, thereby alleviating muscle damage in muscular dystrophy.

  13. Correlated NOS-Imu and myf5 expression by satellite cells in mdx mouse muscle regeneration during NOS manipulation and deflazacort treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Judy E; Vargas, Cinthya

    2003-06-01

    Satellite cells, muscle precursor cells in skeletal muscle, are normally quiescent and become activated by disease or injury. A lack of dystrophin and changes in the expression or activity of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS-I) affect the timing of activation in vivo. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition delays muscle repair in normal mice, and worsens muscular dystrophy in the mdx mouse, a genetic homologue of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, the potential role of activation and repair events mediated by nitric oxide in determining the outcome of steroid or other treatments for muscular dystrophy is not clear. We tested the hypothesis that the extent of repair in dystrophic muscles of mdx mice is partly dependent on NOS-Imu expression and activity. Myotube formation in regenerating muscle was promoted by deflazacort treatment of mdx dystrophic mice (PImu mRNA expression and activity were present in satellite cells and very new myotubes of regenerating and dystrophic muscle. Deflazacort treatment resulted in increased NOS-Imu expression in regenerating muscles in a strong and specific correlation with myf5 expression (r=0.95, PImu and myf5 expression in the diaphragm without affecting the diameter of non-regenerating fibres. These in vivo studies suggest that gains in NOS-Imu expression and nitric oxide synthase activity in satellite cells can increase the extent and speed of repair, even in the absence of dystrophin in muscle fibres. NOS-Imu may be a useful therapeutic target to augment the effects of steroidal or other treatments of muscular dystrophy.

  14. Muscle development in mdx mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangain, J; Vrbova, G

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical and contractile properties of tibialis anterior (TA) muscles from X-linked muscular dystrophic (mdx) mutant mice at different stages of development are compared to those of muscles from normal control animals. There is no difference between the tension output, speeds of contraction and relaxation, and weight of TA muscles from mutant adults and normal control animals. However, it is found that in 3-4-week-old mutant animals, tension output and muscle weight are very much reduced, and half relaxation time is prolonged. Thus, during this stage of development, muscles from mdx mice do not function properly. Histological examination of these muscles provides further evidence that, in these animals, rapid muscle destruction occurs at a particular time of development and that it is followed by complete recovery. This new mutant therefore presents an interesting case of muscle destruction and rapid regeneration. However, it is not an adequate model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  15. Whole body periodic acceleration is an effective therapy to ameliorate muscular dystrophy in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, Francisco; Perez, Claudio F; Liu, Min; Widrick, Jeffrey; Barton, Elisabeth R; Allen, Paul D; Adams, Jose A; Lopez, Jose R

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. This leads to severe muscle degeneration, and dilated cardiomyopathy that produces patient death, which in most cases occurs before the end of the second decade. Several lines of evidence have shown that modulators of nitric oxide (NO) pathway can improve skeletal muscle and cardiac function in the mdx mouse, a mouse model for DMD. Whole body periodic acceleration (pGz) is produced by applying sinusoidal motion to supine humans and in standing conscious rodents in a headward-footward direction using a motion platform. It adds small pulses as a function of movement frequency to the circulation thereby increasing pulsatile shear stress to the vascular endothelium, which in turn increases production of NO. In this study, we examined the potential therapeutic properties of pGz for the treatment of skeletal muscle pathology observed in the mdx mouse. We found that pGz (480 cpm, 8 days, 1 hr per day) decreased intracellular Ca(2+) and Na(+) overload, diminished serum levels of creatine kinase (CK) and reduced intracellular accumulation of Evans Blue. Furthermore, pGz increased muscle force generation and expression of both utrophin and the carboxy-terminal PDZ ligand of nNOS (CAPON). Likewise, pGz (120 cpm, 12 h) applied in vitro to skeletal muscle myotubes reduced Ca(2+) and Na(+) overload, diminished abnormal sarcolemmal Ca(2+) entry and increased phosphorylation of endothelial NOS. Overall, this study provides new insights into the potential therapeutic efficacy of pGz as a non-invasive and non-pharmacological approach for the treatment of DMD patients through activation of the NO pathway.

  16. Deficiencies

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    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  17. Expression of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex at the skeletal muscle sarcolemma in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei ZHAO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  Eccentric exercise or high tension exercise could cause damage to skeletal muscle structure, resulting in deficiency of dystrophin and secondary loss of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC from the sarcolemma, which indicated that down-regulation of dystrophin was one of the key points of skeletal muscle injury from eccentric exercise. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is caused by mutations of DMD gene, resulting in the absence of dystrophin, which means that skeletal muscles of DMD patients after birth are in the natural state of actual path of force transmission which carried high tension from eccentric exercise. This paper investigated systematically whether expression of DGC is associated with progressive muscle weakness in natural history of DMD, and analyzed the expression of DGC at the sarcolemma of 197 confirmed DMD cases (9 days-12 years old.  Methods  The expression of α- and β-dystroglycan (DG, α-, β-, γ- and δ-sarcoglycan (SG and syntrophin at the sarcolemma of DMD patients was analyzed by immunofluorescent staining.  Results  The study showed that there was no relationship between lack of proteins and progressive muscle weakness with increasing age, although expression of α- and β-DG, α-, β-, γ- and δ-SG and syntrophin at the sarcolemma at different stages of 197 DMD patients (9 days-12 years old had different degrees of deficiency.  Conclusions  Deficiency of DGC may occur before birth and DMD patients were recommended to avoid further damage to skeletal muscles from eccentric exercise and high-resistance movement in activities of daily life and rehabilitation training. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.06.006

  18. Heregulin ameliorates the dystrophic phenotype in mdx mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O B; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Jensen, Claus J

    2004-01-01

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disease caused by absence of dystrophin. Utrophin is a chromosome 6-encoded dystrophin-related protein (DRP), sharing functional motifs with dystrophin. Utrophin's ability to compensate for dystrophin during development and when...... ectodomain for 3 months in vivo resulted in up-regulation of utrophin, a marked improvement in the mechanical properties of muscle as evidenced by resistance to eccentric contraction mediated damage, and a reduction of muscle pathology. The amelioration of dystrophic phenotype by heregulin-mediated utrophin...

  19. Efficient Restoration of the Dystrophin Gene Reading Frame and Protein Structure in DMD Myoblasts Using the CinDel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Iyombe-Engembe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a great revolution in biology. This technology allows the modification of genes in vitro and in vivo in a wide variety of living organisms. In most Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD patients, expression of dystrophin (DYS protein is disrupted because exon deletions result in a frame shift. We present here the CRISPR-induced deletion (CinDel, a new promising genome-editing technology to correct the DMD gene. This strategy is based on the use of two gRNAs targeting specifically exons that precede and follow the patient deletion in the DMD gene. This pair of gRNAs induced a precise large additional deletion leading to fusion of the targeted exons. Using an adequate pair of gRNAs, the deletion of parts of these exons and the intron separating them restored the DMD reading frame in 62% of the hybrid exons in vitro in DMD myoblasts and in vivo in electroporated hDMD/mdx mice. Moreover, adequate pairs of gRNAs also restored the normal spectrin-like repeat of the dystrophin rod domain; such restoration is not obtained by exon skipping or deletion of complete exons. The expression of an internally deleted DYS protein was detected following the formation of myotubes by the unselected, treated DMD myoblasts. Given that CinDel induces permanent reparation of the DMD gene, this treatment would not have to be repeated as it is the case for exon skipping induced by oligonucleotides.

  20. Dual Myostatin and Dystrophin Exon Skipping by Morpholino Nucleic Acid Oligomers Conjugated to a Cell-penetrating Peptide Is a Promising Therapeutic Strategy for the Treatment of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Malerba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The knockdown of myostatin, a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass may have important implications in disease conditions accompanied by muscle mass loss like cancer, HIV/AIDS, sarcopenia, muscle atrophy, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. In DMD patients, where major muscle loss has occurred due to a lack of dystrophin, the therapeutic restoration of dystrophin expression alone in older patients may not be sufficient to restore the functionality of the muscles. We recently demonstrated that phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs can be used to re-direct myostatin splicing and promote the expression of an out-of-frame transcript so reducing the amount of the synthesized myostatin protein. Furthermore, the systemic administration of the same PMO conjugated to an octaguanidine moiety (Vivo-PMO led to a significant increase in the mass of soleus muscle of treated mice. Here, we have further optimized the use of Vivo-PMO in normal mice and also tested the efficacy of the same PMO conjugated to an arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide (B-PMO. Similar experiments conducted in mdx dystrophic mice showed that B-PMO targeting myostatin is able to significantly increase the tibialis anterior (TA muscle weight and when coadministered with a B-PMO targeting the dystrophin exon 23, it does not have a detrimental interaction. This study confirms that myostatin knockdown by exon skipping is a potential therapeutic strategy to counteract muscle wasting conditions and dual myostatin and dystrophin skipping has potential as a therapy for DMD.

  1. Possible influences on the expression of X chromosome-linked dystrophin abnormalities by heterozygosity for autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggs, A.H.; Neumann, P.E.; Anderson, M.S.; Kunkel, L.M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Arahata, Kiichi; Arikawa, Eri; Nonaka, Ikuya (National Inst. of Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-01-15

    Abnormalities of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein of muscle and nerve, are generally considered specific for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. However, several patients have recently been identified with dystrophin deficiency who, before dystrophin testing, were considered to have Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) on the basis of clinical findings. Epidemiologic data suggest that only 1/3,500 males with autosomal recessive FCMD should have abnormal dystrophin. To explain the observation of 3/23 FCMD males with abnormal dystrophin, the authors propose that dystrophin and the FCMD gene product interact and that the earlier onset and greater severity of these patients' phenotype (relative to Duchenne muscular dystrophy) are due to their being heterozygous for the FCMD mutation in addition to being hemizygous for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genotype that is predicted to occur in 1/175,000 Japanese males. This model may help explain the genetic basis for some of the clinical and pathological variability seen among patients with FCMD, and it has potential implications for understanding the inheritance of other autosomal recessive disorders in general. For example, sex ratios for rare autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in proteins that interact with X chromosome-linked gene products may display predictable deviation from 1:1.

  2. Resveratrol ameliorates muscular pathology in the dystrophic mdx mouse, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yusuke S; Kuno, Atsushi; Hosoda, Ryusuke; Tanno, Masaya; Miura, Tetsuji; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2011-09-01

    Muscular dystrophies are inherited myogenic disorders accompanied by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and degeneration. We previously showed that resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), an antioxidant and activator of the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1, delays the progression of heart failure and prolongs the lifespan of δ-sarcoglycan-deficient hamsters. Because a defect of dystroglycan complex causes muscular dystrophies, and δ-sarcoglycan is a component of this complex, we hypothesized that resveratrol might be a new therapeutic tool for muscular dystrophies. Here, we examined resveratrol's effect in mdx mice, an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. mdx mice that received resveratrol in the diet for 32 weeks (4 g/kg diet) showed significantly less muscle mass loss and nonmuscle interstitial tissue in the biceps femoris compared with mdx mice fed a control diet. In the muscles of these mice, resveratrol significantly decreased oxidative damage shown by the immunostaining of nitrotyrosine and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and suppressed the up-regulation of NADPH oxidase subunits Nox4, Duox1, and p47(phox). Resveratrol also reduced the number of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)(+) myofibroblast cells and endomysial fibrosis in the biceps femoris, although the infiltration of CD45(+) inflammatory cells and increase in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were still observed. In C2C12 myoblast cells, resveratrol pretreatment suppressed the TGF-β1-induced increase in reactive oxygen species, fibronectin production, and expression of α-SMA, and SIRT1 knockdown blocked these inhibitory effects. SIRT1 small interfering RNA also increased the expression of Nox4, p47(phox), and α-SMA in C2C12 cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that SIRT1 activation may be a useful strategy for treating muscular dystrophies.

  3. Altered ROS production, NF-κB activation and Interleukin-6 gene expression induced by electrical stimulation of in dystrophic mdx skeletal muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Altamirano, Francisco; Valladares, Denisse; López, José R.; Allen, Paul D.; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked genetic disease, caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which cause functional loss of this protein. DMD pathology is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS). The aim of this work was to study the alterations in NF-κB activation and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression induced by membrane depolarization in dystrophic mdx myotubes. Membrane depolarization elicited by electrical stimulation (ES) increased p65 phosphorylation, NF-κB transcriptional activity and NF-κB-dependent IL-6 expression in wt myotubes, whereas in mdx myotubes it had the opposite effect. We have previously shown that depolarization-induced intracellular Ca2+ increases and ROS production are necessary for NF-κB activation and stimulation of gene expression in wt myotubes. Dystrophic myotubes showed a reduced amplitude and area under the curve of the Ca2+ transient elicited by ES. On the other hand, ES induced higher ROS production in mdx than wt myotubes, which were blocked by NOX2 inhibitors. Moreover, mRNA expression and protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunits; p47phox and gp91phox were increased in mdx myotubes. Looking at ROS-dependence of NF-κB activation we found that in wt myotubes external administration of 50µM H2O2 increased NF-κB activity; after administration of 100 and 200 µM H2O2 there was no effect. In mdx myotubes there was a dose-dependent reduction in NF-κB activity in response to external administration of H2O2, with a significant effect of 100 µM and 200 µM, suggesting that ROS levels are critical for NF-κB activity. Prior blockage with NOX2 inhibitors blunted the effects of ES in both NF-κB activation and IL-6 expression. Finally, to ascertain whether stimulation of NF-κB and IL-6 gene expression by the inflammatory pathway is also impaired in mdx myotubes, we studied the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on both NF-κB activation and IL-6 expression

  4. Dystrophin deficiency-induced changes in porcine skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel porcine stress syndrome was detected in the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center’s swine research population when two sibling barrows died of apparent stress symptoms (open mouth breathing, vocalization, and refusal to move or stand) after transport at 12 weeks of age. At eight weeks of age, the...

  5. Gait analysis using accelerometry in dystrophin-deficient dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthélémy, Inès; Barrey, Eric; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Uriarte, Ane; Voit, Thomas; Blot, Stéphane; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2009-11-01

    Dogs affected with Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) exhibit striking clinical similarities with patients suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), particularly gait impairments. The purpose of this study was to describe the use and reliability of accelerometry in gait assessment of dogs with muscular dystrophy. Eight healthy and 11 GRMD adult dogs underwent three gait assessment sessions, using accelerometry. Three-axial recordings of accelerations were performed, and gait variables calculated. Total power, force and regularity of accelerations, stride length and speed, normalized by height at withers, stride frequency, and cranio-caudal power were significantly decreased, whereas medio-lateral power was significantly increased in GRMD dogs. Moreover, these variables were repeatable within and between sessions. Accelerometry provides reliable variables which highlight specific gait patterns of GRMD dogs, describing objectively and quantitatively their slow, short-stepped, and swaying gait. As it is easy to set-up, quick to perform and inexpensive, accelerometry represents a useful tool, to assess locomotion during pre-clinical trials.

  6. Functional and molecular effects of arginine butyrate and prednisone on muscle and heart in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo D Guerron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The number of promising therapeutic interventions for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is increasing rapidly. One of the proposed strategies is to use drugs that are known to act by multiple different mechanisms including inducing of homologous fetal form of adult genes, for example utrophin in place of dystrophin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we have treated mdx mice with arginine butyrate, prednisone, or a combination of arginine butyrate and prednisone for 6 months, beginning at 3 months of age, and have comprehensively evaluated the functional, biochemical, histological, and molecular effects of the treatments in this DMD model. Arginine butyrate treatment improved grip strength and decreased fibrosis in the gastrocnemius muscle, but did not produce significant improvement in muscle and cardiac histology, heart function, behavioral measurements, or serum creatine kinase levels. In contrast, 6 months of chronic continuous prednisone treatment resulted in deterioration in functional, histological, and biochemical measures. Arginine butyrate-treated mice gene expression profiling experiments revealed that several genes that control cell proliferation, growth and differentiation are differentially expressed consistent with its histone deacetylase inhibitory activity when compared to control (saline-treated mdx mice. Prednisone and combination treated groups showed alterations in the expression of genes that control fibrosis, inflammation, myogenesis and atrophy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that 6 months treatment with arginine butyrate can produce modest beneficial effects on dystrophic pathology in mdx mice by reducing fibrosis and promoting muscle function while chronic continuous treatment with prednisone showed deleterious effects to skeletal and cardiac muscle. Our results clearly indicate the usefulness of multiple assays systems to monitor both beneficial and toxic effects of drugs with

  7. Human adipose tissue derived pericytes increase life span in Utrn (tm1Ked) Dmd (mdx) /J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadares, M C; Gomes, J P; Castello, G; Assoni, A; Pellati, M; Bueno, C; Corselli, M; Silva, H; Bartolini, P; Vainzof, M; Margarido, P F; Baracat, E; Péault, B; Zatz, M

    2014-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is still an untreatable lethal X-linked disorder, which affects 1 in 3500 male births. It is caused by the absence of muscle dystrophin due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. The potential regenerative capacity as well as immune privileged properties of mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) has been under investigation for many years in an attempt to treat DMD. One of the questions to be addressed is whether stem cells from distinct sources have comparable clinical effects when injected in murine or canine muscular dystrophy animal models. Many studies comparing different stem cells from various sources were reported but these cells were obtained from different donors and thus with different genetic backgrounds. Here we investigated whether human pericytes obtained from 4 different tissues (muscle, adipose tissue, fallopian tube and endometrium) from the same donor have a similar clinical impact when injected in double mutant Utrn (tm1Ked) Dmd (mdx) /J mice, a clinically relevant model for DMD. After a weekly regimen of intraperitoneal injections of 10(6) cells per 8 weeks we evaluated the motor ability as well as the life span of the treated mice as compared to controls. Our experiment showed that only adipose tissue derived pericytes are able to increase significantly (39 days on average) the life span of affected mice. Microarray analysis showed an inhibition of the interferon pathway by adipose derived pericytes. Our results suggest that the clinical benefit associated with intraperitoneal injections of these adult stem cells is related to immune modulation rather than tissue regeneration.

  8. Myogenin regulates exercise capacity but is dispensable for skeletal muscle regeneration in adult mdx mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Meadows

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most prevalent inherited childhood muscle disorder in humans. mdx mice exhibit a similar pathophysiology to the human disorder allowing for an in-depth investigation of DMD. Myogenin, a myogenic regulatory factor, is best known for its role in embryonic myogenesis, but its role in adult muscle maintenance and regeneration is still poorly understood. Here, we generated an mdx:Myog(flox/flox mouse harboring a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase transgene, which was used to conditionally delete Myog during adult life. After tamoxifen treatment, three groups of mice were created to study the effects of Myog deletion: mdx:Myog(flox/flox mice (mdx, Myog(flox/flox mice (wild-type, and mdx:Myog(floxΔ/floxΔ:Cre-ER mice (mdx:Myog-deleted. mdx:Myog-deleted mice exhibited no adverse phenotype and behaved normally. When run to exhaustion, mdx:Myog-deleted mice demonstrated an enhanced capacity for exercise compared to mdx mice, running nearly as far as wild-type mice. Moreover, these mice showed the same signature characteristics of muscle regeneration as mdx mice. Unexpectedly, we found that myogenin was dispensable for muscle regeneration. Factors associated with muscle fatigue, metabolism, and proteolysis were significantly altered in mdx:Myog-deleted mice, and this might contribute to their increased exercise capacity. Our results reveal novel functions for myogenin in adult muscle and suggest that reducing Myog expression in other muscle disease models may partially restore muscle function.

  9. Specific expression of myogenic,adipogenic and osteogenic gene in skeletal muscle of mdx mice%mdx小鼠骨骼肌组织成肌、成脂、成骨基因的特异性表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷雁; 张为西; 周琛; 郑振扬; 张成; 李秋玲

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal recessive X-Iinked form of muscular dystrophy characterized by prog ressive muscular degeneration, and there is no cure for DMD currently. Stem cell transplantation may provide us with a creative perspective. But the myogenic differentiation rate of transplanted cells is quite low in skeletal muscle. OBJECTIVE: The differences of myogenic, adipogenic and osteogenic gene expression levels in skeletal muscle between mdx mice and C57BL/6J mice were compared, with the purpose of investigating the underlying mechanism of pathological changes in skeletal muscle from mdx mice.METHODS : Frozen sections of skeletal muscle from mdx and C57BL/6J mice were prepared, stained with hematoxylin-eosin staining and Vonkossa staining. The morphological changes of the muscles were observed under microscope. Additionally, total RNA of skeletal muscle from mdx and C57BL/6J mice was extracted, reversed, and the expression levels of myogenic,adipogenic and osteogenic characteristic genes were examined by real-time PCR.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Necrosis and regeneration were found in skeletal muscles of mdx mice, and mild adipose hyperplasia and fibrous connective tissue hyperplasia were also observed. Moreover, calcium deposition nodules were easily detected by Vonkossa staining. The form of skeletal muscle cells from C57 mice was clear, and the nuclei were located in the cell periphery. Osteogenic and adipogenic gene expressions of skeletal muscle from mdx mice were elevated to a certain degree by real-time PCR (P < 0.05), compared with C57 mice, whereas myogenic gene expression was decreased (P< 0.05). The reason why adipocyte and osteoblast in skeletal muscle of mdx mice overgrew may be due to degeneration and necrosis of skeletal muscle which caused by dystrophin gene deletion, and it differentiates into osteoblasts and adipocytes instead of myoblasts.%背景:干细胞移植是治疗肌营养不良症的有效方法之一,

  10. Polyquaternium-mediated delivery of morpholino oligonucleotides for exon-skipping in vitro and in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxing; Wu, Bo; Shah, Sapana N; Lu, Peijuan; Lu, Qilong

    2017-11-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy has shown great potential in preclinical and clinical trials, but its therapeutic applications are still limited due to inefficient delivery. In this study, we investigated a few polyquaterniums (PQs) with different size and composition for their potential to improve delivery performance of an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) both in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that Luviquat(TM) series, especially PQ-1 and PQ-3, promoted the exon-skipping efficiency comparable to Endoporter-mediated PMO delivery in vitro. Significant enhancement in skipping dystrophin exon 23 has also been achieved with PQ-3 up to seven-fold when compared to PMO alone in mdx mice. Cytotoxicity of the PQs was lower than Endoporter and PEI 25 K in vitro and muscle damage not clearly detected in vivo under the tested concentrations. These results together demonstrate that the optimization of PQ in molecular size, composition and distribution of positive charges is the key factor to achieve enhanced PMO exon-skipping efficiency. The higher efficiency and lower toxicity endow polyquaternium series as AO delivery enhancing agents for treating muscular dystrophy and other diseases.

  11. Cationic polyelectrolyte-mediated delivery of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides for exon-skipping in vitro and in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxing; Wu, Bo; Tucker, Jason D; Lu, Peijuan; Lu, Qilong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated a series of cationic polyelectrolytes (PEs) with different size and composition for their potential to improve delivery of an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) both in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDAC) polymer series, especially PE-3 and PE-4, improves the delivery efficiency of PMO, comparable with Endoporter-mediated PMO delivery in vitro. The enhanced PMO delivery and targeting to dystrophin exon 23 was further observed in mdx mice, up to fourfold with the PE-4, compared with PMO alone. The cytotoxicity of the PEs was lower than that of Endoporter and polyethylenimine 25,000 Da in vitro, and was not clearly detected in muscle in vivo under the tested concentrations. Together, these results demonstrate that optimization of PE molecular size, composition, and distribution of cationic charge are key factors to achieve enhanced PMO exon-skipping efficiency. The increased efficiency and lower toxicity show this PDDAC series to be capable gene/antisense oligonucleotide delivery-enhancing agents for treating muscular dystrophy and other diseases.

  12. A Two-amino Acid Mutation Encountered in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Decreases Stability of the Rod Domain 23 (R23) Spectrin-like Repeat of Dystrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legardinier, Sébastien; Legrand, Baptiste; Raguénès-Nicol, Céline; Bondon, Arnaud; Hardy, Serge; Tascon, Christophe; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Hubert, Jean-François

    2009-03-27

    Lack of functional dystrophin causes severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The subsarcolemmal location of dystrophin, as well as its association with both cytoskeleton and membrane, suggests a role in the mechanical regulation of muscular membrane stress. In particular, phenotype rescue in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy mice model has shown that some parts of the central rod domain of dystrophin, constituted by 24 spectrin-like repeats, are essential. In this study, we made use of rare missense pathogenic mutations in the dystrophin gene and analyzed the biochemical properties of the isolated repeat 23 bearing single or double mutations E2910V and N2912D found in muscle dystrophy with severity grading. No dramatic effect on secondary and tertiary structure of the repeat was found in mutants compared with wild type as revealed by circular dichroism and NMR. Thermal and chemical unfolding data from circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence show significant decrease of stability for the mutants, and stopped-flow spectroscopy shows decreased refolding rates. The most deleterious single mutation is the N2912D replacement, although we observe additive effects of the two mutations on repeat stability. Based on three-dimensional structures built by homology molecular modeling, we discuss the modifications of the mutation-induced repeat stability. We conclude that the main forces involved in repeat stability are electrostatic inter-helix interactions that are disrupted following mutations. This study represents the first analysis at the protein level of the consequences of missense mutations in the human dystrophin rod domain. Our results suggest that it may participate in mechanical weakening of dystrophin-deficient muscle.

  13. Accurate Quantitation of Dystrophin Protein in Human Skeletal Muscle Using Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kristy J; Marathi, Ramya; Fiorillo, Alyson A; Ciccimaro, Eugene F.; Sharma, Seema; Rowlands, David S.; Rayavarapu, Sree; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Eric P. Hoffman; Hathout, Yetrib

    2012-01-01

    Quantitation of human dystrophin protein in muscle biopsies is a clinically relevant endpoint for both diagnosis and response to dystrophin-replacement therapies for dystrophinopathies. A robust and accurate assay would enable the use of dystrophin as a surrogate biomarker, particularly in exploratory Phase 2 trials. Currently available methods to quantitate dystrophin rely on immunoblot or immunohistochemistry methods that are not considered robust. Here we present a mass spectrometry based ...

  14. Localization and quantitation of the chromosome 6-encoded dystrophin-related protein in normal and pathological human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpati, G; Carpenter, S; Morris, G E; Davies, K E; Guerin, C; Holland, P

    1993-03-01

    A dystrophin-related protein (DRP) encoded by a gene on chromosome 6 was studied in 14 normal and 79 pathological human skeletal muscle biopsies, as well as in cultured myotubes by light microscopic immunocytochemistry and quantitative immunoblots. In normal muscle immunoreactive DRP was present at the postjunctional surface membrane, at the surface of satellite cells, in the walls of blood vessels, in Schwann cells and in perineurium of intramuscular nerves. All of this produced a weak signal on immunoblots. In Duchenne/Becker dystrophy (DMD/BMD) and in polymyositis (PM) or dermatomyositis (DM) DRP was present throughout the extrajunctional surface membrane of extra- and intrafusal muscle fibers, particularly regenerating ones. This produced a 15-17-fold increase of DRP over normal in DMD/BMD and 4-10-fold increase over normal in PM and DM on immunoblots. In other pathological muscles, DRP localization pattern and quantity was about the same as in normals. Dystrophin-related protein was present in about the same amounts and distribution in normal and DMD cultured myoblasts and myotubes. The molecular stimulus for the marked upregulation of DRP in DMD/BMD and in the inflammatory myopathies is not known. In DMD/BMD the diffuse sarcolemmal DRP may partially compensate for dystrophin deficiency.

  15. The roles of dystrophin and dystrobrevin : in synaptic signaling in drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potikanond, Saranyapin

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a disease, characterized by progressive muscle wasting, caused by the lack of Dystrophin. A subset of DMD patients also have cognitive deficits likely due to the absence of Dystrophin from brain synapses where it is usually localized. Dystrophin and a number of o

  16. Brain Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of dystrophin disorders in the CNS function of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, an animal model of DMD, is reviewed at the University of New South Wales, University of Sydney, Australia.

  17. EXPRESSION OF INTERCELLULAR ADHESION MOLECULE-1 BY MYOFIBERS IN mdx MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    TORRES-PALSA, MARIA J.; KOZIOL, MATTHEW V.; GOH, QINGNIAN; CICINELLI, PETER A.; PETERSON, JENNIFER M.; PIZZA, FRANCIS X.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the extent to which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a critical protein of the inflammatory response, is expressed in skeletal muscles of mdx mice (a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy). Methods Muscles were collected from control and mdx mice at 2–24 weeks of age and analyzed for ICAM-1 expression by means of Western blot and immunofluorescence. Results Western blot revealed higher expression of ICAM-1 in mdx compared with control muscles through 24 weeks of age. In contrast to control muscles, ICAM-1 was expressed on the membrane of damaged, regenerating, and normal myofibers of mdx mice. CD11b+ myeloid cells also expressed ICAM-1 in mdx muscles, and CD11b+ cells were closely associated with the membrane of myofibers expressing ICAM-1. Conclusions These findings support a paradigm in which ICAM-1 and its localization to myofibers in muscles of mdx mice contributes to the dystrophic pathology. PMID:25728314

  18. Microsoft® SQL Server® 2008 MDX Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Bryan; Consulting, Hitachi

    2009-01-01

    Teach yourself the Multidimensional Expressions (MDX) query language-one step at a time. With this practical, learn-by-doing tutorial, you'll build the core techniques for using MDX with Analysis Services to deliver high-performance business intelligence solutions. Discover how to: Construct and execute MDX queriesWork with tuples, sets, and expressionsBuild complex sets to retrieve the exact data users needPerform aggregation functions and navigate data hierarchiesAssemble time-based business metricsCustomize an Analysis Services cube through the MDX scriptImplement dynamic security to cont

  19. Erythropoietin reduces the expression of myostatin in mdx dystrophic mice

    OpenAIRE

    D Feder; Rugollini, M.; Santomauro Jr,A.; de Oliveira, L. P.; Lioi,V.P.; R. dos Santos; Ferreira, L.G.; Nunes,M.T.; M.H. Carvalho; P.O. Delgado; A.A.S. Carvalho; Fonseca, F.L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been well characterized as a renal glycoprotein hormone regulating red blood cell production by inhibiting apoptosis of erythrocyte progenitors in hematopoietic tissues. EPO exerts regulatory effects in cardiac and skeletal muscles. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal degenerative disorder of skeletal and cardiac muscle. in this study, we tested the possible therapeutic beneficial effect of recombinant EPO (rhEPO) in dystrophic muscles in mdx mice. Total strength ...

  20. Tachykinergic neurotransmission is enhanced in duodenum from dystrophic (mdx) mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zizzo, Maria Grazia; Mulè, Flavia; Serio, Rosa

    2005-01-01

    Duodenal longitudinal muscle of mdx mice, an animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, showed a decrease in the electrically evoked nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) inhibitory responses associated with a reduction of the participation of nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we investigated whether the impairment of NO could also lead to alterations in the NANC excitatory transmission.Nerve-evoked responses consisted of an inhibitory phase followed, at the end of stimulation, by an excita...

  1. The dystrophin gene and cognitive function in the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Vojinovic (Dina); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); S. van der Lee (Sven); C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); M.C.G.N. van den hout (Mirjam); E. Oole (Edwin); J. van Rooij (Jeroen); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Hofman (Albert); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); A. Aartsma-Rus (Annemieke); G.-J.B. Van Ommen (Gert-Jan B.); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia M.); N. Amin (Najaf)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of our study is to investigate whether single-nucleotide dystrophin gene (DMD) variants associate with variability in cognitive functions in healthy populations. The study included 1240 participants from the Erasmus Rucphen family (ERF) study and 1464 individuals from the Rotterd

  2. Role of dystrophins and utrophins in platelet adhesion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Mondragón, Ricardo; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Rendón, Alvaro

    2006-07-01

    Platelets are crucial at the site of vascular injury, adhering to the sub-endothelial matrix through receptors on their surface, leading to cell activation and aggregation to form a haemostatic plug. Platelets display focal adhesions as well as stress fibres to contract and facilitate expulsion of growth and pro-coagulant factors contained in the granules and to constrict the clot. The interaction of F-actin with different actin-binding proteins determines the properties and composition of the focal adhesions. Recently, we demonstrated the presence of dystrophin-associated protein complex corresponding to short dystrophin isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71) and the uthophin gene family (Up400 and Up71), which promote shape change, adhesion, aggregation, and granule centralisation. To elucidate participation of both complexes during the platelet adhesion process, their potential association with integrin beta-1 fraction and the focal adhesion system (alpha-actinin, vinculin and talin) was evaluated by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assays. It was shown that the short dystrophin-associated protein complex participated in stress fibre assembly and in centralisation of cytoplasmic granules, while the utrophin-associated protein complex assembled and regulated focal adhesions. The simultaneous presence of dystrophin and utrophin complexes indicates complementary structural and signalling mechanisms to the actin network, improving the platelet haemostatic role.

  3. Dystrophins, Utrophins, and Associated Scaffolding Complexes: Role in Mammalian Brain and Implications for Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Perronnet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two decades of molecular, cellular, and functional studies considerably increased our understanding of dystrophins function and unveiled the complex etiology of the cognitive deficits in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, which involves altered expression of several dystrophin-gene products in brain. Dystrophins are normally part of critical cytoskeleton-associated membrane-bound molecular scaffolds involved in the clustering of receptors, ion channels, and signaling proteins that contribute to synapse physiology and blood-brain barrier function. The utrophin gene also drives brain expression of several paralogs proteins, which cellular expression and biological roles remain to be elucidated. Here we review the structural and functional properties of dystrophins and utrophins in brain, the consequences of dystrophins loss-of-function as revealed by numerous studies in mouse models of DMD, and we discuss future challenges and putative therapeutic strategies that may compensate for the cognitive impairment in DMD based on experimental manipulation of dystrophins and/or utrophins brain expression.

  4. Integrins (alpha7beta1) in muscle function and survival. Disrupted expression in merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vachon, P H; Xu, H; Liu, L;

    1997-01-01

    isoforms in myofibers of merosin-deficient human patients and mice, but not in dystrophin-deficient or sarcoglycan-deficient humans and animals. It was shown previously that skeletal muscle fibers require merosin for survival and function (Vachon, P.H., F. Loechel, H. Xu, U.M. Wewer, and E. Engvall. 1996...

  5. Dystrophin Distribution and Expression in Human and Experimental Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Ruben G. F.; Schipper, Sandra; Hoogland, Govert; Schijns, Olaf E. M. G.; Dings, Jim T. A.; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Vles, Johan S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Dystrophin is part of a protein complex that connects the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. In addition to its role in muscle tissue, it functions as an anchoring protein within the central nervous system such as in hippocampus and cerebellum. Its presence in the latter regions is illustrated by the cognitive problems seen in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Since epilepsy is also supposed to constitute a comorbidity of DMD, it is hypothesized that dystrophin plays a role in neuronal excitability. Here, we aimed to study brain dystrophin distribution and expression in both, human and experimental temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Method: Regional and cellular dystrophin distribution was evaluated in both human and rat hippocampi and in rat cerebellar tissue by immunofluorescent colocalization with neuronal (NeuN and calbindin) and glial (GFAP) markers. In addition, hippocampal dystrophin levels were estimated by Western blot analysis in biopsies from TLE patients, post-mortem controls, amygdala kindled (AK)-, and control rats. Results: Dystrophin was expressed in all hippocampal pyramidal subfields and in the molecular-, Purkinje-, and granular cell layer of the cerebellum. In these regions it colocalized with GFAP, suggesting expression in astrocytes such as Bergmann glia (BG) and velate protoplasmic astrocytes. In rat hippocampus and cerebellum there were neither differences in dystrophin positive cell types, nor in the regional dystrophin distribution between AK and control animals. Quantitatively, hippocampal full-length dystrophin (Dp427) levels were about 60% higher in human TLE patients than in post-mortem controls (p < 0.05), whereas the level of the shorter Dp71 isoform did not differ. In contrast, AK animals showed similar dystrophin levels as controls. Conclusion: Dystrophin is ubiquitously expressed by astrocytes in the human and rat hippocampus and in the rat cerebellum. Hippocampal full-length dystrophin (Dp427) levels are upregulated

  6. Detection of an exon 53 polymorphism in the dystrophin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S

    1993-10-01

    We utilized a heteroduplex method to screen for small mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients who did not have deletions or duplications. A dystrophin exon 53 heteroduplex band was identified in 14.4% of the affected patients. Direct sequencing of the amplified product from DNA producing the heteroduplex revealed the presence of a polymorphism in the coding region. The codon for asparagine was converted from AAT to AAC.

  7. Evolutionary study of vertebrate and invertebrate members of the dystrophin and utrophin gene family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R.G.; Nicholson, L.; Bobrow, M. [Paediatric Research Unit, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Vertebrates express two members of the dystrophin gene family. The prototype, dystrophin, is expressed in muscle and neural tissue, and is defective in the human disorders Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD, BMD). The dystrophin homologue utrophin is more generally expressed but has not yet been associated with a genetic disorder. The function of neither protein is clear. A comparison of human utrophin with the known dystrophins (human, mouse, chicken, Torpedo) suggests that dystrophin and utrophin diverged before the vertebrate radiation. We have used reverse-transcript PCR (RT-PCR) directed by degenerate primers to characterize dystrophin and utrophin transcripts from a range of vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Our results suggest that the duplication leading to distinct dystrophin and utrophin genes occurred close to the point of divergence of urochordates from the cephalochordate-vertebrate lineage. This divergence may have occurred to fulfill a novel role which arose at this point, or may reflect a need for separate regulation of the neuromuscular and other functions of the ancient dystrophin. Our data include sequences of the first non-human utrophins to be characterized, and show these to be substantially more divergent than their cognate dystrophins. In addition, our results provide a large body of information regarding the tolerance of amino acid positions in the cysteine-rich and C-terminal domains to substitution. This will aid the interpretations of DMD and BMD missense mutations in these regions.

  8. Proteomic analysis reveals new cardiac-specific dystrophin-associated proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K Johnson

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the expression of dystrophin result in progressive loss of skeletal muscle function and cardiomyopathy leading to early mortality. Interestingly, clinical studies revealed no correlation in disease severity or age of onset between cardiac and skeletal muscles, suggesting that dystrophin may play overlapping yet different roles in these two striated muscles. Since dystrophin serves as a structural and signaling scaffold, functional differences likely arise from tissue-specific protein interactions. To test this, we optimized a proteomics-based approach to purify, identify and compare the interactome of dystrophin between cardiac and skeletal muscles from as little as 50 mg of starting material. We found selective tissue-specific differences in the protein associations of cardiac and skeletal muscle full length dystrophin to syntrophins and dystrobrevins that couple dystrophin to signaling pathways. Importantly, we identified novel cardiac-specific interactions of dystrophin with proteins known to regulate cardiac contraction and to be involved in cardiac disease. Our approach overcomes a major challenge in the muscular dystrophy field of rapidly and consistently identifying bona fide dystrophin-interacting proteins in tissues. In addition, our findings support the existence of cardiac-specific functions of dystrophin and may guide studies into early triggers of cardiac disease in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies.

  9. Professional Microsoft SQL Server Analysis Services 2008 with MDX

    CERN Document Server

    Harinath, Sivakumar; Meenakshisundaram, Sethu

    2009-01-01

    When used with the MDX query language, SQL Server Analysis Services allows developers to build full-scale database applications to support such business functions as budgeting, forecasting, and market analysis.; Shows readers how to build data warehouses and multi-dimensional databases, query databases, and use Analysis Services and other components of SQL Server to provide end-to-end solutions; Revised, updated, and enhanced, the book discusses new features such as improved integration with Office and Excel 2007; query performance enhancements; improvements to aggregation designer, dimension

  10. Effect of omega-3 in dystrophic muscle of mdx mice

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Fogagnolo Maurício

    2012-01-01

    Resumo: Na Distrofia Muscular de Duchenne (DMD) e no camundongo mdx, modelo experimental da DMD, a ausência de distrofina promove instabilidade do sarcolema e degeneração muscular progressiva. O processo inflamatório que se instala contribui de forma significativa para a fisiopatologia da doença, sendo que antiinflamatórios esteroides são amplamente utilizados para a terapia da DMD. Entretanto, em decorrência da sua ação pouco efetiva e dos efeitos colaterais outras drogas são investigadas co...

  11. Dystrophin in frameshift deletion patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangopadhyay, S.B.; Ray, P.N.; Worton, R.G.; Sherratt, T.G.; Heckmatt, J.Z.; Dubowitz, V.; Strong, P.N.; Miller, G. (Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)); Shokeir, M. (Univ. Hospital, Saskatchewan (Canada))

    1992-09-01

    In a previous study the authors identified 14 cases with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or its milder variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), with a deletion of exons 3-7, a deletion that would be expected to shift the translational reading frame of the mRNA and give a severe phenotype. They have examined dystrophin and its mRNA from muscle biopsies of seven cases with either mild or intermediate phenotypes. In all cases they detected slightly lower-molecular-weight dystrophin in 12%-15% abundance relative to the normal. By sequencing amplified mRNA they have found that exon 2 is spliced to exon 8, a splice that produces a frameshifted mRNA, and have found no evidence for alternate splicing that might be involved in restoration of dystrophin mRNA reading frame in the patients with a mild phenotype. Other transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms such as cryptic promoter, ribosomal frameshifting, and reinitiation are suggested that might play some role in restoring the reading frame. 34 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  12. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Pearl, D K; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Mendell, J R

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5' and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened approximately 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3' of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3' mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications.

  13. Autologous skeletal muscle derived cells expressing a novel functional dystrophin provide a potential therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jinhong; Counsell, John R; Reza, Mojgan; Laval, Steven H; Danos, Olivier; Thrasher, Adrian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2016-01-27

    Autologous stem cells that have been genetically modified to express dystrophin are a possible means of treating Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). To maximize the therapeutic effect, dystrophin construct needs to contain as many functional motifs as possible, within the packaging capacity of the viral vector. Existing dystrophin constructs used for transduction of muscle stem cells do not contain the nNOS binding site, an important functional motif within the dystrophin gene. In this proof-of-concept study, using stem cells derived from skeletal muscle of a DMD patient (mdcs) transplanted into an immunodeficient mouse model of DMD, we report that two novel dystrophin constructs, C1 (ΔR3-R13) and C2 (ΔH2-R23), can be lentivirally transduced into mdcs and produce dystrophin. These dystrophin proteins were functional in vivo, as members of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex were restored in muscle fibres containing donor-derived dystrophin. In muscle fibres derived from cells that had been transduced with construct C1, the largest dystrophin construct packaged into a lentiviral system, nNOS was restored. The combination of autologous stem cells and a lentivirus expressing a novel dystrophin construct which optimally restores proteins of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex may have therapeutic application for all DMD patients, regardless of their dystrophin mutation.

  14. Erythropoietin reduces the expression of myostatin in mdx dystrophic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Feder

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO has been well characterized as a renal glycoprotein hormone regulating red blood cell production by inhibiting apoptosis of erythrocyte progenitors in hematopoietic tissues. EPO exerts regulatory effects in cardiac and skeletal muscles. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal degenerative disorder of skeletal and cardiac muscle. In this study, we tested the possible therapeutic beneficial effect of recombinant EPO (rhEPO in dystrophic muscles in mdx mice. Total strength was measured using a force transducer coupled to a computer. Gene expression for myostatin, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. Myostatin expression was significantly decreased in quadriceps from mdx mice treated with rhEPO (rhEPO=0.60±0.11, control=1.07±0.11. On the other hand, rhEPO had no significant effect on the expression of TGF-β1 (rhEPO=0.95±0.14, control=1.05±0.16 and TNF-α (rhEPO=0.73±0.20, control=1.01±0.09. These results may help to clarify some of the direct actions of EPO on skeletal muscle.

  15. Erythropoietin reduces the expression of myostatin in mdx dystrophic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feder, D.; Rugollini, M.; Santomauro, A. Jr; Oliveira, L.P.; Lioi, V.P. [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Santos, R. dos; Ferreira, L.G.; Nunes, M.T.; Carvalho, M.H. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Delgado, P.O.; Carvalho, A.A.S. [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, F.L.A. [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Ambientais e Farmacêuticas, Instituto de Ciências Químicas, Diadema, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-05

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been well characterized as a renal glycoprotein hormone regulating red blood cell production by inhibiting apoptosis of erythrocyte progenitors in hematopoietic tissues. EPO exerts regulatory effects in cardiac and skeletal muscles. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal degenerative disorder of skeletal and cardiac muscle. In this study, we tested the possible therapeutic beneficial effect of recombinant EPO (rhEPO) in dystrophic muscles in mdx mice. Total strength was measured using a force transducer coupled to a computer. Gene expression for myostatin, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. Myostatin expression was significantly decreased in quadriceps from mdx mice treated with rhEPO (rhEPO=0.60±0.11, control=1.07±0.11). On the other hand, rhEPO had no significant effect on the expression of TGF-β1 (rhEPO=0.95±0.14, control=1.05±0.16) and TNF-α (rhEPO=0.73±0.20, control=1.01±0.09). These results may help to clarify some of the direct actions of EPO on skeletal muscle.

  16. The influence of low dystrophin levels on disease pathology in mouse models for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, Maaike van

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most prevalent neuromuscular disorder, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that prevent synthesis of dystrophin. Fibers that lack dystrophin are sensitive to exercise-induced damage, resulting in progressive muscle wasting, loss of ambulation and premature de

  17. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinder Janghra

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ -sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these

  18. Novel Nuclear Protein Complexes of Dystrophin 71 Isoforms in Rat Cultured Hippocampal GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Rodríguez-Muñoz

    Full Text Available The precise functional role of the dystrophin 71 in neurons is still elusive. Previously, we reported that dystrophin 71d and dystrophin 71f are present in nuclei from cultured neurons. In the present work, we performed a detailed analysis of the intranuclear distribution of dystrophin 71 isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71f, during the temporal course of 7-day postnatal rats hippocampal neurons culture for 1h, 2, 4, 10, 15 and 21 days in vitro (DIV. By immunofluorescence assays, we detected the highest level of nuclear expression of both dystrophin Dp71 isoforms at 10 DIV, during the temporal course of primary culture. Dp71d and Dp71f were detected mainly in bipolar GABAergic (≥60% and multipolar Glutamatergic (≤40% neurons, respectively. We also characterized the existence of two nuclear dystrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC: dystrophin 71d or dystrophin 71f bound to β-dystroglycan, α1-, β-, α2-dystrobrevins, α-syntrophin, and syntrophin-associated protein nNOS (Dp71d-DAPC or Dp71f-DAPC, respectively, in the hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, both complexes were localized in interchromatin granule cluster structures (nuclear speckles of neuronal nucleoskeleton preparations. The present study evinces that each Dp71's complexes differ slightly in dystrobrevins composition. The results demonstrated that Dp71d-DAPC was mainly localized in bipolar GABAergic and Dp71f-DAPC in multipolar Glutamatergic hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our results show that dystrophin 71d, dystrophin 71f and DAP integrate protein complexes, and both complexes were associated to nuclear speckles structures.

  19. Novel Nuclear Protein Complexes of Dystrophin 71 Isoforms in Rat Cultured Hippocampal GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurons.

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    Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Cárdenas-Aguayo, María Del Carmen; Alemán, Víctor; Osorio, Beatriz; Chávez-González, Oscar; Rendon, Alvaro; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The precise functional role of the dystrophin 71 in neurons is still elusive. Previously, we reported that dystrophin 71d and dystrophin 71f are present in nuclei from cultured neurons. In the present work, we performed a detailed analysis of the intranuclear distribution of dystrophin 71 isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71f), during the temporal course of 7-day postnatal rats hippocampal neurons culture for 1h, 2, 4, 10, 15 and 21 days in vitro (DIV). By immunofluorescence assays, we detected the highest level of nuclear expression of both dystrophin Dp71 isoforms at 10 DIV, during the temporal course of primary culture. Dp71d and Dp71f were detected mainly in bipolar GABAergic (≥60%) and multipolar Glutamatergic (≤40%) neurons, respectively. We also characterized the existence of two nuclear dystrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC): dystrophin 71d or dystrophin 71f bound to β-dystroglycan, α1-, β-, α2-dystrobrevins, α-syntrophin, and syntrophin-associated protein nNOS (Dp71d-DAPC or Dp71f-DAPC, respectively), in the hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, both complexes were localized in interchromatin granule cluster structures (nuclear speckles) of neuronal nucleoskeleton preparations. The present study evinces that each Dp71's complexes differ slightly in dystrobrevins composition. The results demonstrated that Dp71d-DAPC was mainly localized in bipolar GABAergic and Dp71f-DAPC in multipolar Glutamatergic hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our results show that dystrophin 71d, dystrophin 71f and DAP integrate protein complexes, and both complexes were associated to nuclear speckles structures.

  20. Skeletal muscle NADPH oxidase is increased and triggers stretch-induced damage in the mdx mouse.

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    Whitehead, Nicholas P; Yeung, Ella W; Froehner, Stanley C; Allen, David G

    2010-12-20

    Recent studies have shown that oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of muscle damage in dystrophic (mdx) mice. In this study we have investigated the role of NADPH oxidase as a source of the oxidative stress in these mice. The NADPH oxidase subunits gp91(phox), p67(phox) and rac 1 were increased 2-3 fold in tibilais anterior muscles from mdx mice compared to wild type. Importantly, this increase occurred in 19 day old mice, before the onset of muscle necrosis and inflammation, suggesting that NADPH oxidase is an important source of oxidative stress in mdx muscle. In muscles from 9 week old mdx mice, gp91(phox) and p67(phox) were increased 3-4 fold and NADPH oxidase superoxide production was 2 times greater than wild type. In single fibers from mdx muscle NADPH oxidase subunits were all located on or near the sarcolemma, except for p67(phox),which was expressed in the cytosol. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase significantly reduced the intracellular Ca(2+) rise following stretched contractions in mdx single fibers, and also attenuated the loss of muscle force. These results suggest that NADPH oxidase is a major source of reactive oxygen species in dystrophic muscle and its enhanced activity has a stimulatory effect on stretch-induced Ca(2+) entry, a key mechanism for muscle damage and functional impairment.

  1. The Study of Baculovirus Modiifed Adipose-derived Stem Cells Tranplantation on mdx Mice%杆状病毒修饰后的脂肪干细胞移植治疗mdx鼠的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔杰; 操基清; 陈菲; 杨娟; 张成

    2015-01-01

    Aim To explore the safety and feasibility of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) transplantation on Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) treatment, in which gene defect on mdx mouse was repaired with recombinant baculovirus carrying micro-dystrophin. Methods Adipose stem cells of mdx mouse were isolated and cultured in vitro. Gene defect was repaired with recombinant baculovirus. The modiifed stem cells were injected DMD mouse model through tail vein. Motor function, serum CK levels, muscle pathology and muscle dystrophin expression were observed after transplantation. Results After transplantation, micro-dystrophin expression in DMD mouse model could be rebuilt, pathological damage on muscles and serum CK levels were reduced, motor function of mouse model showed improvement. Conclusion After transplantation, gene expression can be partially reconstructed, pathological damage can be improved. These results suggested that stem cell transplantation should be a promising cure therapy for DMD.%目的:利用经杆状病毒基因载体系统进行micro-dystrophin基因修饰后的脂肪干细胞(ADSCs)移植治疗Duchenne型肌营养不良症模型(mdx)鼠,探讨ADSCs移植治疗DMD的安全性及可行性。方法 Mdx鼠60只,分为mdx对照组(30只)和mdx移植组(30只);正常C57小鼠为C57对照组(30只)。体外分离培养小鼠ADSCs,利用杆状病毒基因载体进行micro-dystrophin基因修饰;将基因修饰后的ADSCs经尾静脉移植到mdx鼠体内。于移植后检测mdx鼠的运动功能(采用主动牵引实验和被动转棒实验)、血清CK水平、肌肉病理改变以及肌肉micro-dystrophin表达水平。结果经micro-dystrophin基因修饰的ADSCs移植后,能够重建mdx鼠的micro-dystrophin表达,一定程度上减轻并逆转肌肉的病理损害,进而降低血清CK水平,mdx鼠整体运动功能也有一定改善。结论 ADSCs治疗mdx鼠后,可部分重建模型鼠的dystrophin表达,改善肌肉的病理损害,

  2. Changes in calsequestrin, TNF-α, TGF-β and MyoD levels during the progression of skeletal muscle dystrophy in mdx mice: a comparative analysis of the quadriceps, diaphragm and intrinsic laryngeal muscles.

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    Barros Maranhão, Juliana; de Oliveira Moreira, Drielen; Maurício, Adriana Fogagnolo; de Carvalho, Samara Camaçari; Ferretti, Renato; Pereira, Juliano Alves; Santo Neto, Humberto; Marques, Maria Julia

    2015-10-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the search for new biomarkers to follow the evolution of the disease is of fundamental importance in the light of the evolving gene and pharmacological therapies. In addition to the lack of dystrophin, secondary events including changes in calcium levels, inflammation and fibrosis greatly contribute to DMD progression and the molecules involved in these events may represent potential biomarkers. In this study, we performed a comparative evaluation of the progression of dystrophy within muscles that are differently affected by dystrophy (diaphragm; DIA and quadriceps; QDR) or spared (intrinsic laryngeal muscles) using the mdx mice model of DMD. We assessed muscle levels of calsequestrin (calcium-related protein), tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α; pro-inflammatory cytokine), tumour growth factor (TGF-β; pro-fibrotic factor) and MyoD (muscle proliferation) vs. histopathology at early (1 and 4 months of age) and late (9 months of age) stages of dystrophy. Fibrosis was the primary feature in the DIA of mdx mice (9 months: 32% fibrosis), which was greater than in the QDR (9 months: 0.6% fibrosis). Muscle regeneration was the primary feature in the QDR (9 months: 90% of centrally nucleated fibres areas vs. 33% in the DIA). The QDR expressed higher levels of calsequestrin than the DIA. Laryngeal muscles showed normal levels of TNF-α, TGF-β and MyoD. A positive correlation between histopathology and cytokine levels was observed only in the diaphragm, suggesting that TNF-α and TGF-β serve as markers of dystrophy primarily for the diaphragm.

  3. Endogenous mesenchymal stromal cells in bone marrow are required to preserve muscle function in mdx mice.

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    Fujita, Ryo; Tamai, Katsuto; Aikawa, Eriko; Nimura, Keisuke; Ishino, Saki; Kikuchi, Yasushi; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2015-03-01

    The physiological role of "endogenous" bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in tissue regeneration is poorly understood. Here, we show the significant contribution of unique endogenous BM-MSC populations to muscle regeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mice (mdx). Transplantation of BM cells (BMCs) from 10-week-old mdx into 3-4-week-old mdx mice increased inflammation and fibrosis and reduced muscle function compared with mdx mice that received BMCs from 10-week-old wild-type mice, suggesting that the alteration of BMC populations in mdx mice affects the progression of muscle pathology. Two distinct MSC populations in BM, that is, hematopoietic lineage (Lin)(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) and Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(-) cells, were significantly reduced in 10-week-old mdx mice in disease progression. The results of a whole-transcriptome analysis indicated that these two MSC populations have distinct gene expression profiles, indicating that the Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) and Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(-) MSC populations are proliferative- and dormant-state populations in BM, respectively. BM-derived Lin(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) MSCs abundantly migrated to damaged muscles and highly expressed tumor necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated gene/protein-6 (TSG-6), an anti-inflammatory protein, in damaged muscles. We also demonstrated that TSG-6 stimulated myoblast proliferation. The injection of Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) MSCs into the muscle of mdx mice successfully ameliorated muscle dysfunction by decreasing inflammation and enhancing muscle regeneration through TSG-6-mediated activities. Thus, we propose a novel function of the unique endogenous BM-MSC population, which countered muscle pathology progression in a DMD model.

  4. A defect in dystrophin causes a novel porcine stress syndrome

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    Nonneman Dan J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Losses of slaughter-weight pigs due to transport stress are both welfare and economic concerns to pork producers. Historically, the HAL-1843 mutation in ryanodine receptor 1 was considered responsible for most of the losses; however, DNA testing has effectively eliminated this mutation from commercial herds. We identified two sibling barrows in the USMARC swine herd that died from apparent symptoms of a stress syndrome after transport at 12 weeks of age. The symptoms included open-mouth breathing, skin discoloration, vocalization and loss of mobility. Results We repeated the original mating along with sire-daughter matings to produce additional offspring. At 8 weeks of age, heart rate and electrocardiographs (ECG were monitored during isoflurane anesthesia challenge (3% for 3 min. Four males from the original sire-dam mating and two males from a sire-daughter mating died after one minute of anesthesia. Animals from additional litters were identified as having a stress response, sometimes resulting in death, during regular processing and weighing. Affected animals had elevated plasma creatine phosphokinase (CPK levels before and immediately after isoflurane challenge and cardiac arrhythmias. A pedigree containing 250 pigs, including 49 affected animals, was genotyped with the Illumina PorcineSNP60 Beadchip and only one chromosomal region, SSCX at 25.1-27.7 Mb over the dystrophin gene (DMD, was significantly associated with the syndrome. An arginine to tryptophan (R1958W polymorphism in exon 41 of DMD was the most significant marker associated with stress susceptibility. Immunoblots of affected heart and skeletal muscle showed a dramatic reduction of dystrophin protein and histopathology of affected hearts indicated muscle fiber degeneration. Conclusions A novel stress syndrome was characterized in pigs and the causative genetic factor most likely resides within DMD that results in less dystrophin protein and cardiac

  5. Platelet adhesion: structural and functional diversity of short dystrophin and utrophins in the formation of dystrophin-associated-protein complexes related to actin dynamics.

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    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Chávez, Oscar; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; García-Sierra, Francisco; Rendon, Alvaro; Mornet, Dominique; Mondragón, Ricardo

    2005-12-01

    Platelets are dynamic cell fragments that modify their shape during activation. Utrophin and dystrophins are minor actin-binding proteins present in muscle and non-muscle cytoskeleton. In the present study, we characterised the pattern of Dp71 isoforms and utrophin gene products by immunoblot in human platelets. Two new dystrophin isoforms were found, Dp71f and Dp71 d, as well as the Up71 isoform and the dystrophin-associated proteins, alpha and beta -dystrobrevins. Distribution of Dp71d/Dp71delta110m, Up400/Up71 and dystrophin-associated proteins in relation to the actin cytoskeleton was evaluated by confocal microscopy in both resting and platelets adhered on glass. Formation of two dystrophin-associated protein complexes (Dp71d/Dp71delta110m approximately DAPC and Up400/Up71 approximately DAPC) was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and their distribution in relation to the actin cytoskeleton was characterised during platelet adhesion. The Dp71d/Dp71delta100m approximately DAPC is maintained mainly at the granulomere and is associated with dynamic structures during activation by adhesion to thrombin-coated surfaces. Participation of both Dp71d/Dp71delta110m approximately DAPC and Up400/Up71 approximately DAPC in the biological roles of the platelets is discussed.

  6. Sparing of the extraocular muscles in mdx mice with absent or reduced utrophin expression: A life span analysis.

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    McDonald, Abby A; Hebert, Sadie L; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-11-01

    Sparing of the extraocular muscles in muscular dystrophy is controversial. To address the potential role of utrophin in this sparing, mdx:utrophin(+/-) and mdx:utrophin(-/-) mice were examined for changes in myofiber size, central nucleation, and Pax7-positive and MyoD-positive cell density at intervals over their life span. Known to be spared in the mdx mouse, and contrary to previous reports, the extraocular muscles from both the mdx:utrophin(+/-) and mdx:utrophin(-/-) mice were also morphologically spared. In the mdx:utrophin(+/)(-) mice, which have a normal life span compared to the mdx:utrophin(-/-) mice, the myofibers were larger at 3 and 12 months than the wild type age-matched eye muscles. While there was a significant increase in central nucleation in the extraocular muscles from all mdx:utrophin(+/)(-) mice, the levels were still very low compared to age-matched limb skeletal muscles. Pax7- and MyoD-positive myogenic precursor cell populations were retained and were similar to age-matched wild type controls. These results support the hypothesis that utrophin is not involved in extraocular muscle sparing in these genotypes. In addition, it appears that these muscles retain the myogenic precursors that would allow them to maintain their regenerative capacity and normal morphology over a lifetime even in these more severe models of muscular dystrophy.

  7. Analysis of dystrophin gene deletions by multiplex PCR in eastern India

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    Basak Jayasri

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common genetic neuromuscular disease of childhood, Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD is caused by deletion, duplication or point mutation of the dystrophin gene located at Xp 21.2. In the present study DNA from seventy unrelated patients clinically diagnosed as having DMD/BMD referred from different parts of West Bengal, a few other states and Bangladesh are analyzed using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR to screen for exon deletions and its distribution within the dystrophin gene. Out of seventy patients forty six (63% showed large intragenic deletion in the dystrophin gene. About 79% of these deletions are located in the hot spot region i.e., between exon 42 to 53. This is the first report of frequency and distribution of deletion in dystrophin gene in eastern Indian DMD/BMD population.

  8. Dystrophin hydrophobic regions in the pathogenesis of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies

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    Yingyin Liang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to determine the role of dystrophin hydrophobic regions in the pathogenesis of Duchenne (DMD and Becker (BMD muscular dystrophies, by the Kyte-Doolittle scale mean hydrophobicity profile and 3D molecular models. A total of 1038 cases diagnosed with DMD or BMD with the in-frame mutation were collected in our hospital and the Leiden DMD information database in the period 2002-2013. Correlation between clinical types and genotypes were determined on the basis of these two sources. In addition, the Kyte-Doolittle scale mean hydrophobicity of dystrophin was analyzed using BioEdit software and the models of the hydrophobic domains of dystrophin were constructed. The presence of four hydrophobic regions is confirmed. They include the calponin homology CH2 domain on the actin-binding domain (ABD, spectrin-type repeat 16, hinge III and the EF Hand domain. The severe symptoms of DMD usually develop as a result of the mutational disruption in the hydrophobic regions I, II and IV of dystrophin – those that bind associated proteins of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC. On the other hand, when the hydrophobic region III is deleted, the connection of the ordered repeat domains of the central rod domain remains intact, resulting in the less severe clinical presentation. We conclude that mutational changes in the structure of hydrophobic regions of dystrophin play an important role in the pathogenesis of DMD.

  9. Telomere shortening in diaphragm and tibialis anterior muscles of aged mdx mice.

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    Lund, Troy C; Grange, Robert W; Lowe, Dawn A

    2007-09-01

    The progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is, in part, due to satellite cell senescence driven by high replicative pressure as these muscle stem cells repeatedly divide and fuse to damaged muscle fibers. We hypothesize that telomere shortening in satellite cells underlies their senescence. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the diaphragm and a leg muscle from dystrophic mice of various ages for telomere dynamics. We found 30% telomere shortening in tibialis anterior muscles from 600-day-old mdx mice relative to age-matched wildtype mice. We also found a more severe shortening of telomere length in diaphragm muscles of old mdx mice. In those muscles, telomeres were shortened by approximately 15% and 40% in 100- and 600-day-old mdx mice, respectively. These findings indicate that satellite cells undergo telomere erosion, which may contribute to the inability of these cells to perpetually repair DMD muscle.

  10. In vivo MRI characterization of progressive cardiac dysfunction in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

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    Daniel J Stuckey

    Full Text Available AIMS: The mdx mouse has proven to be useful in understanding the cardiomyopathy that frequently occurs in muscular dystrophy patients. Here we employed a comprehensive array of clinically relevant in vivo MRI techniques to identify early markers of cardiac dysfunction and follow disease progression in the hearts of mdx mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: Serial measurements of cardiac morphology and function were made in the same group of mdx mice and controls (housed in a non-SPF facility using MRI at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after birth. Left ventricular (LV and right ventricular (RV systolic and diastolic function, response to dobutamine stress and myocardial fibrosis were assessed. RV dysfunction preceded LV dysfunction, with RV end systolic volumes increased and RV ejection fractions reduced at 3 months of age. LV ejection fractions were reduced at 12 months, compared with controls. An abnormal response to dobutamine stress was identified in the RV of mdx mice as early as 1 month. Late-gadolinium-enhanced MRI identified increased levels of myocardial fibrosis in 6, 9 and 12-month-old mdx mice, the extent of fibrosis correlating with the degree of cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS: MRI could identify cardiac abnormalities in the RV of mdx mice as young as 1 month, and detected myocardial fibrosis at 6 months. We believe these to be the earliest MRI measurements of cardiac function reported for any mice, and the first use of late-gadolinium-enhancement in a mouse model of congenital cardiomyopathy. These techniques offer a sensitive and clinically relevant in vivo method for assessment of cardiomyopathy caused by muscular dystrophy and other diseases.

  11. Computational study of the human dystrophin repeats: interaction properties and molecular dynamics.

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    Legrand, Baptiste; Giudice, Emmanuel; Nicolas, Aurélie; Delalande, Olivier; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Dystrophin is a large protein involved in the rare genetic disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). It functions as a mechanical linker between the cytoskeleton and the sarcolemma, and is able to resist shear stresses during muscle activity. In all, 75% of the dystrophin molecule consists of a large central rod domain made up of 24 repeat units that share high structural homology with spectrin-like repeats. However, in the absence of any high-resolution structure of these repeats, the molecular basis of dystrophin central domain's functions has not yet been deciphered. In this context, we have performed a computational study of the whole dystrophin central rod domain based on the rational homology modeling of successive and overlapping tandem repeats and the analysis of their surface properties. Each tandem repeat has very specific surface properties that make it unique. However, the repeats share enough electrostatic-surface similarities to be grouped into four separate clusters. Molecular dynamics simulations of four representative tandem repeats reveal specific flexibility or bending properties depending on the repeat sequence. We thus suggest that the dystrophin central rod domain is constituted of seven biologically relevant sub-domains. Our results provide evidence for the role of the dystrophin central rod domain as a scaffold platform with a wide range of surface features and biophysical properties allowing it to interact with its various known partners such as proteins and membrane lipids. This new integrative view is strongly supported by the previous experimental works that investigated the isolated domains and the observed heterogeneity of the severity of dystrophin related pathologies, especially Becker muscular dystrophy.

  12. Computational study of the human dystrophin repeats: interaction properties and molecular dynamics.

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    Baptiste Legrand

    Full Text Available Dystrophin is a large protein involved in the rare genetic disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. It functions as a mechanical linker between the cytoskeleton and the sarcolemma, and is able to resist shear stresses during muscle activity. In all, 75% of the dystrophin molecule consists of a large central rod domain made up of 24 repeat units that share high structural homology with spectrin-like repeats. However, in the absence of any high-resolution structure of these repeats, the molecular basis of dystrophin central domain's functions has not yet been deciphered. In this context, we have performed a computational study of the whole dystrophin central rod domain based on the rational homology modeling of successive and overlapping tandem repeats and the analysis of their surface properties. Each tandem repeat has very specific surface properties that make it unique. However, the repeats share enough electrostatic-surface similarities to be grouped into four separate clusters. Molecular dynamics simulations of four representative tandem repeats reveal specific flexibility or bending properties depending on the repeat sequence. We thus suggest that the dystrophin central rod domain is constituted of seven biologically relevant sub-domains. Our results provide evidence for the role of the dystrophin central rod domain as a scaffold platform with a wide range of surface features and biophysical properties allowing it to interact with its various known partners such as proteins and membrane lipids. This new integrative view is strongly supported by the previous experimental works that investigated the isolated domains and the observed heterogeneity of the severity of dystrophin related pathologies, especially Becker muscular dystrophy.

  13. HEK293 cells express dystrophin Dp71 with nucleus-specific localization of Dp71ab.

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    Nishida, Atsushi; Yasuno, Sato; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Awano, Hiroyuki; Lee, Tomoko; Niba, Emma Tabe Eko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Hisahide; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    The dystrophin gene consists of 79 exons and encodes tissue-specific isoforms. Mutations in the dystrophin gene cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy, of which a substantial proportion of cases are complicated by non-progressive mental retardation. Abnormalities of Dp71, an isoform transcribed from a promoter in intron 62, are a suspected cause of mental retardation. However, the roles of Dp71 in human brain have not been fully elucidated. Here, we characterized dystrophin in human HEK293 cells with the neuronal lineage. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification of the full-length dystrophin transcript revealed the absence of fragments covering the 5' part of the dystrophin cDNA. In contrast, fragments covering exons 64-79 were present. The Dp71 promoter-specific exon G1 was shown spliced to exon 63. We demonstrated that the Dp71 transcript comprised two subisoforms: one lacking exon 78 (Dp71b) and the other lacking both exons 71 and 78 (Dp71ab). Western blotting of cell lysates using an antibody against the dystrophin C-terminal region revealed two bands, corresponding to Dp71b and Dp71ab. Immunohistochemical examination with the dystrophin antibody revealed scattered punctate signals in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Western blotting revealed one band corresponding to Dp71b in the cytoplasm and two bands corresponding to Dp71b and Dp71ab in the nucleus, with Dp71b being predominant. These results indicated that Dp71ab is a nucleus-specific subisoform. We concluded that Dp71, comprising Dp71b and Dp71ab, was expressed exclusively in HEK293 cells and that Dp71ab was specifically localized to the nucleus. Our findings suggest that Dp71ab in the nucleus contributes to the diverse functions of HEK293 cells.

  14. Loss of dystrophin is associated with increased myocardial stiffness in a model of left ventricular hypertrophy.

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    Donato, Martín; Buchholz, Bruno; Morales, Celina; Valdez, Laura; Zaobornyj, Tamara; Baratta, Sergio; Paez, Diamela T; Matoso, Mirian; Vaccarino, Guillermo; Chejtman, Demian; Agüero, Oscar; Telayna, Juan; Navia, José; Hita, Alejandro; Boveris, Alberto; Gelpi, Ricardo J

    2017-08-01

    Transition from compensated to decompensated left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is accompanied by functional and structural changes. Here, the aim was to evaluate dystrophin expression in murine models and human subjects with LVH by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and aortic stenosis (AS), respectively. We determined whether doxycycline (Doxy) prevented dystrophin expression and myocardial stiffness in mice. Additionally, ventricular function recovery was evaluated in patients 1 year after surgery. Mice were subjected to TAC and monitored for 3 weeks. A second group received Doxy treatment after TAC. Patients with AS were stratified by normal left ventricular end-diastolic wall stress (LVEDWS) and high LVEDWS, and groups were compared. In mice, LVH decreased inotropism and increased myocardial stiffness associated with a dystrophin breakdown and a decreased mitochondrial O2 uptake (MitoMVO2). These alterations were attenuated by Doxy. Patients with high LVEDWS showed similar results to those observed in mice. A correlation between dystrophin and myocardial stiffness was observed in both mice and humans. Systolic function at 1 year post-surgery was only recovered in the normal-LVEDWS group. In summary, mice and humans present diastolic dysfunction associated with dystrophin degradation. The recovery of ventricular function was observed only in patients with normal LVEDWS and without dystrophin degradation. In mice, Doxy improved MitoMVO2. Based on our results it is concluded that the LVH with high LVEDWS is associated to a degradation of dystrophin and increase of myocardial stiffness. At least in a murine model these alterations were attenuated after the administration of a matrix metalloprotease inhibitor.

  15. Measuring tendon properties in mdx mice: cell viability and viscoelastic characteristics.

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    Rizzuto, E; Musarò, A; Catizone, A; Del Prete, Z

    2009-10-16

    Muscular dystrophy is a genetic disorder of skeletal muscle characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Here we assessed whether muscle wasting affects cell viability and mechanical properties of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and of tibialis anterior (TA) tendons from mdx dystrophic mice compared to wild type (WT) mice. mdx mice represent the classical animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and show several signs of the pathology, including a decrease in specific force and an increase of fibrotic index. Cell viability of tendons was evaluated by histological analysis, and viscoelastic properties have been assessed by a rapid measurement protocol that allowed us to compute, at the same time, tissue complex compliance for all the frequencies of interest. Confocal microscopy and mechanical properties measurements revealed that mdx tendons, compared to WT ones, have an increase in the number of dead cells and a significant reduction in tissue elasticity for all the frequencies that were tested. These findings indicate a reduced quality of the tissue. Moreover, mdx tendons have an increase in the viscous response, indicating that during dynamic loading, they dissipate more energy compared to WT. Our results demonstrate that muscular dystrophy involves not only muscle wasting, but also alteration in the viscoelastic properties of tendons, suggesting a paracrine effect of altered skeletal muscle on tendinous tissue.

  16. Ex vivo gene editing of the dystrophin gene in muscle stem cells mediated by peptide nucleic acid single stranded oligodeoxynucleotides induces stable expression of dystrophin in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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    Nik-Ahd, Farnoosh; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which result in the complete absence of dystrophin protein throughout the body. Gene correction strategies hold promise to treating DMD. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated the ability of peptide nucleic acid single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (PNA-ssODNs) to permanently correct single-point mutations at the genomic level. In this study, we show that PNA-ssODNs can target and correct muscle satellite cells (SCs), a population of stem cells capable of self-renewing and differentiating into muscle fibers. When transplanted into skeletal muscles, SCs transfected with correcting PNA-ssODNs were able to engraft and to restore dystrophin expression. The number of dystrophin-positive fibers was shown to significantly increase over time. Expression was confirmed to be the result of the activation of a subpopulation of SCs that had undergone repair as demonstrated by immunofluorescence analyses of engrafted muscles using antibodies specific to full-length dystrophin transcripts and by genomic DNA analysis of dystrophin-positive fibers. Furthermore, the increase in dystrophin expression detected over time resulted in a significant improvement in muscle morphology. The ability of transplanted cells to return into quiescence and to activate upon demand was confirmed in all engrafted muscles following injury. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using gene editing strategies to target and correct SCs and further establish the therapeutic potential of this approach to permanently restore dystrophin expression into muscle of DMD patients.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies against the muscle-specific N-terminus of dystrophin: Characterization of dystrophin in a muscular dystrophy patient with a frameshift deletion of Exons 3-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, L. T.; Man, N. thi; Morris, G.E. (North East Wales Institute, Clwyd (United Kingdom)); Love, D.R.; Davies, K.E. (Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Helliwell, T.R. (Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1993-07-01

    The first three exons of the human muscle dystrophin gene were expressed as a [beta]-galactosidase fusion protein. 1-his protein was then used to prepare two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which react with native dystrophin on frozen muscle sections and with denatured dystrophin on western blots but which do not cross-react with the distrophin-related protein, utrophin. Both mAbs recognized dystrophin in muscular dystrophy (MD) patients with deletions of exon 3, and further mapping with 11 overlapping synthetic peptides showed that they both recognize an epitope encoded by the muscle-specific exon 1. Neither mAb recognizes the brain dystrophin isoform, confirming the prediction from mRNA data that this has a different N-terminus. One Becker MD patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 3-7 is shown to produce dystrophin which reacts with the N-terminal mAbs, as well as with mAbs which bind on the C-terminal side of the deletion. The data suggest that transcription begins at the normal muscle dystrophin promoter and that the normal reading frame is restored after the deletion. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for restoration of the reading frame after deletion of exons 3-7, but those which predict dystrophin with an abnormal N-terminus do not appear to be major mechanisms in this patient. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Increased sphingosine-1-phosphate improves muscle regeneration in acutely injured mdx mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Presently, there is no effective treatment for the lethal muscle wasting disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here we show that increased sphingosine-1-phoshate (S1P) through direct injection or via the administration of the small molecule 2-acetyl-4(5)-tetrahydroxybutyl imidazole (THI), an S1P lyase inhibitor, has beneficial effects in acutely injured dystrophic muscles of mdx mice. Methods We treated mdx mice with and without acute injury and characterized the histopathological and functional effects of increasing S1P levels. We also tested exogenous and direct administration of S1P on mdx muscles to examine the molecular pathways under which S1P promotes regeneration in dystrophic muscles. Results Short-term treatment with THI significantly increased muscle fiber size and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle specific force in acutely injured mdx limb muscles. In addition, the accumulation of fibrosis and fat deposition, hallmarks of DMD pathology and impaired muscle regeneration, were lower in the injured muscles of THI-treated mdx mice. Furthermore, increased muscle force was observed in uninjured EDL muscles with a longer-term treatment of THI. Such regenerative effects were linked to the response of myogenic cells, since intramuscular injection of S1P increased the number of Myf5nlacz/+ positive myogenic cells and newly regenerated myofibers in injured mdx muscles. Intramuscular injection of biotinylated-S1P localized to muscle fibers, including newly regenerated fibers, which also stained positive for S1P receptor 1 (S1PR1). Importantly, plasma membrane and perinuclear localization of phosphorylated S1PR1 was observed in regenerating muscle fibers of mdx muscles. Intramuscular increases of S1P levels, S1PR1 and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P-rpS6), and elevated EDL muscle specific force, suggest S1P promoted the upregulation of anabolic pathways that mediate skeletal muscle mass and function. Conclusions These data show that S1P is

  19. Is the human dystrophin gene's intron structure related to its intron instability?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛文利; 陈江瑛; 朱良付; 刘焯霖

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the human dystrophin gene molecular deletion mechanism, we analyzed breakpoint regions within junction fragments of deletion-type patients and investigated whether the dystrophin gene's intron structure might be related to intron instability.Methods Junction fragments corresponding to exon 46 and 51 deletions were cloned. The breakpoint regions were sequenced, and the features of introns with available Genebank sequences were analyzed.Results An analysis of junction fragment sequences corresponding to exon 46 and 51 deletions showed that all 5' and 3' breakpoints are located within repeat sequences. No small insertions, small deletions, or point mutations are located near the breakpoint junctions. By analyzing the secondary structure of the junction fragments, we demonstrated that all junction fragment breakpoints are located in non-matching regions of single-stranded hairpin loops. A high concentration of repetitive elements is found to be a key feature of many dystrophin introns. In total, 34.8% of the overall dystrophin intron sequences is composed of repeat sequences.Conclusion Repeat elements in many dystrophin gene introns are the key to their structural bases and reflect intron instability. As a result of the primary DNA sequences, single-stranded hairpin loops form, increasing the instability of the gene, and forming the base for breaks in the DNA. The formation of the single-stranded hairpins can result in reattachment of two different breakpoints, producing a deletion.

  20. Mismatched single stranded antisense oligonucleotides can induce efficient dystrophin splice switching

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    Kole Ryszard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense oligomer induced exon skipping aims to reduce the severity of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by redirecting splicing during pre-RNA processing such that the causative mutation is by-passed and a shorter but partially functional Becker muscular dystrophy-like dystrophin isoform is produced. Normal exons are generally targeted to restore the dystrophin reading frame however, an appreciable subset of dystrophin mutations are intra-exonic and therefore have the potential to compromise oligomer efficiency, necessitating personalised oligomer design for some patients. Although antisense oligomers are easily personalised, it remains unclear whether all patient polymorphisms within antisense oligomer target sequences will require the costly process of producing and validating patient specific compounds. Methods Here we report preclinical testing of a panel of splice switching antisense oligomers, designed to excise exon 25 from the dystrophin transcript, in normal and dystrophic patient cells. These patient cells harbour a single base insertion in exon 25 that lies within the target sequence of an oligomer shown to be effective at removing exon 25. Results It was anticipated that such a mutation would compromise oligomer binding and efficiency. However, we show that, despite the mismatch an oligomer, designed and optimised to excise exon 25 from the normal dystrophin mRNA, removes the mutated exon 25 more efficiently than the mutation-specific oligomer. Conclusion This raises the possibility that mismatched AOs could still be therapeutically applicable in some cases, negating the necessity to produce patient-specific compounds.

  1. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: application to point mutation and carrier detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartolo, C; Moxley, R T; Mendell, J R

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, we identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. We conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing.

  2. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: Application to point mutation and carrier detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, T.W.; Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.; Sedra, M.S.; Western, L.M.; Bartolo, C.; Mendell, J.R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Moxley, R.T. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, the authors identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. The authors conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Dystrophin expression in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient with a frame shift deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Kissel, J T; Luquette, M H; Tsao, C Y; Mendell, J R

    1997-02-01

    The exon 45 deletion is a common dystrophin gene deletion. Although this is an out-of-frame deletion, which should not allow for protein synthesis, it has been observed in mildly affected patients. We describe a patient with an exon 45 deletion who produced protein, but still had a severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy phenotype. RT-PCR analysis and cDNA sequencing from the muscle biopsy sample revealed that the exon 45 deletion induced exon skipping of exon 44, which resulted in an in-frame deletion and the production of dystrophin. A conformational change in dystrophin induced by the deletion is proposed as being responsible for the severe phenotype in the patient. We feel that the variable clinical phenotype observed in patients with the exon 45 deletion is not due to exon splicing but may be the result of other environmental or genetic factors, or both.

  4. Regional genomic instability predisposes to complex dystrophin gene rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Junko; Magner, Daniel B; Lee, Jennifer A; Breman, Amy M; Schmitt, Eric S; White, Lisa D; Crowe, Carol A; Merrill, Michelle; Jayakar, Parul; Rajadhyaksha, Aparna; Eng, Christine M; del Gaudio, Daniela

    2009-09-01

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) cause Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies and the majority of cases are due to DMD gene rearrangements. Despite the high incidence of these aberrations, little is known about their causative molecular mechanism(s). We examined 792 DMD/BMD clinical samples by oligonucleotide array-CGH and report on the junction sequence analysis of 15 unique deletion cases and three complex intragenic rearrangements to elucidate potential underlying mechanism(s). Furthermore, we present three cases with intergenic rearrangements involving DMD and neighboring loci. The cases with intragenic rearrangements include an inversion with flanking deleted sequences; a duplicated segment inserted in direct orientation into a deleted region; and a splicing mutation adjacent to a deletion. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that 7 of 12 breakpoints combined among 3 complex cases aligned with repetitive sequences, as compared to 4 of 30 breakpoints for the 15 deletion cases. Moreover, the inversion/deletion case may involve a stem-loop structure that has contributed to the initiation of this rearrangement. For the duplication/deletion and splicing mutation/deletion cases, the presence of the first mutation, either a duplication or point mutation, may have elicited the deletion events in an attempt to correct preexisting mutations. While NHEJ is one potential mechanism for these complex rearrangements, the highly complex junction sequence of the inversion/deletion case suggests the involvement of a replication-based mechanism. Our results support the notion that regional genomic instability, aided by the presence of repetitive elements, a stem-loop structure, and possibly preexisting mutations, may elicit complex rearrangements of the DMD gene.

  5. Proper Voltage-Dependent Ion Channel Function in Dysferlin-Deficient Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi, Lena; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Kubista, Helmut; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Koenig, Xaver

    2015-01-01

    Dysferlin plays a decisive role in calcium-dependent membrane repair in myocytes. Mutations in the encoding DYSF gene cause a number of myopathies, e.g. limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B). Besides skeletal muscle degenerative processes, dysferlin deficiency is also associated with cardiac complications. Thus, both LGMD2B patients and dysferlin-deficient mice develop a dilated cardiomyopathy. We and others have recently reported that dystrophin-deficient ventricular cardiomyocytes from mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy show significant abnormalities in voltage-dependent ion channels, which may contribute to the pathophysiology in dystrophic cardiomyopathy. The aim of the present study was to investigate if dysferlin, like dystrophin, is a regulator of cardiac ion channels. By using the whole cell patch-clamp technique, we compared the properties of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels, as well as action potentials in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from the hearts of normal and dysferlin-deficient (dysf) mice. In contrast to dystrophin deficiency, the lack of dysferlin did not impair the ion channel properties and left action potential parameters unaltered. In connection with normal ECGs in dysf mice these results suggest that dysferlin deficiency does not perturb cardiac electrophysiology. Our study demonstrates that dysferlin does not regulate cardiac voltage-dependent ion channels, and implies that abnormalities in cardiac ion channels are not a universal characteristic of all muscular dystrophy types. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Proper Voltage-Dependent Ion Channel Function in Dysferlin-Deficient Cardiomyocytes

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    Lena Rubi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Dysferlin plays a decisive role in calcium-dependent membrane repair in myocytes. Mutations in the encoding DYSF gene cause a number of myopathies, e.g. limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B. Besides skeletal muscle degenerative processes, dysferlin deficiency is also associated with cardiac complications. Thus, both LGMD2B patients and dysferlin-deficient mice develop a dilated cardiomyopathy. We and others have recently reported that dystrophin-deficient ventricular cardiomyocytes from mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy show significant abnormalities in voltage-dependent ion channels, which may contribute to the pathophysiology in dystrophic cardiomyopathy. The aim of the present study was to investigate if dysferlin, like dystrophin, is a regulator of cardiac ion channels. Methods and Results: By using the whole cell patch-clamp technique, we compared the properties of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels, as well as action potentials in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from the hearts of normal and dysferlin-deficient (dysf mice. In contrast to dystrophin deficiency, the lack of dysferlin did not impair the ion channel properties and left action potential parameters unaltered. In connection with normal ECGs in dysf mice these results suggest that dysferlin deficiency does not perturb cardiac electrophysiology. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that dysferlin does not regulate cardiac voltage-dependent ion channels, and implies that abnormalities in cardiac ion channels are not a universal characteristic of all muscular dystrophy types.

  7. Functional Substitution by TAT-Utrophin in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Muscular dystrophies are genetic (inherited) diseases in which the body's muscles gradually weaken and degenerate. The commonest and most severe muscular dystrophy—Duchenne muscular dystrophy—affects 1 in 3,500 boys (girls can be carriers of the disease but rarely have any symptoms). At birth, these boys seem normal but the symptoms of their disease begin to appear in early childhood. Affected children may initially have difficulty walking or find it to hard to sit...

  8. Dystrophin Dp71f associates with the beta1-integrin adhesion complex to modulate PC12 cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerna, Joel; Cerecedo, Doris; Ortega, Arturo; García-Sierra, Francisco; Centeno, Federico; Garrido, Efrain; Mornet, Dominique; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2006-10-01

    Dystrophin Dp71 is the main product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in the brain; however, its function is unknown. To study the role of Dp71 in neuronal cells, we previously generated by antisense treatment PC12 neuronal cell clones with decreased Dp71 expression (antisense-Dp71 cells). PC12 cells express two different splicing isoforms of Dp71, a cytoplasmic variant called Dp71f and a nuclear isoform called Dp71d. We previously reported that antisense-Dp71 cells display deficient adhesion to substrate and reduced immunostaining of beta1-integrin in the cell area contacting the substrate. In this study, we isolated additional antisense-Dp71 clones to analyze in detail the potential involvement of Dp71f isoform with the beta1-integrin adhesion system of PC12 cells. Immunofluorescence analyses as well as immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the PC12 cell beta1-integrin adhesion complex is composed of beta1-integrin, talin, paxillin, alpha-actinin, FAK and actin. In addition, our results showed that Dp71f associates with most of the beta1-integrin complex components (beta1-integrin, FAK, alpha-actinin, talin and actin). In the antisense-Dp71 cells, the deficiency of Dp71 provokes a significant reduction of the beta1-integrin adhesion complex and, consequently, the deficient adhesion of these cells to laminin. In vitro binding experiments confirmed the interaction of Dp71f with FAK and beta1-integrin. Our data indicate that Dp71f is a structural component of the beta1-integrin adhesion complex of PC12 cells that modulates PC12 cell adhesion by conferring proper complex assembly and/or maintenance.

  9. Pre-exercise low-level laser therapy improves performance and levels of oxidative stress markers in mdx mice subjected to muscle fatigue by high-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andreia Aparecida de Oliveira; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; D'Avila, Katia de Angelis Lobo; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Albertini, Regiane; França, Cristiane Miranda; Nishida, Joen Akemi; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to determine if the levels of oxidative stress markers are influenced by low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in mdx mice subjected to high-intensity exercise training on an electric treadmill. We used 21 C57BL/10ScSn-Dmdmdx/J mice and 7 C57BL/10ScSn mice, all aged 4 weeks. The mice were divided into four groups: a positive control group of normal, wild-type mice (WT); a negative control group of untreated mdx mice; a group of mdx mice that underwent forced high-intensity exercise on a treadmill (mdx fatigue); and another group of mdx mice with the same characteristics that were treated with LLLT at a single point on the gastrocnemius muscle of the hind paw and underwent forced high-intensity exercise on a treadmill. The mdx mice treated with LLLT showed significantly lower levels of creatine kinase (CK) and oxidative stress than mdx mice that underwent forced high-intensity exercise on a treadmill. The activities of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) were higher in control mdx mice than in WT mice. LLLT also significantly reduced the level of this marker. LLLT had a beneficial effect also on the skeletal muscle performance of mdx mice. However, the single application of LLLT and the dose parameters used in this study were not able to change the morphology of a dystrophic muscle.

  10. Importância do camundongo mdx na fisiopatologia da distrofia muscular de Duchenne The importance of mdx mouse in the pathophysiology of Duchenne's muscular distrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Lopes Seixas; Jussara Lagrota-Cândido; Wilson Savino; Thereza Quirico-Santos

    1997-01-01

    O camundongo mdx desenvolve distrofia muscular recessiva ligada ao cromossoma X (locus Xp21.1) e não expressa distrofina. Embora não apresente intensa fibrose do tecido muscular e acúmulo de tecido adiposo, é considerado o modelo animal mais adequado da distrofia muscular de Duchenne. As alterações estruturais no tecido muscular associadas à mionecrose e presença do infiltrado inflamatório com predomínio de linfócitos e monócitos/macrófagos sugerem uma participação do sistema imunológico nest...

  11. Analysis of Dystrophin Gene Deletions by Multiplex PCR in Moroccan Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziza Sbiti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD and BMD are X-linked diseases resulting from a defect in the dystrophin gene located on Xp21. DMD is the most frequent neuromuscular disease in humans (1/3500 male newborn. Deletions in the dystrophin gene represent 65% of mutations in DMD/BMD patients. We have analyzed DNA from 72 Moroccan patients with DMD/BMD using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR to screen for exon deletions within the dystrophin gene, and to estimate the frequency of these abnormalities. We found dystrophin gene deletions in 37 cases. Therefore the frequency in Moroccan DMD/BMD patients is about 51.3%. All deletions were clustered in the two known hot-spots regions, and in 81% of cases deletions were detected in the region from exon 43 to exon 52. These findings are comparable to those reported in other studies. It is important to note that in our population, we can first search for deletions of DMD gene in the most frequently deleted exons determined by this study. This may facilitate the molecular diagnosis of DMD and BMD in our country.

  12. Dystrophin and the two related genetic diseases, Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies

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    Elisabeth Le Rumeur

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the dystrophin DMD gene, essentially deletions of one or several exons, are the cause of two devastating and to date incurable diseases, Duchenne (DMD and Becker (BMD muscular dystrophies. Depending upon the preservation or not of the reading frame, dystrophin is completely absent in DMD, or present in either a mutated or a truncated form in BMD. DMD is a severe disease which leads to a premature death of the patients. Therapy approaches are evolving with the aim to transform the severe DMD in the BMD form of the disease by restoring the expression of a mutated or truncated dystrophin. These therapies are based on the assumption that BMD is a mild disease. However, this is not completely true as BMD patients are more or less severely affected and no molecular basis of this heterogeneity of the BMD form of the disease is yet understood. The aim of this review is to report for the correlation between dystrophin structures in BMD deletions in view of this heterogeneity and to emphasize that examining BMD patients in details is highly relevant to anticipate for DMD therapy effects.

  13. Studying the role of dystrophin-associated proteins in influencing Becker muscular dystrophy disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergen, J C; Wokke, B H A; Hulsker, M A; Verschuuren, J J G M; Aartsma-Rus, A M

    2015-03-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy is characterized by a variable disease course. Many factors have been implicated to contribute to this diversity, among which the expression of several components of the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex. Together with dystrophin, most of these proteins anchor the muscle fiber cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix, thus protecting the muscle from contraction induced injury, while nNOS is primarily involved in inducing vasodilation during muscle contraction, enabling adequate muscle oxygenation. In the current study, we investigated the role of three components of the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex (beta-dystroglycan, gamma-sarcoglycan and nNOS) and the dystrophin homologue utrophin on disease severity in Becker patients. Strength measurements, data about disease course and fresh muscle biopsies of the anterior tibial muscle were obtained from 24 Becker patients aged 19 to 66. The designation of Becker muscular dystrophy in this study was based on the mutation and not on the clinical severity. Contrary to previous studies, we were unable to find a relationship between expression of nNOS, beta-dystroglycan and gamma-sarcoglycan at the sarcolemma and disease severity, as measured by muscle strength in five muscle groups and age at reaching several disease milestones. Unexpectedly, we found an inverse correlation between utrophin expression at the sarcolemma and age at reaching disease milestones.

  14. Collagen content does not alter the passive mechanical properties of fibrotic skeletal muscle in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lucas R; Barton, Elisabeth R

    2014-05-15

    Many skeletal muscle diseases are associated with progressive fibrosis leading to impaired muscle function. Collagen within the extracellular matrix is the primary structural protein providing a mechanical scaffold for cells within tissues. During fibrosis collagen not only increases in amount but also undergoes posttranslational changes that alter its organization that is thought to contribute to tissue stiffness. Little, however, is known about collagen organization in fibrotic muscle and its consequences for function. To investigate the relationship between collagen content and organization with muscle mechanical properties, we studied mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) that undergoes skeletal muscle fibrosis, and age-matched control mice. We determined collagen content both histologically, with picosirius red staining, and biochemically, with hydroxyproline quantification. Collagen content increased in the mdx soleus and diaphragm muscles, which was exacerbated by age in the diaphragm. Collagen packing density, a parameter of collagen organization, was determined using circularly polarized light microscopy of picosirius red-stained sections. Extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscle had proportionally less dense collagen in mdx muscle, while the diaphragm did not change packing density. The mdx muscles had compromised strength as expected, yet only the EDL had a significantly increased elastic stiffness. The EDL and diaphragm had increased dynamic stiffness and a change in relative viscosity. Unexpectedly, passive stiffness did not correlate with collagen content and only weakly correlated with collagen organization. We conclude that muscle fibrosis does not lead to increased passive stiffness and that collagen content is not predictive of muscle stiffness. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Skeletal Muscle Differentiation on a Chip Shows Human Donor Mesoangioblasts' Efficiency in Restoring Dystrophin in a Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serena, Elena; Zatti, Susi; Zoso, Alice; Lo Verso, Francesca; Tedesco, F Saverio; Cossu, Giulio; Elvassore, Nicola

    2016-12-01

    : Restoration of the protein dystrophin on muscle membrane is the goal of many research lines aimed at curing Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Results of ongoing preclinical and clinical trials suggest that partial restoration of dystrophin might be sufficient to significantly reduce muscle damage. Different myogenic progenitors are candidates for cell therapy of muscular dystrophies, but only satellite cells and pericytes have already entered clinical experimentation. This study aimed to provide in vitro quantitative evidence of the ability of mesoangioblasts to restore dystrophin, in terms of protein accumulation and distribution, within myotubes derived from DMD patients, using a microengineered model. We designed an ad hoc experimental strategy to miniaturize on a chip the standard process of muscle regeneration independent of variables such as inflammation and fibrosis. It is based on the coculture, at different ratios, of human dystrophin-positive myogenic progenitors and dystrophin-negative myoblasts in a substrate with muscle-like physiological stiffness and cell micropatterns. Results showed that both healthy myoblasts and mesoangioblasts restored dystrophin expression in DMD myotubes. However, mesoangioblasts showed unexpected efficiency with respect to myoblasts in dystrophin production in terms of the amount of protein produced (40% vs. 15%) and length of the dystrophin membrane domain (210-240 µm vs. 40-70 µm). These results show that our microscaled in vitro model of human DMD skeletal muscle validated previous in vivo preclinical work and may be used to predict efficacy of new methods aimed at enhancing dystrophin accumulation and distribution before they are tested in vivo, reducing time, costs, and variability of clinical experimentation. This study aimed to provide in vitro quantitative evidence of the ability of human mesoangioblasts to restore dystrophin, in terms of protein accumulation and distribution, within myotubes derived from

  16. A Mathematical Model of Skeletal Muscle Disease and Immune Response in the mdx Mouse

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    Abdul Salam Jarrah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a genetic disease that results in the death of affected boys by early adulthood. The genetic defect responsible for DMD has been known for over 25 years, yet at present there is neither cure nor effective treatment for DMD. During early disease onset, the mdx mouse has been validated as an animal model for DMD and use of this model has led to valuable but incomplete insights into the disease process. For example, immune cells are thought to be responsible for a significant portion of muscle cell death in the mdx mouse; however, the role and time course of the immune response in the dystrophic process have not been well described. In this paper we constructed a simple mathematical model to investigate the role of the immune response in muscle degeneration and subsequent regeneration in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Our model suggests that the immune response contributes substantially to the muscle degeneration and regeneration processes. Furthermore, the analysis of the model predicts that the immune system response oscillates throughout the life of the mice, and the damaged fibers are never completely cleared.

  17. Contribution of oxidative stress to pathology in diaphragm and limb muscles with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hee; Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Thompson, LaDora V; Lawler, John M

    2013-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative skeletal muscle disease that makes walking and breathing difficult. DMD is caused by an X-linked (Xp21) mutation in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a scaffolding protein located in the sarcolemmal cytoskeleton, important in maintaining structural integrity and regulating muscle cell (muscle fiber) growth and repair. Dystrophin deficiency in mouse models (e.g., mdx mouse) destabilizes the interface between muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix, resulting in profound damage, inflammation, and weakness in diaphragm and limb muscles. While the link between dystrophin deficiency with inflammation and pathology is multi-factorial, elevated oxidative stress has been proposed as a central mediator. Unfortunately, the use of non-specific antioxidant scavengers in mouse and human studies has led to inconsistent results, obscuring our understanding of the importance of redox signaling in pathology of muscular dystrophy. However, recent studies with more mechanistic approaches in mdx mice suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase and nuclear factor-kappaB are important in amplifying dystrophin-deficient muscle pathology. Therefore, more targeted antioxidant therapeutics may ameliorate damage and weakness in human population, thus promoting better muscle function and quality of life. This review will focus upon the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency in diaphragm and limb muscle primarily in mouse models, with a rationale for development of targeted therapeutic antioxidants in DMD patients.

  18. Analyses of the differentiation potential of satellite cells from myoD-/-, mdx, and PMP22 C22 mice

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    Huxley Clare

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sporadic and sometimes contradictory studies have indicated changes in satellite cell behaviour associated with the progressive nature of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Satellite cell proliferation and number are reportedly altered in DMD and the mdx mouse model. We recently found that satellite cells in MSVski transgenic mice, a muscle hypertrophy model showing progressive muscle degeneration, display a severe ageing-related differentiation defect in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that similar changes contribute to the gradual loss of muscle function with age in mdx and PMP22 mice, a model of human motor and sensory neuropathy type 1A (HMSN1A. Methods Single extensor digitorum longus muscle fibres were cultured from mdx and PMP22 mice and age- and genetic background-matched controls. Mice at several ages were compared with regard to the differentiation of satellite cells, assayed as the proportion of desmin-expressing cells that accumulated sarcomeric myosin heavy chain. Results Satellite cells of 2 month, 6 month, and 12 month old mdx mice were capable of differentiating to a similar extent to age-matched wild type control animals in an in vitro proliferation/differentiation model. Strikingly, differentiation efficiency in individual 6 month and 12 month old mdx animals varies to a much higher extent than in age-matched controls, younger mdx animals, or PMP22 mice. In contrast, differentiation of myoblasts from all myoD null mice assayed was severely impaired in this assay system. The defect in satellite cell differentiation that occurs in some mdx animals arises from a delay in differentiation that is not overcome by IGF-1 treatment at any phase of cultivation. Conclusion Overall, a defect in satellite cell differentiation above that arising through normal ageing does not occur in mdx or PMP22 mouse models of human disease. Nonetheless, the impaired differentiation of satellite cells from some mdx animals

  19. Phase 2a study of ataluren-mediated dystrophin production in patients with nonsense mutation Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Finkel, Richard S; Flanigan, Kevin M; Wong, Brenda; Bönnemann, Carsten; Sampson, Jacinda; Sweeney, H Lee; Reha, Allen; Northcutt, Valerie J; Elfring, Gary; Barth, Jay; Peltz, Stuart W

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 13% of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene, resulting in a premature stop codon in the corresponding mRNA and failure to generate a functional protein. Ataluren (PTC124...

  20. Quantitative T2 combined with texture analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance images identify different degrees of muscle involvement in three mouse models of muscle dystrophy: mdx, Largemyd and mdx/Largemyd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea B Martins-Bach

    Full Text Available Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been considered a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring therapeutic essays in small size mouse models of muscular dystrophies. Here, we combined MRI (anatomical images and transverse relaxation time constant-T2-measurements to texture analyses in the study of four mouse strains covering a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Two still unexplored mouse models of muscular dystrophies were analyzed: The severely affected Largemyd mouse and the recently generated and worst double mutant mdx/Largemyd mouse, as compared to the mildly affected mdx and normal mice. The results were compared to histopathological findings. MRI showed increased intermuscular fat and higher muscle T2 in the three dystrophic mouse models when compared to the wild-type mice (T2: mdx/Largemyd: 37.6±2.8 ms; mdx: 35.2±4.5 ms; Largemyd: 36.6±4.0 ms; wild-type: 29.1±1.8 ms, p<0.05, in addition to higher muscle T2 in the mdx/Largemyd mice when compared to mdx (p<0.05. The areas with increased muscle T2 in the MRI correlated spatially with the identified histopathological alterations such as necrosis, inflammation, degeneration and regeneration foci. Nevertheless, muscle T2 values were not correlated with the severity of the phenotype in the 3 dystrophic mouse strains, since the severely affected Largemyd showed similar values than both the mild mdx and worst mdx/Largemyd lineages. On the other hand, all studied mouse strains could be unambiguously identified with texture analysis, which reflected the observed differences in the distribution of signals in muscle MRI. Thus, combined T2 intensity maps and texture analysis is a powerful approach for the characterization and differentiation of dystrophic muscles with diverse genotypes and phenotypes. These new findings provide important noninvasive tools in the evaluation of the efficacy of new therapies, and most importantly, can be directly applied in human

  1. Quantitative T2 Combined with Texture Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Images Identify Different Degrees of Muscle Involvement in Three Mouse Models of Muscle Dystrophy: mdx, Largemyd and mdx/Largemyd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B.; Malheiros, Jackeline; Matot, Béatrice; Martins, Poliana C. M.; Almeida, Camila F.; Caldeira, Waldir; Ribeiro, Alberto F.; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Azzabou, Noura; Tannús, Alberto; Carlier, Pierre G.; Vainzof, Mariz

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring therapeutic essays in small size mouse models of muscular dystrophies. Here, we combined MRI (anatomical images and transverse relaxation time constant—T2—measurements) to texture analyses in the study of four mouse strains covering a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Two still unexplored mouse models of muscular dystrophies were analyzed: The severely affected Largemyd mouse and the recently generated and worst double mutant mdx/Largemyd mouse, as compared to the mildly affected mdx and normal mice. The results were compared to histopathological findings. MRI showed increased intermuscular fat and higher muscle T2 in the three dystrophic mouse models when compared to the wild-type mice (T2: mdx/Largemyd: 37.6±2.8 ms; mdx: 35.2±4.5 ms; Largemyd: 36.6±4.0 ms; wild-type: 29.1±1.8 ms, p<0.05), in addition to higher muscle T2 in the mdx/Largemyd mice when compared to mdx (p<0.05). The areas with increased muscle T2 in the MRI correlated spatially with the identified histopathological alterations such as necrosis, inflammation, degeneration and regeneration foci. Nevertheless, muscle T2 values were not correlated with the severity of the phenotype in the 3 dystrophic mouse strains, since the severely affected Largemyd showed similar values than both the mild mdx and worst mdx/Largemyd lineages. On the other hand, all studied mouse strains could be unambiguously identified with texture analysis, which reflected the observed differences in the distribution of signals in muscle MRI. Thus, combined T2 intensity maps and texture analysis is a powerful approach for the characterization and differentiation of dystrophic muscles with diverse genotypes and phenotypes. These new findings provide important noninvasive tools in the evaluation of the efficacy of new therapies, and most importantly, can be directly applied in human translational research

  2. Role of mental retardation-associated dystrophin-gene product Dp71 in excitatory synapse organization, synaptic plasticity and behavioral functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Daoud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is caused by deficient expression of the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. One third of DMD patients also have mental retardation (MR, likely due to mutations preventing expression of dystrophin and other brain products of the DMD gene expressed from distinct internal promoters. Loss of Dp71, the major DMD-gene product in brain, is thought to contribute to the severity of MR; however, the specific function of Dp71 is poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Complementary approaches were used to explore the role of Dp71 in neuronal function and identify mechanisms by which Dp71 loss may impair neuronal and cognitive functions. Besides the normal expression of Dp71 in a subpopulation of astrocytes, we found that a pool of Dp71 colocalizes with synaptic proteins in cultured neurons and is expressed in synaptic subcellular fractions in adult brains. We report that Dp71-associated protein complexes interact with specialized modular scaffolds of proteins that cluster glutamate receptors and organize signaling in postsynaptic densities. We then undertook the first functional examination of the brain and cognitive alterations in the Dp71-null mice. We found that these mice display abnormal synapse organization and maturation in vitro, altered synapse density in the adult brain, enhanced glutamatergic transmission and reduced synaptic plasticity in CA1 hippocampus. Dp71-null mice show selective behavioral disturbances characterized by reduced exploratory and novelty-seeking behavior, mild retention deficits in inhibitory avoidance, and impairments in spatial learning and memory. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results suggest that Dp71 expression in neurons play a regulatory role in glutamatergic synapse organization and function, which provides a new mechanism by which inactivation of Dp71 in association with that of other DMD-gene products may lead to increased severity of MR.

  3. Assessment of the structural and functional impact of in-frame mutations of the DMD gene, using the tools included in the eDystrophin online database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Aurélie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dystrophin is a large essential protein of skeletal and heart muscle. It is a filamentous scaffolding protein with numerous binding domains. Mutations in the DMD gene, which encodes dystrophin, mostly result in the deletion of one or several exons and cause Duchenne (DMD and Becker (BMD muscular dystrophies. The most common DMD mutations are frameshift mutations resulting in an absence of dystrophin from tissues. In-frame DMD mutations are less frequent and result in a protein with partial wild-type dystrophin function. The aim of this study was to highlight structural and functional modifications of dystrophin caused by in-frame mutations. Methods and results We developed a dedicated database for dystrophin, the eDystrophin database. It contains 209 different non frame-shifting mutations found in 945 patients from a French cohort and previous studies. Bioinformatics tools provide models of the three-dimensional structure of the protein at deletion sites, making it possible to determine whether the mutated protein retains the typical filamentous structure of dystrophin. An analysis of the structure of mutated dystrophin molecules showed that hybrid repeats were reconstituted at the deletion site in some cases. These hybrid repeats harbored the typical triple coiled-coil structure of native repeats, which may be correlated with better function in muscle cells. Conclusion This new database focuses on the dystrophin protein and its modification due to in-frame deletions in BMD patients. The observation of hybrid repeat reconstitution in some cases provides insight into phenotype-genotype correlations in dystrophin diseases and possible strategies for gene therapy. The eDystrophin database is freely available: http://edystrophin.genouest.org/.

  4. Relatively low proportion of dystrophin gene deletions in Israeili Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shomrat, R.; Gluck, E.; Legum, C.; Shiloh, Y. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)

    1994-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the X-linked dystrophin gene. The most common mutations in western populations are deletions that are spread non-randomly throughout the gene. Molecular analysis of the dystrophin gene structure by hybridization of the full length cDNA to Southern blots and by PCR in 62 unrelated Israeli male DMD/BMD patients showed deletions in 23 (37%). This proportion is significantly lower than that found in European and North American populations (55-65%). Seventy-eight percent of the deletions were confined to exons 44-52, half of these exons 44-45, and the remaining 22% to exons 1 and 19. There was no correlation between the size of the deletion and the severity of the disease. All the deletions causing frameshift resulted in the DMD phenotypes. 43 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. A missense mutation in the dystrophin gene in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Burghes, A H; Bartolo, C; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Mendell, J R

    1993-08-01

    About two thirds of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients have either gene deletions or duplications. The other DMD cases are most likely the result of point mutations that cannot be easily identified by current strategies. Utilizing a heteroduplex technique and direct sequencing of amplified products, we screened our nondeletion/duplication DMD population for point mutations. We now describe what we believe to be the first dystrophin missense mutation in a DMD patient. The mutation results in the substitution of an evolutionarily conserved leucine to arginine in the actin-binding domain. The patient makes a dystrophin protein which is properly localized and is present at a higher level than is observed in DMD patients. This suggests that an intact actin-binding domain is necessary for protein stability and essential for function.

  6. Increasing taurine intake and taurine synthesis improves skeletal muscle function in the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jessica R; Pinniger, Gavin J; Graves, Jamie A; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle wasting disease associated with increased inflammation, oxidative stress and myofibre necrosis. Cysteine precursor antioxidants such as N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and l-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate (OTC) reduce dystropathology in the mdx mouse model for DMD, and we propose this is via increased synthesis of the amino acid taurine. We compared the capacity of OTC and taurine treatment to increase taurine content of mdx muscle, as well as effects on in vivo and ex vivo muscle function, inflammation and oxidative stress. Both treatments increased taurine in muscles, and improved many aspects of muscle function and reduced inflammation. Taurine treatment also reduced protein thiol oxidation and was overall more effective, as OTC treatment reduced body and muscle weight, suggesting some adverse effects of this drug. These data suggest that increasing dietary taurine is a better candidate for a therapeutic intervention for DMD. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle wasting disease for which there is no widely available cure. Whilst the mechanism of loss of muscle function in DMD and the mdx mouse model are not fully understood, disruptions in intracellular calcium homeostasis, inflammation and oxidative stress are implicated. We have shown that protein thiol oxidation is increased in mdx muscle, and that the indirect thiol antioxidant l-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate (OTC), which increases cysteine availability, decreases pathology and increases in vivo strength. We propose that the protective effects of OTC are a consequence of conversion of cysteine to taurine, which has itself been shown to be beneficial to mdx pathology. This study compares the efficacy of taurine with OTC in decreasing dystropathology in mdx mice by measuring in vivo and ex vivo contractile function and measurements of inflammation and protein thiol oxidation. Increasing the taurine content of mdx muscle improved both in vivo and ex

  7. Antisense oligonucleotide induced exon skipping and the dystrophin gene transcript: cocktails and chemistries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fletcher Sue

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs can interfere with exon recognition and intron removal during pre-mRNA processing, and induce excision of a targeted exon from the mature gene transcript. AOs have been used in vitro and in vivo to redirect dystrophin pre-mRNA processing in human and animal cells. Targeted exon skipping of selected exons in the dystrophin gene transcript can remove nonsense or frame-shifting mutations that would otherwise have lead to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, the most common childhood form of muscle wasting. Results Although many dystrophin exons can be excised using a single AO, several exons require two motifs to be masked for efficient or specific exon skipping. Some AOs were inactive when applied individually, yet pronounced exon excision was induced in transfected cells when the AOs were used in select combinations, clearly indicating synergistic rather than cumulative effects on splicing. The necessity for AO cocktails to induce efficient exon removal was observed with 2 different chemistries, 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers. Similarly, other trends in exon skipping, as a consequence of 2'-O-methyl AO action, such as removal of additional flanking exons or variations in exon skipping efficiency with overlapping AOs, were also seen when the corresponding sequences were prepared as phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers. Conclusion The combination of 2 AOs, directed at appropriate motifs in target exons was found to induce very efficient targeted exon skipping during processing of the dystrophin pre-mRNA. This combinatorial effect is clearly synergistic and is not influenced by the chemistry of the AOs used to induce exon excision. A hierarchy in exon skipping efficiency, observed with overlapping AOs composed of 2'-O-methyl modified bases, was also observed when these same sequences were evaluated as phosphorodiamidate morpholino

  8. The Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex in the Prevention of Muscle Damage

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are genetically diverse but share common phenotypic features of muscle weakness, degeneration, and progressive decline in muscle function. Previous work has focused on understanding how disruptions in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex result in muscular dystrophy, supporting a hypothesis that the muscle sarcolemma is fragile and susceptible to contraction-induced injury in multiple forms of dystrophy. Although benign in healthy muscle, contractions in dystrophic muscle ...

  9. Intellectual Ability in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Dystrophin Gene Mutation Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasic Milic V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common form of muscular dystrophy during childhood. Mutations in dystrophin (DMD gene are also recognized as a cause of cognitive impairment. We aimed to determine the association between intelligence level and mutation location in DMD genes in Serbian patients with DMD. Forty-one male patients with DMD, aged 3 to 16 years, were recruited at the Clinic for Neurology and Psychiatry for Children and Youth in Belgrade, Serbia. All patients had defined DMD gene deletions or duplications [multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification (MLPA, polymerase chain reaction (PCR] and cognitive status assessment (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Brunet-Lezine scale, Vineland-Doll scale. In 37 patients with an estimated full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ, six (16.22% had borderline intelligence (70dystrophin isoforms and when mutations in the 5’-untranslated region (5’UTR of Dp140 (exons 45-50 were assigned to affect only Dp427 and Dp260. Mutations affecting Dp140 and Dp71/Dp40 have been associated with more frequent and more severe cognitive impairment. Finally, the same classification of mutations explained the greater proportion of FSIQ variability associated with cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms. In conclusion, cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms increases the risk of intellectual impairment in DMD and characterizing the genotype can define necessity of early cognitive interventions in DMD patients.

  10. In silico analyses of dystrophin Dp40 cellular distribution, nuclear export signals and structure modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Martínez-Herrera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophin Dp40 is the shortest protein encoded by the DMD (Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene. This protein is unique since it lacks the C-terminal end of dystrophins. In this data article, we describe the subcellular localization, nuclear export signals and the three-dimensional structure modeling of putative Dp40 proteins using bioinformatics tools. The Dp40 wild type protein was predicted as a cytoplasmic protein while the Dp40n4 was predicted to be nuclear. Changes L93P and L170P are involved in the nuclear localization of Dp40n4 protein. A close analysis of Dp40 protein scored that amino acids 93LEQEHNNLV101 and 168LLLHDSIQI176 could function as NES sequences and the scores are lost in Dp40n4. In addition, the changes L93/170P modify the tertiary structure of putative Dp40 mutants. The analysis showed that changes of residues 93 and 170 from leucine to proline allow the nuclear localization of Dp40 proteins. The data described here are related to the research article entitled “EF-hand domains are involved in the differential cellular distribution of dystrophin Dp40” (J. Aragón et al. Neurosci. Lett. 600 (2015 115–120 [1].

  11. Becker muscular dystrophy due to an intronic splicing mutation inducing a dual dystrophin transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todeschini, Alice; Gualandi, Francesca; Trabanelli, Cecilia; Armaroli, Annarita; Ravani, Anna; Fanin, Marina; Rota, Silvia; Bello, Luca; Ferlini, Alessandra; Pegoraro, Elena; Padovani, Alessandro; Filosto, Massimiliano

    2016-10-01

    We describe a 29-year-old patient who complained of left thigh muscle weakness since he was 23 and of moderate proximal weakness of both lower limbs with difficulty in climbing stairs and running since he was 27. Mild weakness of iliopsoas and quadriceps muscles and muscle atrophy of both the distal forearm and thigh were observed upon clinical examination. He harboured a novel c.1150-3C>G substitution in the DMD gene, affecting the intron 10 acceptor splice site and causing exon 11 skipping and an out-of-frame transcript. However, protein of normal molecular weight but in reduced amounts was observed on Western Blot analysis. Reverse transcription analysis on muscle RNA showed production, via alternative splicing, of a transcript missing exon 11 as well as a low abundant full-length transcript which is enough to avoid the severe Duchenne phenotype. Our study showed that a reduced amount of full length dystrophin leads to a mild form of Becker muscular dystrophy. These results confirm earlier findings that low amounts of dystrophin can be associated with a milder phenotype, which is promising for therapies aiming at dystrophin restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Screening of Dystrophin Gene Deletions in Egyptian Patients with DMD/BMD Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila K. Effat

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD are allelic disorders caused by mutations within the dystrophin gene. Our study has identified 100 Egyptian families collected from the Human Genetics Clinic, National Research Center, Cairo. All cases were subjected to complete clinical evaluation pedigree analysis, electromyography studies, estimation of serum creatine phosphokinase enzyme (CPK levels and DNA analysis. Multiplex PCR using 18 pairs of specific primers were used for screening of deletion mutations within the dystrophin gene. A frequency of 55% among the families. Sixty per cent of detected deletions involved multiple exons spanning the major or the minor hot spot of the dystrophin gene. The remainder 40% which mainly involved exon 45. Comparing these findings with frequencies of other countries it was found that our figures fall within the reported range of 40%– for deletions. The distribution of deletions in our study and other different studies was variable and specific ethnic differences do not apparently account for specific deletions. In addition this study concluded that employment of the 18 exon analysis is a cost effective and a highly accurate (97% to launch a nationwide program.

  13. Functional disruption of the dystrophin gene in rhesus monkey using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongchang; Zheng, Yinghui; Kang, Yu; Yang, Weili; Niu, Yuyu; Guo, Xiangyu; Tu, Zhuchi; Si, Chenyang; Wang, Hong; Xing, Ruxiao; Pu, Xiuqiong; Yang, Shang-Hsun; Li, Shihua; Ji, Weizhi; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-07-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 has been used to genetically modify genomes in a variety of species, including non-human primates. Unfortunately, this new technology does cause mosaic mutations, and we do not yet know whether such mutations can functionally disrupt the targeted gene or cause the pathology seen in human disease. Addressing these issues is necessary if we are to generate large animal models of human diseases using CRISPR/Cas9. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 to target the monkey dystrophin gene to create mutations that lead to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a recessive X-linked form of muscular dystrophy. Examination of the relative targeting rate revealed that Crispr/Cas9 targeting could lead to mosaic mutations in up to 87% of the dystrophin alleles in monkey muscle. Moreover, CRISPR/Cas9 induced mutations in both male and female monkeys, with the markedly depleted dystrophin and muscle degeneration seen in early DMD. Our findings indicate that CRISPR/Cas9 can efficiently generate monkey models of human diseases, regardless of inheritance patterns. The presence of degenerated muscle cells in newborn Cas9-targeted monkeys suggests that therapeutic interventions at the early disease stage may be effective at alleviating the myopathy.

  14. Gene therapies that restore dystrophin expression for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Hamm, Jacqueline N; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common inherited genetic diseases and is caused by mutations to the DMD gene that encodes the dystrophin protein. Recent advances in genome editing and gene therapy offer hope for the development of potential therapeutics. Truncated versions of the DMD gene can be delivered to the affected tissues with viral vectors and show promising results in a variety of animal models. Genome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been used to restore dystrophin expression by deleting one or more exons of the DMD gene in patient cells and in a mouse model that led to functional improvement of muscle strength. Exon skipping with oligonucleotides has been successful in several animal models and evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Next-generation oligonucleotide formulations offer significant promise to build on these results. All these approaches to restoring dystrophin expression are encouraging, but many hurdles remain. This review summarizes the current state of these technologies and summarizes considerations for their future development.

  15. Single Cell Analysis of Dystrophin and SRY Gene by Using Whole Genome Amplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晨明; 金帆; 黄荷凤; 陶冶; 叶英辉

    2001-01-01

    Objective To develop a reliable and sensitive method for detection of sex and multiloci of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene in single cell Materials & methods Whole genome of single cell were amplified by using 15-base random primers (primer extension preamplification, PEP), then a small aliquot of PEP product were analyzed by using locus-specific nest PCR amplification. The procedure was evaluated by detection dystrophin exons 8, 17, 19, 44, 45, 48 and human testis-determining gene (SRY)in single lymphocytes from known sources and single blastomeres from the couples with no family history of DMD.Results The amplification efficiency rate of six dystrophin exons from single lymphocytes and single blastomeres were 97. 2% (175/180) and 100% (60/60) respectively.Results of SRY showed that 100% (15/15) amplification in single male-derived lymphocytes and 0% (0/15) amplification in single female-derived lymphocytes. Conclusion The technique of single cell PEP-nest PCR for dystrophin exons 8, 17,19, 44, 45, 48 and SRY is highly specifc. PEP-nest PCR is suitable for Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of DMD at single cell level.

  16. Evaluation of Amphiphilic Peptide Modified Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides In Vitro and in Dystrophic mdx Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mingxing Wang; Bo Wu; Peijuan Lu; Shah, Sapana N.; Jason D. Tucker; Lauren E. Bollinger; Qilong Lu

    2017-01-01

    A series of amphiphilic peptides modified PMO (Pt-PMO) were prepared, and their antisense effect and toxicity were evaluated both in vitro and in mdx mice. The results showed that the exon-skipping performance of Pt-PMO are relative to the structure of the conjugated peptide: the Pt3/Pt4 composed of six/seven arginines and one myristoylation modified PMO showed more efficacy and with less toxicity as compared to others, confirming that appropriate hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) and cati...

  17. Importância do camundongo mdx na fisiopatologia da distrofia muscular de Duchenne

    OpenAIRE

    Seixas,Sandra Lopes; Lagrota-Cândido,Jussara; Savino, Wilson; Quirico-Santos,Thereza

    1997-01-01

    O camundongo mdx desenvolve distrofia muscular recessiva ligada ao cromossoma X (locus Xp21.1) e não expressa distrofina. Embora não apresente intensa fibrose do tecido muscular e acúmulo de tecido adiposo, é considerado o modelo animal mais adequado da distrofia muscular de Duchenne. As alterações estruturais no tecido muscular associadas à mionecrose e presença do infiltrado inflamatório com predomínio de linfócitos e monócitos/macrófagos sugerem uma participação do sistema imunológico nest...

  18. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor improves MDX mouse response to peripheral nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ferreira Simões

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: G-CSF has been shown to increase neuronal survival, which may positively influence the spinal cord microenvironment during the course of muscular dystrophies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male MDX mice that were six weeks of age received a left sciatic nerve transection and were treated with intraperitoneal injections of 200 µg/kg/day of G-CSF 7 days before and 7 days after the transection. The axotomy was performed after the cycles of muscular degeneration/regeneration, consistent with previous descriptions of this model of muscular dystrophy. C57BL/10 mice were used as control subjects. Seven days after the surgery, the animals were sacrificed and their lumbar spinal cords were processed for immunohistochemistry (anti-MHC I, anti-Synaptophysin, anti-GFAP and anti-IBA-1 and transmission electron microscopy. MHC I expression increased in both strains of mice after the axotomy. Nevertheless, the MDX mice displayed a significantly smaller MHC I upregulation than the control mice. Regarding GFAP expression, the MDX mice showed a stronger astrogliosis compared with the C57BL/10 mice across all groups. Both groups that were treated with G-CSF demonstrated preservation of synaptophysin expression compared with the untreated and placebo groups. The quantitative analysis of the ultrastructural level showed a preservation of the synaptic covering for the both groups that were treated with G-CSF and the axotomized groups showed a smaller loss of synaptic contact in relation to the treated groups after the lesion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The reduction of active inputs to the alpha-motoneurons and increased astrogliosis in the axotomized and control groups may be associated with the cycles of muscle degeneration/regeneration that occur postnatally. The G-CSF treated group showed a preservation of the spinal cord microenvironment after the lesion. Moreover, the increase of MHC I expression in the MDX mice that were treated with G-CSF may

  19. Importância do camundongo mdx na fisiopatologia da distrofia muscular de Duchenne

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Lopes Seixas; Jussara Lagrota-Cândido; Wilson Savino; Thereza Quirico-Santos

    1997-01-01

    O camundongo mdx desenvolve distrofia muscular recessiva ligada ao cromossoma X (locus Xp21.1) e não expressa distrofina. Embora não apresente intensa fibrose do tecido muscular e acúmulo de tecido adiposo, é considerado o modelo animal mais adequado da distrofia muscular de Duchenne. As alterações estruturais no tecido muscular associadas à mionecrose e presença do infiltrado inflamatório com predomínio de linfócitos e monócitos/macrófagos sugerem uma participação do sistema imunológico nest...

  20. Immobilization and therapeutic passive stretching generate thickening and increase the expression of laminin and dystrophin in skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cação-Benedini, L.O.; Ribeiro, P.G. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor, Departamento de Biomecânica, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Biomecânica, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Prado, C.M.; Chesca, D.L. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Patologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Mattiello-Sverzut, A.C. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor, Departamento de Biomecânica, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Biomecânica, Medicina e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-05-09

    Extracellular matrix and costamere proteins transmit the concentric, isometric, and eccentric forces produced by active muscle contraction. The expression of these proteins after application of passive tension stimuli to muscle remains unknown. This study investigated the expression of laminin and dystrophin in the soleus muscle of rats immobilized with the right ankle in plantar flexion for 10 days and subsequent remobilization, either by isolated free movement in a cage or associated with passive stretching for up to 10 days. The intensity of the macrophage response was also evaluated. One hundred and twenty-eight female Wistar rats were divided into 8 groups: free for 10 days; immobilized for 10 days; immobilized/free for 1, 3, or 10 days; or immobilized/stretched/free for 1, 3, or 10 days. After the experimental procedures, muscle tissue was processed for immunofluorescence (dystrophin/laminin/CD68) and Western blot analysis (dystrophin/laminin). Immobilization increased the expression of dystrophin and laminin but did not alter the number of macrophages in the muscle. In the stretched muscle groups, there was an increase in dystrophin and the number of macrophages after 3 days compared with the other groups; dystrophin showed a discontinuous labeling pattern, and laminin was found in the intracellular space. The amount of laminin was increased in the muscles treated by immobilization followed by free movement for 10 days. In the initial stages of postimmobilization (1 and 3 days), an exacerbated macrophage response and an increase of dystrophin suggested that the therapeutic stretching technique induced additional stress in the muscle fibers and costameres.

  1. SY-1和MDX4-4210硅橡胶热老化性能试验%Heat ageing test of SY-1 and MDX4-4210 silicon rubber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵龙泉; 赵铱民; 赵信义

    2003-01-01

    目的对比SY-1和MDX4-4210硅橡胶的热老化性能.方法在相同条件下对两种硅橡胶材料进行了热老化试验,对其老化性能加以评价.结果热老化后,SY-1硅橡胶的扯断强度性能变化百分比与MDX4-4210硅橡胶无显著差异(P>0.05);SY-1硅橡胶的邵氏硬度、扯断伸长率、永久变形率(3min后)、撕裂强度的性能变化百分比优于MDX4-4210硅橡胶(P<0.01).结论SY-1硅橡胶热老化性能略优于MDX4-4210硅橡胶,热老化性能可以满足作为面部软组织缺损赝复材料的要求.

  2. Calcium-binding proteins in skeletal muscles of the mdx mice: potential role in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertille, Adriana; de Carvalho, Candida Luiza Tonizza; Matsumura, Cintia Yuri; Neto, Humberto Santo; Marques, Maria Julia

    2010-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common hereditary diseases. Abnormal ion handling renders dystrophic muscle fibers more susceptible to necrosis and a rise in intracellular calcium is an important initiating event in dystrophic muscle pathogenesis. In the mdx mice, muscles are affected with different intensities and some muscles are spared. We investigated the levels of the calcium-binding proteins calsequestrin and calmodulin in the non-spared axial (sternomastoid and diaphragm), limb (tibialis anterior and soleus), cardiac and in the spared extraocular muscles (EOM) of control and mdx mice. Immunoblotting analysis showed a significant increase of the proteins in the spared mdx EOM and a significant decrease in the most affected diaphragm. Both proteins were comparable to the cardiac muscle controls. In limb and sternomastoid muscles, calmodulin and calsequestrin were affected differently. These results suggest that differential levels of the calcium-handling proteins may be involved in the pathogenesis of myonecrosis in mdx muscles. Understanding the signaling mechanisms involving Ca(2+)-calmodulin activation and calsequestrin expression may be a valuable way to develop new therapeutic approaches to the dystrophinopaties.

  3. Adeno-associated virus-mediated microdystrophin expression protects young mdx muscle from contraction-induced injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Mingju; Yue, Yongping; Harper, Scott Q; Grange, Robert W; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Duan, Dongsheng

    2005-01-01

    ... a CMV.DeltaR4/DeltaC cassette in AAV-5 and evaluated the transduction and muscle contractile profiles in the extensor digitorum longus muscles of young (7-week-old) and adult (9-month-old) mdx mice...

  4. A Japanese boy with myalgia and cramps has a novel in-frame deletion of the dystrophin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, C; Patria, S Y; Nishio, H; Yabe, M; Matsuo, M

    1996-05-01

    We report a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) patient with occasional myalgia and cramps during normal activity that developed at the age of 28 months. His family history was negative for neuromuscular diseases. Muscle biopsy analyses, including dystrophin immunostaining, disclosed no clinically relevant findings. The diagnosis of BMD was initially made at the age of 10 years, when indications of persistent high serum levels of CK prompted us to screen deletions in the dystrophin gene by amplification of 19 deletion-prone exons from the genomic DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Among the exons examined, exons 13 and 17 were deleted. To clarify the size of the deletion, the dystrophin transcript was analyzed by reverse transcription PCR. The determined nucleotide sequence of the amplified product encompassing exons 10 to 20 disclosed that the entire segment corresponding to exons 13 to 18 (810 bp) was absent, a deletion that would be expected to cause the production of a dystrophin protein lacking 270 amino acids from the rod domain. This result indicates that occasional myalgia and cramps could be early clinical manifestations of mild BMD, especially in patients who have a deletion in the rod domain, and that deletion screening of the dystrophin gene might be the only reliable method to diagnose such cases.

  5. Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) caused by duplication of exons 3-6 of the dystrophin gene presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, A.C.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; Becker, L. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is a progressive myocardial disease presenting with congestive heart failure in teenage males without clinical signs of skeletal myopathy. Tight linkage of XLCM to the DMD locus has been demonstrated; it has been suggested that, at least in some families, XLCM is a {open_quotes}dystrophinopathy.{close_quotes} We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with acute heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. He had no history of muscle weakness, but physical examination revealed pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles. He subsequently received a heart transplantation. Family history was negative. Serum CK level at the time of diagnosis was 10,416. Myocardial biopsy showed no evidence of carditis. Dystrophin staining of cardiac and skeletal muscle with anti-sera to COOH and NH{sub 2}termini showed a patchy distribution of positivity suggestive of Becker muscular dystrophy. Analysis of 18 of the 79 dystrophin exons detected a duplication that included exons 3-6. The proband`s mother has an elevated serum CK and was confirmed to be a carrier of the same duplication. A mutation in the muscle promotor region of the dystrophin gene has been implicated in the etiology of SLCM. However, Towbin et al. (1991) argued that other 5{prime} mutations in the dystrophin gene could cause selective cardiomyopathy. The findings in our patient support the latter hypothesis. This suggests that there are multiple regions in the dystrophin gene which, when disrupted, can cause isolated dilated cardiomyopathy.

  6. Characterization of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy using monoclonal antibodies against a deletion-prone region of dystrophin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, L.T.; Man, Nguyen Thi; Morris, G.E. [Wales Institute, Clwyd (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-08-28

    We have produced a new panel of 20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against a region of the dystrophin protein corresponding to a deletion-prone region of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene (exons 45-50). We show that immunohistochemistry or Western blotting with these {open_quotes}exon-specific{close_quotes} mAbs can provide a valuable addition to Southern blotting or PCR methods for the accurate identification of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. The antibodies were mapped to the following exons: exon 45 (2 mAbs), exon 46 (6), exon 47 (1), exons 47/48 (4), exons 48-50 (6), and exon 50 (1). PCR amplification of single exons or groups of exons was used both to produce specific dystrophin immunogens and to map the mAbs obtained. PCR-mediated mutagenesis was also used to identify regions of dystrophin important for mAb binding. Because the mAbs can be used to characterize the dystrophin produced by individual muscle fibres, they will also be useful for studying {open_quotes}revertant{close_quotes} fibres in Duchenne muscle and for monitoring the results of myoblast therapy trials in MD patients with deletions in this region of the dystrophin gene. 27 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Selective activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) inhibits muscular degeneration in mdx dystrophic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Paulo Emílio Correa; Gandía, Luís; de Pascual, Ricardo; Nanclares, Carmen; Colmena, Inés; Santos, Wilson C; Lagrota-Candido, Jussara; Quirico-Santos, Thereza

    2014-07-21

    Amount evidence indicates that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) activation reduces production of inflammatory mediators. This work aimed to verify the influence of endogenous nAChRα7 activation on the regulation of full-blown muscular inflammation in mdx mouse with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We used mdx mice with 3 weeks-old at the height myonecrosis, and C57 nAChRα7(+/+) wild-type and nAChRα7(-/-) knockout mice with muscular injury induced with 60µL 0.5% bupivacaine (bp) in the gastrocnemius muscle. Pharmacological treatment included selective nAChRα7 agonist PNU282987 (0.3mg/kg and 1.0mg/kg) and the antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA at 1.0mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally for 7 days. Selective nAChRα7 activation of mdx mice with PNU282987 reduced circulating levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, a marker of cell death by necrosis) and the area of perivascular inflammatory infiltrate, and production of inflammatory mediators TNFα and metalloprotease MMP-9 activity. Conversely, PNU282987 treatment increased MMP-2 activity, an indication of muscular tissue remodeling associated with regeneration, in both mdx mice and WTα7 mice with bp-induced muscular lesion. Treatment with PNU282987 had no effect on α7KO, and MLA abolished the nAChRα7 agonist-induced anti-inflammatory effect in both mdx and WT. In conclusion, nAChRα7 activation inhibits muscular inflammation and activates tissue remodeling by increasing muscular regeneration. These effects were not accompanied with fibrosis and/or deposition of non-functional collagen. The nAChRα7 activation may be considered as a potential target for pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation and activate mechanisms of muscular regeneration.

  8. Dystrophic tendon functionality is recovered by muscle-specific expression of insulin-like growth factor in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuto, E; Catizone, A; Musarò, A; Del Prete, Z

    2013-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe genetic disorder of skeletal muscle, characterized by a steady muscle weakness. By using the animal model for DMD, the mdx mice, we have previously demonstrated that biomechanical properties of tendinous tissue are also significantly affected in this muscle pathology. Muscle specific over-expression of insulin like growth factor-1 (mIgf-1) is known to induce a partial recovery in muscle functionality, in particular increasing the muscle absolute force, but not the specific force. To test whether Igf-1 muscle specific over-expression helps the recovery also in tendinous tissue, mechanical and cellular evaluation of mdx and mdx:MLC/mIgf-1 mice tendons has been performed. Mechanical properties were investigated by measuring the viscoelastic response of the tissue, while cell viability was evaluated by molecular assays. An absolute recovery in the mechanical properties of EDL and TA tendons was observed through the measurement of tissue viscoelasticity for several different frequencies of interest. Moreover, when compared with tendons from dystrophic mdx animals, mdx:MLC/mIgf-1 specimens showed an almost complete recovery in the number of viable cells for both extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and tibialis anterior (TA) tendons. Of note, the partial recovery in muscle functionality and the full recovery in tendons response, suggests that mIgf-1 muscle specific over-expression exerts its effect on tendons either indirectly, improving the tendon viability and its functional properties as a consequence of the reduction of the hostile muscle dystrophic environment, or acting directly on the tendon tissue, as a paracrine trophic factor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Passive mechanical properties of maturing extensor digitorum longus are not affected by lack of dystrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Andrew V; Niday, Ashley K; Voelker, Kevin A; Call, Jarrod A; Evans, Nicholas P; Granata, Kevin P; Grange, Robert W

    2006-09-01

    Mechanical weakness of skeletal muscle is thought to contribute to onset and early progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, but this has not been systematically assessed. The purpose of this study was to determine in mice: (1) whether the passive mechanical properties of maturing dystrophic (mdx) muscles were different from control; and (2) if different, the time during maturation when these properties change. Prior to and following the overt onset of the dystrophic process (14-35 days), control and dystrophic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were subjected to two passive stretch protocols in vitro (5% strain at instantaneous and 1.5 L(0)/s strain rates). Force profiles were fit to a viscoelastic muscle model to determine stiffness and damping. The mdx and control EDL muscles exhibited similar passive mechanical properties at each age, suggesting a functional threshold for dystrophic muscle below which damage may be minimized. Determining this threshold may have important clinical implications for treatments of muscular dystrophy involving physical activity.

  10. Muscular dystrophy begins early in embryonic development deriving from stem cell loss and disrupted skeletal muscle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Deborah; Stadler, Lukas Kurt Josef; Larner, Dean; Smith, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Examination of embryonic myogenesis of two distinct, but functionally related, skeletal muscle dystrophy mutants (mdx and cav-3(-/-)) establishes for the first time that key elements of the pathology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD-1c) originate in the disruption of the embryonic cardiac and skeletal muscle patterning processes. Disruption of myogenesis occurs earlier in mdx mutants, which lack a functional form of dystrophin, than in cav-3(-/-) mutants, which lack the Cav3 gene that encodes the protein caveolin-3; this finding is consistent with the milder phenotype of LGMD-1c, a condition caused by mutations in Cav3, and the earlier [embryonic day (E)9.5] expression of dystrophin. Myogenesis is severely disrupted in mdx embryos, which display developmental delays; myotube morphology and displacement defects; and aberrant stem cell behaviour. In addition, the caveolin-3 protein is elevated in mdx embryos. Both cav-3(-/-) and mdx mutants (from E15.5 and E11.5, respectively) exhibit hyperproliferation and apoptosis of Myf5-positive embryonic myoblasts; attrition of Pax7-positive myoblasts in situ; and depletion of total Pax7 protein in late gestation. Furthermore, both cav-3(-/-) and mdx mutants have cardiac defects. In cav-3(-/-) mutants, there is a more restricted phenotype comprising hypaxial muscle defects, an excess of malformed hypertrophic myotubes, a twofold increase in myonuclei, and reduced fast myosin heavy chain (FMyHC) content. Several mdx mutant embryo pathologies, including myotube hypotrophy, reduced myotube numbers and increased FMyHC, have reciprocity with cav-3(-/-) mutants. In double mutant (mdxcav-3(+/-)) embryos that are deficient in dystrophin (mdx) and heterozygous for caveolin-3 (cav-3(+/-)), whereby caveolin-3 is reduced to 50% of wild-type (WT) levels, these phenotypes are severely exacerbated: intercostal muscle fibre density is reduced by 71%, and Pax7-positive cells are depleted

  11. Deletion of Dystrophin In-Frame Exon 5 Leads to a Severe Phenotype: Guidance for Exon Skipping Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Yon Charles Toh

    Full Text Available Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy severity depends upon the nature and location of the DMD gene lesion and generally correlates with the dystrophin open reading frame. However, there are striking exceptions where an in-frame genomic deletion leads to severe pathology or protein-truncating mutations (nonsense or frame-shifting indels manifest as mild disease. Exceptions to the dystrophin reading frame rule are usually resolved after molecular diagnosis on muscle RNA. We report a moderate/severe Becker muscular dystrophy patient with an in-frame genomic deletion of DMD exon 5. This mutation has been reported by others as resulting in Duchenne or Intermediate muscular dystrophy, and the loss of this in-frame exon in one patient led to multiple splicing events, including omission of exon 6, that disrupts the open reading frame and is consistent with a severe phenotype. The patient described has a deletion of dystrophin exon 5 that does not compromise recognition of exon 6, and although the deletion does not disrupt the reading frame, his clinical presentation is more severe than would be expected for classical Becker muscular dystrophy. We suggest that the dystrophin isoform lacking the actin-binding sequence encoded by exon 5 is compromised, reflected by the phenotype resulting from induction of this dystrophin isoform in mouse muscle in vivo. Hence, exon skipping to address DMD-causing mutations within DMD exon 5 may not yield an isoform that confers marked clinical benefit. Additional studies will be required to determine whether multi-exon skipping strategies could yield more functional dystrophin isoforms, since some BMD patients with larger in-frame deletions in this region have been reported with mild phenotypes.

  12. A sensitive, reproducible and objective immunofluorescence analysis method of dystrophin in individual fibers in samples from patients with duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Beekman

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is characterized by the absence or reduced levels of dystrophin expression on the inner surface of the sarcolemmal membrane of muscle fibers. Clinical development of therapeutic approaches aiming to increase dystrophin levels requires sensitive and reproducible measurement of differences in dystrophin expression in muscle biopsies of treated patients with DMD. This, however, poses a technical challenge due to intra- and inter-donor variance in the occurrence of revertant fibers and low trace dystrophin expression throughout the biopsies. We have developed an immunofluorescence and semi-automated image analysis method that measures the sarcolemmal dystrophin intensity per individual fiber for the entire fiber population in a muscle biopsy. Cross-sections of muscle co-stained for dystrophin and spectrin have been imaged by confocal microscopy, and image analysis was performed using Definiens software. Dystrophin intensity has been measured in the sarcolemmal mask of spectrin for each individual muscle fiber and multiple membrane intensity parameters (mean, maximum, quantiles per fiber were calculated. A histogram can depict the distribution of dystrophin intensities for the fiber population in the biopsy. This method was tested by measuring dystrophin in DMD, Becker muscular dystrophy, and healthy muscle samples. Analysis of duplicate or quadruplicate sections of DMD biopsies on the same or multiple days, by different operators, or using different antibodies, was shown to be objective and reproducible (inter-assay precision, CV 2-17% and intra-assay precision, CV 2-10%. Moreover, the method was sufficiently sensitive to detect consistently small differences in dystrophin between two biopsies from a patient with DMD before and after treatment with an investigational compound.

  13. Becker muscular dystrophy in Indian patients: Analysis of dystrophin gene deletion patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastur Rashna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene with variable phenotypes. Becker muscular dystrophy patients have low levels of nearly full-length dystrophin and carry in-frame mutations, which allow partial functioning of the protein. Aim: To study the deletion patterns of BMD and to correlate the same with reading frame rule and different phenotypes. Setting: A tertiary care teaching hospital. Design: This is a prospective hospital-based study. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two exons spanning different "hot spot" regions using Multiplex PCR techniques were studied in 347 patients. Two hundred and twenty-two showed deletions in one or more of the 32 exons. Out of these, 46 diagnosed as BMD patients were analyzed. Results: Forty-six BMD patients showed deletions in both regions of the dystrophin gene. Out of these 89.1% (41/46 were in-frame deletions. Deletions starting with Exon 45 were found in 76.1% (35/46 of the cases. Mutations in the majority of cases i.e. 39/46 (84.8% were seen in 3′ downstream region (Exon 45-55, distal rod domain. Few, i.e. 5/46 (10.8% showed deletions in 5′ upstream region (Exons 3-20, N-terminus and proximal rod domain of the gene, while in 2/46 (4.4% large mutations (>40 bp spanning both regions (Exons 3-55 were detected. Conclusion: This significant gene deletion analysis has been carried out for BMD patients particularly from Western India using 32 exons.

  14. Effects of Mechanical Overloading on the Properties of Soleus Muscle Fibers, with or without Damage in MDX and Wild Type Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Takashi; Oke, Yoshihiko; Nakai, Naoya; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Effects of mechanical overloading on the characteristics of regenerating or not-regenerating soleus muscle fibers were studied. The muscle fibers of mdx mice were characterized by the localization of myonuclei. Muscle damage was also induced in wild type (WT) mice by injection of cardiotoxin (CTX) into soleus muscle. Overloading was applied for 14 days to the left soleus muscle in mdx and intact and CTX-injected WT mice by removing the distal tendons of plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles. The contralateral muscle served as the normal control. These animals were then allowed ambulation recovery in the cage. Central myonuclei were noted in many fibers of mdx and CTX-injected mice with or without overloading. In general, the fibers with central nuclei were considered as regenerating fibers. The fibers with more central nuclei were increased in mdx mice, but the fibers with more peripheral nuclei were increased in CTX-injected WT mice by overloading. The muscle satellite cells, neuromuscular junctions (NMJ), and myonuclei were stained. Most of the properties, such as number of myonuclei and satellite cells, size of NMJ, and fiber length, were not influenced by mechanical overloading in all mice. Approximately 0.6% branched fibers were seen in the intact soleus of mdx mice, although these fibers were not detected in WT mice. However, the percentage of these fibers was increased by overloading especially in mdx mice (~50% vs. ~2.5% in WT). In CTX-injected WT mice, these fibers were ~15% with or without overloading. The fiber cross sectional area in normal WT, but not in mdx and CTX-injected WT mice, was increased by overloading (pmuscle damage in mdx mice, but promoted the regeneration in CTX-injected WT mice.

  15. Gene expression in mdx mouse muscle in relation to age and exercise: aberrant mechanical-metabolic coupling and implications for pre-clinical studies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerino, Giulia Maria; Cannone, Maria; Giustino, Arcangela; Massari, Ada Maria; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Cozzoli, Anna; De Luca, Annamaria

    2014-11-01

    Weakness and fatigability are typical features of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and are aggravated in dystrophic mdx mice by chronic treadmill exercise. Mechanical activity modulates gene expression and muscle plasticity. Here, we investigated the outcome of 4 (T4, 8 weeks of age) and 12 (T12, 16 weeks of age) weeks of either exercise or cage-based activity on a large set of genes in the gastrocnemius muscle of mdx and wild-type (WT) mice using quantitative real-time PCR. Basal expression of the exercise-sensitive genes peroxisome-proliferator receptor γ coactivator 1α (Pgc-1α) and Sirtuin1 (Sirt1) was higher in mdx versus WT mice at both ages. Exercise increased Pgc-1α expression in WT mice; Pgc-1α was downregulated by T12 exercise in mdx muscles, along with Sirt1, Pparγ and the autophagy marker Bnip3. Sixteen weeks old mdx mice showed a basal overexpression of the slow Mhc1 isoform and Serca2; T12 exercise fully contrasted this basal adaptation as well as the high expression of follistatin and myogenin. Conversely, T12 exercise was ineffective in WT mice. Damage-related genes such as gp91-phox (NADPH-oxidase2), Tgfβ, Tnfα and c-Src tyrosine kinase were overexpressed in mdx muscles and not affected by exercise. Likewise, the anti-inflammatory adiponectin was lower in T12-exercised mdx muscles. Chronic exercise with minor adaptive effects in WT muscles leads to maladaptation in mdx muscles with a disequilibrium between protective and damaging signals. Increased understanding of the pathways involved in the altered mechanical-metabolic coupling may help guide appropriate physical therapies while better addressing pharmacological interventions in translational research.

  16. Nonmechanical Roles of Dystrophin and Associated Proteins in Exercise, Neuromuscular Junctions, and Brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Nichols

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC is an important structural unit in skeletal muscle that connects the cytoskeleton (f-actin of a muscle fiber to the extracellular matrix (ECM. Several muscular dystrophies, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Becker muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophies (dystroglycanopathies, and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (sarcoglycanopathies, are caused by mutations in the different DGC components. Although many early studies indicated DGC plays a crucial mechanical role in maintaining the structural integrity of skeletal muscle, recent studies identified novel roles of DGC. Beyond a mechanical role, these DGC members play important signaling roles and act as a scaffold for various signaling pathways. For example, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, which is localized at the muscle membrane by DGC members (dystrophin and syntrophins, plays an important role in the regulation of the blood flow during exercise. DGC also plays important roles at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ and in the brain. In this review, we will focus on recently identified roles of DGC particularly in exercise and the brain.

  17. Current understanding of dystrophin-related muscular dystrophy and therapeutic challenges ahead

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Guang-qian; XIE Hui-qi; ZHANG Su-zhen; YANG Zhi-ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective To review the recent research progress in dystrophin-related muscular dystrophy includes X-linked hereditary Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD).Data sources Information included in this article was identified by searches of PUBMED and other online resources using the key terms DMD, dystrophin, mutations, animal models, pathophysiology, gene expression, stem cells, gene therapy, cell therapy, and pharmacological.Study selection Mainly original milestone articles and timely reviews written by major pioneer investigators of the field were selected.Results The key issues related to the genetic basis and pathophysiological factors of the diseases were critically addressed. The availabilities and advantages of various animal models for the diseases were described. Major molecular and cellular therapeutic approaches were also discussed, many of which have indeed exhibited some success in pre-clinical studies but at the same time encountered a number of technical hurdles, including the efficient and systemic delivery of a functional gene and myogenic precursor/stem cells to repair genetic defects.Conclusions Further understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms at molecular levels and regenerative properites of myogenic precursor/stem cells will promote the development of multiple therapeutic strategies. The combined use of multiple strategies may represent the major challenge as well as the greatest hope for the therapy of these diseases in coming years.

  18. Up-regulation of Paxillin and Focal Adhesion Signaling follows Dystroglycan Complex deletions and promotes a Hypertensive State of Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Shamik; Tewari, Manorama; Zajac, Allison; Barton, Elisabeth; Sweeney, H. Lee; Discher, Dennis E.

    2011-01-01

    Anchorage to matrix is mediated for many cells not only by integrin-based focal adhesions but also by a parallel assembly of integral and peripheral membrane proteins known as the Dystroglycan Complex. Deficiencies in either dystrophin (mdx mice) or γ-sarcoglycan (γSG−/− mice) components of the Dystroglycan Complex lead to upregulation of numerous focal adhesion proteins, and the phosphoprotein paxillin proves to be among the most prominent. In mdx muscle, paxillin-Y31 and Y118 are both hyper...

  19. A case of Becker muscular dystrophy resulting from the skipping of four contiguous exons (71-74) of the dystrophin gene during mRNA maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patria, S Y; Alimsardjono, H; Nishio, H; Takeshima, Y; Nakamura, H; Matsuo, M

    1996-07-01

    The mutations in one-third of both Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown because they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. Here we report the first example of multiple exon skipping during the splicing of dystrophin mRNA precursor encoded by an apparently normal dystrophin gene. A 9-year-old Japanese boy exhibiting excessive fatigue and high serum creatine kinase activity was examined for dystrophinopathy. An immunohistochemical study of muscle tissue biopsy disclosed faint and discontinuous staining of the N-terminal and rod domains of dystrophin but no staining at all of the C-terminal domain of dystrophin. The dystrophin transcript from muscle tissue was analyzed by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. An amplified product encompassing exons 67-79 of dystrophin cDNA was found to be smaller than that of the wild-type product. Sequence analysis of this fragment showed that the 3' end of exon 70 was directly connected to the 5' end of exon 75 and, thus, that exons 71-74 were completely absent. As a result, a truncated dystrophin protein lacking 110 amino acids from the C-terminal domain should result from translation of this truncated mRNA, and the patient was diagnosed as having Becker muscular dystrophy at the molecular level. Genomic DNA was analyzed to identify the cause of the disappearance of these exons. Every exon-encompassing region could be amplified from genomic DNA, indicating that the dystrophin gene is intact. Furthermore, sequencing of these amplified products did not disclose any particular nucleotide change that could be responsible for the multiple exon skipping observed. Considering that exons 71-74 are spliced out alternatively in some tissue-specific isoforms, to suppose that the alternative splicing machinery is present in the muscle tissue of the index case and that it is activated by an undetermined mechanism is reasonable. These results illustrate a novel genetic anomaly that

  20. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017 By ATA | Featured , Iodine Deficiency , News Releases , Potassium Iodide (KI) | No Comments IDD NEWSLETTER – February 2017 VOLUME ... 2016 By ATA | Featured , Iodine Deficiency , News Releases , Potassium Iodide (KI) | No Comments IDD NEWSLETTER – November 2015 (PDF ...

  1. Bortezomib (PS-341 treatment decreases inflammation and partially rescues the expression of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in GRMD dogs.

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    Karla P C Araujo

    Full Text Available Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD is a genetic myopathy corresponding to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD in humans. Muscle atrophy is known to be associated with degradation of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In the present study, we investigated the effect of bortezomib treatment on the muscle fibers of GRMD dogs. Five GRMD dogs were examined; two were treated (TD- Treated dogs with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, and three were control dogs (CD. Dogs were treated with bortezomib using the same treatment regimen used for multiple myeloma. Pharmacodynamics were evaluated by measuring the inhibition of 20S proteasome activity in whole blood after treatment and comparing it to that in CD. We performed immunohistochemical studies on muscle biopsy specimens to evaluate the rescue of dystrophin and dystrophin-associated proteins in the muscles of GRMD dogs treated with bortezomib. Skeletal tissue from TD had lower levels of connective tissue deposition and inflammatory cell infiltration than CD as determined by histology, collagen morphometry and ultrastructural analysis. The CD showed higher expression of phospho-NFκB and TGF-β1, suggesting a more pronounced activation of anti-apoptotic factors and inflammatory molecules and greater connective tissue deposition, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that dystrophin was not present in the sarcoplasmic membrane of either group. However, bortezomib-TD showed higher expression of α- and β-dystroglycan, indicating an improved disease histopathology phenotype. Significant inhibition of 20S proteasome activity was observed 1 hour after bortezomib administration in the last cycle when the dose was higher. Proteasome inhibitors may thus improve the appearance of GRMD muscle fibers, lessen connective tissue deposition and reduce the infiltration of inflammatory cells. In addition, proteasome inhibitors may rescue some

  2. Phenotypic improvement of dystrophic muscles by rAAV/microdystrophin vectors is augmented by Igf1 codelivery.

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    Abmayr, Simone; Gregorevic, Paul; Allen, James M; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2005-09-01

    The absence of dystrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to sarcolemmal instability and enhances the susceptibility of muscle fibers to contraction-induced injury. Various viral vectors have been used to deliver mini- and microdystrophin expression cassettes to muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, significantly increasing both the morphological and the functional properties of the muscles. However, dystrophin delivery to adult mdx mice has not yielded a complete rescue of the dystrophic phenotype. Here we investigated a novel strategy involving dual gene transfer of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors expressing either microdystrophin (rAAV-muDys) or a muscle-specific isoform of Igf-1 (rAAV-mIgf-1). Injection of mdx muscles with rAAV-muDys reduced myofiber degeneration and turnover and increased their resistance to mechanical injury, but did not increase muscle mass or force generation. Injection of mdx muscles with rAAV-mIgf-1 led to increased muscle mass, but did not provide protection against mechanical injury or halt myofiber degeneration, leading to loss of the vector over time. In contrast, co-injection of the rAAV-muDys and rAAV-mIgf-1 vectors resulted in increased muscle mass and strength, reduced myofiber degeneration, and increased protection against contraction-induced injury. These results suggest that a dual-gene, combinatorial strategy could enhance the efficacy of gene therapy of DMD.

  3. Quantitative analysis of the dystrophin gene by real-time PCR

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    Maksimovic Nela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD are severe X-linked neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Our aim was to optimize a quantitative real-time PCR method based on SYBR® Green I chemistry for routine diagnostics of DMD/BMD deletion carriers. Twenty female relatives of DMD/BMD patients with previously detected partial gene deletions were studied. The relative quantity of the target exons was calculated by a comparative threshold cycle method (ΔΔCt. The carrier status of all subjects was successfully determined. The gene dosage ratio for non-carriers was 1.07±0.20, and for carriers 0.56±0.11. This assay proved to be simple, rapid, reliable and cost-effective.

  4. The Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex in the Prevention of Muscle Damage

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    Jessica D. Gumerson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are genetically diverse but share common phenotypic features of muscle weakness, degeneration, and progressive decline in muscle function. Previous work has focused on understanding how disruptions in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex result in muscular dystrophy, supporting a hypothesis that the muscle sarcolemma is fragile and susceptible to contraction-induced injury in multiple forms of dystrophy. Although benign in healthy muscle, contractions in dystrophic muscle may contribute to a higher degree of muscle damage which eventually overwhelms muscle regeneration capacity. While increased susceptibility of muscle to mechanical injury is thought to be an important contributor to disease pathology, it is becoming clear that not all DGC-associated diseases share this supposed hallmark feature. This paper outlines experimental support for a function of the DGC in preventing muscle damage and examines the evidence that supports novel functions for this complex in muscle that when impaired, may contribute to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy.

  5. Early cardiac failure in a child with Becker muscular dystrophy is due to an abnormally low amount of dystrophin transcript lacking exon 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, C; Patria, S Y; Nishio, H; Yoshioka, A; Matsuo, M

    1997-12-01

    Two Japanese brothers with Becker muscular dystrophy were shown by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cDNA sequence analysis to produce a dystrophin gene transcript lacking a single exon: that is, number 13. Despite having the same deletion mutation, the brothers showed clearly different clinical phenotypes: the younger brother developed cardiac failure at the age of nine, while the elder brother was asymptomatic. As alternative splicing was not responsible for this clinical difference, the amount of dystrophin transcript was examined by using reverse transcription semi-nested and parallel PCR. The results showed that the amount of the dystrophin transcript in the younger brother was 20% of that of the elder brother. This finding suggested that lesser amount of dystrophin transcript in the younger brother was responsible for the early onset of cardiac failure. This would represent a novel molecular mechanism for dystrophinopathy.

  6. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons

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    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko, E-mail: kxi14@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • Identification of dystrophin (Dp) shortest isoform, Dp40, is a neuron-type Dp. • Dp40 expression is temporally and differentially regulated in comparison to Dp71. • Somatodendritic and nuclear localization of Dp40. • Dp40 is localized to excitatory postsynapses. • Dp40 might play roles in dendritic and synaptic functions. - Abstract: The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions.

  7. New Dystrophin/Dystroglycan interactors control neuron behavior in Drosophila eye

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    Rishko Valentyna M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC is a large multi-component complex that is well known for its function in muscle tissue. When the main components of the DGC, Dystrophin (Dys and Dystroglycan (Dg are affected cognitive impairment and mental retardation in addition to muscle degeneration can occur. Previously we performed an array of genetic screens using a Drosophila model for muscular dystrophy in order to find novel DGC interactors aiming to elucidate the signaling role(s in which the complex is involved. Since the function of the DGC in the brain and nervous system has not been fully defined, we have here continued to analyze the DGC modifiers' function in the developing Drosophila brain and eye. Results Given that disruption of Dys and Dg leads to improper photoreceptor axon projections into the lamina and eye neuron elongation defects during development, we have determined the function of previously screened components and their genetic interaction with the DGC in this tissue. Our study first found that mutations in chif, CG34400, Nrk, Lis1, capt and Cam cause improper axon path-finding and loss of SP2353, Grh, Nrk, capt, CG34400, vimar, Lis1 and Cam cause shortened rhabdomere lengths. We determined that Nrk, mbl, capt and Cam genetically interact with Dys and/or Dg in these processes. It is notable that most of the neuronal DGC interacting components encountered are involved in regulation of actin dynamics. Conclusions Our data indicate possible DGC involvement in the process of cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons. The identification of new components that interact with the DGC not only helps to dissect the mechanism of axon guidance and eye neuron differentiation but also provides a great opportunity for understanding the signaling mechanisms by which the cell surface receptor Dg communicates via Dys with the actin cytoskeleton.

  8. Disaccharidase deficiency.

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    Bayless, T M; Christopher, N L

    1969-02-01

    This review of the literature and current knowledge concerning a nutritional disorder of disaccharidase deficiency discusses the following topics: 1) a description of disorders of disaccharide digestion; 2) some historical perspective on the laboratory and bedside advances in the past 10 years that have helped define a group of these digestive disorders; 3) a classification of conditions causing disaccharide intolerance; and 4) a discussion of some of the specific clinical syndromes emphasizing nutritional consequences of these syndromes. The syndromes described include congenital lactase deficiency, acquired lactase deficiency in teenagers and adults, acquired generalized disaccharidase deficiency secondary to diffuse mucosal damage, acquired lactose intolerance secondary to alterations in the intestinal transit, sucrase-isomaltase deficiencies, and other disease associations connected with lactase deficiency such as colitis.

  9. Myofiber-specific TEAD1 overexpression drives satellite cell hyperplasia and counters pathological effects of dystrophin deficiency

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    Southard, Sheryl; Kim, Ju-Ryoung; Low, SiewHui; Tsika, Richard W; Lepper, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    When unperturbed, somatic stem cells are poised to affect immediate tissue restoration upon trauma. Yet, little is known regarding the mechanistic basis controlling initial and homeostatic ‘scaling’ of stem cell pool sizes relative to their target tissues for effective regeneration. Here, we show that TEAD1-expressing skeletal muscle of transgenic mice features a dramatic hyperplasia of muscle stem cells (i.e. satellite cells, SCs) but surprisingly without affecting muscle tissue size. Super-numeral SCs attain a ‘normal’ quiescent state, accelerate regeneration, and maintain regenerative capacity over several injury-induced regeneration bouts. In dystrophic muscle, the TEAD1 transgene also ameliorated the pathology. We further demonstrate that hyperplastic SCs accumulate non-cell-autonomously via signal(s) from the TEAD1-expressing myofiber, suggesting that myofiber-specific TEAD1 overexpression activates a physiological signaling pathway(s) that determines initial and homeostatic SC pool size. We propose that TEAD1 and its downstream effectors are medically relevant targets for enhancing muscle regeneration and ameliorating muscle pathology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15461.001 PMID:27725085

  10. Functional muscle ischemia in neuronal nitric oxide synthase-deficient skeletal muscle of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

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    Sander, Mikael; Chavoshan, Bahman; Harris, Shannon A.; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Stull, James T.; Thomas, Gail D.; Victor, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by mutation of the gene encoding the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Despite a wealth of recent information about the molecular basis of DMD, effective treatment for this disease does not exist because the mechanism by which dystrophin deficiency produces the clinical phenotype is unknown. In both mouse and human skeletal muscle, dystrophin deficiency results in loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, which normally is localized to the sarcolemma as part of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex. Recent studies in mice suggest that skeletal muscle-derived nitric oxide may play a key role in the regulation of blood flow within exercising skeletal muscle by blunting the vasoconstrictor response to α-adrenergic receptor activation. Here we report that this protective mechanism is defective in children with DMD, because the vasoconstrictor response (measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation) to reflex sympathetic activation was not blunted during exercise of the dystrophic muscles. In contrast, this protective mechanism is intact in healthy children and those with polymyositis or limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, muscle diseases that do not result in loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase. This clinical investigation suggests that unopposed sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising human skeletal muscle may constitute a heretofore unappreciated vascular mechanism contributing to the pathogenesis of DMD. PMID:11087833

  11. Lack of the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1 improves muscle force characteristics and attenuates fibrosis in dystrophic mdx mouse muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinberger, Martin; Föller, Michael; Vogelgesang, Silke

    2015-01-01

    size variations, central nuclei of muscle fibers, fibrosis in the diaphragm, and force reduction by 30–50 %. Muscles from sgk1 -/- mice were histologically overall intact and specific force was only slightly reduced compared to wild-type muscles. Surprisingly, soleus and diaphragm muscles of mdx/sgk1......Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a human genetic disease characterized by fibrosis and severe muscle weakness. Currently, there is no effective treatment available to prevent progressive fibrosis in skeletal muscles. The serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1 regulates a variety...... of physiological functions and participates in fibrosis stimulation. Here, we investigated whether SGK1 influences structure, function and/or fibrosis of the muscles from the mdx mouse, an animal model for DMD. As expected, mdx muscles showed the typical pathological features of muscular dystrophy including fiber...

  12. Chimeric snRNA molecules carrying antisense sequences against the splice junctions of exon 51 of the dystrophin pre-mRNA induce exon skipping and restoration of a dystrophin synthesis in Δ48-50 DMD cells

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    De Angelis, Fernanda Gabriella; Sthandier, Olga; Berarducci, Barbara; Toso, Silvia; Galluzzi, Giuliana; Ricci, Enzo; Cossu, Giulio; Bozzoni, Irene

    2002-01-01

    Deletions and point mutations in the dystrophin gene cause either the severe progressive myopathy Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or the milder Becker muscular dystrophy, depending on whether the translational reading frame is lost or maintained. Because internal in-frame deletions in the protein produce only mild myopathic symptoms, it should be possible, by preventing the inclusion of specific mutated exon(s) in the mature dystrophin mRNA, to restore a partially corrected phenotype. Such control has been previously accomplished by the use of synthetic oligonucleotides; nevertheless, a significant drawback to this approach is caused by the fact that oligonucleotides would require periodic administrations. To circumvent this problem, we have produced several constructs able to express in vivo, in a stable fashion, large amounts of chimeric RNAs containing antisense sequences. In this paper we show that antisense molecules against exon 51 splice junctions are able to direct skipping of this exon in the human DMD deletion 48–50 and to rescue dystrophin synthesis. We also show that the highest skipping activity was found when antisense constructs against the 5′ and 3′ splice sites are coexpressed in the same cell. PMID:12077324

  13. Prolidase deficiency

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    Masood Qazi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolidase deficiency is a rare inborn disorder of collagen metabolism characterized by chronic recurrent skin ulceration. A seven-year-old girl and her younger sibling with clinical features and laboratory criteria fulfilling the diagnosis of prolidase deficiency are presented in view of rarity of the condition.

  14. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected. Howeve

  15. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected. Howeve

  16. Identification of two point mutations and a one base deletion in exon 19 of the dystrophin gene by heteroduplex formation.

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    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Burghes, A H; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartello, C; Mendell, J R

    1993-03-01

    Two thirds of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy population have either gene deletions or duplications. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of point mutations or small deletions and duplications that cannot be easily identified by current strategies. The major obstacle in identifying small mutations is due to the large size of the dystrophin gene. We selectively screened 5 DMD exons containing CpG dinucleotides in 110 DMD patients without detectable deletions or duplications. Nonsenses mutations are frequently due to a C- to -T transition within a CG dinucleotide pair. To screen for the nonsense mutations, we used the heteroduplex method. Utilizing this approach, we identified 2 different nonsense mutations and a single base deletion all occurring in exon 19. This is the first report of a clustering of small mutations in the dystrophin gene.

  17. IFN-γ promotes muscle damage in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by suppressing M2 macrophage activation and inhibiting muscle cell proliferation.

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    Villalta, S Armando; Deng, Bo; Rinaldi, Chiara; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle; Tidball, James G

    2011-11-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a degenerative disorder that leads to death by the third decade of life. Previous investigations have shown that macrophages that invade dystrophic muscle are a heterogeneous population consisting of M1 and M2 macrophages that promote injury and repair, respectively. In the present investigation, we tested whether IFN-γ worsens the severity of mdx dystrophy by activating macrophages to a cytolytic M1 phenotype and by suppressing the activation of proregenerative macrophages to an M2 phenotype. IFN-γ is a strong inducer of the M1 phenotype and is elevated in mdx dystrophy. Contrary to our expectations, null mutation of IFN-γ caused no reduction of cytotoxicity of macrophages isolated from mdx muscle and did not reduce muscle fiber damage in vivo or improve gross motor function of mdx mice at the early, acute peak of pathology. In contrast, ablation of IFN-γ reduced muscle damage in vivo during the regenerative stage of the disease and increased activation of the M2 phenotype and improved motor function of mdx mice at that later stage of the disease. IFN-γ also inhibited muscle cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro, and IFN-γ mutation increased MyoD expression in mdx muscle in vivo, showing that IFN-γ can have direct effects on muscle cells that could impair repair. Taken together, the findings show that suppression of IFN-γ signaling in muscular dystrophy reduces muscle damage and improves motor performance by promoting the M2 macrophage phenotype and by direct actions on muscle cells.

  18. Clinical map document based on XML (cMDX: document architecture with mapping feature for reporting and analysing prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy specimens

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    Bettendorf Olaf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathology report of radical prostatectomy specimens plays an important role in clinical decisions and the prognostic evaluation in Prostate Cancer (PCa. The anatomical schema is a helpful tool to document PCa extension for clinical and research purposes. To achieve electronic documentation and analysis, an appropriate documentation model for anatomical schemas is needed. For this purpose we developed cMDX. Methods The document architecture of cMDX was designed according to Open Packaging Conventions by separating the whole data into template data and patient data. Analogue custom XML elements were considered to harmonize the graphical representation (e.g. tumour extension with the textual data (e.g. histological patterns. The graphical documentation was based on the four-layer visualization model that forms the interaction between different custom XML elements. Sensible personal data were encrypted with a 256-bit cryptographic algorithm to avoid misuse. In order to assess the clinical value, we retrospectively analysed the tumour extension in 255 patients after radical prostatectomy. Results The pathology report with cMDX can represent pathological findings of the prostate in schematic styles. Such reports can be integrated into the hospital information system. "cMDX" documents can be converted into different data formats like text, graphics and PDF. Supplementary tools like cMDX Editor and an analyser tool were implemented. The graphical analysis of 255 prostatectomy specimens showed that PCa were mostly localized in the peripheral zone (Mean: 73% ± 25. 54% of PCa showed a multifocal growth pattern. Conclusions cMDX can be used for routine histopathological reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens and provide data for scientific analysis.

  19. In vitro mouse model in Duchenne muscular dystrophy diagnosis using 50-MHz ultrasound waves.

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    Laux, D; Blasco, H; Ferrandis, J Y; Hugon, G; Despaux, G; Leydier, A; Mornet, D

    2010-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the absence of dystrophin, the protein that plays a key mechanical role in maintaining muscle membrane integrity. One of the major consequences of dystrophin deficiency is the degeneration of muscle fibres, with a progressive loss in muscle strength. The objective of this research was to find an ultrasonic parameter sensitive to DMD, which could give relevant information related to microstructure if compared to traditional investigations such as morphometrical analysis. This "in vitro" study focused on the Mdx mouse model and investigated the potential differences between wild-type and dystrophin-deficient mice diaphragms. Using a 50MHz ultrasonic sensor built in our group, we recorded an increase in ultrasonic wave attenuation in the dystrophin-deficient samples in comparison with normal muscles. A correlation between attenuation, mouse age and the percentage of non-muscular proportion in muscle was observed. As Mdx mouse is the best animal model for DMD and reproduces the degenerative pattern observed in human DMD muscles, this approach could be a powerful tool for in vitro DMD investigation and, more generally, for the characterisation of muscle properties. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. EPA protects against muscle damage in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by promoting a shift from the M1 to M2 macrophage phenotype.

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    Carvalho, Samara Camaçari de; Apolinário, Leticia Montanholi; Matheus, Selma Maria Michelin; Santo Neto, Humberto; Marques, Maria Julia

    2013-11-15

    In dystrophic mdx mice and in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, inflammation contributes to myonecrosis. Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreased inflammation and necrosis in dystrophic muscle. In the present study, we examined the effects of EPA and the corticoid deflazacort (DFZ) as modulators of M1 (iNOS-expressing cells) and M2 (CD206-expressing cells) macrophages. Mdx mice (14 days old) received EPA or DFZ for 16 days. The diaphragm, biceps brachii and quadriceps muscles were studied. Immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and ELISA assays showed that EPA increased interleucin-10, reduced interferon-γ and was more effective than DFZ in promoting a shift from M1 to M2.

  1. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Zhu, Kexian; Cheng, Jason K W; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Yan, Winston X; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Church, George M; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-22

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated, but still functional, protein. In this study, we developed and tested a direct gene-editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored the Dmd reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes, and muscle stem cells after local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle.

  2. Muscle dysfunction and structural defects of dystrophin-null sapje mutant zebrafish larvae are rescued by ataluren treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Andersson-Lendahl, Monika; Sejersen, Thomas; Arner, Anders

    2014-04-01

    Sapje zebrafish carry a mutation in the dystrophin gene, which results in a premature stop codon, and a severe muscle phenotype. They display several of the structural characteristics of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Ataluren (PTC124) is proposed to cause readthrough of premature stop codons and has been introduced as a potential treatment of genetic disorders. Clinical trials in DMD have shown promise, although with complex dose dependency. We have established physiology techniques, enabling high resolution of contractile function in skeletal muscle of zebrafish larvae. We aimed to provide a mechanical analysis of sapje larval muscle and examine effects of ataluren. Homozygous 5 d postfertilization (dpf) sapje larvae exhibited structural defects with 50% decrease in active tension. Ataluren (0.1-1 μM, 3-5 dpf) improved contractile function (~60% improvement of force at 0.5 μM) and dystrophin expression. Controls were not affected. Higher doses (5 μM, 35 μM) impaired contractile function, an effect also observed in controls, suggesting unspecific negative effects at high concentrations. In summary, Sapje larvae exhibit impaired contractile performance and provide a relevant DMD model for functional studies. Ataluren significantly improves skeletal muscle function in the sapje larvae, most likely reflecting an observed increase in dystrophin expression. The bell-shaped dose dependence in sapje resembles that previously reported in clinical DMD studies.

  3. An alpha-catulin homologue controls neuromuscular function through localization of the dystrophin complex and BK channels in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Linu S Abraham

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The large conductance, voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium (BK channel serves as a major negative feedback regulator of calcium-mediated physiological processes and has been implicated in muscle dysfunction and neurological disorders. In addition to membrane depolarization, activation of the BK channel requires a rise in cytosolic calcium. Localization of the BK channel near calcium channels is therefore critical for its function. In a genetic screen designed to isolate novel regulators of the Caenorhabditis elegans BK channel, SLO-1, we identified ctn-1, which encodes an α-catulin homologue with homology to the cytoskeletal proteins α-catenin and vinculin. ctn-1 Mutants resemble slo-1 loss-of-function mutants, as well as mutants with a compromised dystrophin complex. We determined that CTN-1 uses two distinct mechanisms to localize SLO-1 in muscles and neurons. In muscles, CTN-1 utilizes the dystrophin complex to localize SLO-1 channels near L-type calcium channels. In neurons, CTN-1 is involved in localizing SLO-1 to a specific domain independent of the dystrophin complex. Our results demonstrate that CTN-1 ensures the localization of SLO-1 within calcium nanodomains, thereby playing a crucial role in muscles and neurons.

  4. Long-Term Blocking of Calcium Channels in mdx Mice Results in Differential Effects on Heart and Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Blain, Alison; Greally, Elizabeth;

    2011-01-01

    calcium ions to enter the cell. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of chronically blocking calcium channels with the aminoglycoside antibiotic streptomycin from onset of disease in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Treatment in utero onwards delayed onset...... in older mice. However, streptomycin treatment did not show positive effects in diaphragm or heart muscle, and heart pathology was worsened. Thus, blocking calcium channels even before disease onset does not prevent dystrophy, making this an unlikely treatment for DMD. These findings highlight...

  5. Dystrophic changes in extraocular muscles after gamma irradiation in mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice.

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    McDonald, Abby A; Kunz, Matthew D; McLoon, Linda K

    2014-01-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOM) have a strikingly different disease profile than limb skeletal muscles. It has long been known that they are spared in Duchenne (DMD) and other forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, the cause for this sparing is not understood. We have proposed that differences in myogenic precursor cell properties in EOM maintain normal morphology over the lifetime of individuals with DMD due to either greater proliferative potential or greater resistance to injury. This hypothesis was tested by exposing wild type and mdx:utrophin(+/-) (het) mouse EOM and limb skeletal muscles to 18 Gy gamma irradiation, a dose known to inhibit satellite cell proliferation in limb muscles. As expected, over time het limb skeletal muscles displayed reduced central nucleation mirrored by a reduction in Pax7-positive cells, demonstrating a significant loss in regenerative potential. In contrast, in the first month post-irradiation in the het EOM, myofiber cross-sectional areas first decreased, then increased, but ultimately returned to normal compared to non-irradiated het EOM. Central nucleation significantly increased in the first post-irradiation month, resembling the dystrophic limb phenotype. This correlated with decreased EECD34 stem cells and a concomitant increase and subsequent return to normalcy of both Pax7 and Pitx2-positive cell density. By two months, normal het EOM morphology returned. It appears that irradiation disrupts the normal method of EOM remodeling, which react paradoxically to produce increased numbers of myogenic precursor cells. This suggests that the EOM contain myogenic precursor cell types resistant to 18 Gy gamma irradiation, allowing return to normal morphology 2 months post-irradiation. This supports our hypothesis that ongoing proliferation of specialized regenerative populations in the het EOM actively maintains normal EOM morphology in DMD. Ongoing studies are working to define the differences in the myogenic precursor cells

  6. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 0 Iodine Daily Serving now recommended in Multivitamin/Mineral Supplements for Pregnant and Lactating Women By ATA | 2015 News Releases , Iodine Deficiency , News Releases , Thyroid Disease and Pregnancy | No Comments Falls Church, February 10, 2015 —The ...

  7. Elements determination of clinical relevance in biological tissues Dmd{sup mdx}/J dystrophic mice strains investigated by NAA; Determinacao de elementos de relevancia clinica em tecidos biologicos de camundongos distroficos Dmd{sup mdx}/J por AAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metairon, Sabrina

    2012-07-01

    In this work the determination of chemistry elements in biological tissues (whole blood, bones and organs) of dystrophic mice, used as animal model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), was performed using analytical nuclear technique. The aim of this work was to determine reference values of elements of clinical (Ca, Cl, K, Mg, Na) and nutritional (Br and S) relevance in whole blood, tibia, quadriceps and hearts from Dmdmdx/J (10 males and 10 females) dystrophic mice and C57BL/6J (10 males) control group mice, using Neutron Activation Analysis technique (NAA). To show in more details the alterations that this disease may cause in these biological tissues, correlations matrixes of the DMD{sup mdx}/J mouse strain were generated and compared with C57BL/6J control group. For this study 119 samples of biological tissue were irradiated in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN (Sao Paulo, Brazil). The concentrations of these elements in biological tissues of Dmd{sup mdx}/J and C57B/6J mice are the first indicative interval for reference values. Moreover, the alteration in some correlation coefficients data among the elements in the health status and in the diseased status indicates a connection between these elements in whole blood, tibia, quadriceps and heart. These results may help the researchers to evaluate the efficiency of new treatments and to compare the advantages of different treatment approaches before performing tests in patients with muscular dystrophy. (author)

  8. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  9. Genetic modifier screens reveal new components that interact with the Drosophila dystroglycan-dystrophin complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya M Kucherenko

    Full Text Available The Dystroglycan-Dystrophin (Dg-Dys complex has a capacity to transmit information from the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton inside the cell. It is proposed that this interaction is under tight regulation; however the signaling/regulatory components of Dg-Dys complex remain elusive. Understanding the regulation of the complex is critical since defects in this complex cause muscular dystrophy in humans. To reveal new regulators of the Dg-Dys complex, we used a model organism Drosophila melanogaster and performed genetic interaction screens to identify modifiers of Dg and Dys mutants in Drosophila wing veins. These mutant screens revealed that the Dg-Dys complex interacts with genes involved in muscle function and components of Notch, TGF-beta and EGFR signaling pathways. In addition, components of pathways that are required for cellular and/or axonal migration through cytoskeletal regulation, such as Semaphorin-Plexin, Frazzled-Netrin and Slit-Robo pathways show interactions with Dys and/or Dg. These data suggest that the Dg-Dys complex and the other pathways regulating extracellular information transfer to the cytoskeletal dynamics are more intercalated than previously thought.

  10. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH2-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions.

  11. Correlation analysis of inorganic elements in biological tissue if DMD{sup mdx}/J mice using INAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metairon, Sabrina; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Suzuki, Miriam F., E-mail: metairon@usp.b, E-mail: czamboni@ipen.b, E-mail: mfsuzuki@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bueno Junior, Carlos R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias. Centro de Estudos do Genoma Humano; Sant' Anna, Osvaldo A., E-mail: gbrazil@usp.b [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis technique (INAA) has been used to determine Br, Ca, Cl, K, Mg, Na and S concentrations in bone and other organs samples from DMD{sup mdx}/J dystrophic mice as well as C57BL/6J control group mice. The DMD{sup mdx}/J mouse strain is relevant as an experimental model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), which is the most severe and prevalent type of muscular dystrophy. Muscle weakness, premature death and instability of the membrane that involves the muscle fibers - causing functional/structural abnormalities and cell death - are main characteristics of this genetic disease. To show in more details the alterations that this disease may cause in bones (tibiae) and organs (quadriceps and heart), correlations matrixes were generated for both strains permitting a comparison between these groups. A significant change was observed in the analysis of the heart of dystrophic mice suggesting that this dysfunction affects severely the heart muscle. The results emphasize physiologic differences for Na, Ca and Mg and suggest that Br and S results are altered, emphasizing a constant monitoring needs. Other than that, these results may help the researchers to evaluate the efficiency of new treatments and to compare the advantages of different treatment approaches before performing tests in patients with muscular dystrophy. (author)

  12. Insulin-like growth factor-I analogue protects muscles of dystrophic mdx mice from contraction-mediated damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrig, Stefan M; Ryall, James G; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Lynch, Gordon S

    2008-11-01

    Contraction-mediated injury is a major contributing factor to the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy and therefore therapies that can attenuate this type of injury have clinical relevance. Systemic administration of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) has been shown to improve muscle function in dystrophic mdx mice, an effect associated with a shift towards a more oxidative muscle phenotype and a reduced susceptibility to contraction-mediated damage. The actions of IGF-I in vivo are modulated by IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), which generally act to inhibit IGF-I signalling. We tested the hypothesis that an analogue of IGF-I (LR IGF-I), which has significantly reduced binding affinity for IGFBPs, would improve the dystrophic pathology by reducing the susceptibility to muscle injury. Dystrophic mdx and wild-type (C57BL/10) mice were administered LR IGF-I continuously ( approximately 1.5 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) via osmotic mini-pump for 4 weeks. Administration of LR IGF-I reduced the susceptibility of extensor digitorum longus, soleus and diaphragm muscles to contraction damage, as evident from lower force deficits after a protocol of lengthening contractions. In contrast to the mechanism of protection conferred by administration of IGF-I, the protection conferred by LR IGF-I was independent of changes in muscle fatigue and oxidative metabolism. This study further indicates that modulation of IGF-I signalling has therapeutic potential for muscular diseases.

  13. Unloaded speed of shortening in voltage-clamped intact skeletal muscle fibers from wt, mdx, and transgenic minidystrophin mice using a novel high-speed acquisition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, O; Weber, C; von Wegner, F; Chamberlain, J S; Fink, R H A

    2008-06-01

    Skeletal muscle unloaded shortening has been indirectly determined in the past. Here, we present a novel high-speed optical tracking technique that allows recording of unloaded shortening in single intact, voltage-clamped mammalian skeletal muscle fibers with 2-ms time resolution. L-type Ca(2+) currents were simultaneously recorded. The time course of shortening was biexponential: a fast initial phase, tau(1), and a slower successive phase, tau(2,) with activation energies of 59 kJ/mol and 47 kJ/mol. Maximum unloaded shortening speed, v(u,max), was faster than that derived using other techniques, e.g., approximately 14.0 L(0) s(-1) at 30 degrees C. Our technique also allowed direct determination of shortening acceleration. We applied our technique to single fibers from C57 wild-type, dystrophic mdx, and minidystrophin-expressing mice to test whether unloaded shortening was affected in the pathophysiological mechanism of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. v(u,max) and a(u,max) values were not significantly different in the three strains, whereas tau(1) and tau(2) were increased in mdx fibers. The results were complemented by myosin heavy and light chain (MLC) determinations that showed the same myosin heavy chain IIA profiles in the interossei muscles from the different strains. In mdx muscle, MLC-1f was significantly increased and MLC-2f and MLC-3f somewhat reduced. Fast initial active shortening seems almost unaffected in mdx muscle.

  14. CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression in adult mice is associated with extrasynaptic utrophin in skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durko, Margaret; Allen, Carol; Nalbantoglu, Josephine; Karpati, George

    2010-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic muscle disease characterized by the absence of sub-sarcolemmal dystrophin that results in muscle fibre necrosis, progressive muscle wasting and is fatal. Numerous experimental studies with dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, an animal model for the disease, have demonstrated that extrasynaptic upregulation of utrophin, an analogue of dystrophin, can prevent muscle fibre deterioration and reduce or negate the dystrophic phenotype. A different approach for ectopic expression of utrophin relies on augmentation of CT-GalNAc transferase in muscle fibre. We investigated whether CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression in adult mice influence appearance of utrophin in the extrasynaptic sarcolemma. After electrotransfer of plasmid DNA carrying an expression cassette of CT-GalNAc transferase into tibialis anterior muscle of wild type and dystrophic mice, muscle sections were examined by immunofluorescence. CT-GalNAc transgene expression augmented sarcolemmal carbohydrate glycosylation and was accompanied by extrasynaptic utrophin. A 6-week time course study showed that the highest efficiency of utrophin overexpression in a plasmid harboured muscle fibres was 32.2% in CD-1 and 52% in mdx mice, 2 and 4 weeks after CT-GalNAc gene transfer, respectively. The study provides evidence that postnatal CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression stimulates utrophin upregulation that is inherently beneficial for muscle structure and strength restoration. Thus CT-GalNAc may provide an important therapeutic molecule for treatment of dystrophin deficiency in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  15. In vivo anisotropic mechanical properties of dystrophic skeletal muscles measured by anisotropic MR elastographic imaging: the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Eric C; Jugé, Lauriane; Lambert, Simon A; Paradis, Valérie; Sinkus, Ralph; Bilston, Lynne E

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the utility of mechanical anisotropy (shear storage modulus parallel to fiber/shear storage modulus perpendicular to fiber) measured by combined magnetic resonance (MR) elastography and diffusion-tensor imaging ( DTI diffusion-tensor imaging ) technique (anisotropic MR elastography) to distinguish between healthy and necrotic muscle with different degrees of muscle necrosis in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. The experimental protocol was approved by the regional animal ethics committee. Twenty-one mdx and 21 wild-type ( WT wild type ) mice were used in our study. Animals were divided into exercised and sedentary groups. Anisotropic MR elastography was used to obtain mechanical anisotropic shear moduli for the lateral gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles in a 7-T MR imager, from which the mechanical anisotropic ratio was calculated. The animals were imaged before and after 10 weeks of a horizontal treadmill running protocol. Spearman rank correlations were used to compare MR elastographic data with muscle necrotic area percentage from histologic analysis. Mechanical anisotropy in WT wild type and mdx mice muscle were compared by using t test and one-way analysis of variance, and receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed by using statistical software. Anisotropic MR elastography was able to be used to distinguish between the muscles of mdx and WT wild type mice, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.8. Strong negative correlation (rs = -0.701; P mechanical anisotropic ratio and the percentage of muscle necrotic area was found. By comparing mice with no or mild (0%-5% mean necrotic area) and severe (>5% mean necrotic area) muscle necrosis, an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.964 was achieved. Diffusion parameters alone were unable to distinguish between the WT wild type and mdx mice at any time point. The mechanical anisotropic ratio of the shear storage moduli measured by

  16. Overexpression of Galgt2 in skeletal muscle prevents injury resulting from eccentric contractions in both mdx and wild-type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul T; Xu, Rui; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Oglesbay, Elaine; Camboni, Marybeth; Montgomery, Chrystal L; Shontz, Kim; Chicoine, Louis G; Clark, K Reed; Sahenk, Zarife; Mendell, Jerry R; Janssen, Paul M L

    2009-03-01

    The cytotoxic T cell (CT) GalNAc transferase, or Galgt2, is a UDP-GalNAc:beta1,4-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase that is localized to the neuromuscular synapse in adult skeletal muscle, where it creates the synaptic CT carbohydrate antigen {GalNAcbeta1,4[NeuAc(orGc)alpha2, 3]Galbeta1,4GlcNAcbeta-}. Overexpression of Galgt2 in the skeletal muscles of transgenic mice inhibits the development of muscular dystrophy in mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we provide physiological evidence as to how Galgt2 may inhibit the development of muscle pathology in mdx animals. Both Galgt2 transgenic wild-type and mdx skeletal muscles showed a marked improvement in normalized isometric force during repetitive eccentric contractions relative to nontransgenic littermates, even using a paradigm where nontransgenic muscles had force reductions of 95% or more. Muscles from Galgt2 transgenic mice, however, showed a significant decrement in normalized specific force and in hindlimb and forelimb grip strength at some ages. Overexpression of Galgt2 in muscles of young adult mdx mice, where Galgt2 has no effect on muscle size, also caused a significant decrease in force drop during eccentric contractions and increased normalized specific force. A comparison of Galgt2 and microdystrophin overexpression using a therapeutically relevant intravascular gene delivery protocol showed Galgt2 was as effective as microdystrophin at preventing loss of force during eccentric contractions. These experiments provide a mechanism to explain why Galgt2 overexpression inhibits muscular dystrophy in mdx muscles. That overexpression also prevents loss of force in nondystrophic muscles suggests that Galgt2 is a therapeutic target with broad potential applications.

  17. Cobalamin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Wolfgang; Obeid, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B12) consists of a corrinoid structure with cobalt in the centre of the molecule. Neither humans nor animals are able to synthesize this vitamin. Foods of animal source are the only natural source of cobalamin in human diet. There are only two enzymatic reactions in mammalian cells that require cobalamin as cofactor. Methylcobolamin is a cofactor for methionine synthase. The enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA-mutase requires adenosylcobalamin as a cofactor. Therefore, serum concentrations of homocysteine (tHcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) will increase in cobalamin deficiency. The cobalamin absorption from diet is a complex process that involves different proteins: haptocorrin, intrinsic factor and transcobalamin (TC). Cobalamin that is bound to TC is called holotranscobalamin (holoTC) which is the metabolically active vitamin B12 fraction. HoloTC consists 6 and 20% of total cobalamin whereas 80% of total serum cobalamin is bound to another binding protein, haptocorrin. Cobalamin deficiency is common worldwide. Cobalamin malabsorption is common in elderly subjects which might explain low vitamin status. Subjects who ingest low amount of cobalamin like vegetarians develop vitamin deficiency. No single parameter can be used to diagnose cobalamin deficiency. Total serum cobalamin is neither sensitive nor it is specific for cobalamin deficiency. This might explain why many deficient subjects would be overlooked by utilizing total cobalamin as status marker. Concentration of holotranscobalamin (holoTC) in serum is an earlier marker that becomes decreased before total serum cobalamin. Concentrations of MMA and tHcy increase in blood of cobalamin deficient subjects. Despite limitations of these markers in patients with renal dysfunction, concentrations of MMA and tHcy are useful functional markers of cobalamin status. The combined use of holoTC and MMA assays may better indicate cobalamin status than either of them. Because Cbl deficiency is a risk factor

  18. Distribution of dystrophin- and utrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC/UAPC) in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teniente-De Alba, Carmen; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Vivanco-Calixto, Raúl; Galván, Iván J; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Cerecedo, Doris

    2011-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are defined by their cardinal properties, such as sustained proliferation, multilineage differentiation, and self-renewal, which give rise to a hierarchy of progenitor populations with more restricted potential lineage, ultimately leading to the production of all types of mature blood cells. HSC are anchored by cell adhesion molecules to their specific microenvironment, thus regulating their cell cycle, while cell migration is essentially required for seeding the HSC of the fetal bone marrow (BM) during development as well as in adult BM homeostasis. The dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) is a large group of membrane-associated proteins linking the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and exhibiting scaffolding, adhesion, and signaling roles in muscle and non-muscle cells including mature blood cells. Because adhesion and migration are mechanisms that influence the fate of the HSC, we explored the presence and the feasible role of DAPC. In this study, we characterized the pattern expression by immunoblot technique and, by confocal microscopy analysis, the cellular distribution of dystrophin and utrophin gene products, and the dystrophin-associated proteins (α-, β-dystroglycan, α-syntrophin, α-dystrobrevin) in relation to actin filaments in freshly isolated CD34+ cells from umbilical cord blood. Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the presence of Dp71d/Dp71Δ110m ∼DAPC and Up400/Up140∼DAPC. The subcellular distribution of the two DAPC in actin-based structures suggests their dynamic participation in adhesion and cell migration. In addition, the particular protein pattern expression found in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells might be indicative of their feasible participation during differentiation.

  19. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N

    2006-01-01

    We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood...

  20. Screening the dystrophin gene suggests a high rate of polymorphism in general but no exonic deletions in schizophrenics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindor, N.M.; Sobell, J.L.; Thibodeau, S.N. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-15

    The dystrophin gene, located at chromosome Xp21, was evaluated as a candidate gene in chronic schizophrenia in response to the report of a large family in which schizophrenia cosegregated with Becker muscular dystrophy. Genomic DNA from 94 men with chronic schizophrenia was evaluated by Southern blot analysis using cDNA probes that span exons 1-59. No exonic deletions were identified. An unexpectedly high rate of polymorphism was calculated in this study and two novel polymorphisms were found, demonstrating the usefulness of the candidate gene approach even when results of the original study are negative. 41 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. Sensitivity and Frequencies of Dystrophin Gene Mutations in Thai DMD/BMD Patients As Detected by Multiplex PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanyachai Sura

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, a lethal X-linked disease affecting 1 in 3500 male births, and its more benign variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, are caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Because of its large size, analysing the whole gene is impractical. Methods have been developed to detect the commonest mutations i.e. the deletions of the exons. Although these tests are highly specific, their sensitivity is inherently limited by the prevalence of deletions, which differs among different populations.

  2. Identification of muscle necrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyen, Blake R.; Shavlakadze, Thea; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-07-01

    Three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) was used to image the structure and pathology of skeletal muscle tissue from the treadmill-exercised mdx mouse model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of excised muscle samples were compared with co-registered hematoxylin and eosin-stained and Evans blue dye fluorescence histology. We show, for the first time, structural 3D-OCT images of skeletal muscle dystropathology well correlated with co-located histology. OCT could identify morphological features of interest and necrotic lesions within the muscle tissue samples based on intrinsic optical contrast. These findings demonstrate the utility of 3D-OCT for the evaluation of small-animal skeletal muscle morphology and pathology, particularly for studies of mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

  3. DESREGULACION DE LA ACTIVIDAD DEL FACTOR DE TRANSCRIPCION NF-KB MEDIADA POR CALCIO EN CELULAS MUSCULARES DISTROFICAS MDX

    OpenAIRE

    ALTAMIRANO FULLA, FRANCISCO JAVIER; ALTAMIRANO FULLA; FRANCISCO JAVIER

    2012-01-01

    La Distrofia Muscular de Duchenne (DMD) es una enfermedad genética recesiva,ligada al cromosoma X, que afecta a 1 de cada 3500 hombres nacidos. La causa de esta enfermedad es la mutación del gen de la distrofina en humanos y en ratones mdx (modelo animal de DMD). La DMD es una enfermedad progresiva que se caracteriza por daños en la membrana de las fibras musculares, infiltración de células inmunes en el músculo,inflamación crónica, daño de sarcómeros, muerte celular y degeneración severa del...

  4. Deletion analysis of the dystrophin gene in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients: Use in carrier diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari D

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The dystrophin gene was analyzed in 8 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and 10 Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD unrelated families (22 subjects: 18 index cases and 4 sibs for the presence of deletions by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR; 27 exons and Southern hybridization using 8 cDMD probes. Deletions were identified in 5 DMD and 7 BMD patients (6 index cases and 1 sib. The concordance between the clinical phenotype and 'reading frame hypothesis' was observed in 11/12 patients (92%. The female relatives of DMD/BMD patients with identifiable deletions were examined by quantitative mPCR. Carriers were identified in 7 families. We also describe a variation in the HindIII pattern with cDNA probe 8 and 11-14. Molecular characterization of the dystrophin gene in this study has been helpful in advising the patients concerning the inheritance of the condition, and carrier diagnosis of female relatives, and should also prove useful for prenatal diagnosis.

  5. 免疫组织化学dystrophin染色诊断Duchenne型肌营养不良症的研究%Diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy through dystrophin expression detection by immunohistochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鹏; 沈定国

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨Duchenne型肌营养不良症(DMD)肌萎缩蛋白(dystrophin)表达规律和临床意义.方法 收集我院7例DMD患者作为试验组,7例非DMD患者为对照组.使用抗dystrophin杆状结构域单抗、免疫组织化学染色,观察肌膜dystrophin表达.结果 7例DMD患者肌细胞膜dystrophin阴性,7例非DMD患者dystrophin染色阳性.结论 证实DMD患者肌细胞膜dystrophin表达阴性,揭示dystrophin缺失是其发病机制,可以作为确诊DMD手段,对临床诊断DMD有实际意义.%Objective To study dystrophin expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and non-DMD patients. Methods With immunohistochemistry method, using monoclonal antibody of dystrophin, expression of dystrophin was analyzed in 7 DMD patients (experimental group)and 7 non-DMD patients (control group). Results In 7 non-DMD patients, uniform and continuous dystrophin expression was found along the sarolemma, while not in 7 DMD patients. Conclusions Dystrophin expression in myocyte membrane is negative in DMD patients, which indicates that dystrophin loss may be involved in the pathogenesis of DMD. It can be used as a "gold standard" in diagnosing DMD.

  6. More deletions in the 5{prime} region than in the central region of the dystrophin gene were identified among Filipino Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-06

    This report describes mutations in the dystrophin gene and the frequency of these mutations in Filipino pedigrees with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD). The findings suggest the presence of genetic variability among DMD/BMD patients in different populations. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Absence of Dystrophin Disrupts Skeletal Muscle Signaling: Roles of Ca2+, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Nitric Oxide in the Development of Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David G; Whitehead, Nicholas P; Froehner, Stanley C

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin is a long rod-shaped protein that connects the subsarcolemmal cytoskeleton to a complex of proteins in the surface membrane (dystrophin protein complex, DPC), with further connections via laminin to other extracellular matrix proteins. Initially considered a structural complex that protected the sarcolemma from mechanical damage, the DPC is now known to serve as a scaffold for numerous signaling proteins. Absence or reduced expression of dystrophin or many of the DPC components cause the muscular dystrophies, a group of inherited diseases in which repeated bouts of muscle damage lead to atrophy and fibrosis, and eventually muscle degeneration. The normal function of dystrophin is poorly defined. In its absence a complex series of changes occur with multiple muscle proteins showing reduced or increased expression or being modified in various ways. In this review, we will consider the various proteins whose expression and function is changed in muscular dystrophies, focusing on Ca(2+)-permeable channels, nitric oxide synthase, NADPH oxidase, and caveolins. Excessive Ca(2+) entry, increased membrane permeability, disordered caveolar function, and increased levels of reactive oxygen species are early changes in the disease, and the hypotheses for these phenomena will be critically considered. The aim of the review is to define the early damage pathways in muscular dystrophy which might be appropriate targets for therapy designed to minimize the muscle degeneration and slow the progression of the disease.

  8. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  9. Identification of a novel first exon in the human dystrophin gene and of a new promoter located more than 500 kb upstream of the nearest known promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagawa, H.; Nishio, H.; Takeshima, Y. [Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The dystrophin gene, which is muted in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies, is the largest known human gene. Five alternative promoters have been characterized until now. Here we show that a novel dystrophin isoform with a different first exon can be produced through transcription initiation at a previously-unidentified alternative promoter. The case study presented is that of patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who had a deletion extending from 5{prime} end of the dystrophin gene to exon 2, including all promoters previously mapped in the 5{prime} part of the gene. Transcripts from lymphoblastoid cells were found to contain sequences corresponding to exon 3, indicating the presence of new promoter upstream of this exon. The nucleotide sequence of amplified cDNA corresponding to the 5{prime} end of the new transcript indicated that the 5{prime} end of exon 3 was extended by 9 codons, only the last (most 3{prime}) of which codes for methionine. The genomic nucleotide sequence upstream from the new exon, as determined using inverse polymerase chain reaction, revealed the presence of sequences similar to a TATA box, an octamer motif and an MEF-2 element. The identified promoter/exon did not map to intron 2, as might have been expected, but to a position more than 500 kb upstream of the most 5{prime} of the previously-identified promoters, thereby adding 500 kb to the dystrophin gene. The sequence of part of the new promoter region is very similar to that of certain medium reiteration frequency repetitive sequences. These findings may help us understand the molecular evolution of the dystrophin gene.

  10. Distribution of components of basal lamina and dystrophin-dystroglycan complex in the rat pineal gland: differences from the brain tissue and between the subdivisions of the gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagyura, Zsolt; Pócsai, Károly; Kálmán, Mihály

    2010-01-01

    The pineal gland is an evagination of the brain tissue, a circumventricular neuroendocrine organ. Our immunohistochemical study investigates basal lamina components (laminin, agrin, perlecan, fibronectin), their receptor, the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex (beta-dystroglycan, dystrophin utrophin), aquaporins (-4,-9) and cellular markers (S100, neurofilament, GFAP, glutamine synthetase) in the adult rat corpus pineale. The aim was to compare the immunohistochemical features of the cerebral and pineal vessels and their environment, and to compare their features in the distal and proximal subdivisions of the so-called 'superficial pineal gland'. In contrast to the cerebral vessels, pineal vessels proved to be immunonegative to alpha1-dystrobrevin, but immunoreactive to laminin. An inner, dense, and an outer, loose layer of laminin as two basal laminae were present. The gap between them contained agrin and perlecan. Basal lamina components enmeshed the pinealocytes, too. Components of dystrophin-dystroglycan complex were also distributed along the vessels. Dystrophin, utrophin and agrin gave a 'patchy' distribution rather than a continuous one. The vessels were interconnected by wing-like structures, composed of basal lamina-components: a delicate network forming nests for cells. Cells immunostained with glutamine synthetase, S100-protein or neurofilament protein contacted the vessels, as well as GFAP- or aquaporin-immunostained astrocytes. Within the body a smaller, proximal, GFAP-and aquaporin-containing subdivision, and a larger, distal, GFAP-and aquaporin-free subdivision could be distinguished. The vascular localization of agrin and utrophin, as well as dystrophin, delineated vessels unequally, preferring the proximal or distal end of the body, respectively.

  11. The physiological effects of IGF-1 (class 1:Ea transgene) over-expression on exercise-induced damage and adaptation in dystrophic muscles of mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgley, James A; Pinniger, Gavin J; Hamer, Peter W; Grounds, Miranda D

    2009-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder in which muscle weakness and fragility contribute to ongoing muscle degeneration. Although exercise-induced muscle damage is associated with adaptation that protects normal muscle from further damage, exploiting this process to protect dystrophic muscle has been avoided for fear of inducing excessive muscle degeneration. However, muscle-specific over-expression of the class 1:Ea isoform of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) reduces myofibre necrosis in dystrophic mdx mice (a model for DMD) and, therefore, may enhance the adaptation process in response to eccentric exercise. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the effect of transgenic class 1:Ea IGF-1 over-expression on the susceptibility to muscle damage and subsequent adaptation in 12-week-old dystrophic mdx and non-dystrophic control mice. Experiments were conducted in vivo using a custom-built isokinetic mouse dynamometer to measure the deficit in joint torque (indicating muscle damage) after 20 maximal lengthening (eccentric) contractions. Adaptation to this damaging exercise was evaluated by repeating the protocol 7 days after the initial exercise. The over-expression of IGF-1 significantly increased the normalised joint torque in non-dystrophic mice and appeared to ameliorate the muscle weakness in dystrophic mice. All mice displayed a marked reduction in the susceptibility to muscle damage on day 7; however, this adaptation was unaffected by IGF-1, showing that IGF-1 does not protect the dystrophic muscles of adult mdx mice against damage resulting from maximal lengthening contractions.

  12. Evaluation of point mutations in dystrophin gene in Iranian Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients: introducing three novel variants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MARYAM HAGHSHENAS; MOHAMMAD TAGHI AKBARI; SHOHREH ZARE KARIZI; FARAVAREH KHORDADPOOR DEILAMANI; SHAHRIAR NAFISSI; ZIVAR SALEHI

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked neuromuscular diseases characterized by progres-sive muscular weakness and degeneration of skeletal muscles. Approximately two-thirds of the patients have large deletionsor duplications in the dystrophin gene and the remaining one-third have point mutations. This study was performed to eval-uate point mutations in Iranian DMD/BMD male patients. A total of 29 DNA samples from patients who did not show anylarge deletion/duplication mutations following multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex ligation-dependentprobe amplification (MLPA) screening were sequenced for detection of point mutations in exons 50–79. Also exon 44 wassequenced in one sample in which a false positive deletion was detected by MLPA method. Cycle sequencing revealed fournonsense, one frameshift and two splice site mutations as well as two missense variants

  13. Evaluation of point mutations in dystrophin gene in Iranian Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients: introducing three novel variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghshenas, Maryam; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Karizi, Shohreh Zare; Deilamani, Faravareh Khordadpoor; Nafissi, Shahriar; Salehi, Zivar

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked neuromuscular diseases characterized by progressive muscular weakness and degeneration of skeletal muscles. Approximately two-thirds of the patients have large deletions or duplications in the dystrophin gene and the remaining one-third have point mutations. This study was performed to evaluate point mutations in Iranian DMD/BMD male patients. A total of 29 DNA samples from patients who did not show any large deletion/duplication mutations following multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) screening were sequenced for detection of point mutations in exons 50-79. Also exon 44 was sequenced in one sample in which a false positive deletion was detected by MLPA method. Cycle sequencing revealed four nonsense, one frameshift and two splice site mutations as well as two missense variants.

  14. Deletion of exon 26 of the dystrophin gene is associated with a mild Becker muscular dystrophy phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten; Vissing, John

    2011-01-01

    calf hypertrophy was noted. Creatine kinase was normal or raised maximally to 500 U/l. The muscle biopsy was myopathic with increased fiber size variation and many internal nuclei, but no dystrophy. No comorbidity was found. In both cases, western blot showed a reduced dystrophin band. Genetic...... associated with an exon 26 deletion. The proband, a 23-year-old man, had slightly delayed motor milestones, walking 1 1/2 years old. He had no complaints of muscle weakness, but had muscle pain. Clinical examination revealed no muscle wasting or loss of power, but his CK was 1500-7000 U/l. Muscle biopsy...... showed dystrophic changes. He had comorbidity with dystonia, slight mental retardation, low stature and neuropathy. The brother of the proband's mother came to medical attention when he was 43 years old. He complained about muscle pain. On examination, a MRC grade 4+ hip extention palsy and a discrete...

  15. Deletion of exon 26 of the dystrophin gene is associated with a mild Becker muscular dystrophy phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten; Vissing, John

    2011-01-01

    calf hypertrophy was noted. Creatine kinase was normal or raised maximally to 500 U/l. The muscle biopsy was myopathic with increased fiber size variation and many internal nuclei, but no dystrophy. No comorbidity was found. In both cases, western blot showed a reduced dystrophin band. Genetic...... associated with an exon 26 deletion. The proband, a 23-year-old man, had slightly delayed motor milestones, walking 1 1/2 years old. He had no complaints of muscle weakness, but had muscle pain. Clinical examination revealed no muscle wasting or loss of power, but his CK was 1500-7000 U/l. Muscle biopsy...... showed dystrophic changes. He had comorbidity with dystonia, slight mental retardation, low stature and neuropathy. The brother of the proband's mother came to medical attention when he was 43 years old. He complained about muscle pain. On examination, a MRC grade 4+ hip extention palsy and a discrete...

  16. Ocular and neurodevelopmental features of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a signature of dystrophin function in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotti, Valeria; Jägle, Herbert; Theodorou, Maria; Moore, Anthony T; Muntoni, Francesco; Thompson, Dorothy A

    2016-04-01

    Multiple isoforms of dystrophin (Dp427, Dp260, Dp140, Dp71) are expressed differentially in the central nervous system (CNS) including the retinal layers. Disruption of these protein products is responsible for cognitive dysfunction, electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities and behavioural disorders in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We studied the ocular characteristics and neuropsychiatric profile of 16 DMD boys. The ISCEV standard, full-field flash ERGs were assessed. Intellectual ability and behavioural disturbances were measured. All genotypes were associated with mildly abnormal photopic ERG a:b-wave amplitude ratios. In addition, we identified the following genotype/phenotype correlations: boys with mutations upstream of exon 30 (ie, isolated Dp427 altered expression) showed normal scotopic a:b ratios, abnormal photopic oscillatory potential OP2 and normal scotopic OP2. Conversely, all boys with DMD mutations downstream of exon 30 showed profoundly 'negative' scotopic ERGs (a:b ratios >1). In these patients, the involvement of Dp260 isoform resulted in the absence of slow rod pathway signalling in15 Hz scotopic flicker ERGs. These boys had abnormal scotopic OP2 and normal photopic OP2. Finally, children with mutations also affecting Dp71 were associated with more pronounced electronegative ERGs. When correlating ERGs to neurodevelopmental outcome, we found a positive correlation between negative scotopic ERGs and neurodevelopmental disturbances, and the most severe findings were in boys with Dp71 disruption. These findings suggest a strong association between DMD mutations affecting different DMD isoforms with characteristically abnormal scotopic ERGs and severe neurodevelopmental problems. The role of the ERG as a potential biomarker for dystrophin function in the CNS and response to novel genetic therapies warrants further exploration.

  17. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency anemia, Susan got ...

  19. Enhanced currents through L-type calcium channels in cardiomyocytes disturb the electrophysiology of the dystrophic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Obermair, Gerald J; Cervenka, Rene; Dang, Xuan B; Lukacs, Peter; Kummer, Stefan; Bittner, Reginald E; Kubista, Helmut; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2014-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), induced by mutations in the gene encoding for the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, is an inherited disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Besides the relatively well characterized skeletal muscle degenerative processes, DMD is also associated with cardiac complications. These include cardiomyopathy development and cardiac arrhythmias. The current understanding of the pathomechanisms in the heart is very limited, but recent research indicates that dysfunctional ion channels in dystrophic cardiomyocytes play a role. The aim of the present study was to characterize abnormalities in L-type calcium channel function in adult dystrophic ventricular cardiomyocytes. By using the whole cell patch-clamp technique, the properties of currents through calcium channels in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from the hearts of normal and dystrophic adult mice were compared. Besides the commonly used dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse model for human DMD, we also used mdx-utr mice, which are both dystrophin- and utrophin-deficient. We found that calcium channel currents were significantly increased, and channel inactivation was reduced in dystrophic cardiomyocytes. Both effects enhance the calcium influx during an action potential (AP). Whereas the AP in dystrophic mouse cardiomyocytes was nearly normal, implementation of the enhanced dystrophic calcium conductance in a computer model of a human ventricular cardiomyocyte considerably prolonged the AP. Finally, the described dystrophic calcium channel abnormalities entailed alterations in the electrocardiograms of dystrophic mice. We conclude that gain of function in cardiac L-type calcium channels may disturb the electrophysiology of the dystrophic heart and thereby cause arrhythmias.

  20. Up-regulation of miR-31 in human atrial fibrillation begets the arrhythmia by depleting dystrophin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Recalde, Alice; Muszkiewicz, Anna; Jayaram, Raja; Carena, Maria Cristina; Wijesurendra, Rohan; Stefanini, Matilde; Surdo, Nicoletta C.; Lomas, Oliver; Ratnatunga, Chandana; Sayeed, Rana; Krasopoulos, George; Rajakumar, Timothy; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Verheule, Sander; Fulga, Tudor A.; Rodriguez, Blanca; Schotten, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a growing public health burden, and its treatment remains a challenge. AF leads to electrical remodeling of the atria, which in turn promotes AF maintenance and resistance to treatment. Although remodeling has long been a therapeutic target in AF, its causes remain poorly understood. We show that atrial-specific up-regulation of microRNA-31 (miR-31) in goat and human AF depletes neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by accelerating mRNA decay and alters nNOS subcellular localization by repressing dystrophin translation. By shortening action potential duration and abolishing rate-dependent adaptation of the action potential duration, miR-31 overexpression and/or disruption of nNOS signaling recapitulates features of AF-induced remodeling and significantly increases AF inducibility in mice in vivo. By contrast, silencing miR-31 in atrial myocytes from patients with AF restores dystrophin and nNOS and normalizes action potential duration and its rate dependency. These findings identify atrial-specific up-regulation of miR-31 in human AF as a key mechanism causing atrial dystrophin and nNOS depletion, which in turn contributes to the atrial phenotype begetting this arrhythmia. miR-31 may therefore represent a potential therapeutic target in AF. PMID:27225184

  1. Precise Correction of the Dystrophin Gene in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patient Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Lisa Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a severe muscle-degenerative disease caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. Genetic correction of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs by TALENs or CRISPR-Cas9 holds promise for DMD gene therapy; however, the safety of such nuclease treatment must be determined. Using a unique k-mer database, we systematically identified a unique target region that reduces off-target sites. To restore the dystrophin protein, we performed three correction methods (exon skipping, frameshifting, and exon knockin in DMD-patient-derived iPSCs, and found that exon knockin was the most effective approach. We further investigated the genomic integrity by karyotyping, copy number variation array, and exome sequencing to identify clones with a minimal mutation load. Finally, we differentiated the corrected iPSCs toward skeletal muscle cells and successfully detected the expression of full-length dystrophin protein. These results provide an important framework for developing iPSC-based gene therapy for genetic disorders using programmable nucleases.

  2. Cellular trafficking determines the exon skipping activity of Pip6a-PMO in mdx skeletal and cardiac muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Taavi; Castillo Alvarez, Alejandra; Gauck, Sarah; Gait, Michael J; Coursindel, Thibault; Wood, Matthew J A; Lebleu, Bernard; Boisguerin, Prisca

    2014-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) has shown great promise for exon-skipping therapy of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Pip6a-PMO, a recently developed conjugate, is particularly efficient in a murine DMD model, although mechanisms responsible for its increased biological activity have not been studied. Here, we evaluate the cellular trafficking and the biological activity of Pip6a-PMO in skeletal muscle cells and primary cardiomyocytes. Our results indicate that Pip6a-PMO is taken up in the skeletal muscle cells by an energy- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, its cellular distribution is different in undifferentiated and differentiated skeletal muscle cells (vesicular versus nuclear). Likewise, Pip6a-PMO mainly accumulates in cytoplasmic vesicles in primary cardiomyocytes, in which clathrin-mediated endocytosis seems to be the pre-dominant uptake pathway. These differences in cellular trafficking correspond well with the exon-skipping data, with higher activity in myotubes than in myoblasts or cardiomyocytes. These differences in cellular trafficking thus provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the variations in exon-skipping activity and restoration of dystrophin protein in heart muscle compared with skeletal muscle tissues in DMD models. Overall, Pip6a-PMO appears as the most efficient conjugate to date (low nanomolar EC50), even if limitations remain from endosomal escape.

  3. Comparative study of inorganic elements determined in whole blood from Dmd(mdx)/J mice strain by EDXRF and NAA analytical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redígolo, M M; Sato, I M; Metairon, S; Zamboni, C B

    2016-04-01

    Several diseases can be diagnosed observing the variation of specific elements concentration in body fluids. In this study the concentration of inorganic elements in blood samples of dystrophic (Dmd(mdx)/J) and C57BL/6J (control group) mice strain were determined. The results obtained from Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) were compared with Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. Both analytical techniques showed to be appropriate and complementary offering a new contribution for veterinary medicine as well as detailed knowledge of this pathology.

  4. Poly(ester amine) Composed of Polyethylenimine and Pluronic Enhance Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides In Vitro and in Dystrophic mdx Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Mingxing; Wu, Bo; Tucker, Jason D; Bollinger, Lauren E; Lu, Peijuan; Lu, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    A series of poly(esteramine)s (PEAs) constructed from low molecular weight polyethyleneimine (LPEI) and Pluronic were evaluated for the delivery of antisense oligonuclotides (AOs), 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate RNA (2′-OMePS) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) in cell culture and dystrophic mdx mice. Improved exon-skipping efficiency of both 2′-OMePS and PMO was observed in the C2C12E50 cell line with all PEA polymers compared with PEI 25k or LF-2k. The degree of efficiency was f...

  5. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Anouk de Bruyn; Yves Jacquemyn; Kristof Kinget; François Eyskens

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, su...

  6. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification for rapid detection of deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are X-linked disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The majority of recognized mutations are copy number changes of individual exons. The objective of the present study was to assess the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) effects of detection of gene mutations. Methods: Samples of 20 control males and 80 males and their mothers referred to our diagnostic facility on the clinical suspicion of DMD or BMD were tested by MLPA and multiplex PCR. Results: The mean DQs for all peak of 20 control male samples was 1.02 (range from 0.83 to 1.21) by MLPA. Deletions or duplications were identified in 6 out of 31 families that had been previously tested as negative by multiplex PCR. One case of complex rearrangement involving a duplication of two regions: dupEX3-9 and dupEX 17-41 were found by MLPA. Conclusions: MLPA is a highly sensitive method and rapid alternative to multiplex PCR for detection of DMD and BMD.

  7. Absence of Dystrophin Related Protein-2 disrupts Cajal bands in a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Kathryn M; Bai, Yunhong; Pisciotta, Chiara; Wang, Suola; Feely, Shawna M E; Hoegger, Mark; Gutmann, Laurie; Moore, Steven A; Gonzalez, Michael; Sherman, Diane L; Brophy, Peter J; Züchner, Stephan; Shy, Michael E

    2015-10-01

    Using exome sequencing in an individual with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) we have identified a mutation in the X-linked dystrophin-related protein 2 (DRP2) gene. A 60-year-old gentleman presented to our clinic and underwent clinical, electrophysiological and skin biopsy studies. The patient had clinical features of a length dependent sensorimotor neuropathy with an age of onset of 50 years. Neurophysiology revealed prolonged latencies with intermediate conduction velocities but no conduction block or temporal dispersion. A panel of 23 disease causing genes was sequenced and ultimately was uninformative. Whole exome sequencing revealed a stop mutation in DRP2, c.805C>T (Q269*). DRP2 interacts with periaxin and dystroglycan to form the periaxin-DRP2-dystroglycan complex which plays a role in the maintenance of the well-characterized Cajal bands of myelinating Schwann cells. Skin biopsies from our patient revealed a lack of DRP2 in myelinated dermal nerves by immunofluorescence. Furthermore electron microscopy failed to identify Cajal bands in the patient's dermal myelinated axons in keeping with ultrastructural pathology seen in the Drp2 knockout mouse. Both the electrophysiologic and dermal nerve twig pathology support the interpretation that this patient's DRP2 mutation causes characteristic morphological abnormalities recapitulating the Drp2 knockout model and potentially represents a novel genetic cause of CMT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel point mutation (G[sup [minus]1] to T) in a 5[prime] splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, Yoko; Nishio, Hisahide; Kitoh, Yoshihiko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Narita, Naoko; Wada, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Matsuo, Masafumi (Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. The authors now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5[prime] splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5[prime] splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G[sup [minus]1]-to-T mutation at the 5[prime] splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Direct observation of failing fibers in muscles of dystrophic mice provides mechanistic insight into muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claflin, Dennis R; Brooks, Susan V

    2008-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by the absence of the protein dystrophin. Dystrophin's function is not known, but its cellular location and associations with both the force-generating contractile core and membrane-spanning entities suggest a role in mechanically coupling force from its intracellular origins to the fiber membrane and beyond. We report here the presence of destructive contractile activity in lumbrical muscles from dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice during nominally quiescent periods following exposure to mechanical stress. The ectopic activity, which was observable microscopically, resulted in longitudinal separation and clotting of fiber myoplasm and was absent when calcium (Ca(2+)) was removed from the bathing medium. Separation and clotting of myoplasm were also produced in dystrophin-deficient muscles by local application of a Ca(2+) ionophore to create membrane breaches in the absence of mechanical stress, whereas muscles from control mice tolerated ionophore-induced entry of Ca(2+) without damage. These observations suggest a failure cascade in dystrophin-deficient fibers that 1) is initiated by a stress-induced influx of extracellular Ca(2+), causing localized activation to continue after cessation of stimulation, and 2) proceeds as the persistent local activation, combined with reduced lateral mechanical coupling between the contractile core and the extracellular matrix, results in longitudinal separation of myoplasm in nonactivated regions of the fiber. This mechanism invokes both the membrane stabilization and the mechanical coupling functions frequently proposed for dystrophin and suggests that, whereas the absence of either function alone is not sufficient to cause fiber failure, their combined absence is catastrophic.

  10. Poly(ester amine Composed of Polyethylenimine and Pluronic Enhance Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides In Vitro and in Dystrophic mdx Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of poly(esteramines (PEAs constructed from low molecular weight polyethyleneimine (LPEI and Pluronic were evaluated for the delivery of antisense oligonuclotides (AOs, 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate RNA (2′-OMePS and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO in cell culture and dystrophic mdx mice. Improved exon-skipping efficiency of both 2′-OMePS and PMO was observed in the C2C12E50 cell line with all PEA polymers compared with PEI 25k or LF-2k. The degree of efficiency was found in the order of PEA 01, PEA 04 > PEA 05 > others. The in vivo study in mdx mice demonstrated enhanced exon-skipping of 2′-OMePS with the order of PEA 06 > PEA 04, PEA 07 > PEA 03 > PEA 01 > others, and much higher than PEI 25k formulated 2′-OMePS. Exon-skipping efficiency of PMO in formulation with the PEAs were significantly enhanced in the order of PEA 02 > PEA 10 > PEA 01, PEA 03 > PEA 05, PEA 07, PEA 08 > others, with PEA 02 reaching fourfold of Endo-porter formulated PMO. PEAs improve PMO delivery more effectively than 2′-OMePS delivery in vivo, and the systemic delivery evaluation further highlight the efficiency of PEA for PMO delivery in all skeletal muscle. The results suggest that the flexibility of PEA polymers could be explored for delivery of different AO chemistries, especially for antisense therapy.

  11. Amelioration of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in mdx mice by elimination of matrix-associated fibrin-driven inflammation coupled to the αMβ2 leukocyte integrin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Berta; Ardite, Esther; Suelves, Mònica; Ruiz-Bonilla, Vanessa; Janué, Anna; Flick, Matthew J; Degen, Jay L; Serrano, Antonio L; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2012-05-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a persistently altered and reorganizing extracellular matrix (ECM) within inflamed muscle promotes damage and dysfunction. However, the molecular determinants of the ECM that mediate inflammatory changes and faulty tissue reorganization remain poorly defined. Here, we show that fibrin deposition is a conspicuous consequence of muscle-vascular damage in dystrophic muscles of DMD patients and mdx mice and that elimination of fibrin(ogen) attenuated dystrophy progression in mdx mice. These benefits appear to be tied to: (i) a decrease in leukocyte integrin α(M)β(2)-mediated proinflammatory programs, thereby attenuating counterproductive inflammation and muscle degeneration; and (ii) a release of satellite cells from persistent inhibitory signals, thereby promoting regeneration. Remarkably, Fib-gamma(390-396A) (Fibγ(390-396A)) mice expressing a mutant form of fibrinogen with normal clotting function, but lacking the α(M)β(2) binding motif, ameliorated dystrophic pathology. Delivery of a fibrinogen/α(M)β(2) blocking peptide was similarly beneficial. Conversely, intramuscular fibrinogen delivery sufficed to induce inflammation and degeneration in fibrinogen-null mice. Thus, local fibrin(ogen) deposition drives dystrophic muscle inflammation and dysfunction, and disruption of fibrin(ogen)-α(M)β(2) interactions may provide a novel strategy for DMD treatment.

  12. Isobaric Tagging-Based Quantification for Proteomic Analysis: A Comparative Study of Spared and Affected Muscles from mdx Mice at the Early Phase of Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Yuri Matsumura

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common childhood myopathy, characterized by muscle loss and cardiorespiratory failure. While the genetic basis of DMD is well established, secondary mechanisms associated with dystrophic pathophysiology are not fully clarified yet. In order to obtain new insights into the molecular mechanisms of muscle dystrophy during earlier stages of the disease, we performed a comparative proteomic profile of the spared extraocular muscles (EOM vs. affected diaphragm from the mdx mice, using a label based shotgun proteomic approach. Out of the 857 identified proteins, 42 to 62 proteins had differential abundance of peptide ions. The calcium-handling proteins sarcalumenin and calsequestrin-1 were increased in control EOM compared with control DIA, reinforcing the view that constitutional properties of EOM are important for their protection against myonecrosis. The finding that galectin-1 (muscle regeneration, annexin A1 (anti-inflammatory and HSP 47 (fibrosis were increased in dystrophic diaphragm provides novel insights into the mechanisms through which mdx affected muscles are able to counteract dystrophy, during the early stage of the disease. Overall, the shotgun technique proved to be suitable to perform quantitative comparisons between distinct dystrophic muscles and allowed the suggestion of new potential biomarkers and drug targets for dystrophinopaties.

  13. Tissue Doppler imaging for detection of radial and longitudinal myocardial dysfunction in a family of cats affected by dystrophin-deficient hypertrophic muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetboul, Valérie; Blot, Stephane; Sampedrano, Carolina Carlos; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Granger, Nicolas; Tissier, Renaud; Bruneval, Patrick; Gaschen, Frederic; Gouni, Vassiliki; Nicolle, Audrey P; Pouchelon, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Diagnosis of feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy currently is based on the presence of myocardial hypertrophy detected using conventional echocardiography. The accuracy of tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) for earlier detection of the disease has never been described. The objective of this sudy was to quantify left ventricular free wall (LVFW) velocities in cats with hypertrophic muscular dystrophy (HFMD) during preclinical cardiomyopathy using TDI. The study animals included 22 healthy controls and 7 cats belonging to a family of cats with HFMD (2 affected adult males, 2 heterozygous adult females, one 2.5-month-old affected male kitten, and 2 phenotypically normal female kittens from the same litter). All cats were examined via conventional echocardiography and 2-dimensional color TDI. No LVFW hypertrophy was detected in the 2 carriers or in the affected kitten when using conventional echocardiography and histologic examination, respectively. The LVFW also was normal for 1 affected male and at the upper limit of normal for the 2nd male. Conversely, LVFW dysfunction was detected in all affected and carrier cats with HFMD when using TDI. TDI consistently detects LVFW dysfunction in cats with HFMD despite the absence of myocardial hypertrophy. Therefore, TDI appears more sensitive than conventional echocardiography in detecting regional myocardial abnormalities.

  14. A new technique for the quantitative assessment of 8-oxoguanine in nuclear DNA as a marker of oxidative stress. Application to dystrophin-deficient DMD skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Yoshiko; Stoward, Peter J; Bespalov, Ivan A; Melamede, Robert J; Wallace, Susan S

    2005-09-01

    This is the first report on the development of an immunohistochemical technique, combined with quantitative image analysis, for the assessment of oxidative stress quantitatively in nuclear DNA in situ, and its application to measure DNA damage in Duchenne muscular dystrophic (DMD) muscles. Three sequential staining procedures for cell nuclei, a cell marker, and a product of oxidative DNA damage, 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), were performed. First, the nuclei in muscle sections were stained with Neutral Red followed by the capture of their images with an image analysis system used for absorbance measurements. Second, the same sections were then immunostained for laminin in basement membranes as the cell marker. Next, the sections were treated with 2 N HCl to remove the bound Neutral Red and to denature tissue DNA. Third, the sections were immunostained for 8-oxoG in DNA, using diaminobenzidine (DAB) to reveal the antibody complex. This was followed by capture of the images of the immunostained sections as previously. The absorbances at 451.2 nm of bound Neutral Red and DAB polymer oxides, the final product of 8-oxoG immunostaining, were measured in the same myonuclei in the sections. Analysis of these absorbances permitted indices of the 8-oxoG content, independent of the nuclear densities, to be determined in nuclear DNA in single myofibres and myosatellite cells surrounded by basement membranes. We found that the mean index for the myonuclei in biceps brachii muscles of 2- to 7-year-old patients was 14% higher than that in age-matched normal controls. This finding of the increased oxidative stress in the myonuclei in young DMD muscles agrees with the previous reports of increased oxidative stress in the cytoplasm in the DMD myofibres and myosatellite cells. The present technique for the quantitative assessment of oxidative stress in nuclear DNA in situ is applicable not only in biomedical research but also in the development of effective drugs for degenerative diseases related to oxidative stress.

  15. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000408.htm Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency is a group of rare genetic ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  18. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood ... With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don' ... from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers ...

  8. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk de Bruyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations.

  9. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  10. Evaluation of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis versus multiplex polymerase chain reaction assays in the detection of dystrophin gene rearrangements in an Iranian population subset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayereh Nouri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD gene is located in the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp21. It spans 2.4 Mb of the human genomic DNA and is composed of 79 exons. Mutations in the Dystrophin gene result in DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy. In this study, the efficiency of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA over multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays in an Iranian population was investigated. Materials and Methods: Multiplex PCR assays and MLPA analysis were carried out in 74 patients affected with DMD. Results: Multiplex PCR detected deletions in 51% of the patients with DMD. MLPA analysis could determine all the deletions detected by the multiplex PCR. Additionally, MLPA was able to identify one more deletion and duplication in patients without detectable mutations by multiplex PCR. Moreover, MLPA precisely determined the exact size of the deletions. Conclusion: Although MLPA analysis is more sensitive for detection of deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene, multiplex PCR might be used for the initial analysis of the boys affected with DMD in the Iranian population as it was able to detect 95% of the rearrangements in patients with DMD.

  11. GLPG0492, a novel selective androgen receptor modulator, improves muscle performance in the exercised-mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzoli, Anna; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Sblendorio, Valeriana Teresa; Dinardo, Maria Maddalena; Jagerschmidt, Catherine; Namour, Florence; Camerino, Giulia Maria; De Luca, Annamaria

    2013-06-01

    Anabolic drugs may counteract muscle wasting and dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD); however, steroids have unwanted side effects. We focused on GLPG0492, a new non-steroidal selective androgen receptor modulator that is currently under development for musculo-skeletal diseases such as sarcopenia and cachexia. GLPG0492 was tested in the exercised mdx mouse model of DMD in a 4-week trial at a single high dose (30 mg/kg, 6 day/week s.c.), and the results were compared with those from the administration of α-methylprednisolone (PDN; 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and nandrolone (NAND, 5 mg/kg, s.c.). This assessment was followed by a 12-week dose-dependence study (0.3-30 mg/kg s.c.). The outcomes were evaluated in vivo and ex vivo on functional, histological and biochemical parameters. Similar to PDN and NAND, GLPG0492 significantly increased mouse strength. In acute exhaustion tests, a surrogate of the 6-min walking test used in DMD patients, GLPG0492 preserved running performance, whereas vehicle- or comparator-treated animals showed a significant increase in fatigue (30-50%). Ex vivo, all drugs resulted in a modest but significant increase of diaphragm force. In parallel, a decrease in the non-muscle area and markers of fibrosis was observed in GLPG0492- and NAND-treated mice. The drugs exerted minor effects on limb muscles; however, electrophysiological biomarkers were ameliorated in extensor digitorum longus muscle. The longer dose-dependence study confirmed the effect on mdx mouse strength and resistance to fatigue and demonstrated the efficacy of lower drug doses on in vivo and ex vivo functional parameters. These results support the interest of further studies of GLPG0492 as a potential treatment for DMD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of muscle-specific microRNAs in serum of muscular dystrophy animal models: promising novel blood-based markers for muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideya Mizuno

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a lethal X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Creatine kinase (CK is generally used as a blood-based biomarker for muscular disease including DMD, but it is not always reliable since it is easily affected by stress to the body, such as exercise. Therefore, more reliable biomarkers of muscular dystrophy have long been desired. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, ∼22 nucleotide, noncoding RNAs which play important roles in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, it has been reported that miRNAs exist in blood. In this study, we hypothesized that the expression levels of specific serum circulating miRNAs may be useful to monitor the pathological progression of muscular diseases, and therefore explored the possibility of these miRNAs as new biomarkers for muscular diseases. To confirm this hypothesis, we quantified the expression levels of miRNAs in serum of the dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy mouse model, mdx, and the canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan dog model (CXMD(J, by real-time PCR. We found that the serum levels of several muscle-specific miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133a and miR-206 are increased in both mdx and CXMD(J. Interestingly, unlike CK levels, expression levels of these miRNAs in mdx serum are little influenced by exercise using treadmill. These results suggest that serum miRNAs are useful and reliable biomarkers for muscular dystrophy.

  13. Identification of muscle-specific microRNAs in serum of muscular dystrophy animal models: promising novel blood-based markers for muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hideya; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Ito, Naoki; Kishi, Soichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Hashido, Kazuo

    2011-03-30

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Creatine kinase (CK) is generally used as a blood-based biomarker for muscular disease including DMD, but it is not always reliable since it is easily affected by stress to the body, such as exercise. Therefore, more reliable biomarkers of muscular dystrophy have long been desired. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, ∼22 nucleotide, noncoding RNAs which play important roles in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, it has been reported that miRNAs exist in blood. In this study, we hypothesized that the expression levels of specific serum circulating miRNAs may be useful to monitor the pathological progression of muscular diseases, and therefore explored the possibility of these miRNAs as new biomarkers for muscular diseases. To confirm this hypothesis, we quantified the expression levels of miRNAs in serum of the dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy mouse model, mdx, and the canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan dog model (CXMD(J)), by real-time PCR. We found that the serum levels of several muscle-specific miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133a and miR-206) are increased in both mdx and CXMD(J). Interestingly, unlike CK levels, expression levels of these miRNAs in mdx serum are little influenced by exercise using treadmill. These results suggest that serum miRNAs are useful and reliable biomarkers for muscular dystrophy.

  14. MDX-station

    CERN Document Server

    Chechin, A I

    2000-01-01

    The installation for carrying out the investigations of synchrotron radiation (SR) and of electron beam diagnostics, Mossbauer and XAFS experiments was made. The installation is multipurpose due to its block construction. It consists of two precision double-crystal monochromators (range of rotation -- 360 deg. , precision -- 5'', step -- 0.545''), X-ray goniometer (range of rotation -- 360 deg. , precision -- 18'', step -- 3''), control and registration systems (time resolution 5 ns). It is possible to have fixed-in-space monochromatic SR beam.

  15. Correlating In Vitro Splice Switching Activity With Systemic In Vivo Delivery Using Novel ZEN-modified Oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan M Hammond

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs induce alternative splicing of pre-mRNA and typically employ chemical modifications to increase nuclease resistance and binding affinity to target pre-mRNA. Here we describe a new SSO non-base modifier (a naphthyl-azo group, “ZEN™” to direct exon exclusion in mutant dystrophin pre-mRNA to generate functional dystrophin protein. The ZEN modifier is placed near the ends of a 2′-O-methyl (2′OMe oligonucleotide, increasing melting temperature and potency over unmodified 2′OMe oligonucleotides. In cultured H2K cells, a ZEN-modified 2′OMe phosphorothioate (PS oligonucleotide delivered by lipid transfection greatly enhanced dystrophin exon skipping over the same 2′OMePS SSO lacking ZEN. However, when tested using free gymnotic uptake in vitro and following systemic delivery in vivo in dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the same ZEN-modified SSO failed to enhance potency. Importantly, we show for the first time that in vivo activity of anionic SSOs is modelled in vitro only when using gymnotic delivery. ZEN is thus a novel modifier that enhances activity of SSOs in vitro but will require improved delivery methods before its in vivo clinical potential can be realized.

  16. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  18. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  19. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A;

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  20. Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Tarım

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone deficiency is the most promising entity in terms of response to therapy among the treatable causes of growth retardation. It may be due to genetic or acquired causes. It may be isolated or a part of multiple hormone deficiencies. Diagnostic criteria and therefore treatment indications are still disputed. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 36-8

  1. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... periods. By following her treatment plan and making smart lifestyle choices, Susan continues to feel better and see the benefits of treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics Iron-Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, ...

  3. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  4. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  5. Deficiently Extremal Gorenstein Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavinder Singh

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this article is to study the homological properties of deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebras. We prove that if / is an odd deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebra with pure minimal free resolution, then the codimension of / must be odd. As an application, the structure of pure minimal free resolution of a nearly extremal Gorenstein algebra is obtained.

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  7. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  8. Divergent impact of Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency on repair mechanisms in healthy muscle versus Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojumdar, Kamalika; Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Liang, Feng; Divangahi, Maziar; Qureshi, Salman T; Petrof, Basil J

    2016-05-01

    Injury to skeletal muscle, whether acute or chronic, triggers macrophage-mediated innate immunity in a manner which can be either beneficial or harmful for subsequent repair. Endogenous ligands for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) are released by damaged tissues and might play an important role in activating the innate immune system following muscle injury. To test this hypothesis, we compared macrophage behaviour and muscle repair mechanisms in mice lacking TLR2 under conditions of either acute (cardiotoxin-induced) or chronic (mdx mouse genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy; DMD) muscle damage. In previously healthy muscle subjected to acute damage, TLR2 deficiency reduced macrophage numbers in the muscle post-injury but did not alter the expression pattern of the prototypical macrophage polarization markers iNOS and CD206. In addition, there was abnormal persistence of necrotic fibres and impaired regeneration in TLR2-/- muscles after acute injury. In contrast, TLR2 ablation in chronically diseased muscles of mdx mice not only resulted in significantly reduced macrophage numbers but additionally modified their phenotype by shifting from inflammatory (iNOS(pos) CD206(neg) ) to more anti-inflammatory (iNOS(neg) CD206(pos) ) characteristics. This decrease in macrophage-mediated inflammation was associated with ameliorated muscle histopathology and improved force-generating capacity of the dystrophic muscle. Our results suggest that the role of TLR2 in macrophage function and skeletal muscle repair depends greatly upon the muscle injury context, and raise the possibility that inhibition of TLR2 could serve as a useful therapeutic measure in DMD.

  9. Immunohistochemical alterations of dystrophin in congenital muscular dystrophy Alterações imuno-hístoquímicas da distrofina na distrofia muscular congênita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lineu Cesar Werneck

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available The dystrophin distribution in the plasma muscle membrane using immunohystochemistry was studied in 22 children with congenital muscular dystrophy. The dystrophin was detected by immunofluorescence in muscle biopsy through a polyclonal antibody. All the cases had patchy interruptions of the fluorescence in the plasma membrane. A large patchy interruption of the sarcolemma was found in 17 cases, small interruption in 12, and a combination of large and small patchy discontinuity in 7. Small gaps around the fiber like a rosary were found in 15 cases. The frequency of these abnormalities ranged cases from: all fibers in 5 cases, frequent in 8, occasional in 5, and rare in 4. Five cases had total absence of immunofluorescence. These results suggest that the dystrophin expression is abnormal in this group of children and that this type of abnormalities can not be differentiated from early Becker muscular dystrophy nor childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy through immunohystochemistry alone.Foi estudada a distribuição da distrofina na membrana plasmática das fibras musculares em 22 crianças com distrofia muscular congênita, através de técnicas de imuno-histoquímica. A distrofina foi identificada nas biópsias musculares processadas a fresco, por técnicas de imunofluorescência utilizando anticorpos policlonais. Todos os casos tinham interrupções da imunofluorescência na membrana plasmática. Em 17 elas eram grandes, em 12 eram pequenas e em 7 eram de ambos os tipos. Fibras com interrupções pequenas e constantes, como um rosário, foram vistas em 15 casos. Essas anormalidades estavam presentes em todas as fibras em 5 casos, eram frequentes em 8, ocasionais em 5 e raras em 4. Cinco casos mostraram fibras sem distrofina. Esses dados sugerem que a expressão da distrofina é anormal nesse grupo de crianças. Essas anormalidades podem também ser encontradas em casos precoces de distrofia muscular de Becker e distrofia autoss

  10. Voltage-gated ion channel dysfunction precedes cardiomyopathy development in the dystrophic heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xaver Koenig

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, is associated with severe cardiac complications including cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmias. Recent research suggests that impaired voltage-gated ion channels in dystrophic cardiomyocytes accompany cardiac pathology. It is, however, unknown if the ion channel defects are primary effects of dystrophic gene mutations, or secondary effects of the developing cardiac pathology.To address this question, we first investigated sodium channel impairments in cardiomyocytes derived from dystrophic neonatal mice prior to cardiomyopahty development, by using the whole cell patch clamp technique. Besides the most common model for DMD, the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, we also used mice additionally carrying an utrophin mutation. In neonatal cardiomyocytes, dystrophin-deficiency generated a 25% reduction in sodium current density. In addition, extra utrophin-deficiency significantly altered sodium channel gating parameters. Moreover, also calcium channel inactivation was considerably reduced in dystrophic neonatal cardiomyocytes, suggesting that ion channel abnormalities are universal primary effects of dystrophic gene mutations. To assess developmental changes, we also studied sodium channel impairments in cardiomyocytes derived from dystrophic adult mice, and compared them with the respective abnormalities in dystrophic neonatal cells. Here, we found a much stronger sodium current reduction in adult cardiomyocytes. The described sodium channel impairments slowed the upstroke of the action potential in adult cardiomyocytes, and only in dystrophic adult mice, the QRS interval of the electrocardiogram was prolonged.Ion channel impairments precede pathology development in the dystrophic heart, and may thus be considered potential cardiomyopathy triggers.

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  12. Factor II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  13. Factor VII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor VII is one such coagulation factor. Factor VII deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This ... video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency ... to stop her monthly periods. By following her treatment plan and making smart lifestyle choices, Susan continues ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ...

  3. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency? Sleep deprivation (DEP-rih-VA- ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: June 7, 2017 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of breath, chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  11. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-rescue of dystrophin/utrophin double knockout mice does not require nNOS localization to the cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Wehling-Henricks

    Full Text Available Survival of dystrophin/utrophin double-knockout (dko mice was increased by muscle-specific expression of a neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS transgene. Dko mice expressing the transgene (nNOS TG+/dko experienced delayed onset of mortality and increased life-span. The nNOS TG+/dko mice demonstrated a significant decrease in the concentration of CD163+, M2c macrophages that can express arginase and promote fibrosis. The decrease in M2c macrophages was associated with a significant reduction in fibrosis of heart, diaphragm and hindlimb muscles of nNOS TG+/dko mice. The nNOS transgene had no effect on the concentration of cytolytic, CD68+, M1 macrophages. Accordingly, we did not observe any change in the extent of muscle fiber lysis in the nNOS TG+/dko mice. These findings show that nNOS/NO (nitric oxide-mediated decreases in M2c macrophages lead to a reduction in the muscle fibrosis that is associated with increased mortality in mice lacking dystrophin and utrophin. Interestingly, the dramatic and beneficial effects of the nNOS transgene were not attributable to localization of nNOS protein at the cell membrane. We did not detect any nNOS protein at the sarcolemma in nNOS TG+/dko muscles. This important observation shows that sarcolemmal localization is not necessary for nNOS to have beneficial effects in dystrophic tissue and the presence of nNOS in the cytosol of dystrophic muscle fibers can ameliorate the pathology and most importantly, significantly increase life-span.

  12. Iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be ...

  13. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contra...

  14. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Labrune Philippe; Gajdos Vincent; Eberschweiler Pascale; Hubert-Buron Aurélie; Petit François; Vianey-Saban Christine; Boudjemline Alix; Piraud Monique; Froissart Roseline

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, betw...

  15. Vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Robert; Brown, David L

    2003-03-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency is a common cause of macrocytic anemia and has been implicated in a spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. The role of B12 deficiency in hyperhomocysteinemia and the promotion of atherosclerosis is only now being explored. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is typically based on measurement of serum vitamin B12 levels; however, about 50 percent of patients with subclinical disease have normal B12 levels. A more sensitive method of screening for vitamin B12 deficiency is measurement of serum methylmalonic acid and homocysteine levels, which are increased early in vitamin B12 deficiency. Use of the Schilling test for detection of pernicious anemia has been supplanted for the most part by serologic testing for parietal cell and intrinsic factor antibodies. Contrary to prevailing medical practice, studies show that supplementation with oral vitamin B12 is a safe and effective treatment for the B12 deficiency state. Even when intrinsic factor is not present to aid in the absorption of vitamin B12 (pernicious anemia) or in other diseases that affect the usual absorption sites in the terminal ileum, oral therapy remains effective.

  16. 骨髓干细胞移植后mdx鼠腓肠肌病理变化%Pathologic change in mdx mice gastrocnemius muscle after bone marrow stem cells transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢锡林; 冯善伟; 姚晓黎; 张为西; 于美娟; 张成

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the pathologic change in mdx mice gastrecnemius muscle after the bone marrow stem cells transplantation. Methods Twenty mdx mice (7 to 9 weeks old) preconditioned with 7 Gy γ-ray were divided into 4 groups and bone marrow stem ceils from C57 mice (6 to 8 weeks old) were injected intravenously into the mdx mice. Morphology and centrally nucleated fibers (CNF)were observed by HE stain and the rate of CNF was calculated 4 weeks ,8 weeks ,12 weeks and 16 weeks after transplantation respectively. Five C57 mice and 5 mdx mice were acted as positive and negative controls. Results The myocytes of normal C57 mice were polygon and uniform in size with nuclei localized in borderline. No inflammation was found in intraceilular substance. The myocytes of treated and untreated mdx mice were round in shape and various in size. The obvious abnormality was nucleus centralized. The rate of CNF in untreated mdx mice was highest, up to 70%. The rate of CNF decreased to 55%,50% and 44% at the 4th, 12th, 16th week after transplantation. Condusion CNF of mdx mice gastrecnemias muscle decreases gradually after bone marrow stem cells transplantation, which indicates that the bone marrow stem cells can participate in the repair and regeneration of the injured tissues permanently and constantly.%目的 研究骨髓干细胞移植后mdx鼠腓肠肌组织病理变化. 方法 7~9周龄mdx鼠20只平均分为4组,放射处理后移植1.2×107细胞/只同种异基因全骨髓干细胞,于移植后4、8、12及16周用HE染色观察腓肠肌组织细胞形态及核中心移位纤维(CNF).C57鼠和未治疗mdx鼠各5只作阳性和阴性对照. 结果 CS7鼠腓肠肌横切面可见肌细胞大小形态基本一致,无核中心移位现象.各细胞移植治疗组和阴性对照组mdx鼠均有大量的炎细胞浸润,核中心移位明显.未治疗mdx鼠CNF最高,约达70%;移植后4、12和16周,CNF分别为55%、50%和44%. 结论 骨髓干细胞移植后mdx鼠腓肠

  17. Superpulsed low-level laser therapy protects skeletal muscle of mdx mice against damage, inflammation and morphological changes delaying dystrophy progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Cesar Pinto Leal-Junior

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the effects of preventive treatment with low-level laser therapy (LLLT on progression of dystrophy in mdx mice. METHODS: Ten animals were randomly divided into 2 experimental groups treated with superpulsed LLLT (904 nm, 15 mW, 700 Hz, 1 J or placebo-LLLT at one point overlying the tibialis anterior muscle (bilaterally 5 times per week for 14 weeks (from 6th to 20th week of age. Morphological changes, creatine kinase (CK activity and mRNA gene expression were assessed in animals at 20th week of age. RESULTS: Animals treated with LLLT showed very few morphological changes in skeletal muscle, with less atrophy and fibrosis than animals treated with placebo-LLLT. CK was significantly lower (p=0.0203 in animals treated with LLLT (864.70 U.l-1, SEM 226.10 than placebo (1708.00 U.l-1, SEM 184.60. mRNA gene expression of inflammatory markers was significantly decreased by treatment with LLLT (p<0.05: TNF-α (placebo-control=0.51 µg/µl [SEM 0.12], - LLLT=0.048 µg/µl [SEM 0.01], IL-1β (placebo-control=2.292 µg/µl [SEM 0.74], - LLLT=0.12 µg/µl [SEM 0.03], IL-6 (placebo-control=3.946 µg/µl [SEM 0.98], - LLLT=0.854 µg/µl [SEM 0.33], IL-10 (placebo-control=1.116 µg/µl [SEM 0.22], - LLLT=0.352 µg/µl [SEM 0.15], and COX-2 (placebo-control=4.984 µg/µl [SEM 1.18], LLLT=1.470 µg/µl [SEM 0.73]. CONCLUSION: Irradiation of superpulsed LLLT on successive days five times per week for 14 weeks decreased morphological changes, skeletal muscle damage and inflammation in mdx mice. This indicates that LLLT has potential to decrease progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  18. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  19. Quantitative assessment of muscle damage in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojie; Chin, Lixin; Klyen, Blake R; Shavlakadze, Tea; McLaughlin, Robert A; Grounds, Miranda D; Sampson, David D

    2013-11-01

    Minimally invasive, high-resolution imaging of muscle necrosis has the potential to aid in the assessment of diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Undamaged muscle tissue possesses high levels of optical birefringence due to its anisotropic ultrastructure, and this birefringence decreases when the tissue undergoes necrosis. In this study, we present a novel technique to image muscle necrosis using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). From PS-OCT scans, our technique is able to quantify the birefringence in muscle tissue, generating an image indicative of the tissue ultrastructure, with areas of abnormally low birefringence indicating necrosis. The technique is demonstrated on excised skeletal muscles from exercised dystrophic mdx mice and control C57BL/10ScSn mice with the resulting images validated against colocated histological sections. The technique additionally gives a measure of the proportion (volume fraction) of necrotic tissue within the three-dimensional imaging field of view. The percentage necrosis assessed by this technique is compared against the percentage necrosis obtained from manual assessment of histological sections, and the difference between the two methods is found to be comparable to the interobserver variability of the histological assessment. This is the first published demonstration of PS-OCT to provide automated assessment of muscle necrosis.

  20. Eccentric contractions lead to myofibrillar dysfunction in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaauw, Bert; Agatea, Lisa; Toniolo, Luana; Canato, Marta; Quarta, Marco; Dyar, Kenneth A; Danieli-Betto, Daniela; Betto, Romeo; Schiaffino, Stefano; Reggiani, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that skeletal muscles from dystrophin-deficient mdx mice are more susceptible than those from wild-type mice to damage from eccentric contractions. However, the downstream mechanisms involved in this enhanced force drop remain controversial. We studied the reduction of contractile force induced by eccentric contractions elicited in vivo in the gastrocnemius muscle of wild-type mice and three distinct models of muscle dystrophy: mdx, alpha-sarcoglycan (Sgca)-null, and collagen 6A1 (Col6a1)-null mice. In mdx and Sgca-null mice, force decreased 35% compared with 14% in wild-type mice. Drop of force in Col6a1-null mice was comparable to that in wild-type mice. To identify the determinants of the force drop, we measured force generation in permeabilized fibers dissected from gastrocnemius muscle that had been exposed in vivo to eccentric contractions and from the contralateral unstimulated muscle. A force loss in skinned fibers after in vivo eccentric contractions was detectable in fibers from mdx and Sgca-null, but not wild-type and Col6a1-null, mice. The enhanced force reduction in mdx and Sgca-null mice was observed only when eccentric contractions were elicited in vivo, since eccentric contractions elicited in vitro had identical effects in wild-type and dystrophic skinned fibers. These results suggest that 1) the enhanced force loss is due to a myofibrillar impairment that is present in all fibers, and not to individual fiber degeneration, and 2) the mechanism causing the enhanced force reduction is active in vivo and is lost after fiber permeabilization.

  1. Treatment with a nitric oxide-donating NSAID alleviates functional muscle ischemia in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gail D; Ye, Jianfeng; De Nardi, Claudio; Monopoli, Angela; Ongini, Ennio; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    In patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the standard mdx mouse model of DMD, dystrophin deficiency causes loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) from the sarcolemma, producing functional ischemia when the muscles are exercised. We asked if functional muscle ischemia would be eliminated and normal blood flow regulation restored by treatment with an exogenous nitric oxide (NO)-donating drug. Beginning at 8 weeks of age, mdx mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with 1% soybean oil alone or in combination with a low (15 mg/kg) or high (45 mg/kg) dose of HCT 1026, a NO-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent which has previously been shown to slow disease progression in the mdx model. After 1 month of treatment, vasoconstrictor responses to intra-arterial norepinephrine (NE) were compared in resting and contracting hindlimbs. In untreated mdx mice, the usual effect of muscle contraction to attenuate NE-mediated vasoconstriction was impaired, resulting in functional ischemia: NE evoked similar decreases in femoral blood flow velocity and femoral vascular conductance (FVC) in the contracting compared to resting hindlimbs (ΔFVC contraction/ΔFVC rest=0.88 ± 0.03). NE-induced functional ischemia was unaffected by low dose HCT 1026 (ΔFVC ratio=0.92 ± 0.04; P>0.05 vs untreated), but was alleviated by the high dose of the drug (ΔFVC ratio=0.22 ± 0.03; P<0.05 vs untreated or low dose). The beneficial effect of high dose HCT 1026 was maintained with treatment up to 3 months. The effect of the NO-donating drug HCT 1026 to normalize blood flow regulation in contracting mdx mouse hindlimb muscles suggests a putative novel treatment for DMD. Further translational research is warranted.

  2. [Vitamin deficiencies and hypervitaminosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino, M

    1999-10-01

    There have recently been very few deficiencies with respect to fat soluble and water soluble vitamins in Japan All-trans-retinoic acid as induction or maintenance treatment improves disease free and overall survival against acute promyelocytic leukemia. In the isolated vitamin E deficiencies gene mutation has been cleared for alpha-tocopherol transferprotein. Recently, a relation of nutritional vitamin K intake and senile osteoporosis in women was epidemiologically demonstrated on a prospective study. Thiamin was yet noticed as development of deficiency in alcoholism, while the importance of supplemental folic acid during pregnancy has become especially clear in light of studies showing that folic acid supplements reduce the risk of neural tube defects in the fetus. With respect to hypervitaminosis, the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), USA, has established safe intakes by identifying the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) and LOAEL (Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level). Summaries of NOAEL and LOAEL for individual vitamins were shown.

  3. Antepartum Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakajima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left.

  4. The role of branched fibres in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S; Head, S I

    2011-06-01

    Branched fibres are a well-documented phenomenon of regenerating skeletal muscle. They are found in the muscles of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe condition of progressive muscle wasting caused by an absence of the sarcolemmal protein dystrophin, and in the muscles of the mdx mouse, an animal model of DMD. However, only a handful of studies have investigated how the physiological properties of these morphologically deformed fibres differ from those of normal fibres. These studies have found an association between the extent of fibre branching in mdx muscles and the susceptibility of these muscles to damage from eccentric contractions. They have also found that branched mdx muscle fibres cannot sustain maximal contractions in buffered Ca(2+) solutions, that branch points are sites of increased mechanical stress and that myofibrillar structure is greatly disturbed at branch points. These findings have important implications for understanding the function of dystrophin. It is commonly thought that the role of dystrophin is mechanical stabilization of the sarcolemma, as numerous studies have shown that eccentric contractions damage mdx muscle more than normal muscle. However, the finding that branched mdx fibres are mechanically weakened raises the question, is it the lack of dystrophin or is it the fibre branching that leads to the vulnerability of mdx muscle to contractile damage? The importance of this question to our understanding of the function of dystrophin warrants further research into the physiological properties of branched fibres and how they differ from morphologically normal fibres.

  5. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided into chil......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided...

  6. Differential requirement for utrophin in the induced pluripotent stem cell correction of muscle versus fat in muscular dystrophy mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Beck

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an incurable degenerative muscle disorder. We injected WT mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs into mdx and mdx∶utrophin mutant blastocysts, which are predisposed to develop DMD with an increasing degree of severity (mdx <<< mdx∶utrophin. In mdx chimeras, iPSC-dystrophin was supplied to the muscle sarcolemma to effect corrections at morphological and functional levels. Dystrobrevin was observed in dystrophin-positive and, at a lesser extent, utrophin-positive areas. In the mdx∶utrophin mutant chimeras, although iPSC-dystrophin was also supplied to the muscle sarcolemma, mice still displayed poor skeletal muscle histopathology, and negligible levels of dystrobrevin in dystrophin- and utrophin-negative areas. Not only dystrophin-expressing tissues are affected by iPSCs. Mdx and mdx∶utrophin mice have reduced fat/body weight ratio, but iPSC injection normalized this parameter in both mdx and mdx∶utrophin chimeras, despite the fact that utrophin was compromised in the mdx∶utrophin chimeric fat. The results suggest that the presence of utrophin is required for the iPSC-corrections in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the results highlight a potential (utrophin-independent non-cell autonomous role for iPSC-dystrophin in the corrections of non-muscle tissue like fat, which is intimately related to the muscle.

  7. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficien

  8. Factor V deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When certain blood clotting factors are low or missing, your blood does not clot properly. Factor V deficiency is rare. It may be caused by: A defective Factor V gene passed down through families (inherited) An antibody that interferes with normal Factor ...

  9. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    biennially to exchange views and research findings. The fourth biennial meeting was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 2-3 June 2005. This review covers the wide range of AAT deficiency-related topics that were addressed encompassing advances in genetic characterization, risk factor identification, clinical...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  10. MCAD deficiency in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Brage Storstein; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common defect of fatty acid oxidation. Many countries have introduced newborn screening for MCADD, because characteristic acylcarnitines can easily be identified in filter paper blood spot samples by tandem mass spectrometry (MS...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  12. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficien

  13. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  14. Morbidity and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Laursen, Torben; Green, Anders;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...

  15. Diagnosing oceanic nutrient deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. Mark

    2016-11-01

    The supply of a range of nutrient elements to surface waters is an important driver of oceanic production and the subsequent linked cycling of the nutrients and carbon. Relative deficiencies of different nutrients with respect to biological requirements, within both surface and internal water masses, can be both a key indicator and driver of the potential for these nutrients to become limiting for the production of new organic material in the upper ocean. The availability of high-quality, full-depth and global-scale datasets on the concentrations of a wide range of both macro- and micro-nutrients produced through the international GEOTRACES programme provides the potential for estimation of multi-element deficiencies at unprecedented scales. Resultant coherent large-scale patterns in diagnosed deficiency can be linked to the interacting physical-chemical-biological processes which drive upper ocean nutrient biogeochemistry. Calculations of ranked deficiencies across multiple elements further highlight important remaining uncertainties in the stoichiometric plasticity of nutrient ratios within oceanic microbial systems and caveats with regards to linkages to upper ocean nutrient limitation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  16. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  18. Clinical and molecular characterization of a cohort of patients with novel nucleotide alterations of the Dystrophin gene detected by direct sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corti Stefania

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne and Becker Muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which encodes a sarcolemmal protein responsible for muscle integrity. Deletions and duplications account for approximately 75% of mutations in DMD and 85% in BMD. The implementation of techniques allowing complete gene sequencing has focused attention on small point mutations and other mechanisms underlying complex rearrangements. Methods We selected 47 patients (41 families; 35 DMD, 6 BMD without deletions and duplications in DMD gene (excluded by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis. This cohort was investigated by systematic direct sequence analysis to study sequence variation. We focused our attention on rare mutational events which were further studied through transcript analysis. Results We identified 40 different nucleotide alterations in DMD gene and their clinical correlates; altogether, 16 mutations were novel. DMD probands carried 9 microinsertions/microdeletions, 19 nonsense mutations, and 7 splice-site mutations. BMD patients carried 2 nonsense mutations, 2 splice-site mutations, 1 missense substitution, and 1 single base insertion. The most frequent stop codon was TGA (n = 10 patients, followed by TAG (n = 7 and TAA (n = 4. We also analyzed the molecular mechanisms of five rare mutational events. They are two frame-shifting mutations in the DMD gene 3'end in BMD and three novel splicing defects: IVS42: c.6118-3C>A, which causes a leaky splice-site; c.9560A>G, which determines a cryptic splice-site activation and c.9564-426 T>G, which creates pseudoexon retention within IVS65. Conclusion The analysis of our patients' sample, carrying point mutations or complex rearrangements in DMD gene, contributes to the knowledge on phenotypic correlations in dystrophinopatic patients and can provide a better understanding of pre-mRNA maturation defects

  19. Genetics Home Reference: carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyperammonemia due to carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency hyperammonemic encephalopathy due to carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase va deficiency Related Information How are ...

  20. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition in which ...

  1. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Werder, Steven F

    2010-01-01

    ...) What is to be expected from treatment? (7) How is B12 deficiency treated? On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia...

  2. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Growth Defici H e o n r c m y one in Children What is growth hormone deficiency? Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a rare condition in which the body does not make enough growth hormone (GH). GH is made by the pituitary ...

  3. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  4. [Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Alicja; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class A is the main protein of the mucosal immune system. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (sIgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. sIGAD is strongly associated with the certain major histocompatibility complex region. Most individuals with sIgAD are asymptomatic and identified coincidentally. However, some patients may present with recurrent infections, allergic disorders and autoimmune manifestations. Several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, diabetes mellitus type 1, Graves disease and celiac disease, are associated with an increased prevalence of sIgAD. Screening for sIgAD in coeliac disease is essential. Patients need treatment of associated diseases. It is also known that IgA deficiency may progress into a common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Pathogenesis and molecular mechanism involved in sIgAD should be elucidated in the future.

  5. Isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relinque, B; Bardallo, L; Granero, M; Jiménez, P J; Luna, S

    2015-03-10

    Sulfite oxidase deficiency is an uncommon metabolic disease. Only few cases of its isolated form have been reported in the literature. We report a case of severe neonatal onset. A newborn baby of 41 weeks gestational age, weighted at birth of 3240 grams and had an Apgar score of 6-10-10. Fifty-three hours after being born, the baby started with seizures that were refractory to antiepileptic treatment. Brain function was monitored using a-EEG. Laboratory and imaging tests were performed. All of them were consistent with sulfite oxidase deficiency. The diagnosis was confirmed by genetic testing. We highlight the importance of this disease as part of the differential diagnosis of seizures during the neonatal period, as well as the importance of the therapeutic support based on dietary restrictions. It's also remarkable the possibility of prenatal diagnosis by quantifying enzyme activity and it's also possible carrying out DNA mutational analysis.

  6. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contrast arthrography orMagnetic Resonance Imaging is indicated when radiological features are questionable and to disclose thepresence and location of the femoral head and any cartilagenous anlage. The disorder is more commonlyunilateral and is apparent at birth. However, bilateral involvement is rarely seen. Therapy of the disorder isdirected towards satisfactory ambulation and specific treatment depending on the severity of dysplasia.

  7. Micronutrient deficiency in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhan, M K; Sommerfelt, H; Strand, T

    2001-05-01

    Malnutrition increases morbidity and mortality and affects physical growth and development, some of these effects resulting from specific micronutrient deficiencies. While public health efforts must be targeted to improve dietary intakes in children through breast feeding and appropriate complementary feeding, there is a need for additional measures to increase the intake of certain micronutrients. Food-based approaches are regarded as the long-term strategy for improving nutrition, but for certain micronutrients, supplementation, be it to the general population or to high risk groups or as an adjunct to treatment must also be considered. Our understanding of the prevalence and consequences of iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiency in children and pregnant women has advanced considerably while there is still a need to generate more knowledge pertaining to many other micronutrients, including zinc, selenium and many of the B-vitamins. For iron and vitamin A, the challenge is to improve the delivery to target populations. For disease prevention and growth promotion, the need to deliver safe but effective amounts of micronutrients such as zinc to children and women of fertile age can be determined only after data on deficiency prevalence becomes available and the studies on mortality reduction following supplementation are completed. Individual or multiple micronutrients must be used as an adjunct to treatment of common infectious diseases and malnutrition only if the gains are substantial and the safety window sufficiently wide. The available data for zinc are promising with regard to the prevention of diarrhea and pneumonia. It should be emphasized that there must be no displacement of important treatment such as ORS in acute diarrhea by adjunct therapy such as zinc. Credible policy making requires description of not only the clinical effects but also the underlying biological mechanisms. As findings of experimental studies are not always feasible to extrapolate to

  8. Orexin deficiency and narcolepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Orexin deficiency results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy in many mammalian species, including mice, dogs, and humans, suggesting that the orexin system is particularly important for normal regulation of sleep/wakefulness states, and especially for maintenance of wakefulness. This review discusses animal models of narcolepsy; the contribution of each orexin receptor subtype to the narcoleptic phenotypes; and the etiology of orexin neuronal death. It also raises the possibility of novel thera...

  9. Screening Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients for deletions in 30 exons of the dystrophin gene by three-multiplex PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risch, N. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Deletion mutations of the dystrophin gene may cause either the severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or the milder, allelic Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and are clustered in two high-frequency-deletion regions (HFDRs) located, respectively, 500 kb and 1,200 kb downstream from the 5[prime] end of the gene. Three PCR reactions described allowed the analysis of a total of 30 exons and led, to the identification of three additional deletions involving the following exons: (a) 42 only, (b) 28-42, and (c) 16 only, none of which were detected with the two original multiplex reactions. Therefore, the three modified multiplexes detected 95 of the 96 deletions identified among the 152 patients studied so far by using Southern analysis and cDNA probes. The only deletion that remained undetected with this system involves exons 22-25 and generates the junction fragment described elsewhere. The percentage of deletion mutations among DMS/BMD patients amounts to 63%, which is in agreement with similar estimates from other laboratories. When field-inversion gel electrophoresis is coupled to Southern analysis, the detection rate of deletion and duplication mutations reaches 65%.

  10. Early-progressive dilated cardiomyopathy in a family with Becker muscular dystrophy related to a novel frameshift mutation in the dystrophin gene exon 27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Takeshi; Fitzgerald, Kristi; Scavena, Mena; Gidding, Samuel; Cox, Mary O; Marks, Harold; Flanigan, Kevin M; Moore, Steven A

    2015-03-01

    We report a family in which two male siblings with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) developed severe dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and progressive heart failure (HF) at age 11 years; one died at age 14 years while awaiting heart transplant and the other underwent left ventricular assist device implantation at the same age. Genetic analysis of one sibling showed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 27 of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene (c.3779_3785delCTTTGGAinsGG), in which seven base pairs are deleted and two are inserted. Although this predicts an amino-acid substitution and premature termination (p.Thr1260Argfs*8), muscle biopsy dystrophin immunostaining instead indicates that the mutation is more likely to alter splicing. Despite relatively preserved skeletal muscular performance, both the siblings developed progressive HF secondary to early-onset DCM. In addition, their 7-year-old nephew with delayed gross motor development, mild proximal muscle weakness and markedly elevated serum creatine kinase level (>13 000 IU l(-1)) at 16 months was recently demonstrated to have the familial DMD mutation. Here, we report a novel genotype of BMD with early-onset DCM and progressive lethal HF during early adolescence.

  11. Activation of Both the Calpain and Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems Contributes to Septic Cardiomyopathy through Dystrophin Loss/Disruption and mTOR Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Ana Caroline Silva; Figueiredo, Maria Jose; Campos, Erica Carolina; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; Ramos, Simone Gusmao; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction caused by the impairment of myocardial contractility has been recognized as an important factor contributing to the high mortality in sepsis. Calpain activation in the heart takes place in response to increased intracellular calcium influx resulting in proteolysis of structural and contractile proteins with subsequent myocardial dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that increased levels of calpain in the septic heart leads to disruption of structural and contractile proteins and that administration of calpain inhibitor-1 (N-acetyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-norleucinal (ALLN)) after sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture prevents cardiac protein degradation. We also tested the hypothesis that calpain plays a role in the modulation of protein synthesis/degradation through the activation of proteasome-dependent proteolysis and inhibition of the mTOR pathway. Severe sepsis significantly increased heart calpain-1 levels and promoted ubiquitin and Pa28β over-expression with a reduction in the mTOR levels. In addition, sepsis reduced the expression of structural proteins dystrophin and β-dystroglycan as well as the contractile proteins actin and myosin. ALLN administration prevented sepsis-induced increases in calpain and ubiquitin levels in the heart, which resulted in decreased of structural and contractile proteins degradation and basal mTOR expression levels were re-established. Our results support the concept that increased calpain concentrations may be part of an important mechanism of sepsis-induced cardiac muscle proteolysis. PMID:27880847

  12. Spatio-Temporal Differences in Dystrophin Dynamics at mRNA and Protein Levels Revealed by a Novel FlipTrap Line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederique Ruf-Zamojski

    Full Text Available Dystrophin (Dmd is a structural protein that links the extracellular matrix to actin filaments in muscle fibers and is required for the maintenance of muscles integrity. Mutations in Dmd lead to muscular dystrophies in humans and other vertebrates. Here, we report the characterization of a zebrafish gene trap line that fluorescently labels the endogenous Dmd protein (Dmd-citrine, Gt(dmd-citrine ct90a. We show that the Dmd-citrine line recapitulates endogenous dmd transcript expression and Dmd protein localization. Using this Dmd-citrine line, we follow Dmd localization to the myosepta in real-time using time-lapse microscopy, and find that the accumulation of Dmd protein at the transverse myosepta coincides with the onset of myotome formation, a critical stage in muscle maturation. We observed that Dmd protein localizes specifically to the myosepta prior to dmd mRNA localization. Additionally, we demonstrate that the Dmd-citrine line can be used to assess muscular dystrophy following both genetic and physical disruptions of the muscle.

  13. [Iron deficiency, thrombocytosis and thromboembolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstatiev, Rayko

    2016-10-01

    Iron deficiency, the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide, is often associated with reactive thrombocytosis. Although secondary thrombocytosis is commonly considered to be harmless, there is accumulating evidence that elevated platelet counts, especially in the setting of iron deficiency, can lead to an increased thromboembolic risk in both arterial and venous systems. Here we present the mechanisms of iron deficiency-induced thrombocytosis and summarize its clinical consequences especially in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, chronic kidney disease or cancer. We hypothesize that iron deficiency is an underestimated thromboembolic risk factor, and that iron replacement therapy can become an effective preventive strategy in a variety of clinical settings.

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  15. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will depend ... may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia A A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  17. Altered muscle force and stiffness of skeletal muscles in alpha-sarcoglycan-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nisha D; Jannapureddy, Suneal R; Hwang, Willy; Chaudhry, Imran; Boriek, Aladin M

    2003-04-01

    Alpha-sarcoglycan (ASG) is a transmembrane protein of the dystrophin-associated complex, and absence of ASG causes limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. We hypothesize that disruption of the sarcoglycan complex may alter muscle extensibility and disrupt the coupling between passive transverse and axial contractile elements in the diaphragm. We determined the length-tension relationships of the diaphragm of young ASG-deficient mice and their controls during uniaxial and biaxial loading. We also determined the isometric contractile properties of the diaphragm muscles from mutant and normal mice in the absence and presence of passive transverse stress. We found that the diaphragm muscles of the null mutants for the protein ASG show 1) significant decrease in muscle extensibility in the directions of the muscle fibers and transverse to fibers, 2) significant reductions in force-generating capacity, and 3) significant reductions in coupling between longitudinal and transverse properties. Thus these findings suggest that the sarcoglycan complex serves a mechanical function in the diaphragm by contributing to muscle passive stiffness and to the modulation of the contractile properties of the muscle.

  18. Immunoproteasome in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiao-Nan Joyce; Graber, Ted G; Bratten, Wendy M; Ferrington, Deborah A; Thompson, LaDora V

    2014-04-01

    Increased proteasome activity has been implicated in the atrophy and deterioration associated with dystrophic muscles of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). While proteasome inhibitors show promise in the attenuation of muscle degeneration, proteasome inhibition-induced toxicity was a major drawback of this therapeutic strategy. Inhibitors that selectively target the proteasome subtype that is responsible for the loss in muscle mass and quality would reduce side effects and be less toxic. This study examined proteasome activity and subtype populations, along with muscle function, morphology and damage in wild-type (WT) mice and two murine models of DMD, dystrophin-deficient (MDX) and dystrophin- and utrophin-double-knockout (DKO) mice. We found that immunoproteasome content was increased in dystrophic muscles while the total proteasome content was unchanged among the three genotypes of mice. Proteasome proteolytic activity was elevated in dystrophic muscles, especially in DKO mice. These mice also exhibited more severe muscle atrophy than either WT or MDX mice. Muscle damage and regeneration, characterized by the activity of muscle creatine kinase in the blood and the percentage of central nuclei were equally increased in dystrophic mice. Accordingly, the overall muscle function was similarly reduced in both dystrophic mice compared with WT. These data demonstrated that there was transformation of standard proteasomes to immunoproteasomes in dystrophic muscles. In addition, DKO that showed greatest increase in proteasome activities also demonstrated more severe atrophy compared with MDX and WT. These results suggest a putative role for the immunoproteasome in muscle deterioration associated with DMD and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John J; Trakadis, Yannis J; Scriver, Charles R

    2011-08-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in intolerance to the dietary intake of the essential amino acid phenylalanine. It occurs in approximately 1:15,000 individuals. Deficiency of this enzyme produces a spectrum of disorders including classic phenylketonuria, mild phenylketonuria, and mild hyperphenylalaninemia. Classic phenylketonuria is caused by a complete or near-complete deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase activity and without dietary restriction of phenylalanine most children will develop profound and irreversible intellectual disability. Mild phenylketonuria and mild hyperphenylalaninemia are associated with lower risk of impaired cognitive development in the absence of treatment. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency can be diagnosed by newborn screening based on detection of the presence of hyperphenylalaninemia using the Guthrie microbial inhibition assay or other assays on a blood spot obtained from a heel prick. Since the introduction of newborn screening, the major neurologic consequences of hyperphenylalaninemia have been largely eradicated. Affected individuals can lead normal lives. However, recent data suggest that homeostasis is not fully restored with current therapy. Treated individuals have a higher incidence of neuropsychological problems. The mainstay of treatment for hyperphenylalaninemia involves a low-protein diet and use of a phenylalanine-free medical formula. This treatment must commence as soon as possible after birth and should continue for life. Regular monitoring of plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine concentrations is necessary. Targets of plasma phenylalanine of 120-360 μmol/L (2-6 mg/dL) in the first decade of life are essential for optimal outcome. Phenylalanine targets in adolescence and adulthood are less clear. A significant proportion of patients with phenylketonuria may benefit from adjuvant therapy with 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin stereoisomer. Special consideration must be

  20. Hsp72 preserves muscle function and slows progression of severe muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrig, Stefan M; van der Poel, Chris; Sayer, Timothy A; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Henstridge, Darren C; Church, Jarrod E; Lamon, Severine; Russell, Aaron P; Davies, Kay E; Febbraio, Mark A; Lynch, Gordon S

    2012-04-04

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe and progressive muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that result in the absence of the membrane-stabilizing protein dystrophin. Dystrophin-deficient muscle fibres are fragile and susceptible to an influx of Ca(2+), which activates inflammatory and muscle degenerative pathways. At present there is no cure for DMD, and existing therapies are ineffective. Here we show that increasing the expression of intramuscular heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) preserves muscle strength and ameliorates the dystrophic pathology in two mouse models of muscular dystrophy. Treatment with BGP-15 (a pharmacological inducer of Hsp72 currently in clinical trials for diabetes) improved muscle architecture, strength and contractile function in severely affected diaphragm muscles in mdx dystrophic mice. In dko mice, a phenocopy of DMD that results in severe spinal curvature (kyphosis), muscle weakness and premature death, BGP-15 decreased kyphosis, improved the dystrophic pathophysiology in limb and diaphragm muscles and extended lifespan. We found that the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA, the main protein responsible for the removal of intracellular Ca(2+)) is dysfunctional in severely affected muscles of mdx and dko mice, and that Hsp72 interacts with SERCA to preserve its function under conditions of stress, ultimately contributing to the decreased muscle degeneration seen with Hsp72 upregulation. Treatment with BGP-15 similarly increased SERCA activity in dystrophic skeletal muscles. Our results provide evidence that increasing the expression of Hsp72 in muscle (through the administration of BGP-15) has significant therapeutic potential for DMD and related conditions, either as a self-contained therapy or as an adjuvant with other potential treatments, including gene, cell and pharmacological therapies.

  1. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, loss of stamina, or changes in mental status. Minimal laboratory tests should include hematologic evaluation, B12, folate, iron, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, sodium, potassium, chloride, and carbon dioxide levels. Roentgenologic examination of the bone should also be obtained. Loss of bone substance is a major consequence of many forms of treatment, and dietary supplementation with calcium is warranted. Patients undergoing hemodialysis have shown carnitine and choline deficiencies, potassium depletion, and hypovitaminosis, as well as osteomalacia. Chronic drug use may alter intake, synthesis, absorption, transport, storage, metabolism, or excretion of nutrients. Patients vary markedly in the metabolic effects of drugs, and recommendations for nutrition must be related to age, sex, reproductive status, and genetic endowment. Moreover, the illness being treated can itself alter nutritional requirements and the effect of the treatment on nutrient status. The changes in nutritional levels induced by use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) are obscure; however, the effects on folate matabolism appear to be of less clinical import than previously suggested. Reduction in pyridoxine and serum vitamin B12 levels has been

  2. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  3. Phosphorus Deficiency in Ducklins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CuiHengmin; LuoLingping

    1995-01-01

    20 one-day-old Tianfu ducklings were fed on a natural diet deficient in phosphorus(Ca 0.80%,P 0.366%)for three weeks and examined for signs and lesions.Signs began to appear at the age of one week,and became serous at two weeks.13 ducklings died during the experiment.Morbidity was 100% and mortality was 65%.The affected ducklings mainly showed leg weakness,severe lamencess,deprssion,lack of appetite and stunted growth,The serum alkaline phosphatase activities increased markedly.The serum phosphorus concentration,tibial ash,ash calcium and phosphorus content decreased obviously.At necropsy,maxillae and ribe were soft,and the latter was crooked.Long ones were soft and broke easily.The hypertrophic zone of the growth-plate in the epiphysis of long ones was lengthened and osteoid tissue increased in the metaphyseal spongiosa histopathologically.The above mentioned symptoms and lesions could be prevented by adding phosphorus to the natural deficient diet(up to 0.65%),The relationship between lesions and signs,pathomorphological characterisation and pathogensis were also discussed in this paper.

  4. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  5. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froissart, Roseline; Piraud, Monique; Boudjemline, Alix Mollet; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Petit, François; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Eberschweiler, Pascale Trioche; Gajdos, Vincent; Labrune, Philippe

    2011-05-20

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  6. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blo...

  7. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene expression profiling identifies molecular pathways associated with collagen VI deficiency and provides novel therapeutic targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Paco

    Full Text Available Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD, caused by collagen VI deficiency, is a common congenital muscular dystrophy. At present, the role of collagen VI in muscle and the mechanism of disease are not fully understood. To address this we have applied microarrays to analyse the transcriptome of UCMD muscle and compare it to healthy muscle and other muscular dystrophies. We identified 389 genes which are differentially regulated in UCMD relative to controls. In addition, there were 718 genes differentially expressed between UCMD and dystrophin deficient muscle. In contrast, only 29 genes were altered relative to other congenital muscular dystrophies. Changes in gene expression were confirmed by real-time PCR. The set of regulated genes was analysed by Gene Ontology, KEGG pathways and Ingenuity Pathway analysis to reveal the molecular functions and gene networks associated with collagen VI defects. The most significantly regulated pathways were those involved in muscle regeneration, extracellular matrix remodelling and inflammation. We characterised the immune response in UCMD biopsies as being mainly mediated via M2 macrophages and the complement pathway indicating that anti-inflammatory treatment may be beneficial to UCMD as for other dystrophies. We studied the immunolocalisation of ECM components and found that biglycan, a collagen VI interacting proteoglycan, was reduced in the basal lamina of UCMD patients. We propose that biglycan reduction is secondary to collagen VI loss and that it may be contributing towards UCMD pathophysiology. Consequently, strategies aimed at over-expressing biglycan and restore the link between the muscle cell surface and the extracellular matrix should be considered.

  9. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Molecular Pathways Associated with Collagen VI Deficiency and Provides Novel Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paco, Sonia; Kalko, Susana G.; Jou, Cristina; Rodríguez, María A.; Corbera, Joan; Muntoni, Francesco; Feng, Lucy; Rivas, Eloy; Torner, Ferran; Gualandi, Francesca; Gomez-Foix, Anna M.; Ferrer, Anna; Ortez, Carlos; Nascimento, Andrés; Colomer, Jaume; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), caused by collagen VI deficiency, is a common congenital muscular dystrophy. At present, the role of collagen VI in muscle and the mechanism of disease are not fully understood.