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Sample records for dystroglycan loss disrupts

  1. Dystroglycan loss disrupts polarity and beta-casein induction inmammary epithelial cells by perturbing laminin anchoring

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    Weir, M. Lynn; Oppizzi, Maria Luisa; Henry, Michael D.; Onishi,Akiko; Campbell, Kevin P.; Bissell, Mina J.; Muschler, John L.

    2006-02-17

    Precise contact between epithelial cells and their underlying basement membrane is critical to the maintenance of tissue architecture and function. To understand the role that the laminin receptor dystroglycan (DG) plays in these processes, we assayed cell responses to laminin-111 following conditional ablation of DG expression in cultured mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Strikingly, DG loss disrupted laminin-111-induced polarity and {beta}-casein production, and abolished laminin assembly at the step of laminin binding to the cell surface. DG re-expression restored these deficiencies. Investigations of mechanism revealed that DG cytoplasmic sequences were not necessary for laminin assembly and signaling, and only when the entire mucin domain of extracellular DG was deleted did laminin assembly not occur. These results demonstrate that DG is essential as a laminin-111 co-receptor in MECs that functions by mediating laminin anchoring to the cell surface, a process that allows laminin polymerization, tissue polarity, and {beta}-casein induction. The observed loss of laminin-111 assembly and signaling in DG-/-MECs provides insights into the signaling changes occurring in breast carcinomas and other cancers, where DG's laminin-binding function is frequently defective.

  2. Development of rabbit monoclonal antibodies for detection of alpha-dystroglycan in normal and dystrophic tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa J Fortunato

    Full Text Available Alpha-dystroglycan requires a rare O-mannose glycan modification to form its binding epitope for extracellular matrix proteins such as laminin. This functional glycan is disrupted in a cohort of muscular dystrophies, the secondary dystroglycanopathies, and is abnormal in some metastatic cancers. The most commonly used reagent for detection of alpha-dystroglycan is mouse monoclonal antibody IIH6, but it requires the functional O-mannose structure for recognition. Therefore, the ability to detect alpha-dystroglycan protein in disease states where it lacks the full O-mannose glycan has been limited. To overcome this hurdle, rabbit monoclonal antibodies against the alpha-dystroglycan C-terminus were generated. The new antibodies, named 5-2, 29-5, and 45-3, detect alpha-dystroglycan from mouse, rat and pig skeletal muscle by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In a mouse model of fukutin-deficient dystroglycanopathy, all antibodies detected low molecular weight alpha-dystroglycan in disease samples demonstrating a loss of functional glycosylation. Alternately, in a porcine model of Becker muscular dystrophy, relative abundance of alpha-dystroglycan was decreased, consistent with a reduction in expression of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in affected muscle. Therefore, these new rabbit monoclonal antibodies are suitable reagents for alpha-dystroglycan core protein detection and will enhance dystroglycan-related studies.

  3. [Dystroglycan linkage and muscular dystrophy].

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    Shimizu, Teruo

    2002-11-01

    Dystroglycan is a key complex between basal lamina laminin, extracellularly and membrano-cytoskeleton, intracellularly. The damage of this linkage is turned out to cause muscular dystrophies. Dystroglycan knockout is lethal. Dystroglycan-associated intracellular proteins such as dystrophin, dystrobrevin, sarcoglycans, plectin and caveolin-3 are responsible for causing severe (Duchenne type) and moderate forms (Becker, LGMDs). Laminin, dystroglycan-binding extracellular protein, is deficient in the most severe form of congenital muscular dystrophy with normal intelligence and eye. Recently, a remarkable progress is made in most severe forms of congenital muscular dystrophy with anomalies of brain and eye such as Fukuyama type (Japan) and muscle-eye-brain disease (Finland). The gene product for Fukuyama type, fukutin, belongs to a family of glycosylation enzymes in bacteria and yeast. Since alpha-dystroglycan contains 14-15 o-glycans, ser/thr-mannose 2-1 GlcNAc 4-1 Gal 3-2 Sial in the middle third mucin-domain and the sial-o-glycan is essential for laminin-binding, and since alpha-dystroglycan is defective in Fukuyama type sarcolemma with anti both sugar moiety- and peptide-antidodies, defective fukutin causes incomplete o-glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan. In '02, it is clarified that a glycosylation enzyme, POMGnT1 which modifies GlcNAc onto ser/thr-mannose, is defective in 6 MEB patients. The loss of the enzyme activity is turned out to lose alpha-dystroglycan from sarcolemma of MEB. These data strongly suggests that o-glycosylation defect of alpha-dystroglycan causes the most severe congenital muscular dystrophy such as Fukuyama type, MEB and Walker Warburg syndrome.

  4. Vestibular loss disrupts daily rhythm in rats.

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    Martin, T; Mauvieux, B; Bulla, J; Quarck, G; Davenne, D; Denise, P; Philoxène, B; Besnard, S

    2015-02-01

    Hypergravity disrupts the circadian regulation of temperature (Temp) and locomotor activity (Act) mediated through the vestibular otolithic system in mice. In contrast, we do not know whether the anatomical structures associated with vestibular input are crucial for circadian rhythm regulation at 1 G on Earth. In the present study we observed the effects of bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) on the daily rhythms of Temp and Act in semipigmented rats. Our model of vestibular lesion allowed for selective peripheral hair cell degeneration without any other damage. Rats with BVL exhibited a disruption in their daily rhythms (Temp and Act), which were replaced by a main ultradian period (τ <20 h) for 115.8 ± 68.6 h after vestibular lesion compared with rats in the control group. Daily rhythms of Temp and Act in rats with BVL recovered within 1 wk, probably counterbalanced by photic and other nonphotic time cues. No correlation was found between Temp and Act daily rhythms after vestibular lesion in rats with BVL, suggesting a direct influence of vestibular input on the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Our findings support the hypothesis that the vestibular system has an influence on daily rhythm homeostasis in semipigmented rats on Earth, and raise the question of whether daily rhythms might be altered due to vestibular pathology in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Basal lamina strengthens cell membrane integrity via the laminin G domain-binding motif of α-dystroglycan

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    Han, Renzhi; Kanagawa, Motoi; Yoshida-Moriguchi, Takako; Rader, Erik P.; Ng, Rainer A.; Michele, Daniel E.; Muirhead, David E.; Kunz, Stefan; Moore, Steven A.; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.; Mayer, Ulrike; Oldstone, Michael B. A.; Faulkner, John A.; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle basal lamina is linked to the sarcolemma through transmembrane receptors, including integrins and dystroglycan. The function of dystroglycan relies critically on posttranslational glycosylation, a common target shared by a genetically heterogeneous group of muscular dystrophies characterized by α-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation. Here we show that both dystroglycan and integrin α7 contribute to force-production of muscles, but that only disruption of dystroglycan causes detachment of the basal lamina from the sarcolemma and renders muscle prone to contraction-induced injury. These phenotypes of dystroglycan-null muscles are recapitulated by Largemyd muscles, which have an intact dystrophin–glycoprotein complex and lack only the laminin globular domain-binding motif on α-dystroglycan. Compromised sarcolemmal integrity is directly shown in Largemyd muscles and similarly in normal muscles when arenaviruses compete with matrix proteins for binding α-dystroglycan. These data provide direct mechanistic insight into how the dystroglycan-linked basal lamina contributes to the maintenance of sarcolemmal integrity and protects muscles from damage. PMID:19633189

  6. Neuronal Dystroglycan Is Necessary for Formation and Maintenance of Functional CCK-Positive Basket Cell Terminals on Pyramidal Cells.

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    Früh, Simon; Romanos, Jennifer; Panzanelli, Patrizia; Bürgisser, Daniela; Tyagarajan, Shiva K; Campbell, Kevin P; Santello, Mirko; Fritschy, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-05

    Distinct types of GABAergic interneurons target different subcellular domains of pyramidal cells, thereby shaping pyramidal cell activity patterns. Whether the presynaptic heterogeneity of GABAergic innervation is mirrored by specific postsynaptic factors is largely unexplored. Here we show that dystroglycan, a protein responsible for the majority of congenital muscular dystrophies when dysfunctional, has a function at postsynaptic sites restricted to a subset of GABAergic interneurons. Conditional deletion of Dag1, encoding dystroglycan, in pyramidal cells caused loss of CCK-positive basket cell terminals in hippocampus and neocortex. PV-positive basket cell terminals were unaffected in mutant mice, demonstrating interneuron subtype-specific function of dystroglycan. Loss of dystroglycan in pyramidal cells had little influence on clustering of other GABAergic postsynaptic proteins and of glutamatergic synaptic proteins. CCK-positive terminals were not established at P21 in the absence of dystroglycan and were markedly reduced when dystroglycan was ablated in adult mice, suggesting a role for dystroglycan in both formation and maintenance of CCK-positive terminals. The necessity of neuronal dystroglycan for functional innervation by CCK-positive basket cell axon terminals was confirmed by reduced frequency of inhibitory events in pyramidal cells of dystroglycan-deficient mice and further corroborated by the inefficiency of carbachol to increase IPSC frequency in these cells. Finally, neurexin binding seems dispensable for dystroglycan function because knock-in mice expressing binding-deficient T190M dystroglycan displayed normal CCK-positive terminals. Together, we describe a novel function of dystroglycan in interneuron subtype-specific trans-synaptic signaling, revealing correlation of presynaptic and postsynaptic molecular diversity.

  7. Dystroglycan Suppresses Notch to Regulate Stem Cell Niche Structure and Function in the Developing Postnatal Subventricular Zone.

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    McClenahan, Freyja K; Sharma, Himanshu; Shan, Xiwei; Eyermann, Christopher; Colognato, Holly

    2016-09-12

    While the extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to regulate neural stem cell quiescence in the adult subventricular zone (SVZ), the function of ECM in the developing SVZ remains unknown. Here, we report that the ECM receptor dystroglycan regulates a unique developmental restructuring of ECM in the early postnatal SVZ. Dystroglycan is furthermore required for ependymal cell differentiation and assembly of niche pinwheel structures, at least in part by suppressing Notch activation in radial glial cells, which leads to the increased expression of MCI, Myb, and FoxJ1, transcriptional regulators necessary for acquisition of the multiciliated phenotype. Dystroglycan also regulates perinatal radial glial cell proliferation and transition into intermediate gliogenic progenitors, such that either acute or constitutive loss of function in dystroglycan results in increased oligodendrogenesis. These findings reveal a role for dystroglycan in orchestrating both the assembly and function of the SVZ neural stem cell niche.

  8. Dystroglycan is required for polarizing the epithelial cells and the oocyte in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Wu-Min; Schneider, Martina; Frock, Richard;

    2003-01-01

    The transmembrane protein Dystroglycan is a central element of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex, which is involved in the pathogenesis of many forms of muscular dystrophy. Dystroglycan is a receptor for multiple extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules such as Laminin, agrin and perleca......, possibly by organizing the Laminin ECM. These data suggest that the primary function of Dystroglycan in oogenesis is to organize cellular polarity; and this study sets the stage for analyzing the Dystroglycan complex by using the power of Drosophila molecular genetics......., and plays a role in linking the ECM to the actin cytoskeleton; however, how these interactions are regulated and their basic cellular functions are poorly understood. Using mosaic analysis and RNAi in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, we show that Dystroglycan is required cell......-autonomously for cellular polarity in two different cell types, the epithelial cells (apicobasal polarity) and the oocyte (anteroposterior polarity). Loss of Dystroglycan function in follicle and disc epithelia results in expansion of apical markers to the basal side of cells and overexpression results in a reduced apical...

  9. Drug screens based on the newly found role of dystroglycan proteolysis and restoration of dystroglycan function thereof

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    Bissell, Mina J.; Muschler, John L.

    2010-02-23

    The present invention provides methods and compositions for the diagnosis and treatment of cells lacking normal growth arresting characteristic. The present invention demonstrates that many tumor cells lack normal cell surface .alpha.-dystroglycan and thereby lack dystroglycan function. Dystroglycan can be lost from the cell surface by proteolytic shedding of a fragment of .alpha.-dystroglycan into the surrounding medium. Upon restoration of dystroglycan function and over-expression of the dystroglycan gene, the once tumorigenic cells revert to non-tumorigenic cells which polarize and arrest cell growth in the presence of basement membrane proteins, demonstrating that dystroglycan functions as a tumor marker and suppressor.

  10. Development of rabbit monoclonal antibodies for detection of alpha-dystroglycan in normal and dystrophic tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha-dystroglycan requires a rare O-mannose glycan modification to form its binding epitope for extracellular matrix proteins such as laminin. This functional glycan is disrupted in a cohort of muscular dystrophies, the secondary dystroglycanopathies, and is abnormal in some metastatic cancers. The...

  11. The conserved WW-domain binding sites in Dystroglycan C-terminus are essential but partially redundant for Dystroglycan function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng W-M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dystroglycan (Dg is a transmembrane protein that is a part of the Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC which connects the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton. The C-terminal end of Dg contains a number of putative SH3, SH2 and WW domain binding sites. The most C-terminal PPXY motif has been established as a binding site for Dystrophin (Dys WW-domain. However, our previous studies indicate that both Dystroglycan PPXY motives, WWbsI and WWbsII can bind Dystrophin protein in vitro. Results We now find that both WW binding sites are important for maintaining full Dg function in the establishment of oocyte polarity in Drosophila. If either WW binding site is mutated, the Dg protein can still be active. However, simultaneous mutations in both WW binding sites abolish the Dg activities in both overexpression and loss-of-function oocyte polarity assays in vivo. Additionally, sequence comparisons of WW binding sites in 12 species of Drosophila, as well as in humans, reveal a high level of conservation. This preservation throughout evolution supports the idea that both WW binding sites are functionally required. Conclusion Based on the obtained results we propose that the presence of the two WW binding sites in Dystroglycan secures the essential interaction between Dg and Dys and might further provide additional regulation for the cytoskeletal interactions of this complex.

  12. Hypoglycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan in patients with hereditary IBM due to GNE mutations.

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    Huizing, Marjan; Rakocevic, Goran; Sparks, Susan E; Mamali, Ioanna; Shatunov, Alexey; Goldfarb, Lev; Krasnewich, Donna; Gahl, William A; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2004-03-01

    Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is an adult onset neuromuscular disorder associated with mutations in the gene UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE), whose product is the rate limiting bi-functional enzyme catalyzing the first two steps of sialic acid biosynthesis. Loss of GNE activity in HIBM is thought to impair sialic acid production and interfere with proper sialylation of glycoconjugates, but it remains unclear how such a defect would lead to muscle destruction and muscle weakness. Hypoglycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan, a central protein of the skeletal muscle dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, results in disturbed interactions with extracellular matrix proteins. This has recently been identified as the pathomechanism involved in several congenital muscular dystrophies. We examined the glycosylation status of alpha-dystroglycan in muscle biopsies of four HIBM patients of non-Iranian Jewish origin (one American, two Indians, and one Greek). Two of these patients carry novel compound heterozygous GNE mutations on exon 2 and exon 9. All four muscle biopsies showed absent or markedly reduced immunolabeling with two different antibodies (VIA4 and IIH6) to glycosylated epitopes of alpha-dystroglycan. Normal labeling was found using antibodies to the core alpha-dystroglycan protein, beta-dystroglycan, and laminin alpha-2. These findings resemble those found for other congenital muscular dystrophies, suggesting that HIBM may be a "dystroglycanopathy," and providing an explanation for the muscle weakness of patients with GNE mutations.

  13. Mechanisms of plasma disruption and runaway electron losses in tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullaev, S S; Wongrach, K; Tokar, M; Koslowski, H R; Willi, O; Zeng, L

    2015-01-01

    Based on the analysis of data from the numerous dedicated experiments on plasma disruptions in the TEXTOR tokamak mechanisms of the formation of runaway electron beams and their losses are proposed. The plasma disruption is caused by strong stochastic magnetic field formed due to nonlinearly excited low-mode number MHD modes. It is hypothesized that the runaway electron beam is formed in the central plasma region confined inside the intact magnetic surface located between $q=1$ and the closest low--order rational [$q=4/3$ or $q=3/2$] magnetic surfaces. The thermal quench time caused by the fast electron transport in a stochastic magnetic field is calculated using the collisional transport model. The current decay stage is due to the ambipolar particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field. The runaway electron beam in the confined plasma region is formed due to their acceleration the inductive toroidal electric field. The runaway electron beam current is modeled as a sum of toroidally symmetric part and a ...

  14. Circadian Disruption Leads to Loss of Homeostasis and Disease

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    Carolina Escobar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of a synchronized temporal order for adaptation and homeostasis is discussed in this review. We present evidence suggesting that an altered temporal order between the biological clock and external temporal signals leads to disease. Evidence mainly based on a rodent model of “night work” using forced activity during the sleep phase suggests that altered activity and feeding schedules, out of phase from the light/dark cycle, may be the main cause for the loss of circadian synchrony and disease. It is proposed that by avoiding food intake during sleep hours the circadian misalignment and adverse consequences can be prevented. This review does not attempt to present a thorough revision of the literature, but instead it aims to highlight the association between circadian disruption and disease with special emphasis on the contribution of feeding schedules in circadian synchrony.

  15. Deficiency in Cardiac Dystrophin Affects the Abundance of the α-/β-Dystroglycan Complex

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    James Lohan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Duchenne muscular dystrophy is primarily categorised as a skeletal muscle disease, deficiency in the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin also affects the heart. The central transsarcolemmal linker between the actin membrane cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix is represented by the dystrophin-associated dystroglycans. Chemical cross-linking analysis revealed no significant differences in the dimeric status of the α-/β-dystroglycan subcomplex in the dystrophic mdx heart as compared to normal cardiac tissue. In analogy to skeletal muscle fibres, heart muscle also exhibited a greatly reduced abundance of both dystroglycans in dystrophin-deficient cells. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the degree of reduction in α-dystroglycan is more pronounced in matured mdx skeletal muscle as contrasted to the mdx heart. The fact that the deficiency in dystrophin triggers a similar pathobiochemical response in both types of muscle suggests that the cardiomyopathic complications observed in x-linked muscular dystrophy might be initiated by the loss of the dystrophin-associated surface glycoprotein complex.

  16. The conserved WW-domain binding sites in Dystroglycan C-terminus are essential but partially redundant for Dystroglycan function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yatsenko, A S; Kucherenko, M M; Pantoja, M;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dystroglycan (Dg) is a transmembrane protein that is a part of the Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC) which connects the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton. The C-terminal end of Dg contains a number of putative SH3, SH2 and WW domain binding sites. The most C-terminal ......BACKGROUND: Dystroglycan (Dg) is a transmembrane protein that is a part of the Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC) which connects the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton. The C-terminal end of Dg contains a number of putative SH3, SH2 and WW domain binding sites. The most C...... function in the establishment of oocyte polarity in Drosophila. If either WW binding site is mutated, the Dg protein can still be active. However, simultaneous mutations in both WW binding sites abolish the Dg activities in both overexpression and loss-of-function oocyte polarity assays in vivo....... Additionally, sequence comparisons of WW binding sites in 12 species of Drosophila, as well as in humans, reveal a high level of conservation. This preservation throughout evolution supports the idea that both WW binding sites are functionally required. CONCLUSION: Based on the obtained results we propose...

  17. Dystroglycan depletion inhibits the functions of differentiated HL-60 cells.

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    Martínez-Zárate, Alma Delia; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Alonso-Rangel, Lea; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Winder, Steve J; Cerecedo, Doris

    2014-06-01

    Dystroglycan has recently been characterized in blood tissue cells, as part of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex but to date nothing is known of its role in the differentiation process of neutrophils. We have investigated the role of dystroglycan in the human promyelocytic leukemic cell line HL-60 differentiated to neutrophils. Depletion of dystroglycan by RNAi resulted in altered morphology and reduced properties of differentiated HL-60 cells, including chemotaxis, respiratory burst, phagocytic activities and expression of markers of differentiation. These findings strongly implicate dystroglycan as a key membrane adhesion protein involved in the differentiation process in HL-60 cells.

  18. Transgenic overexpression of LARGE induces α-dystroglycan hyperglycosylation in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

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    Martin Brockington

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: LARGE is one of seven putative or demonstrated glycosyltransferase enzymes defective in a common group of muscular dystrophies with reduced glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. Overexpression of LARGE induces hyperglycosylation of α-dystroglycan in both wild type and in cells from dystroglycanopathy patients, irrespective of their primary gene defect, restoring functional glycosylation. Viral delivery of LARGE to skeletal muscle in animal models of dystroglycanopathy has identical effects in vivo, suggesting that the restoration of functional glycosylation could have therapeutic applications in these disorders. Pharmacological strategies to upregulate Large expression are also being explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to asses the safety and efficacy of long term LARGE over-expression in vivo, we have generated four mouse lines expressing a human LARGE transgene. On observation, LARGE transgenic mice were indistinguishable from the wild type littermates. Tissue analysis from young mice of all four lines showed a variable pattern of transgene expression: highest in skeletal and cardiac muscles, and lower in brain, kidney and liver. Transgene expression in striated muscles correlated with α-dystroglycan hyperglycosylation, as determined by immunoreactivity to antibody IIH6 and increased laminin binding on an overlay assay. Other components of the dystroglycan complex and extracellular matrix ligands were normally expressed, and general muscle histology was indistinguishable from wild type controls. Further detailed muscle physiological analysis demonstrated a loss of force in response to eccentric exercise in the older, but not in the younger mice, suggesting this deficit developed over time. However this remained a subclinical feature as no pathology was observed in older mice in any muscles including the diaphragm, which is sensitive to mechanical load-induced damage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work shows that

  19. Defective glycosylation of α-dystroglycan contributes to podocyte flattening.

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    Kojima, Kenichiro; Nosaka, Hitonari; Kishimoto, Yuki; Nishiyama, Yuri; Fukuda, Seiichi; Shimada, Masaru; Kodaka, Kenzo; Saito, Fumiaki; Matsumura, Kiichiro; Shimizu, Teruo; Toda, Tatsushi; Takeda, Satoshi; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shunya

    2011-02-01

    In addition to skeletal muscle and the nervous system, α-dystroglycan is found in the podocyte basal membrane, stabilizing these cells on the glomerular basement membrane. Fukutin, named after the gene responsible for Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy, is a putative glycosyltransferase required for the post-translational modification of α-dystroglycan. Chimeric mice targeted for both alleles of fukutin develop severe muscular dystrophy; however, these mice do not have proteinuria. Despite the lack of a functional renal defect, we evaluated glomerular structure and found minor abnormalities in the chimeric mice by light microscopy. Electron microscopy revealed flattening of podocyte foot processes, the number of which was significantly lower in the chimeric compared to wild-type mice. A monoclonal antibody against the laminin-binding carbohydrate residues of α-dystroglycan did not detect α-dystroglycan glycosylation in the glomeruli by immunoblotting or immunohistochemistry. In contrast, expression of the core α-dystroglycan protein was preserved. There was no statistical difference in dystroglycan mRNA expression or in the amount of nephrin and α3-integrin protein in the chimeric compared to the wild-type mice as judged by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. Thus, our results indicate that appropriate glycosylation of α-dystroglycan has an important role in the maintenance of podocyte architecture.

  20. Structure of the runaway electron loss during induced disruptions in TEXTOR

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    Wongrach, K.; Finken, K. H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Willi, O.; Zeng, L.; Xu, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The loss of runaway electrons during an induced disruption is recorded by a synchrotron imaging technique using a fast infrared CCD camera. The loss is predominantly diffuse. During the "spiky-loss phase", when the runaway beam moves close to the wall, a narrow channel between the runaway column and a scintillator probe is formed and lasts until the runaway beam is terminated. In some cases, the processed images show a stripe pattern at the plasma edge. A comparison between the MHD dominated disruptions and the MHD-free disruption is performed. A new mechanism of plasma disruptions with the runaway electron generation and a novel model which reproduces many characteristic features of the plasma beam evolution during a disruption is briefly described.

  1. Structure of the runaway electron loss during induced disruptions in TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongrach, K.; Finken, K. H.; Willi, O. [Institut für Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf 40225 (Germany); Abdullaev, S. S. [Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich 52428 (Germany); Zeng, L. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Xu, Y. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-10-15

    The loss of runaway electrons during an induced disruption is recorded by a synchrotron imaging technique using a fast infrared CCD camera. The loss is predominantly diffuse. During the “spiky-loss phase”, when the runaway beam moves close to the wall, a narrow channel between the runaway column and a scintillator probe is formed and lasts until the runaway beam is terminated. In some cases, the processed images show a stripe pattern at the plasma edge. A comparison between the MHD dominated disruptions and the MHD-free disruption is performed. A new mechanism of plasma disruptions with the runaway electron generation and a novel model which reproduces many characteristic features of the plasma beam evolution during a disruption is briefly described.

  2. New Dystrophin/Dystroglycan interactors control neuron behavior in Drosophila eye

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    Rishko Valentyna M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC is a large multi-component complex that is well known for its function in muscle tissue. When the main components of the DGC, Dystrophin (Dys and Dystroglycan (Dg are affected cognitive impairment and mental retardation in addition to muscle degeneration can occur. Previously we performed an array of genetic screens using a Drosophila model for muscular dystrophy in order to find novel DGC interactors aiming to elucidate the signaling role(s in which the complex is involved. Since the function of the DGC in the brain and nervous system has not been fully defined, we have here continued to analyze the DGC modifiers' function in the developing Drosophila brain and eye. Results Given that disruption of Dys and Dg leads to improper photoreceptor axon projections into the lamina and eye neuron elongation defects during development, we have determined the function of previously screened components and their genetic interaction with the DGC in this tissue. Our study first found that mutations in chif, CG34400, Nrk, Lis1, capt and Cam cause improper axon path-finding and loss of SP2353, Grh, Nrk, capt, CG34400, vimar, Lis1 and Cam cause shortened rhabdomere lengths. We determined that Nrk, mbl, capt and Cam genetically interact with Dys and/or Dg in these processes. It is notable that most of the neuronal DGC interacting components encountered are involved in regulation of actin dynamics. Conclusions Our data indicate possible DGC involvement in the process of cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons. The identification of new components that interact with the DGC not only helps to dissect the mechanism of axon guidance and eye neuron differentiation but also provides a great opportunity for understanding the signaling mechanisms by which the cell surface receptor Dg communicates via Dys with the actin cytoskeleton.

  3. Disrupted functional brain connectome in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haibo; Fan, Wenliang; Zhao, Xueyan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenjuan; Lei, Ping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Haha; Cheng, Huamao; Shi, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is generally defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30 dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies and within a three-day period. This hearing loss is usually unilateral and can be associated with tinnitus and vertigo. The pathogenesis of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss is still unknown, and the alterations in the functional connectivity are suspected to involve one possible pathogenesis. Despite scarce findings with respect to alterations in brain functional networks in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss, the alterations of the whole brain functional connectome and whether these alterations were already in existence in the acute period remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of brain functional connectome in two large samples of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients and to investigate the correlation between unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss characteristics and changes in the functional network properties. Pure tone audiometry was performed to assess hearing ability. Abnormal changes in the peripheral auditory system were examined using conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The graph theoretical network analysis method was used to detect brain connectome alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Compared with the control groups, both groups of unilateral SSNHL patients exhibited a significantly increased clustering coefficient, global efficiency, and local efficiency but a significantly decreased characteristic path length. In addition, the primary increased nodal strength (e.g., nodal betweenness, hubs) was observed in several regions primarily, including the limbic and paralimbic systems, and in the auditory network brain areas. These findings suggest that the alteration of network organization already exists in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients within the acute period

  4. Dystroglycan versatility in cell adhesion: a tale of multiple motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winder Steve J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dystroglycan is a ubiquitously expressed heterodimeric adhesion receptor. The extracellular α-subunit makes connections with a number of laminin G domain ligands including laminins, agrin and perlecan in the extracellular matrix and the transmembrane β-subunit makes connections to the actin filament network via cytoskeletal linkers including dystrophin, utrophin, ezrin and plectin, depending on context. Originally discovered as part of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex of skeletal muscle, dystroglycan is an important adhesion molecule and signalling scaffold in a multitude of cell types and tissues and is involved in several diseases. Dystroglycan has emerged as a multifunctional adhesion platform with many interacting partners associating with its short unstructured cytoplasmic domain. Two particular hotspots are the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane region and at the very carboxy terminus of dystroglycan. Regions which between them have several overlapping functions: in the juxtamembrane region; a nuclear localisation signal, ezrin/radixin/moesin protein, rapsyn and ERK MAP Kinase binding function, and at the C terminus a regulatory tyrosine governing WW, SH2 and SH3 domain interactions. We will discuss the binding partners for these motifs and how their interactions and regulation can modulate the involvement of dystroglycan in a range of different adhesion structures and functions depending on context. Thus dystroglycan presents as a multifunctional scaffold involved in adhesion and adhesion-mediated signalling with its functions under exquisite spatio-temporal regulation.

  5. Loss of ceramide synthase 3 causes lethal skin barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennemann, Richard; Rabionet, Mariona; Gorgas, Karin; Epstein, Sharon; Dalpke, Alexander; Rothermel, Ulrike; Bayerle, Aline; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Imgrund, Silke; Kirsch, Joachim; Nickel, Walter; Willecke, Klaus; Riezman, Howard; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Sandhoff, Roger

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum as the outermost epidermal layer protects against exsiccation and infection. Both the underlying cornified envelope (CE) and the intercellular lipid matrix contribute essentially to these two main protective barriers. Epidermis-unique ceramides with ultra-long-chain acyl moities (ULC-Cers) are key components of extracellular lipid lamellae (ELL) and are bound to CE proteins, thereby contributing to the cornified lipid envelope (CLE). Here, we identified human and mouse ceramide synthase 3 (CerS3), among CerS1-6, to be exclusively required for the ULC-Cer synthesis in vitro and of mouse CerS3 in vivo. Deficiency of CerS3 in mice results in complete loss of ULC-Cers (≥C26), lack of continuous ELL and a non-functional CLE. Consequently, newborn mutant mice die shortly after birth from transepidermal water loss. Mutant skin is prone to Candida albicans infection highlighting ULC-Cers to be pivotal for both barrier functions. Persistent periderm, hyperkeratosis and deficient cornification are hallmarks of mutant skin demonstrating loss of Cers to trigger a keratinocyte maturation arrest at an embryonic pre-barrier stage.

  6. Disruption?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray......This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray...

  7. Disruption?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray......This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray...

  8. The conserved WW-domain binding sites in Dystroglycan C-terminus are essential but partially redundant for Dystroglycan function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yatsenko, A S; Kucherenko, M M; Pantoja, M;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dystroglycan (Dg) is a transmembrane protein that is a part of the Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC) which connects the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton. The C-terminal end of Dg contains a number of putative SH3, SH2 and WW domain binding sites. The most C-terminal ......BACKGROUND: Dystroglycan (Dg) is a transmembrane protein that is a part of the Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC) which connects the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton. The C-terminal end of Dg contains a number of putative SH3, SH2 and WW domain binding sites. The most C......-terminal PPXY motif has been established as a binding site for Dystrophin (Dys) WW-domain. However, our previous studies indicate that both Dystroglycan PPXY motives, WWbsI and WWbsII can bind Dystrophin protein in vitro. RESULTS: We now find that both WW binding sites are important for maintaining full Dg...

  9. Autosomal recessive dilated cardiomyopathy due to DOLK mutations results from abnormal dystroglycan O-mannosylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk J Lefeber

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic causes for autosomal recessive forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM are only rarely identified, although they are thought to contribute considerably to sudden cardiac death and heart failure, especially in young children. Here, we describe 11 young patients (5-13 years with a predominant presentation of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Metabolic investigations showed deficient protein N-glycosylation, leading to a diagnosis of Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG. Homozygosity mapping in the consanguineous families showed a locus with two known genes in the N-glycosylation pathway. In all individuals, pathogenic mutations were identified in DOLK, encoding the dolichol kinase responsible for formation of dolichol-phosphate. Enzyme analysis in patients' fibroblasts confirmed a dolichol kinase deficiency in all families. In comparison with the generally multisystem presentation in CDG, the nonsyndromic DCM in several individuals was remarkable. Investigation of other dolichol-phosphate dependent glycosylation pathways in biopsied heart tissue indicated reduced O-mannosylation of alpha-dystroglycan with concomitant functional loss of its laminin-binding capacity, which has been linked to DCM. We thus identified a combined deficiency of protein N-glycosylation and alpha-dystroglycan O-mannosylation in patients with nonsyndromic DCM due to autosomal recessive DOLK mutations.

  10. Dystroglycan Depletion Impairs Actin-Dependent Functions of Differentiated Kasumi-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escárcega-Tame, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Alonso-Rangel, Lea; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Winder, Steve J; Cerecedo, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Dystroglycan has recently been characterised in blood tissue cells, as part of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex involved in the differentiation process of neutrophils. In the present study we have investigated the role of dystroglycan in the human promyelocytic leukemic cell line Kasumi-1 differentiated to macrophage-like cells. We characterised the pattern expression and subcellular distribution of dystroglycans in non-differentiated and differentiated Kasumi-1 cells. Our results demonstrated by WB and flow cytometer assays that during the differentiation process to macrophages, dystroglycans were down-regulated; these results were confirmed with qRT-PCR assays. Additionally, depletion of dystroglycan by RNAi resulted in altered morphology and reduced properties of differentiated Kasumi-1 cells, including morphology, migration and phagocytic activities although secretion of IL-1β and expression of markers of differentiation are not altered. Our findings strongly implicate dystroglycan as a key membrane adhesion protein involved in actin-based structures during the differentiation process in Kasumi-1 cells.

  11. Disruption of PTH receptor 1 in T cells protects against PTH-induced bone loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Tawfeek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperparathyroidism in humans and continuous parathyroid hormone (cPTH treatment in mice cause bone loss by regulating the production of RANKL and OPG by stromal cells (SCs and osteoblasts (OBs. Recently, it has been reported that T cells are required for cPTH to induce bone loss as the binding of the T cell costimulatory molecule CD40L to SC receptor CD40 augments SC sensitivity to cPTH. However it is unknown whether direct PTH stimulation of T cells is required for cPTH to induce bone loss, and whether T cells contribute to the bone catabolic activity of PTH with mechanisms other than induction of CD40 signaling in SCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that silencing of PTH receptor 1 (PPR in T cells blocks the bone loss and the osteoclastic expansion induced by cPTH, thus demonstrating that PPR signaling in T cells is central for PTH-induced reduction of bone mass. Mechanistic studies revealed that PTH activation of the T cell PPR stimulates T cell production of the osteoclastogenic cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF. Attesting to the relevance of this effect, disruption of T cell TNF production prevents PTH-induced bone loss. We also show that a novel mechanism by which TNF mediates PTH induced osteoclast formation is upregulation of CD40 expression in SCs, which increases their RANKL/OPG production ratio. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate that PPR signaling in T cells plays an essential role in PTH induced bone loss by promoting T cell production of TNF. A previously unknown effect of TNF is to increase SC expression of CD40, which in turn increases SC osteoclastogenic activity by upregulating their RANKL/OPG production ratio. PPR-dependent stimulation of TNF production by T cells and the resulting TNF regulation of CD40 signaling in SCs are potential new therapeutic targets for the bone loss of hyperparathyroidism.

  12. Disruption of PTH Receptor 1 in T Cells Protects against PTH-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfeek, Hesham; Bedi, Brahmchetna; Li, Jau-Yi; Adams, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Weitzmann, M. Neale; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Pacifici, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperparathyroidism in humans and continuous parathyroid hormone (cPTH) treatment in mice cause bone loss by regulating the production of RANKL and OPG by stromal cells (SCs) and osteoblasts (OBs). Recently, it has been reported that T cells are required for cPTH to induce bone loss as the binding of the T cell costimulatory molecule CD40L to SC receptor CD40 augments SC sensitivity to cPTH. However it is unknown whether direct PTH stimulation of T cells is required for cPTH to induce bone loss, and whether T cells contribute to the bone catabolic activity of PTH with mechanisms other than induction of CD40 signaling in SCs. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that silencing of PTH receptor 1 (PPR) in T cells blocks the bone loss and the osteoclastic expansion induced by cPTH, thus demonstrating that PPR signaling in T cells is central for PTH-induced reduction of bone mass. Mechanistic studies revealed that PTH activation of the T cell PPR stimulates T cell production of the osteoclastogenic cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF). Attesting to the relevance of this effect, disruption of T cell TNF production prevents PTH-induced bone loss. We also show that a novel mechanism by which TNF mediates PTH induced osteoclast formation is upregulation of CD40 expression in SCs, which increases their RANKL/OPG production ratio. Conclusions/Significance These findings demonstrate that PPR signaling in T cells plays an essential role in PTH induced bone loss by promoting T cell production of TNF. A previously unknown effect of TNF is to increase SC expression of CD40, which in turn increases SC osteoclastogenic activity by upregulating their RANKL/OPG production ratio. PPR-dependent stimulation of TNF production by T cells and the resulting TNF regulation of CD40 signaling in SCs are potential new therapeutic targets for the bone loss of hyperparathyroidism. PMID:20808842

  13. Dystrophin, utrophin and {beta}-dystroglycan expression in skeletal muscle from patients with Becker muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawajiri, Masakazu; Mitsui, Takao; Kawai, Hisaomi [Univ. of Tokushima (Japan)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    The precise localization and semiquantitative correlation of dystrophin, utrophin and {beta}-dystroglycan expression on the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle cells obtained from patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was studied using three types of double immunofluorescence. Staining intensity was measured using a confocal laser microscope. Each of these proteins was identified at the same locus on the sarcolemma. The staining intensities of dystrophin and utrophin were approximately reciprocal at sarcolemmal sites where dystrophin expression was obviously observed. The staining intensity of {beta}-dystroglycan was strong in areas where dystrophin staining was also strong and utrophin expression was weak. Quantitative analysis revealed that the staining intensity of {beta}-dystroglycan minus that of dystrophin approximated the staining intensity of utrophin, indicating that the sum of dystrophin and utrophin expression corresponds to that of {beta}-dystroglycan. These results suggest that utrophin may compensate for dystrophin deficiency found in BMD by binding to {beta}-dystroglycan. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Loss of Tgif function causes holoprosencephaly by disrupting the SHH signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Kenichiro; Anderson, Anoush E; Sutherland, Ann E; Wotton, David

    2012-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a severe human genetic disease affecting craniofacial development, with an incidence of up to 1/250 human conceptions and 1.3 per 10,000 live births. Mutations in the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) gene result in HPE in humans and mice, and the Shh pathway is targeted by other mutations that cause HPE. However, at least 12 loci are associated with HPE in humans, suggesting that defects in other pathways contribute to this disease. Although the TGIF1 (TG-interacting factor) gene maps to the HPE4 locus, and heterozygous loss of function TGIF1 mutations are associated with HPE, mouse models have not yet explained how loss of Tgif1 causes HPE. Using a conditional Tgif1 allele, we show that mouse embryos lacking both Tgif1 and the related Tgif2 have HPE-like phenotypes reminiscent of Shh null embryos. Eye and nasal field separation is defective, and forebrain patterning is disrupted in embryos lacking both Tgifs. Early anterior patterning is relatively normal, but expression of Shh is reduced in the forebrain, and Gli3 expression is up-regulated throughout the neural tube. Gli3 acts primarily as an antagonist of Shh function, and the introduction of a heterozygous Gli3 mutation into embryos lacking both Tgif genes partially rescues Shh signaling, nasal field separation, and HPE. Tgif1 and Tgif2 are transcriptional repressors that limit Transforming Growth Factor β/Nodal signaling, and we show that reducing Nodal signaling in embryos lacking both Tgifs reduces the severity of HPE and partially restores the output of Shh signaling. Together, these results support a model in which Tgif function limits Nodal signaling to maintain the appropriate output of the Shh pathway in the forebrain. These data show for the first time that Tgif1 mutation in mouse contributes to HPE pathogenesis and provide evidence that this is due to disruption of the Shh pathway.

  15. Loss of Tgif function causes holoprosencephaly by disrupting the SHH signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Taniguchi

    Full Text Available Holoprosencephaly (HPE is a severe human genetic disease affecting craniofacial development, with an incidence of up to 1/250 human conceptions and 1.3 per 10,000 live births. Mutations in the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH gene result in HPE in humans and mice, and the Shh pathway is targeted by other mutations that cause HPE. However, at least 12 loci are associated with HPE in humans, suggesting that defects in other pathways contribute to this disease. Although the TGIF1 (TG-interacting factor gene maps to the HPE4 locus, and heterozygous loss of function TGIF1 mutations are associated with HPE, mouse models have not yet explained how loss of Tgif1 causes HPE. Using a conditional Tgif1 allele, we show that mouse embryos lacking both Tgif1 and the related Tgif2 have HPE-like phenotypes reminiscent of Shh null embryos. Eye and nasal field separation is defective, and forebrain patterning is disrupted in embryos lacking both Tgifs. Early anterior patterning is relatively normal, but expression of Shh is reduced in the forebrain, and Gli3 expression is up-regulated throughout the neural tube. Gli3 acts primarily as an antagonist of Shh function, and the introduction of a heterozygous Gli3 mutation into embryos lacking both Tgif genes partially rescues Shh signaling, nasal field separation, and HPE. Tgif1 and Tgif2 are transcriptional repressors that limit Transforming Growth Factor β/Nodal signaling, and we show that reducing Nodal signaling in embryos lacking both Tgifs reduces the severity of HPE and partially restores the output of Shh signaling. Together, these results support a model in which Tgif function limits Nodal signaling to maintain the appropriate output of the Shh pathway in the forebrain. These data show for the first time that Tgif1 mutation in mouse contributes to HPE pathogenesis and provide evidence that this is due to disruption of the Shh pathway.

  16. Activation of Both the Calpain and Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems Contributes to Septic Cardiomyopathy through Dystrophin Loss/Disruption and mTOR Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Ana Caroline Silva; Figueiredo, Maria Jose; Campos, Erica Carolina; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; Ramos, Simone Gusmao; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction caused by the impairment of myocardial contractility has been recognized as an important factor contributing to the high mortality in sepsis. Calpain activation in the heart takes place in response to increased intracellular calcium influx resulting in proteolysis of structural and contractile proteins with subsequent myocardial dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that increased levels of calpain in the septic heart leads to disruption of structural and contractile proteins and that administration of calpain inhibitor-1 (N-acetyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-norleucinal (ALLN)) after sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture prevents cardiac protein degradation. We also tested the hypothesis that calpain plays a role in the modulation of protein synthesis/degradation through the activation of proteasome-dependent proteolysis and inhibition of the mTOR pathway. Severe sepsis significantly increased heart calpain-1 levels and promoted ubiquitin and Pa28β over-expression with a reduction in the mTOR levels. In addition, sepsis reduced the expression of structural proteins dystrophin and β-dystroglycan as well as the contractile proteins actin and myosin. ALLN administration prevented sepsis-induced increases in calpain and ubiquitin levels in the heart, which resulted in decreased of structural and contractile proteins degradation and basal mTOR expression levels were re-established. Our results support the concept that increased calpain concentrations may be part of an important mechanism of sepsis-induced cardiac muscle proteolysis. PMID:27880847

  17. Loss of Usp9x disrupts cortical architecture, hippocampal development and TGFβ-mediated axonogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Stegeman

    Full Text Available The deubiquitylating enzyme Usp9x is highly expressed in the developing mouse brain, and increased Usp9x expression enhances the self-renewal of neural progenitors in vitro. USP9X is a candidate gene for human neurodevelopmental disorders, including lissencephaly, epilepsy and X-linked intellectual disability. To determine if Usp9x is critical to mammalian brain development we conditionally deleted the gene from neural progenitors, and their subsequent progeny. Mating Usp9x(loxP/loxP mice with mice expressing Cre recombinase from the Nestin promoter deleted Usp9x throughout the entire brain, and resulted in early postnatal lethality. Although the overall brain architecture was intact, loss of Usp9x disrupted the cellular organization of the ventricular and sub-ventricular zones, and cortical plate. Usp9x absence also led to dramatic reductions in axonal length, in vivo and in vitro, which could in part be explained by a failure in Tgf-β signaling. Deletion of Usp9x from the dorsal telencephalon only, by mating with Emx1-cre mice, was compatible with survival to adulthood but resulted in reduction or loss of the corpus callosum, a dramatic decrease in hippocampal size, and disorganization of the hippocampal CA3 region. This latter phenotypic aspect resembled that observed in Doublecortin knock-out mice, which is an Usp9x interacting protein. This study establishes that Usp9x is critical for several aspects of CNS development, and suggests that its regulation of Tgf-β signaling extends to neurons.

  18. Loss of inhibin alpha uncouples oocyte-granulosa dynamics and disrupts postnatal folliculogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michelle; Middlebrook, Brooke S.; Matzuk, Martin M.; Pangas, Stephanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Targeted disruption of the inhibin α gene (Inha−/−) in mice results in an ovarian phenotype of granulosa cell tumors that renders the animals infertile. Little is known about the reproductive defects prior to tumor development. Here, we report novel data on early follicle dynamics in Inha−/− mice, which demonstrate that inhibin α has important consequences upon follicle development. Morphological changes in both germ and somatic cells were evident in postnatal day 12 ovaries, with Inha−/− mice exhibiting numerous multilayered follicles that were far more advanced than those observed in age-matched controls. These changes were accompanied by alterations in follicle dynamics such that Inha−/− ovaries had fewer follicles in the resting pool and more committed in the growth phase. Absence of inhibin α resulted in advanced follicular maturation as marked by premature loss of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in secondary follicles. Additionally, gene expression analysis revealed changes in factors known to be vital for oocyte and follicle development. Together, these data provide key evidence to suggest that regulation of the inhibin/activin system is essential for early folliculogenesis in the prepubertal mouse ovary. PMID:19666016

  19. Tau causes synapse loss without disrupting calcium homeostasis in the rTg4510 model of tauopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J Kopeikina

    Full Text Available Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs of tau are one of the defining hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD, and are closely associated with neuronal degeneration. Although it has been suggested that calcium dysregulation is important to AD pathogenesis, few studies have probed the link between calcium homeostasis, synapse loss and pathological changes in tau. Here we test the hypothesis that pathological changes in tau are associated with changes in calcium by utilizing in vivo calcium imaging in adult rTg4510 mice that exhibit severe tau pathology due to over-expression of human mutant P301L tau. We observe prominent dendritic spine loss without disruptions in calcium homeostasis, indicating that tangles do not disrupt this fundamental feature of neuronal health, and that tau likely induces spine loss in a calcium-independent manner.

  20. Cell entry of Lassa virus induces tyrosine phosphorylation of dystroglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pythoud, Christelle; Turk, Rolf; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Pasquato, Antonella; Campbell, Kevin P; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor dystroglycan (DG) serves as a cellular receptor for the highly pathogenic arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) that causes a haemorrhagic fever with high mortality in human. In the host cell, DG provides a molecular link between the ECM and the actin cytoskeleton via the adapter proteins utrophin or dystrophin. Here we investigated post-translational modifications of DG in the context of LASV cell entry. Using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, we found that tyrosine kinases are required for efficient internalization of virus particles, but not virus-receptor binding. Engagement of cellular DG by LASV envelope glycoprotein (LASV GP) in human epithelial cells induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of DG. LASV GP binding to DG further resulted in dissociation of the adapter protein utrophin from virus-bound DG. This virus-induced dissociation of utrophin was affected by genistein treatment, suggesting a role of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in the process.

  1. Dystroglycan Depletion Impairs Actin-Dependent Functions of Differentiated Kasumi-1 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Escárcega-Tame

    Full Text Available Dystroglycan has recently been characterised in blood tissue cells, as part of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex involved in the differentiation process of neutrophils.In the present study we have investigated the role of dystroglycan in the human promyelocytic leukemic cell line Kasumi-1 differentiated to macrophage-like cells.We characterised the pattern expression and subcellular distribution of dystroglycans in non-differentiated and differentiated Kasumi-1 cells.Our results demonstrated by WB and flow cytometer assays that during the differentiation process to macrophages, dystroglycans were down-regulated; these results were confirmed with qRT-PCR assays. Additionally, depletion of dystroglycan by RNAi resulted in altered morphology and reduced properties of differentiated Kasumi-1 cells, including morphology, migration and phagocytic activities although secretion of IL-1β and expression of markers of differentiation are not altered.Our findings strongly implicate dystroglycan as a key membrane adhesion protein involved in actin-based structures during the differentiation process in Kasumi-1 cells.

  2. Loss of Dendritic Complexity Precedes Neurodegeneration in a Mouse Model with Disrupted Mitochondrial Distribution in Mature Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo López-Doménech

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Correct mitochondrial distribution is critical for satisfying local energy demands and calcium buffering requirements and supporting key cellular processes. The mitochondrially targeted proteins Miro1 and Miro2 are important components of the mitochondrial transport machinery, but their specific roles in neuronal development, maintenance, and survival remain poorly understood. Using mouse knockout strategies, we demonstrate that Miro1, as opposed to Miro2, is the primary regulator of mitochondrial transport in both axons and dendrites. Miro1 deletion leads to depletion of mitochondria from distal dendrites but not axons, accompanied by a marked reduction in dendritic complexity. Disrupting postnatal mitochondrial distribution in vivo by deleting Miro1 in mature neurons causes a progressive loss of distal dendrites and compromises neuronal survival. Thus, the local availability of mitochondrial mass is critical for generating and sustaining dendritic arbors, and disruption of mitochondrial distribution in mature neurons is associated with neurodegeneration.

  3. Role of dystroglycan in limiting contraction-induced injury to the sarcomeric cytoskeleton of mature skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Erik P; Turk, Rolf; Willer, Tobias; Beltrán, Daniel; Inamori, Kei-Ichiro; Peterson, Taylor A; Engle, Jeffrey; Prouty, Sally; Matsumura, Kiichiro; Saito, Fumiaki; Anderson, Mary E; Campbell, Kevin P

    2016-09-27

    Dystroglycan (DG) is a highly expressed extracellular matrix receptor that is linked to the cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle. DG is critical for the function of skeletal muscle, and muscle with primary defects in the expression and/or function of DG throughout development has many pathological features and a severe muscular dystrophy phenotype. In addition, reduction in DG at the sarcolemma is a common feature in muscle biopsies from patients with various types of muscular dystrophy. However, the consequence of disrupting DG in mature muscle is not known. Here, we investigated muscles of transgenic mice several months after genetic knockdown of DG at maturity. In our study, an increase in susceptibility to contraction-induced injury was the first pathological feature observed after the levels of DG at the sarcolemma were reduced. The contraction-induced injury was not accompanied by increased necrosis, excitation-contraction uncoupling, or fragility of the sarcolemma. Rather, disruption of the sarcomeric cytoskeleton was evident as reduced passive tension and decreased titin immunostaining. These results reveal a role for DG in maintaining the stability of the sarcomeric cytoskeleton during contraction and provide mechanistic insight into the cause of the reduction in strength that occurs in muscular dystrophy after lengthening contractions.

  4. Loss of aPKCλ in differentiated neurons disrupts the polarity complex but does not induce obvious neuronal loss or disorientation in mouse brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Cell polarity plays a critical role in neuronal differentiation during development of the central nervous system (CNS. Recent studies have established the significance of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC and its interacting partners, which include PAR-3, PAR-6 and Lgl, in regulating cell polarization during neuronal differentiation. However, their roles in neuronal maintenance after CNS development remain unclear. Here we performed conditional deletion of aPKCλ, a major aPKC isoform in the brain, in differentiated neurons of mice by camk2a-cre or synapsinI-cre mediated gene targeting. We found significant reduction of aPKCλ and total aPKCs in the adult mouse brains. The aPKCλ deletion also reduced PAR-6β, possibly by its destabilization, whereas expression of other related proteins such as PAR-3 and Lgl-1 was unaffected. Biochemical analyses suggested that a significant fraction of aPKCλ formed a protein complex with PAR-6β and Lgl-1 in the brain lysates, which was disrupted by the aPKCλ deletion. Notably, the aPKCλ deletion mice did not show apparent cell loss/degeneration in the brain. In addition, neuronal orientation/distribution seemed to be unaffected. Thus, despite the polarity complex disruption, neuronal deletion of aPKCλ does not induce obvious cell loss or disorientation in mouse brains after cell differentiation.

  5. Decision-making deficits associated with disrupted synchronization between basolateral amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex in rats after tooth loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoxiang; Cao, Bing; Wang, Jun; Yu, Tianran; Li, Ying

    2015-07-03

    Human studies have shown that multiple teeth loss was significantly associated with cognitive impairment, dementia and Alzheimer's disease. However, the causal relationship between tooth loss and cognitive deficits has not been clarified. Rodents demonstrate human-like cognitive faculties. In this study by performing rat gambling task (RGT), we reported that prolonged tooth loss condition by extracting all left molars in the rats led to an increase in the proportion of poor decision-makers, and decrease in the proportion of good decision-makers compared with controls. No influence was detected on the general activity and motivation after tooth loss. Recent experiments have shown that decision-making performances in the RGT rely on the functional integrity of the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The theta band brain oscillation has been acknowledged for extensive cognitive functions. Here, we performed multiple-electrode array recordings of local field potential (LFP) in anesthetized rats. The results exhibited an increase in accumulative power of the theta frequency of LFP in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and decrease of theta power in the ACC in tooth loss rats. Furthermore, cross-correlation analysis displayed that tooth loss suppressed the synchronization of theta frequency of LFP between the BLA and ACC, indicating reduced neuronal communications between these two regions. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that tooth loss leads to higher-order cognitive deficits accompanied by the alteration of theta frequency of LFP in brain circuitries and disruption of neural network integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Claudin Loss-of-Function Disrupts Tight Junctions and Impairs Amelogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Bardet

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Claudins are a family of proteins that forms paracellular barriers and pores determining tight junctions (TJ permeability. Claudin-16 and -19 are pore forming TJ proteins allowing calcium and magnesium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TAL. Loss-of-function mutations in the encoding genes, initially identified to cause Familial Hypomagnesemia with Hypercalciuria and Nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC, were recently shown to be also involved in Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI. In addition, both claudins were expressed in the murine tooth germ and Claudin-16 knockout (KO mice displayed abnormal enamel formation. Claudin-3, an ubiquitous claudin expressed in epithelia including kidney, acts as a barrier-forming tight junction protein. We determined that, similarly to claudin-16 and claudin-19, claudin-3 was expressed in the tooth germ, more precisely in the TJ located at the apical end of secretory ameloblasts. The observation of Claudin-3 KO teeth revealed enamel defects associated to impaired TJ structure at the secretory ends of ameloblasts and accumulation of matrix proteins in the forming enamel. Thus, claudin-3 protein loss-of-function disturbs amelogenesis similarly to claudin-16 loss-of-function, highlighting the importance of claudin proteins for the TJ structure. These findings unravel that loss-of-function of either pore or barrier-forming TJ proteins leads to enamel defects. Hence, the major structural function of claudin proteins appears essential for amelogenesis.

  7. Loss of DNMT1o disrupts imprinted X chromosome inactivation and accentuates placental defects in females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge McGraw

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of key germline derived DNA methylation patterns during preimplantation development depends on stores of DNA cytosine methyltransferase-1o (DNMT1o provided by the oocyte. Dnmt1o(mat-/- mouse embryos born to Dnmt1(Δ1o/Δ1o female mice lack DNMT1o protein and have disrupted genomic imprinting and associated phenotypic abnormalities. Here, we describe additional female-specific morphological abnormalities and DNA hypomethylation defects outside imprinted loci, restricted to extraembryonic tissue. Compared to male offspring, the placentae of female offspring of Dnmt1(Δ1o/Δ1o mothers displayed a higher incidence of genic and intergenic hypomethylation and more frequent and extreme placental dysmorphology. The majority of the affected loci were concentrated on the X chromosome and associated with aberrant biallelic expression, indicating that imprinted X-inactivation was perturbed. Hypomethylation of a key regulatory region of Xite within the X-inactivation center was present in female blastocysts shortly after the absence of methylation maintenance by DNMT1o at the 8-cell stage. The female preponderance of placental DNA hypomethylation associated with maternal DNMT1o deficiency provides evidence of additional roles beyond the maintenance of genomic imprints for DNA methylation events in the preimplantation embryo, including a role in imprinted X chromosome inactivation.

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the dystroglycan gene do not correlate with disease severity in hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Emily; Ciccone, Carla; Darvish, Daniel; Naiem-Cohen, Shahrouz; Dalakas, Marinos C; Savelkoul, Paul J; Krasnewich, Donna M; Gahl, William A; Huizing, Marjan

    2005-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of dystroglycan occurs in certain muscular dystrophies, including hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM). HIBM harbors a widely varying clinical severity and age of onset, which raised the suspicion of the presence of disease modifier genes. We considered the highly polymorphic dystroglycan gene (DAG1) as a feasible candidate modifier gene. DAG1 genomic DNA was sequenced for 32 HIBM patients, mainly of Persian-Jewish descent. Five novel DAG1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, bringing the total number of SNPs to 19. However, no direct correlation between DAG1 SNPs and clinical severity of HIBM could be detected. Several identified SNPs substitute an amino acid and might modulate dystroglycan function or glycosylation status, and deserve further research. These data are valuable for future studies on the role of DAG1 in HIBM and other muscular dystrophies, especially those dystrophies that involve abnormal glycosylation of dystroglycan.

  9. Downregulation of dystroglycan glycosyltransferases LARGE2 and ISPD associate with increased mortality in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael R; Ma, Deqin; Schappet, James; Breheny, Patrick; Mott, Sarah L; Bannick, Nadine; Askeland, Eric; Brown, James; Henry, Michael D

    2015-07-30

    Dystroglycan (DG) is a cell-surface laminin receptor that links the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix in a variety of epithelial tissues. Its function as a matrix receptor requires extensive glycosylation of its extracellular subunit αDG, which involves at least 13 distinct genes. Prior work has shown loss of αDG glycosylation in an assortment of carcinomas, including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) though the cause (s) and functional consequences of this loss are still unclear. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database, we analyzed the DG glycosylation pathway to identify changes in mRNA expression and correlation with clinical outcomes. We validated our findings with a cohort of 65 patients treated with radical nephrectomy by analyzing DG glycosylation via immunohistochemistry and gene expression via qRT-PCR. Analysis of TCGA database revealed frequent dysregulation of a subset of DG glycosyltransferases. Most notably, there was a frequent, significant downregulation of GYLTL1B (LARGE2) and ISPD. DG glycosylation is frequently impaired in ccRCC patient samples and most strongly associates with downregulation of GYLTL1B. Reduced levels of GYLTL1B and ISPD mRNA associated with increased patient mortality and are the likely cause of αDG hypoglycosylation in ccRCC.

  10. Mechanisms of plasma disruption and runaway electron losses in the TEXTOR tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullaev, S. S.; Finken, K. H.; Wongrach, K.; Tokar, M.; Koslowski, H. R.; Willi, O.; Zeng, L.; Zeng

    2015-10-01

    > . The thermal quench (TQ) time caused by the fast electron transport in a stochastic magnetic field is calculated using the collisional transport model. The current quench (CQ) stage is due to the particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field. The RE beam current is modelled as a sum of a toroidally symmetric part and a small-amplitude helical current with a predominant component. The REs are lost due to two effects: (i) by outward drift of electrons in a toroidal electric field until they touch the wall and (ii) by the formation of a stochastic layer of REs at the beam edge. Such a stochastic layer for high-energy REs is formed in the presence of the MHD mode. It has a mixed topological structure with a stochastic region open to the wall. The effect of external resonant magnetic perturbations on RE loss is discussed. A possible cause of the sudden MHD signals accompanied by RE bursts is explained by the redistribution of runaway current during the resonant interaction of high-energetic electron orbits with the MHD mode.

  11. Disruption of claudin-18 diminishes ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha-Young; Alarcon, Catrina; Pourteymour, Sheila; Wergedal, Jon E; Mohan, Subburaman

    2013-03-01

    Claudin-18 (Cldn-18), a member of the tight junction family of proteins, is a negative regulator of RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption (BR) in vivo. Since estrogen deficiency decreases bone mass in part by a RANKL-mediated increase in BR, we evaluated whether estrogen regulates Cldn-18 expression in bone. We found that Cldn-18 expression was reduced in the bones of estrogen deficient mice, whereas it was increased by estrogen treatment in osteoblasts and osteoclasts in vitro. We next evaluated the role of Cldn-18 in mediating estrogen-induced bone loss. Cldn-18 knockout (KO) and littermate wild-type (WT) mice were ovariectomized (OVX) or sham operated at 6 wk of age, and the skeletal phenotype was evaluated at 14 wk of age. PIXImus revealed that total body, femur, and lumbar BMD were reduced 8-13% (P ovariectomy failed to induce significant changes in BMD of total body, femur, or vertebra in the Cldn-18 KO mice. μCT analysis of the distal femur revealed that trabecular (Tb) bone volume was decreased 50% in the OVX WT mice compared with sham that was caused by a 26% decrease in Tb number and a 30% increase in Tb separation (all P < 0.05). By contrast, none of the Tb parameters were significantly different in OVX Cldn-18 KO mice compared with sham KO mice. Histomorphometric analyses at the Tb site revealed that neither osteoclast surface nor osteoclast perimeter was increased significantly as a consequence of OVX in either genotype at the time point examined. Based on our findings, we conclude that the estrogen effects on osteoclasts may in part be mediated via regulation of Cldn-18 signaling.

  12. Identification of cell surface molecules involved in dystroglycan-independent Lassa virus cell entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojima, Masayuki; Ströher, Ute; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2012-02-01

    Although O-mannosylated dystroglycan is a receptor for Lassa virus, a causative agent of Lassa fever, recent findings suggest the existence of an alternative receptor(s). Here we identified four molecules as receptors for Lassa virus: Axl and Tyro3, from the TAM family, and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial calcium-dependent lectin (LSECtin), from the C-type lectin family. These molecules enhanced the binding of Lassa virus to cells and mediated infection independently of dystroglycan. Axl- or Tyro3-mediated infection required intracellular signaling via the tyrosine kinase activity of Axl or Tyro3, whereas DC-SIGN- or LSECtin-mediated infection and binding were dependent on a specific carbohydrate and on ions. The identification of these four molecules as Lassa virus receptors advances our understanding of Lassa virus cell entry.

  13. The role of dystroglycan in PDGF-BB-dependent migration of activated hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastanis, George John; Hernandez-Nazara, Zamira; Nieto, Natalia; Rincón-Sanchez, Ana Rosa; Popratiloff, Anastas; Dominguez-Rosales, Jose Alfredo; Lechuga, Carmen G.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells are embedded in the loose connective tissue matrix within the space of Disse. This extracellular matrix contains several basement membrane components including laminin, but its composition changes during liver injury because of the production of extracellular matrix components found in scar tissue. These changes in extracellular matrix composition and in cell-extracellular matrix interactions may play a key role in hepatic stellate cell transdifferentiation. In this communication we used early passages of mouse hepatic stellate cells (activated HSC/myofibroblasts) to study the platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-dependent expression and regulation of β-dystroglycan and its role in activated HSC/myofibroblast migration. We used Northern and Western analysis to study dystroglycan expression and confocal microscopy to investigate changes in subcellular distribution of the protein. Activated HSC migration was investigated using an in vitro wound-healing assay. PDGF-BB induced significant changes in dystroglycan regulation and subcellular distribution of the protein. Whereas steady-state levels of dystroglycan mRNA remained constant, PDGF-BB increased dystroglycan transcription but shortened the t1/2 by 50%. Moreover, PDGF-BB changed dystroglycan and α5-integrin cellular distribution. Cell migration experiments revealed that PDGF-BB-dependent migration of activated HSC/myofibroblasts was completely blocked by neutralizing antibodies to fibronectin, α5-integrin, laminin, and β-dystroglycan. Overall, these findings suggest that both laminin and fibronectin and their receptors play a key role in PDGF-BB-induced activated HSC migration. PMID:21659621

  14. Hyperlipidemic diet causes loss of olfactory sensory neurons, reduces olfactory discrimination, and disrupts odor-reversal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiebaud, Nicolas; Johnson, Melissa C; Butler, Jessica L; Bell, Genevieve A; Ferguson, Kassandra L; Fadool, Andrew R; Fadool, James C; Gale, Alana M; Gale, David S; Fadool, Debra A

    2014-05-14

    Currently, 65% of Americans are overweight, which leads to well-supported cardiovascular and cognitive declines. Little, however, is known concerning obesity's impact on sensory systems. Because olfaction is linked with ingestive behavior to guide food choice, its potential dysfunction during obesity could evoke a positive feedback loop to perpetuate poor ingestive behaviors. To determine the effect of chronic energy imbalance and reveal any structural or functional changes associated with obesity, we induced long-term, diet-induced obesity by challenging mice to high-fat diets: (1) in an obesity-prone (C57BL/6J) and obesity-resistant (Kv1.3(-/-)) line of mice, and compared this with (2) late-onset, genetic-induced obesity in MC4R(-/-) mice in which diabetes secondarily precipitates after disruption of the hypothalamic axis. We report marked loss of olfactory sensory neurons and their axonal projections after exposure to a fatty diet, with a concomitant reduction in electro-olfactogram amplitude. Loss of olfactory neurons and associated circuitry is linked to changes in neuronal proliferation and normal apoptotic cycles. Using a computer-controlled, liquid-based olfactometer, mice maintained on fatty diets learn reward-reinforced behaviors more slowly, have deficits in reversal learning demonstrating behavioral inflexibility, and exhibit reduced olfactory discrimination. When obese mice are removed from their high-fat diet to regain normal body weight and fasting glucose, olfactory dysfunctions are retained. We conclude that chronic energy imbalance therefore presents long-lasting structural and functional changes in the operation of the sensory system designed to encode external and internal chemical information and leads to altered olfactory- and reward-driven behaviors.

  15. Up-regulation of Paxillin and Focal Adhesion Signaling follows Dystroglycan Complex deletions and promotes a Hypertensive State of Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Shamik; Tewari, Manorama; Zajac, Allison; Barton, Elisabeth; Sweeney, H. Lee; Discher, Dennis E.

    2011-01-01

    Anchorage to matrix is mediated for many cells not only by integrin-based focal adhesions but also by a parallel assembly of integral and peripheral membrane proteins known as the Dystroglycan Complex. Deficiencies in either dystrophin (mdx mice) or γ-sarcoglycan (γSG−/− mice) components of the Dystroglycan Complex lead to upregulation of numerous focal adhesion proteins, and the phosphoprotein paxillin proves to be among the most prominent. In mdx muscle, paxillin-Y31 and Y118 are both hyper...

  16. Linker molecules between laminins and dystroglycan ameliorate laminin-alpha2-deficient muscular dystrophy at all disease stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinen, Sarina; Barzaghi, Patrizia; Lin, Shuo; Lochmüller, Hanns; Ruegg, Markus A

    2007-03-26

    Mutations in laminin-alpha2 cause a severe congenital muscular dystrophy, called MDC1A. The two main receptors that interact with laminin-alpha2 are dystroglycan and alpha7beta1 integrin. We have previously shown in mouse models for MDC1A that muscle-specific overexpression of a miniaturized form of agrin (mini-agrin), which binds to dystroglycan but not to alpha7beta1 integrin, substantially ameliorates the disease (Moll, J., P. Barzaghi, S. Lin, G. Bezakova, H. Lochmuller, E. Engvall, U. Muller, and M.A. Ruegg. 2001. Nature. 413:302-307; Bentzinger, C.F., P. Barzaghi, S. Lin, and M.A. Ruegg. 2005. Matrix Biol. 24:326-332.). Now we show that late-onset expression of mini-agrin still prolongs life span and improves overall health, although not to the same extent as early expression. Furthermore, a chimeric protein containing the dystroglycan-binding domain of perlecan has the same activities as mini-agrin in ameliorating the disease. Finally, expression of full-length agrin also slows down the disease. These experiments are conceptual proof that linking the basement membrane to dystroglycan by specifically designed molecules or by endogenous ligands, could be a means to counteract MDC1A at a progressed stage of the disease, and thus opens new possibilities for the development of treatment options for this muscular dystrophy.

  17. Disruption of the Pfg27 locus by homologous recombination leads to loss of the sexual phenotype in P. falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, C A; Fujioka, H; Aikawa, M; Kumar, N

    1999-06-01

    Transmission of malaria depends upon the differentiation and development of the sexual stages of the parasite. In Plasmodium falciparum, it is a complex, multistage process, involving the expression of a large number of sexual stage-specific proteins. Pfg27 is one such protein, abundantly expressed at the onset of gametocytogenesis. We report successful disruption of the Pfg27 locus using homologous recombination and show that it is essential for the maintenance of the sexual phenotype. Transfectants lacking Pfg27 abort early in sexual development, resulting in vacuolated, highly disarranged, and disintegrating parasites. This suggests a critical role for Pfg27 in the sexual development of the parasite.

  18. Distinct roles for dystroglycan, beta1 integrin and perlecan in cell surface laminin organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henry, M D; Satz, J S; Brakebusch, C

    2001-01-01

    Dystroglycan (DG) is a cell surface receptor for several extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules including laminins, agrin and perlecan. Recent data indicate that DG function is required for the formation of basement membranes in early development and the organization of laminin on the cell surface....... Here we show that DG-mediated laminin clustering on mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is a dynamic process in which clusters are consolidated over time into increasingly more complex structures. Utilizing various null-mutant ES cell lines, we define roles for other molecules in this process. In beta1...... integrin-deficient ES cells, laminin-1 binds to the cell surface, but fails to organize into more morphologically complex structures. This result indicates that beta1 integrin function is required after DG function in the cell surface-mediated laminin assembly process. In perlecan-deficient ES cells...

  19. Loss of Zona Pellucida Binding Proteins in the Acrosomal Matrix Disrupts Acrosome Biogenesis and Sperm Morphogenesis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Nan; Roy, Angshumoy; Yan, Wei; Burns, Kathleen H.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2007-01-01

    Zona pellucida binding protein 1 (ZPBP1), a spermatid and spermatozoon protein that localizes to the acrosome, was originally identified in pigs and named for its binding to the oocyte zona pellucida. In an in silico search for germ cell-specific genes, Zpbp1 and its novel paralog, Zpbp2, were discovered and confirmed to be expressed only in the testes in both mice and humans. To study the in vivo functions of both ZPBP proteins, we disrupted Zpbp1 and Zpbp2 in mice. Males lacking ZPBP1 were sterile, with abnormal round-headed sperm morphology and no forward sperm motility. Ultrastructural studies demonstrated that absence of ZPBP1 prevents proper acrosome compaction, resulting in acrosome fragmentation and disruption of the Sertoli-spermatid junctions. Males null for ZPBP2 were subfertile, demonstrated aberrant acrosomal membrane invaginations, and produced dysmorphic sperm with reduced ability to penetrate zona pellucida. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of ZPBPs from amphibians, birds, and mammals suggests that these paralogous genes coevolved to play cooperative roles during spermiogenesis. Whereas ZPBP1 was discovered for an in vitro role in sperm-egg interactions, we have shown that both ZPBP proteins play an earlier structural role during spermiogenesis. PMID:17664285

  20. Increased expression of CD133 and reduced dystroglycan expression are strong predictors of poor outcome in colon cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coco Claudio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression levels of CD133, a cancer stem cell marker, and of the α-subunit of the dystroglycan (α-DG complex, have been previously reported to be altered in colorectal cancers. Methods Expression levels of CD133 and α-DG were assessed by immunohistochemistry in a series of colon cancers and their prognostic significance was evaluated. Results Scattered cells positive for CD133 were rarely detected at the bases of the crypts in normal colonic mucosa while in cancer cells the median percentage of positive cells was 5% (range 0–80. A significant correlation was observed with pT parameter and tumor stage but not with tumor grade and N status. Recurrence and death from disease were significantly more frequent in CD133-high expressing tumors and Kaplan-Meier curves showed a significant separation between high vs low expressor groups for both disease-free (p = 0.002 and overall (p = 0.008 survival. Expression of α-DG was reduced in a significant fraction of tumors but low α-DG staining did not correlate with any of the classical clinical-pathological parameters. Recurrence and death from the disease were significantly more frequent in α-DG-low expressing tumors and Kaplan-Meier curves showed a significant separation between high vs low expressor tumors for both disease-free (p = 0.02 and overall (p = 0.02 survival. Increased expression of CD133, but not loss of α-DG, confirmed to be an independent prognostic parameters at a multivariate analysis associated with an increased risk of recurrence (RR = 2.4; p = 0.002 and death (RR = 2.3; p = 0.003. Conclusions Loss of α-DG and increased CD133 expression are frequent events in human colon cancer and evaluation of CD133 expression could help to identify high-risk colon cancer patients.

  1. Muscular dystrophy begins early in embryonic development deriving from stem cell loss and disrupted skeletal muscle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Deborah; Stadler, Lukas Kurt Josef; Larner, Dean; Smith, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Examination of embryonic myogenesis of two distinct, but functionally related, skeletal muscle dystrophy mutants (mdx and cav-3(-/-)) establishes for the first time that key elements of the pathology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD-1c) originate in the disruption of the embryonic cardiac and skeletal muscle patterning processes. Disruption of myogenesis occurs earlier in mdx mutants, which lack a functional form of dystrophin, than in cav-3(-/-) mutants, which lack the Cav3 gene that encodes the protein caveolin-3; this finding is consistent with the milder phenotype of LGMD-1c, a condition caused by mutations in Cav3, and the earlier [embryonic day (E)9.5] expression of dystrophin. Myogenesis is severely disrupted in mdx embryos, which display developmental delays; myotube morphology and displacement defects; and aberrant stem cell behaviour. In addition, the caveolin-3 protein is elevated in mdx embryos. Both cav-3(-/-) and mdx mutants (from E15.5 and E11.5, respectively) exhibit hyperproliferation and apoptosis of Myf5-positive embryonic myoblasts; attrition of Pax7-positive myoblasts in situ; and depletion of total Pax7 protein in late gestation. Furthermore, both cav-3(-/-) and mdx mutants have cardiac defects. In cav-3(-/-) mutants, there is a more restricted phenotype comprising hypaxial muscle defects, an excess of malformed hypertrophic myotubes, a twofold increase in myonuclei, and reduced fast myosin heavy chain (FMyHC) content. Several mdx mutant embryo pathologies, including myotube hypotrophy, reduced myotube numbers and increased FMyHC, have reciprocity with cav-3(-/-) mutants. In double mutant (mdxcav-3(+/-)) embryos that are deficient in dystrophin (mdx) and heterozygous for caveolin-3 (cav-3(+/-)), whereby caveolin-3 is reduced to 50% of wild-type (WT) levels, these phenotypes are severely exacerbated: intercostal muscle fibre density is reduced by 71%, and Pax7-positive cells are depleted

  2. Reduced ability to recover from spindle disruption and loss of kinetochore spindle assembly checkpoint proteins in oocytes from aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yan; Holt, Janet E; Lane, Simon I R; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Merriman, Julie A; Jones, Keith T

    2014-01-01

    Currently, maternal aging in women, based on mouse models, is thought to raise oocyte aneuploidy rates, because chromosome cohesion deteriorates during prophase arrest, and Sgo2, a protector of centromeric cohesion, is lost. Here we show that the most common mouse strain, C57Bl6/J, is resistant to maternal aging, showing little increase in aneuploidy or Sgo2 loss. Instead it demonstrates significant kinetochore-associated loss in the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad2 and phosphorylated Aurora C, which is involved in microtubule-kinetochore error correction. Their loss affects the fidelity of bivalent segregation but only when spindle organization is impaired during oocyte maturation. These findings have an impact clinically regarding the handling of human oocytes ex vivo during assisted reproductive techniques and suggest there is a genetic basis to aneuploidy susceptibility.

  3. α-Dystroglycan hypoglycosylation affects cell migration by influencing β-dystroglycan membrane clustering and filopodia length: A multiscale confocal microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, V; Bozzi, M; Signorino, G; Papi, M; De Spirito, M; Brancaccio, A; Maulucci, G; Sciandra, F

    2017-09-01

    Dystroglycan (DG) serves as an adhesion complex linking the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. DG is encoded by a single gene as a precursor, which is constitutively cleaved to form the α- and β-DG subunits. α-DG is a peripheral protein characterized by an extensive glycosylation that is essential to bind laminin and other extracellular matrix proteins, while β-DG binds the cytoskeleton proteins. The functional properties of DG depend on the correct glycosylation of α-DG and on the cross-talk between the two subunits. A reduction of α-DG glycosylation has been observed in muscular dystrophy and cancer while the inhibition of the interaction between α- and β-DG is associated to aberrant post-translational processing of the complex. Here we used confocal microscopy based techniques to get insights into the influence of α-DG glycosylation on the functional properties of the β-DG, and its effects on cell migration. We used epithelial cells transfected with wild-type and with a mutated DG harboring the mutation T190M that has been recently associated to dystroglycanopathy. We found that α-DG hypoglycosylation, together with an increased protein instability, reduces the membrane dynamics of the β-subunit and its clustering within the actin-rich domains, influencing cell migration and spontaneous cell movement. These results contribute to give novel insights into the involvement of aberrant glycosylation of DG in the developing of muscular dystrophy and tumor metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. New World Arenavirus Clade C, but Not Clade A and B Viruses, Utilizes α-Dystroglycan as Its Major Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Kunz, Stefan; Rollin, Pierre E.; Campbell, Kevin P; Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    2002-01-01

    α-Dystroglycan (α-DG) has been identified as a major receptor for lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Lassa virus, two Old World arenaviruses. The situation with New World arenaviruses is less clear: previous studies demonstrated that Oliveros virus also exhibited high-affinity binding to α-DG but that Guanarito virus did not. To extend these initial studies, several additional Old and New World arenaviruses were screened for entry into mouse embryonic stem cells possessing or lacki...

  5. Loss of Oca2 disrupts the unfolded protein response and increases resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress in melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tsing; Orlow, Seth J; Manga, Prashiela

    2013-11-01

    Accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) typically induces stress and initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR) to facilitate recovery. If homeostasis is not restored, apoptosis is induced. However, adaptation to chronic UPR activation can increase resistance to subsequent acute ER stress. We therefore investigated adaptive mechanisms in Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (Oca2)-null melanocytes where UPR signaling is arrested despite continued tyrosinase accumulation leading to resistance to the chemical ER stressor thapsigargin. Although thapsigargin triggers UPR activation, instead of Perk-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2α, in Oca2-null melanocytes, eIF2α was rapidly dephosphorylated upon treatment. Dephosphorylation was mediated by the Gadd34-PP1α phosphatase complex. Gadd34-complex inhibition blocked eIF2α dephosphorylation and significantly increased Oca2-null melanocyte sensitivity to thapsigargin. Thus, Oca2-null melanocytes adapt to acute ER stress by disruption of pro-apoptotic Perk signaling, which promotes cell survival. This is the first study to demonstrate rapid eIF2α dephosphorylation as an adaptive mechanism to ER stress.

  6. Disrupted plasma membrane localization and loss of function reveal regions of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 involved in structural integrity and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivillac, Nicole M I; Wasal, Karanvir; Villani, Daniela F; Naydenova, Zlatina; Hanna, W J Brad; Coe, Imogen R

    2009-10-01

    Human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 (hENT1) is an integral membrane protein that transports nucleosides and analog drugs across cellular membranes. Very little is known about intracellular processing and localization of hENT1. Here we show that disruption of a highly conserved triplet (PWN) near the N-terminus, or the last eight C-terminal residues (two hydrophobic triplets separated by a positive arginine) result in loss of plasma membrane localization and/or transport function. To understand the role of specific residues within these regions, we studied the localization patterns of N- or C-terminal deletion and/or substitution mutants of GFP-hENT1 using confocal microscopy. Quantification of GFP-hENT1 (mutant and wildtype) protein at the plasma membrane was conducted using nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI) binding. Functionality of the GFP-hENT1 mutants was determined by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes followed by measurement of uridine uptake. Mutation of the proline within the PWN motif disrupts plasma membrane localization. C-terminal mutations (primarily within the hydrophobic triplets) lead to hENT1 retention within the cell (e.g. in the ER). Some mutants still localize to the plasma membrane but show reduced transport activity. These data suggest that these two regions contribute to the structural integrity and thus correct processing and function of hENT1.

  7. Loss-of-function mutation in the X-linked TBX22 promoter disrupts an ETS-1 binding site and leads to cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiazhou; Cheng, Yibin; Yuan, Jia; Huang, Chunhua; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2015-02-01

    The cleft palate only (CPO) is a common congenital defect with complex etiology in humans. The molecular etiology of the CPO remains unknown. Here, we report a loss-of-function mutation in X-linked TBX22 gene (T-box 22) in a six-generation family of the CPO with obvious phenotypes of both cleft palate and hyper-nasal speech. We identify a functional -73G>A mutation in the promoter of TBX22, which is located at the core-binding site of transcription factor ETS-1 (v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the sequence around the -73G>A mutation site is specific in primates. The mutation was detected in all five affected male members cosegregating with the affected phenotype and heterozygote occurred only in some unaffected females of the family, suggesting an X-linked transmission of the mutation in the family. The -73G>A variant is a novel single nucleotide mutation. Cell co-transfections indicated that ETS-1 could activate the TBX22 promoter. Moreover, EMSA and ChIP assays demonstrated that the allele A disrupts the binding site of ETS-1, thus markedly decreases the activity of the TBX22 promoter, which is likely to lead to the birth defect of the CPO without ankyloglossia. These results suggest that a loss-of-function mutation in the X-linked TBX22 promoter may cause the cleft palate through disruption of TBX22-ETS-1 pathway.

  8. Regional early and progressive loss of brain pericytes but not vascular smooth muscle cells in adult mice with disrupted platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakopoulou, Angeliki Maria; Zhao, Zhen; Montagne, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Pericytes regulate key neurovascular functions of the brain. Studies in pericyte-deficient transgenic mice with aberrant signaling between endothelial-derived platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) in pericytes have contributed to better understanding of the role of pericytes in the brain. Here, we studied PdgfrβF7/F7 mice, which carry seven point mutations that disrupt PDGFRβ signaling causing loss of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the developing brain. We asked whether these mice have a stable or progressive vascular phenotype after birth, and whether both pericyte and VSMCs populations are affected in the adult brain. We found an early and progressive region-dependent loss of brain pericytes, microvascular reductions and blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, which were more pronounced in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum than in the thalamus, whereas VSMCs population remained unaffected at the time when pericyte loss was already established. For example, compared to age-matched controls, PdgfrβF7/F7 mice between 4–6 and 36–48 weeks of age developed a region-dependent loss in pericyte coverage (22–46, 24–44 and 4–31%) and cell numbers (36–49, 34–64 and 11–36%), reduction in capillary length (20–39, 13–46 and 1–30%), and an increase in extravascular fibrinogen-derived deposits (3.4–5.2, 2.8–4.1 and 0–3.6-fold) demonstrating BBB breakdown in the cortex, hippocampus and thalamus, respectively. Capillary reductions and BBB breakdown correlated with loss of pericyte coverage. Our data suggest that PdgfrβF7/F7 mice develop an aggressive and rapid vascular phenotype without appreciable early involvement of VSMCs, therefore providing a valuable model to study regional effects of pericyte loss on brain vascular and neuronal functions. This model could be a useful tool for future studies directed at understanding the role of pericytes in the pathogenesis

  9. Genetic modifier screens reveal new components that interact with the Drosophila dystroglycan-dystrophin complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya M Kucherenko

    Full Text Available The Dystroglycan-Dystrophin (Dg-Dys complex has a capacity to transmit information from the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton inside the cell. It is proposed that this interaction is under tight regulation; however the signaling/regulatory components of Dg-Dys complex remain elusive. Understanding the regulation of the complex is critical since defects in this complex cause muscular dystrophy in humans. To reveal new regulators of the Dg-Dys complex, we used a model organism Drosophila melanogaster and performed genetic interaction screens to identify modifiers of Dg and Dys mutants in Drosophila wing veins. These mutant screens revealed that the Dg-Dys complex interacts with genes involved in muscle function and components of Notch, TGF-beta and EGFR signaling pathways. In addition, components of pathways that are required for cellular and/or axonal migration through cytoskeletal regulation, such as Semaphorin-Plexin, Frazzled-Netrin and Slit-Robo pathways show interactions with Dys and/or Dg. These data suggest that the Dg-Dys complex and the other pathways regulating extracellular information transfer to the cytoskeletal dynamics are more intercalated than previously thought.

  10. beta-Dystroglycan modulates the interplay between actin and microtubules in human-adhered platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Suárez-Sánchez, Rocío; Hernández-González, Enrique; Galván, Iván

    2008-05-01

    To maintain the continuity of an injured blood vessel, platelets change shape, secrete granule contents, adhere, aggregate, and retract in a haemostatic plug. Ordered arrays of microtubules, microfilaments, and associated proteins are responsible for these platelet responses. In full-spread platelets, microfilament bundles in association with other cytoskeleton proteins are anchored in focal contacts. Recent studies in migrating cells suggest that co-ordination and direct physical interaction of microtubules and actin network modulate adhesion development. In platelets, we have proposed a feasible association between these two cytoskeletal systems, as well as the participation of the dystrophin-associated protein complex, as part of the focal adhesion complex. The present study analysed the participation of microtubules and actin during the platelet adhesion process. Confocal microscopy, fluorescence resonance transfer energy and immunoprecipitation assays were used to provide evidence of a cross-talk between these two cytoskeletal systems. Interestingly, beta-dystroglycan was found to act as an interplay protein between actin and microtubules and an additional communication between these two cytoskeleton networks was maintained through proteins of focal adhesion complex. Altogether our data are indicative of a dynamic co-participation of actin filaments and microtubules in modulating focal contacts to achieve platelet function.

  11. A mouse model of acrodermatitis enteropathica: loss of intestine zinc transporter ZIP4 (Slc39a4 disrupts the stem cell niche and intestine integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Geiser

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human Zip4 gene cause acrodermatitis enteropathica, a rare, pseudo-dominant, lethal genetic disorder. We created a tamoxifen-inducible, enterocyte-specific knockout of this gene in mice which mimics this human disorder. We found that the enterocyte Zip4 gene in mice is essential throughout life, and loss-of-function of this gene rapidly leads to wasting and death unless mice are nursed or provided excess dietary zinc. An initial effect of the knockout was the reprogramming of Paneth cells, which contribute to the intestinal stem cell niche in the crypts. Labile zinc in Paneth cells was lost, followed by diminished Sox9 (sex determining region Y-box 9 and lysozyme expression, and accumulation of mucin, which is normally found in goblet cells. This was accompanied by dysplasia of the intestinal crypts and significantly diminished small intestine cell division, and attenuated mTOR1 activity in villus enterocytes, indicative of increased catabolic metabolism, and diminished protein synthesis. This was followed by disorganization of the absorptive epithelium. Elemental analyses of small intestine, liver, and pancreas from Zip4-intestine knockout mice revealed that total zinc was dramatically and rapidly decreased in these organs whereas iron, manganese, and copper slowly accumulated to high levels in the liver as the disease progressed. These studies strongly suggest that wasting and lethality in acrodermatitis enteropathica patients reflects the loss-of-function of the intestine zinc transporter ZIP4, which leads to abnormal Paneth cell gene expression, disruption of the intestinal stem cell niche, and diminished function of the intestinal mucosa. These changes, in turn, cause a switch from anabolic to catabolic metabolism and altered homeostasis of several essential metals, which, if untreated by excess dietary zinc, leads to dramatic weight loss and death.

  12. Loss of p12CDK2-AP1 Expression in Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Disrupted Transforming Growth Factor-β-Smad Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Peng

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined correlations between TGF-β1, TβR-I and TβR-II, p12CDK2-AP1 p21WAF1 p27KIP1 Smad2, and p-Smad2 in 125 cases of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC to test the hypothesis that resistance to TGF-β1-induced growth suppression is due to the disruption of its signaling pathway as a consequence of reduced or lost p12CDK2-AP1. Immunoreactivity for TβR-II decreased in OSCC with increasing disease aggressiveness; however, no differences were observed for TβR-I and TGF-β1. The expression of TβR-II significantly correlated with p12CDK2-AP1 and p27KIP1 (P<.001 and P<.01, respectively. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between TβR-II expression and p-Smad2 (P < .001. The in vivo correlation of the levels of TβR-II, p12CDK2-AP1 and p27 KIP1 was confirmed in normal and OSCC cell lines. Additionally, in vitro analysis of TGF-β-treated cells showed that TGF-β1 treatment of normal keratinocytes suppressed cell growth with upregulation of p-Smad2, p12CDK2-API and p21WAF1 expression, whereas there was no effect on OSCC cell lines. These results provide evidence of a link between a disrupted TGF-β-Smad signaling pathway and loss of induction of cell cycle-inhibitory proteins, especially p12CDK2-AP1 in OSCC, which may lead to the resistance of TGF-β1 growth-inhibitory effect on OSCC.

  13. Upregulation of paxillin and focal adhesion signaling follows Dystroglycan Complex deletions and promotes a hypertensive state of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Shamik; Tewari, Manorama; Zajac, Allison; Barton, Elisabeth; Sweeney, H Lee; Discher, Dennis E

    2011-01-01

    Anchorage to matrix is mediated for many cells not only by integrin-based focal adhesions but also by a parallel assembly of integral and peripheral membrane proteins known as the Dystroglycan Complex. Deficiencies in either dystrophin (mdx mice) or γ-sarcoglycan (γSG(-/-) mice) components of the Dystroglycan Complex lead to upregulation of numerous focal adhesion proteins, and the phosphoprotein paxillin proves to be among the most prominent. In mdx muscle, paxillin-Y31 and Y118 are both hyper-phosphorylated as are key sites in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the stretch-stimulatable pro-survival MAPK pathway, whereas γSG(-/-) muscle exhibits more erratic hyper-phosphorylation. In cultured myotubes, cell tension generated by myosin-II appears required for localization of paxillin to adhesions while vinculin appears more stably integrated. Overexpression of wild-type (WT) paxillin has no obvious effect on focal adhesion density or the physical strength of adhesion, but WT and a Y118F mutant promote contractile sarcomere formation whereas a Y31F mutant shows no effect, implicating Y31 in striation. Self-peeling of cells as well as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) probing of cells with or without myosin-II inhibition indicate an increase in cell tension within paxillin-overexpressing cells. However, prednisolone, a first-line glucocorticoid for muscular dystrophies, decreases cell tension without affecting paxillin at adhesions, suggesting a non-linear relationship between paxillin and cell tension. Hypertension that results from upregulation of integrin adhesions is thus a natural and treatable outcome of Dystroglycan Complex down-regulation.

  14. The evolution of the dystroglycan complex, a major mediator of muscle integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine C. Adams

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Basement membrane (BM extracellular matrices are crucial for the coordination of different tissue layers. A matrix adhesion receptor that is important for BM function and stability in many mammalian tissues is the dystroglycan (DG complex. This comprises the non-covalently-associated extracellular α-DG, that interacts with laminin in the BM, and the transmembrane β-DG, that interacts principally with dystrophin to connect to the actin cytoskeleton. Mutations in dystrophin, DG, or several enzymes that glycosylate α-DG underlie severe forms of human muscular dystrophy. Nonwithstanding the pathophysiological importance of the DG complex and its fundamental interest as a non-integrin system of cell-ECM adhesion, the evolution of DG and its interacting proteins is not understood. We analysed the phylogenetic distribution of DG, its proximal binding partners and key processing enzymes in extant metazoan and relevant outgroups. We identify that DG originated after the divergence of ctenophores from porifera and eumetazoa. The C-terminal half of the DG core protein is highly-conserved, yet the N-terminal region, that includes the laminin-binding region, has undergone major lineage-specific divergences. Phylogenetic analysis based on the C-terminal IG2_MAT_NU region identified three distinct clades corresponding to deuterostomes, arthropods, and mollusks/early-diverging metazoans. Whereas the glycosyltransferases that modify α-DG are also present in choanoflagellates, the DG-binding proteins dystrophin and laminin originated at the base of the metazoa, and DG-associated sarcoglycan is restricted to cnidarians and bilaterians. These findings implicate extensive functional diversification of DG within invertebrate lineages and identify the laminin-DG-dystrophin axis as a conserved adhesion system that evolved subsequent to integrin-ECM adhesion, likely to enhance the functional complexity of cell-BM interactions in early metazoans.

  15. The evolution of the dystroglycan complex, a major mediator of muscle integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Josephine C; Brancaccio, Andrea

    2015-08-28

    Basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrices are crucial for the coordination of different tissue layers. A matrix adhesion receptor that is important for BM function and stability in many mammalian tissues is the dystroglycan (DG) complex. This comprises the non-covalently-associated extracellular α-DG, that interacts with laminin in the BM, and the transmembrane β-DG, that interacts principally with dystrophin to connect to the actin cytoskeleton. Mutations in dystrophin, DG, or several enzymes that glycosylate α-DG underlie severe forms of human muscular dystrophy. Nonwithstanding the pathophysiological importance of the DG complex and its fundamental interest as a non-integrin system of cell-ECM adhesion, the evolution of DG and its interacting proteins is not understood. We analysed the phylogenetic distribution of DG, its proximal binding partners and key processing enzymes in extant metazoan and relevant outgroups. We identify that DG originated after the divergence of ctenophores from porifera and eumetazoa. The C-terminal half of the DG core protein is highly-conserved, yet the N-terminal region, that includes the laminin-binding region, has undergone major lineage-specific divergences. Phylogenetic analysis based on the C-terminal IG2_MAT_NU region identified three distinct clades corresponding to deuterostomes, arthropods, and mollusks/early-diverging metazoans. Whereas the glycosyltransferases that modify α-DG are also present in choanoflagellates, the DG-binding proteins dystrophin and laminin originated at the base of the metazoa, and DG-associated sarcoglycan is restricted to cnidarians and bilaterians. These findings implicate extensive functional diversification of DG within invertebrate lineages and identify the laminin-DG-dystrophin axis as a conserved adhesion system that evolved subsequent to integrin-ECM adhesion, likely to enhance the functional complexity of cell-BM interactions in early metazoans.

  16. Flow cytometry for the analysis of α-dystroglycan glycosylation in fibroblasts from patients with dystroglycanopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Stevens

    Full Text Available α-dystroglycan (α-DG is a peripheral membrane protein that is an integral component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. In an inherited subset of muscular dystrophies known as dystroglycanopathies, α-DG has reduced glycosylation which results in lower affinity binding to several extracellular matrix proteins including laminins. The glycosylation status of α-DG is normally assessed by the binding of the α-DG antibody IIH6 to a specific glycan epitope on α-DG involved in laminin binding. Immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting are two of the most widely used methods to detect the amount of α-DG glycosylation in muscle. While the interpretation of the presence or absence of the epitope on muscle using these techniques is straightforward, the assessment of a mild defect can be challenging. In this study, flow cytometry was used to compare the amount of IIH6-reactive glycans in fibroblasts from dystroglycanopathy patients with defects in genes known to cause α-DG hypoglycosylation to the amount in fibroblasts from healthy and pathological control subjects. A total of twenty one dystroglycanopathy patient fibroblasts were assessed, as well as fibroblasts from three healthy controls and seven pathological controls. Control fibroblasts have clearly detectable amounts of IIH6-reactive glycans, and there is a significant difference in the amount of this glycosylation, as measured by the mean fluorescence intensity of an antibody recognising the epitope and the percentage of cells positive for the epitope, between these controls and dystroglycanopathy patient fibroblasts (p<0.0001 for both. Our results indicate that the amount of α-DG glycosylation in patient fibroblasts is comparable to that in patient skeletal muscle. This method could complement existing immunohistochemical assays in skeletal muscle as it is quantitative and simple to perform, and could be used when a muscle biopsy is not available. This test could also be used to assess the

  17. Heterozygous deletion of a 2-Mb region including the dystroglycan gene in a patient with mild myopathy, facial hypotonia, oral-motor dyspraxia and white matter abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Amy R; Böhm, Sabrina V; Sewduth, Raj N; Josifova, Dragana; Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie; Izatt, Louise; Roberts, Roland G

    2010-07-01

    Dystroglycan is a protein which binds directly to two proteins defective in muscular dystrophies (dystrophin and laminin alpha2) and whose own aberrant post-translational modification is the common aetiological route of neuromuscular diseases associated with mutations in genes encoding at least six other proteins (POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, LARGE, FKTN and FKRP). It is surprising, therefore, that to our knowledge no mutations of the human dystroglycan gene itself have yet been reported. In this study, we describe a patient with a heterozygous de novo deletion of a approximately 2-Mb region of chromosome 3, which includes the dystroglycan gene (DAG1). The patient is a 16-year-old female with learning difficulties, white matter abnormalities, elevated serum creatine kinase, oral-motor dyspraxia and facial hypotonia but minimal clinically significant involvement of other muscles. As these symptoms are a subset of those observed in disorders of dystroglycan glycosylation (muscle-eye-brain disease and Warker-Warburg syndrome), we assess the likely contribution to her phenotype of her heterogosity for a null mutation of DAG1. We also show that the transcriptional compensation observed in the Dag1(+/-) mouse is not observed in the patient. Although we cannot show that haploinsufficiency of DAG1 is the sole cause of this patient's myopathy and white matter changes, this case serves to constrain our ideas of the severity of the phenotypic consequences of heterozygosity for null DAG1 mutations.

  18. Duplication of the dystroglycan gene in most branches of teleost fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giardina Bruno

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dystroglycan (DG complex is a major non-integrin cell adhesion system whose multiple biological roles involve, among others, skeletal muscle stability, embryonic development and synapse maturation. DG is composed of two subunits: α-DG, extracellular and highly glycosylated, and the transmembrane β-DG, linking the cytoskeleton to the surrounding basement membrane in a wide variety of tissues. A single copy of the DG gene (DAG1 has been identified so far in humans and other mammals, encoding for a precursor protein which is post-translationally cleaved to liberate the two DG subunits. Similarly, D. rerio (zebrafish seems to have a single copy of DAG1, whose removal was shown to cause a severe dystrophic phenotype in adult animals, although it is known that during evolution, due to a whole genome duplication (WGD event, many teleost fish acquired multiple copies of several genes (paralogues. Results Data mining of pufferfish (T. nigroviridis and T. rubripes and other teleost fish (O. latipes and G. aculeatus available nucleotide sequences revealed the presence of two functional paralogous DG sequences. RT-PCR analysis proved that both the DG sequences are transcribed in T. nigroviridis. One of the two DG sequences harbours an additional mini-intronic sequence, 137 bp long, interrupting the uncomplicated exon-intron-exon pattern displayed by DAG1 in mammals and D. rerio. A similar scenario emerged also in D. labrax (sea bass, from whose genome we have cloned and sequenced a new DG sequence that also harbours a shorter additional intronic sequence of 116 bp. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of DG protein products in all the species analysed including two teleost Antarctic species (T. bernacchii and C. hamatus. Conclusion Our evolutionary analysis has shown that the whole-genome duplication event in the Class Actinopterygii (ray-finned fish involved also DAG1. We unravelled new important molecular genetic details

  19. Old World and Clade C New World Arenaviruses Mimic the Molecular Mechanism of Receptor Recognition Used by α-Dystroglycan's Host-Derived Ligands▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rojek, Jillian M.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Campbell, Kevin P; Kunz, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    α-Dystroglycan (DG) is an important cellular receptor for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and also serves as the receptor for Old World arenaviruses Lassa fever virus (LFV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and clade C New World arenaviruses. In the host cell, α-DG is subject to a remarkably complex pattern of O glycosylation that is crucial for its interactions with ECM proteins. Two of these unusual sugar modifications, protein O mannosylation and glycan modifications involv...

  20. Family Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stay angry, or avoid fights altogether? Your children model themselves on you. Departures and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family ...

  1. Differential expression of Dystroglycan-spliceforms with and without the mucin-like domain during Drosophila embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Martina; Baumgartner, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    and the cytoskeleton. Disruption of this linkage in skeletal muscle is the underlying cause in various types of muscular dystrophies (MD). One particular type of MD is caused by alterations of O-linked glycosylation in the mucin-like domain of DG, which is required for binding of the ECM molecules Laminin and Perlecan....... In epithelial cells, reduced expression of DG is associated with increased invasiveness of cancer cells and loss of cell polarity. Drosophila Dg is, in contrast to vertebrate Dg, subjected to differential splicing of the mRNA. Interestingly, the shorter DG splice forms lack the mucin-like domain. Here, we...... on glial cells. Our findings further support the idea that DG forms lacking the mucin-like domain serve a specific function in Drosophila....

  2. Lost Polarization of Aquaporin4 and Dystroglycan in the Core Lesion after Traumatic Brain Injury Suggests Functional Divergence in Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To understand how aquaporin4 (AQP4 and dystroglycan (DG polarized distribution change and their roles in brain edema formation after traumatic brain injury (TBI. Methods. Brain water content, Evans blue detection, real-time PCR, western blot, and immunofluorescence were used. Results. At an early stage of TBI, AQP4 and DG maintained vessel-like pattern in perivascular endfeet; M1, M23, and M1/M23 were increased in the core lesion. At a later stage of TBI, DG expression was lost in perivascular area, accompanied with similar but delayed change of AQP4 expression; expression of M1, M23, and DG and the ratio of M1/M2 were increased. Conclusion. At an early stage, AQP4 and DG maintained the polarized distribution. Upregulated M1 and M23 could retard the cytotoxic edema formation. At a later stage AQP4 and DG polarized expression were lost from perivascular endfeet and induced the worst cytotoxic brain edema. The alteration of DG expression could regulate that of AQP4 expression after TBI.

  3. Disrupting Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff; Bazzichelli, Tatiana

    Disruptive Business explores some of the interconnections between art, activism and the business concept of disruptive innovation. With a backdrop of the crisis of financial capitalism, austerity cuts in the cultural sphere, the idea is to focus on potential art strategies in relation to a broken...... economy. In a perverse way, we ask whether this presents new opportunities for cultural producers to achieve more autonomy over their production process. If it is indeed possible, or desirable, what alternative business models emerge? The book is concerned broadly with business as material for reinvention...

  4. Disrupting Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff; Bazzichelli, Tatiana

    Disruptive Business explores some of the interconnections between art, activism and the business concept of disruptive innovation. With a backdrop of the crisis of financial capitalism, austerity cuts in the cultural sphere, the idea is to focus on potential art strategies in relation to a broken...... economy. In a perverse way, we ask whether this presents new opportunities for cultural producers to achieve more autonomy over their production process. If it is indeed possible, or desirable, what alternative business models emerge? The book is concerned broadly with business as material for reinvention...

  5. Politisk disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Dette blogindlæg giver en kort analyse af hvordan de sociale medier ved at give en ny tid har åbnet for den disruption af de politiske processer som især Trump stå som et eksempel på.......Dette blogindlæg giver en kort analyse af hvordan de sociale medier ved at give en ny tid har åbnet for den disruption af de politiske processer som især Trump stå som et eksempel på....

  6. Loss of circadian rhythm of circulating insulin concentration induced by high-fat diet intake is associated with disrupted rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Kazue; Hikosaka, Maki; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2016-04-01

    Peripheral clock genes show a circadian rhythm is correlated with the timing of feeding in peripheral tissues. It was reported that these clock genes are strongly regulated by insulin action and that a high-fat diet (HFD) intake in C57BL/6J mice for 21days induced insulin secretion during the dark phase and reduced the circadian rhythm of clock genes. In this study, we examined the circadian expression patterns of these clock genes in insulin-resistant animal models with excess secretion of insulin during the day. We examined whether insulin resistance induced by a HFD intake for 80days altered blood parameters (glucose and insulin concentrations) and expression of mRNA and proteins encoded by clock and functional genes in the liver using male ICR mice. Serum insulin concentrations were continuously higher during the day in mice fed a HFD than control mice. Expression of lipogenesis-related genes (Fas and Accβ) and the transcription factor Chrebp peaked at zeitgeber time (ZT)24 in the liver of control mice. A HFD intake reduced the expression of these genes at ZT24 and disrupted the circadian rhythm. Expression of Bmal1 and Clock, transcription factors that compose the core feedback loop, showed circadian variation and were synchronously associated with Fas gene expression in control mice, but not in those fed a HFD. These results indicate that the disruption of the circadian rhythm of insulin secretion by HFD intake is closely associated with the disappearance of circadian expression of lipogenic and clock genes in the liver of mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to support hair growth. Some teens who are vegetarians also lose their hair if they don't get enough protein from non-meat sources. And some athletes are at higher risk for hair loss because they may be more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Disruption of the hair growth cycle. Some ...

  8. Distribution of components of basal lamina and dystrophin-dystroglycan complex in the rat pineal gland: differences from the brain tissue and between the subdivisions of the gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagyura, Zsolt; Pócsai, Károly; Kálmán, Mihály

    2010-01-01

    The pineal gland is an evagination of the brain tissue, a circumventricular neuroendocrine organ. Our immunohistochemical study investigates basal lamina components (laminin, agrin, perlecan, fibronectin), their receptor, the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex (beta-dystroglycan, dystrophin utrophin), aquaporins (-4,-9) and cellular markers (S100, neurofilament, GFAP, glutamine synthetase) in the adult rat corpus pineale. The aim was to compare the immunohistochemical features of the cerebral and pineal vessels and their environment, and to compare their features in the distal and proximal subdivisions of the so-called 'superficial pineal gland'. In contrast to the cerebral vessels, pineal vessels proved to be immunonegative to alpha1-dystrobrevin, but immunoreactive to laminin. An inner, dense, and an outer, loose layer of laminin as two basal laminae were present. The gap between them contained agrin and perlecan. Basal lamina components enmeshed the pinealocytes, too. Components of dystrophin-dystroglycan complex were also distributed along the vessels. Dystrophin, utrophin and agrin gave a 'patchy' distribution rather than a continuous one. The vessels were interconnected by wing-like structures, composed of basal lamina-components: a delicate network forming nests for cells. Cells immunostained with glutamine synthetase, S100-protein or neurofilament protein contacted the vessels, as well as GFAP- or aquaporin-immunostained astrocytes. Within the body a smaller, proximal, GFAP-and aquaporin-containing subdivision, and a larger, distal, GFAP-and aquaporin-free subdivision could be distinguished. The vascular localization of agrin and utrophin, as well as dystrophin, delineated vessels unequally, preferring the proximal or distal end of the body, respectively.

  9. Carbohydrate-binding domain of the POMGnT1 stem region modulates O-mannosylation sites of α-dystroglycan

    OpenAIRE

    Kuwabara, Naoyuki; Manya, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takeyuki; Tateno, Hiroaki; Kanagawa, Motoi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Akasaka-Manya, Keiko; Hirose, Yuriko; Mizuno, Mamoru; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Toda, Tatsushi; Hirabayashi, Jun; Senda, Toshiya; Endo, Tamao; Kato, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is caused by hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG). In some CMD patients, mutations in the gene encoding protein O-linked mannose β1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1, POMGnT1, are responsible for such hypoglycosylation. Many CMD-related genes are thought to be involved in the glycosylation of core M3, a specific O-mannose–type structure in α-DG. Although POMGnT1 has long been known to be associated with CMD, its role in the glycosylation of core M3 ...

  10. Disruptive innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Viglia, Giampaolo; Werthner, H.; Buhalis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of disrupting innovations has generated significant market changes, modifying the dominant logic and affecting the strategic positioning of companies. This structural change is affecting market structure, the networks and the services that tourism players are supposed to use (Gretzel et al. 2015). One can also refer to the notion of digital infrastructure, which provides a nice framework that connects the different stakeholders, their relations as well as internal dynamics. At t...

  11. Disruptive innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Viglia, Giampaolo; H. Werthner; Buhalis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of disrupting innovations has generated significant market changes, modifying the dominant logic and affecting the strategic positioning of companies. This structural change is affecting market structure, the networks and the services that tourism players are supposed to use (Gretzel et al. 2015). One can also refer to the notion of digital infrastructure, which provides a nice framework that connects the different stakeholders, their relations as well as internal dynamics. At t...

  12. Disrupted Disclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause Hansen, Hans; Uldam, Julie

    While projects of governance by transparency have become widespread over the past decades, theyare usually investigated and theorized in isolation from the wider field of visibility and surveillancein which they are embedded. Building on theories of governance, visibility and surveillance...... appearances become challenged through disruptive disclosures in mediaenvironments characterized by multiple levels of visibility, with companies both observing andbeing observed by civil society groups that criticize them; (c) why and how the mobilization aroundtransparency and ensuing practices...... of surveillance produce new forms of governing, potentiallywidening the space of manoeuvring for corporations....

  13. Rodent host cell/Lassa virus interactions: evolution and expression of α-Dystroglycan, LARGE-1 and LARGE-2 genes, with special emphasis on the Mastomys genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayeh, Ashraf; Tatard, Caroline; Kako-Ouraga, Sandrine; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Dobigny, Gauthier

    2010-12-01

    Arenaviruses are usually rodent-borne viruses that constitute a major threat for human health. Among them, Lassa Fever Virus (LFV) occurs in Western Africa where it infects hundreds of thousands of people annually. According to the most recent surveys, LFV is hosted by one of the multimammate rats, Mastomys natalensis, but has never been detected in its sibling and sometimes sympatric species Mastomys erythroleucus. This pattern suggests that intrinsic, i.e. genetic properties underlie such a drastic epidemiological difference (M. natalensis as a reservoir vs. M. erythroleucus as a non-reservoir species). Here we investigate genomic differences between these two closely related rodent species by focusing on three genes that have recently been described as pivotal for LFV/human cell interactions: Dystroglycan (the LFV cellular receptor), LARGE-1 and LARGE-2 (two enzymes that are essential to Dystroglycan functioning). For all three genes, sequence analyses showed that amino-acid chains undergo extremely strong purifying selective pressures, and indicated that no nucleotide (therefore no tertiary structure) change can be advocated to explain species-specific differences in LFV-cellular mediation. Nevertheless, preliminary studies of kidney-specific expression profiles suggested that important species-specific differences exist between Mastomys species. Taking into account current knowledge about LFV-human cell interactions, our results may point towards a possible role for LARGE-1 and LARGE-2 enzymes at the intracellular replication level of the virus, rather than at the LFV-host cell receptor binding step.

  14. Disruption of ion-trafficking system in the cochlear spiral ligament prior to permanent hearing loss induced by exposure to intense noise: possible involvement of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal as a mediator of oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss is at least in part due to disruption of endocochlear potential, which is maintained by various K(+ transport apparatuses including Na(+, K(+-ATPase and gap junction-mediated intercellular communication in the lateral wall structures. In this study, we examined the changes in the ion-trafficking-related proteins in the spiral ligament fibrocytes (SLFs following in vivo acoustic overstimulation or in vitro exposure of cultured SLFs to 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, which is a mediator of oxidative stress. Connexin (Cx26 and Cx30 were ubiquitously expressed throughout the spiral ligament, whereas Na(+, K(+-ATPase α1 was predominantly detected in the stria vascularis and spiral prominence (type 2 SLFs. One-hour exposure of mice to 8 kHz octave band noise at a 110 dB sound pressure level produced an immediate and prolonged decrease in the Cx26 expression level and in Na+, K(+-ATPase activity, as well as a delayed decrease in Cx30 expression in the SLFs. The noise-induced hearing loss and decrease in the Cx26 protein level and Na(+, K(+-ATPase activity were abolished by a systemic treatment with a free radical-scavenging agent, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl, or with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride. In vitro exposure of SLFs in primary culture to 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal produced a decrease in the protein levels of Cx26 and Na(+, K(+-ATPase α1, as well as Na(+, K(+-ATPase activity, and also resulted in dysfunction of the intercellular communication between the SLFs. Taken together, our data suggest that disruption of the ion-trafficking system in the cochlear SLFs is caused by the decrease in Cxs level and Na(+, K(+-ATPase activity, and at least in part involved in permanent hearing loss induced by intense noise. Oxidative stress-mediated products might contribute to the decrease in Cxs content and Na(+, K(+-ATPase activity in the cochlear lateral wall structures.

  15. Chronic GluN2B antagonism disrupts behavior in wild-type mice without protecting against synapse loss or memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jesse E; Meilandt, William J; Gogineni, Alvin; Reynen, Paul; Herrington, James; Weimer, Robby M; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-06-11

    Extensive evidence implicates GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2B-NMDARs) in excitotoxic-insult-induced neurodegeneration and amyloid β (Aβ)-induced synaptic dysfunction. Therefore, inhibiting GluN2B-NMDARs would appear to be a potential therapeutic strategy to provide neuroprotection and improve cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are no reports of long-term in vivo treatment of AD mouse models with GluN2B antagonists. We used piperidine18 (Pip18), a potent and selective GluN2B-NMDAR antagonist with favorable pharmacokinetic properties, for long-term dosing in AD mouse models. Reduced freezing behavior in Tg2576 mice during fear conditioning was partially reversed after subchronic (17 d) Pip18 treatment. However, analysis of freezing behavior in different contexts indicated that this increased freezing likely involves elevated anxiety or excessive memory generalization in both nontransgenic (NTG) and Tg2576 mice. In PS2APP mice chronically fed with medicated food containing Pip18 for 4 months, spatial learning and memory deficits were not rescued, plaque-associated spine loss was not affected, and synaptic function was not altered. At the same time, altered open field activity consistent with increased anxiety and degraded performance in an active avoidance task were observed in NTG after chronic treatment. These results indicate that long-term treatment with a GluN2B-NMDAR antagonist does not provide a disease-modifying benefit and could cause cognitive liabilities rather than symptomatic benefit in AD mouse models. Therefore, these results challenge the expectation of the therapeutic potential for GluN2B-NMDAR antagonists in AD. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/348277-12$15.00/0.

  16. Sustainable Disruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Kjær, Lykke Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 the Sustainable Disruptions (SD) project at the Laboratory for Sustainability at Design School Kolding (DK) has developed and tested a set of design thinking tools, specifically targeting the barriers to economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable business development...... invested in the issue of sustainable business development, in particular the leaders and employees of SMEs, but also to design education seeking new ways to consciously handle and teach the complexity inherent in sustainable transformation. Findings indicate that the SD design thinking approach contributes....... The tools have been applied in practice in collaboration with 11 small and medium sized companies (SMEs). The study investigates these approaches to further understand how design thinking can contribute to sustainable transition in a business context. The study and the findings are relevant to organizations...

  17. Celibacy and Family Disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emaletdinov B. M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Causes for celibacy, divorces and successful marriage are discussed in the article. Absence of true love and inability to build and keep it are the main reasons for family disruption. Amorousness, immature love and various forms of false or flawed love substitute the true feeling. It is caused by increased women’s independence, loss of mutual understanding and trust (due to infidelity or jealousy, incompatibility of characters or values. Celibacy is often conditioned by physical disability, revaluation of freedom and independence, huge requirements to partners, consumer attitude to life, infertility, alcohol and drug abuse, abnormalities in personality and sexuality.

  18. 损失厌恶供应链应对突变风险的收益共享契约%On Revenue Sharing Contract in Loss-Aversion Supply Chain under Disruption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施国洪; 曾月凤; 陈敬贤

    2012-01-01

    A two-stage supply chain composed of a risk-neutral supplier and a loss-aversion retailer is discussed in this paper. With revenue sharing contract as coordination means, the supply chain coordinate problem under sudden disruptions is studied. By using the loss-averse model to describe the loss-aversion level of the retailer, the profit of the supply chain is analyzed under both decentralized and centralized control modes. Results show that, by using revenue sharing contract, such a supply chain can be coordinated. To do so, the range of the contract parameter value increases as the level of the loss-aversion of the retailer increases. A numerical example is used to verify the results obtained in this paper.%研究一个风险中性的供应商和具有损失厌恶特性的零售商组成的二阶供应链,在供应链遭遇突变风险的情况下,收益共享契约能否协调该供应链的问题.利用损失厌恶模型对零售商的损失厌恶程度进行了刻画,分别讨论了突变风险发生后分散和集中控制的情况下供应链的整体利润.研究发现,收益共享契约能够协调该供应链,并且零售商的损失厌恶程度越强,契约参数的上下限越大.通过数值算例的方法对上述结论进行了验证,且发现当突变风险导致需求发生变动时,零售商的效用和供应商的利润呈反方向变化.

  19. Automatic location of disruption times in JET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, R; Vega, J; Murari, A

    2014-11-01

    The loss of stability and confinement in tokamak plasmas can induce critical events known as disruptions. Disruptions produce strong electromagnetic forces and thermal loads which can damage fundamental components of the devices. Determining the disruption time is extremely important for various disruption studies: theoretical models, physics-driven models, or disruption predictors. In JET, during the experimental campaigns with the JET-C (Carbon Fiber Composite) wall, a common criterion to determine the disruption time consisted of locating the time of the thermal quench. However, with the metallic ITER-like wall (JET-ILW), this criterion is usually not valid. Several thermal quenches may occur previous to the current quench but the temperature recovers. Therefore, a new criterion has to be defined. A possibility is to use the start of the current quench as disruption time. This work describes the implementation of an automatic data processing method to estimate the disruption time according to this new definition. This automatic determination allows both reducing human efforts to locate the disruption times and standardizing the estimates (with the benefit of being less vulnerable to human errors).

  20. Deficiency of syntrophin, dystroglycan, and merosin in a female infant with a congenital muscular dystrophy phenotype lacking cysteine-rich and C-terminal domains of dystrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, N; Ohya, K; Chiba, S; Matsuo, M; Patria, S Y; Matsumura, K

    1997-08-01

    Primary deficiency of merosin is the cause of the classic form of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) accompanied by brain white matter abnormalities. We report a female infant with dystrophinopathy who was deficient in merosin in skeletal muscle. The patient had a phenotype of typical CMD and white matter abnormalities on brain MRI. Merosin was greatly reduced in the biopsied skeletal muscle. However, the expression of dystroglycan and syntrophin was also greatly reduced, and the immunoreactivity for the antibodies against the cysteine-rich/C-terminal domains of dystrophin was absent in the sarcolemma. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis of the dystrophin gene revealed a complete lack of exons 71 through 74. In skeletal muscle, only the mutant gene was expressed. These results suggest that the patient is a symptomatic Duchenne muscular dystrophy carrier with skewed X-inactivation. This patient illustrates for the first time that a dystrophin abnormality can cause a secondary deficiency of merosin in dystrophinopathy. The reduction of merosin may account for the clinical phenotype of CMD and correlate with the white matter abnormalities in our patient.

  1. Glycosylation of α-dystroglycan: O-mannosylation influences the subsequent addition of GalNAc by UDP-GalNAc polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Duy T; Lim, Jae-Min; Liu, Mian; Stalnaker, Stephanie H; Wells, Lance; Ten Hagen, Kelly G; Live, David

    2012-06-15

    O-Linked glycosylation is a functionally and structurally diverse type of protein modification present in many tissues and across many species. α-Dystroglycan (α-DG), a protein linked to the extracellular matrix, whose glycosylation status is associated with human muscular dystrophies, displays two predominant types of O-glycosylation, O-linked mannose (O-Man) and O-linked N-acetylgalactosamine (O-GalNAc), in its highly conserved mucin-like domain. The O-Man is installed by an enzyme complex present in the endoplasmic reticulum. O-GalNAc modifications are initiated subsequently in the Golgi apparatus by the UDP-GalNAc polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (ppGalNAc-T) enzymes. How the presence and position of O-Man influences the action of the ppGalNAc-Ts on α-DG and the distribution of the two forms of glycosylation in this domain is not known. Here, we investigated the interplay between O-Man and the addition of O-GalNAc by examining the activity of the ppGalNAc-Ts on peptides and O-Man-containing glycopeptides mimicking those found in native α-DG. These synthetic glycopeptides emulate intermediate structures, not otherwise readily available from natural sources. Through enzymatic and mass spectrometric methods, we demonstrate that the presence and specific location of O-Man can impact either the regional exclusion or the site of O-GalNAc addition on α-DG, elucidating the factors contributing to the glycosylation patterns observed in vivo. These results provide evidence that one form of glycosylation can influence another form of glycosylation in α-DG and suggest that in the absence of proper O-mannosylation, as is associated with certain forms of muscular dystrophy, aberrant O-GalNAc modifications may occur and could play a role in disease presentation.

  2. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations: structural basis for the V567D mutation-induced instability of zebrafish alpha-dystroglycan and comparison with the murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Pirolli

    Full Text Available A missense amino acid mutation of valine to aspartic acid in 567 position of alpha-dystroglycan (DG, identified in dag1-mutated zebrafish, results in a reduced transcription and a complete absence of the protein. Lacking experimental structural data for zebrafish DG domains, the detailed mechanism for the observed mutation-induced destabilization of the DG complex and membrane damage, remained unclear. With the aim to contribute to a better clarification of the structure-function relationships featuring the DG complex, three-dimensional structural models of wild-type and mutant (V567D C-terminal domain of alpha-DG from zebrafish were constructed by a template-based modelling approach. We then ran extensive molecular dynamics (MD simulations to reveal the structural and dynamic properties of the C-terminal domain and to evaluate the effect of the single mutation on alpha-DG stability. A comparative study has been also carried out on our previously generated model of murine alpha-DG C-terminal domain including the I591D mutation, which is topologically equivalent to the V567D mutation found in zebrafish. Trajectories from MD simulations were analyzed in detail, revealing extensive structural disorder involving multiple beta-strands in the mutated variant of the zebrafish protein whereas local effects have been detected in the murine protein. A biochemical analysis of the murine alpha-DG mutant I591D confirmed a pronounced instability of the protein. Taken together, the computational and biochemical analysis suggest that the V567D/I591D mutation, belonging to the G beta-strand, plays a key role in inducing a destabilization of the alpha-DG C-terminal Ig-like domain that could possibly affect and propagate to the entire DG complex. The structural features herein identified may be of crucial help to understand the molecular basis of primary dystroglycanopathies.

  3. β-Dystroglycan cleavage by matrix metalloproteinase-2/-9 disturbs aquaporin-4 polarization and influences brain edema in acute cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W; Zhao, X; Chen, H; Zhong, D; Jin, J; Qin, Q; Zhang, H; Ma, S; Li, G

    2016-06-21

    Dystroglycan (DG) is widely expressed in various tissues, and throughout the cerebral microvasculature. It consists of two subunits, α-DG and β-DG, and the cleavage of the latter by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 underlies a number of physiological and pathological processes. However, the involvement of MMP-2/-9-mediated β-DG cleavage in cerebral ischemia remains uncertain. In astrocytes, DG is crucial for maintaining the polarization of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which plays a role in the regulation of cytotoxic and vasogenic edema. The present study aimed to explore the effects of MMP-2/-9-mediated β-DG cleavage on AQP4 polarization and brain edema in acute cerebral ischemia. A model of cerebral ischemia was established via permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in male C57BL/6 mice. Western blotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemical staining, immunofluorescent staining, electron microscopy, and light microscopy were used. Captopril was applied as a selective MMP-2/-9 inhibitor. Recombinant mouse MMP (rmMMP)-2 and -9 were used in an in vitro cleavage experiment. The present study demonstrated evidence of β-DG cleavage by MMP-2/-9 in pMCAO mouse brains; this cleavage was implicated in AQP4 redistribution and brain edema in cerebral ischemia. In addition, captopril exacerbated cytotoxic edema and ameliorated vasogenic edema at 24h after pMCAO, and alleviated brain edema and neurological deficit at 48h and 72h. In conclusion, this study provides novel insight into the effects of MMP-2/-9-mediated β-DG cleavage in acute cerebral ischemia. Such findings might facilitate the development of a therapeutic strategy for the optimization of MMP-2/-9 targeted treatment in cerebral ischemia.

  4. Initiation of mammalian O-mannosylation in vivo is independent of a consensus sequence and controlled by peptide regions within and upstream of the alpha-dystroglycan mucin domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breloy, Isabelle; Schwientek, Tilo; Gries, Barbara; Razawi, Hanieh; Macht, Marcus; Albers, Christian; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2008-07-01

    To reveal insight into the initiation of mammalian O-mannosylation in vivo, recombinant glycosylation probes containing sections of human alpha-dystroglycan (hDG) were expressed in epithelial cell lines. We demonstrate that O-mannosylation within the mucin domain of hDG occurs preferentially at Thr/Ser residues that are flanked by basic amino acids. Protein O-mannosylation is independent of a consensus sequence, but strictly dependent on a peptide region located upstream of the mucin domain. This peptide region cannot be replaced by other N-terminal peptides, however, it is not sufficient to induce O-mannosylation on a structurally distinct mucin domain in hybrid constructs. The presented in vivo evidence for a more complex regulation of mammalian O-mannosylation contrasts with a recent in vitro study of O-mannosylation in human alpha-dystroglycan peptides indicating the existence of an 18-meric consensus sequence. We demonstrate in vivo that the entire region p377-417 is necessary and sufficient for O-mannosylation initiation of hDG, but not of MUC1 tandem repeats. The feature of a doubly controlled initiation process distinguishes mammalian O-mannosylation from other types of O-glycosylation, which are largely controlled by structural properties of the substrate positions and their local peptide environment.

  5. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  6. Confronting the disruptive physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linney, B J

    1997-01-01

    Ignoring disruptive behavior is no longer an option in today's changing health care environment. Competition and managed care have caused more organizations to deal with the disruptive physician, rather than look the other way as many did in years past. But it's not an easy task, possibly the toughest of your management career. How should you confront a disruptive physician? By having clearly stated expectations for physician behavior and policies in place for dealing with problem physicians, organizations have a context from which to address the situation.

  7. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts....... The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improves search in complementary technologies, while demoting it when strategic interests are misaligned in disruptive technologies....... However, incumbent sources engaged in capability reconfiguration to accommodate disruption improve search efforts in disruptive technologies. The paper concludes that the value of external sources is contingent on more than their knowledge. Specifically, interdependence of sources in search gives rise...

  8. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts....... The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improves search in complementary technologies, while demoting it when strategic interests are misaligned in disruptive technologies....... However, incumbent sources engaged in capability reconfiguration to accommodate disruption improve search efforts in disruptive technologies. The paper concludes that the value of external sources is contingent on more than their knowledge. Specifically, interdependence of sources in search gives rise...

  9. Carbohydrate-binding domain of the POMGnT1 stem region modulates O-mannosylation sites of α-dystroglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Naoyuki; Manya, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takeyuki; Tateno, Hiroaki; Kanagawa, Motoi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Akasaka-Manya, Keiko; Hirose, Yuriko; Mizuno, Mamoru; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Toda, Tatsushi; Hirabayashi, Jun; Senda, Toshiya; Endo, Tamao; Kato, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    The dystrophin glycoprotein complex, which connects the cell membrane to the basement membrane, is essential for a variety of biological events, including maintenance of muscle integrity. An O-mannose–type GalNAc-β1,3-GlcNAc-β1,4-(phosphate-6)-Man structure of α-dystroglycan (α-DG), a subunit of the complex that is anchored to the cell membrane, interacts directly with laminin in the basement membrane. Reduced glycosylation of α-DG is linked to some types of inherited muscular dystrophy; consistent with this relationship, many disease-related mutations have been detected in genes involved in O-mannosyl glycan synthesis. Defects in protein O-linked mannose β1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 (POMGnT1), a glycosyltransferase that participates in the formation of GlcNAc-β1,2-Man glycan, are causally related to muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), a congenital muscular dystrophy, although the role of POMGnT1 in postphosphoryl modification of GalNAc-β1,3-GlcNAc-β1,4-(phosphate-6)-Man glycan remains elusive. Our crystal structures of POMGnT1 agreed with our previous results showing that the catalytic domain recognizes substrate O-mannosylated proteins via hydrophobic interactions with little sequence specificity. Unexpectedly, we found that the stem domain recognizes the β-linked GlcNAc of O-mannosyl glycan, an enzymatic product of POMGnT1. This interaction may recruit POMGnT1 to a specific site of α-DG to promote GlcNAc-β1,2-Man clustering and also may recruit other enzymes that interact with POMGnT1, e.g., fukutin, which is required for further modification of the GalNAc-β1,3-GlcNAc-β1,4-(phosphate-6)-Man glycan. On the basis of our findings, we propose a mechanism for the deficiency in postphosphoryl modification of the glycan observed in POMGnT1-KO mice and MEB patients. PMID:27493216

  10. Total sleep deprivation, chronic sleep restriction and sleep disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Amy C; Banks, Siobhan

    2010-01-01

    Sleep loss may result from total sleep deprivation (such as a shift worker might experience), chronic sleep restriction (due to work, medical conditions or lifestyle) or sleep disruption (which is common in sleep disorders such as sleep apnea or restless legs syndrome). Total sleep deprivation has been widely researched, and its effects have been well described. Chronic sleep restriction and sleep disruption (also known as sleep fragmentation) have received less experimental attention. Recently, there has been increasing interest in sleep restriction and disruption as it has been recognized that they have a similar impact on cognitive functioning as a period of total sleep deprivation. Sleep loss causes impairments in cognitive performance and simulated driving and induces sleepiness, fatigue and mood changes. This review examines recent research on the effects of sleep deprivation, restriction and disruption on cognition and neurophysiologic functioning in healthy adults, and contrasts the similarities and differences between these three modalities of sleep loss.

  11. β2 and γ3 laminins are critical cortical basement membrane components: ablation of Lamb2 and Lamc3 genes disrupts cortical lamination and produces dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radner, Stephanie; Banos, Charles; Bachay, Galina; Li, Yong N; Hunter, Dale D; Brunken, William J; Yee, Kathleen T

    2013-03-01

    Cortical development is dependent on the timely production and migration of neurons from neurogenic sites to their mature positions. Mutations in several receptors for extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and their downstream signaling cascades produce dysplasia in brain. Although mutation of a critical binding site in the gene that encodes the ECM molecule laminin γ1 (Lamc1) disrupts cortical lamination, the ECM ligand(s) for many ECM receptors have not been demonstrated directly in the cortex. Several isoforms of the heterotrimeric laminins, all containing the β2 and γ3 chain, have been isolated from the brain, suggesting they are important for CNS function. Here, we report that mice homozygous null for the laminin β2 and γ3 chains exhibit cortical laminar disorganization. Mice lacking both of these laminin chains exhibit hallmarks of human cobblestone lissencephaly (type II, nonclassical): they demonstrate severe laminar disruption; midline fusion; perturbation of Cajal-Retzius cell distribution; altered radial glial cell morphology; and ectopic germinal zones. Surprisingly, heterozygous mice also exhibit laminar disruption of cortical neurons, albeit with lesser severity. In compound null mice, the pial basement membrane is fractured, and the distribution of a key laminin receptor, dystroglycan, is altered. These data suggest that β2 and γ3-containing laminins play an important dose-dependent role in development of the cortical pial basement membrane, which serves as an attachment site for Cajal-Retzius and radial glial cells, thereby guiding neural development.

  12. Endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen

    BACKGROUND: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may contribute to reproductive changes in boys in the Western world, however, less is known about influence of EDCs in women. The incidence of precocious breast development is increasing in USA and Europe and mammary gland development has been...... suggested as particularly sensitive to endocrine disruption. Mammary gland examination in toxicological studies may be useful for improving knowledge on possible influences of EDCs on human mammary glands and also be useful for detection of endocrine disrupting effects of chemicals as part of safety testing...... and genistein, a mixture of phytoestrogens, and a mixture of environmentally relevant estrogenic EDCs of various origins. Moreover, mixtures of antiandrogenic chemicals were investigated. These include a mixture of pesticides and a mixture of environmentally relevant anti-androgenic EDCs of various origins...

  13. The disruption management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, James

    2011-10-01

    Within all organisations, business continuity disruptions present a set of dilemmas that managers may not have dealt with before in their normal daily duties. The disruption management model provides a simple but effective management tool to enable crisis management teams to stay focused on recovery in the midst of a business continuity incident. The model has four chronological primary headlines, which steer the team through a quick-time crisis decision-making process. The procedure facilitates timely, systematic, rationalised and justified decisions, which can withstand post-event scrutiny. The disruption management model has been thoroughly tested within an emergency services environment and is proven to significantly support clear and concise decision making in a business continuity context.

  14. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    Extant research on external knowledge search and open innovation assumes that collaborators are aligned in their strategic interests towards solving innovation problems. However, disruptive innovation is known to threaten the competitive advantage of incumbent firms, thereby creating a potential...... conflict of interest between these firms and their collaborators. This paper explores the extent to which strategic interests influence joint problem solving in both complementary and disruptive technologies by analyzing the effects of incumbent collaboration. The analysis disentangles inability...... and strategic intent to find that non-incumbents experience suppression of problem solving likelihood within disruptive technologies when incumbent collaborators are not strategically committed. The paper contributes to extant theory by showing the influence of firms’ underlying strategic interests...

  15. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages. PMID:27683538

  16. Changing circumstances, disrupting habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Wendy; Witt, Melissa Guerrero; Tam, Leona

    2005-06-01

    The present research investigated the mechanisms guiding habitual behavior, specifically, the stimulus cues that trigger habit performance. When usual contexts for performance change, habits cannot be cued by recurring stimuli, and performance should be disrupted. Thus, the exercising, newspaper reading, and TV watching habits of students transferring to a new university were found to survive the transfer only when aspects of the performance context did not change (e.g., participants continued to read the paper with others). In some cases, the disruption in habits also placed behavior under intentional control so that participants acted on their current intentions. Changes in circumstances also affected the favorability of intentions, but changes in intentions alone could not explain the disruption of habits. Furthermore, regardless of whether contexts changed, nonhabitual behavior was guided by intentions.

  17. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kricka, Larry J

    2016-08-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages.

  18. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decreased hearing; Deafness; Loss of hearing; Conductive hearing loss; Sensorineural hearing loss; Presbycusis ... Symptoms of hearing loss may include: Certain sounds seeming too ... conversations when two or more people are talking Difficulty ...

  20. Extinction order and altered community structure rapidly disrupt ecosystem functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Trond H; Williams, Neal M; Kremen, Claire

    2005-05-01

    By causing extinctions and altering community structure, anthropogenic disturbances can disrupt processes that maintain ecosystem integrity. However, the relationship between community structure and ecosystem functioning in natural systems is poorly understood. Here we show that habitat loss appeared to disrupt ecosystem functioning by affecting extinction order, species richness and abundance. We studied pollination by bees in a mosaic of agricultural and natural habitats in California and dung burial by dung beetles on recently created islands in Venezuela. We found that large-bodied bee and beetle species tended to be both most extinction-prone and most functionally efficient, contributing to rapid functional loss. Simulations confirmed that extinction order led to greater disruption of function than predicted by random species loss. Total abundance declined with richness and also appeared to contribute to loss of function. We demonstrate conceptually and empirically how the non-random response of communities to disturbance can have unexpectedly large functional consequences.

  1. Search and Disrupt

    OpenAIRE

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts. The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improv...

  2. Stellar dynamics and tidal disruption events in galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Tal

    2012-01-01

    The disruption of a star by the tidal field of a massive black hole is the final outcome of a chain of complex dynamical processes in the host galaxy. I introduce the "loss cone problem", and describe the many theoretical and numerical challenges on the path of solving it. I review various dynamical channels by which stars can be supplied to a massive black hole, and the relevant dynamical relaxation / randomization mechanisms. I briefly mention some "exotic" tidal disruption scenarios, and conclude by discussing some new dynamical results that are changing our understanding of dynamics near a massive black hole, and may well be relevant for tidal disruption dynamics.

  3. Disruptive Space Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, Jim

    2004-01-01

    In 1997 "The Innovator’s Dilemma" by Clayton M. Christensen became a popular book in the small satellite and launch vehicle communities. But like the weather, every one talks about “Disruptive Technology” but few do anything about it. In the ‘70s and ‘80s, people were looking for “Paradigm Shifts,” and since the resurrection of Donald Rumsfeld, a recent watchword has been “Transformational Technology.” But today’s buzzword is now “Responsive Space Systems.”

  4. Disruption - Access cards service

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    We would like to inform you that between 10 November and 15 December 2014, the access cards service in Building 55 will be disrupted, as the GS Department has decided to improve the facilities for users of this building. During the work, you will find the registration, biometric registration and dosimeter exchange services on the second floor of Building 55 and the vehicle sticker service on the ground floor along with the access cards service. We thank you for your understanding and apologise for any inconvenience caused.

  5. Manuel's asteroid disruption technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Manuel; Ipe, Abraham; Jacob, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    A seventy-year-old male presented with dense asteroid hyalosis in both eyes. He had undergone cataract extraction in one eye 3 years ago, and the other eye had immature cataract. Both the autorefractor and dilated streak retinoscopy did not give readings and subjective visual improvement could not be achieved. Immediately following YAG posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitreous asteroid disruption, the vision improved to 20/20 with recordable auto refractor and streak retinoscopy values. Our initial experience indicates that the treatment is simple, safe and effective but needs controlled and prospective studies to confirm its long-term safety.

  6. Loss of elongation factor P disrupts bacterial outer membrane integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Hersch, Steven J; Roy, Hervé;

    2012-01-01

    increased uptake of the hydrophobic dye 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN). Analysis of the membrane proteomes of wild-type and efp mutant Salmonella strains reveals few changes, including the prominent overexpression of a single porin, KdgM, in the efp mutant outer membrane. Removal of KdgM in the efp mutant...... overexpression of an outer membrane porin....

  7. Coping with loss: cell adaptation to cytoskeleton disruption

    OpenAIRE

    McGarry, David J.; Olson, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Unravelling the role of cytoskeleton regulators may be complicated by adaptations to experimental manipulations. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Cerikan et al. (2016) reveal how acute effects of DOCK6 RhoGEF depletion on RAC1 and CDC42 activation are reversed over time by compensatory mechanisms that re-establish cellular homeostasis.

  8. Cell disruption for microalgae biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günerken, E; D'Hondt, E; Eppink, M H M; Garcia-Gonzalez, L; Elst, K; Wijffels, R H

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are a potential source for various valuable chemicals for commercial applications ranging from nutraceuticals to fuels. Objective in a biorefinery is to utilize biomass ingredients efficiently similarly to petroleum refineries in which oil is fractionated in fuels and a variety of products with higher value. Downstream processes in microalgae biorefineries consist of different steps whereof cell disruption is the most crucial part. To maintain the functionality of algae biochemicals during cell disruption while obtaining high disruption yields is an important challenge. Despite this need, studies on mild disruption of microalgae cells are limited. This review article focuses on the evaluation of conventional and emerging cell disruption technologies, and a comparison thereof with respect to their potential for the future microalgae biorefineries. The discussed techniques are bead milling, high pressure homogenization, high speed homogenization, ultrasonication, microwave treatment, pulsed electric field treatment, non-mechanical cell disruption and some emerging technologies.

  9. Mutualism Disruption Threatens Global Plant Biodiversity: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare E Aslan

    Full Text Available As global environmental change accelerates, biodiversity losses can disrupt interspecific interactions. Extinctions of mutualist partners can create "widow" species, which may face reduced ecological fitness. Hypothetically, such mutualism disruptions could have cascading effects on biodiversity by causing additional species coextinctions. However, the scope of this problem - the magnitude of biodiversity that may lose mutualist partners and the consequences of these losses - remains unknown.We conducted a systematic review and synthesis of data from a broad range of sources to estimate the threat posed by vertebrate extinctions to the global biodiversity of vertebrate-dispersed and -pollinated plants. Though enormous research gaps persist, our analysis identified Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and global oceanic islands as geographic regions at particular risk of disruption of these mutualisms; within these regions, percentages of plant species likely affected range from 2.1-4.5%. Widowed plants are likely to experience reproductive declines of 40-58%, potentially threatening their persistence in the context of other global change stresses.Our systematic approach demonstrates that thousands of species may be impacted by disruption in one class of mutualisms, but extinctions will likely disrupt other mutualisms, as well. Although uncertainty is high, there is evidence that mutualism disruption directly threatens significant biodiversity in some geographic regions. Conservation measures with explicit focus on mutualistic functions could be necessary to bolster populations of widowed species and maintain ecosystem functions.

  10. Sustainable Disruption Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Bo Valdemar

    an increasingly expensive resource, and it is being consumed in vast amounts by the transportation industry. The single largest expense for both airlines and shipping companies is fuel, which exceeds both labour costs and capital expenditure. This thesis addresses how fuel considerations can be taken into account...... management fits in to the larger scope of optimization related processes in an airline and provides a brief survey of these. The thesis goes into more detail with disruption management and does as its main contribution describe how this can be combined with flight planning. Flight planning is the calculation...... of the horizontal and vertical flight path, which an aircraft should follow in order to get from airport A to airport B. The objective of this calculation is typically to minimize fuel consumption, while satisfying airspace regulations. To the knowledge of the author the work in this thesis represents the first...

  11. Endocrine disrupters as obesogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Felix; Blumberg, Bruce

    2009-05-25

    The recent dramatic rise in obesity rates is an alarming global health trend that consumes an ever increasing portion of health care budgets in Western countries. The root cause of obesity is thought to be a prolonged positive energy balance. Hence, the major focus of preventative programs for obesity has been to target overeating and inadequate physical exercise. Recent research implicates environmental risk factors, including nutrient quality, stress, fetal environment and pharmaceutical or chemical exposure as relevant contributing influences. Evidence points to endocrine disrupting chemicals that interfere with the body's adipose tissue biology, endocrine hormone systems or central hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as suspects in derailing the homeostatic mechanisms important to weight control. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms of action for these compounds and areas of future research needed to evaluate the significance of their contribution to obesity.

  12. The characteristics of railway service disruption: implications for disruption management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, D; Dadashi, N

    2017-03-01

    Rail disruption management is central to operational continuity and customer satisfaction. Disruption is not a unitary phenomenon - it varies by time, cause, location and complexity of coordination. Effective, user-centred technology for rail disruption must reflect this variety. A repertory grid study was conducted to elicit disruption characteristics. Construct elicitation with a group of experts (n = 7) captured 26 characteristics relevant to rail disruption. A larger group of operational staff (n = 28) rated 10 types of rail incident against the 26 characteristics. The results revealed distinctions such as business impact and public perception, and the importance of management of the disruption over initial detection. There were clear differences between those events that stop the traffic, as opposed to those that only slow the traffic. The results also demonstrate the utility of repertory grid for capturing the characteristics of complex work domains. Practitioner Summary: The aim of the paper is to understand how variety in rail disruption influences socio-technical design. It uses repertory grid to identify and prioritise 26 constructs, and group 10 disruption types, identifying critical factors such as whether an incident stops or merely slows the service, and business reputation.

  13. Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss at the scarred areas. These conditions include lichen planus, some types of lupus and sarcoidosis. Hair- ... increase your risk of hair loss, including: Family history Age Poor nutrition Certain medical conditions, such as ...

  14. Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... effects on your hearing — ringing in the ear (tinnitus) or hearing loss — can occur if you take ... adults with hearing loss, commonly reported problems include: Depression Anxiety An often false sense that others are ...

  15. Natural Hazards and Supply Chain Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, M.

    2016-12-01

    Natural hazards distress the global economy through disruptions in supply chain networks. Moreover, despite increasing investment to infrastructure for disaster risk management, economic damages and losses caused by natural hazards are increasing. Manufacturing companies today have reduced inventories and streamlined logistics in order to maximize economic competitiveness. As a result, today's supply chains are profoundly susceptible to systemic risks, which are the risk of collapse of an entire network caused by a few node of the network. For instance, the prolonged floods in Thailand in 2011 caused supply chain disruptions in their primary industries, i.e. electronic and automotive industries, harming not only the Thai economy but also the global economy. Similar problems occurred after the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami in 2011, the Mississippi River floods and droughts during 2011 - 2013, and the Earthquake in Kumamoto Japan in 2016. This study attempts to discover what kind of effective measures are available for private companies to manage supply chain disruptions caused by floods. It also proposes a method to estimate potential risks using a Bayesian network. The study uses a Bayesian network to create synthetic networks that include variables associated with the magnitude and duration of floods, major components of supply chains such as logistics, multiple layers of suppliers, warehouses, and consumer markets. Considering situations across different times, our study shows desirable data requirements for the analysis and effective measures to improve Value at Risk (VaR) for private enterprises and supply chains.

  16. Spreading depression transiently disrupts myelin via interferon-gamma signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusic, Aya D; Mitchell, Heidi M; Kunkler, Phillip E; Klauer, Neal; Kraig, Richard P

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis and migraine with aura are clinically correlated and both show imaging changes suggestive of myelin disruption. Furthermore, cortical myelin loss in the cuprizone animal model of multiple sclerosis enhances susceptibility to spreading depression, the likely underlying cause of migraine with aura. Since multiple sclerosis pathology involves inflammatory T cell lymphocyte production of interferon-gamma and a resulting increase in oxidative stress, we tested the hypothesis that spreading depression disrupts myelin through similar signaling pathways. Rat hippocampal slice cultures were initially used to explore myelin loss in spreading depression, since they contain T cells, and allow for controlled tissue microenvironment. These experiments were then translated to the in vivo condition in neocortex. Spreading depression in slice cultures induced significant loss of myelin integrity and myelin basic protein one day later, with gradual recovery by seven days. Myelin basic protein loss was abrogated by T cell depletion, neutralization of interferon-gamma, and pharmacological inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase-2. Conversely, one day after exposure to interferon-gamma, significant reductions in spreading depression threshold, increases in oxidative stress, and reduced levels of glutathione, an endogenous neutral sphingomyelinase-2 inhibitor, emerged. Similarly, spreading depression triggered significant T cell accumulation, sphingomyelinase activation, increased oxidative stress, and reduction of gray and white matter myelin in vivo. Myelin disruption is involved in spreading depression, thereby providing pathophysiological links between multiple sclerosis and migraine with aura. Myelin disruption may promote spreading depression by enhancing aberrant excitability. Thus, preservation of myelin integrity may provide novel therapeutic targets for migraine with aura.

  17. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

    1984-03-01

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

  18. Observation of runaway electron behaviour during disruptions in LHCD discharges in the HT-7 Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H.W.; Hu, L.Q.; Li, S.Y.; Zhou, R.J.; Zhong, G.Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2011-09-15

    Production of runaway electrons during disruptions has been observed in the HT-7 Tokamak. The runaway current plateaus, which can carry part of the pre-disruptive current, are observed in lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) limiter discharges. It is found that the runaway current can mitigate the disruptions effectively. We can use gas puffing to increase the line-averaged density to restrain the runaway electrons and rebuild the plasmas after the disruptions. Detailed observations are presented on the runaway electrons generated following disruptions in the HT-7 tokamak discharges. The results indicate that the magnetic oscillations play a significant role in the loss of runaway electrons in disruptions. There are two important preconditions to rebuild plasmas by runaway electrons after the disruptions. One of them are weak magnetic oscillations; another one are LHWs (lower-hybrid waves) (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Disrupting Ethnography through Rhizoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Masny

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article interrogates principles of ethnography in education proposed by Mills and Morton: raw tellings, analytic pattern, vignette and empathy. This article adopts a position that is uncomfortable, unconventional and interesting. It involves a deterritorialization/ rupture of ethnography in education in order to reterritorialize a different concept: rhizoanalysis, a way to position theory and data that is multilayered, complex and messy. Rhizoanalysis, the main focus of this article is not a method. It is an approach to research conditioned by a reality in which Deleuze and Guattari disrupt representation, interpretation and subjectivity. In this article, Multiple Literacies Theory, a theoretical and practical framework, becomes a lens to examine a rhizomatic study of a Korean family recently arrived to Australia and attending English as a second language classes. Observations and interviews recorded the daily lives of the family. The vignettes were selected by reading data intensively and immanently through a process of palpation, an innovative approach to educational research. Rhizoanalysis proposes to abandon the given and invent different ways of thinking about and doing research and what might happen when reading data differently, intensively and immanently, through Multiple Literacies Theory. Rhizoanalysis, a game-changer in the way research can be conducted, affords a different lens to tackle issues in education through research.

  20. Tidal disruption event demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-09-01

    We survey the properties of stars destroyed in tidal disruption events (TDEs) as a function of black hole (BH) mass, stellar mass and evolutionary state, star formation history and redshift. For M_{BH} ≲ 10^7 M_{⊙}, the typical TDE is due to a M* ˜ 0.3 M⊙ M-dwarf, although the mass function is relatively flat for M_{ast } ≲ M_{⊙}. The contribution from older main-sequence stars and sub-giants is small but not negligible. From MBH ≃ 107.5-108.5 M⊙, the balance rapidly shifts to higher mass stars and a larger contribution from evolved stars, and is ultimately dominated by evolved stars at higher BH masses. The star formation history has little effect until the rates are dominated by evolved stars. TDE rates should decline very rapidly towards higher redshifts. The volumetric rate of TDEs is very high because the BH mass function diverges for low masses. However, any emission mechanism which is largely Eddington-limited for low BH masses suppresses this divergence in any observed sample and leads to TDE samples dominated by MBH ≃ 106.0-107.5 M⊙ BHs with roughly Eddington peak accretion rates. The typical fall-back time is relatively long, with 16 per cent having tfb plausible if tfb has any relation to the transient rise time. For almost any BH mass function, systematic searches for fainter, faster time-scale TDEs in smaller galaxies, and longer time-scale TDEs in more massive galaxies are likely to be rewarded.

  1. Interception and disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solem, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    Given sufficient warning we might try to avert a collision with a comet or asteroid by using beamed energy or by using the kinetic energy of an interceptor rocket. If motivated by the opportunity to convert the object into a space asset, perhaps a microgravity mine for construction materials or spacecraft fuels, we might try a rendezvous to implant a propulsion system of some sort. But the most cost-effective means of disruption is a nuclear explosive. In this paper, I discuss optimal tactics for terminal intercept, which can be extended to remote-interdiction scenarios as well. I show that the optimal mass ratio of an interceptor rock carrying a nuclear explosive depends mainly on the ratio of the exhaust velocity to the assailant-object closing velocity. I compare the effectiveness of stand-off detonation, surface burst, and penetration, for both deflection and pulverization, concluding that a penetrator has no clear advantage over a surface-burst device for deflection, but is a distinctly more capable pulverizer. The advantage of a stand-off device is to distribute the impulse more evenly over the surface of the object and to prevent fracture, an event which would greatly complicate the intercept problem. Finally, I present some results of a model for gravitationally bound objects and obtain the maximum non-fracturing deflection speed for a variety of object sizes and structures. For a single engagement, I conclude that the non-fracturing deflection speed obtainable with a stand-off device is about four times the speed obtainable with a surface-burst device. Furthermore, the non-fracturing deflection speed is somewhat dependent on the number of competent components of the object, the speed for a 13 component object being about twice that for a 135 component object.

  2. The disruptive physician: righteous Maverick or dangerous Pariah?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbar, Ross I S; Taylor, Lisa D; Canady, John W

    2009-01-01

    "Disruptive physician" is a term appearing more frequently in many hospital bylaws. It has significant negative implications that can lead to loss of privileges for plastic surgeons. Exploring the various definitions of disruptive physician reveals palpable differences between those of the Joint Commission and the American Medical Association. These discrepancies expose plastic surgeons to potential harm when actively addressing quality issues in the hospital environment. The disruptive label can be inappropriately leveraged by hospital administrators against plastic surgeons who confront quality issues. Moreover, the term disruptive is open to subjective interpretation. Challenging the disruptive label in court reveals only that the justice system is concerned that the actual process leading to the disruptive charge is followed appropriately as outlined within the organizational bylaws; the courts are not interested in the actual quality issues and generally will not second-guess the judgment of peer review panels or hospital administrators. Plastic surgeons would benefit from familiarizing themselves with these issues. Hospitals should be required to use root cause analysis when dealing with quality issues raised by members of the medical staff. Furthermore, findings from root cause analysis should be privileged from legal discovery in all jurisdictions to permit honest exploration of quality issues. When a conflict does arise, consideration of mediation should be given to resolve disputes.

  3. Tidal disruption of inviscid protoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Alan P.; Cameron, A. G. W.; Benz, W.

    1991-01-01

    Roche showed that equilibrium is impossible for a small fluid body synchronously orbiting a primary within a critical radius now termed the Roche limit. Tidal disruption of orbitally unbound bodies is a potentially important process for planetary formation through collisional accumulation, because the area of the Roche limit is considerably larger then the physical cross section of a protoplanet. Several previous studies were made of dynamical tidal disruption and different models of disruption were proposed. Because of the limitation of these analytical models, we have used a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code to model the tidal disruption process. The code is basically the same as the one used to model giant impacts; we simply choose impact parameters large enough to avoid collisions. The primary and secondary both have iron cores and silicate mantles, and are initially isothermal at a molten temperature. The conclusions based on the analytical and numerical models are summarized.

  4. Vortex disruption by magnetohydrodynamic feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, Julian; Hughes, D W

    2016-01-01

    In an electrically conducting fluid, vortices stretch out a weak, large-scale magnetic field to form strong current sheets on their edges. Associated with these current sheets are magnetic stresses, which are subsequently released through reconnection, leading to vortex disruption, and possibly even destruction. This disruption phenomenon is investigated here in the context of two-dimensional, homogeneous, incompressible magnetohydrodynamics. We derive a simple order of magnitude estimate for the magnetic stresses --- and thus the degree of disruption --- that depends on the strength of the background magnetic field (measured by the parameter $M$, a ratio between the Alfv\\'en speed and a typical flow speed) and on the magnetic diffusivity (measured by the magnetic Reynolds number $\\mbox{Rm}$). The resulting estimate suggests that significant disruption occurs when $M^{2}\\mbox{Rm} = O(1)$. To test our prediction, we analyse direct numerical simulations of vortices generated by the breakup of unstable shear flo...

  5. Ultrasonic disruption of algae cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P. M.; Nowotarski, K.; Joyce, E. M.; Mason, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    During last decade there has been increasing interest in the production of sustainable fuels from microalgae (R.H. Wijffels and M.J. Barbosa, 2010; Singh et al 2011; D.H. Lee 2011). The aim of this project was to determine if algal cells can be ultrasonically disrupted to release lipids for biofuel production. Ultrasonic disruption of two unicellular algal species: Dunnaliella salina and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated using a 20 kHz probe. Haemocytometer, optical density, UV-Vis, fluoro-spectrophotometer and confocal microscopy results demonstrated complete cell destruction of Dunaliella salina within 16 minutes of sonication. Results obtained for Nannochloropsis oculata differed in that ultrasound dispersed clumped cells with little or no cell disruption, as observed by haemocytometer and confocal microscopy analysis. However, UV-Visible and fluoro-spectrophotometer analysis indicated chlorophyll release following sonication, suggesting some cell disruption had occurred.

  6. Neurotoxicity of Thyroid Disrupting Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones playa critical role in the normal development ofthe mammalian brain. Thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs) are environmental contaminants that alter the structure or function ofthe thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeost...

  7. Persistent forecasting of disruptive technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Forecasting Future Disruptive Technologies; National Research Council

    ...) and the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) tasked the Committee for Forecasting Future Disruptive Technologies with providing guidance and insight on how to build a persistent forecasting system to predict, analyze, and reduce the impact...

  8. Disruptive innovation: the demand side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havighurst, Clark C

    2008-01-01

    The notion of disruptive innovation provides a welcome framework for considering the prospects for low-cost alternatives in American medicine. Such innovations as have been seen, however, are largely the result of demand by patients paying their own bills because they have high-deductible coverage or are uninsured. Many other cost-saving innovations are discouraged by financing systems that are themselves largely immune to competition from disruptive innovators.

  9. Disruption scenarios, their mitigation and operation window in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, M.; Shimada, M.; Fujieda, H.; Gribov, Yu.; Ioki, K.; Kawano, Y.; Khayrutdinov, R.; Lukash, V.; Ohmori, J.

    2007-04-01

    The impacts of plasma disruptions on ITER have been investigated in detail to confirm the robustness of the design of the machine to the potential consequential loads. The loads include both electro-magnetic (EM) and heat loads on the in-vessel components and the vacuum vessel. Several representative disruption scenarios are specified based on newly derived physics guidelines for the shortest current quench time as well as the maximum product of halo current fraction and toroidal peaking factor arising from disruptions in ITER. Disruption simulations with the DINA code and EM load analyses with a 3D finite element method code are performed for these scenarios. Some margins are confirmed in the EM load on in-vessel components due to induced eddy and halo currents for these representative scenarios. However, the margins are not very large. The heat load on various parts of the first wall due to the vertical movement and the thermal quench (TQ) is calculated with a 2D heat conduction code based on the database of heat deposition during disruptions and simulation results with the DINA code. For vertical displacement event, it is found that the beryllium (Be) wall does not melt during the vertical movement, prior to the TQ. Significant melting is anticipated for the upper Be wall and the tungsten divertor baffle due to TQ after the vertical movement. However, its impact could be substantially mitigated by implementing a reliable detection system of the vertical movement and a mitigation system, e.g. massive noble gas injection. Some melting of the upper Be wall is anticipated at major disruptions. At least several tens of unmitigated disruptions must be considered even if an advanced prediction/mitigation system is implemented. With these unmitigated disruptions, the loss of the Be layer is expected to be within ap30-100 µm/event out of a 10 mm thick Be first wall.

  10. Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of hair loss have found patients’ self-esteem, body image and self-confidence to be negatively affected. 1-2 Known psychosocial complications include depression, low self-esteem, altered self-image, and less frequent and enjoyable ...

  11. Experiencing Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maria; Younis, Tarek; Hassani, Amani

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore how Islam, minority status and refugee experiencesintersect in shaping meaning-making processes following bereavement. We do this througha phenomenological analysis of a biographical account of personal loss told by Aisha, a Muslim Palestinian refugee living in Denmark......, thus highlightingthe complex way in which religious beliefs, minority status and migration historycome together in shaping meaning-making processes, and the importance of reciprocity innarrative studies......., who narrates her experience of losing herhusband to lung cancer. By drawing on a religious framework, Aisha creates meaning fromher loss, which enables her to incorporate this loss into her life history and sustain agency.Her narrative invites wider audiences to witness her tale of overcoming loss...

  12. Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well- ...

  13. Memory loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    A person with memory loss needs a lot of support. It helps to show the person familiar objects, music, or and photos or play familiar music. Write down when the person should take any medicine or do other ...

  14. Mechanisms by which circadian rhythm disruption may lead to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Roden

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Humans have evolved in a rhythmic environment and display daily (circadian rhythms in physiology, metabolism and behaviour that are in synchrony with the solar day. Modern lifestyles have compromised the exposure to bright light during the day and dark nights, resulting in the desynchronisation of endogenously generated circadian rhythms from the external environment and loss of coordination between rhythms within the body. This has detrimental effects on physical and mental health, due to the misregulation and uncoupling of important cellular and physiological processes. Long-term shift workers who are exposed to bright light at night experience the greatest disruption of their circadian rhythms. Studies have shown an association between exposure to light at night, circadian rhythm disruption and an increased risk of cancer. Previous reviews have explored the relevance of light and melatonin in cancer, but here we explore the correlation of circadian rhythm disruption and cancer in terms of molecular mechanisms affecting circadian gene expression and melatonin secretion.

  15. Online Education Cast as "Disruptive Innovation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Technology-based forces of "disruptive innovation" are gathering around public education and will overhaul the way K-12 students learn--with potentially dramatic consequences for established public schools, according to an upcoming book that draws parallels to disruptions in other industries. In his "Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation…

  16. Wall force produced during disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, H.; Paccagnella, R.; Breslau, J.

    2009-11-01

    The study of disruptions is of great importance for ITER. Previous work on disruptions [1] is extended to compute toroidally asymmetric wall force in ITER, using the M3D code. The disruptions are produced by n = 1 resistive wall modes or external kink modes. A thin wall resistive boundary model is used to calculate the wall forces. The symmetric wall force, produced by a VDE, and the asymmetric wall force, produced by n = 1 modes, are comparable in magnitude. It is found that the asymmetric and axisymmetric forces scale with the growth rate of the instability multiplied by the square of the current divided by magnetic field. A similar scaling was reported for VDEs in JET [2]. Numerically, the study of disruptions is very challenging. In the M3D extended MHD code, dealiasing was applied in the toroidal direction. Advection terms were treated with a numerical upwind method. These techniques provided sufficient numerical stability to simulate entire disruption events. [4pt] [1] R. Paccagnella, H. R. Strauss, and J. Breslau, Nucl. Fusion (2009) 49 035003. [2] V. Riccardo, T. C. Hender, P. J. Lomas, et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion (2004)

  17. Tidal disruption of inviscid planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, A. P.; Cameron, A. G. W.; Benz, W.

    1991-01-01

    In view of previous efforts' demonstration that strongly dissipative planetesimals are immune to tidal disruption, an examination is presently conducted of the complementary case of inviscid planetesimals arising from collisions that are sufficiently energetic to entirely melt the resulting planetesimal and debris. The tidal disruption is numerically simulated by means of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code of Cameron and Benz (1991), concentrating on the tidal disruption of 0.01 earth-mass planetesimals passing by the earth with variations in the impact parameter at perigee and velocity at infinity. The SPH models show that tidal forces during a close encounter can efficiently convert orbital angular momentum into spin angular momentum, thereby initiating equatorial mass-shedding to inviscid planetesimals that have been spun up beyond the limit of rotational stability.

  18. DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR AMONGST DOCTORS, MYTH OR REALITY?

    OpenAIRE

    Avtar Singh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Disruptive behavior in a medical setting is defined as objectionable or offensive interpersonal behavior that leads to disruption of professional activities in the workplace. 1 It has been observed that majority of doctors do not show disruptive behavior in their day today conduct and only few doctors are identified for their disruptive behavior . Special commi ttee on professional conduct and ethics defines disruptive behavio...

  19. Market Susceptibility Toward Disruptive Business Model Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Dover, Oliver; Nord, Erik

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the conditional factors indicating market susceptibility toward disruptive innovation. There is a need to separate the different forms of disruptive innovation into segments targeting; technology, product or business model disruption. The concepts are fundamentally different and the literature to date is very one sided toward disruptive technology/product innovation. A shortage of studies on disruptive business model innovation has been discovered. This study therefore pr...

  20. Disruption avoidance through active magnetic feedback in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, Roberto; Zanca, Paolo; Yanovskiy, Vadim; Finotti, Claudio; Manduchi, Gabriele; Piron, Chiara; Carraro, Lorella; Franz, Paolo; RFX Team

    2014-10-01

    Disruptions avoidance and mitigation is a fundamental need for a fusion relevant tokamak. In this paper a new experimental approach for disruption avoidance using active magnetic feedback is presented. This scheme has been implemented and tested on the RFX-mod device operating as a circular tokamak. RFX-mod has a very complete system designed for active mode control that has been proved successful for the stabilization of the Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs). In particular the current driven 2/1 mode, unstable when the edge safety factor, qa, is around (or even less than) 2, has been shown to be fully and robustly stabilized. However, at values of qa (qa > 3), the control of the tearing 2/1 mode has been proved difficult. These results suggested the idea to prevent disruptions by suddenly lowering qa to values around 2 where the tearing 2/1 is converted to a RWM. Contrary to the universally accepted idea that the tokamaks should disrupt at low qa, we demonstrate that in presence of a well designed active control system, tokamak plasmas can be driven to low qa actively stabilized states avoiding plasma disruption with practically no loss of the plasma internal energy.

  1. Tidal Decay and Disruption of Short-Period Gaseous Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Brian; Peacock, Sarah; Arras, Phil; Penev, Kaloyan

    2016-01-01

    Many gaseous exoplanets in short-period orbits are on the verge or are in the process of tidal disruption. Moreover, orbital stability analysis shows tides can drive many hot Jupiters to spiral toward their host stars. Thus, the coupled processes of orbital evolution and tidal disruption likely shape the observed distribution of close-in exoplanets and may even be responsible for producing some of the short-period rocky planets. However, the exact outcome for a disrupting planet depends on its internal response to mass loss, and the accompanying orbital evolution can act to enhance or inhibit the disruption process. In this study, we apply the fully-featured and robust Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) suite to model Roche-lobe overflow (RLO) of short-period gaseous planets. We show that, although the detailed evolution may depend on several properties of the planetary system, it is largely determined by the core mass of the disrupting gas giant. In particular, we find that the orbital ex...

  2. Asymmetry in patient-related information disrupts pre-anesthetic patient briefing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoor, Joerg; Kupfer, Anja; Jurack, Babette; Reuter, Ulrike; Wrigge, Herrmann; Friese, Steffen; Thieme, Volker

    2013-10-04

    If one party has more or better information than the other, an information asymmetry can be assumed. The aim of the study was to identify the origin of incomplete patient-related preoperative information, which led to disruptions and losses of time during pre-anaesthetic patient briefing. We hypothesized that lower employees' educational level increases the amount of disruptive factors. A prospective observational study design was used. Patient selection was depending on the current patient flow in the area of the clinic for pre-anesthetic patient briefing. Data were collected over a period of 8 weeks. A stopwatch was used to record the time of disruptive factors. Various causes of time losses were grouped to facilitate statistical evaluation, which was performed by using the U-test of Mann and Whitney, Chi-square test or the Welch-t-test, as required. Out of 221 patients, 130 patient briefings (58.8%) had been disrupted. Residents were affected more often than consultants (66% vs. 47%, p = 0.008). Duration of disruptions was independent of the level of training and lasted about 2,5 minutes and 10% of the total time of patient briefing. Most time-consuming disruptive factors were missing study results, incomplete case histories, and limited patient compliance. Disruptions during pre-anesthetic patient briefings that were caused by patient-related information asymmetry are common and account for a significant loss of time. The resultant costs justify investments in appropriate personnel allocation.

  3. Jogging Can Modify Disruptive Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jill I.

    1980-01-01

    Jogging was used to modify disruptive behavior as part of the classroom routine for 12 learning disabled elementary-grade boys. The number of incidents of each of five negative behaviors were reduced by half following the 10-minute jogging routine. (SBH)

  4. Strategic network disruption and defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyer, Britta; De Jaegher, K.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    We study a game between a network designer, who uses costly links to connect nodes in a network, and a network disruptor who tries to disrupt the resulting network as much as possible by deleting either nodes or links. For low linking costs networks with all nodes in symmetric positions are a best r

  5. Disruptive Technologies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of "disruptive" innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally…

  6. Fisheries-induced disruptive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Pietro; Hui, Cang; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2015-01-21

    Commercial harvesting is recognized to induce adaptive responses of life-history traits in fish populations, in particular by shifting the age and size at maturation through directional selection. In addition to such evolution of a target stock, the corresponding fishery itself may adapt, in terms of fishing policy, technological progress, fleet dynamics, and adaptive harvest. The aim of this study is to assess how the interplay between natural and artificial selection, in the simplest setting in which a fishery and a target stock coevolve, can lead to disruptive selection, which in turn may cause trait diversification. To this end, we build an eco-evolutionary model for a size-structured population, in which both the stock׳s maturation schedule and the fishery׳s harvest rate are adaptive, while fishing may be subject to a selective policy based on fish size and/or maturity stage. Using numerical bifurcation analysis, we study how the potential for disruptive selection changes with fishing policy, fishing mortality, harvest specialization, life-history tradeoffs associated with early maturation, and other demographic and environmental parameters. We report the following findings. First, fisheries-induced disruptive selection is readily caused by commonly used fishing policies, and occurs even for policies that are not specific for fish size or maturity, provided that the harvest is sufficiently adaptive and large individuals are targeted intensively. Second, disruptive selection is more likely in stocks in which the selective pressure for early maturation is naturally strong, provided life-history tradeoffs are sufficiently consequential. Third, when a fish stock is overexploited, fisheries targeting only large individuals might slightly increase sustainable yield by causing trait diversification (even though the resultant yield always remains lower than the maximum sustainable yield that could be obtained under low fishing mortality, without causing disruptive

  7. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: alpha-dystroglycan immunoexpression in skeletal muscle and cognitive performance Distrofia muscular de Duchenne: imunoexpressão da alfa-distroglicana em musculatura esquelética e performance cognitiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conceição Campanario da Silva Pereira

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The Duchenne muscular systrophy (DMD is a muscular dystrophy with cognitive impairment present in 20-30% of the cases. In the present study, in order to study the relationship between the alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG immunostaining in skeletal muscle and cognitive performance in DMD patients, 19 were assessed. Twelve patients performed the intelligence quotient (IQ below the average. Among the 19 patients, two were assessed by the Stanford-Binet test and 17 by Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III (WISC-III. Nine patients performed a verbal IQ below the average, only three patients performed an average verbal IQ. The muscle biopsies immunostained with antibodies to alpha-DG showed that 17 patients presented a low expression, below 25% of the total fibers. Two patients presented alpha-DG immunostaining above 40% and an IQ within the average. No significant statistical relationship was demonstrated among total IQ, verbal IQ and execution IQ and alpha-DG immunostaining at these patients muscle samples.A distrofia muscular de Duchenne (DMD é uma distrofia muscular com comprometimento cognitivo presente em 20-30% dos casos. No presente estudo, com a finalidade de estudar a relação entre a imunoexpressão da alfa-distroglicana (alfa-DG em musculatura esquelética e a performance cognitiva em pacientes com DMD, foram avaliadas 19 crianças. Doze pacientes apresentaram o quociente de inteligência (QI abaixo da média. Entre os 19 pacientes, dois foram avaliados pelo teste de Stanford-Binet e 17 pelo Wechsler Intelligence Scale para crianças-III (WISC-III. Nove apresentaram QI verbal abaixo da média, e apenas três QI verbal na média. As biopsias musculares com os anticorpos para alfa-DG mostraram que 17 pacientes apresentaram baixa expressão, abaixo de 25% do total de fibras. Dois pacientes apresentaram a imunoexpressão da alfa-DG acima de 40% e QI dentro da média. Não foi demonstrada relação estatisticamente significante entre o QI

  8. Disrupted iron homeostasis causes dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matak, Pavle; Matak, Andrija; Moustafa, Sarah; Aryal, Dipendra K; Benner, Eric J; Wetsel, William; Andrews, Nancy C

    2016-03-29

    Disrupted brain iron homeostasis is a common feature of neurodegenerative disease. To begin to understand how neuronal iron handling might be involved, we focused on dopaminergic neurons and asked how inactivation of transport proteins affected iron homeostasis in vivo in mice. Loss of the cellular iron exporter, ferroportin, had no apparent consequences. However, loss of transferrin receptor 1, involved in iron uptake, caused neuronal iron deficiency, age-progressive degeneration of a subset of dopaminergic neurons, and motor deficits. There was gradual depletion of dopaminergic projections in the striatum followed by death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Damaged mitochondria accumulated, and gene expression signatures indicated attempted axonal regeneration, a metabolic switch to glycolysis, oxidative stress, and the unfolded protein response. We demonstrate that loss of transferrin receptor 1, but not loss of ferroportin, can cause neurodegeneration in a subset of dopaminergic neurons in mice.

  9. Hidden loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kieffer-Kristensen, Rikke; Johansen, Karen Lise Gaardsvig

    2013-01-01

    to participate. RESULTS: All children were affected by their parents' ABI and the altered family situation. The children's expressions led the authors to identify six themes, including fear of losing the parent, distress and estrangement, chores and responsibilities, hidden loss, coping and support. The main...... the ill parent. These findings contribute to a deeper understanding of the traumatic process of parental ABI that some children experience and emphasize the importance of family-centred interventions that include the children....

  10. Bodily illusions disrupt tactile sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Sarah; Pritchett, Lisa M; Harris, Laurence R

    2015-02-01

    To accurately interpret tactile information, the brain needs to have an accurate representation of the body to which to refer the sensations. Despite this, body representation has only recently been incorporated into the study of tactile perception. Here, we investigate whether distortions of body representation affect tactile sensations. We perceptually altered the length of the arm and the width of the waist using a tendon vibration illusion and measured spatial acuity and sensitivity. Surprisingly, we found reduction in both tactile acuity and sensitivity thresholds when the arm or waist was perceptually altered, which indicates a general disruption of low-level tactile processing. We postulate that the disruptive changes correspond to the preliminary stage as the body representation starts to change and may give new insights into sensory processing in people with long-term or sudden abnormal body representation such as are found in eating disorders or following amputation.

  11. Optimal Disruption of Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jin-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The collection of all the strongly connected components in a directed graph, among each cluster of which any node has a path to another node, is a typical example of the intertwining structure and dynamics in complex networks, as its relative size indicates network cohesion and it also composes of all the feedback cycles in the network. Here we consider finding an optimal strategy with minimal effort in removal arcs (for example, deactivation of directed interactions) to fragment all the strongly connected components into tree structure with no effect from feedback mechanism. We map the optimal network disruption problem to the minimal feedback arc set problem, a non-deterministically polynomial hard combinatorial optimization problem in graph theory. We solve the problem with statistical physical methods from spin glass theory, resulting in a simple numerical method to extract sub-optimal disruption arc sets with significantly better results than a local heuristic method and a simulated annealing method both...

  12. Disrupting the habit of interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Honan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to the growing domain of ‘post-qualitative’ research and experiments with a new (representational form to move away from traditional and clichéd descriptions of research methods. In this paper, I want to interrogate the category of interview, and the habit of interviewing, to disrupt the clichés, so as to allow thinking of different ways of writing/speaking/representing the interactions between researcher and researched that will breathe new life into qualitative inquiries. I will attempt to flatten and shred, destabilise and disrupt our common-sense ideas about interview, including those held most sacred to the qualitative community, that of anonymity and confidentiality, as well as the privilege of the ‘transcript’ in re-presenting interview data.

  13. Disrupted Nighttime Sleep in Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Montplaisir, Jacques; Paul, Josh; Swick, Todd; Zee, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Characterize disrupted nighttime sleep (DNS) in narcolepsy, an important symptom of narcolepsy. Methods: A panel of international narcolepsy experts was convened in 2011 to build a consensus characterization of DNS in patients with narcolepsy. A literature search of the Medline (1965 to date), Medline In-Process (latest weeks), Embase (1974 to date), Embase Alert (latest 8 weeks), and Biosis (1965 to date) databases was conducted using the following search terms: narcolepsy and disrupted nighttime sleep, disturbed nighttime sleep, fragmented sleep, consolidated sleep, sleep disruption, and narcolepsy questionnaire. The purpose of the literature search was to identify publications characterizing the nighttime sleep of patients with narcolepsy. The panel reviewed the literature. Nocturnal sleep can also be disturbed by REM sleep abnormalities such as vivid dreaming and REM sleep behavior disorder; however, these were not reviewed in the current paper, as we were evaluating for idiopathic sleep disturbances. Results: The literature reviewed provide a consistent characterization of nighttime sleep in patients with narcolepsy as fragmented, with reports of frequent, brief nightly awakenings with difficulties returning to sleep and associated reports of poor sleep quality. Polysomnographic studies consistently report frequent awakenings/arousals after sleep onset, more stage 1 (S1) sleep, and more frequent shifts to S1 sleep or wake from deeper stages of sleep. The consensus of the International Experts' Panel on Narcolepsy was that DNS can be distressing for patients with narcolepsy and that treatment of DNS warrants consideration. Conclusions: Clinicians involved in the management of patients with narcolepsy should investigate patients' quality of nighttime sleep, give weight and consideration to patient reports of nighttime sleep experience, and consider DNS a target for treatment. Citation: Roth T; Dauvilliers Y; Mignot E; Montplaisir J; Paul J

  14. Disruptive technologies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Flavin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the role of “disruptive” innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally adopted and used by students and staff. Instead, other technologies not owned or controlled by HEIs are widely used to support learning and teaching. According to Christensen's theory of Disruptive Innovation, these disruptive technologies are not designed explicitly to support learning and teaching in higher education, but have educational potential. This study uses Activity Theory and Expansive Learning to analyse data regarding the impact of disruptive technologies. The data were obtained through a questionnaire survey about awareness and use of technologies, and through observation and interviews, exploring participants’ actual practice. The survey answers tended to endorse Disruptive Innovation theory, with participants establishing meanings for technologies through their use of them, rather than in keeping with a designer's intentions. Observation revealed that learners use a narrow range of technologies to support learning, but with a tendency to use resources other than those supplied by their HEIs. Interviews showed that participants use simple and convenient technologies to support their learning and teaching. This study identifies a contradiction between learning technologies made available by HEIs, and technologies used in practice. There is no evidence to suggest that a wide range of technologies is being used to support learning and teaching. Instead, a small range of technologies is being used for a wide range of tasks. Students and lecturers are not dependent on their HEIs to support learning and teaching. Instead, they self-select technologies, with use weighted towards established brands. The

  15. A bright year for tidal disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Stone, Nicholas C.

    2016-09-01

    When a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (SMBH), roughly half of its mass falls back to the SMBH at super-Eddington rates. As this gas is tenuously gravitationally bound and unable to cool radiatively, only a small fraction fin ≪ 1 may accrete, with the majority instead becoming unbound in an outflow of velocity ˜104 km s-1. The outflow spreads laterally as it expands to large radii, encasing the SMBH and blocking the inner disc's EUV/X-ray radiation, which becomes trapped in a radiation-dominated nebula. Ionizing nebular radiation heats the inner edge of the ejecta, converting the emission to optical/near-UV wavelengths where photons more readily escape due to the lower opacity. This can explain the unexpectedly low and temporally constant effective temperatures of optically discovered tidal disruption event (TDE) flares. For high-mass SMBHs, M• ≳ 107 M⊙, the ejecta can become fully ionized at an earlier stage, or for a wider range of viewing angles, producing a TDE flare accompanied by thermal X-ray emission. The peak optical luminosity is suppressed as the result of adiabatic losses in the inner disc wind when M• ≪ 107 M⊙, possibly contributing to the unexpected dearth of optical TDEs in galaxies with low-mass SMBHs. In the classical picture, where fin ≈ 1, TDEs de-spin supermassive SMBHs and cap their maximum spins well below theoretical accretion physics limits. This cap is relaxed in our model, and existing Fe Kα spin measurements provide preliminary evidence that fin < 1.

  16. HOW TO IDENTIFY DISRUPTIVE NEW BUSINESSES

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Robles

    2015-01-01

    In almost any industry, the most dramatic stories of growth and success were launched from a platform of disruptive innovation (Christensen et al., 2002). The probability of creating a successful, new growth business is 10 times greater if the innovators pursue a disruptive strategy rather than a sustaining one. Genuinely disruptive innovations are the ones that result in the creation of entirely new markets and business models. Few companies have introduced these innovations. Disruptive inno...

  17. Engineering analysis of TFTR disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1984-09-01

    This report covers an engineering approach quantifying the currents, forces, and times, as well as plasma position, for the worst-case disruption based on engineerign circuit assumptions for the plasma. As the plasma moves toward the wall during the current-decay phase of disruption, the wall currents affect the rate of movement and, hence, the decay time. The calculated structure-induced currents differ considerably from those calculated using a presently available criterion, which specifies that the plasma remains stationary in the center of the torus while decaying in 10 ms. This report outlines the method and basis for the engineering calculation used to determine the current and forces as a function of the circuit characteristics. It provides specific calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with variations in parameters such as the thermal decay time, the torus resistance, and plasma temperature during the current decay. The study reviews possible ways to reduce the disruption damage of TFTR by reducing the magnitude of the plasma external field energy that is absorbed by the plasma during the current decay.

  18. LYSOSOMAL DISRUPTION BY BACTERIAL TOXINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernheimer, Alan W.; Schwartz, Lois L.

    1964-01-01

    Bernheimer, Alan W. (New York University School of Medicine, New York), and Lois L. Schwartz. Lysosomal disruption by bacterial toxins. J. Bacteriol. 87:1100–1104. 1964.—Seventeen bacterial toxins were examined for capacity (i) to disrupt rabbit leukocyte lysosomes as indicated by decrease in turbidity of lysosomal suspensions, and (ii) to alter rabbit liver lysosomes as measured by release of β-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase. Staphylococcal α-toxin, Clostridium perfringens α-toxin, and streptolysins O and S affected lysosomes in both systems. Staphylococcal β-toxin, leucocidin and enterotoxin, Shiga neurotoxin, Serratia endotoxin, diphtheria toxin, tetanus neurotoxin, C. botulinum type A toxin, and C. perfringens ε-toxin were not active in either system. Staphylococcal δ-toxin, C. histolyticum collagenase, crude C. perfringens β-toxin, and crude anthrax toxin caused lysosomal damage in only one of the test systems. There is a substantial correlation between the hemolytic property of a toxin and its capacity to disrupt lysosomes, lending support to the concept that erythrocytes and lysosomes are bounded by similar membranes. PMID:5874534

  19. Disruptive innovation as an entrepreneurial process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandra, Y.; Yang, S.-J.S.; Singh, P.; Prajogo, D.; O'Neill, P.; Rahman, S.

    2008-01-01

    Research on conditions and causal mechanisms that influence disruptive innovation has been relatively unexplored in the extant research in disruptive innovation. By re-conceptualizing disruptive innovation as an entrepreneurial process at product, firm and industry levels, this paper draws on emergi

  20. Disruption and Distinctiveness in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    "Disruption"--while an evocative word triggering feelings of anxiety and perhaps even fear--also signals renewal and growth. The Higher Education (HE) sector in England has experienced some profound disruption over the years, and yet has emerged stronger and renewed in many ways. The impact of recent disruptive forces, from fees to the…

  1. Dealing with Disruptive Behavior of Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobmeier, Robert; Moran, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The adult education literature on disruptive behavior of adult learners was reviewed and a survey on disruptive behavior of adult learners was conducted with adult educators. The findings are synthesized in a conceptual framework for understanding the types and causes of disruptive behavior, which fall into the categories of inattention,…

  2. Disruptive innovation as an entrepreneurial process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandra, Y.; Yang, S.-J.S.; Singh, P.; Prajogo, D.; O'Neill, P.; Rahman, S.

    2008-01-01

    Research on conditions and causal mechanisms that influence disruptive innovation has been relatively unexplored in the extant research in disruptive innovation. By re-conceptualizing disruptive innovation as an entrepreneurial process at product, firm and industry levels, this paper draws on

  3. A unified treatment of tidal disruption by Schwarzschild black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Servin, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Stars on orbits with pericenters sufficiently close to the supermassive black hole at the center of their host galaxy can be ripped apart by tidal stresses. Some of the resulting stellar debris becomes more tightly bound to the hole and can potentially produce an observable flare called a tidal-disruption event (TDE). We provide a self-consistent, unified treatment of TDEs by non-spinning (Schwarzschild) black holes, investigating several effects of general relativity including changes to the boundary in phase space that defines the loss-cone orbits on which stars are tidally disrupted or captured. TDE rates decrease rapidly at large black-hole masses due to direct stellar capture, but this effect is slightly countered by the widening of the loss cone due to the stronger tidal fields in general relativity. We provide a new mapping procedure that translates between Newtonian gravity and general relativity, allowing us to better compare predictions in both gravitational theories. Partial tidal disruptions in re...

  4. Changing perspectives in medical practice: disruptive innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterick, Zachary R; Pradhan, Sala R; Paterick, Timothy E; Waterhouse, Blake E

    2009-01-01

    Disruptive innovation represents a business model that identifies a market location and increases consumer options. Retail clinics may represent a disruptive healthcare innovation that identifies strategies to reduce the cost of healthcare at the primary care level. The future of healthcare demands disruptive innovation that will allow for the 50 million uninsured members of our society to receive medical care. Disruptive innovative solutions need to ensure access, quality, and reasonable cost. Retail clinics represent the tip of the iceberg in disruptive innovative thinking. The obstacles that retail clinics must solve will be lessons learned for those that identify future innovative techniques.

  5. From Digital Disruption to Business Model Scalability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Lund, Morten; Thomsen, Peter Poulsen

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the terms disruption, digital disruption, business models and business model scalability. It illustrates how managers should be using these terms for the benefit of their business by developing business models capable of achieving exponentially increasing returns to scale...... will seldom lead to business model scalability capable of competing with digital disruption(s)....... as a response to digital disruption. A series of case studies illustrate that besides frequent existing messages in the business literature relating to the importance of creating agile businesses, both in growing and declining economies, as well as hard to copy value propositions or value propositions that take...

  6. Knockdown of col22a1 gene in zebrafish induces a muscular dystrophy by disruption of the myotendinous junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvet, Benjamin; Guiraud, Alexandre; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Zwolanek, Daniela; Guillon, Emilie; Bretaud, Sandrine; Monnot, Catherine; Schulze, Jörg; Bader, Hannah L; Allard, Bruno; Koch, Manuel; Ruggiero, Florence

    2013-11-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the major site of force transfer in skeletal muscle, and defects in its structure correlate with a subset of muscular dystrophies. Col22a1 encodes the MTJ component collagen XXII, the function of which remains unknown. Here, we have cloned and characterized the zebrafish col22a1 gene and conducted morpholino-based loss-of-function studies in developing embryos. We showed that col22a1 transcripts localize at muscle ends when the MTJ forms and that COLXXII protein integrates the junctional extracellular matrix. Knockdown of COLXXII expression resulted in muscular dystrophy-like phenotype, including swimming impairment, curvature of embryo trunk/tail, strong reduction of twitch-contraction amplitude and contraction-induced muscle fiber detachment, and provoked significant activation of the survival factor Akt. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence studies revealed that absence of COLXXII caused a strong reduction of MTJ folds and defects in myoseptal structure. These defects resulted in reduced contractile force and susceptibility of junctional extracellular matrix to rupture when subjected to repeated mechanical stress. Co-injection of sub-phenotypic doses of morpholinos against col22a1 and genes of the major muscle linkage systems showed a synergistic gene interaction between col22a1 and itga7 (α7β1 integrin) that was not observed with dag1 (dystroglycan). Finally, pertinent to a conserved role in humans, the dystrophic phenotype was rescued by microinjection of recombinant human COLXXII. Our findings indicate that COLXXII contributes to the stabilization of myotendinous junctions and strengthens skeletal muscle attachments during contractile activity.

  7. Professional Disruption in Health Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    How do professions respond to fast-moving technological changes? Disruptive innovations overturn expectations about how markets function and develop, and they often raise moral, legal and scientific concerns among professionals. Sudden technological changes can result in a state of professional...... recent revision to the Tobacco Products Directive. Medical and public health professionals that control tobacco issues were challenged by a coalition of e-cigarette industry representatives, e-cigarette users, and liberal politicians. The challengers drew on the contending norm of harm reduction...

  8. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltz, Jacob I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  9. Incumbent response to disruptive innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaulio, Matti; Thorén, Kent; Rohrbeck, René

    changes, however successful in minor business model adaptions. An implication hereof is that the business model concept as such has low predictive power in explaining success and failure and is in the need of an operationalization. In addition, the article discusses the relationship between technological...... in relation to disruptive change. In relation to technical change the case company has successfully in transferred its technology from one generation to the next during more than 20 years. In relation to business model change the case company has been proactive but not successful in major business model...... innovation and business innovation....

  10. Disruptive innovation for social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Clayton M; Baumann, Heiner; Ruggles, Rudy; Sadtler, Thomas M

    2006-12-01

    Countries, organizations, and individuals around the globe spend aggressively to solve social problems, but these efforts often fail to deliver. Misdirected investment is the primary reason for that failure. Most of the money earmarked for social initiatives goes to organizations that are structured to support specific groups of recipients, often with sophisticated solutions. Such organizations rarely reach the broader populations that could be served by simpler alternatives. There is, however, an effective way to get to those underserved populations. The authors call it "catalytic innovation." Based on Clayton Christensen's disruptive-innovation model, catalytic innovations challenge organizational incumbents by offering simpler, good-enough solutions aimed at underserved groups. Unlike disruptive innovations, though, catalytic innovations are focused on creating social change. Catalytic innovators are defined by five distinct qualities. First, they create social change through scaling and replication. Second, they meet a need that is either overserved (that is, the existing solution is more complex than necessary for many people) or not served at all. Third, the products and services they offer are simpler and cheaper than alternatives, but recipients view them as good enough. Fourth, they bring in resources in ways that initially seem unattractive to incumbents. And fifth, they are often ignored, put down, or even encouraged by existing organizations, which don't see the catalytic innovators' solutions as viable. As the authors show through examples in health care, education, and economic development, both nonprofit and for-profit groups are finding ways to create catalytic innovation that drives social change.

  11. A Bright Year for Tidal Disruptions?

    CERN Document Server

    Metzger, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    When a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (BH), roughly half of its mass falls back to the BH at super-Eddington rates. Being tenuously gravitationally bound and unable to cool radiatively, only a small fraction f_in few 1e4 K, converting the emission to optical/near-UV wavelengths where photons more readily escape due to the lower opacity. This can explain the unexpectedly low and temporally constant effective temperatures of optically-discovered TDE flares. For BHs with relatively high masses M_BH > 1e7 M_sun the ejecta can become ionized at an earlier stage, or for a wider range of viewing angles, producing a TDE flare which is instead dominated by thermal X-ray emission. We predict total radiated energies consistent with those of observed TDE flares, and ejecta velocities that agree with the measured emission line widths. The peak optical luminosity for M_BH < 1e6 M_sun is suppressed due to adiabatic losses in the inner disk wind, possibly contributing to the unexpected dearth of o...

  12. Economic Loan Loss Provision and Expected Loss

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hlawatsch, Stefan; Ostrowski, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    ... adjusted. This however assumes that the loan loss provision and the expected loss are based on a similar economic rationale, which is only valid conditionally in current loan loss provisioning methods according to IFRS...

  13. Oxytocin and Social Relationships: From Attachment to Bond Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Oliver J; Young, Larry J

    2017-08-16

    Social relationships throughout life are vital for well-being and physical and mental health. A significant amount of research in animal models as well as in humans suggests that oxytocin (OT) plays an important role in the development of the capacity to form social bonds, the mediation of the positive aspects of early-life nurturing on adult bonding capacity, and the maintenance of social bonding. Here, we focus on the extensive research on a socially monogamous rodent model organism, the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). OT facilitates mating-induced pair bonds in adults through interaction with the mesolimbic dopamine system. Variation in striatal OT receptor density predicts resilience and susceptibility to neonatal social neglect in female prairie voles. Finally, in adults, loss of a partner results in multiple disruptions in OT signaling, including decreased OT release in the striatum, which is caused by an activation of the brain corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) system. The dramatic behavioral consequence of partner loss is increased depressive-like behavior reminiscent of bereavement. Importantly, infusions of OT into the striatum of adults prevents the onset of depressive-like behavior following partner loss, and evoking endogenous OT release using melanocortin agonists during neonatal social isolation rescues impairments in social bonding in adulthood. This work has important translational implications relevant to the disruptions of social bonds in childhood and in adults.

  14. Current concepts in neuroendocrine disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Olea, Martha; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Orlando, Edward F; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Wolstenholme, Jennifer T; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  15. Advancing a multidimensional, developmental spectrum approach to preschool disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakschlag, Lauren S; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J; Choi, Seung W; Nichols, Sara R; Kestler, Jacqueline; Burns, James L; Carter, Alice S; Henry, David

    2014-01-01

    Dimensional approaches are gaining scientific traction. However, their potential for elucidating developmental aspects of psychopathology has not been fully realized. The goal of this article is to apply a multidimensional, developmental framework to model the normal-abnormal spectrum of preschool disruptive behavior. The Multidimensional Assessment of Preschool Disruptive Behavior (MAP-DB), a novel measure, was used to model dimensional severity across developmental parameters theorized to distinguish the normative misbehavior of early childhood from clinically salient disruptive behavior. The 4 MAP-DB dimensions are Temper Loss, Noncompliance, Aggression, and Low Concern for Others. Parents of a diverse sample of 1,488 preschoolers completed the MAP-DB. Multidimensional item response theory (IRT) was used for dimensional modeling. The 4-dimensional, developmentally informed model demonstrated excellent fit. Its factor loadings did not differ across demographic subgroups. All dimensions provided good coverage of the abnormal end of the severity continuum, but only Temper Loss and Noncompliance provided good coverage of milder, normatively occurring behaviors. The developmental expectability and quality of behaviors distinguished normative from atypical behaviors. The point at which frequency of behaviors was atypical varied based on dimensional location for Temper Loss, Noncompliance, and Aggression. The MAP-DB provides an innovative method for operationalizing developmentally specified, dimensional phenotypes in early childhood. Establishing the validity of these dimensional phenotypes in relation to clinical outcomes, neurocognitive substrates, and etiologic pathways will be a crucial test of their clinical utility. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Manufacturing doubt about endocrine disrupter science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Becher, Georg; Blumberg, Bruce;

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed response to the critique of "State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals 2012" (UNEP/WHO, 2013) by financial stakeholders, authored by Lamb et al. (2014). Lamb et al.'s claim that UNEP/WHO (2013) does not provide a balanced perspective on endocrine disruption...... not intimately familiar with the topic of endocrine disruption and therefore susceptible to false generalizations of bias and subjectivity....

  17. Catastrophic Disruption of Comet ISON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Jacqueline V.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Coulson, Iain M.; Kleyna, Jan T.; Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer; Riesen, Timm-Emmanuel; Meech, Karen J.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    We report submillimeter 450 and 850 microns dust continuum observations for comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained at heliocentric distances 0.31-0.08 au prior to perihelion on 2013 November 28 (rh?=?0.0125 au). These observations reveal a rapidly varying dust environment in which the dust emission was initially point-like. As ISON approached perihelion, the continuum emission became an elongated dust column spread out over as much as 60? (greater than 10(exp 5) km in the anti-solar direction. Deconvolution of the November 28.04 850 microns image reveals numerous distinct clumps consistent with the catastrophic disruption of comet ISON, producing approximately 5.2?×?10(exp 10) kg of submillimeter-sized dust. Orbital computations suggest that the SCUBA-2 emission peak coincides with the comet's residual nucleus.

  18. Disrupting Entanglement of Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Leichenauer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We study entanglement in thermofield double states of strongly coupled CFTs by analyzing two-sided Reissner-Nordstrom solutions in AdS. The central object of study is the mutual information between a pair of regions, one on each asymptotic boundary of the black hole. For large regions the mutual information is positive and for small ones it vanishes; we compute the critical length scale, which goes to infinity for extremal black holes, of the transition. We also generalize the butterfly effect of Shenker and Stanford to a wide class of charged black holes, showing that mutual information is disrupted upon perturbing the system and waiting for a time of order $\\log E/\\delta E$ in units of the temperature. We conjecture that the parametric form of this timescale is universal.

  19. Resistance to disruption in a classroom setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E; Neal, Carrie M; Ahearn, William H; Wheeler, Emily E; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B; Dube, William V

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple variable-interval (VI) 7-s VI 30-s schedule for 6 participants with developmental disabilities. Resistance to disruption was measured by presenting a distracting item. Response rates in the disruption components were compared to within-session response rates in prior baseline components. Results were consistent with the predictions of behavioral momentum theory for 5 of 6 participants.

  20. Tumor vascular disruption using various radiation types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JJ Bevelacqua

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of disrupting a tumor’s vascular structure with various radiation types and radionuclides is investigated. Calculated absorbed dose profiles for photons and 4He ions suggest that low-energy beta-gamma and alpha emitting radionuclides can deposit sufficient absorbed dose to disrupt a tumor’s vascular structure while minimizing the dose outside the blood vessel. Candidate radionuclides uniformly distributed in microspheres are theoretically investigated with respect to their vascular disruption potential and to offer an alternative to 90Y microsphere therapy. Requisite activities of candidate low-energy beta-gamma and alpha emitting radionuclides to facilitate vascular disruption are calculated.

  1. Dipolarization front and current disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    2016-10-01

    The modification of current density on the dawn-dusk cross section of the magnetotail with the earthward approach of a dipolarization front (DF) is examined through the recently published results of a three-dimensional (3-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is found that the current density intensifies by 37% abruptly within 1.5 ion gyrotime as the DF approaches and shows localized regions with north-south extrusions. After reaching its peak value, it undergoes a drastic current reduction (DCR) by 65% within 2 ion gyrotime. Breakdown of the frozen-in condition occurs in the neutral sheet region in association with DCR, demonstrating the non-MHD behavior of the phenomenon. The evolution of current density from this 3-D PIC simulation bears several similarities to those observed for the current disruption (CD) phenomenon, such as explosive growth and disruption of the current density leading to a breakdown of the frozen-in condition. The evolution is also similar to those from a previous two-dimensional (2-D) PIC simulation specially designed to investigate the nonlinear evolution of the cross-field current instability for CD. One interpretation of these findings is that CD and substorm triggering can be associated with earthward intrusion of a DF into the near-Earth plasma sheet as indicated by previous Cluster and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations. An alternative interpretation is that both DF and CD are consequences of a global evolution from an ion-tearing-like instability of the magnetotail.

  2. Vision Loss, Sudden

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of age-related macular degeneration. Spotlight on Aging: Vision Loss in Older People Most commonly, vision loss ... Some Causes and Features of Sudden Loss of Vision Cause Common Features* Tests Sudden loss of vision ...

  3. The Influence of Slope Breaks on Lava Flow Surface Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Wright, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the underlying slope of a lava flow impart a significant fraction of rotational energy beyond the slope break. The eddies, circulation and vortices caused by this rotational energy can disrupt the flow surface, having a significant impact on heat loss and thus the distance the flow can travel. A basic mechanics model is used to compute the rotational energy caused by a slope change. The gain in rotational energy is deposited into an eddy of radius R whose energy is dissipated as it travels downstream. A model of eddy friction with the ambient lava is used to compute the time-rate of energy dissipation. The key parameter of the dissipation rate is shown to be rho R(sup 2/)mu, where ? is the lava density and mu is the viscosity, which can vary by orders of magnitude for different flows. The potential spatial disruption of the lava flow surface is investigated by introducing steady-state models for the main flow beyond the steepening slope break. One model applies to slow-moving flows with both gravity and pressure as the driving forces. The other model applies to fast-moving, low-viscosity, turbulent flows. These models provide the flow velocity that establishes the downstream transport distance of disrupting eddies before they dissipate. The potential influence of slope breaks is discussed in connection with field studies of lava flows from the 1801 Hualalai and 1823 Keaiwa Kilauea, Hawaii, and 2004 Etna eruptions.

  4. Manufacturing doubt about endocrine disrupter science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Becher, Georg; Blumberg, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed response to the critique of "State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals 2012" (UNEP/WHO, 2013) by financial stakeholders, authored by Lamb et al. (2014). Lamb et al.'s claim that UNEP/WHO (2013) does not provide a balanced perspective on endocrine disruption is b...

  5. Network Formation under the Threat of Disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyer, B.

    2013-01-01

    The studies in this thesis are focused on the impact the presence of a network disruptor has on network formation models. In particular, we build two theoretical models to study the effect of network disruption on network formation and test the effect network disruption has on equilibrium selection

  6. Thyroid effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Malene; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Main, Katharina M

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many studies of thyroid-disrupting effects of environmental chemicals have been published. Of special concern is the exposure of pregnant women and infants, as thyroid disruption of the developing organism may have deleterious effects on neurological outcome. Chemicals may exert ...

  7. Disruption Management in Passenger Railway Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Julie Jespersen; Potthoff, Daniel; Clausen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with disruption management in passenger railway transportation. In the disruption management process, many actors belonging to different organizations play a role. In this paper we therefore describe the process itself and the roles of the different actors. Furthermore, we discuss...

  8. Resistance to Disruption in a Classroom Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E.; Neal, Carrie M.; Ahearn, William H.; Wheeler, Emily E.; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B.; Dube, William V.

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple…

  9. Network Formation under the Threat of Disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyer, B.

    2013-01-01

    The studies in this thesis are focused on the impact the presence of a network disruptor has on network formation models. In particular, we build two theoretical models to study the effect of network disruption on network formation and test the effect network disruption has on equilibrium selection

  10. Restricted and disrupted sleep : Effects on autonomic function, neuroendocrine stress systems and stress responsivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, Peter; Sgoifo, Andrea; Suchecki, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Frequently disrupted and restricted sleep is a common problem for many people in our modern around-the-clock society. In this context, it is an important question how sleep loss affects the stress systems in our bodies since these systems enable us to deal with everyday challenges. Altered activity

  11. Restricted and disrupted sleep : Effects on autonomic function, neuroendocrine stress systems and stress responsivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, Peter; Sgoifo, Andrea; Suchecki, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Frequently disrupted and restricted sleep is a common problem for many people in our modern around-the-clock society. In this context, it is an important question how sleep loss affects the stress systems in our bodies since these systems enable us to deal with everyday challenges. Altered activity

  12. Rotation-Dependent Catastrophic Disruption of Gravitational Aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Ballouz, Ronald-Louis; Michel, Patrick; Schwartz, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    We carry out a systematic exploration of the effect of pre-impact rotation on the outcomes of low-speed collisions between planetesimals modeled as gravitational aggregates. We use pkdgrav, a cosmology code adapted to collisional problems and recently enhanced with a new soft-sphere collision algorithm that includes more realistic contact forces. A rotating body has lower effective surface gravity than a non-rotating one and therefore might suffer more mass loss as the result of a collision. What is less well understood, however, is whether rotation systematically increases mass loss on average regardless of the impact trajectory. This has important implications for the efficiency of planet formation via planetesimal growth, and also more generally for the determination of the impact energy threshold for catastrophic disruption (leading to the largest remnant retaining 50% of the original mass), as this has generally only been evaluated for non-spinning bodies. We find that for most collision scenarios, rotat...

  13. Loss of cell-surface laminin anchoring promotes tumor growth and is associated with poor clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Armin; Griffith, Obi L; Soroceanu, Liliana; Leonoudakis, Dmitri; Luciani-Torres, Maria Gloria; Daemen, Anneleen; Gray, Joe W; Muschler, John L

    2012-05-15

    Perturbations in the composition and assembly of extracellular matrices (ECM) contribute to progression of numerous diseases, including cancers. Anchoring of laminins at the cell surface enables assembly and signaling of many ECMs, but the possible contributions of altered laminin anchoring to cancer progression remain undetermined. In this study, we investigated the prominence and origins of defective laminin anchoring in cancer cells and its association with cancer subtypes and clinical outcomes. We found loss of laminin anchoring to be widespread in cancer cells. Perturbation of laminin anchoring originated from several distinct defects, which all led to dysfunctional glycosylation of the ECM receptor dystroglycan. In aggressive breast and brain cancers, defective laminin anchoring was often due to suppressed expression of the glycosyltransferase LARGE. Reduced expression of LARGE characterized a broad array of human tumors in which it was associated with aggressive cancer subtypes and poor clinical outcomes. Notably, this defect robustly predicted poor survival in patients with brain cancers. Restoring LARGE expression repaired anchoring of exogenous and endogenous laminin and modulated cell proliferation and tumor growth. Together, our findings suggest that defects in laminin anchoring occur commonly in cancer cells, are characteristic of aggressive cancer subtypes, and are important drivers of disease progression.

  14. Flood-related work disruption and poor health outcomes among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek-Asa, Corinne; Ramirez, Marizen; Young, Tracy; Cao, YanYan

    2012-12-01

    Globally, floods are the most common and among the most devastating of natural disasters. Natural disasters such as floods impact local businesses, increasing local unemployment by up to 8.2%. Previous research has linked individual losses from disasters with symptoms such as posttraumatic stress disorder. However, little is known about the impact of work disruption and job loss on post-disaster psychological symptoms. University students, who are often living far away from family support structures and have limited resources, may be particularly vulnerable. This study examines student psychological health following a large flood at a university. Students who experienced flood-related job loss or disruption had a higher proportion of psychological symptoms than those who did not experience job loss or disruption, controlling for individual loss such as injury, home loss or evacuation. On June 8, 2008, a major flood affected seven US Midwestern states. A total of two dozen people were killed and 148 injured, although no deaths or serious injuries were reported in the population used for this study. At the study university, operations were closed for one week, and 20 buildings were severely damaged. A cross-sectional survey of all students enrolled during the semester of the flood was conducted. Students were sent an online survey six weeks after the flood. In addition to questions about damage to their homes, the survey asked students if their work was disrupted because of the floods. Symptoms of PTSD were measured through the modified Child PTSD Symptom Scale. Of the 1,231 responding students with complete surveys, 667 (54.2%) reported that their work was disrupted due to the floods. Controlling for gender, ethnicity, grade, and damage to the student's home, students reporting work disruption were more than four times more likely to report PTSD symptoms (95% CI, 2.5-8.2). Work disruption was independently associated with decreases in general mental and physical

  15. Intrepreting Debris from Satellite Disruption In External Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, K V; Bullock, J S; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Sackett, Penny D.; Bullock, James S.

    2001-01-01

    We examine the detectability and interpretation of debris trails caused by satellite disruption in external galaxies using semi-analytic approximations for the dependence of streamer length, width and surface brightness on satellite and primary galaxy characteristics. The semi-analytic method is tested successfully against N-body simulations and then applied to three representative astronomical applications. First, we show how streamer properties can be used to estimate mass-to-light ratios $\\Upsilon$ and streamer ages of totally disrupted satellites, and apply the method to the stellar arc in NGC 5907. Second, we discuss how the lack of observed tidal debris around a satellite can provide an upper limit on its mass-loss rate, and, as an example, derive the implied limits on mass-loss rates for M32 and NGC 205 around Andromeda. Finally, we point out that a statistical analysis of streamer properties might be applied to test and refine cosmological models of hierachical galaxy formation, and use the predicted ...

  16. Interpreting Debris from Satellite Disruption in External Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Kathryn V.; Sackett, Penny D.; Bullock, James S.

    2001-08-01

    We examine the detectability and interpretation of debris trails caused by satellite disruption in external galaxies using semianalytic approximations for the dependence of streamer length, width, and surface brightness on satellite and primary galaxy characteristics. The semianalytic method is tested successfully against N-body simulations and then applied to three representative astronomical applications. First, we show how streamer properties can be used to estimate mass-to-light ratios Υ and streamer ages of totally disrupted satellites, and we apply the method to the stellar arc in NGC 5907. Second, we discuss how the lack of observed tidal debris around a satellite can provide an upper limit on its mass-loss rate and, as an example, derive the implied limits on mass-loss rates for M32 and NGC 205 around Andromeda. Finally, we point out that a statistical analysis of streamer properties might be applied to test and refine cosmological models of hierarchical galaxy formation, and we use the predicted debris from a standard Λ cold dark matter realization to test the feasibility of such a study. Using the Local Group satellites and the few known examples of debris trails in the Galaxy and in external systems, we estimate that the best current techniques could characterize the brightest (RCELT and OWL may allow fainter trails to be detected routinely and thus may be used for statistical studies such as those required for tests of galaxy formation.

  17. Extending natural hazard impacts: an assessment of landslide disruptions on a national road transportation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postance, Benjamin; Hillier, John; Dijkstra, Tom; Dixon, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Disruptions to transportation networks by natural hazard events cause direct losses (e.g. by physical damage) and indirect socio-economic losses via travel delays and decreased transportation efficiency. The severity and spatial distribution of these losses varies according to user travel demands and which links, nodes or infrastructure assets are physically disrupted. Increasing transport network resilience, for example by targeted mitigation strategies, requires the identification of the critical network segments which if disrupted would incur undesirable or unacceptable socio-economic impacts. Here, these impacts are assessed on a national road transportation network by coupling hazard data with a transport network model. This process is illustrated using a case study of landslide hazards on the road network of Scotland. A set of possible landslide-prone road segments is generated using landslide susceptibility data. The results indicate that at least 152 road segments are susceptible to landslides, which could cause indirect economic losses exceeding £35 k for each day of closure. In addition, previous estimates for historic landslide events might be significant underestimates. For example, the estimated losses for the 2007 A83 ‘Rest and Be Thankful’ landslide are £80 k day-1, totalling £1.2 million over a 15 day closure, and are ˜60% greater than previous estimates. The spatial distribution of impact to road users is communicated in terms of ‘extended hazard impact footprints’. These footprints reveal previously unknown exposed communities and unanticipated spatial patterns of severe disruption. Beyond cost-benefit analyses for landslide mitigation efforts, the approach implemented is applicable to other natural hazards (e.g. flooding), combinations of hazards, or even other network disruption events.

  18. Microalgal cell disruption via ultrasonic nozzle spraying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Yuan, W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the effect of operating parameters, including ultrasound amplitude, spraying pressure, nozzle orifice diameter, and initial cell concentration on microalgal cell disruption and lipid extraction in an ultrasonic nozzle spraying system (UNSS). Two algal species including Scenedesmus dimorphus and Nannochloropsis oculata were evaluated. Experimental results demonstrated that the UNSS was effective in the disruption of microalgal cells indicated by significant changes in cell concentration and Nile red-stained lipid fluorescence density between all treatments and the control. It was found that increasing ultrasound amplitude generally enhanced cell disruption and lipid recovery although excessive input energy was not necessary for best results. The effect of spraying pressure and nozzle orifice diameter on cell disruption and lipid recovery was believed to be dependent on the competition between ultrasound-induced cavitation and spraying-generated shear forces. Optimal cell disruption was not always achieved at the highest spraying pressure or biggest nozzle orifice diameter; instead, they appeared at moderate levels depending on the algal strain and specific settings. Increasing initial algal cell concentration significantly reduced cell disruption efficiency. In all UNSS treatments, the effectiveness of cell disruption and lipid recovery was found to be dependent on the algal species treated.

  19. Plasma current asymmetries during disruptions in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, S. N.; Hender, T. C.; Morris, J.; Riccardo, V.; Zakharov, L. E.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-07-01

    A key feature of disruptions during vertical displacement events, discovered in JET in 1996, is the toroidal variation in the measured plasma current Ip, i.e. the plasma current asymmetries, lasting for almost the entire current quench. The unique magnetic diagnostics at JET (full set of poloidal coils and saddle loops recorded either from two toroidally opposite or from four toroidally orthogonal locations) allow for a comprehensive analysis of asymmetrical disruptions with a large scale database. This paper presents an analysis of 4854 disruptions over an 18 year period that includes both the JET carbon (C) wall and the ITER-like (IL) wall (a mixed beryllium/tungsten first wall). In spite of the Ip quench time significantly increasing for the IL-wall compared to C-wall disruptions, the observed toroidal asymmetry time integral (˜ sideways force impulse), did not increase for IL-wall disruptions. The Ip asymmetry has a dominantly n = 1 structure. Its motion in the toroidal direction has a sporadic behaviour, in general. The distributions of the number of rotation periods are found to be very similar for both C- and IL-wall disruptions, and multi-turn rotation was sometimes observed. The Ip asymmetry amplitude has no degradation with rotation frequency for either the C- or IL-wall disruption. Therefore dynamic amplification remains a potentially serious issue for ITER due to possible mechanical resonance of the machine components with the rotating asymmetry.

  20. Disrupted Stars in Unusual Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDEs) occur when a star passes a little too close to a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy. Tidal forces from the black hole cause the passing star to be torn apart, resulting in a brief flare of radiation as the stars material accretes onto the black hole. A recent study asks the following question: do TDEs occur most frequently in an unusual type of galaxy?A Trend in DisruptionsSo far, we have data from eight candidate TDEs that peaked in optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. The spectra from these observations have shown an intriguing trend: many of these TDEs host galaxies exhibit weak line emission (indicating little or no current star-formation activity), and yet they show strong Balmer absorption lines (indicating star formation activity occurred within the last Gyr). These quiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies likely underwent a period of intense star formation that recently ended.To determine if TDEs are overrepresented in such galaxies, a team of scientists led by Decker French (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona) has quantified the fraction of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that exhibit similar properties to those of TDE hosts.Quantifying OverrepresentationSpectral characteristics of SDSS galaxies (gray) and TDE candidate host galaxies (colored points): line emission vs. Balmer absorption. The lower right-hand box identifies thequiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies which contain most TDE events, yet are uncommon among the galaxy sample as a whole. Click for a better look! [French et al. 2016]French and collaborators compare the optical spectra of the TDE host galaxies to those of nearly 600,000 SDSS galaxies, using two different cutoffs for the Balmer absorption the indicator of past star formation. Their strictest cut, filtering for very high Balmer absorption, selected only 0.2% of the SDSS galaxies, yet 38% of the TDEs are hosted in such galaxies. Using a more relaxed cutoff selects 2.3% of

  1. DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR AMONGST DOCTORS, MYTH OR REALITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avtar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Disruptive behavior in a medical setting is defined as objectionable or offensive interpersonal behavior that leads to disruption of professional activities in the workplace. 1 It has been observed that majority of doctors do not show disruptive behavior in their day today conduct and only few doctors are identified for their disruptive behavior . Special commi ttee on professional conduct and ethics defines disruptive behavior in physicians as aberrant behavior manifested through personal interaction with physicians , hospital personnel , health care professionals , patients , family members or others which interferes with patient care or could reasonably be expected to interfere with the process of delivering quality care. 2 Common forms of disruptive behaviors generally seen amongst young doctors are use of abusive language , yelling or shouting at patients , colleagues and subordinate staff , showing in disciplined behavior and at times indulging in physical abuse. 3 - 4 STUDY DESIGN : Study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital where 614 health care professionals participated which included 108 doctors 432 nurs ing staff and 74 paramedical staff METHOD : Data collection was done by semi structured pretested questionnaire and was entered in Microsoft Excel and analyzed for frequency and percentages . RESULTS : 64 % doctor , 66% nursing staff and 50% of the paramedicals answered that they have seen doctors showing disruptive behavior at one time or the other . Not all the doctors show disruptive behavior but this type of aberrant behavior is seen mainly in2 - 3 percent of doctors only. While answering to the que stion as to the type of disruptive behavior , 57% health care professionals reported that commonest form of disruptive behavior noticed by them amongst doctors was yelling or shouting on junior staff , patients and colleagues . 47% answered that doctors with disruptive behavior do not follow laid down orders or

  2. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. Grøne; Krægpøth, Morten; Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving school-cohort. We...... identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic...

  3. School-based interventions for disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Youth disruptive behavior is a concern for youth, school personnel,families, and society. Early childhood disruptive behaviors negatively impact the classroom, and are associated with negative academic, social, behavioral, emotional, substance use, health, and justice system outcomes in adolescence and adulthood. Effective, comprehensive, multicomponent interventions targeting risk/protective factors and pathways associated with antisocial behavior reduce and/or mitigate these negative outcomes. Positive effects have been demonstrated for universal and indicated programs for participating youth and families in early childhood, and for high-risk youth in adolescence and young adulthood. These empirically supported programs inform the treatment of complex and difficult-to-treat disruptive behavior.

  4. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G.; Krægpøth, Morten; Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    2015-01-01

    This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving school-cohort. We...... identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic...

  5. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G.; Krægpøth, Morten Visby; Skyt Nielsen, Helena

    This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving schoolcohort. We...... identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic...

  6. Managing Disruptive Behavior by Patients and Physicians: A Responsibility of the Dialysis Facility Medical Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edward R; Goldman, Richard S

    2015-08-07

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Conditions for Coverage make the medical director of an ESRD facility responsible for all aspects of care, including high-quality health care delivery (e.g., safe, effective, timely, efficient, and patient centered). Because of the high-pressure environment of the dialysis facility, conflicts are common. Conflict frequently occurs when aberrant behaviors disrupt the dialysis facility. Patients, family members, friends, and, less commonly appreciated, nephrology clinicians (i.e., nephrologists and advanced care practitioners) may manifest disruptive behavior. Disruptive behavior in the dialysis facility impairs the ability to deliver high-quality care. Furthermore, disruptive behavior is the leading cause for involuntary discharge (IVD) or involuntary transfer (IVT) of a patient from a facility. IVD usually results in loss of continuity of care, increased emergency department visits, and increased unscheduled, acute dialysis treatments. A sufficient number of IVDs and IVTs also trigger an extensive review of the facility by the regional ESRD Networks, exposing the facility to possible Medicare-imposed sanctions. Medical directors must be equipped to recognize and correct disruptive behavior. Nephrology-based literature and tools exist to help dialysis facility medical directors successfully address and resolve disruptive behavior before medical directors must involuntarily discharge a patient or terminate an attending clinician.

  7. What's Hearing Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches What's Hearing Loss? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Hearing Loss? Print A ... brain, allowing you to hear. continue Types of Hearing Loss There are a few different types of hearing ...

  8. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient Health Information News media interested in covering ... One of the most common birth defects is hearing loss or deafness (congenital), which can affect as many ...

  9. Living with vision loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes - vision loss; Retinopathy - vision loss; Low vision; Blindness - vision loss ... Low vision is a visual disability. Wearing regular glasses or contacts does not help. People with low vision have ...

  10. Disrupted reproduction, estrous cycle, and circadian rhythms in female mice deficient in vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, D H; Kuljis, D A; Azuma, L; Wu, Y; Truong, D; Wang, H B; Colwell, C S

    2014-10-01

    The female reproductive cycle is gated by the circadian timing system and may be vulnerable to disruptions in the circadian system. Prior work suggests that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are one pathway by which the circadian clock can influence the estrous cycle, but the impact of the loss of this peptide on reproduction has not been assessed. In the present study, we first examine the impact of the genetic loss of the neuropeptide VIP on the reproductive success of female mice. Significantly, mutant females produce about half the offspring of their wild-type sisters even when mated to the same males. We also find that VIP-deficient females exhibit a disrupted estrous cycle; that is, ovulation occurs less frequently and results in the release of fewer oocytes compared with controls. Circadian rhythms of wheel-running activity are disrupted in the female mutant mice, as is the spontaneous electrical activity of dorsal SCN neurons. On a molecular level, the VIP-deficient SCN tissue exhibits lower amplitude oscillations with altered phase relationships between the SCN and peripheral oscillators as measured by PER2-driven bioluminescence. The simplest explanation of our data is that the loss of VIP results in a weakened SCN oscillator, which reduces the synchronization of the female circadian system. These results clarify one of the mechanisms by which disruption of the circadian system reduces female reproductive success.

  11. Shell Galaxies, Dynamical Friction, and Dwarf Disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrova, Ivana; Canalizo, Gabriela; Bennert, Nicola; Jilkova, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    Using N-body simulations of shell galaxies created in nearly radial minor mergers, we investigate the error of collision dating, resulting from the neglect of dynamical friction and of gradual disruption of the cannibalized dwarf.

  12. Towards a Framework of Digital Platform Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazan, Erol; Tan, Chee-Wee; Lim, Eric T. K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital platforms are disruptive information technology (IT) artifacts that erode conventional business logic associated with traditional market structures. This paper presents a framework for examining the disruptive potential of digital platforms whereby we postulate that the strategic interplay...... of governance regimes and platform layers is deterministic of whether disruptive derivatives are permitted to flourish. This framework has been employed in a comparative case study between centralized (i.e., PayPal) and decentralized (i.e., Coinkite) digital payment platforms to illustrate its applicability...... and yield propositions on the nature and impact of digital platform disruptions. Preliminary findings indicate that centralized digital platforms attempt to create unique configurals to obtain monopolistic power by tightly coupling platform layers, which are difficult to replicate. Conversely, decentralized...

  13. The Logic of Digital Platform Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazan, Erol; Tan, Chee-Wee; Lim, Eric T. K.

    Digital platforms are disruptive IT artifacts, because they facilitate the quick release of innovative platform derivatives from third parties (e.g., apps). This study endeavours to unravel the disruptive potential, caused by distinct designs and configurations of digital platforms on market...... environments. We postulate that the disruptive potential of digital platforms is determined by the degree of alignment among the business, technology and platform profiles. Furthermore, we argue that the design and configuration of the aforementioned three elements dictates the extent to which open innovation...... is permitted. To shed light on the disruptive potential of digital platforms, we opted for payment platforms as our unit of analysis. Through interviews with experts and payment providers, we seek to gain an in-depth appreciation of how contemporary digital payment platforms are designed and configured...

  14. Report on Criteria for Endocrine Disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters as a project contracted by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. The Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters is an interdisciplinary scientific network without walls. The main purpose of the Centre is to build and gather...... new knowledge on endocrine disrupters with the focus on providing information requested for the preventive work of the regulatory authorities. The Centre is financed by the Ministry of the Environment and the scientific work programme is followed by an international scientific advisory board....... The overall aim of this project is to provide a science based proposal for criteria for endocrine disrupters. The terms of reference for the project specify elements to be included and/or addressed when developing the criteria (Annex 1). Also, several international reports and papers dealing with assessment...

  15. Magnetic field evolution in tidal disruption events

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe; Rossi, Elena M

    2016-01-01

    When a star gets tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole, its magnetic field is expected to be transmitted to the debris. In this paper, we study this process via smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the disruption and early debris evolution including the stellar magnetic field. As the gas stretches into a stream, we show that the magnetic field evolution is strongly dependent on its orientation with respect to the stretching direction. In particular, an alignment of the field lines with the direction of stretching induces an increase of the magnetic energy. For disruptions happening well within the tidal radius, the star compression causes the magnetic field strength to sharply increase by an order of magnitude at the time of pericentre passage. If the disruption is partial, we find evidence for a dynamo process occurring inside the surviving core due to the formation of vortices. This causes an amplification of the magnetic field strength by a factor of $\\sim 10$. However, this valu...

  16. Endocrine disruption in aquatic insects: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soin, Thomas; Smagghe, Guy

    2007-02-01

    There is mounting evidence that a wide variety of compounds can have endocrine disrupting effects on humans and wildlife. However, investigations so far have focused primarily on exposure to human and other vertebrates, with invertebrate findings largely restricted to marine mollusks or to the ecdysteroid and juvenile hormone agonists as purposely synthesized endocrine disrupters for the pest management of insects. This article provides a brief description of the insect hormone system, a short sum-up of the relevant insect groups with aquatic life stages, and an overview of the additional evidence for endocrine disruption in aquatic insects from laboratory and field studies since 1999. In addition, the suitability of insects as sentinels for endocrine disrupting chemicals in aquatic ecosystems is discussed. Conclusions are drawn and research needs are defined.

  17. Double tidal disruptions in galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    A star on a nearly radial trajectory approaching a massive black hole (MBH) gets tidally disrupted if it comes sufficiently close to the MBH. Here we explore what happens to binary stars whose centers of mass approach the MBH on nearly radial orbits. The interaction with the MBH often leads to both stars being disrupted in sequence. We argue that such events could produce light curves that are substantially different from those of the single disruptions, with possible features such as two local maxima. Tidal forces from the MBH can also lead the binary components to collide; these merger products can form highly magnetized stars, whose subsequent tidal disruption may enable prompt jet formation.

  18. Disruption Management in Passenger Railway Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen-Groth, Julie; Potthoff, Daniel; Clausen, Jens

    This paper deals with disruption management in passenger railway transportation. In the disruption management process, many actors belonging to different organizations play a role. In this paper we therefore describe the process itself and the roles of the different actors. Furthermore, we discuss...... the three main subproblems in railway disruption management: timetable adjustment, and rolling stock and crew re-scheduling. Next to a general description of these problems, we give an overview of the existing literature and we present some details of the specific situations at DSB S-tog and NS....... These are the railway operators in the suburban area of Copenhagen, Denmark, and on the main railway lines in the Netherlands, respectively. Since not much research has been carried out yet on Operations Research models for disruption management in the railway context, models and techniques that have been developed...

  19. Integrated Decision Support Tools for Disruption Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besinovic, N.; Cacchiani, V.; Dollevoet, T.; Goverde, R.M.P.; Huisman, D.; Kidd, M.P.; Kroon, L.G.; Quaglietta, E.; Rodriguez, J.; Toth, P.; Veelenturf, L.; Wagenaar, J.

    2015-01-01

    During railway operations unexpected events can require railway operators and infrastructure managers to adjust their schedules. In this research we investigate the disruption management process. More specifically, we come up with an architecture and algorithmic framework which railway operators cou

  20. The Logic of Digital Platform Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazan, Erol; Tan, Chee-Wee; Lim, Eric T. K.

    Digital platforms are disruptive IT artifacts, because they facilitate the quick release of innovative platform derivatives from third parties (e.g., apps). This study endeavours to unravel the disruptive potential, caused by distinct designs and configurations of digital platforms on market...... environments. We postulate that the disruptive potential of digital platforms is determined by the degree of alignment among the business, technology and platform profiles. Furthermore, we argue that the design and configuration of the aforementioned three elements dictates the extent to which open innovation...... is permitted. To shed light on the disruptive potential of digital platforms, we opted for payment platforms as our unit of analysis. Through interviews with experts and payment providers, we seek to gain an in-depth appreciation of how contemporary digital payment platforms are designed and configured...

  1. Thyroid disrupting chemicals: Mechanisms and mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental contaminants are known to act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are xenobiotics that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis, or change circulating o...

  2. DOUBLE TIDAL DISRUPTIONS IN GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandel, Ilya [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Levin, Yuri, E-mail: imandel@star.sr.bham.ac.uk, E-mail: yuri.levin@monash.edu [Monash Center for Astrophysics and School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2015-05-20

    A star on a nearly radial trajectory approaching a massive black hole (MBH) gets tidally disrupted if it comes sufficiently close to the MBH. Here we explore what happens to binary stars whose centers of mass approach the MBH on nearly radial orbits. The interaction with the MBH often leads to both stars being disrupted in sequence. We argue that such events could produce light curves that are substantially different from those of the single disruptions, with possible features such as two local maxima. Tidal forces from the MBH can also lead the binary components to collide; these merger products can form highly magnetized stars, whose subsequent tidal disruption may enable prompt jet formation.

  3. Structuring the Classroom to Prevent Disruptive Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, William; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Specific suggestions to help teachers structure the classroom to prevent disruptive behaviors are offered in the areas of physical arrangement and "traffic rules" time management, assignments, grouping practices, classroom atmosphere, and professional demeanor. (DB)

  4. Disrupted functional brain networks in autistic toddlers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, M.; Kemner, C.; Reus, M.A. de; Collin, G.; Snijders, T.M.; Hofman, D.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Stam, C.J.; Heuvel, M.P. van den

    2013-01-01

    Communication and integration of information between brain regions plays a key role in healthy brain function. Conversely, disruption in brain communication may lead to cognitive and behavioral problems. Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by impaired social interactions

  5. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Disease Susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Janesick, Amanda; Blumberg, Bruce; Heindel, Jerrold J.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental chemicals have significant impacts on biological systems. Chemical exposures during early stages of development can disrupt normal patterns of development and thus dramatically alter disease susceptibility later in life. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with the body's endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic and immune effects in humans. A wide range of substances, both natural and man-made, are tho...

  6. Anastomotic disruption after large bowel resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad U NasirKhan; Farshad Abir; Walter Longo; Robert Kozol

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic disruption is a feared and serious complication of colon surgery. Decades of research have identified factors favoring successful healing of anastomoses as well as risk factors for anastomotic disruption. However, some factors, such as the role of mechanical bowel preparation, remain controversial.Despite proper caution and excellent surgical technique,some anastomotic leaks are inevitable. The rapid identification of anastomotic leaks and the timely treatment in these cases are paramount.

  7. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING EFFECTS OF BUTYLPARABEN: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Pallabi Goswami; J.C Kalita

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing concern in the field of endocrine disruption over the presence of various endocrine disrupting chemicals in Pharmaceuticals and Personal care products (PPCPs). This concern has also been as PPCPs are most widely used and had led to introduction of thousands of new and complex chemicals that enter the environment in large quantities. The effect of the chemicals has not only been restricted to human who are exposed directly to the chemicals or the a...

  8. BUSINESS MODEL PATTERNS FOR DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    BENJAMIN AMSHOFF; CHRISTIAN DÜLME; JULIAN ECHTERFELD; JÜRGEN GAUSEMEIER

    2015-01-01

    Companies nowadays face a myriad of business opportunities as a direct consequence of manifold disruptive technology developments. As a basic characteristic, disruptive technologies lead to a severe shift in value-creation networks giving rise to new market segments. One of the key challenges is to anticipate the business logics within these nascent and formerly unknown markets. Business model patterns promise to tackle this challenge. They can be interpreted as proven business model elements...

  9. Magnetic field evolution in tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnerot, Clément; Price, Daniel J.; Lodato, Giuseppe; Rossi, Elena M.

    2017-08-01

    When a star gets tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole, its magnetic field is expected to pervade its debris. In this paper, we study this process via smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the disruption and early debris evolution including the stellar magnetic field. As the gas stretches into a stream, we show that the magnetic field evolution is strongly dependent on its orientation with respect to the stretching direction. In particular, an alignment of the field lines with the direction of stretching induces an increase of the magnetic energy. For disruptions happening well within the tidal radius, the star compression causes the magnetic field strength to sharply increase by an order of magnitude at the time of pericentre passage. If the disruption is partial, we find evidence for a dynamo process occurring inside the surviving core due to the formation of vortices. This causes an amplification of the magnetic field strength by a factor of ˜10. However, this value represents a lower limit since it increases with numerical resolution. For an initial field strength of 1 G, the magnetic field never becomes dynamically important. Instead, the disruption of a star with a strong 1 MG magnetic field produces a debris stream within which magnetic pressure becomes similar to gas pressure a few tens of hours after disruption. If the remnant of one or multiple partial disruptions is eventually fully disrupted, its magnetic field could be large enough to magnetically power the relativistic jet detected from Swift J1644+57. Magnetized streams could also be significantly thickened by magnetic pressure when it overcomes the confining effect of self-gravity.

  10. Economic Loan Loss Provision and Expected Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hlawatsch

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The intention of a loan loss provision is the anticipation of the loan's expected losses by adjusting the book value of the loan. Furthermore, this loan loss provision has to be compared to the expected loss according to Basel II and, in the case of a difference, liable equity has to be adjusted. This however assumes that the loan loss provision and the expected loss are based on a similar economic rationale, which is only valid conditionally in current loan loss provisioning methods according to IFRS. Therefore, differences between loan loss provisions and expected losses should only result from different approaches regarding the parameter estimation within each model and not due to different assumptions regarding the outcome of the model. The provisioning and accounting model developed in this paper overcomes the before-mentioned shortcomings and is consistent with an economic rationale of expected losses. Additionally, this model is based on a close-to-market valuation of the loan that is in favor of the basic idea of IFRS. Suggestions for changes in current accounting and capital requirement rules are provided.

  11. Airline Disruption Management - Perspectives, Experiences and Outlook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohl, Niklas; Larsen, Allan; Larsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused by for ex......Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused...... by for example severe weather, technical problems and crew sickness. Thus, the field of Airline Disruption Management has emerged within the past few years. The increased focus on cutting cost at the major airlines has intensified the interest in the development of new and cost e cient methods to handle airline...... disruptions. The purpose of this paper is twofold. In the first part it o ers an introduction to airline disruption management, provides the readers with a description of the planning processes and delivers a detailed overview of the numerous aspects of airline disruption management. In the second part we...

  12. Airline Disruption Management - Perspectives, Experiences and Outlook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohl, Niklas; Larsen, Allan; Larsen, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused by for ex......Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused...... by for example severe weather, technical problems and crew sickness. Thus, the field of Airline Disruption Management has emerged within the past few years. The increased focus on cutting cost at the major airlines has intensified the interest in the development of new and cost efficient methods to handle...... airline disruptions. The purpose of this paper is twofold. In the first part it offers an introduction to airline disruption management provides the readers with a description of the planning processes and delivers a detailed overview of the numerous aspects of airline disruption management. In the second...

  13. Disrupting incrementalism in health care innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Farzad; Zenios, Stefanos

    2011-08-01

    To build enabling innovation frameworks for health care entrepreneurs to better identify, evaluate, and pursue entrepreneurial opportunities. Powerful frameworks have been developed to enable entrepreneurs and investors identify which opportunity areas are worth pursuing and which start-up ideas have the potential to succeed. These frameworks, however, have not been clearly defined and interpreted for innovations in health care. Having a better understanding of the process of innovation in health care allows physician entrepreneurs to innovate more successfully. A review of academic literature was conducted. Concepts and frameworks related to technology innovation were analyzed. A new set of health care specific frameworks was developed. These frameworks were then applied to innovations in various health care subsectors. Health care entrepreneurs would greatly benefit from distinguishing between incremental and disruptive innovations. The US regulatory and reimbursement systems favor incrementalism with a greater chance of success for established players. Small companies and individual groups, however, are more likely to thrive if they adopt a disruptive strategy. Disruption in health care occurs through various mechanisms as detailed in this article. While the main mechanism of disruption might vary across different health care subsectors, it is shown that disruptive innovations consistently require a component of contrarian interpretation to guarantee considerable payoff. If health care entrepreneurs choose to adopt an incrementalist approach, they need to build the risk of disruption into their models and also ascertain that they have a very strong intellectual property (IP) position to weather competition from established players. On the contrary, if they choose to pursue disruption in the market, albeit the competition will be less severe, they need to recognize that the regulatory and reimbursement hurdles are going to be very high. Thus, they would benefit

  14. Comparing gains and losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, A Peter; Larsen, Jeff T; Kahneman, Daniel; Schkade, David

    2010-10-01

    Loss aversion in choice is commonly assumed to arise from the anticipation that losses have a greater effect on feelings than gains, but evidence for this assumption in research on judged feelings is mixed. We argue that loss aversion is present in judged feelings when people compare gains and losses and assess them on a common scale. But many situations in which people judge and express their feelings lack these features. When judging their feelings about an outcome, people naturally consider a context of similar outcomes for comparison (e.g., they consider losses against other losses). This process permits gains and losses to be normed separately and produces psychological scale units that may not be the same in size or meaning for gains and losses. Our experiments show loss aversion in judged feelings for tasks that encourage gain-loss comparisons, but not tasks that discourage them, particularly those using bipolar scales.

  15. Suppression of runaway current generation by supersonic molecular beam injection during disruptions on J-TEXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, D. W.; Chen, Z. Y.; Tong, R. H.; Yan, W.; Wang, S. Y.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Dai, A. J.; Wang, X. L.; Jiang, Z. H.; Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.; Pan, Y.; J-TEXT Team

    2017-08-01

    The suppression of disruption-generated runaway electrons (REs) by supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) has been investigated on the J-TEXT tokamak. Experimental results demonstrate that the hydrogen injected by SMBI during plasma current flattop phase can provoke magnetic perturbations, which increase RE losses rapidly. The effective radial diffusion coefficient of REs due to SMBI is estimated as D r ≈ 16 m2 s-1. Based on this benefit, the SMBI has been used to explore the suppression of disruption-generated REs. In J-TEXT, RE current is created with rapid argon injection by a massive gas injection valve. It is found that hydrogen SMBI before disruption efficiently suppresses the generation of RE current.

  16. How to distinguish between 'business as usual' and 'significant business disruptions' and plan accordingly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to provide an insight into Air New Zealand and how business continuity is managed in an industry with inherent disruptions. The differences between 'business as usual' and 'significant business disruptions' are outlined along with their associated criteria, response and escalation processes. The paper describes why the company incorporates the four 'R's of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act within its BCM framework and how this aids resilience. A case study is provided that details a 'significant disruption' that occurred in November 2006. This event resulted in the total loss of a sales office and cargo shed after unrest in the Kingdom of Tonga escalated to widespread rioting, looting and destruction of their central business district. The lessons from this event have been captured and provide some essential mitigation measures that will assist in future events.

  17. Ionizing radiation induces heritable disruption of epithelial cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Catherine C.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Talhouk, Rabih; Parvin, Bahram; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a known human breast carcinogen. Although the mutagenic capacity of IR is widely acknowledged as the basis for its action as a carcinogen, we and others have shown that IR can also induce growth factors and extracellular matrix remodeling. As a consequence, we have proposed that an additional factor contributing to IR carcinogenesis is the potential disruption of critical constraints that are imposed by normal cell interactions. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether IR affected the ability of nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo tissue-specific morphogenesis in culture by using confocal microscopy and imaging bioinformatics. We found that irradiated single HMEC gave rise to colonies exhibiting decreased localization of E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and connexin-43, proteins necessary for the establishment of polarity and communication. Severely compromised acinar organization was manifested by the majority of irradiated HMEC progeny as quantified by image analysis. Disrupted cell-cell communication, aberrant cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and loss of tissue-specific architecture observed in the daughters of irradiated HMEC are characteristic of neoplastic progression. These data point to a heritable, nonmutational mechanism whereby IR compromises cell polarity and multicellular organization.

  18. Disruption of mitochondrial function in interpopulation hybrids of Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher K; Burton, Ronald S

    2006-07-01

    Electron transport system (ETS) function in mitochondria is essential for the aerobic production of energy. Because ETS function requires extensive interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear gene products, coadaptation between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes may evolve within populations. Hybridization between allopatric populations may then expose functional incompatibilities between genomes that have not coevolved. The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus has high levels of nucleotide divergence among populations at mitochondrial loci and suffers F2 hybrid breakdown in interpopulation hybrids. We hypothesize that hybridization results in incompatibilities among subunits in ETS enzyme complexes and that these incompatibilities result in diminished mitochondrial function and fitness. To test this hypothesis, we measured fitness, mitochondrial function, and ETS enzyme activity in inbred recombinant hybrid lines of Tigriopus californicus. We found that (1) both fitness and mitochondrial function are reduced in hybrid lines, (2) only those ETS enzymes with both nuclear and mitochondrial subunits show a loss of activity in hybrid lines, and (3) positive relationships exist between ETS enzyme activity and mitochondrial function and between mitochondrial function and fitness. We also present evidence that hybrid lines harboring mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial RNA polymerase (mtRPOL) from the same parental source population have higher fitness than those with mtDNA and mtRPOL from different populations, suggesting that mitochondrial gene regulation may play a role in disruption of mitochondrial performance and fitness of hybrids. These results suggest that disruption of coadaptation between nuclear and mitochondrial genes contributes to the phenomenon of hybrid breakdown.

  19. Simulation study of disruption characteristics in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongkyu; Kim, J. Y.; Kessel, C. E.; Poli, F.

    2012-10-01

    A detailed simulation study of disruption in KSTAR had been performed using the Tokamak Simulation Code(TSC) [1] during the initial design phase of KSTAR [2]. Recently, however, a partial modification in the structure of passive plate was made in relation to reduce eddy current and increase the efficiency of control of vertical position. A substantial change can then occur in disruption characteristics and plasma behavior during disruption due to changes in passive plate structure. Because of this, growth rate of vertical instability is expected to be increased and eddy current and its associated electomagnetic force are expected to be reduced. To check this in more detail, a new simulation study is here given with modified passive plate structure of KSTAR. In particular, modeling of vertical disruption that is vertical displacement event (VDE) was carried out. We calculated vertical growth rate for a drift phase of plasma and electromagnetic force acting on PFC structures and compared the results between in a new model and an old model. [4pt] [1] S.C. Jardin, N. Pomphrey and J. Delucia, J. Comp. Phys. 66, 481 (1986).[0pt] [2] J.Y. Kim, S.Y. Cho and KSTAR Team, Disruption load analysis on KSTAR PFC structures, J. Accel. Plasma Res. 5, 149 (2000).

  20. Disruptive Intelligence : How to gather Information to deal with disruptive innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriens, D.J.; Solberg Søilen, K.

    2014-01-01

    Disruptive innovations are innovations that have the capacity to transform a whole business into one with products that are more accessible and affordable (cf. Christensen et al. 2009). As Christensen et al. argue no business is immune to such disruptive innovations. If these authors are right, it

  1. Disruptive Intelligence : How to gather Information to deal with disruptive innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriens, D.J.; Solberg Søilen, K.

    2014-01-01

    Disruptive innovations are innovations that have the capacity to transform a whole business into one with products that are more accessible and affordable (cf. Christensen et al. 2009). As Christensen et al. argue no business is immune to such disruptive innovations. If these authors are right, it m

  2. Preschool Children's Observed Disruptive Behavior: Variations across Sex, Interactional Context, and Disruptive Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sarah A. O.; Carter, Alice S.; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Hill, Carri; Danis, Barbara; Keenan, Kate; Wakschlag, Lauren S.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in disruptive behavior and sensitivity to social context are documented, but the intersection between them is rarely examined empirically. This report focuses on sex differences in observed disruptive behavior across interactional contexts and diagnostic status. Preschoolers (n = 327) were classified as nondisruptive (51%),…

  3. Disrupting posterior cingulate connectivity disconnects consciousness from the external environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbet, Guillaume; Lafargue, Gilles; de Champfleur, Nicolas Menjot; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; le Bars, Emmanuelle; Bonnetblanc, François; Duffau, Hugues

    2014-04-01

    Neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies including both patients with disorders of consciousness and healthy subjects with modified states of consciousness suggest a crucial role of the medial posteroparietal cortex in conscious information processing. However no direct neuropsychological evidence supports this hypothesis and studies including patients with restricted lesions of this brain region are almost non-existent. Using direct intraoperative electrostimulations, we showed in a rare patient that disrupting the subcortical connectivity of the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) reliably induced a breakdown in conscious experience. This acute phenomenon was mainly characterized by a transient behavioral unresponsiveness with loss of external connectedness. In all cases, when he regained consciousness, the patient described himself as in dream, outside the operating room. This finding suggests that functional integrity of the PPC connectivity is necessary for maintaining consciousness of external environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.P. Gerhardt

    2012-09-27

    This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

  5. Disruption of microtubule integrity initiates mitosis during CNS repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossing, Torsten; Barros, Claudia S; Fischer, Bettina; Russell, Steven; Shepherd, David

    2012-08-14

    Mechanisms of CNS repair have vital medical implications. We show that traumatic injury to the ventral midline of the embryonic Drosophila CNS activates cell divisions to replace lost cells. A pilot screen analyzing transcriptomes of single cells during repair pointed to downregulation of the microtubule-stabilizing GTPase mitochondrial Rho (Miro) and upregulation of the Jun transcription factor Jun-related antigen (Jra). Ectopic Miro expression can prevent midline divisions after damage, whereas Miro depletion destabilizes cortical β-tubulin and increases divisions. Disruption of cortical microtubules, either by chemical depolymerization or by overexpression of monomeric tubulin, triggers ectopic mitosis in the midline and induces Jra expression. Conversely, loss of Jra renders midline cells unable to replace damaged siblings. Our data indicate that upon injury, the integrity of the microtubule cytoskeleton controls cell division in the CNS midline, triggering extra mitosis to replace lost cells. The conservation of the identified molecules suggests that similar mechanisms may operate in vertebrates.

  6. Evolution and precession of accretion disk in tidal disruption events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matzner C.D.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In a supermassive black hole (BH tidal disruption event (TDE, the tidally disrupted star feeds the BH via an accretion disk. Most often it is assumed that the accretion rate history, hence the emission light curve, tracks the rate at which new debris mass falls back onto the disk, notably the t−5/3 power law. But this is not the case when the disk evolution due to viscous spreading - the driving force for accretion - is carefully considered. We construct a simple analytical model that comprehensively describes the accretion rate history across 4 different phases of the disk evolution, in the presence of mass fallback and disk wind loss. Accretion rate evolves differently in those phases which are governed by how the disk heat energy is carried away, early on by advection and later by radiation. The accretion rate can decline as steeply as t−5/3 only if copious disk wind loss is present during the early advection-cooled phase. Later, the accretion rate history is t−8/7 or shallower. These have great implications on the TDE flare light curve. A TDE accretion disk is most likely misaligned with the equatorial plane of the spinning BH. Moreover, in the TDE the accretion rate is super- or near-Eddington thus the disk is geometrically thick, for which case the BH’s frame dragging effect may cause the disk precess as a solid body, which may manifest itself as quasi-periodic signal in the TDE light curve. Our disk evolution model predicts the disk precession period increases with time, typically as ∝ t. The results are applied to the recently jetted TDE flare Swift transient J1644 + 57 which shows numerous, quasi-periodic dips in its long-term X-ray light curve. As the current TDE sample increases, the identification of the disk precession signature provides a unique way of measuring BH spin and studying BH accretion physics.

  7. Disruption, beamstrahlung, and beamstrahlung pair creation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P.

    1988-12-01

    The two major effects from the interaction of e/sup /minus//e/sup +/ beams---beamstrahlung and disruption---are reviewed, with emphasis on flat beam collisions. For the disruption effects we discuss the luminosity enhancement factor, the maximum and rms disruption angles, and the ''kink instability''. All the results are obtained from computer simulations, and scaling laws based on these are deduced whenever possible. For the beamstrahlung effects, we concentrate only on the final electron energy spectrum and the deflection angle associated with low energy particles. In addition to the generic studies on the beam-beam effects, we also list the relevant beam-beam parameters obtained from simulations on two sample designs: the TLC and the ILC. As an addendum, the newly discovered phenomenon of coherent beamstrahlung pair creation, together with the incoherent process, are discussed. 18 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Isolated Sleep Paralysis: Fear, Prevention, and Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian Andrew; Grom, Jessica Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about isolated sleep paralysis (ISP), and no empirically supported treatments are available. This study aims to determine: the clinical impact of ISP, the techniques used to prevent or disrupt ISP, and the effectiveness of these techniques. 156 undergraduates were assessed with lifetime ISP using a clinical interview. 75.64% experienced fear during ISP, and 15.38% experienced clinically significant distress/interference, while 19.23% attempted to prevent ISP, and 79.31% of these believed their methods were successful. Regarding disruption, 69.29% made attempts, but only 54.12% reported them effective. Disruption was more common than prevention, but several techniques were useful. Encouraging individuals to utilize these techniques and better monitor their symptoms may be an effective way to manage problematic ISP.

  9. Disruption Management in Passenger Railway Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Julie Jespersen; Potthoff, Daniel; Clausen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with disruption management in passenger railway transportation. In the disruption management process, many actors belonging to different organizations play a role. In this paper we therefore describe the process itself and the roles of the different actors. Furthermore, we discuss...... the three main subproblems in railway disruption management: timetable adjustment, and rolling stock and crew re-scheduling. Next to a general description of these problems, we give an overview of the existing literature and we present some details of the specific situations at DSB S-tog and NS....... These are the railway operators in the suburban area of Copenhagen, Denmark, and on the main railway lines in The Netherlands, respectively. Finally, we address the integration of the re-scheduling processes of the timetable, and the resources rolling stock and crew....

  10. Extensor mechanism disruption after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Michael D; Springer, Bryan D

    2015-02-01

    Extensor mechanism disruption is a rare and potentially devastating complication associated with total knee arthroplasty. Disruption can occur at the quadriceps or patellar tendons or, in the setting of a fracture, at the patella. Recognition of the risk factors for disruption and prevention via meticulous surgical technique are critical to avoid this complication. Various management techniques and the challenges associated with treatment have been described. Nonsurgical management consists of the use of walking aids and/or knee braces, which may not be acceptable for the active patient. Surgical options include primary repair and reconstructive techniques using allograft, autograft, synthetic material, and gastrocnemius rotational flaps. However, no single method has reliably demonstrated satisfactory outcomes. Although research on reconstructive procedures with synthetic materials has been promising, further study is need to assess the use of these materials.

  11. Disc formation from stellar tidal disruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The potential of tidal disruption of stars to probe otherwise quiescent supermassive black holes cannot be exploited, if their dynamics is not fully understood. So far, the observational appearance of these events has been commonly derived from analytical extrapolations of the debris dynamical properties just after the stellar disruption. In this paper, we perform hydrodynamical simulations of stars in highly eccentric orbits, that follow the stellar debris after disruption and investigate their ultimate fate. We demonstrate that gas debris circularize on an orbital timescale because relativistic apsidal precession causes the stream to self-cross. The higher the eccentricity and/or the deeper the encounter, the faster is the circularization. If the internal energy deposited by shocks during stream self-interaction is readily radiated, the gas forms a narrow ring at the circularization radius. It will then proceed to accrete viscously at a super-Eddington rate, puffing up under radiation pressure. If instead c...

  12. Lasting Adaptations in Social Behavior Produced by Social Disruption and Inhibition of Adult Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opendak, Maya; Offit, Lily; Monari, Patrick; Schoenfeld, Timothy J.; Sonti, Anup N.; Cameron, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Research on social instability has focused on its detrimental consequences, but most people are resilient and respond by invoking various coping strategies. To investigate cellular processes underlying such strategies, a dominance hierarchy of rats was formed and then destabilized. Regardless of social position, rats from disrupted hierarchies had fewer new neurons in the hippocampus compared with rats from control cages and those from stable hierarchies. Social disruption produced a preference for familiar over novel conspecifics, a change that did not involve global memory impairments or increased anxiety. Using the neuropeptide oxytocin as a tool to increase neurogenesis in the hippocampus of disrupted rats restored preference for novel conspecifics to predisruption levels. Conversely, reducing the number of new neurons by limited inhibition of adult neurogenesis in naive transgenic GFAP–thymidine kinase rats resulted in social behavior similar to disrupted rats. Together, these results provide novel mechanistic evidence that social disruption shapes behavior in a potentially adaptive way, possibly by reducing adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To investigate cellular processes underlying adaptation to social instability, a dominance hierarchy of rats was formed and then destabilized. Regardless of social position, rats from disrupted hierarchies had fewer new neurons in the hippocampus compared with rats from control cages and those from stable hierarchies. Unexpectedly, these changes were accompanied by changes in social strategies without evidence of impairments in cognition or anxiety regulation. Restoring adult neurogenesis in disrupted rats using oxytocin and conditionally suppressing the production of new neurons in socially naive GFAP–thymidine kinase rats showed that loss of 6-week-old neurons may be responsible for adaptive changes in social behavior. PMID:27358459

  13. Measuring the Resiliency of the Manhattan Points of Entry in the Face of Severe Disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayada Omer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Resilient infrastructure systems are able to continue to provide the expected service levels following disruptive events. Implementing resiliency in infrastructure systems requires knowledge of the current resiliency of the system and a methodology by which different resiliency strategies can be evaluated. In the transportation infrastructure in particular, disruptions cause delays, which will in turn incur substantial economic losses and environmental damages. Approach: The Networked Infrastructure Resiliency framework (NIRA is proposes to assess the resiliency of the road network that connects Manhattan in New York City to the rest of the regions. The framework proposes to create a network model of the system onto which hypothetical disruptions can be introduced and then to measure resiliency as the impact of disruptions on the performance measures of the system. One of the key performance measures of the transportation infrastructure system is the travel time; hence, the base resiliency of the system is measured as the ratio of the travel time preceding a disruption to the travel time following a disruption. Different resiliency strategies that improve the system’s resiliency can be evaluated through the use of decision tree analysis. Results: The proposed NIRA framework is a novel approach for assessing the resiliency of networked infrastructure system by measuring the impact of disruptions on the system’s performance measures. In road transportation networks, such as that connecting Manhattan entry points, resiliency is achievable through reducing the vulnerability of the system and increasing its adaptive capacity. Conclusion: One vulnerability reduction strategy is the clever assignment of vehicles to other routes in the network. The adaptive capacity of the system is enhanced through the deployment of other parallel systems such as ferries.

  14. Corona helps curb losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, M.; Lahtinen, M.; Lustre, L.

    1996-11-01

    The greatest power losses in electricity transmission arise through a phenomenon called load losses. Corona losses caused by the surface discharge of electricity also constitute a considerable cost item. IVS, the nationwide network company, is investigating corona- induced losses, and has also commissioned similar research from IVO International, the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and from Tampere University of Technology. The research work strives to gain more in-depth knowledge on the phenomenon of frosting and its impact on corona losses. The correct prediction of frost helps reduce corona losses, while also cutting costs considerably. (orig.)

  15. Corona helps curb losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, M.; Lahtinen, M.; Lustre, L.

    1996-11-01

    The greatest power losses in electricity transmission arise through a phenomenon called load losses. Corona losses caused by the surface discharge of electricity also constitute a considerable cost item. IVS, the nationwide network company, is investigating corona- induced losses, and has also commissioned similar research from IVO International, the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and from Tampere University of Technology. The research work strives to gain more in-depth knowledge on the phenomenon of frosting and its impact on corona losses. The correct prediction of frost helps reduce corona losses, while also cutting costs considerably. (orig.)

  16. Putting theory to the test: modeling a multidimensional, developmentally-based approach to preschool disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakschlag, Lauren S; Henry, David B; Tolan, Patrick H; Carter, Alice S; Burns, James L; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J

    2012-06-01

    There is increasing emphasis on dimensional conceptualizations of psychopathology, but empirical evidence of their utility is just emerging. In particular, although a range of multidimensional models have been proposed, the relative fit of competing models has rarely been tested. Furthermore, developmental considerations have received scant attention. In this study, we tested a developmentally based, four-dimensional model of disruptive behavior theorized to represent the defining features of disruptive behavior at preschool age: Temper Loss, Noncompliance, Aggression, and Low Concern for Others. Model testing was conducted in two independent samples of preschoolers: Clinically Enriched Sample (n = 336) and Epidemiologic Sample (n = 532). The tau-equivalent confirmatory factor analyses were used to test the fit of the Developmental Model relative to three leading competing models (DSM opositional defiant disorder (ODD)/conduct disorder (CD) Model, "Callous" Model, and an "Irritable/Headstrong/Hurtful" Model). Reliability of the four dimensions was also tested. Validity of the dimensions was tested by predicting multi-informant, multi-method ratings of disruptive behavior and impairment, and incremental utility relative to DSM symptoms. In both samples, the Developmental Model demonstrated a superior fit compared with the competing models within the full sample, and across key demographic subgroups. Validity was also demonstrated, including incremental utility relative to DSM-IV disruptive behavior symptoms. Critical next steps for achieving scientific consensus about the optimal dimensional model of disruptive behavior and its clinical application are discussed. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Traditional facial tattoos disrupt face recognition processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttle, Heather; East, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Factors that are important to successful face recognition, such as features, configuration, and pigmentation/reflectance, are all subject to change when a face has been engraved with ink markings. Here we show that the application of facial tattoos, in the form of spiral patterns (typically associated with the Maori tradition of a Moko), disrupts face recognition to a similar extent as face inversion, with recognition accuracy little better than chance performance (2AFC). These results indicate that facial tattoos can severely disrupt our ability to recognise a face that previously did not have the pattern.

  18. 3D MHD Simulations of Tokamak Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James

    2014-10-01

    Two disruption scenarios are modeled numerically by use of the CORSICA 2D equilibrium and NIMROD 3D MHD codes. The work follows the simulations of pressure-driven modes in DIII-D and VDEs in ITER. The aim of the work is to provide starting points for simulation of tokamak disruption mitigation techniques currently in the CDR phase for ITER. Pressure-driven instability growth rates previously observed in simulations of DIIID are verified; Halo and Hiro currents produced during vertical displacements are observed in simulations of ITER with implementation of resistive walls in NIMROD. We discuss plans to exercise new code capabilities and validation.

  19. Reproductive Endocrinology in Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Maria C; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Christiansen, Ole B

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disruptions may be important in patients experiencing recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). This review focuses on data available on RPL and the endocrine system to investigate relevant, and perhaps modifiable, endocrine factors of importance for the disorder. Evidence indicates that some...... hormones may be important as immune modulators and a better understanding of this interplay has potential for improving pregnancy outcome in RPL. To date there is a lack of consensus on the effect of endocrine treatment options in RPL and there is a strong need for large randomized-controlled trials....

  20. Burden of disease and costs of exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals in the European Union: an updated analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trasande, L.; Zoeller, R. T.; Hass, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    A previous report documented that endocrine disrupting chemicals contribute substantially to certain forms of disease and disability. In the present analysis, our main objective was to update a range of health and economic costs that can be reasonably attributed to endocrine disrupting chemical...... Group, and evaluated laboratory and animal evidence of endocrine disruption using definitions recently promulgated by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. The Delphi method was used to make decisions on the strength of the data. Expert panels consensus was achieved for probable (>20%) endocrine...... disrupting chemical causation for IQ loss and associated intellectual disability; autism; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; endometriosis; fibroids; childhood obesity; adult obesity; adult diabetes; cryptorchidism; male infertility, and mortality associated with reduced testosterone. Accounting...

  1. OI Issues: Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearing Loss and Osteogenesis Imperfecta Introduction Significant hearing loss has been reported in approximately 50% of people with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) beginning any time from childhood into middle age. While not everyone ...

  2. Devices for hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000359.htm Devices for hearing loss To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. If you are living with hearing loss , you know that it takes extra effort to ...

  3. Living with hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000360.htm Living with hearing loss To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. If you are living with hearing loss, you know that it takes extra effort to ...

  4. Hearing Loss: Screening Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Hearing Loss Screening Newborns Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of ... of newborns in the U.S. are screened for hearing loss before they leave the hospital. Research improves the ...

  5. Female Pattern Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are signs of hormone imbalance, such as excess facial or body hair, a hormone evaluation should be done. Hormonal changes are a common cause of female hair loss. Many women do not realize that hair loss can occur ...

  6. Genetics of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Latin America Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetics of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... of hearing loss in babies is due to genetic causes. There are also a number of things ...

  7. Coping with Memory Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Coping With Memory Loss Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... a health professional. back to top What Causes Memory Loss? Anything that affects cognition—the process of ...

  8. Recurrent pregnancy loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerup, P; Kolte, A M; Larsen, E C

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is there a different prognostic impact for consecutive and non-consecutive early pregnancy losses in women with secondary recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL)? SUMMARY ANSWER: Only consecutive early pregnancy losses after the last birth have a statistically significant negative prognostic...... impact in women with secondary RPL. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: The risk of a new pregnancy loss increases with the number of previous pregnancy losses in patients with RPL. Second trimester losses seem to exhibit a stronger negative impact than early losses. It is unknown whether the sequence of pregnancy...... losses plays a role for the prognosis in patients with a prior birth. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This retrospective cohort study of pregnancy outcome in patients with unexplained secondary RPL included in three previously published, Danish double-blinded placebo-controlled trials of intravenous...

  9. Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you ... caused by obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food ...

  10. Weight-loss medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000346.htm Weight-loss medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Several weight-loss medicines are available. Ask your health care provider ...

  11. Photovoltaic array loss mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Charles

    1986-10-01

    Loss mechanisms which come into play when solar cell modules are mounted in arrays are identified. Losses can occur either from a reduction in the array electrical performance or with nonoptimal extraction of power from the array. Electrical performance degradation is caused by electrical mismatch, transmission losses from cell surface soiling and steep angle of reflectance, and electrical losses from field wiring resistance and the voltage drop across blocking diodes. The second type of loss, concerned with the operating points of the array, can involve nonoptimal load impedance and limiting the operating envelope of the array to specific ranges of voltage and current. Each of the loss mechanisms are discussed and average energy losses expected from soiling, steep reflectance angles and circuit losses are calculated.

  12. Injection losses and protection

    CERN Document Server

    Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Bracco, C; Dehning, B; Di Mauro, A; Drosdal, L; Emery, J; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Höfle, W; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Radaelli, S; Shaposhnilova, E; Uythoven, J; Valuch, D; Wenninger, J; Zamantzas, C; Gianfelice-Wendt, E

    2012-01-01

    Injection losses are compared for 2010 and 2011 operation. Mitigation techniques which were put in place in 2010 to reduce losses at injection are described. Issues in 2011 operation, their potential improvements and the performance reach for 2012 are shown.

  13. Menopause and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet & Menopause Bone Loss How are bone loss and menopause related? Throughout life your body keeps a balance between the ... lose bone faster than it can be replaced. Menopause—the time when menstrual periods end, which usually ...

  14. Disruption of Lysosome Function Promotes Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Drosophila *

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Congwu; Zhu, Huanhu; Han,Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Xu, Tian

    2010-01-01

    Lysosome function is essential to many physiological processes. It has been suggested that deregulation of lysosome function could contribute to cancer. Through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we have discovered that mutations disrupting lysosomal degradation pathway components contribute to tumor development and progression. Loss-of-function mutations in the Class C vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) gene, deep orange (dor), dramatically promote tumor overgrowth and invasion of the RasV12 cells....

  15. Conductive Hearing Loss during Infancy: Effects on Later Auditory Brain Stem Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarson, Adele D.; Finitzo, Terese

    1991-01-01

    Long-term effects on auditory electrophysiology from early fluctuating hearing loss were studied in 27 children, aged 5 to 7 years, who had been evaluated originally in infancy. Findings suggested that early fluctuating hearing loss disrupts later auditory brain stem electrophysiology. (Author/DB)

  16. Reacting to Face Loss in Chinese Business Culture: An Interview Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardon, Peter W.

    2006-01-01

    In Chinese culture, the concept of face refers to personal dignity, prestige, and status and serves to maintain harmony in social relationships and hierarchies. The fear of the loss of face permeates Chinese society. In business, face loss may disrupt deals and harm goodwill. However, limited empirical research has addressed the emotional…

  17. Blindness and vision loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... means you cannot see anything and DO NOT see light. (Most people who use the term "blindness" mean ... the vision loss. For long-term vision loss, see a low-vision specialist, who can help you learn to care for yourself and ... of vision; No light perception (NLP); Low vision; Vision loss and blindness ...

  18. Proven Weight Loss Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Proven Weight Loss Methods What can weight loss do for you? Losing weight can improve your health in a number of ways. ... limiting calories) usually isn’t enough to cause weight loss. But exercise plays an important part in helping ...

  19. Constraining Cluster Disruption in M83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Villa, E.; Adamo, A.; Bastian, N.; Fouesneau, M.

    2014-09-01

    Currently two contrasting models have been put forward to explain cluster disruption. These models are known as Mass Independent Disruption (MID) and Mass Dependent Disruption (MDD) models. Here we will shortly introduce the two models and present the latest observational results obtained in the field. We will focus on the results achieved us- ing the new and unprecedented Hubble Space Telescope-WFC3 dataset of the face-on, spiral galaxy M83. The dataset, composed of 7 different fields, covers the galaxy up to a radius of ˜8 kpc, and is used to construct one of the most complete and systematic star cluster catalogues for a galaxy in the local universe. The cluster properties were estimated comparing the photometry (NUV and optical) with Single Stellar Population (SSP) models. If the age distribution is approximated by a single power-law, we find indices between -0.6 and 0 for the seven fields (independently of the binning used), finding a systematic trend with the local environment. Additionally, our results are inconsistent with the expected slope of ˜1 from the MID model, showing to be flatter. The combination of our results with the M31 galaxy (The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury program), and the LMC (Baumgardt et al. 2013), is starting to guide the global understanding on star cluster disruption, and how these systems are strongly correlated with the local environment where they were formed.

  20. Study of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Juvancz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC cause more and more seriousenvironmental pollutions. The EDCs show only ng-μg/l concentration level in theenvironment, therefore their determinations require multistep sample preparationprocesses and highly sophisticated instrumentation. This paper discuss the EDC effects,and show examples for determination of such compounds.

  1. Heavy Metals Acting as Endocrine Disrupters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Georgescu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Last years researches focused on several natural and synthetic compounds that may interfere with the major functionsof the endocrine system and were termed endocrine disrupters. Endocrine disrupters are defined as chemicalsubstances with either agonist or antagonist endocrine effects in human and animals. These effects may be achievedby interferences with the biosynthesis or activity of several endogenous hormones. Recently, it was demonstratedthat heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd, arsen (As, mercury (Hg, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb and zinc (Zn may exhibitendocrine-disrupting activity in animal experiments. Emerging evidence of the intimate mechanisms of action ofthese heavy metals is accumulating. It was revealed, for example, that the Zn atom from the Zn fingers of theestrogen receptor can be replaced by several heavy metal molecules such as copper, cobalt, Ni and Cd. By replacingthe Zn atom with Ni or copper, binding of the estrogen receptor to the DNA hormone responsive elements in the cellnucleus is prevented. In both males and females, low-level exposure to Cd interferes with the biological effects ofsteroid hormones in reproductive organs. Arsen has the property to bind to the glucocorticoid receptor thusdisturbing glucocorticoids biological effects. With regard to Hg, this may induce alterations in male and femalefertility, may affect the function of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis or the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis,and disrupt biosynthesis of steroid hormones.

  2. The Structure of Childhood Disruptive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Michelle M.; Gremillion, Monica; Roberts, Bethan; von Eye, Alexander; Nigg, Joel T.

    2010-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) frequently co-occur. Comorbidity of these 2 childhood disruptive behavior domains has not been satisfactorily explained at either a structural or etiological level. The current study evaluated a bifactor model, which allows for a "g" factor in addition to…

  3. Analysis of recent fuel-disruption experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, J.M.; Kraft, T.E.; DiMelfi, R.J.; Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    Recent USDOE-sponsored DEH, FGR, and TREAT F series fuel-disruption experiments are analyzed with existing analytical models. The experiments are interpreted and the results used to evaluate the models. Calculations are presented using the FRAS3 fission-gas-behavior code and the DiMelfi-Deitrich fuel-response model.

  4. Family Disruption and Delinquency. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberry, Terence P.; Smith, Carolyn A.; Rivera, Craig; Huizinga, David; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda

    At study sites in Rochester (New York), Denver (Colorado) and Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania), three research teams studying the impact of family disruption on juvenile delinquency have interviewed approximately 4,000 participants at regular intervals for a decade, recording their lives in detail. Findings to date indicate that preventing delinquency…

  5. Endocrine disrupting chemicals and disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Janesick, Amanda; Blumberg, Bruce; Heindel, Jerrold J

    2011-11-01

    Environmental chemicals have significant impacts on biological systems. Chemical exposures during early stages of development can disrupt normal patterns of development and thus dramatically alter disease susceptibility later in life. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with the body's endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic and immune effects in humans. A wide range of substances, both natural and man-made, are thought to cause endocrine disruption, including pharmaceuticals, dioxin and dioxin-like compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, DDT and other pesticides, and components of plastics such as bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates. EDCs are found in many everyday products--including plastic bottles, metal food cans, detergents, flame retardants, food additives, toys, cosmetics, and pesticides. EDCs interfere with the synthesis, secretion, transport, activity, or elimination of natural hormones. This interference can block or mimic hormone action, causing a wide range of effects. This review focuses on the mechanisms and modes of action by which EDCs alter hormone signaling. It also includes brief overviews of select disease endpoints associated with endocrine disruption.

  6. The Relative Ineffectiveness of Criminal Network Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijn, Paul A. C.; Kashirin, Victor; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2014-02-01

    Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in secrecy, data-driven knowledge concerning the effectiveness of different criminal network disruption strategies is very limited. By combining computational modeling and social network analysis with unique criminal network intelligence data from the Dutch Police, we discovered, in contrast to common belief, that criminal networks might even become `stronger', after targeted attacks. On the other hand increased efficiency within criminal networks decreases its internal security, thus offering opportunities for law enforcement agencies to target these networks more deliberately. Our results emphasize the importance of criminal network interventions at an early stage, before the network gets a chance to (re-)organize to maximum resilience. In the end disruption strategies force criminal networks to become more exposed, which causes successful network disruption to become a long-term effort.

  7. Traffic disruption route Einstein near building 170

    CERN Multimedia

    A Lopez - TS/CE

    2005-01-01

    The TS/CE Group informs you that, for the duration of the work at Building 170, there may be some disruption to traffic on route Einstein in the vicinity of Building 170. The work is due to take place from the 14th to 18th February. For more information, please contact 165029. A. Lopez TS/CE

  8. THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION: FROM KINETICS TO DYNAMICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wide range of chemicals with diverse structures act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are chemicals that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormones (THs), or change circulating or t...

  9. Is Online Learning a Disruptive Innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Katrina A.

    2011-01-01

    In their desire to plan for the future, planners must assess the role of both internal and external influences on the institution. What then should people make of the idea that technology is disruptive? This perception fuels the views of Barone and Hagner (2001), who claimed that technology would "transform" higher education; Duderstadt (2000),…

  10. E-Learning: Between Augmentation and Disruption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilesen, Simon B.; Josephsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Based on a framework for analysis combining diffusion theory, content layer analysis and sense making, this paper discusses the theme of "e-learning as augmentation or disruption" from the point of view of technological innovation. Two cases of on-campus blended learning at Roskilde University, Denmark, are introduced to illustrate the…

  11. The Structure of Childhood Disruptive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Michelle M.; Gremillion, Monica; Roberts, Bethan; von Eye, Alexander; Nigg, Joel T.

    2010-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) frequently co-occur. Comorbidity of these 2 childhood disruptive behavior domains has not been satisfactorily explained at either a structural or etiological level. The current study evaluated a bifactor model, which allows for a "g" factor in addition to…

  12. Maternal Characteristics Predicting Young Girls' Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Elsa; Hipwell, Alison E.; Vermeiren, Robert; Loeber, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the relative predictive utility of maternal characteristics and parenting skills on the development of girls' disruptive behavior. The current study used five waves of parent- and child-report data from the ongoing Pittsburgh Girls Study to examine these relationships in a sample of 1,942 girls from age 7 to 12 years.…

  13. Managing Disruptive Behaviour in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Both faculty and students at many colleges and universities report numerous incidents of disruptive and uncivil behaviour. However, studies show that faculty are often reluctant to confront these situations, or they feel ill-equipped to intervene. If the behaviour escalates, a disproportionate amount of time and effort can be spent trying to…

  14. Disrupting Educational Inequalities through Youth Digital Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stornaiuolo, Amy; Thomas, Ebony Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews scholarship on youth and young adult activism in digital spaces, as young users of participatory media sites are engaging in political, civic, social, or cultural action and advocacy online to create social change. The authors argue that youth's digital activism serves as a central mechanism to disrupt inequality, and that…

  15. Development of Disruptive Open Access Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Terry; McConkey, Brigette

    2009-01-01

    Open access (OA) publication has emerged, with disruptive effects, as a major outlet for scholarly publication. OA publication is usually associated with on-line distribution and provides access to scholarly publications to anyone, anywhere--regardless of their ability to pay subscription fees or their association with an educational institution.…

  16. Is Online Learning a Disruptive Innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Katrina A.

    2011-01-01

    In their desire to plan for the future, planners must assess the role of both internal and external influences on the institution. What then should people make of the idea that technology is disruptive? This perception fuels the views of Barone and Hagner (2001), who claimed that technology would "transform" higher education; Duderstadt (2000),…

  17. Hot Super Earths: disrupted young jupiters?

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Recent {\\em Kepler} observations revealed an unexpected abundance of "hot" Earth-size to Neptune-size planets in the inner $0.02-0.2$ AU from their parent stars. We propose that these smaller planets are the remnants of massive giant planets that migrated inward quicker than they could contract. We show that such disruptions naturally occur in the framework of the Tidal Downsizing hypothesis for planet formation. We find that the characteristic planet-star separation at which such "hot disruptions" occur is $R \\approx 0.03-0.2$ AU. This result is independent of the planet's embryo mass but is dependent on the accretion rate in the disc. At high accretion rates, $\\dot M \\simgt 10^{-6}\\msun$ yr$^{-1}$, the embryo is unable to contract quickly enough and is disrupted. At late times, when the accretion rate drops to $\\dot M \\simlt 10^{-8} \\msun$ yr$^{-1}$, the embryos migrate sufficiently slow to not be disrupted. These "late arrivals" may explain the well known population of hot jupiters. If type I migration reg...

  18. Analysis of recent fuel-disruption experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, J.M.; Kraft, T.E.; DiMelfi, R.J.; Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    Recent USDOE-sponsored DEH, FGR, and TREAT F series fuel-disruption experiments are analyzed with existing analytical models. The experiments are interpreted and the results used to evaluate the models. Calculations are presented using the FRAS3 fission-gas-behavior code and the DiMelfi-Deitrich fuel-response model.

  19. Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Kong, Ying-Yee; Michalewski, Henry J; Starr, Arnold

    2005-06-01

    Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity were systematically studied in 21 subjects who had been clinically diagnosed with auditory neuropathy (AN), a recently defined disorder characterized by normal outer hair cell function but disrupted auditory nerve function. Neurological and electrophysical evidence suggests that disrupted auditory nerve activity is due to desynchronized or reduced neural activity or both. Psychophysical measures showed that the disrupted neural activity has minimal effects on intensity-related perception, such as loudness discrimination, pitch discrimination at high frequencies, and sound localization using interaural level differences. In contrast, the disrupted neural activity significantly impairs timing related perception, such as pitch discrimination at low frequencies, temporal integration, gap detection, temporal modulation detection, backward and forward masking, signal detection in noise, binaural beats, and sound localization using interaural time differences. These perceptual consequences are the opposite of what is typically observed in cochlear-impaired subjects who have impaired intensity perception but relatively normal temporal processing after taking their impaired intensity perception into account. These differences in perceptual consequences between auditory neuropathy and cochlear damage suggest the use of different neural codes in auditory perception: a suboptimal spike count code for intensity processing, a synchronized spike code for temporal processing, and a duplex code for frequency processing. We also proposed two underlying physiological models based on desynchronized and reduced discharge in the auditory nerve to successfully account for the observed neurological and behavioral data. These methods and measures cannot differentiate between these two AN models, but future studies using electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant might. These results not only show the unique

  20. Inhibited osteoblastogenesis, enhanced bone resorption and disrupted vitamin d3 homeostasis in female c57bl/6 mice fed alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol abuse is a well-known factor for increased risk of osteoporosis. Previous studies have shown that molecular mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced bone loss are complex, involving direct effects on both bone formation and resorption and additional indirect actions via endocrine disruption. Wh...

  1. Beam Loss in Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M A

    2016-01-01

    Beam loss is a critical issue in high-intensity accelerators, and much effort is expended during both the design and operation phases to minimize the loss and to keep it to manageable levels. As new accelerators become ever more powerful, beam loss becomes even more critical. Linacs for H- ion beams, such as the one at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, have many more loss mechanisms compared to H+ (proton) linacs, such as the one being designed for the European Spallation Neutron Source. Interesting H- beam loss mechanisms include residual gas stripping, H+ capture and acceleration, field stripping, black-body radiation and the recently discovered intra-beam stripping mechanism. Beam halo formation, and ion source or RF turn on/off transients, are examples of beam loss mechanisms that are common for both H+ and H- accelerators. Machine protection systems play an important role in limiting the beam loss.

  2. Laminopathies disrupt epigenomic developmental programs and cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovanovic, Jelena; Dell'Orso, Stefania; Gnochi, Viola F; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Vigouroux, Corinne; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Mouly, Vincent; Bonne, Gisèle; Hoffman, Eric P

    2016-04-20

    The nuclear envelope protein lamin A is encoded by thelamin A/C(LMNA) gene, which can contain missense mutations that cause Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) (p.R453W). We fused mutated forms of the lamin A protein to bacterial DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) to define euchromatic-heterochromatin (epigenomic) transitions at the nuclear envelope during myogenesis (using DamID-seq). Lamin A missense mutations disrupted appropriate formation of lamin A-associated heterochromatin domains in an allele-specific manner-findings that were confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation-DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) in murine H2K cells and DNA methylation studies in fibroblasts from muscular dystrophy patient who carried a distinctLMNAmutation (p.H222P). Observed perturbations of the epigenomic transitions included exit from pluripotency and cell cycle programs [euchromatin (open, transcribed) to heterochromatin (closed, silent)], as well as induction of myogenic loci (heterochromatin to euchromatin). In muscle biopsies from patients with either a gain- or change-of-functionLMNAgene mutation or a loss-of-function mutation in theemeringene, both of which cause EDMD, we observed inappropriate loss of heterochromatin formation at theSox2pluripotency locus, which was associated with persistent mRNA expression ofSox2 Overexpression ofSox2inhibited myogenic differentiation in human immortalized myoblasts. Our findings suggest that nuclear envelopathies are disorders of developmental epigenetic programming that result from altered formation of lamina-associated domains.

  3. Anthropogenic tracers, endocrine disrupting chemicals, and endocrine disruption in Minnesota lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Writer, J.H.; Barber, L.B.; Brown, G.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kiesling, R.L.; Ferrey, M.L.; Jahns, N.D.; Bartell, S.E.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of endocrine disrupting chemicals and endocrine disruption in fish were determined in 11 lakes across Minnesota that represent a range of trophic conditions and land uses (urban, agricultural, residential, and forested) and in which wastewater treatment plant discharges were absent. Water, sediment, and passive polar organic integrative samplers (POCIS) were analyzed for steroidal hormones, alkylphenols, bisphenol A, and other organic and inorganic molecular tracers to evaluate potential non-point source inputs into the lakes. Resident fish from the lakes were collected, and caged male fathead minnows were deployed to evaluate endocrine disruption, as indicated by the biological endpoints of plasma vitellogenin and gonadal histology. Endocrine disrupting chemicals, including bisphenol A, 17??-estradiol, estrone, and 4-nonylphenol were detected in 90% of the lakes at part per trillion concentrations. Endocrine disruption was observed in caged fathead minnows and resident fish in 90% of the lakes. The widespread but variable occurrence of anthropogenic chemicals in the lakes and endocrine disruption in fish indicates that potential sources are diverse, not limited to wastewater treatment plant discharges, and not entirely predictable based on trophic status and land use. ?? 2010.

  4. Longitudinal association between marital disruption and child BMI and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkes, Jeremy

    2012-08-01

    This research examines whether family disruptions (i.e., divorces and separation) contribute to children's weight problems. The sample consists of 7,299 observations for 2,333 children, aged 5-14, over the 1986-2006 period, from a US representative sample from the Child and Young Adult Survey accompanying the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The study uses individual-fixed-effects models in a longitudinal framework to compare children's BMI and weight problems before and after a disruption. Furthermore, besides doing a before-after comparison for children, the study also estimates the effects at various periods relative to the disruption in order to examine whether children are affected before the disruption and whether any effects change as time passes from the disruption, as some effects may be temporary or slow to develop. Despite having a larger sample than the previous studies, the results provide no evidence that, on average, children's BMI and BMI percentile scores (measured with continuous outcomes) are affected before the disruption, after the disruption, and as time passes from the disruption, relative to a baseline period a few years before the disruption. However, children experiencing a family disruption do have an increased risk of obesity (having a BMI percentile score of 95 or higher) in the two years leading up to the disruption as well as after the disruption, and as time passes from the disruption.

  5. Indirect economic impact of landslide hazards by disruption to national road transportation networks; Scotland, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postance, Benjamin; Hillier, John; Dijkstra, Tom; Dixon, Neil

    2016-04-01

    The failure of engineered or natural slopes which support or are adjacent to transportation systems often inflicts costly direct physical damage and indirect system disruption. The consequences and severity of indirect impacts vary according to which links, nodes or network facilities are physically disrupted. Moreover, it is often the case that multiple slope failure disruptions are triggered simultaneously following prolonged or intense precipitation events due to a degree of local homogeneity of slope characteristics and materials. This study investigates the application of national commuter statistics and network agent simulation to evaluate indirect impacts of landslide events disrupting the Scottish trunk road transportation network (UK). Previous studies often employ shortest pathway analysis whereas agent simulation has received relatively little attention. British Geological Survey GeoSure landslide susceptibility data is used to select 35 susceptible trunk road segments by means of neighbouring total area at risk. For each of the candidate 35 segments the network and zonal variation in travel time is calculated for a single day of disruption, economic impact is approximated using established governmental and industry transport planning and appraisal values. The results highlight that a number of trunk road segments incur indirect economic losses in the order of tens of thousands of pounds for each day of closure. Calculated losses at the A83 Rest and Be Thankful are 50% greater than previous estimates at £75 thousand per day of closure. Also highlighted are events in which economic impact is relatively minor, yet concentrating on particular communities that can become substantially isolated as a consequence of a single event. The findings of this study are of interest and support wider investigations exploring cost considerations for decision makers and mitigation strategies, in addition to identifying network topological and demand indicators conducive

  6. 5-Flurouracil disrupts nuclear export and nuclear pore permeability in a calcium dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higby, Kelly J; Bischak, Melissa M; Campbell, Christina A; Anderson, Rebecca G; Broskin, Sarah A; Foltz, Lauren E; Koper, Jarrett A; Nickle, Audrey C; Resendes, Karen K

    2017-03-01

    Regulation of nuclear transport is an essential component of apoptosis. As chemotherapy induced cell death progresses, nuclear transport and the nuclear pore complex (NPC) are slowly disrupted and dismantled. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and the camptothecin derivatives irinotecan and topotecan, are linked to altered nuclear transport of specific proteins; however, their general effects on the NPC and transport during apoptosis have not been characterized. We demonstrate that 5-FU, but not topotecan, increases NPC permeability, and disrupts Ran-mediated nuclear transport before the disruption of the NPC. This increased permeability is dependent on increased cellular calcium, as the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM, abolishes the effect. Furthermore, increased calcium alone was sufficient to disrupt the Ran gradient. Combination treatments of 5-FU with topotecan or irinotecan, similarly disrupted nuclear transport before disassembly of the NPC. In both single and combination treatments nuclear transport was disrupted before caspase 9 activation, indicating that 5-FU induces an early caspase-independent increase in NPC permeability and alteration of nuclear transport. Because Crm1-mediated nuclear export of tumor suppressors is linked to drug resistance we also examined the effect of 5-FU on the nuclear export of a specific target, topoisomerase. 5-FU treatment led to accumulation of topoisomerase in the nucleus and recovered the loss nuclear topoisomerase induced by irinotecan or topotecan, a known cause of drug resistance. Furthermore, 5-FU retains its ability to cause nuclear accumulation of p53 in the presence of irinotecan or topotecan. Our results reveal a new mechanism of action for these therapeutics during apoptosis, opening the door to other potential combination chemotherapies that employ 5-FU as a calcium mediated inhibitor of Crm1-induced nuclear export of tumor suppressors.

  7. Conversion of homothallic yeast to heterothallism trough HO gene disruption

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, WH

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple method was developed for the conversion of homothallic Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeaststrains to heterothallism through HO gene disruption. An integrative ho:: neo disrupted allele was constructed by cloning a dominant selectable marker...

  8. Handbook on loss reserving

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Klaus; Schnaus, Anja

    2016-01-01

    This handbook presents the basic aspects of actuarial loss reserving. Besides the traditional methods, it also includes a description of more recent ones and a discussion of certain problems occurring in actuarial practice, like inflation, scarce data, large claims, slow loss development, the use of market statistics, the need for simulation techniques and the task of calculating best estimates and ranges of future losses. In property and casualty insurance the provisions for payment obligations from losses that have occurred but have not yet been settled usually constitute the largest item on the liabilities side of an insurer's balance sheet. For this reason, the determination and evaluation of these loss reserves is of considerable economic importance for every property and casualty insurer. Actuarial students, academics as well as practicing actuaries will benefit from this overview of the most important actuarial methods of loss reserving by developing an understanding of the underlying stochastic models...

  9. Endocrine disrupters. The case of estrogen xenobiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Olea Serrano

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest of the scientific community in chemical substances able to alter the hormone balance –endocrine disrupters- has grown with increasing evidence of the consequences for animal populations of exposure to these substances. As has occurred on previous occasions, observational data on animal populations have been sufficiently suggestive to cause concerns among clinicians that similar effects may be produced in human populations. Although data on the effects on populations of animals are more easily generated than those on individuals, clinical observations on human individuals alongside the few existing epidemiological studies have shown a certain parallelism. Indeed, in vitro and in vivo models have been able to designate many chemical compounds as hormonal mimics, including both natural and human-produced compounds to which there are exposure risks. The present work reviews the conceptual premises of endocrine disruption and the development of the use of this term.

  10. Minimally Disruptive Medicine for Patients with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Valentina; Spencer-Bonilla, Gabriela; Boehmer, Kasey R; Montori, Victor M

    2017-09-23

    Patients with diabetes must deal with the burden of symptoms and complications (burden of illness). Simultaneously, diabetes care demands practical and emotional work from patients and their families, work to access and use healthcare and to enact self-care (burden of treatment). Patient work must compete with the demands of family, job, and community life. Overwhelmed patients may not have the capacity to access care or enact self-care and will thus experience suboptimal diabetes outcomes. Minimally disruptive medicine (MDM) is a patient-centered approach to healthcare that prioritizes patients' goals for life and health while minimizing the healthcare disruption on patients' lives. In patients with diabetes, particularly in those with complex lives and multimorbidity, MDM coordinates healthcare and community responses to improve outcomes, reduce treatment burden, and enable patients to pursue their life's hopes and dreams.

  11. The hexagon hypothesis: Six disruptive scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtles, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to bring a simple but effective and comprehensive approach to the development, delivery and monitoring of business continuity solutions. To ensure that the arguments and principles apply across the board, the paper sticks to basic underlying concepts rather than sophisticated interpretations. First, the paper explores what exactly people are defending themselves against. Secondly, the paper looks at how defences should be set up. Disruptive events tend to unfold in phases, each of which invites a particular style of protection, ranging from risk management through to business continuity to insurance cover. Their impact upon any business operation will fall into one of six basic scenarios. The hexagon hypothesis suggests that everyone should be prepared to deal with each of these six disruptive scenarios and it provides them with a useful benchmark for business continuity.

  12. Rotavirus disrupts cytoplasmic P bodies during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Rahul; Mukherjee, Arpita; Patra, Upayan; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta

    2015-12-02

    Cytoplasmic Processing bodies (P bodies), the RNA-protein aggregation foci of translationally stalled and potentially decaying mRNA, have been reported to be differentially modulated by viruses. Rotavirus, the causative agent of acute infantile gastroenteritis is a double stranded RNA virus which completes its entire life-cycle exclusively in host cell cytoplasm. In this study, the fate of P bodies was investigated upon rotavirus infection. It was found that P bodies get disrupted during rotavirus infection. The disruption occurred by more than one different mechanism where deadenylating P body component Pan3 was degraded by rotavirus NSP1 and exonuclease XRN1 along with the decapping enzyme hDCP1a were relocalized from cytoplasm to nucleus. Overall the study highlights decay and subcellular relocalization of P body components as novel mechanisms by which rotavirus subverts cellular antiviral responses.

  13. Ultrasonic cavitation for disruption of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenly, Justin M; Tester, Jefferson W

    2015-05-01

    Challenges with mid-stream fractionation steps in proposed microalgae biofuel pathways arise from the typically dilute cell density in growth media, micron scale cell sizes, and often durable cell walls. For microalgae to be a sustainable source of biofuels and co-products, efficient fractionation by some method will be necessary. This study evaluates ultrasonic cell disruption as a processing step that fractionates microalgae. A range of species types with different sizes and cell wall compositions were treated. The initial seconds of sonication offered the most significant disruption, even for the more durable Nannochloropsis cells. Following this initial period, diminishing effectiveness was attributed, by acoustic measurements, to attenuation of the ultrasound in the ensuing cloud of cavitating bubbles. At longer exposure times, differences between species were more pronounced. Processing higher concentrations of Isochrysis slowed cell disintegration only marginally, making the expenditure of energy more worthwhile.

  14. The mass disruption of Jupiter Family comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Michael J. S.

    2015-01-01

    I show that the size-distribution of small scattered-disk trans-neptunian objects when derived from the observed size-distribution of Jupiter Family comets (JFCs) and other observational constraints implies that a large percentage (94-97%) of newly arrived active comets within a range of 0.2-15.4 km effective radius must physically disrupt, i.e., macroscopically disintegrate, within their median dynamical lifetime. Additional observational constraints include the numbers of dormant and active nuclei in the near-Earth object (NEO) population and the slope of their size distributions. I show that the cumulative power-law slope (-2.86 to -3.15) of the scattered-disk TNO hot population between 0.2 and 15.4 km effective radius is only weakly dependent on the size-dependence of the otherwise unknown disruption mechanism. Evidently, as JFC nuclei from the scattered disk evolve into the inner Solar System only a fraction achieve dormancy while the vast majority of small nuclei (e.g., primarily those with effective radius Morbidelli, A., Dones, L., Jedicke, R., Wiegert, P.A., Bottke Jr., W.F. [2002]. Science 296, 2212-2215) suggesting that all types of comet nuclei may have similar structural characteristics even though they may have different source regions and thermal histories. The typical disruption rate for a 1 km radius active nucleus is ∼5 × 10-5 disruptions/year and the dormancy rate is typically 3 times less. We also estimate that average fragmentation rates range from 0.01 to 0.04 events/year/comet, somewhat above the lower limit of 0.01 events/year/comet observed by Chen and Jewitt (Chen, J., Jewitt, D.C. [1994]. Icarus 108, 265-271).

  15. Five disruptive technology directions for 5G

    OpenAIRE

    Boccardi, Federico; W. Heath Jr., Robert; Lozano, Angel; L. Marzetta, Thomas; POPOVSKI, Petar

    2014-01-01

    New research directions will lead to fundamental changes in the design of future fifth generation (5G) cellular networks. This article describes five technologies that could lead to both architectural and component disruptive design changes: device-centric architectures, millimeter wave, massive MIMO, smarter devices, and native support for machine-to-machine communications. The key ideas for each technology are described, along with their potential impact on 5G and the research challenges th...

  16. Subtle sabotage: endocrine disruption in wild populations

    OpenAIRE

    Cheek, Ann Oliver

    2016-01-01

    How important is endocrine disruption as a threat to wildlife populations? This review applies causal criteria to existing studies of wild populations of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals to answer three questions: (1) Have endocrine-mediated effects of contaminant exposure been documented? (2) Have individual adverse effects that could lead to population effects been documented? (3) Have population level effects been documented? In fish, the possibility of population level effec...

  17. Five disruptive technology directions for 5G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccardi, Federico; W. Heath Jr., Robert; Lozano, Angel

    2014-01-01

    New research directions will lead to fundamental changes in the design of future fifth generation (5G) cellular networks. This article describes five technologies that could lead to both architectural and component disruptive design changes: device-centric architectures, millimeter wave, massive...... MIMO, smarter devices, and native support for machine-to-machine communications. The key ideas for each technology are described, along with their potential impact on 5G and the research challenges that remain....

  18. Identifying and engaging 'disengaged' and 'disruptive' students

    OpenAIRE

    Ted Cole

    2009-01-01

    This paper outlines concerns in the UK about young people who are disruptive in class and/or disengaged from the normal educational process. After discussing who these children are and estimating their numbers, the paper examines recent research on how best to meet their needs. This research indicates the appropriateness of the UK government's recent softening of its position on 'inclusion'. The studies cited indicate that far more can be done in 'normal' school settings to promote engagement...

  19. Policy development for disruptive student behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cynthia M; Farnsworth, Judy; Springer, Pamela J

    2008-01-01

    Nursing students who demonstrate disruptive and at-risk behaviors in the classroom and clinical arena compromise the learning environment and are unable to provide safe, quality client care. They require early and swift identification, consultation, sanctions, or possible referral into treatment to protect themselves and public safety. The authors describe the evolution of a comprehensive policy for faculty intervention with at-risk students and provide an exemplar of a situation illustrating the use of the policy.

  20. Disruptive technologies and networking in telecom industries

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Erik Strøjer; Hartington, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This article discuss’ how economics of scale in supply and demand in the telecommunication industry has developed and how this has had great effect on the widespread usage and popularity of smart phones. By using this as a theoretical ground the paper looks into technical innovation in the telecommunication industry and finds significant similarities between the industry development and the literature on disruptive technology, which finds that incumbent companies are not able to react in a su...

  1. Modeling Loss Amplification After Devastating Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissonnade, A. C.; Muir Wood, R.

    2008-05-01

    With the catastrophic events that occurred in 2004 and 2005 came the realization that Catastrophic (Cat) loss models were not properly modeling insured losses and their associated uncertainty. One reason was that major catastrophes were generally characterized by losses caused by the primary initiating events. Such approaches are not adequate when losses can result from the compounded impacts of scenarios of secondary cascading events (physical, economic, social and political) that can have much larger impacts than those due to the primary events themselves. Situations where more and more cascading events can occur will result in different outcomes, some leading to extreme loss events, generally referred as Super Cats. These situations occurred in December 2004 with the Sumatra earthquake and tsunami and in August 2005 with hurricane Katrina and resulting New Orleans flooding. A review of historical events shows that these events are not exceptions. Modeling such scenarios adds new levels of complexity and different perspectives in the understanding of characterizing and assessing impacts of catastrophic events. Modeling economic consequences of extreme events can be improved by developing scenarios of cascades of secondary events triggered by the primary event(s). The likelihood of each scenario should be modeled, along with the hazards of primary and secondary events and resulting losses with their impacts to the different stakeholders. In addition, it is also important to model the impacts of the hazards on the infrastructure and the resulting disruption to the residents and the local economy because these can result in additional losses. This paper describes current work with the goals of better modeling the full economic impacts from catastrophic events, and of a more comprehensive treatment of uncertainty. We will present approaches for modeling loss amplification that account for all the ways in which the cost incurred for a certain level of damage due to a

  2. Loss of estrogen-related receptor alpha disrupts ventral-striatal synaptic function in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesús-Cortés, Héctor; Lu, Yuan; Anderson, Rachel M; Khan, Michael Z; Nath, Varun; McDaniel, Latisha; Lutter, Michael; Radley, Jason J; Pieper, Andrew A; Cui, Huxing

    2016-08-01

    Eating disorders (EDs), including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-ED, are mental illnesses characterized by high morbidity and mortality. While several studies have identified neural deficits in patients with EDs, the cellular and molecular basis of the underlying dysfunction has remained poorly understood. We previously identified a rare missense mutation in the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRA) associated with development of EDs. Because ventral-striatal signaling is related to the reward and motivation circuitry thought to underlie EDs, we performed functional and structural analysis of ventral-striatal synapses in Esrra-null mice. Esrra-null female, but not male, mice exhibit altered miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the ventral striatum, including increased frequency, increased amplitude, and decreased paired pulse ratio. These electrophysiological measures are associated with structural and molecular changes in synapses of MSNs in the ventral striatum, including fewer pre-synaptic glutamatergic vesicles and enhanced GluR1 function. Neuronal Esrra is thus required for maintaining normal synaptic function in the ventral striatum, which may offer mechanistic insights into the behavioral deficits observed in Esrra-null mice.

  3. Airline Schedule Disruption Management. The impact of flight delays on connection loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahil Hicham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Air travel demand is important and many travellers choose to drive to larger airports instead of flying from a small airport for many reasons, especially availability of non-stop flights. Another reason is perceived reliability of service. Consultants have pointed to a large number of delays and cancellations as reasons for low passenger. However, the effect of these flight delays on actual travel times is less clear. Because connections are usually necessary when traveling from small airports, departure delays may lead to missed connections. In the case of a cancellation, need to wait several hours (often overnight for the next flight due to the small number of daily departures. This paper evaluate the impact of delays and cancellations on the profit earned through the seats captured on new opened routes. This aspect of decision-making comes in the form of multi-objective problem by testing the impact of a new opened route in terms of flight delays costs, financial gain and the quality of the service provided to a target customer. The NSGA-II algorithm is adopted to generate a front of Pareto-optimal compound of a number of optimal departure times to the new destination while ensuring the best fill rate, and a minimum flight delays. The experiences are based on the flights of the Royal Air Maroc Company on the Casablanca hub.

  4. Sleep loss and circadian disruption in shift work: health burden and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Howard, Mark E; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2013-10-21

    About 1.5 million Australians are shift workers. Shift work is associated with adverse health, safety and performance outcomes. Circadian rhythm misalignment, inadequate and poor-quality sleep, and sleep disorders such as sleep apnoea, insomnia and shift work disorder (excessive sleepiness and/or insomnia temporally associated with the work schedule) contribute to these associations. Falling asleep at work at least once a week occurs in 32%-36% of shift workers. Risk of occupational accidents is at least 60% higher for non-day shift workers. Shift workers also have higher rates of cardiometabolic diseases and mood disturbances. Road and workplace accidents related to excessive sleepiness, to which shift work is a significant contributor, are estimated to cost $71-$93 billion per annum in the United States. There is growing evidence that understanding the interindividual variability in sleep-wake responses to shift work will help detect and manage workers vulnerable to the health consequences of shift work. A range of approaches can be used to enhance alertness in shift workers, including screening and treating sleep disorders, melatonin treatment to promote sleep during the daytime, and avoidance of inappropriate use of sedatives and wakefulness-promoters such as modafinil and caffeine. Short naps, which minimise sleep inertia, are generally effective. Shifting the circadian pacemaker with appropriately timed melatonin and/or bright light may be used to facilitate adjustment to a shift work schedule in some situations, such as a long sequence of night work. It is important to manage the health risk of shift workers by minimising vascular risk factors through dietary and other lifestyle approaches.

  5. Geminin loss causes neural tube defects through disrupted progenitor specification and neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ethan S; Waller, Laura E; Kroll, Kristen L

    2014-09-01

    Geminin is a nucleoprotein that can directly bind chromatin regulatory complexes to modulate gene expression during development. Geminin knockout mouse embryos are preimplantation lethal by the 32-cell stage, precluding in vivo study of Geminin's role in neural development. Therefore, here we used a conditional Geminin allele in combination with several Cre-driver lines to define an essential role for Geminin during mammalian neural tube (NT) formation and patterning. Geminin was required in the NT within a critical developmental time window (embryonic day 8.5-10.5), when NT patterning and closure occurs. Geminin excision at these stages resulted in strongly diminished expression of genes that mark and promote dorsal NT identities and decreased differentiation of ventral motor neurons, resulting in completely penetrant NT defects, while excision after embryonic day 10.5 did not result in NT defects. When Geminin was deleted specifically in the spinal NT, both NT defects and axial skeleton defects were observed, but neither defect occurred when Geminin was excised in paraxial mesenchyme, indicating a tissue autonomous requirement for Geminin in developing neuroectoderm. Despite a potential role for Geminin in cell cycle control, we found no evidence of proliferation defects or altered apoptosis. Comparisons of gene expression in the NT of Geminin mutant versus wild-type siblings at embryonic day 10.5 revealed decreased expression of key regulators of neurogenesis, including neurogenic bHLH transcription factors and dorsal interneuron progenitor markers. Together, these data demonstrate a requirement for Geminin for NT patterning and neuronal differentiation during mammalian neurulation in vivo.

  6. Influence of Dynamic Capabilities in Creating Disruptive Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Čiutienė, R; Thattakath, E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the influence of Dynamic Capabilities in creating Disruptive Innovation. For doing so the concepts of Dynamic Capabilities and Disruptive Innovation are reviewed. The criteria of an innovation named Disruptive Innovation are obtained by comparative study between the various innovation types. To demonstrate the role of Dynamic Capabilities in creating Disruptive Innovation, the Innovation Lifecycle is demonstrated with respect to Dynamic Capabilities. Th...

  7. A case for change: disruption in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Marc J; Maurer, Ralph; Wartman, Steven A; Sachs, Benjamin P

    2014-09-01

    Disruptive technologies allow less expensive and more efficient processes to eventually dominate a market sector. The academic health center's tripartite mission of education, clinical care, and research is threatened by decreasing revenues and increasing expenses and is, as a result, ripe for disruption. The authors describe current disruptive technologies that threaten traditional operations at academic health centers and provide a prescription not only to survive, but also to prosper, in the face of disruptive forces.

  8. A science of loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jon; Tschakert, Petra; Head, Lesley; Adger, W. Neil

    2016-11-01

    Avoiding losses from climate change requires socially engaged research that explains what people value highly, how climate change imperils these phenomena, and strategies for embracing and managing grief.

  9. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  10. Risk Evaluation of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gioiosa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We review here our studies on early exposure to low doses of the estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA on behavior and metabolism in CD-1 mice. Mice were exposed in utero from gestation day (GD 11 to delivery (prenatal exposure or via maternal milk from birth to postnatal day 7 (postnatal exposure to 10 µg/kg body weight/d of BPA or no BPA (controls. Bisphenol A exposure resulted in long-term disruption of sexually dimorphic behaviors. Females exposed to BPA pre- and postnatally showed increased anxiety and behavioral profiles similar to control males. We also evaluated metabolic effects in prenatally exposed adult male offspring of dams fed (from GD 9 to 18 with BPA at doses ranging from 5 to 50 000 µg/kg/d. The males showed an age-related significant change in a number of metabolic indexes ranging from food intake to glucose regulation at BPA doses below the no observed adverse effect level (5000 µg/kg/d. Consistent with prior findings, low but not high BPA doses produced significant effects for many outcomes. These findings provide further evidence of the potential risks that developmental exposure to low doses of the endocrine disrupter BPA may pose to human health, with fetuses and infants being highly vulnerable.

  11. Disruptive Innovation Can Prevent the Next Pandemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affan eShaikh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Public health surveillance (PHS is at a tipping point, where the application of novel processes, technologies, and tools promise to vastly improve efficiency and effectiveness. Yet 20th-century, entrenched ideology and lack of training results in slow uptake and resistance to change. The term disruptive innovation – used to describe advances in technology and processes that change existing markets, is useful to describe the transformation of PHS. Past disruptive innovations used in PHS, such as distance learning, the smart phone, and field-based laboratory testing have outpaced older services, practices, and technologies used in the traditional classroom, governmental offices, and personal communication, respectively. Arguably, the greatest of these is the Internet – an infrastructural innovation that continues to enable exponential benefits in seemingly limitless ways. Considering the Global Health Security Agenda and facing emerging and reemerging infectious disease threats, evolving environmental and behavioral risks, and ever changing epidemiologic trends, PHS must transform. Embracing disruptive innovation in the structures and processes of PHS can be unpredictable. However it is necessary to strengthen and unlock the potential to prevent, detect, and respond.

  12. Prenatal Testosterone and Preschool Disruptive Behavior Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Bethan A; Martel, Michelle M

    2013-11-01

    Disruptive Behaviors Disorders (DBD), including Oppositional-Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), are fairly common and highly impairing childhood behavior disorders that can be diagnosed as early as preschool. Prenatal exposure to testosterone may be particularly relevant to these early-emerging DBDs that exhibit a sex-biased prevalence rate favoring males. The current study examined associations between preschool DBD symptom domains and prenatal exposure to testosterone measured indirectly via right 2D:4D finger-length ratios. The study sample consisted of 109 preschool-age children between ages 3 and 6 (64% males;72% with DBD) and their primary caregivers. Primary caregivers completed a semi-structured interview (i.e., Kiddie Disruptive Behavior Disorder Schedule), as well as symptom questionnaires (i.e., Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale, Peer Conflict Scale); teachers and/or daycare providers completed symptom questionnaires and children provided measures of prenatal testosterone exposure, measured indirectly via finger-length ratios (i.e., right 2D:4D). Study results indicated a significant association of high prenatal testosterone (i.e., smaller right 2D:4D) with high hyperactive-impulsive ADHD symptoms in girls but not boys, suggesting that the effect may be driven by, or might only exist in, girls. The present study suggests that prenatal exposure to testosterone may increase risk for early ADHD, particularly hyperactivity-impulsivity, in preschool girls.

  13. The impact of disruptive innovations in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Erik; Bozic, Kevin J

    2009-10-01

    The US healthcare system is currently facing daunting demographic and economic challenges. Because musculoskeletal disorders and disease represent a substantial and growing portion of this healthcare burden, novel approaches will be needed to continue to provide high-quality, affordable, and accessible orthopaedic care to our population. The concept of "disruptive innovations," which has been studied and popularized by Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen, may offer a potential framework for developing strategies to improve quality and control costs associated with musculoskeletal care. The introduction of mobile fluoroscopic imaging systems, the development of the Surgical Implant Generation Network intramedullary nail for treatment of long bone fractures in the developing world, the expanding role and contributions of physician assistants and nurse practitioners to the orthopaedic team, and the rise of ambulatory surgery centers are all examples of disruptive innovations in the field of orthopaedics. Although numerous cultural and regulatory barriers have limited the widespread adoption of these "disruptive innovations," we believe they represent an opportunity for clinicians to regain leadership in health care while at the same time improving quality and access to care for patients with musculoskeletal disease.

  14. Circadian dysregulation disrupts bile acid homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bile acids are potentially toxic compounds and their levels of hepatic production, uptake and export are tightly regulated by many inputs, including circadian rhythm. We tested the impact of disrupting the peripheral circadian clock on integral steps of bile acid homeostasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both restricted feeding, which phase shifts peripheral clocks, and genetic ablation in Per1(-/-/Per2(-/- (PERDKO mice disrupted normal bile acid control and resulted in hepatic cholestasis. Restricted feeding caused a dramatic, transient elevation in hepatic bile acid levels that was associated with activation of the xenobiotic receptors CAR and PXR and elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, indicative of liver damage. In the PERDKO mice, serum bile acid levels were elevated and the circadian expression of key bile acid synthesis and transport genes, including Cyp7A1 and NTCP, was lost. This was associated with blunted expression of a primary clock output, the transcription factor DBP, which transactivates the promoters of both genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that disruption of the circadian clock results in dysregulation of bile acid homeostasis that mimics cholestatic disease.

  15. Disruptive Innovation Can Prevent the Next Pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Affan T; Ferland, Lisa; Hood-Cree, Robert; Shaffer, Loren; McNabb, Scott J N

    2015-01-01

    Public health surveillance (PHS) is at a tipping point, where the application of novel processes, technologies, and tools promise to vastly improve efficiency and effectiveness. Yet twentieth century, entrenched ideology and lack of training results in slow uptake and resistance to change. The term disruptive innovation - used to describe advances in technology and processes that change existing markets - is useful to describe the transformation of PHS. Past disruptive innovations used in PHS, such as distance learning, the smart phone, and field-based laboratory testing have outpaced older services, practices, and technologies used in the traditional classroom, governmental offices, and personal communication, respectively. Arguably, the greatest of these is the Internet - an infrastructural innovation that continues to enable exponential benefits in seemingly limitless ways. Considering the Global Health Security Agenda and facing emerging and reemerging infectious disease threats, evolving environmental and behavioral risks, and ever changing epidemiologic trends, PHS must transform. Embracing disruptive innovation in the structures and processes of PHS can be unpredictable. However, it is necessary to strengthen and unlock the potential to prevent, detect, and respond.

  16. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Moosa Faniband; Lindh, Christian H; Bo AG Jönsson

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and o...

  17. Disruptive Behaviour of Students in Primary Education and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esturgo-Deu, M. Estrella; Sala-Roca, Josefina

    2010-01-01

    This study analyses the relation between disruptive behaviours and the emotional abilities of children in primary education. To do this, disruptive behaviour and emotional abilities were evaluated in 1422 pupils aged between 6 and 12 years of age at 11 education centres using EQIjv. No relation was found between disruptive behaviours and age, but…

  18. A CIT Investigation of Disruptive Faculty Behaviors: The Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, K. Douglas; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent focus on disruptive student behaviors in the classroom, little attention has been given to disruptive faculty behaviors. Utilizing theoretical concepts developed in the services-marketing literature, this study empirically explores student perceptions of disruptive faculty behaviors in the classroom. More specifically, this…

  19. Computation of loss allocation in electric power networks using loss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computation of loss allocation in electric power networks using loss vector. ... The losses to be allocated are derived from load flow of a specified power network and operating conditions. Loss vectors associated with demand ... Article Metrics.

  20. Energy losses in switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, T.H.; Seamen, J.F.; Jobe, D.O.

    1993-07-01

    The authors experiments show energy losses between 2 and 10 times that of the resistive time predictions. The experiments used hydrogen, helium, air, nitrogen, SF{sub 6} polyethylene, and water for the switching dielectric. Previously underestimated switch losses have caused over predicting the accelerator outputs. Accurate estimation of these losses is now necessary for new high-efficiency pulsed power devices where the switching losses constitute the major portion of the total energy loss. They found that the switch energy losses scale as (V{sub peak}I{sub peak}){sup 1.1846}. When using this scaling, the energy losses in any of the tested dielectrics are almost the same. This relationship is valid for several orders of magnitude and suggested a theoretical basis for these results. Currents up to .65 MA, with voltages to 3 MV were applied to various gaps during these experiments. The authors data and the developed theory indicates that the switch power loss continues for a much longer time than the resistive time, with peak power loss generally occurring at peak current in a ranging discharge instead of the early current time. All of the experiments were circuit code modeled after developing a new switch loss version based on the theory. The circuit code predicts switch energy loss and peak currents as a function of time. During analysis of the data they noticed slight constant offsets between the theory and data that depended on the dielectric. They modified the plasma conductivity for each tested dielectric to lessen this offset.

  1. Analyzing the concept of disruptive behavior in healthcare work: an integrative review*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Meneses Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze the concept of disruptive behavior in healthcare work. METHOD An integrative review carried out in the theoretical phase of a qualitative research substantiated by the theoretical framework of the Hybrid Model of Concept Development. The search for articles was conducted in the CINAHL, LILACS, PsycINFO, PubMed and SciVerse Scopus databases in 2013. RESULTS 70 scientific articles answered the guiding question and lead to attributes of disruptive behavior, being: incivility, psychological violence and physical/sexual violence; with their main antecedents (intrapersonal, interpersonal and organizational being: personality characteristics, stress and work overload; and consequences of: workers' moral/mental distress, compromised patient safety, labor loss, and disruption of communication, collaboration and teamwork. CONCLUSION Analysis of the disruptive behavior concept in healthcare work showed a construct in its theoretical stage that encompasses different disrespectful conduct adopted by health workers in the hospital context, which deserve the attention of leadership for better recognition and proper handling of cases and their consequences.

  2. Supermassive Black Holes in Galactic Nuclei with Tidal Disruption of Stars: Paper II - Axisymmetric Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Shiyan; Spurzem, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Tidal Disruption of stars by supermassive central black holes from dense rotating star clusters is modelled by high-accuracy direct N-body simulation. As in a previous paper on spherical star clusters we study the time evolution of the stellar tidal disruption rate and the origin of tidally disrupted stars, now according to several classes of orbits which only occur in axisymmetric systems (short axis tube and saucer). Compared with that in spherical systems, we found a higher TD rate in axisymmetric systems. The enhancement can be explained by an enlarged loss-cone in phase space which is raised from the fact that total angular momentum $\\bf J$ is not conserved. As in the case of spherical systems, the distribution of the last apocenter distance of tidally accreted stars peaks at the classical critical radius. However, the angular distribution of the origin of the accreted stars reveals interesting features. Inside the influence radius of the supermassive black hole the angular distribution of disrupted star...

  3. Strategy decision of business interruption insurance and emergency supply strategy based on supply disruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjun Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recent years have witness the pervasive supply disruptions and their impacts on supply chain performance. It is significant for enterprises to adopt comprehensive measures to cope with supply disruptions. The purpose of this study is to investigate how BI insurance make up the shortage of emergency supply and affect the expected profit of enterprises. Design/methodology: This study develops the penalty cost function on the basic of the financial costs caused by the interruption losses, introduces variables of BI insurance and operational measures, establishes the profit model with BI insurance or not. Findings: Through the proof and analysis, it is demonstrated that BI insurance can mitigate the adverse effect of the increasing cost for expected profit. And this study finds that the value of BI insurance is higher when interruption probability is lower and penalty coefficient is higher. Originality/value: In this study, it is investigated that the impact of business interruption (BI insurance on supply disruptions and its complementary value against the higher purchase cost of emergency sourcing strategy. BI insurance is an efficient measure for supply interruption and should be adopted correctly to play a role in managing supply disruption risk.

  4. Breast cancer diagnosis: biographical disruption, emotional experiences and strategic management in Thai women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Suwankhong, Dusanee

    2015-09-01

    In this article we draw on Bury's theory of biographical disruption to discuss the meanings of, and emotional experiences related to, being diagnosed with breast cancer among southern Thai women. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviewing and drawing methods, were used to collect data from 20 women with breast cancer. The women perceived breast cancer to be a rhok raai; an evil or dread disease. They believed that breast cancer would lead to death. The disruption in their biography occurred when they detected abnormalities indicating breast cancer. The women's narratives revealed their chaotic lives upon this diagnosis and the news precipitated in them shock, fear, anxiety and loss of hope. Although they experienced chaos and disruption, the women cultivated strategies that helped them cope with their experiences by accepting their fate and adhering to Buddhist beliefs and practices. Through their narratives of biographical disruption, the women in our study offer healthcare providers knowledge that could lead to an appreciation of their needs and concerns. This knowledge is crucial for health professionals who wish to provide emotional support to women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer in Thailand and elsewhere. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  5. High efficiency TALENs enable F0 functional analysis by targeted gene disruption in Xenopus laevis embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi T. Suzuki

    2013-03-01

    Recently, gene editing with transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs has been used in the life sciences. TALENs can be easily customized to recognize a specific DNA sequence and efficiently introduce double-strand breaks at the targeted genomic locus. Subsequent non-homologous end-joining repair leads to targeted gene disruption by base insertion, deletion, or both. Here, to readily evaluate the efficacy of TALENs in Xenopus laevis embryos, we performed the targeted gene disruption of tyrosinase (tyr and pax6 genes that are involved in pigmentation and eye formation, respectively. We constructed TALENs targeting tyr and pax6 and injected their mRNAs into fertilized eggs at the one-cell stage. Expectedly, introduction of tyr TALEN mRNA resulted in drastic loss of pigmentation with high efficiency. Similarly, for pax6, TALENs led to deformed eyes in the injected embryos. We confirmed mutations of the target alleles by restriction enzyme digestion and sequence analyses of genomic PCR products. Surprisingly, not only biallelic but also paralogous, gene disruption was observed. Our results demonstrate that targeted gene disruption by TALENs provides a method comparable to antisense morpholinos in analyzing gene function in Xenopus F0 embryos, but also applies beyond embryogenesis to any life stage.

  6. Genetic and Environmental Models of Circadian Disruption Link SRC-2 Function to Hepatic Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, Tiffany; Stashi, Erin; Zhu, Bokai; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Kettner, Nicole M; Gorman, Blythe K; Coarfa, Cristian; Fu, Loning; O'Malley, Bert W; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Circadian rhythmicity is a fundamental process that synchronizes behavioral cues with metabolic homeostasis. Disruption of daily cycles due to jet lag or shift work results in severe physiological consequences including advanced aging, metabolic syndrome, and even cancer. Our understanding of the molecular clock, which is regulated by intricate positive feedforward and negative feedback loops, has expanded to include an important metabolic transcriptional coregulator, Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 (SRC-2), that regulates both the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral clocks including the liver. We hypothesized that an environmental uncoupling of the light-dark phases, termed chronic circadian disruption (CCD), would lead to pathology similar to the genetic circadian disruption observed with loss of SRC-2 We found that CCD and ablation of SRC-2 in mice led to a common comorbidity of metabolic syndrome also found in humans with circadian disruption, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The combination of SRC-2(-/-) and CCD results in a more robust phenotype that correlates with human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gene signatures. Either CCD or SRC-2 ablation produces an advanced aging phenotype leading to increased mortality consistent with other circadian mutant mouse models. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that SRC-2 provides an essential link between the behavioral activities influenced by light cues and the metabolic homeostasis maintained by the liver.

  7. Developmental Defects in a Zebrafish Model for Muscular Dystrophies Associated with the Loss of Fukutin-Related Protein (FKRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, Paul; Bassett, David; Lochmuller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2008-01-01

    A number of muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of [alpha]-dystroglycan and many are now known to result from mutations in a number of genes encoding putative or known glycosyltransferases. These diseases include severe forms of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) such as Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy…

  8. Developmental Defects in a Zebrafish Model for Muscular Dystrophies Associated with the Loss of Fukutin-Related Protein (FKRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, Paul; Bassett, David; Lochmuller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2008-01-01

    A number of muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of [alpha]-dystroglycan and many are now known to result from mutations in a number of genes encoding putative or known glycosyltransferases. These diseases include severe forms of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) such as Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy…

  9. Hearing Loss in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing loss can affect a child’s ability to develop communication, language, and social skills. The earlier children with hearing loss start getting services, the more likely they are ...

  10. Loss muinasjuturaamatust / Agu Veetamm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Veetamm, Agu, 1953-

    2004-01-01

    Ballindaloch on üks väheseid Shoti losse, kus omanikud aastaringselt elavad. 450 aastat on loss kuulunud Macpherson-Grantide suguvõsale. Praegu on lossi omanikuks Clare Nancy Macpherson-Grant Russell, kelle kujundatud on kiviktaimla ja rosaarium. Lossi ajaloost, omanikest, ümberehitustest, ringkäigust lossis, pargist. 14 ill

  11. Understanding Rural Population Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranahan, David A.; Beale, Calvin L.

    2002-01-01

    A quarter of nonmetro counties lost population in the 1990s, but population loss was not related to poverty rate or low educational levels, perhaps because low-skill workers can no longer expect better wages in urban areas. Population loss was related to low population density and remoteness (which decrease access to services), lack of natural…

  12. Loss Tolerant Optical Qubits

    CERN Document Server

    Ralph, T C; Gilchrist, A; Gilchrist, Alexei

    2005-01-01

    We present a linear optics quantum computation scheme that employs a new encoding approach that incrementally adds qubits and is tolerant to photon loss errors. The scheme employs a circuit model but uses techniques from cluster state computation and achieves comparable resource usage. To illustrate our techniques we describe a quantum memory which is fault tolerant to photon loss.

  13. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  14. Managing Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you can get help. See your doctor. Hearing aids, special training, certain medicines, and surgery are some of the choices that can help people with hearing problems, but they are not a cure. Read More "Hearing Loss" Articles Managing Hearing Loss / Symptoms, Devices, Prevention & Research / Screening ...

  15. Hearing loss and music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise induced hearing loss - music; Sensory hearing loss - music ... turn up the volume to block out other noise. If you wear headphones, the volume is too loud if a person standing near you can hear the music through your headphones. Other tips about headphones are: ...

  16. Non pecuniary losses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.D. Lindenbergh (Siewert); P.M. Kippersluis (Peter)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractNon pecuniary losses can be characterized as losses that are suffered by damaging goods or interests which have in themselves no economic price or value on a financial market. Examples are damage to goods with a primarily sentimental value, such as an album of wedding photos, pain and

  17. Help! It's Hair Loss!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Help! It's Hair Loss! KidsHealth > For Kids > Help! It's Hair Loss! Print A A A What's in ... part above the skin, is dead. (That's why it doesn't hurt to get a haircut!) This ...

  18. Loss muinasjuturaamatust / Agu Veetamm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Veetamm, Agu, 1953-

    2004-01-01

    Ballindaloch on üks väheseid Shoti losse, kus omanikud aastaringselt elavad. 450 aastat on loss kuulunud Macpherson-Grantide suguvõsale. Praegu on lossi omanikuks Clare Nancy Macpherson-Grant Russell, kelle kujundatud on kiviktaimla ja rosaarium. Lossi ajaloost, omanikest, ümberehitustest, ringkäigust lossis, pargist. 14 ill

  19. Disruptive coloration in woodland camouflage: evaluation of camouflage effectiveness due to minor disruptive patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selj, Gorm K.; Heinrich, Daniela H.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from an observer based photosimulation study of generic camouflage patterns, intended for military uniforms, where three near-identical patterns have been compared. All the patterns were prepared with similar effective color, but were different in how the individual pattern patches were distributed throughout the target. We did this in order to test if high contrast (black) patches along the outline of the target would enhance the survivability when exposed to human observers. In the recent years it has been shown that disruptive coloration in the form of high contrast patches are capable of disturbing an observer by creating false edges of the target and consequently enhance target survivability. This effect has been shown in different forms in the Animal Kingdom, but not to the same extent in camouflaged military targets. The three patterns in this study were i) with no disruptive preference, ii) with a disruptive patch along the outline of the head and iii) with a disruptive patch on the outline of one of the shoulders. We used a high number of human observers to assess the three targets in 16 natural (woodland) backgrounds by showing images of one of the targets at the time on a high definition pc screen. We found that the two patterns that were thought to have a minor disruptive preference to the remaining pattern were more difficult to detect in some (though not all) of the 16 scenes and were also better in overall performance when all the scenes were accounted for.

  20. Acute loss of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness.

  1. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, G

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most dominant handicaps in modern societies, which additionally very often is not realized or not admitted. About one quarter of the general population suffers from inner ear hearing loss and is therefore restricted in communicational skills. Demographic factors like increasing age play an important role as well as environmental influences and an increasing sound and noise exposure especially in leisure activities. Thus borders between a "classical" presbyacusis - if it ever existed - and envirionmentally induced hearing loss disappear. Today restrictions in hearing ability develop earlier in age but at the same time they are detected and diagnosed earlier. This paper can eventually enlighten the wide field of inner ear hearing loss only fragmentarily; therefore mainly new research, findings and developments are reviewed. The first part discusses new aspects of diagnostics of inner ear hearing loss and different etiologies.

  2. Integumentary loss of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J Y; Margen, S; Calloway, D H; Costa, F M

    1979-08-01

    Integumentary calcium loss was studied in 16 healthy young men. The daily loss by the 16 ambulatory but relatively sedentary young men in 52 determinations of 6-day periods each was 8.7 +/- 1.9 mg/m2 per day (average 15.8 mg/man per day). The amount lost was not influenced by calcium intake (0.1 to 2.3 g/day). In contrast to urinary calcium excretion, which is directly related to protein intake, there was no significant change in integumentary calcium loss with varying protein intakes (1 to 96 g nitrogen per day). No compensatory relationship between urinary and integumentary calcium excretion was noted. During strenuous exercise calcium loss increased to an average of 25 mg in 40 min. There was no compensatory decrease in urinary excretion on the day of strenuous exercise. It was also noted that integumentary calcium loss was not affected by general calcium balance.

  3. PRL-3 disrupts epithelial architecture by altering the post-mitotic midbody position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, Pablo; Varsano, Giulia; Rubio, Teresa; Hennrich, Marco L; Sachsenheimer, Timo; Gálvez-Santisteban, Manuel; Martín-Belmonte, Fernando; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Brügger, Britta; Köhn, Maja

    2016-11-01

    Disruption of epithelial architecture is a fundamental event during epithelial tumorigenesis. We show that the expression of the cancer-promoting phosphatase PRL-3 (PTP4A3), which is overexpressed in several epithelial cancers, in polarized epithelial MDCK and Caco2 cells leads to invasion and the formation of multiple ectopic, fully polarized lumens in cysts. Both processes disrupt epithelial architecture and are hallmarks of cancer. The pathological relevance of these findings is supported by the knockdown of endogenous PRL-3 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells grown in three-dimensional branched structures, showing the rescue from multiple-lumen- to single-lumen-containing branch ends. Mechanistically, it has been previously shown that ectopic lumens can arise from midbodies that have been mislocalized through the loss of mitotic spindle orientation or through the loss of asymmetric abscission. Here, we show that PRL-3 triggers ectopic lumen formation through midbody mispositioning without altering the spindle orientation or asymmetric abscission, instead, PRL-3 accelerates cytokinesis, suggesting that this process is an alternative new mechanism for ectopic lumen formation in MDCK cysts. The disruption of epithelial architecture by PRL-3 revealed here is a newly recognized mechanism for PRL-3-promoted cancer progression.

  4. A New Criterion for Disruption Prediction on HL-2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Qing-Wei; JI Xiao-Quan; DING Xuan-Tong; HL-2A team; ZHOU Hang-Yu; FENG Bei-Bin; LIU Yi; PAN Yu-Dong; LI Wei; DUAN Xu-Ru; CHEN Wei; CUI Zheng-Ying

    2006-01-01

    @@ A new criterion has been proposed to predict the major disruptions caused by tearing mode instabilities. According to the HL-2A experimental results, the statistical analyses are employed to investigate the relationships between MHD activities and the plasma disruptions. Two kinds of the tearing mode activities can finally cause the disruption on HL-2A operations. By introducing a new parameter, i.e. an integral of poloidal magnetic field over time, as the criterion of disruption precursor, almost all of the disruptions can be predicted.

  5. An organizational assessment of disruptive clinician behavior: findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walrath, Jo M; Dang, Deborah; Nyberg, Dorothy

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated registered nurses' (RNs) and physicians' (MD) experiences with disruptive behavior, triggers, responses, and impacts on clinicians, patients, and the organization. Using the Disruptive Clinician Behavior Survey for Hospital Settings, it was found that RNs experienced a significantly higher frequency of disruptive behaviors and triggers than MDs; MDs (45% of 295) and RNs (37% of 689) reported that their peer's disruptive behavior affected them most negatively. The most frequently occurring trigger was pressure from high census, volume, and patient flow; 189 incidences of harm to patients as a result of disruptive behavior were reported. Findings provide organizational leaders with evidence to customize interventions to strengthen the culture of safety.

  6. Biological efficacy evaluation of mating disruption against the grape berry moth, Lobesia botrana, in grape in glasshouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, T; Bangels, E; Beliën, T

    2013-01-01

    The grape berry moth, Lobesia botrana, is an important pest of grapes. In Belgium, severe losses of production appeared due to the presence of L. botrona in grapes commercially grown in glasshouses. In 2010 mating disruption became a key pest management tactic in Flemish pip fruit orchards after being tested for several years. In other (European) countries, mating disruption is already applied in grapes but there is no registration in Belgium for use in grapes. Searching for an interesting residue free technique for application in small glasshouses, we evaluated the effect of mating disruption for control of L. botrana under protected conditions (glasshouse trials) during three consecutive years (2010-2012). A prerequisite for successful mating disruption is the treatment of large contiguous areas, as the pheromone product will not remain in sufficient quantities on narrow sites and, moreover, a larger portion of the crop remains at risk from migrating mated females. The glasshouses are rather small, however, we hypothesized that these so called border effects are not present due to the secluded spaces of the glasshouses. Pheromone dispensers were deployed and flights of L botrano moths were monitored (pheromone traps/UV-traps) during the whole time period of the trials. In the mating disrupted glasshouses hardly any moth was caught anymore in pheromone traps, in contrast to UV-traps or catches by pheromone traps in comparable non-mating disrupted glasshouse compartments. This indicates the incapability of the males to localize sex pheromone sources, and hence, the inability of finding females for mating. In line with these flight monitoring data, the nearly absence or strongly decreased L. botrana caused damage symptoms in the mating disrupted glasshouses demonstrates the benefits of the mating disruption technique under protected conditions of grape growing in glasshouses.

  7. Application of the Disruption Predictor Feature Developer to developing a machine-portable disruption predictor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Matthew; Tang, William; Feibush, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    Plasma disruptions pose a major threat to the operation of tokamaks which confine a large amount of stored energy. In order to effectively mitigate this damage it is necessary to predict an oncoming disruption with sufficient warning time to take mitigative action. Machine learning approaches to this problem have shown promise but require further developments to address (1) the need for machine-portable predictors and (2) the availability of multi-dimensional signal inputs. Here we demonstrate progress in these two areas by applying the Disruption Predictor Feature Developer to data from JET and NSTX, and discuss topics of focus for ongoing work in support of ITER. The author is also supported under the Fulbright U.S. Student Program as a graduate student in the department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  8. Tidal disruption events from supermassive black hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Eric R; Nixon, Chris; Begelman, Mitchell C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the pre-disruption gravitational dynamics and post-disruption hydrodynamics of the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. We focus on binaries with relatively low mass primaries ($10^6M_{\\odot}$), moderate mass ratios, and separations with reasonably long gravitational wave inspiral times (tens of Myr). First, we generate a large ensemble (between 1 and 10 million) of restricted three-body integrations to quantify the statistical properties of tidal disruptions by circular SMBH binaries of initially-unbound stars. Compared to the reference case of a disruption by a single SMBH, the binary potential induces significant variance into the specific energy and angular momentum of the star at the point of disruption. Second, we use Newtonian numerical hydrodynamics to study the detailed evolution of the fallback debris from 120 disruptions randomly selected from the three-body ensemble (excluding only the most deeply penetrating encounters). We find that the overall mor...

  9. Multiple mechanisms disrupt the let-7 microRNA family in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, John T; Tsanov, Kaloyan M; Pearson, Daniel S; Roels, Frederik; Spina, Catherine S; Ebright, Richard; Seligson, Marc; de Soysa, Yvanka; Cahan, Patrick; Theißen, Jessica; Tu, Ho-Chou; Han, Areum; Kurek, Kyle C; LaPier, Grace S; Osborne, Jihan K; Ross, Samantha J; Cesana, Marcella; Collins, James J; Berthold, Frank; Daley, George Q

    2016-07-06

    Poor prognosis in neuroblastoma is associated with genetic amplification of MYCN. MYCN is itself a target of let-7, a tumour suppressor family of microRNAs implicated in numerous cancers. LIN28B, an inhibitor of let-7 biogenesis, is overexpressed in neuroblastoma and has been reported to regulate MYCN. Here we show, however, that LIN28B is dispensable in MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell lines, despite de-repression of let-7. We further demonstrate that MYCN messenger RNA levels in amplified disease are exceptionally high and sufficient to sponge let-7, which reconciles the dispensability of LIN28B. We found that genetic loss of let-7 is common in neuroblastoma, inversely associated with MYCN amplification, and independently associated with poor outcomes, providing a rationale for chromosomal loss patterns in neuroblastoma. We propose that let-7 disruption by LIN28B, MYCN sponging, or genetic loss is a unifying mechanism of neuroblastoma development with broad implications for cancer pathogenesis.

  10. Criteria for endocrine disrupters: report from the Danish centre on Endocrine Disrupters (CEHOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Bjerregaard, Poul; Hass, Ulla;

    The aim of this session is to give a presentation of the report (both ENV and HH) on criteria carried out by the Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters (CEHOS) as a project contracted by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. CEHOS is an interdisciplinary scientific network without walls...... and the main purpose of the Centre is to build and gather new knowledge on endocrine disrupters (EDs) with focus on information needed for the preventive work of the regulatory authorities. The aim of the report was to propose scientific criteria for the identification of ED substances of concern for human...

  11. Laser Microbial Killing and Biofilm Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krespi, Yosef P.; Kizhner, Victor

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: To analyze the ability of NIR lasers to reduce bacterial load and demonstrate the capability of fiber-based Q-switched Nd:YAG laser disrupting biofilm. Study Design: NIR diode laser was tested in vitro and in vivo using pathogenic microorganisms (S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa). In addition biofilms were grown from clinical Pseudomonas isolates and placed in culture plates, screws, tympanostomy tubes and PET sutures. Methods: In the animal experiments acute rhinosinusitis model was created by packing the rabbit nose with bacteria soaked solution. The nasal pack was removed in two days and nose was exposed to laser irradiation. A 940 nm diode laser with fiber diffuser was used. Nasal cultures were obtained before and after the laser treatments. Animals were sacrificed fifteen days following laser treatment and bacteriologic/histologic results analyzed. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser generated shockwave pulses were delivered on biofilm using special probes over culture plates, screws, tubes, and PET sutures for the biofilm experiments. Results: Average of two log bacteria reduction was achieved with NIR laser compared to controls. Histologic studies demonstrated preservation of tissue integrity without significant damage to mucosa. Biofilms were imaged before, during and after treatment using a confocal microscope. During laser-generated shockwave application, biofilm was initially seen to oscillate and eventually break off. Large and small pieces of biofilm were totally and instantly removed from the surface to which they were attached in seconds. Conclusions: Significant bacterial reduction was achieved with NIR laser therapy in this experimental in vitro and animal study. In addition we disrupted Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and special probes generating plasma and shockwave. This new and innovative method of bacteria killing and biofilm disruption without injuring host tissue may have clinical application in the

  12. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Manning, L.M.; Stringer, L.D.; Cappadonna, J.; El-Sayed, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m2) to 1- and 4-m2 plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  13. Estrogens can disrupt amphibian mating behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke Hoffmann

    Full Text Available The main component of classical contraceptives, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2, has high estrogenic activity even at environmentally relevant concentrations. Although estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds are assumed to contribute to the worldwide decline of amphibian populations by adverse effects on sexual differentiation, evidence for EE2 affecting amphibian mating behaviour is lacking. In this study, we demonstrate that EE2 exposure at five different concentrations (0.296 ng/L, 2.96 ng/L, 29.64 ng/L, 2.96 µg/L and 296.4 µg/L can disrupt the mating behavior of adult male Xenopus laevis. EE2 exposure at all concentrations lowered male sexual arousal, indicated by decreased proportions of advertisement calls and increased proportions of the call type rasping, which characterizes a sexually unaroused state of a male. Additionally, EE2 at all tested concentrations affected temporal and spectral parameters of the advertisement calls, respectively. The classical and highly sensitive biomarker vitellogenin, on the other hand, was only induced at concentrations equal or higher than 2.96 µg/L. If kept under control conditions after a 96 h EE2 exposure (2.96 µg/L, alterations of male advertisement calls vanish gradually within 6 weeks and result in a lower sexual attractiveness of EE2 exposed males toward females as demonstrated by female choice experiments. These findings indicate that exposure to environmentally relevant EE2 concentrations can directly disrupt male mate calling behavior of X. laevis and can indirectly affect the mating behavior of females. The results suggest the possibility that EE2 exposure could reduce the reproductive success of EE2 exposed animals and these effects might contribute to the global problem of amphibian decline.

  14. Disruption of Four Kinesin Genes in Dictyostelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soga Ikko

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinesin and dynein are the two families of microtubule-based motors that drive much of the intracellular movements in eukaryotic cells. Using a gene knockout strategy, we address here the individual function(s of four of the 13 kinesin proteins in Dictyostelium. The goal of our ongoing project is to establish a minimal motility proteome for this basal eukaryote, enabling us to contrast motor functions here with the often far more elaborate motor families in the metazoans. Results We performed individual disruptions of the kinesin genes, kif4, kif8, kif10, and kif11. None of the motors encoded by these genes are essential for development or viability of Dictyostelium. Removal of Kif4 (kinesin-7; CENP-E family significantly impairs the rate of cell growth and, when combined with a previously characterized dynein inhibition, results in dramatic defects in mitotic spindle assembly. Kif8 (kinesin-4; chromokinesin family and Kif10 (kinesin-8; Kip3 family appear to cooperate with dynein to organize the interphase radial microtubule array. Conclusion The results reported here extend the number of kinesin gene disruptions in Dictyostelium, to now total 10, among the 13 isoforms. None of these motors, individually, are required for short-term viability. In contrast, homologs of at least six of the 10 kinesins are considered essential in humans. Our work underscores the functional redundancy of motor isoforms in basal organisms while highlighting motor specificity in more complex metazoans. Since motor disruption in Dictyostelium can readily be combined with other motility insults and stresses, this organism offers an excellent system to investigate functional interactions among the kinesin motor family.

  15. Cochlear implantation for severe sensorineural hearing loss caused by lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Nam-Suk; Lee, Il-Woo; Goh, Eui-Kyung; Kong, Soo-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Lightning strike can produce an array of clinical symptoms and injuries. It may damage multiple organs and cause auditory injuries ranging from transient hearing loss and vertigo to complete disruption of the auditory system. Tympanic-membrane rupture is relatively common in patients with lightning injury. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of auditory lesions in lightning survivors have not been fully elucidated. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss caused by a lightning strike, who was successfully rehabilitated after a cochlear implantation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nomofungin: a new microfilament disrupting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, A S; Yoshida, W Y; Mooberry, S L; Hemscheidt, T K

    2001-12-28

    A new alkaloid, nomofungin, has been isolated from the fermentation broth of an unidentified endophytic fungus obtained from the bark of Ficus microcarpa L. The structure of nomofungin was determined by application of spectroscopic methods. The absolute stereochemistry of nomofungin was assigned by using the exciton chirality method. Nomofungin disrupts microfilaments in cultured mammalian cells and is moderately cytotoxic with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 2 and 4.5 microg/mL against LoVo and KB cells, respectively. The ring system of nomofungin is unprecedented.

  17. Multimedia data mining and analytics disruptive innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Baughman, Aaron; Pan, Jia-Yu; Petrushin, Valery A

    2015-01-01

    This authoritative text/reference provides fresh insights into the cutting edge of multimedia data mining, reflecting how the research focus has shifted towards networked social communities, mobile devices and sensors. Presenting a detailed exploration into the progression of the field, the book describes how the history of multimedia data processing can be viewed as a sequence of disruptive innovations. Across the chapters, the discussion covers the practical frameworks, libraries, and open source software that enable the development of ground-breaking research into practical applications.

  18. Disruptive Innovation by Emerging Multinational Latecomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Peter Ping

    Despite the growing interest in the emerging-economy multinational enterprise (EMNE), there is little knowledge about the underlying mechanism for EMNEs as latecomers to catch up with and even leapfrog the traditional MNEs as early-movers. The cross-fertilization between the research streams...... on disruptive innovation (DI) and the bottom of the pyramid (BOP) provides a great opportunity to shed light on the key issue. To take advantage of this “missed” opportunity, I integrate the two reframed constructs of DI and BOP and also develop a typology of four ideal-typical innovations toward a theory...

  19. Defending the Pittsburgh Waterways Against Catastrophic Disruption

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This thesis develops an Operatorâ s Model that mimics the real-world behavior of coal transport in the Port of Pittsburgh and allows for systematic investigation of â what ifâ disruption scenarios. We model the multi-modal flow of coal using a network of nodes and arcs representing river transport, with support from a surrounding system of rail lines and roads. Each mode of shipment has finite capacities with varying costs. Our model routes flows in order to satisfy contracted...

  20. Amphibians as model to study endocrine disrupters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloas, Werner; Lutz, Ilka

    2006-10-13

    Environmental compounds can interfere with endocrine systems of wildlife and humans. These so-called endocrine disrupters (ED) are known to affect reproductive biology and thyroid system. The classical model species for these endocrine systems are amphibians and therefore they can serve as sentinels for detection of the modes of action (MOAs) of ED. Recently, amphibians are being reviewed as suitable models to assess (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic MOAs influencing reproductive biology as well as (anti)thyroidal MOAs interfering with the thyroid system. The development of targeted bioassays in combination with adequate chemical analyses is the prerequisite for a concise risk assessment of ED.

  1. Functional MRI studies in disruptive behaviour disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellani, M; Garzitto, M; Brambilla, P

    2012-03-01

    Aggressive or antisocial behaviours with violations of social rules are the main features of disruptive behaviour disorders (DBDs), which are developmental diseases and include conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder. In the last decade, several efforts have been made to shed light on the biological underpinnings of DBDs. In this context, the main findings of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in DBD are reported here. There are indications of neural dysfunctions in response to affective stimuli, especially regarding medial and orbitofrontal prefrontal cortex and connected subcortical structures.

  2. Manuel′s asteroid disruption technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel John

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A seventy-year-old male presented with dense asteroid hyalosis in both eyes. He had undergone cataract extraction in one eye 3 years ago, and the other eye had immature cataract. Both the autorefractor and dilated streak retinoscopy did not give readings and subjective visual improvement could not be achieved. Immediately following YAG posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitreous asteroid disruption, the vision improved to 20/20 with recordable auto refractor and streak retinoscopy values. Our initial experience indicates that the treatment is simple, safe and effective but needs controlled and prospective studies to confirm its long-term safety.

  3. Disruptive Innovation in Air Measurement Technology: Reality ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation is a big picture overview on the changing state of air measurement technology in the world, with a focus on the introduction of low-cost sensors into the market place. The presentation discusses how these new technologies may be a case study in disruptive innovation for the air pollution measurement field. The intended audience is primarily those with experience in air pollution measurement methods, but much of the talk is accessible to the general public. This is a keynote presentation on emerging air monitoring technology, to be provided at the AWMA measurements conference in March, 2016.

  4. Mechanistic evaluation of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla

    , no significant metabolic transformation of the azole fungicides was detected. CONCLUSIONS AND PERSPECTIVES: Overall, the results from the studies presented in this thesis support the evidence suggesting that nutrition relevant concentrations of PEs, both alone and in mixtures, induce various endocrine disrupting...... of in vitro metabolising systems in conection with in vitro testing of EDCs METHODS: Twelve dietary relevant phytoestrogens (PEs) either alone or in mixtures were analysed in a battery of in vitro bioassays designed to look for effects on: a) steroid hormone production in human adrenal corticocarcinoma cells...

  5. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stew, B T; Fishpool, S J C; Williams, H

    2012-02-01

    Sudden onset sensorineural hearing loss is a medical emergency that continues to be poorly understood despite being recognized in the literature since 1944 (De Kleyn, 1944). A commonly used criterion to qualify for this diagnosis is a sensorineural hearing loss over three contiguous pure-tone frequencies of 30 dB or more that develops within 72 hours. The vast majority of cases are unilateral and the estimated annual incidence is 20 per 100 000 persons (Nosrati-Zarenoe et al, 2007). A cause for the hearing loss is only identified in up to 10% of cases but 50% of patients will improve spontaneously (Penido et al, 2009).

  6. Global heterochromatin loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumi, Amy; Li, Willis

    2012-01-01

    The aging field is replete with theories. Over the past years, many distinct, yet overlapping mechanisms have been proposed to explain organismal aging. These include free radicals, loss of heterochromatin, genetically programmed senescence, telomere shortening, genomic instability, nutritional intake and growth signaling, to name a few. The objective of this Point-of-View is to highlight recent progress on the “loss of heterochromatin” model of aging and to propose that epigenetic changes contributing to global heterochromatin loss may underlie the various cellular processes associated with aging. PMID:22647267

  7. Overfishing and nutrient pollution interact with temperature to disrupt coral reefs down to microbial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaneveld, Jesse R; Burkepile, Deron E; Shantz, Andrew A; Pritchard, Catharine E; McMinds, Ryan; Payet, Jérôme P; Welsh, Rory; Correa, Adrienne M S; Lemoine, Nathan P; Rosales, Stephanie; Fuchs, Corinne; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Thurber, Rebecca Vega

    2016-06-07

    Losses of corals worldwide emphasize the need to understand what drives reef decline. Stressors such as overfishing and nutrient pollution may reduce resilience of coral reefs by increasing coral-algal competition and reducing coral recruitment, growth and survivorship. Such effects may themselves develop via several mechanisms, including disruption of coral microbiomes. Here we report the results of a 3-year field experiment simulating overfishing and nutrient pollution. These stressors increase turf and macroalgal cover, destabilizing microbiomes, elevating putative pathogen loads, increasing disease more than twofold and increasing mortality up to eightfold. Above-average temperatures exacerbate these effects, further disrupting microbiomes of unhealthy corals and concentrating 80% of mortality in the warmest seasons. Surprisingly, nutrients also increase bacterial opportunism and mortality in corals bitten by parrotfish, turning normal trophic interactions deadly for corals. Thus, overfishing and nutrient pollution impact reefs down to microbial scales, killing corals by sensitizing them to predation, above-average temperatures and bacterial opportunism.

  8. Estimating Burden and Disease Costs of Exposure to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trasande, Leonardo; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Hass, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly increasing evidence has documented that endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) contribute substantially to disease and disability. Objective: The objective was to quantify a range of health and economic costs that can be reasonably attributed to EDC exposures in the European Union (EU......). Design: A Steering Committee of scientists adapted the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change weight-of-evidence characterization for probability of causation based upon levels of available epidemiological and toxicological evidence for one or more chemicals contributing to disease by an endocrine...... Environmental Protection Agency for evaluating laboratory and animal evidence of endocrine disruption. Expert panels used the Delphi method to make decisions on the strength of the data. Results: Expert panels achieved consensus at least for probable (>20%) EDC causation for IQ loss and associated intellectual...

  9. Disruption of Toxoplasma gondii parasitophorous vacuoles by the mouse p47-resistance GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Martens

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The p47 GTPases are essential for interferon-gamma-induced cell-autonomous immunity against the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, in mice, but the mechanism of resistance is poorly understood. We show that the p47 GTPases, including IIGP1, accumulate at vacuoles containing T. gondii. The accumulation is GTP-dependent and requires live parasites. Vacuolar IIGP1 accumulations undergo a maturation-like process accompanied by vesiculation of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. This culminates in disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and finally of the parasite itself. Over-expression of IIGP1 leads to accelerated vacuolar disruption whereas a dominant negative form of IIGP1 interferes with interferon-gamma-mediated killing of intracellular parasites. Targeted deletion of the IIGP1 gene results in partial loss of the IFN-gamma-mediated T. gondii growth restriction in mouse astrocytes.

  10. Disruption of Toxoplasma gondii Parasitophorous Vacuoles by the Mouse p47-Resistance GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The p47 GTPases are essential for interferon-gamma-induced cell-autonomous immunity against the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, in mice, but the mechanism of resistance is poorly understood. We show that the p47 GTPases, including IIGP1, accumulate at vacuoles containing T. gondii. The accumulation is GTP-dependent and requires live parasites. Vacuolar IIGP1 accumulations undergo a maturation-like process accompanied by vesiculation of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. This culminates in disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and finally of the parasite itself. Over-expression of IIGP1 leads to accelerated vacuolar disruption whereas a dominant negative form of IIGP1 interferes with interferon-gamma-mediated killing of intracellular parasites. Targeted deletion of the IIGP1 gene results in partial loss of the IFN-gamma-mediated T. gondii growth restriction in mouse astrocytes.

  11. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Maggie; Heman-Ackah, Selena E.; Shaikh, Jamil A.

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is commonly encountered in audiologic and otolaryngologic practice. SSNHL is most commonly defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies occurring within a 72-hr period. Although the differential for SSNHL is vast, for the majority of patients an etiologic factor is not identified. Treatment for SSNHL of known etiology is directed toward that agent, with poor hearing outcomes characteristic for discoverable etiologies that cause inner ear hair cell loss. Steroid therapy is the current mainstay of treatment of idiopathic SSNHL in the United States. The prognosis for hearing recovery for idiopathic SSNHL is dependent on a number of factors including the severity of hearing loss, age, presence of vertigo, and shape of the audiogram. PMID:21606048

  12. Prizes for weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englberger, L.

    1999-01-01

    A programme of weight loss competitions and associated activities in Tonga, intended to combat obesity and the noncommunicable diseases linked to it, has popular support and the potential to effect significant improvements in health. PMID:10063662

  13. Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g., death of a loved one or divorce) can cause hair loss. Dieting and poor nutrition ... Immediately stopping some medicines can cause serious side effects. If you think a medicine may be causing ...

  14. What's Hearing Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regular school, or be part of a regular classroom. Depending on how severe their hearing loss is, ... read along to follow the action. Technology is changing all the time, and you will probably see ...

  15. Facilitated physiological adaptation to prolonged circadian disruption through dietary supplementation with essence of chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Yao, Cencen; Tsang, Fai; Huang, Liangfeng; Zhang, Wanjing; Jiang, Jianguo; Mao, Youxiang; Shao, Yujian; Kong, Boda; Singh, Paramjeet; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    Synchrony between circadian and metabolic processes is critical to the maintenance of energy homeostasis. Studies on essence of chicken (EC), a chicken meat extract rich in proteins, amino acids and peptides, showed its effectiveness in alleviating fatigue and promoting metabolism. A recent study revealed that it facilitated the re-entrainment of clock genes (Bmal1, Cry1, Dec1, Per1 and Per2) in the pineal gland and liver in a rat model of circadian disruption. Here, we investigated the role of EC-facilitated circadian synchrony in the maintenance of the energy homeostasis using a mouse model of prolonged circadian disruption. Prolonged circadian disruption (12 weeks) resulted in hepatic maladaptation, manifested by a mild but significant (p < 0.05) hepatomegaly, accompanied by disturbed hepatic lipid metabolism and liver injury (indicated by increased circulating hepatic enzymes). Evidently, there was marked elevations of hepatic inflammatory mediators (interleukin-1beta and interleukin-6), suggesting an underlying inflammation leading to the hepatic injury and functional impairment. Importantly, the disruption paradigm caused the decoupling between key metabolic regulators (e.g. mTOR and AMPK) and hepatic clock genes (Per1, Cry1, Dec1, Bmal1). Further, we showed that the loss of circadian synchrony between the master and hepatic clock genes (Per1, Cry1, Dec1, Bmal1) could be the underlying cause of the maladaptation. When supplemented with EC, the functional impairment and inflammation were abolished. The protective effects could be linked to its effectiveness in maintaining the synchrony between the master and hepatic clocks, and the resultant improved coupling of the circadian oscillators (Per1, Cry1, Dec1, Bmal1) and metabolic regulators (mTOR, AMPK). Overall, EC supplementation promoted the physiological adaptation to the prolonged circadian disruption through facilitation of endogenous circadian synchrony and the coupling of circadian oscillators and

  16. A new Disruption Mitigation System for deuterium–tritium operation at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruezi, Uron, E-mail: uron.kruezi@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Jachmich, Stefan [Laboratory for Plasma Physic, ERM/KMS, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Koslowski, Hans Rudolf [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-4, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Lehnen, Michael [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS90046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Brezinsek, Sebastijan [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-4, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Matthews, Guy [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A Disruption Mitigation System based on massive gas injections has been designed. • The DMS has been installed at the JET-tokamak for routine machine protection. • The DMS is capable of a throughput of up to 4.6 kPa m{sup 3}. • The new DMS is compatible with the deuterium–tritium operation at JET. - Abstract: Disruptions, the fast accidental losses of plasma current and stored energy in tokamaks, represent a significant risk to the mechanical structure as well as the plasma facing components of reactor-scale fusion facilities like ITER. At JET, the tokamak experiment closest to ITER in terms of operating parameters and size, massive gas injection has been established as a disruption mitigation method. As a “last resort” measure it reduces thermal and electromagnetic loads during disruptions which can potentially have a serious impact on the beryllium and tungsten plasma-facing materials of the main chamber and divertor. For the planned deuterium–tritium experiments, a new Disruption Mitigation System (DMS) has been designed and installed and is presented in this article. The new DMS at JET consists of an all metal gate valve compatible with gas injections, a fast high pressure eddy current driven valve, a high voltage power supply and a gas handling system providing six supply lines for pure and mixed noble and flammable gases (Ar, Ne, Kr, D{sub 2}, etc.). The valve throughput varies with the injection pressure and gas type (efficiency – injected/charged gas 50–97%); the maximum injected amount of gas is approximately 4.6 kPa m{sup 3} (at maximum system pressure of 5.0 MPa).

  17. Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baweja R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Raman Baweja, Susan D Mayes, Usman Hameed, James G Waxmonsky Department of Psychiatry, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA Abstract: Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD was introduced as a new diagnostic entity under the category of depressive disorders in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5. It was included in DSM-5 primarily to address concerns about the misdiagnosis and consequent overtreatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. DMDD does provide a home for a large percentage of referred children with severe persistent irritability that did not fit well into any DSM, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV diagnostic category. However, it has been a controversial addition to the DSM-5 due to lack of published validity studies, leading to questions about its validity as a distinct disorder. In this article, the authors discuss the diagnostic criteria, assessment, epidemiology, criticism of the diagnosis, and pathophysiology, as well as treatment and future directions for DMDD. They also review the literature on severe mood dysregulation, as described by the National Institute of Mental Health, as the scientific support for DMDD is based primarily on studies of severe mood dysregulation. Keywords: disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, persistent irritability, temper outbursts 

  18. Abundance Anomalies In Tidal Disruption Events

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanek, C S

    2015-01-01

    The ~10% of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than the Sun should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ~25% on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of 2-3 for debris at a common orbital period. These helium abundance variations may be a contributor to the observed diversity of hydrogen and helium line strengths in TDEs. A still more striking anomaly is the rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the CNO cycle -- stars more massive than the Sun quickly show an increase in their average N/C ratio by factors of 3-10. Because low mass stars evolve slowly and high mass stars are rare, TDEs showing high N/C will almost all be due to 1-2Msun stars disr...

  19. Modeling Steroidogenesis Disruption Using High-Throughput ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental chemicals can elicit endocrine disruption by altering steroid hormone biosynthesis and metabolism (steroidogenesis) causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. Historically, a lack of assays resulted in few chemicals having been evaluated for effects on steroidogenesis. The steroidogenic pathway is a series of hydroxylation and dehydrogenation steps carried out by CYP450 and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, yet the only enzyme in the pathway for which a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay has been developed is aromatase (CYP19A1), responsible for the aromatization of androgens to estrogens. Recently, the ToxCast HTS program adapted the OECD validated H295R steroidogenesis assay using human adrenocortical carcinoma cells into a high-throughput model to quantitatively assess the concentration-dependent (0.003-100 µM) effects of chemicals on 10 steroid hormones including progestagens, androgens, estrogens and glucocorticoids. These results, in combination with two CYP19A1 inhibition assays, comprise a large dataset amenable to clustering approaches supporting the identification and characterization of putative mechanisms of action (pMOA) for steroidogenesis disruption. In total, 514 chemicals were tested in all CYP19A1 and steroidogenesis assays. 216 chemicals were identified as CYP19A1 inhibitors in at least one CYP19A1 assay. 208 of these chemicals also altered hormone levels in the H295R assay, suggesting 96% sensitivity in the

  20. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sanchez

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive events features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive events, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA).

  1. Globally disruptive events show predictable timing patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Michael P.; Erenler, Hilary E.

    2017-01-01

    Globally disruptive events include asteroid/comet impacts, large igneous provinces and glaciations, all of which have been considered as contributors to mass extinctions. Understanding the overall relationship between the timings of the largest extinctions and their potential proximal causes remains one of science's great unsolved mysteries. Cycles of about 60 Myr in both fossil diversity and environmental data suggest external drivers such as the passage of the Solar System through the galactic plane. While cyclic phenomena are recognized statistically, a lack of coherent mechanisms and a failure to link key events has hampered wider acceptance of multi-million year periodicity and its relevance to earth science and evolution. The generation of a robust predictive model of timings, with a clear plausible primary mechanism, would signal a paradigm shift. Here, we present a model of the timings of globally disruptive events and a possible explanation of their ultimate cause. The proposed model is a symmetrical pattern of 63 Myr sequences around a central value, interpreted as the occurrence of events along, and parallel to, the galactic midplane. The symmetry is consistent with multiple dark matter disks, aligned parallel to the midplane. One implication of the precise pattern of timings and the underlying physical model is the ability to predict future events, such as a major extinction in 1-2 Myr.

  2. Multiband lightcurves of tidal disruption events

    CERN Document Server

    Lodato, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Unambiguous detection of the tidal disruption of a star would allow an assessment of the presence and masses of supermassive black holes in quiescent galaxies. It would also provide invaluable information on bulge scale stellar processes (such as two-body relaxation) via the rate at which stars are injected into the tidal sphere of influence of the black holes. This rate, in turn, is essential to predict gravitational radiation emission by compact object inspirals. The signature of a tidal disruption event is thought to be a fallback rate for the stellar debris onto the black hole that decreases as $t^{-5/3}$. This mass flux is often assumed to yield a luminous signal that decreases in time at the same rate. In this paper, we calculate the monochromatic lightcurves arising from such an accretion event. Differently from previous studies, we adopt a more realistic description of the fallback rate and of the super-Eddigton accretion physics. We also provide simultaneous lightcurves in optical, UV and X-rays. We ...

  3. Cool Core Disruption in Abell 1763

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Edmund; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Randall, Scott W.; Edwards, Louise O. V.; Sabry, Ziad

    2017-01-01

    We present the analysis of a 20 ksec Chandra archival observation of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1763. A model-subtracted image highlighting excess cluster emission reveals a large spiral structure winding outward from the core to a radius of ~950 kpc. We measure the gas of the inner spiral to have significantly lower entropy than non-spiral regions at the same radius. This is consistent with the structure resulting from merger-induced motion of the cluster’s cool core, a phenomenon seen in many systems. Atypical of spiral-hosting clusters, an intact cool core is not detected. Its absence suggests the system has experienced significant disruption since the initial dynamical encounter that set the sloshing core in motion. Along the major axis of the elongated ICM distribution we detect thermal features consistent with the merger event most likely responsible for cool core disruption. The merger-induced transition towards non-cool core status will be discussed. The interaction between the powerful (P1.4 ~ 1026 W Hz-1) cluster-center WAT radio source and its ICM environment will also be discussed.

  4. Onset conditions for disruptions during VDEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Janardhan; Gerhardt, Stefan; Boozer, Allen; NSTX Team

    2011-10-01

    The Vertical Displacement Event, VDE, evolves on a slow timescale relative to the ideal MHD Alfvenic timescale. At some point the kink mode is strongly destabilized, leading to the final disruption. In most cases this occurs when q-edge is slightly less than two. Non-axisymmetric halo currents are often observed, well before the disruption. The evolution of the plasma during the VDE is modeled as a sequence of shrinking equilibria, where the core current profile remains constant so that the safety-factor at the axis, q-axis, remains fixed and the q-edge systematically decreases. Stability analysis shows that the plasma is indeed stable or has a small growth-rate until q- edge drops below 2, at which point the growth-rate rises rapidly, approaching γTA = 1 . The kink mode is characterized by m / n = 2 / 1 , where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers. The surface currents associated with the MHD perturbation are computed. These may be related to the non-axisymmetric component of the halo currents and may be providing stability at modest growth-rates. This model is compared with observations on NSTX. This manuscript has been authored by Princeton University and collaborators under Contract Number(s) DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. PUMA-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic disruption by hypoxic postconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YuZhen; Guo, Qi; Liu, XiuHua; Wang, Chen; Song, DanDan

    2015-08-01

    Postconditioning can reduce ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by targeting mitochondria. p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is involved in lethal I/R injury. Here, we hypothesized that postconditioning might inhibit mitochondrial pathway-mediated cardiomyocyte apoptosis by controlling PUMA expression. The cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes underwent 3 h of hypoxia and 3 h of reoxygenation. Postconditioning consisted of three cycles of 5 min reoxygenation and 5 min hypoxia after prolonged hypoxia. Hypoxic postconditioning reduced the levels of PUMA mRNA and protein. Concomitantly, the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation were decreased significantly by postconditioning. Overexpression of PUMA increased greatly not only the number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes, but also the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation under postconditioning condition. The data suggest that reduction of PUMA expression mediates the endogenous cardioprotective mechanisms of postconditioning by disrupting mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  6. Microglial disruption in young mice with early chronic lead exposure☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobin, Christina; Montoya, Mayra Gisel Flores; Parisi, Natali; Schaub, Tanner; Cervantes, Miguel; Armijos, Rodrigo X.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which early chronic lead (Pb) exposure alter brain development have not been identified. We examined neuroimmune system effects in C57BL/6J mice with Pb exposure, including levels that may be common among children in lower socioeconomic income environments. Pups were exposed via dams’ drinking water from birth to post-natal day 28 to low, high or no Pb conditions. We compared gene expression of neuroinflammatory markers (study 1); and microglial mean cell body volume and mean cell body number in dentate gyrus, and dentate gyrus volume (study 2). Blood Pb levels in exposed animals at sacrifice (post-natal day 28) ranged from 2.66 to 20.31 μg/dL. Only interleukin-6 (IL6) differed between groups and reductions were dose-dependent. Microglia cell body number also differed between groups and reductions were dose-dependent. As compared with controls, microglia cell body volume was greater but highly variable in only low-dose animals; dentate gyri volumes in low- and high-dose animals were reduced. The results did not support a model of increased neuroinflammation. Instead, early chronic exposure to Pb disrupted microglia via damage to, loss of, or lack of proliferation of microglia in the developing brains of Pb-exposed animals. PMID:23598043

  7. An SMC ATPase mutant disrupts chromosome segregation in Caulobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Monica A; Shapiro, Lucy

    2011-12-01

    Accurate replication and segregation of the bacterial genome are essential for cell cycle progression. We have identified a single amino acid substitution in the Caulobacter structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein that disrupts chromosome segregation and cell division. The E1076Q point mutation in the SMC ATPase domain caused a dominant-negative phenotype in which DNA replication was able to proceed, but duplicated parS centromeres, normally found at opposite cell poles, remained at one pole. The cellular positions of other chromosomal loci were in the wild-type order relative to the parS centromere, but chromosomes remained unsegregated and appeared to be stacked upon one another. Purified SMC-E1076Q was deficient in ATP hydrolysis and exhibited abnormally stable binding to DNA. We propose that SMC spuriously links the duplicated chromosome immediately after passage of the replication fork. In wild-type cells, ATP hydrolysis opens the SMC dimer, freeing one chromosome to segregate to the opposite pole. The loss of ATP hydrolysis causes the SMC-E1076Q dimer to remain bound to both chromosomes, inhibiting segregation.

  8. Disruptive Conduct: The Impact of Disruptive Technologies on Social Relations in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) have invested significantly in digital technologies for learning and teaching. However, technologies provided by HEIs have not been universally successful in terms of adoption and usage. Meanwhile, both students and lecturers use disruptive technologies to support learning and teaching. This article examines…

  9. Disrupting Law School: How Disruptive Innovation Will Revolutionize the Legal World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone, Michele R.; Horn, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Facing dramatic declines in enrollment, revenue, and student quality at the same time that their cost structure continues to rise and public support has waned, law schools are in crisis. A key driver of the crisis is shrinking employment opportunities for recent graduates, which stem in part from the disruption of the traditional business model…

  10. Disruptive Conduct: The Impact of Disruptive Technologies on Social Relations in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) have invested significantly in digital technologies for learning and teaching. However, technologies provided by HEIs have not been universally successful in terms of adoption and usage. Meanwhile, both students and lecturers use disruptive technologies to support learning and teaching. This article examines…

  11. Calcium-independent disruption of microtubule dynamics by nanosecond pulsed electric fields in U87 human glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lynn; Bardet, Sylvia M.; Burke, Ryan C.; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O’Connor, Rodney P.

    2017-01-01

    High powered, nanosecond duration, pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause cell death by a mechanism that is not fully understood and have been proposed as a targeted cancer therapy. Numerous chemotherapeutics work by disrupting microtubules. As microtubules are affected by electrical fields, this study looks at the possibility of disrupting them electrically with nsPEF. Human glioblastoma cells (U87-MG) treated with 100, 10 ns, 44 kV/cm pulses at a frequency of 10 Hz showed a breakdown of their interphase microtubule network that was accompanied by a reduction in the number of growing microtubules. This effect is temporally linked to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and independent of cellular swelling and calcium influx, two factors that disrupt microtubule growth dynamics. Super-resolution microscopy revealed microtubule buckling and breaking as a result of nsPEF application, suggesting that nsPEF may act directly on microtubules. PMID:28117459

  12. Calcium-independent disruption of microtubule dynamics by nanosecond pulsed electric fields in U87 human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lynn; Bardet, Sylvia M; Burke, Ryan C; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2017-01-24

    High powered, nanosecond duration, pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause cell death by a mechanism that is not fully understood and have been proposed as a targeted cancer therapy. Numerous chemotherapeutics work by disrupting microtubules. As microtubules are affected by electrical fields, this study looks at the possibility of disrupting them electrically with nsPEF. Human glioblastoma cells (U87-MG) treated with 100, 10 ns, 44 kV/cm pulses at a frequency of 10 Hz showed a breakdown of their interphase microtubule network that was accompanied by a reduction in the number of growing microtubules. This effect is temporally linked to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and independent of cellular swelling and calcium influx, two factors that disrupt microtubule growth dynamics. Super-resolution microscopy revealed microtubule buckling and breaking as a result of nsPEF application, suggesting that nsPEF may act directly on microtubules.

  13. Global and Country-Level Fragility to Major Disruptions in Crop Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, M. J.; Wada, Y.; Chon, S. Y.; Cook, B. I.; Nordbotten, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    New food polices are needed to mitigate vulnerabilities in the global food system to unexpected and severe production losses. The starting point for developing such policies is the ability to quantify the potential range of food and economic losses associated with major food-production shocks. Although individual major shock events are unpredictable, it is possible to quantify the relative vulnerabilities of the global food system as a whole and of individual countries within the system to production shocks. Here we combine a scale for food disruptions, which links the magnitude for a production shock with the corresponding short-term food and economic losses for that event (analogous to the well-known Richter magnitude scale for earthquakes), with country-level food system metrics. We demonstrate the value of our approach using the recent El Niño event of 2015-2016. Ultimately, these metrics can be used as part of efforts to develop national and global level food policies to prepare for and mitigate possible food-supply disruptions.

  14. SIMULATING THE SUPPLY DISRUPTION FOR THE COORDINATED SUPPLY CHAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    There are many disruptive accidents in the supply chain operations system and achieving the coordination of supply chain is main objective for supply chain research. While disruptive accidents have increasingly influenced the coordinated operation of the supply chain, existing research literature on the supply chain coordination is setting in a stationary environment. The answer for how the disruptive accidents affect the coordinated supply chain is given in this paper. Based on the benchmark supply chain which is coordinated by the negative incentive mechanism, we study the impacts of supply disruption on the supply chain system by using simulation approach in which two different distribution function of random variable are used to express the supply disruption. Comparison between these two simulation results and possible coordination mechanism under the supply disruption are proposed. From the perspective of supply chain risk management, we provide the inspiration for the manager.

  15. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Tidal Disruption Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenko, Stephen B.

    2017-08-01

    When a star passes within the sphere of disruption of a massive black hole, tidal forces will overcome self-gravity and unbind the star. While approximately half of the stellar debris is ejected at high velocities, the remaining material stays bound to the black hole and accretes, resulting in a luminous, long-lived transient known as a tidal disruption flare (TDF). In addition to serving as unique laboratories for accretion physics,TDFs offer the hope of measuring black hole masses in galaxies much too distant for resolved kinematic studies.In order to realize this potential, we must better understand the detailed processes by which the bound debris circularizes and forms an accretion disk. Spectroscopy is critical to this effort, as emission and absorption line diagnostics provide insight into the location and physical state (velocity, density, composition) of the emitting gas (in analogy with quasars). UV spectra are particularly critical, as most strong atomic features fall in this bandpass, and high-redshift TDF discoveries from LSST will sample rest-frame UV wavelengths.Here I present recent attempts to obtain UV spectra of tidal disruption flares. I describe the UV spectrum of ASASSN-14li, in which we detect three classes of features: narrow absorption from the Milky Way (probably a high-velocity cloud), and narrow absorption and broad (2000-8000 km s-1) emission lines at or near the systemic host velocity. The absorption lines are blueshifted with respect to the emission lines by 250-400 km s-1. Due both to this velocity offset and the lack of common low-ionization features (Mg II, Fe II), we argue these arise from the same absorbing material responsible for the low-velocity outflow discovered at X-ray wavelengths. The broad nuclear emission lines display a remarkable abundance pattern: N III], N IV], and He II are quite prominent, while the common quasar emission lines of C III] and Mg II are weak or entirely absent. Detailed modeling of this spectrum will

  16. Rotation Induced Disruption of Cohesive Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Lana, Diego; Scheeres, D. J.

    2013-10-01

    We use a Soft-Sphere Discrete Element Method (SSDEM) code to study the evolution of self-gravitating cohesive granular aggregates that are spun to disruption as a proxy to "rubble-pile" asteroids. Calculations have shown that the fine regolith in asteroids and molecular Van der Waals forces together may act as a cohesive matrix that provides enough structural strength to hold small NEAs together even at the observed high spin rates. With this in mind we have implemented cohesive forces between the large 10 m) particles that form our aggregates; its strength being controlled by the mean particle size of the matrix. The addition of rolling friction also has allowed us to obtain cohesionless aggregates with friction angles of at least 35° as measured by the Drucker-Prager yield criterion. A series of experiments were run with the code, keeping the size, density and number of grains constant while increasing the cohesive strength of the matrix holding the grains in place. It can be shown, through a scaling analysis, that when the cohesive strength between rubble pile components is increased by a factor of f, that the effective size of the asteroid being modeled will decrease by a factor of 1/√f. To evaluate this we ran a series of 12 cases with increasing cohesive strength, effectively modeling rubble piles of size from 0.1 km up to 100 km with a constant cohesive strength of 25 Pa. Some of our main results are as follows: 1. results from simulations are compatible with a simple model of asteroid strength that predicts, in the cohesion dominated case, that the spin rate for fission is inversely proportional to the size of the asteroid; 2. aggregates may disrupt by shedding or fission, depending on the cohesive strength and the size of the aggregate (shape and heterogeneity factors have not yet been considered); 3. disruption by fission is more likely for small aggregates than for larger aggregates with the same cohesive strength. Further results with spherical and a

  17. Losses in Ferroelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Wenhua; Cao, Wenwu

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials are the best dielectric and piezoelectric materials known today. Since the discovery of barium titanate in the 1940s, lead zirconate titanate ceramics in the 1950s and relaxor-PT single crystals (such as lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate and lead zinc niobate-lead titanate) in the 1980s and 1990s, perovskite ferroelectric materials have been the dominating piezoelectric materials for electromechanical devices, and are widely used in sensors, actuators and ultrasonic transducers. Energy losses (or energy dissipation) in ferroelectrics are one of the most critical issues for high power devices, such as therapeutic ultrasonic transducers, large displacement actuators, SONAR projectors, and high frequency medical imaging transducers. The losses of ferroelectric materials have three distinct types, i.e., elastic, piezoelectric and dielectric losses. People have been investigating the mechanisms of these losses and are trying hard to control and minimize them so as to reduce performance degradation in electromechanical devices. There are impressive progresses made in the past several decades on this topic, but some confusions still exist. Therefore, a systematic review to define related concepts and clear up confusions is urgently in need. With this objective in mind, we provide here a comprehensive review on the energy losses in ferroelectrics, including related mechanisms, characterization techniques and collections of published data on many ferroelectric materials to provide a useful resource for interested scientists and engineers to design electromechanical devices and to gain a global perspective on the complex physical phenomena involved. More importantly, based on the analysis of available information, we proposed a general theoretical model to describe the inherent relationships among elastic, dielectric, piezoelectric and mechanical losses. For multi-domain ferroelectric single crystals and ceramics, intrinsic and extrinsic energy

  18. Losses in Ferroelectric Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Wenhua; Cao, Wenwu

    2015-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials are the best dielectric and piezoelectric materials known today. Since the discovery of barium titanate in the 1940s, lead zirconate titanate ceramics in the 1950s and relaxor-PT single crystals (such as lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate and lead zinc niobate-lead titanate) in the 1980s and 1990s, perovskite ferroelectric materials have been the dominating piezoelectric materials for electromechanical devices, and are widely used in sensors, actuators and ultrasonic transducers. Energy losses (or energy dissipation) in ferroelectrics are one of the most critical issues for high power devices, such as therapeutic ultrasonic transducers, large displacement actuators, SONAR projectors, and high frequency medical imaging transducers. The losses of ferroelectric materials have three distinct types, i.e., elastic, piezoelectric and dielectric losses. People have been investigating the mechanisms of these losses and are trying hard to control and minimize them so as to reduce performance degradation in electromechanical devices. There are impressive progresses made in the past several decades on this topic, but some confusions still exist. Therefore, a systematic review to define related concepts and clear up confusions is urgently in need. With this objective in mind, we provide here a comprehensive review on the energy losses in ferroelectrics, including related mechanisms, characterization techniques and collections of published data on many ferroelectric materials to provide a useful resource for interested scientists and engineers to design electromechanical devices and to gain a global perspective on the complex physical phenomena involved. More importantly, based on the analysis of available information, we proposed a general theoretical model to describe the inherent relationships among elastic, dielectric, piezoelectric and mechanical losses. For multi-domain ferroelectric single crystals and ceramics, intrinsic and extrinsic energy

  19. Research progress of the endocrine disrupting activities of polychlorinated biphenyls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jingming; QIN Zhanfen; CONG Lin; XU Xiaobai

    2004-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are global persistent organic pollutants. Almost all commercial PCBs mixtures, single PCB congener, and their metabolites possess endocrine disrupting activities. They can disrupt the estrogen/androgen system, thyroid hormone system and other endocrine systems by interfering with the synthesis, transport, storage, metabolism, and feedback regulation of hormones. The newest data related to the endocrine disrupting activities of PCBs and their mechanisms are reviewed and the research perspectives are also discussed.

  20. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faniband, Moosa; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo AG

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends. PMID:24369128

  1. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faniband, Moosa; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo A G

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends.

  2. Disruptive behavior in the elementary school with special curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Medved, Tina

    2016-01-01

    The thesis describes disruptive behaviour issues in pupils with mild intellectual disabilities. In the theoretical part I present mild intellectual disabilities in the light of mental development, emotional and behavioural difficulties/disorders. Further on I discuss the issue of disruptive behaviour. Then I focus on disruptive behaviours in pupils with with mild intellectual disabilities. I still present mental disorder in pupils with mild intellectual disabilities. I was interested in t...

  3. Mechanical cell disruption for lipid extraction from microalgal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Ronald; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W T; Tull, Dedreia L; Webley, Paul A

    2013-07-01

    Cell disruption is an integral part of the downstream operation required to produce biodiesel from microalgae. This study investigated the use of ultrasonication and high-pressure homogenization (HPH) as cell disruption methods for two microalgal species, Tetraselmis suecica (TS) and Chlorococcum sp. (C sp.). The kinetics of cell disruption followed a first-order model (0.65triglyceride yield. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Endocrine disrupter - estradiol - in Chesapeake Bay tributaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorabawila, Nelum [University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States); Gupta, Gian [University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States)]. E-mail: gcgupta@umes.edu

    2005-04-11

    Exogenous chemicals that interfere with natural hormonal functions are considered endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Estradiol (17{beta}-estradiol or E2) is the most potent of all xenoestrogens. Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) production in male fish occurs at E2 concentrations as low as 1 ng l{sup -1}. E2 reaches aquatic systems mainly through sewage and animal waste disposal. Surface water samples from ponds, rivers (Wicomico, Manokin and Pocomoke), sewage treatment plants (STPs), and coastal bays (Assawoman, Monie, Chincoteague, and Tangier Sound - Chesapeake Bay) on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were analyzed for E2 using enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). E2 concentrations in river waters varied between 1.9 and 6.0 ng l{sup -1}. Highest E2 concentrations in river waters were observed immediately downstream of STPs. E2 concentrations in all the coastal bays tested were 2.3-3.2 ng l{sup -1}.

  5. Minimally disruptive schedule repair for MCM missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineaux, Matthew; Auslander, Bryan; Moore, Philip G.; Gupta, Kalyan M.

    2015-05-01

    Mine countermeasures (MCM) missions entail planning and operations in very dynamic and uncertain operating environments, which pose considerable risk to personnel and equipment. Frequent schedule repairs are needed that consider the latest operating conditions to keep mission on target. Presently no decision support tools are available for the challenging task of MCM mission rescheduling. To address this capability gap, we have developed the CARPE system to assist operation planners. CARPE constantly monitors the operational environment for changes and recommends alternative repaired schedules in response. It includes a novel schedule repair algorithm called Case-Based Local Schedule Repair (CLOSR) that automatically repairs broken schedules while satisfying the requirement of minimal operational disruption. It uses a case-based approach to represent repair strategies and apply them to new situations. Evaluation of CLOSR on simulated MCM operations demonstrates the effectiveness of case-based strategy. Schedule repairs are generated rapidly, ensure the elimination of all mines, and achieve required levels of clearance.

  6. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. King

    2004-03-31

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report.

  7. Metabolism disrupting chemicals and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindel, Jerrold J; Blumberg, Bruce; Cave, Mathew; Machtinger, Ronit; Mantovani, Alberto; Mendez, Michelle A; Nadal, Angel; Palanza, Paola; Panzica, Giancarlo; Sargis, Robert; Vandenberg, Laura N; Vom Saal, Frederick

    2017-03-01

    The recent epidemics of metabolic diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes(T2D), liver lipid disorders and metabolic syndrome have largely been attributed to genetic background and changes in diet, exercise and aging. However, there is now considerable evidence that other environmental factors may contribute to the rapid increase in the incidence of these metabolic diseases. This review will examine changes to the incidence of obesity, T2D and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the contribution of genetics to these disorders and describe the role of the endocrine system in these metabolic disorders. It will then specifically focus on the role of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the etiology of obesity, T2D and NAFLD while finally integrating the information on EDCs on multiple metabolic disorders that could lead to metabolic syndrome. We will specifically examine evidence linking EDC exposures during critical periods of development with metabolic diseases that manifest later in life and across generations.

  8. The disruptive effect of Think Aloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janni; Yssing, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    Thinking Aloud Thinking Aloud is the most commonly used technique used to test users´ interaction with computers. The assumption is that Think Aloud gives access to what goes on in the users´ minds. However, interfaces are multi modal and play heavily on user´s visual perception. Reflecting upon...... Think Aloud (TA), we ask the question: what happens when users are required to verbalise their visual perceptions and interactions? We argue that TA may have a disruptive effect, suggesting that other techniques be considered. With a theoretical distinction between focal and subsidiary awareness...... and a focus on the sense making process, we develop a frame for test of user´s visual interaction which rely on the coordination between hand/mouse and eye/cursor.Author Keywords: Think Aloud, visual perception, interaction, test...

  9. Disrupting neuronal transmission: Mechanism of DBS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi eChiken

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Applying high-frequency stimulation to deep brain rain structure, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS, has now been recognized an effective therapeutic option for a wide range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. DBS targeting the basal ganglia thalamo-cortical loop, especially the internal segment of the globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus and thalamus, has been widely employed as a successful surgical therapy for movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia and tremor. However, the neurophysiological mechanism underling the action of DBS remains unclear and is still under debate: does DBS inhibit or excite local neuronal elements? In this review, we will examine this question and propose the alternative interpretation: DBS dissociates inputs and outputs, resulting in disruption of abnormal signal transmission.

  10. Stabilization of tearing modes to suppress major disruptions in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, J.A.; Carreras, B.; Hicks, H.R.; Lynch, S.J.; Waddell, B.V.

    1979-02-01

    It is shown, for q-profiles which lead to a disruption, that the control of the amplitude of the 2/1 tearing mode avoids the disruption. Q-profiles measured in T-4 and PLT before a major disruption were studied. Two methods of controlling the 2/1 mode amplitude have been considered: (1) Feedback stabilization with the feedback signal locked in phase with the 2/1 mode. (2) Heating slightly outside the q = 2 surface. In both cases it is only necessary to decrease the 2/1 mode amplitude to suppress the disruption. It is not always necessary to stabilize the unstable modes fully.

  11. A model of disruptive surgeon behavior in the perioperative environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Amalia; Elder, William B

    2014-09-01

    Surgeons are the physicians with the highest rates of documented disruptive behavior. We hypothesized that a unified conceptual model of disruptive surgeon behavior could be developed based on specific individual and system factors in the perioperative environment. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 operating room staff of diverse occupations at a single institution. Interviews were analyzed using grounded theory methods. Participants described episodes of disruptive surgeon behavior, personality traits of perpetrators, environmental conditions of power, and situations when disruptive behavior was demonstrated. Verbal hostility and throwing or hitting objects were the most commonly described disruptive behaviors. Participants indicated that surgical training attracts and creates individuals with particular personality traits, including a sense of shame. Interviewees stated this behavior is tolerated because surgeons have unchecked power, have strong money-making capabilities for the institution, and tend to direct disruptive behavior toward the least powerful employees. The most frequent situational stressors were when something went wrong during an operation and working with unfamiliar team members. Each factor group (ie, situational stressors, cultural conditions, and personality factors) was viewed as being necessary, but none of them alone were sufficient to catalyze disruptive behavior events. Disruptive physician behavior has strong implications for the work environment and patient safety. This model can be used by hospitals to better conceptualize conditions that facilitate disruptive surgeon behavior and to establish programs to mitigate conduct that threatens patient safety and employee satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. DISRUPTION MANAGEMENT FOR SUPPLY CHAIN COORDINATION WITH EXPONENTIAL DEMAND FUNCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The coordination problem of a supply chain comprising one supplier and one retailer under market demand disruption is studied in this article. A novel exponential demand function is adopted, and the penalty cost is introduced explicitly to capture the deviation production cost caused by the market demand disruption. The optimal strategies are obtained for different disruption scale under the centralized mode. For the decentralized mode, it is proved that the supply chain can be fully coordinated by adjusting the price discount policy appropriately when disruption occurs. Furthermore, the authors point out that similar results can be established for more general demand functions that represent different market circumstances if certain assumptions are satisfied.

  13. Exploring the relationship between retrieval disruption from collaboration and recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Sarah J; Rajaram, Suparna

    2011-07-01

    When people recall together in a collaborative group they recall less than their potential. This phenomenon of collaborative inhibition is explained in terms of retrieval disruption. However, collaborative recall also re-exposes individuals to items recalled by others that they themselves might otherwise have forgotten. This re-exposure produces post-collaborative benefits in individual recall. The current study examined whether reduced retrieval disruption during group recall is related not only to less collaborative inhibition, but also to greater post-collaborative recall benefits. To test this we devised a paradigm to calculate the extent to which each individual experienced retrieval disruption during group recall. We also included two types of collaborative groups, one of which was expected to experience greater retrieval disruption than the other. Results suggest that the relationship between retrieval disruption and recall performance depends on the level at which retrieval disruption is measured. When retrieval disruption was assessed at the individual level, then minimising retrieval disruption was associated with higher recall (i.e., less collaborative inhibition and greater post-collaborative individual recall). However, when retrieval disruption was assessed at the group level there was no relationship with recall. Furthermore, the findings from this design suggest a role of cross-cueing in modulating group recall levels.

  14. Is your hospital safe? Disruptive behavior and workplace bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F

    2008-01-01

    The author defines disruptive behavior; distinguishes among disruptive, impaired, and incompetent behavior; describes the prevalence of disruptive behavior; and identifies some recommendations to prevent and resolve disruptive behavior in hospitals. The proactive prevention and management of workplace bullying have implications on managing costs, quality, and satisfaction in hospitals among patients, families, staff, and physicians. The author describes an evidence-based framework and recommends that hospital administrators use it to design an organizational approach to promoting a work environment that is psychologically and physiologically safe and that enables staff to focus on delivering high-quality, cost-effective, and satisfying care.

  15. Disrupted Working Memory Circuitry in Adolescent Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Eckfeld

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with schizophrenia (SZ consistently show deficits in spatial working memory (WM and associated atypical patterns of neural activity within key WM regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC and parietal cortices. However, little research has focused on adolescent psychosis (AP and potential age-associated disruptions of WM circuitry that may occur in youth with this severe form of illness. Here we utilized each subject’s individual spatial WM capacity to investigate task-based neural dysfunction in 17 patients with AP (16.58 ± 2.60 years old as compared to 17 typically developing, demographically comparable adolescents (18.07 ± 3.26 years old. AP patients showed lower behavioral performance at higher WM loads and lower overall WM capacity compared to healthy controls. Whole-brain activation analyses revealed greater bilateral precentral and right postcentral activity in controls relative to AP patients, when controlling for individual WM capacity. Seed-based psychophysiological interaction (PPI analyses revealed significantly greater co-activation between the left dlPFC and left frontal pole in controls relative to AP patients. Significant group-by-age interactions were observed in both whole-brain and PPI analyses, with AP patients showing atypically greater neural activity and stronger coupling between WM task activated brain regions as a function of increasing age. Additionally, AP patients demonstrated positive relationships between right dlPFC neural activity and task performance, but unlike healthy controls, failed to show associations between neural activity and out-of-scanner neurocognitive performance. Collectively, these findings are consistent with atypical WM-related functioning and disrupted developmental processes in youth with AP.

  16. Pungency in paprika (Capsicum annuum). 1. Decrease of capsaicinoid content following cellular disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum-Titze, Petra; Hiepler, Constanze; Mueller-Seitz, Erika; Petz, Michael

    2002-02-27

    The capsaicinoid content in fruits of Capsicum annuum decreased within several days to a level of only 10% of the starting value when cells were disrupted by homogenization. This decrease was not observed in fruits that were carefully cut into halves. The analysis of one half made it possible to determine the reference content at time zero for the second half. A much lower decrease was observed when minced fruits were stored under nitrogen, whereas storage under oxygen resulted in considerable losses of capsaicinoids, indicating oxidative processes as a cause for the decrease of capsaicinoid content.

  17. Weight Loss Nutritional Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerson, Joan M.

    Obesity has reached what may be considered epidemic proportions in the United States, not only for adults but for children. Because of the medical implications and health care costs associated with obesity, as well as the negative social and psychological impacts, many individuals turn to nonprescription nutritional weight loss supplements hoping for a quick fix, and the weight loss industry has responded by offering a variety of products that generates billions of dollars each year in sales. Most nutritional weight loss supplements are purported to work by increasing energy expenditure, modulating carbohydrate or fat metabolism, increasing satiety, inducing diuresis, or blocking fat absorption. To review the literally hundreds of nutritional weight loss supplements available on the market today is well beyond the scope of this chapter. Therefore, several of the most commonly used supplements were selected for critical review, and practical recommendations are provided based on the findings of well controlled, randomized clinical trials that examined their efficacy. In most cases, the nutritional supplements reviewed either elicited no meaningful effect or resulted in changes in body weight and composition that are similar to what occurs through a restricted diet and exercise program. Although there is some evidence to suggest that herbal forms of ephedrine, such as ma huang, combined with caffeine or caffeine and aspirin (i.e., ECA stack) is effective for inducing moderate weight loss in overweight adults, because of the recent ban on ephedra manufacturers must now use ephedra-free ingredients, such as bitter orange, which do not appear to be as effective. The dietary fiber, glucomannan, also appears to hold some promise as a possible treatment for weight loss, but other related forms of dietary fiber, including guar gum and psyllium, are ineffective.

  18. Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Piroux

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA are associated with thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and fetal loss but they occur in a variety of diseases. Despite many efforts, a correlation between the specificity of particular subgroups of APA and particular clinical situations remains to be established. The antigens at the origin of APA remain to be identified. We discuss here the possible links between cell apoptosis or necrosis, leading to plasma membrane alterations, and the occurrence of APA in response to sustained stimulation. The pathogenic potential of APA is also considered with respect to recurrent pregnancy loss.

  19. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... America Information For… Media Policy Makers Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing plays ... sounds over an extended period. Preventing Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Hearing loss caused by exposure to loud sound ...

  20. Overweight, Obesity, and Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overweight, obesity, and weight loss fact sheet ePublications Overweight, obesity, and weight loss fact sheet Print this fact sheet Overweight, obesity, and weight loss fact sheet (full version) ( ...

  1. Evaluation and Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on Disrupted Beam in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toprek, Dragan; /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2008-12-18

    This paper presents calculations of detector solenoid effects on disrupted primary beam in the ILC 14 mrad extraction line. Particle tracking simulations are performed for evaluation of primary beam loss along the line as well as of beam distribution and polarization at Compton Interaction Point. The calculations are done both without and with solenoid compensation. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

  2. Heat loss from Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Kenneth; Næraa, Rikke

    1997-01-01

    Determination of heat loss coefficients for buildings in Denmark. The coefficient are determined for 15 building groups and 3 year intervals. They are based on the BBR-registre and assumptions of U-values(W/K*m2)and computed in a simple spreed sheet model.The results are used in the REVEILLE...... project for calculations in the SESAM model....

  3. Responding to Amphibian Loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendelson III, J.R.; Lips, K.R.; Gagliardo, R.W.; Rabb, G.B.; Collins, J.P.; Diffendorfer, J.E.; Daszak, P.; Ibáñez D., R.; Zippel, K.C.; Lawson, D.P.; Wright, K.M.; Stuart, S.N.; Gascon, C.; da Silva, H.R.; Burrowes, P.A.; Joglar, R.L.; La Marca, E.; Lötters, S.; du Preez, L.H.; Weldon, C.; Hyatt, A.; Rodriguez-Mahecha, J.V.; Hunt, S.; Robertson, H.; Lock, B.; Raxworthy, C.J.; Frost, D.R.; Lacy, R.C.; Alford, R.A.; Campbell, J.A.; Parra-Olea, G.; Bolaños, F.; Calvo Domingo, J.J.; Halliday, T.; Murphy, J.B.; Wake, M.H.; Coloma, L.A.; Kuzmin, S.L.; Price, M.S.; Howell, K.M.; Lau, M.; Pethiyagoda, R.; Boone, M.; Lannoo, M.J.; Blaustein, A.R.; Dobson, A.; Griffiths, R.A.; Crump, M.L.; Wake, D.B.; Brodie Jr, E.D.

    2006-01-01

    In their Policy Forum "Confronting amphibian declines and extinctions" (7 July, p. 48), J. R. Mendelson III and colleagues offer a strategy for "stopping" the widespread losses of frogs, toads, and salamanders. Disease research and captive breeding figure prominently in their call for action.

  4. Property insurance loss distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnecki, Krzysztof; Kukla, Grzegorz; Weron, Rafał

    2000-11-01

    Property claim services (PCS) provides indices for losses resulting from catastrophic events in the US. In this paper, we study these indices and take a closer look at distributions underlying insurance claims. Surprisingly, the lognormal distribution seems to give a better fit than the Paretian one. Moreover, lagged autocorrelation study reveals a mean-reverting structure of indices returns.

  5. Loss and damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, Saleemul; Roberts, Erin; Fenton, Adrian

    2013-11-01

    Loss and damage is a relative newcomer to the climate change agenda. It has the potential to reinvigorate existing mitigation and adaptation efforts, but this will ultimately require leadership from developed countries and enhanced understanding of several key issues, such as limits to adaptation.

  6. Cascadia's Staggering Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Vogt, B.

    2001-05-01

    Recent worldwide earthquakes have resulted in staggering losses. The Northridge, California; Kobe, Japan; Loma Prieta, California; Izmit, Turkey; Chi-Chi, Taiwan; and Bhuj, India earthquakes, which range from magnitudes 6.7 to 7.7, have all occurred near populated areas. These earthquakes have resulted in estimated losses between \\3 and \\300 billion, with tens to tens of thousands of fatalities. Subduction zones are capable of producing the largest earthquakes. The 1939 M7.8 Chilean, the 1960 M9.5 Chilean, the 1964 M9.2 Alaskan, the 1970 M7.8 Peruvian, the 1985 M7.9 Mexico City and the 2001 M7.7 Bhuj earthquakes are damaging subduction zone quakes. The Cascadia fault zone poses a tremendous hazard in the Pacific Northwest due to the ground shaking and tsunami inundation hazards combined with the population. To address the Cascadia subduction zone threat, the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries conducted a preliminary statewide loss study. The 1998 Oregon study incorporated a M8.5 quake, the influence of near surface soil effects and default building, social and economic data available in FEMA's HAZUS97 software. Direct financial losses are projected at over \\$12 billion. Casualties are estimated at about 13,000. Over 5,000 of the casualties are estimated to result in fatalities from hazards relating to tsunamis and unreinforced masonry buildings.

  7. Weight loss - unintentional

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your weight loss. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if: You or a family member loses more ... to Expect at Your Office Visit The ... be asked questions about your medical history and symptoms, including: How much weight have ...

  8. Occupational hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... jobs. Causes Over time, repeated exposure to loud noise and music can cause hearing loss. Watch this video about: ... Airline ground maintenance Construction Farming Jobs involving loud music or machinery Military jobs that involve combat, aircraft noise, or other loud noise posts In the United ...

  9. From Loss to Awakening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高崇毅; 李柳英

    2007-01-01

    Katherine Mansfield's short story A Dill Pickle (1917) shows a full picture of the female image to the readers: Vera's loss in love and her awakening from the sorrow and despair.Vera changes during the talk with her former boyfriend and achieves in awakening as a female at last.

  10. Heat loss from Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Kenneth; Næraa, Rikke

    1997-01-01

    Determination of heat loss coefficients for buildings in Denmark. The coefficient are determined for 15 building groups and 3 year intervals. They are based on the BBR-registre and assumptions of U-values(W/K*m2)and computed in a simple spreed sheet model.The results are used in the REVEILLE...

  11. Evaluation of cell-disruption effects of pulsed-electric-field treatment of Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jie; Vannela, Raveender; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2011-04-15

    In order to use Synechocystis PCC 6803 as feedstock of nonpetroleum-based diesel fuel, pulsed electric field (PEF) technology was used for cell disruption prior to extraction of intracellular lipids. Severe cell disruption was evident after PEF treatment, especially with treatment intensity (TI) > 35 kWh/m(3). Temperature increase during the treatment brought about most of the destruction of autofluorescence compounds, as well as a fraction of inactivation and the destruction of the plasma and thylakoid membranes. However, the forces associated with the pulsing electric field caused significant damage to the plasma membrane, cell wall, and thylakoid membrane, and it even led to complete disruption of some cells into fragments, which resulted in biomass loss. Treatment by PEF enhanced the potential for the low-toxicity solvent isopropanol to access lipid molecules during subsequent solvent extraction, leading to lower usage of isopropanol for the same extraction efficiency. Thus, PEF shows promise for lowering the costs and environmental effects of the lipid-extraction step.

  12. Formation of planetary debris discs around white dwarfs I: Tidal disruption of an extremely eccentric asteroid

    CERN Document Server

    Veras, Dimitri; Bonsor, Amy; Gaensicke, Boris T

    2014-01-01

    25%-50% of all white dwarfs (WDs) host observable and dynamically active remnant planetary systems based on the presence of close-in circumstellar dust and gas and photospheric metal pollution. Currently-accepted theoretical explanations for the origin of this matter include asteroids that survive the star's giant branch evolution at au-scale distances and are subsequently perturbed onto WD-grazing orbits following stellar mass loss. In this work we investigate the tidal disruption of these highly-eccentric (e > 0.98) asteroids as they approach and tidally disrupt around the WD. We analytically compute the disruption timescale and compare the result with fully self-consistent numerical simulations of rubble piles by using the N-body code PKDGRAV. We find that this timescale is highly dependent on the orbit's pericentre and largely independent of its semimajor axis. We establish that spherical asteroids readily break up and form highly eccentric collisionless rings, which do not accrete onto the WD without add...

  13. A literature review of the disruptive effects of user fee exemption policies on health systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridde Valéry

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several low- and middle-income countries have exempted patients from user fees in certain categories of population or of services. These exemptions are very effective in lifting part of the financial barrier to access to services, but they have been organized within unstable health systems where there are sometimes numerous dysfunctions. The objective of this article is to bring to light the disruptions triggered by exemption policies in health systems of low- and middle-income countries. Methods Scoping review of 23 scientific articles. The data were synthesized according to the six essential functions of health systems. Results The disruptions included specifically: 1 immediate and significant increases in service utilization; 2 perceived heavier workloads for health workers, feelings of being exploited and overworked, and decline in morale; 3 lack of information about free services provided and their reimbursement; 4 unavailability of drugs and delays in the distribution of consumables; 5 unpredictable and insufficient funding, revenue losses for health centres, reimbursement delays; 6 the multiplicity of actors and the difficulty of identifying who is responsible (‘no blame’ game, and deficiencies in planning and communication. Conclusions These disruptive elements give us an idea of what is to be expected if exemption policies do not put in place all the required conditions in terms of preparation, planning and complementary measures. There is a lack of knowledge on the effects of exemptions on all the functions of health systems because so few studies have been carried out from this perspective.

  14. A reliable facility location design model with site-dependent disruption in the imperfect information context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Lifen; Wang, Xifu; Fan, Hongqiang; Li, Xiaopeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a reliable facility location design model under imperfect information with site-dependent disruptions; i.e., each facility is subject to a unique disruption probability that varies across the space. In the imperfect information contexts, customers adopt a realistic "trial-and-error" strategy to visit facilities; i.e., they visit a number of pre-assigned facilities sequentially until they arrive at the first operational facility or give up looking for the service. This proposed model aims to balance initial facility investment and expected long-term operational cost by finding the optimal facility locations. A nonlinear integer programming model is proposed to describe this problem. We apply a linearization technique to reduce the difficulty of solving the proposed model. A number of problem instances are studied to illustrate the performance of the proposed model. The results indicate that our proposed model can reveal a number of interesting insights into the facility location design with site-dependent disruptions, including the benefit of backup facilities and system robustness against variation of the loss-of-service penalty.

  15. Heritable Targeted Gene Disruption in Zebrafish Using Designed Zinc Finger Nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyon, Yannick; McCammon, Jasmine M; Miller, Jeffrey C; Faraji, Farhoud; Ngo, Catherine; Katibah, George E; Amora, Rainier; Hocking, Toby D; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Amacher, Sharon L

    2009-01-01

    We describe here the use of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) for somatic and germline disruption of genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio), where targeted mutagenesis was previously intractable. ZFNs induce a targeted double-strand break in the genome that is repaired to generate small insertions and deletions. We designed ZFNs targeting the zebrafish golden and no tail/Brachyury genes. In both cases, injection of ZFN-encoding mRNA into 1-cell embryos yielded a high percentage of animals carrying distinct mutations at the ZFN-specified position and exhibiting expected loss-of-function phenotypes. Disrupted ntl alleles were transmitted from ZFN mRNA-injected founder animals in over half the adults tested at frequencies averaging 20%. The frequency and precision of gene disruption events observed, in combination with the ability to design ZFNs against any locus, open fundamentally novel avenues of experimentation, and suggest that ZFN technology may be widely applied to many organisms that allow mRNA delivery into the fertilized egg. PMID:18500334

  16. Heritable targeted gene disruption in zebrafish using designed zinc-finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyon, Yannick; McCammon, Jasmine M; Miller, Jeffrey C; Faraji, Farhoud; Ngo, Catherine; Katibah, George E; Amora, Rainier; Hocking, Toby D; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Amacher, Sharon L

    2008-06-01

    We describe the use of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) for somatic and germline disruption of genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio), in which targeted mutagenesis was previously intractable. ZFNs induce a targeted double-strand break in the genome that is repaired to generate small insertions and deletions. We designed ZFNs targeting the zebrafish golden and no tail/Brachyury (ntl) genes and developed a budding yeast-based assay to identify the most active ZFNs for use in vivo. Injection of ZFN-encoding mRNA into one-cell embryos yielded a high percentage of animals carrying distinct mutations at the ZFN-specified position and exhibiting expected loss-of-function phenotypes. Over half the ZFN mRNA-injected founder animals transmitted disrupted ntl alleles at frequencies averaging 20%. The frequency and precision of gene-disruption events observed suggest that this approach should be applicable to any loci in zebrafish or in other organisms that allow mRNA delivery into the fertilized egg.

  17. Luminosity Loss due to Beam Distortion and the Beam-Beam Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, Tor O; Seryi, Andrei; Sramek, Christopher K

    2005-01-01

    In a linear collider, sources of emittance dilution such as transverse wakefields or dispersive errors will couple the vertical phase space to the longitudinal position within the beam (the so-called ‘banana effect'). When the Intersection Point (IP) disruption parameter is large, these beam distortions will be amplified by a single bunch kink instability which will lead to luminosity loss. We study this phenomena both analytically using linear theory and via numerical simulation. In particular, we examine the dependence of the luminosity loss on the wavelength of the beam distortions and the disruption parameter. This analysis may prove useful when optimizing the vertical disruption parameter for luminosity operation with given beam distortions.

  18. ComboCoding: Combined intra-/inter-flow network coding for TCP over disruptive MANETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chia Chen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available TCP over wireless networks is challenging due to random losses and ACK interference. Although network coding schemes have been proposed to improve TCP robustness against extreme random losses, a critical problem still remains of DATA–ACK interference. To address this issue, we use inter-flow coding between DATA and ACK to reduce the number of transmissions among nodes. In addition, we also utilize a “pipeline” random linear coding scheme with adaptive redundancy to overcome high packet loss over unreliable links. The resulting coding scheme, ComboCoding, combines intra-flow and inter-flow coding to provide robust TCP transmission in disruptive wireless networks. The main contributions of our scheme are twofold; the efficient combination of random linear coding and XOR coding on bi-directional streams (DATA and ACK, and the novel redundancy control scheme that adapts to time-varying and space-varying link loss. The adaptive ComboCoding was tested on a variable hop string topology with unstable links and on a multipath MANET with dynamic topology. Simulation results show that TCP with ComboCoding delivers higher throughput than with other coding options in high loss and mobile scenarios, while introducing minimal overhead in normal operation.

  19. A Preferred Home for Disrupted Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Observed burps from the shredding of stars by supermassive black holes suggest that this behavior is more common in an unusual type of galaxy. A new study has examined NGC 3156, an example from this galaxy type, to better understand what causes this preference.Stellar BetrayalAn artists illustration of a tidal disruption event, in which a star is sent on a plunging orbit near a supermassive black hole and is subsequently torn apart by the black holes tidal forces. [NASA/CXC/M.Weiss]Tidal disruption events (TDEs) are events where a star plunges too close to a supermassive black hole and is torn apart by the black holes tidal forces. Weve observed roughly a dozen of these violent events in the last five years, and we expect to finds hundreds to thousands more with future surveys.TDEs are triggered when a star is sent on a plunging orbit close to a supermassive black hole. But what sends the star into harms way? One possible culprit is a dynamical mechanism known as two-body relaxation. In this process, stars orbiting a black hole undergo individual starstar interactions that, with a close enough encounter, can send them on plunging orbits.Choosing an Unusual HostOne puzzle with TDEs is that they tend to be preferentially found in rather unusual galaxies: galaxies that recently exhibited a lot of star formation but are now quiescent. In particular, several of the TDEs have been discovered in what are known as E+A galaxies, a rare subtype of elliptical galaxy that has recently undergone a major starburst.Since this subtype makes up only ~0.1% of all galaxies, its surprising that weve found so many TDEs in E+A galaxies so far. So why the preference?In an effort to answer this question, two scientists, Nicholas Stone (Einstein Fellow at Columbia University) and Sjoert van Velzen (Hubble Fellow at Johns Hopkins University), have teamed up to examine a nearby E+A galaxy, NGC 3156.Tidal disruption rates as a function of central supermassive-black-hole mass. The blue curve

  20. Why looking at social media at work disrupts your concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Wiewiura, Joachim Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    You might have heard of the bystander-effect, but what about the Pinball-effect, which disrupts your attention on important tasks?......You might have heard of the bystander-effect, but what about the Pinball-effect, which disrupts your attention on important tasks?...

  1. High trait anxiety: a challenge for disrupting fear memory reconsolidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeter, M.; Kindt, M.

    2013-01-01

    Disrupting reconsolidation may be promising in the treatment of anxiety disorders but the fear-reducing effects are thus far solely demonstrated in the average organism. A relevant question is whether disrupting fear memory reconsolidation is less effective in individuals who are vulnerable to

  2. Why looking at social media at work disrupts your concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Wiewiura, Joachim Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    You might have heard of the bystander-effect, but what about the Pinball-effect, which disrupts your attention on important tasks?......You might have heard of the bystander-effect, but what about the Pinball-effect, which disrupts your attention on important tasks?...

  3. Review of railway disruption management practice and literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghaemi, N.; Goverde, R.M.P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the challenges of railway traffic controllers in dealing with big disruptions and the kind of support tools that could help to improve their task in terms of performance and lead time. The disruption handling process can be partitioned into three phases according to the batht

  4. Testicular dysgenesis syndrome: possible role of endocrine disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Katrine; Asklund, Camilla; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2006-01-01

    and molecular studies, all suggestive of an interrelation between the different symptoms. The aetiology of TDS is suspected to be related to genetic and/or environmental factors, including endocrine disrupters. Few human studies have found associations/correlations between endocrine disrupters, including...

  5. Noncontingent peer attention as treatment for disruptive classroom behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, K. M.; Drew, H A; Weber, N L

    2000-01-01

    A functional analysis isolated peer attention as the primary maintaining variable for disruptive behavior displayed by a student with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Using a brief reversal design, noncontingent reinforcement was then shown to reduce disruptive behavior relative to the peer attention condition. Implications for assessing behavior disorders in mainstream school settings are discussed.

  6. Disruption Management of Rolling Stock in Passenger Railway Transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.K. Nielsen (Lars Kjaer); G. Maróti (Gábor)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis paper deals with real-time disruption management of rolling stock in passenger railway transportation. We present a generic framework for modeling disruptions in railway rolling stock schedules. The framework is presented as an online combinatorial decision problem where the

  7. Parents' Education, Personality, and Their Children's Disruptive Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwati; Japar, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to understand the effects of parents' education and personality aspects on child disruptive behavior, (2) to know the correlation between the parents' personality aspects (N-Deference, N-Succorance, N-Dominance and N-Aggression) and the children' disruptive behavior. A quantitative approach to the correlational…

  8. Teachers' Perceptions of Disruptive Behaviour in Schools: A Psychological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Poppy; Schlösser, Annette; Scarr, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into school teachers' perceptions of disruptive behaviour from a psychological perspective. The inter-disciplinary nature of this research bridges the understanding between educational and psychological perspectives on disruptive behaviour. This article discusses evidence that for the most troubled pupils,…

  9. Disruption management of the vehicle routing problem with vehicle breakdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Q; Fu, Z; Lysgaard, Jens

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a new class of problem, the disrupted vehicle routing problem (VRP), which deals with the disruptions that occur at the execution stage of a VRP plan. The paper then focuses on one type of such problem, in which a vehicle breaks down during the delivery and a new routing...

  10. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING EFFECTS OF BUTYLPARABEN: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallabi Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing concern in the field of endocrine disruption over the presence of various endocrine disrupting chemicals in Pharmaceuticals and Personal care products (PPCPs. This concern has also been as PPCPs are most widely used and had led to introduction of thousands of new and complex chemicals that enter the environment in large quantities. The effect of the chemicals has not only been restricted to human who are exposed directly to the chemicals or the animals which gets exposed to the chemicals through wide variety of veterinary drugs, but also the aquatic organisms and other form of Wildlife which are non target and indirectly gets exposed to the chemicals through individual human activity. Parabens includes a group of compound of which methylparaben, butylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben are most widely used as preservatives in various PPCPs. Recent concern over the use of parabens has been drawn by the scientific community as these chemicals are reported to exert a weak estrogenic activity, with butylparaben showing the most potent activity among methyl-, ethyl- and propyl esters in in vitro recombinant yeast assay and in in vivo uterotrophic assay. Human exposure to butylparaben which occur mainly through inhalation, ingestion, or eye or skin contact, from intake of foods or drugs or use of cosmetics and personal care products where butylparaben is mainly used as a preservative. Effects of butylparaben are studied in various animal model systems like rodents to determine the possible effects in human which showed various effects which include defects in male reproductive system like increase in weight of epididymis, also change in serum testosterone level and a significant increase in uterine weight in ovariectomized and immature rats. Other effects include irritation to the respiratory tract, allergic skin reactions, atrophy of lymphoid tissue in the spleen, thymus, and lymph nodes and multifocal

  11. Divorce and women's risk of health insurance loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Bridget; Smock, Pamela J

    2012-01-01

    This article bridges the literatures on the economic consequences of divorce for women with that on marital transitions and health by focusing on women's health insurance. Using a monthly calendar of marital status and health insurance coverage from 1,442 women in the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we examine how women's health insurance changes after divorce. Our estimates suggest that roughly 115,000 American women lose private health insurance annually in the months following divorce and that roughly 65,000 of these women become uninsured. The loss of insurance coverage we observe is not just a short-term disruption. Women's rates of insurance coverage remain depressed for more than two years after divorce. Insurance loss may compound the economic losses women experience after divorce and contribute to as well as compound previously documented health declines following divorce.

  12. DIVORCE AND WOMEN'S RISK OF HEALTH INSURANCE LOSS*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Bridget; Smock, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    This article bridges the literatures on the economic consequences of divorce for women with that on marital transitions and health by focusing on women's health insurance. Using a monthly calendar of marital status and health insurance coverage from 1,442 women in the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we examine how women's health insurance changes after divorce. Our estimates suggest that roughly 115,000 American women lose private health insurance annually in the months following divorce and that roughly 65,000 of these women become uninsured. The loss of insurance coverage we observe is not just a short-term disruption. Women's rates of insurance coverage remain depressed for more than two years after divorce. Insurance loss may compound the economic losses women experience after divorce, and contribute to as well as compound previously documented health declines following divorce. PMID:23147653

  13. Stochastic Loss of an Occasionally-Essential Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerison, Elizabeth; Desai, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Many biological functions are useful only in specific circumstances. For example, hundreds of single-gene deletions in yeast increase growth rate in some laboratory conditions. During periods of disuse, these genes are vulnerable to disruption or loss via random mutation and genetic drift. Yet they are maintained in natural populations, suggesting that they must be useful at least occasionally. Here we quantify the risk of loss of such occasionally-important functions. We focus on predicting how the statistics of environmental change determine the mean time to loss of the function. Our results suggest a refinement to the Savageau 'use-it-or-lose-it' principle of regulation, and put theoretical lower bounds on how often these functions must be necessary to the organism, in order to be maintained.

  14. Supply Chain Disruptions Theory and Practice of Managing Risk

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrotra, Anuj; Ray, Saibal

    2012-01-01

    One of the most critical issues facing supply chain managers in today’s globalized and highly uncertain business environments is how to deal proactively with disruptions that might affect the complicated supply networks characterizing modern enterprises. Supply Chain Disruptions: Theory and Practice of Managing Risk presents a state-of the-art perspective on this particular issue. Supply Chain Disruptions: Theory and Practice of Managing Risk demonstrates that effective management of supply disruptions necessitates both strategic and tactical measures – the former involving optimal design of supply networks; the latter involving inventory, finance and demand management. It shows that managers ought to use all available levers at their disposal throughout the supply network – like sourcing and pricing strategies, providing financial subsidies, encouraging information sharing and incentive alignment between supply chain partners – in order to tackle supply disruptions. The editors combine up-to-date aca...

  15. Characterization of plasma current quench during disruption in EAST tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大龙; 沈飙; 杨飞; 钱金平; 肖炳甲

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary analysis of plasma current quench is presented in this paper based on the disruption database. It demon-strates that 26.8%discharges have disrupted in the last 2012 campaign, in addition, plasma disruptive rate grows with the increase of plasma current. Best-fit linear and instantaneous plasma current quench rate is extracted from the recent EAST disruptions, showing that 80%–30%interval of the maximum plasma current is well fit for EAST device. The lowest area-normalized current quench time is 3.33 ms/m2 with the estimated plasma electron temperature being 7.3 eV∼9.5 eV. In the disruption case the maximum eddy current goes up to 400 kA, and a fraction of currents are respectively driven on upper and lower outer plate with nearly 100 MPa–200 MPa stress in the leg.

  16. Algal cell disruption using microbubbles to localize ultrasonic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, Joel D; Schideman, Lance C; King, Daniel A; Freund, Jonathan B

    2014-12-01

    Microbubbles were added to an algal solution with the goal of improving cell disruption efficiency and the net energy balance for algal biofuel production. Experimental results showed that disruption increases with increasing peak rarefaction ultrasound pressure over the range studied: 1.90 to 3.07 MPa. Additionally, ultrasound cell disruption increased by up to 58% by adding microbubbles, with peak disruption occurring in the range of 10(8)microbubbles/ml. The localization of energy in space and time provided by the bubbles improve efficiency: energy requirements for such a process were estimated to be one-fourth of the available heat of combustion of algal biomass and one-fifth of currently used cell disruption methods. This increase in energy efficiency could make microbubble enhanced ultrasound viable for bioenergy applications and is expected to integrate well with current cell harvesting methods based upon dissolved air flotation.

  17. Simulations of Magnetic Fields in Tidally-Disrupted Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Guillochon, James

    2016-01-01

    We perform the first magnetohydrodynamical simulations of tidal disruptions of stars by supermassive black holes. We consider stars with both tangled and ordered magnetic fields, for both grazing and deeply disruptive encounters. When the star survives disruption, we find its magnetic field amplifies by a factor of up to twenty, but see no evidence for the a self-sustaining dynamo that would yield arbitrary field growth. For stars that do not survive, and within the tidal debris streams produced in partial disruptions, we find that the component of the magnetic field parallel to the direction of stretching along the debris stream only decreases slightly with time, eventually resulting in a stream where the magnetic pressure is in equipartition with the gas. Our results suggest that the returning gas in most (if not all) stellar tidal disruptions is already highly magnetized by the time it returns to the black hole.

  18. Modeling Hospitals’ Adaptive Capacity during a Loss of Infrastructure Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. Vugrin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resilience in hospitals - their ability to withstand, adapt to, and rapidly recover from disruptive events - is vital to their role as part of national critical infrastructure. This paper presents a model to provide planning guidance to decision makers about how to make hospitals more resilient against possible disruption scenarios. This model represents a hospital’s adaptive capacities that are leveraged to care for patients during loss of infrastructure services (power, water, etc.. The model is an optimization that reallocates and substitutes resources to keep patients in a high care state or allocates resources to allow evacuation if necessary. An illustrative example demonstrates how the model might be used in practice.

  19. Disrupted Renal Mitochondrial Homeostasis after Liver Transplantation in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinlong Liu

    Full Text Available Suppressed mitochondrial biogenesis (MB contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI after many insults. AKI occurs frequently after liver transplantation (LT and increases mortality. This study investigated whether disrupted mitochondrial homeostasis plays a role in AKI after LT.Livers were explanted from Lewis rats and implanted after 18 h cold storage. Kidney and blood were collected 18 h after LT.In the kidney, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS proteins ATP synthase-β and NADH dehydrogenase-3 decreased 44% and 81%, respectively, with marked reduction in associated mRNAs. Renal PGC-1α, the major regulator of MB, decreased 57% with lower mRNA and increased acetylation, indicating inhibited synthesis and suppressed activation. Mitochondrial transcription factor-A, which controls mtDNA replication and transcription, protein and mRNA decreased 66% and 68%, respectively, which was associated with 64% decreases in mtDNA. Mitochondrial fission proteins Drp-1 and Fis-1 and mitochondrial fusion protein mitofusin-1 all decreased markedly. In contrast, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 and microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 increased markedly after LT, indicating enhanced mitophagy. Concurrently, 18- and 13-fold increases in neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cleaved caspase-3 occurred in renal tissue. Both serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen increased >2 fold. Mild to moderate histological changes were observed in the kidney, including loss of brush border, vacuolization of tubular cells in the cortex, cast formation and necrosis in some proximal tubular cells. Finally, myeloperoxidase and ED-1 also increased, indicating inflammation.Suppression of MB, inhibition of mitochondrial fission/fusion and enhancement of mitophagy occur in the kidneys of recipients of liver grafts after long cold storage, which may contribute to the occurrence of AKI and increased mortality after LT.

  20. External inverse-Compton emission from jetted tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenbin; Kumar, Pawan

    2016-05-01

    The recent discoveries of Sw J1644+57 and Sw J2058+05 show that tidal disruption events (TDEs) can launch relativistic jets. Super-Eddington accretion produces a strong radiation field of order Eddington luminosity. In a jetted TDE, electrons in the jet will inverse-Compton scatter the photons from the accretion disc and wind (external radiation field). Motivated by observations of thermal optical-UV spectra in Sw J2058+05 and several other TDEs, we assume the spectrum of the external radiation field intercepted by the relativistic jet to be blackbody. Hot electrons in the jet scatter this thermal radiation and produce luminosities 1045-1048 erg s- 1 in the X/γ-ray band. This model of thermal plus inverse-Compton radiation is applied to Sw J2058+05. First, we show that the blackbody component in the optical-UV spectrum most likely has its origin in the super-Eddington wind from the disc. Then, using the observed blackbody component as the external radiation field, we show that the X-ray luminosity and spectrum are consistent with the inverse-Compton emission, under the following conditions: (1) the jet Lorentz factor is Γ ≃ 5-10; (2) electrons in the jet have a power-law distribution dN_e/dγ _e ∝ γ _e^{-p} with γmin ˜ 1 and p = 2.4; (3) the wind is mildly relativistic (Lorentz factor ≳ 1.5) and has isotropic-equivalent mass-loss rate ˜ 5 M⊙ yr- 1. We describe the implications for jet composition and the radius where jet energy is converted to radiation.