WorldWideScience

Sample records for dysprosium 172

  1. Synthesis and characterization of tetraphenylporphyrinate of dysprosium route dysprosium acetylacetonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez M, V.

    1992-01-01

    Dysprosium bis (tetraphenylporphyrinate) and bis (dysprosium) Tris (tetraphenylporphyrinate) were synthesized from dysprosium tetraphenylporphyrinate prepared in situ, and characterized by IR, UV-vis, TGA, DTA, EPR and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The double decker compound was obtained by direct oxidation of the HDy(TPP) 2 intermediate. The existence of the radical anion, (TPP) - , in the double decker product was conformed by EPR spectrometry. Dysprosium monoporphyrinate was isolated and characterized by the same techniques. (Author)

  2. On polymorphism of dysprosium trichloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Khokhlov, Vladimir A.; Salyulev, Alexander B.; Korzun, Iraida V. [RAS Ural Branch, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry

    2015-07-01

    For the first time, the structure of crystalline DyCl{sub 3} over a wide temperature range from room temperature to melting point was studied by Raman spectroscopy. The phonon modes (cm{sup -1}) of dysprosium trichloride (monoclinic crystal lattice of AlCl{sub 3} type, Z = 4, CN = 6) at room temperature are 257 (A{sub 1g}), 201 (E{sub g}), 112 (E{sub g}), 88 (A{sub 1g}), and 63 (E{sub g}). The monoclinic structure of the crystalline DyCl{sub 3} C{sub 2h}{sup 3} symmetry was found to remain constant over the studied temperature range. No polymorphic transformation in the solid state was detected. Gravimetry, calorimetry, and mass spectrometry have been used in addition to support the conclusions made on the basis of Raman spectroscopic data.

  3. On polymorphism of dysprosium trichloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Khokhlov, Vladimir A.; Salyulev, Alexander B.; Korzun, Iraida V.

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, the structure of crystalline DyCl 3 over a wide temperature range from room temperature to melting point was studied by Raman spectroscopy. The phonon modes (cm -1 ) of dysprosium trichloride (monoclinic crystal lattice of AlCl 3 type, Z = 4, CN = 6) at room temperature are 257 (A 1g ), 201 (E g ), 112 (E g ), 88 (A 1g ), and 63 (E g ). The monoclinic structure of the crystalline DyCl 3 C 2h 3 symmetry was found to remain constant over the studied temperature range. No polymorphic transformation in the solid state was detected. Gravimetry, calorimetry, and mass spectrometry have been used in addition to support the conclusions made on the basis of Raman spectroscopic data.

  4. Can a dysprosium shortage threaten green energy technologies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenderdaal, Sander; Tercero Espinoza, Luis; Marscheider-Weidemann, Frank; Graus, Wina

    2013-01-01

    Dysprosium, one of the various rare earth elements, is currently for more than 99% mined in China. As China is reducing its exports, new mining projects outside of China are needed to sustain supply and meet future demands. Dysprosium is mainly used in permanent magnets to retain the magnet's strength at elevated temperatures. Therefore, the use of dysprosium doped permanent magnets is preferred in electric vehicles and direct-drive wind turbines. Based on four scenarios it could be shown that dysprosium demand will probably outstrip supply in the short term (up to 2020). Although new mines are being developed, it takes several years for them to become productive. For the long term it is expected that enough dysprosium oxide is available in the earth crust (which is economically feasible to mine with current dysprosium prices) to fulfil the projected demand of dysprosium up to 2050. Recycling of dysprosium can further secure dysprosium supply in the long term by reducing primary dysprosium use by 35% in 2050. Electric vehicles are likely to play a dominant role in future increases in dysprosium demand. Even with the limited market share in 2011, electric vehicles already contribute to 20% of dysprosium use. -- Highlights: ► Dysprosium may hamper the implementation of electric cars and wind mills. ► In the short term (up to 2020) a deficit of dysprosium supply can be expected. ► In the long term (up to 2050) sufficient dysprosium is available. ► Electric vehicles are expected to dominate future dysprosium demand. ► China's dominance in dysprosium supply is likely to decrease by 2020.

  5. Resonance ionization spectroscopy in dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, D., E-mail: dstuder@uni-mainz.de; Dyrauf, P.; Naubereit, P.; Heinke, R.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We report on resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of high-lying energy levels in dysprosium. We developed efficient excitation schemes and re-determined the first ionization potential (IP) via analysis of Rydberg convergences. For this purpose both two- and three-step excitation ladders were investigated. An overall ionization efficiency of 25(4) % could be demonstrated in the RISIKO mass separator of Mainz University, using a three-step resonance ionization scheme. Moreover, an extensive analysis of the even-parity 6sns- and 6snd-Rydberg-series convergences, measured via two-step excitation was performed. To account for strong perturbations in the observed s-series, the approach of multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) was applied. Considering all individual series limits we extracted an IP-value of 47901.76(5) cm{sup −1}, which agrees with the current literature value of 47901.7(6) cm{sup −1}, but is one order of magnitude more precise.

  6. Nature of the magnetic susceptibility of dysprosium. Paramagnetic susceptibility of dysprosium - yttrium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidov, V.G.; Levitin, R.Z.; Chistyakov, O.D.

    1976-01-01

    The paramagnetic susceptibility of single crystals of dysprosium-yttirum alloys is measured in the basal plane and along the hexagonal axis. It is shown that the susceptibility of the alloys obeys the Curie-Weiss law, the effective magnetic moments allong the different directions being the same and the paramagnetic Curie temperatures being different. The difference between the paramagnetic Curie temperatures in the basal plane and along the hexagonal axis is independent of the dysprosium concentration in the alloy. As a comparison with the theoretical models of magnetic anisotropy shows, this is an indication that the magnetic anisotropy of dysprosium - yttrium alloys is of a single-ion nature

  7. Semiconductor composition containing iron, dysprosium, and terbium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooser, Raphael C.; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Malasi, Abhinav; Taz, Humaira; Farah, Annettee E.; Kalyanaraman, Ramakrishnan; Duscher, Gerd Josef Mansfred; Patel, Maulik K.

    2017-09-26

    An amorphous semiconductor composition includes 1 to 70 atomic percent iron, 15 to 65 atomic percent dysprosium, 15 to 35 atomic percent terbium, balance X, wherein X is at least one of an oxidizing element and a reducing element. The composition has an essentially amorphous microstructure, an optical transmittance of at least 50% in at least the visible spectrum and semiconductor electrical properties.

  8. Dysprosium complexes with the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez M, V.; Padilla, J.; Ramirez, F.M.

    1992-04-01

    In this report, the results obtained on the synthesis, characterization and study of the chemical behavior of dysprosium complex with the acetylacetone chelating agent (Hacac) and the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand (H 2 TFP) are given. Based on the literature but according to our necessities and interest, the appropriate methodology settled down from the synthesis of prime matters until the obtaining and characterization of the products. The acetyl acetonate complex was obtained of mono hydrated dysprosium [Dy(acac) 3 . H 2 0] and trihydrated [Dy(acac) 3 .3 H 2 0], the mono tetra phenyl porphyrinate [Dy(TFP)(acac). 2 ac] the double sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP) 2 ] and the triple sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP) 3 . 2 TCB] (TCB = trichlorobenzene). Its were characterized by their melting points, solubility, IR, UV, TGA and DTA both first and besides the techniques already mentioned for NMR'H, RPE and Magnetic susceptibility the three last complexes. From the spectroscopic point of view, IR and RPE its suggested the existence of a complex of inverse mixed valence [Dy(TFP) 2- (TFP) 1- ] for the Dy(TFP) 2 as a result of the existence of the free radical (TFP' 1- and that it was not in none of the other porphyrin compounds. In the NMR'H spectra of the compounds were not observed signals in the region from 0 to 10 ppm that which shows that the dysprosium complexes in special those of the porphyrin type are highly paramagnetic and its could be used as displacement reagents, creators of images and contrast agents of great utility in these days in studies of NMR, technique today by today used in medical diagnoses. (Author)

  9. Heat capacity measurements on dysprosium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandan, R.; Prabhakara Reddy, B.; Panneerselvam, G.; Nagarajan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Dysprosium titanate is considered as a candidate material for use in the control rods of future nuclear reactors. The Dy 2 TiO 5 compound was prepared by solid-state synthesis and characterized by XRD technique. The high temperature enthalpy increments of dysprosium titanates have been measured for the first time by employing the method of inverse drop calorimetry in the temperature range 748-1645 K by using high temperature drop calorimeter. The calorimeter, the method of measurement and the procedure adopted for enthalpy increment measurements and analysis of the measured data to compute thermodynamic functions have been described elsewhere. The measured enthalpy increments were fitted to polynomial in temperature by using the least squares method. The fit equation in the temperature range from 298 to 1800 K is given

  10. High temperature oxidation kinetics of dysprosium particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaques, Brian J.; Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: DarrylButt@BoiseState.edu

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • The oxidation behavior of dysprosium particles was studied from 500 to 1000 °C. • Activation energy in initial region found as 8–25 kJ/mol, depending on atmosphere. • Activation energy in intermediate region found as 80–95 kJ/mol. • The oxide grows at the metal–oxide interface. • Generally, the formed oxide behaved as a p-type semiconductor. - Abstract: Rare earth elements have been recognized as critical materials for the advancement of many strategic and green technologies. Recently, the United States Department of Energy has invested many millions of dollars to enhance, protect, and forecast their production and management. The work presented here attempts to clarify the limited and contradictory literature on the oxidation behavior of the rare earth metal, dysprosium. Dysprosium particles were isothermally oxidized from 500 to 1000 °C in N{sub 2}–(2%, 20%, and 50%) O{sub 2} and Ar–20% O{sub 2} using simultaneous thermal analysis techniques. Two distinct oxidation regions were identified at each isothermal temperature in each oxidizing atmosphere. Initially, the oxidation kinetics are very fast until the reaction enters a slower, intermediate region of oxidation. The two regions are defined and the kinetics of each are assessed to show an apparent activation energy of 8–25 kJ/mol in the initial region and 80–95 kJ/mol in the intermediate oxidation reaction region. The effects of varying the oxygen partial pressure on the reaction rate constant are used to show that dysprosium oxide (Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}) generally acts as a p-type semiconductor in both regions of oxidation (with an exception above 750 °C in the intermediate region)

  11. Can a dysprosium shortage threaten green energy technologies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderdaal, S.; Tercero Espinoza, L.; Marschneider-Weidemann, F.; Crijns - Graus, Wina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/308005015

    2013-01-01

    Dysprosium, one of the various rare earth elements, is currently for more than 99% mined in China. As China is reducing its exports, new mining projects outside of China are needed to sustain supply and meet future demands. Dysprosium is mainly used in permanent magnets to retain the magnet's

  12. Ethanolamine derivatives of dysprosium and holmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharia, K.S.; Singh, M.; Mathur, S.; Sankhla, B.S.

    1981-01-01

    The preparation and properties of dysprosium and holmium derivatives of mono-, di- and tri-ethanolamine derivatives are described. Compounds of general formulae: Ln(OPrsup(i)) 2 (mea), Ln(OPrsup(i))(mea) 2 , Ln(mea) 3 , Ln(OPrsup(i))(dea), Ln 2 (dea) 3 , Ln(dea)(deaH) and Ln(tea) (where Ln = Dy or Ho and mea, dea and tea are the anions of respective ethanolamine) were obtained and characterized by elemental analysis and IR spectra. (author)

  13. Synthesis and characterization of tetraphenylporphyrinate of dysprosium route dysprosium acetylacetonate.; Sintesis y caracterizacion de un porfirinato de disprosio via acetilacetonato de disprosio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez M, V

    1993-12-31

    Dysprosium bis (tetraphenylporphyrinate) and bis (dysprosium) Tris (tetraphenylporphyrinate) were synthesized from dysprosium tetraphenylporphyrinate prepared in situ, and characterized by IR, UV-vis, TGA, DTA, EPR and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The double decker compound was obtained by direct oxidation of the HDy(TPP){sub 2} intermediate. The existence of the radical anion, (TPP){sup -} , in the double decker product was conformed by EPR spectrometry. Dysprosium monoporphyrinate was isolated and characterized by the same techniques. (Author).

  14. Method for producing dysprosium-iron-boron alloy powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, F.E.; Wooden, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    A method for producing a dysprosium-iron alloy adapted for use in the manufacture of rare-earth element containing, iron-boron permanent magnets, the method including providing a particle mixture comprising dysprosium oxide, iron and calcium, compacting the particle mixture to produce a consolidated article, heating the article for a time at temperature to form a metallic compound comprising dysprosium and iron and to form calcium oxide, producing a particle mass of -35 mesh from the compact, washing the particle mass with water at a temperature no greater than 10 0 C to react to the calcium and to the calcium oxide therewith to form a calcium hydroxide, while preventing oxidation of the particle mass, and removing the calcium hydroxide from the particle mass

  15. Synthesis and thermal decomposition study of dysprosium trifluoroacetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opata, Y. A.; Grivel, J.-C.

    2018-01-01

    A study of the thermal decomposition process of dysprosium trifluoroacetate hydrate under flowing argon is presented. Thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, evolved gas analysis and ex-situ x-ray diffraction techniques have been employed in the investigation. Three main stages were...

  16. Magnon contribution to electrical resistance of gadolinium-dysprosium alloy single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, S.A.; Slobodchikov, S.S.; Solomkin, I.K.

    1978-01-01

    The magnon, phonon and interelectron collision contributions to the electric resistance of single crystals of gadolinium-dysprosium alloys were quantified. A relationship was found to exist between the electric resistance and the variation of the topology of the Fermi surface on melting of gadolinium with dysprosium. It was found that gadolinium-dysprosium alloys, which have no helicoidal magnetic structure in magnetically ordered state, feature a spin-spin helicoidal-type correlations in the paramagnetic field

  17. Compounds of divalent thulium, neodymium, and dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochkarev, M.N.; Fedushkin, I.L.; Trifonov, A.A.; Fagin, A.A.; Kirillov, E.N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Judging on the Ln(II)/Ln(III) potentials Tm, Nd, and Dy are the first candidates after Sm, Eu, and Yb for the preparation of Ln(II) compounds. The first molecular Tm(II) derivatives, TmI 2 (DME) 3 (I), has been obtained recently by the reduction of TmI 3 with thulium metal in DME (1,2-dimethoxyethane). The tetrahydrofuran (THF) analogue, TmI 2 (THF) 5 , was synthesized similarly. In the case of TmBI 3 and TmCl 3 the same reaction does not occur. The compound I is inert toward naphthalene, anthracene, phenylacetylene, CpH, (Me 3 Si) 2 NH, 2,4,6-t-Bu 3 C 6 H 2 OH, Cp 2 V, Cp 2 Fe, or Cp 3 Er. The reactions of I with PhOH, Ph 3 COH, 3,6-t-Bu 2 C 6 H 2 (OH) 2 -1,2 (Cat), and calixarene (Cal) produce, Ph 3 COTmI 2 (DME) 2 , (Cat)TmI(DME) 2 , and (Cal)TmI, correspondingly. The attempts to use I for preparation of the other Tm(II) complexes failed. In all cases (reactions with C 10 H 8 Li, CpK, [1,3-(Me 3 Si) 2 C 5 H 3 ]MgCl, and [Cp'-SiMe 2 -Ind']K 2 ) the Tm(III) derivatives (respectively, (C 10 H 8 Tm) 2 C 10 H 8 , Cp 3 Tm, [1,3-(Me 3 Si) 2 C 5 H 3 ] 2 TmCl, and Cp'-SiMe 2 -Ind')TmI) were obtained. The new stable Tm(II) complex, PhOTmI(DME) 2 (II), has been synthesized by the reduction of I with potassium metal in DME. The product was isolated as the green crystals with μ eff 4.6 BM. Unlike TmI 3 , NdI 3 and DyI 3 can not be reduced by metallic neodymium, dysprosium or sodium in DME or THF. Re-investigation of the product formed in the reaction of NdCl 3 with a lack of Li and naphthalene which was claimed before as NdCl 2 (THF) 2 has shown that this is a mixture of Nd(III) naphthalene complexes of the type [(NdCl 2 (THF) 2 ]nC 10 H 8 (n = 4- 7) (III). Nevertheless the product may be used instead of NdCl 2 for the preparation of RNdCl 2 type complexes. The reactions of III with t-BuNCH=CHNBu-t (DAD), PhCH=CHCH=CHPh (DBD), and PhCH=CHPh afford (DAD)NdCl 2 (THF) 2 , (DBD)[NdCl 2 (THF) 2 ] 2 , and (PhCHCHPh)[NdCl 2 ] 2 (THF) 3 , respectively. The iodides of Nd

  18. Properties of Polydisperse Tin-doped Dysprosium and Indium Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinovskaya Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the complex permittivity, diffuse-reflectance, and characteristics of crystal lattices of tin-doped indium and dysprosium oxides are presented. Using the methods of spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, it is shown that doping of indium oxide with tin results in a significant increase of the components of the indium oxide complex permittivity and an appearance of the plasma resonance in its diffuse-reflectance spectra. This indicates the appearance of charge carriers with the concentration of more than 1021 cm−3 in the materials. On the other hand, doping of the dysprosium oxide with the same amount of tin has no effect on its optical and electromagnetic properties.

  19. Charge transfer cross sections for dysprosium and cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Hajime; Tamura, Koji; Okazaki, Tetsuji; Shibata, Takemasa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-06-01

    Symmetric resonant charge transfer cross sections between singly ionized ions and the parent atoms were measured for dysprosium and cerium in the impact energy of 200-2000eV. The cross sections were determined from the ratio between the number of ions produced by charge transfer and those in primary ion beam. The primary ion beam was produced by a laser ion source in which their atoms were ionized by laser resonant photo-ionization. The slow ions produced by charge transfer and fast primary ions were detected with Faraday cups. The obtained cross sections were (1.82{+-}0.14) x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2} for dysprosium and (0.88{+-}0.12) x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2} for cerium in the above energy range. The difference of these values can mostly be explained by considering the electron configurations of these atoms and ions. (author)

  20. Charge transfer cross sections for dysprosium and cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hajime; Tamura, Koji; Okazaki, Tetsuji; Shibata, Takemasa

    1998-06-01

    Symmetric resonant charge transfer cross sections between singly ionized ions and the parent atoms were measured for dysprosium and cerium in the impact energy of 200-2000eV. The cross sections were determined from the ratio between the number of ions produced by charge transfer and those in primary ion beam. The primary ion beam was produced by a laser ion source in which their atoms were ionized by laser resonant photo-ionization. The slow ions produced by charge transfer and fast primary ions were detected with Faraday cups. The obtained cross sections were (1.82±0.14) x 10 -14 cm 2 for dysprosium and (0.88±0.12) x 10 -14 cm 2 for cerium in the above energy range. The difference of these values can mostly be explained by considering the electron configurations of these atoms and ions. (author)

  1. Neutron capture measurements and resonance parameters of dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S.G.; Kye, Y.U.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M.H. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Y.R.; Lee, M.W. [Dongnam Inst. of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Research Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G.N. [Kyungpook National University, Department of Physics, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Ro, T.I. [Dong-A University, Department of Physics, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Danon, Y.; Williams, D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Troy, NY (United States); Leinweber, G.; Block, R.C.; Barry, D.P.; Rapp, M.J. [Naval Nuclear Laboratory, Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Neutron capture yields of dysprosium isotopes ({sup 161}Dy, {sup 162}Dy, {sup 163}Dy, and {sup 164}Dy) were measured using the time-of-flight method with a 16 segment sodium iodide multiplicity detector. The measurements were made at the 25m flight station at the Gaerttner LINAC Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Resonance parameters were obtained using the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. The neutron capture data for four enriched dysprosium isotopes and one natural dysprosium sample were sequentially fitted. New resonances not listed in ENDF/B-VII.1 were observed. There were 29 and 17 new resonances from {sup 161}Dy and {sup 163}Dy isotopes, respectively. Six resonances from {sup 161}Dy isotope, two resonances from {sup 163}Dy, and four resonances from {sup 164}Dy were not observed. The capture resonance integrals of each isotope were calculated with the resulting resonance parameters and those of ENDF/B-VII.1 in the energy region from 0.5 eV to 20 MeV and were compared to the capture resonance integrals with the resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VII.1. A resonance integral value of the natural dysprosium calculated with present resonance parameters was 1405 ± 3.5 barn. The value is ∝ 0.3% higher than that obtained with the ENDF/B-VII.1 parameters. The distributions of the present and ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron widths were compared to a Porter-Thomas distribution. Neutron strength functions for {sup 161}Dy and {sup 163}Dy were calculated with the present resonance parameters and both values were in between the values of ''Atlas of Neutron Resonances'' and ENDF/B-VII.1. The present radiation width distributions of {sup 161}Dy and {sup 163}Dy were fitted with the χ{sup 2} distribution by varying the degrees of freedom. (orig.)

  2. The development of dysprosium-165 hydroxide macroaggregates for radiation synovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, A.B.; Hetherington, E.L.R.; Maddalena, D.J.; Snowden, G.M.

    1988-06-01

    The development of a dysprosium-165 product, Dy-HMA, which is suitable for the radiation synovectomy of arthritic joints is described. Dysprosium-165 is a short-lived (t 1/2 = 139 min) beta-emitter produced by the neutron irradiation of natural dysprosium. Dy-HMA is a suspension of macroaggregated hydroxide particles in saline with the majority of particles in the 3-5 μm range. Studies in rabbits have demonstrated minimal leakage following the intra-articular injection of a knee joint. At 24 hours, the accumulation in the liver is about 0.003% of the injected dose and there is considerably less in other organs and tissue. The use of Dy-HMA has considerable advantages over the presently used yttrium-90 products. The undesired leakage to and subsequent irradiation of other organs is considerably reduced. The period of hospitalisation is reduced from four days to one and the production of 165 Dy in Australia will overcome the difficulties of supply 90 Y from overseas. 21 refs., 1 fig., 18 tabs

  3. Dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass irradiated by 6 MV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ab Rasid, A.; Wagiran, H.; Hashim, S.; Ibrahim, Z.; Ali, H.

    2015-01-01

    Undoped and dysprosium doped lithium borate glass system with empirical formula (70–x) B 2 O 3 –30 Li 2 O–(x) Dy 2 O 3 (x=0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0 mol%) were prepared using the melt-quenching technique. The dosimetric measurements were performed by irradiating the samples to 6 MV photon beam using linear accelerator (LINAC) over a dose range of 0.5–5.0 Gy. The glass series of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass produced the best thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve with the highest intensity peak from sample with 1.0 mol% Dy 2 O 3 concentration. Minimum detectable dose was detected at 2.24 mGy, good linearity of regression coefficient, high reproducibility and high sensitivity compared to the undoped glass are from 1.0 mol% dysprosium doped lithium borate glass. The results indicated that the series of dysprosium doped lithium glasses have a great potential to be considered as a thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). - Highlights: • TL response of undoped and dysprosium doped lithium borate glass subjected to 6 MV photons irradiation at low dose range. • TL linear response of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass. • The sensitivity of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass is approximately 93 times higher than undoped glass

  4. Elevated temperature study of Nd-Fe-B--based magnets with cobalt and dysprosium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauder, D.R.; Froning, M.H.; White, R.J.; Ray, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the elevated temperature performance of Nd-Fe-B magnets containing 0--15 wt. % cobalt substitutions for iron and 0--10 wt. % dysprosium substitutions for neodymium. Test samples were prepared using conventional powder metallurgy techniques. Elevated temperature hysteresis loop and open-circuit measurements were performed on the samples to investigate irreversible losses and long term aging losses at 150 0 C. Magnets with high amounts of both cobalt and dysprosium exhibited lower losses of coercivity and magnetization. Dysprosium had more influence on the elevated temperature performance of the material than did cobalt

  5. Study on the electrochemical of the metal deposition from ionic liquids for lithium, titanium and dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Claudia A.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis was aimed to the characterization of electrochemically deposited film of lithium, titanium and dysprosium on Au(111) from different ionic liquids, finally dysprosium on neodymium-iron-boron magnate for industrial applications. The investigation of the deposits were performed using cyclic voltametry, in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy, electrochemical quartz microbalance, XPS and Auger electron spectroscopy. The sample preparation is described in detail. The deposition rate showed a significant temperature dependence.

  6. A terminal fluoride ligand generates axial magnetic anisotropy in dysprosium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norel, Lucie [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ Rennes, CNRS, ISCR (Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes) - UMR 6226, Rennes (France); Darago, Lucy E.; Chakarawet, Khetpakorn; Gonzalez, Miguel I.; Olshansky, Jacob H.; Long, Jeffrey R. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Le Guennic, Boris; Rigaut, Stephane [Univ Rennes, CNRS, ISCR (Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes) - UMR 6226, Rennes (France)

    2018-02-12

    The first dysprosium complexes with a terminal fluoride ligand are obtained as air-stable compounds. The strong, highly electrostatic dysprosium-fluoride bond generates a large axial crystal-field splitting of the J=15/2 ground state, as evidenced by high-resolution luminescence spectroscopy and correlated with the single-molecule magnet behavior through experimental magnetic susceptibility data and ab initio calculations. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Terbium and dysprosium complexes luminescence at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkova, S B; Kravchenko, T B; Kononenko, L.I.; Poluehktov, N S [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Odessa. Fiziko-Khimicheskij Inst.

    1979-01-01

    The variation is studied of the luminescence intensity of terbium and dysprosium complexes used in the analysis as solutions are cooled down to the liquid nitrogen temperature. Three groups of methods have been studied: observation of fluorescence of aqueous solutions, precipitate and extract suspensions in organic solvents. The brightest luminescence and greatest increase in luminescence intensity are observed at freezing of complex solvents with 1,2-dioxybenzene-3,5-disulfonic acid (DBSA) and iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and DBSA+EDTA, as well as in the case of benzene extracting of complexes with phenanthroline and salicylic acid. Otherwise the intensity increases 2-14-fold and for the complex of terbium with acetoacetic ester 36-fold.

  8. Dysprosium (holmium) determination in the presence of erbium and dysprosium (holmium, erbium) determination in the presence of cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolubara, A.I.; Kochubej, A.I.; Usatenko, Yu.I.

    1978-01-01

    Effect of salicylic acid upon complex formation in the systems REE - boronsulfoalizarinate, REE - oxine and REE - boronsulfoalizarinate - oxine is investigated. Comparison of optical characteristics of the above systems in the absence and in the presence of salicylic acid is carried out. It is established that in all the cases the effect of salicylic acid depends both on the nature of REE and the ratio of all the components of the system. Under certain conditions the given dependence is observed only for erbium complexes. Extraction-photometric methods of dysprosium and holmium determination in the presence of equal erbium amounts, as well as holmium and erbium determination in the presence of cerium equal amounts is developed

  9. Dysprosium (holmium) determination in the presence of erbium and dysprosium (holmium, erbium) determination in the presence of cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolubara, A I; Kochubei, A I; Usatenko, Yu I

    1978-01-01

    Effect of salicylic acid upon complex formation in the systems REE - boronsulfoalizarinate, REE - oxine and REE - boronsulfoalizarinate - oxine is investigated. Comparison of optical characteristics of the above systems in the absence and in the presence of salicylic acid is carried out. It is established that in all the cases the effect of salicylic acid depends both on the nature of REE and the ratio of all the components of the system. Under certain conditions the given dependence is observed only for erbium complexes. Extraction-photometric methods of dysprosium and holmium determination in the presence of equal erbium amounts, as well as holmium and erbium determination in the presence of cerium equal amounts is developed.

  10. Isotopic shifts and configuration mixing in the dysprosium II spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufmuth, P.

    1977-01-01

    Using a photoelectric Fabry-Perot spectrometer with digital data acquisition, the isotopic shifts of all stable dysprosium isotopes (Z = 66, A = 156, 158, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164) have been measured in transitions from the groundstate configuration 4f 10 6s to the excited configurations 4f 9 5d6s, 4f 9 5d 2 , and 4f 10 6p of the spark spectrum. Mass and volume effects have been seperated; the results are compared with arc spectrum measurements. From the volume effect of a pure s-p transition the change of the mean electric quadratic nuclear radius delta 2 > has been calculated. In order to test fine structure calculations of the Dy II spectrum, the isotopic shifts of 29 lines of the isotopes 162 Dy and 164 Dy have been measured. Based on the sharing rule, the reported configuration mixing could be confirmed in principle; for one energy level (E = 22908 K) the asignement has been proved to be false, in the case of three other levels (E = 22467, 22672, and 28885 K) the asignement is doubtfull. For the ground state levels 4f 10 6s 6 I the influence of relativistic effects could be proved; these effects can be interpreted in the framework of a parametric representation of the isotopic shift. The order of magnitude of the crossed second order effects has been estimated. (orig.) [de

  11. Low Field Magnetic and Thermal Hysteresis in Antiferromagnetic Dysprosium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliia Liubimova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic and thermal hysteresis (difference in magnetic properties on cooling and heating have been studied in polycrystalline Dy (dysprosium between 80 and 250 K using measurements of the reversible Villari effect and alternating current (AC susceptibility. We argue that measurement of the reversible Villari effect in the antiferromagnetic phase is a more sensitive method to detect magnetic hysteresis than the registration of conventional B(H loops. We found that the Villari point, recently reported in the antiferromagnetic phase of Dy at 166 K, controls the essential features of magnetic hysteresis and AC susceptibility on heating from the ferromagnetic state: (i thermal hysteresis in AC susceptibility and in the reversible Villari effect disappears abruptly at the temperature of the Villari point; (ii the imaginary part of AC susceptibility is strongly frequency dependent, but only up to the temperature of the Villari point; (iii the imaginary part of the susceptibility drops sharply also at the Villari point. We attribute these effects observed at the Villari point to the disappearance of the residual ferromagnetic phase. The strong influence of the Villari point on several magnetic properties allows this temperature to be ranked almost as important as the Curie and Néel temperatures in Dy and likely also for other rare earth elements and their alloys.

  12. Kinetics of the nitridation of dysprosium during mechanochemical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanko, Gordon A.; Osterberg, Daniel D.; Jaques, Brian J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Hurley, Michael F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Boulevard, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: darrylbutt@boisestate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Boulevard, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • DyN was mechanochemically synthesized by milling pure metal under nitrogen. • Temperature and pressure were monitored to investigate reaction progress. • The effects of metal adhered to media on the impact energetics was measured. • The reactive milling kinetics are described in terms of reactive surface formation. - Abstract: Dysprosium nitride was synthesized by the reactive milling of the rare earth metal under 400 kPa nitrogen gas in a planetary ball mill. The nitrogen consumption rate was calculated from in situ temperature and pressure measurements to find the reaction extent as a function of milling time at milling speeds from 350 to 650 rpm. The results are analyzed in terms of a fundamental milling dynamics model in which the input milling energy is the primary driving force for reaction and the rate limiting step of the nitridation kinetics is the formation of chemically active surfaces. The model differs from traditional gas–solid reactions which are often limited by diffusion of a species through a surface layer or by dissociation of the gas molecule. These results give fresh insight into reactive gas–solid milling kinetics.

  13. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CORROSIVE label. 172.442 Section 172.442... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label must... CORROSIVE label must be white in the top half and black in the lower half. [Amdt. 172-123, 56 FR 66259, Dec...

  14. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OXIDIZER label. 172.426 Section 172.426... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be... OXIDIZER label must be yellow. [Amdt. 172-123, 56 FR 66257, Dec. 20, 1991] ...

  15. 49 CFR 172.554 - POISON placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON placard. 172.554 Section 172.554... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.554 POISON placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON placard must be as follows: EC02MR91.057 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.519, the background on the POISON...

  16. Systems of pyridine, piperidine, piperazine, morpholine hydrochlorides-terbium (dysprosium) chloride-water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajfutdinova, R.K.; Sharafutdinova, A.A.; Murinov, Yu.I.

    1988-01-01

    The isothermal cross section method at 25 and 50 deg C is applied to study pyridine hydrochloride-terbium chloride-water (1) piperidine hydrochloride-dysprosium chloride-water (2), piperazine dihydrochloride-dysprosium chloride-water (3) and morpholine hydrochloride-terbium chloride (4) systems. Solubility isotherma prove the formation of incongruently soluble compound of the TbCl 3 x6C 5 H 5 NxHCl composition systems (1). The individuality of the new solid phase is proved by the chemical and DTA methods. Systems (2-4) are of a simple eutonic type

  17. Exploration of dysprosium: the most critical element for Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Dysprosium (Dy), one of the heavy rare earth elements, is used mainly as an additive for NdFeB permanent magnets which are installed in various modern industrial products such as voice coil motors in computers, factory automation machinery, hybrid and electric vehicles, home electronics, and wind turbine, to improve heat resistance of the magnets. Dy has been produced about 2,000t per year from the ores from ion adsorption type deposits in southern China. However, the produced amount of Dy was significantly reduced in 2011 in China due to reservation of heavy rare earth resources and protection of natural environment, resulting in soaring of Dy price in the world. In order to respond the increasing demand of Dy, unconventional supply sources are inevitably developed, in addition to heavy rare earth enriched ion adsorption type deposits outside China. Heavy rare earth elements including Dy are dominantly hosted in xenotime, fergusonite, zircon, eudialyte, keiviite, kainosite, iimoriite, etc. Concentration of xenotime is found in placer deposits in Malaysia and India, hydrothermal deposits associated with unconformity-type uranium mineralization (Athabasca basin in Canada, Western Australia), iron-oxide fluorite mineralization (South Africa) and Sn-bearing alkaline granite (Brazil). Zircon and fergusontie concentration is found as igneous and hydrothermal products in peralkaline syenite, alkaline granite and pegmatite (e.g., Nechalacho in Canada). Eudialyte concentration is found in some peralkaline syenite bodies in Greenland, Canada, Sweden and Russia. Among these sources, large Dy resources are estimated in the deposits hosted in peralkaline rocks (Nechalacho: 79,000t, Kvanefjeld: 49,000t, Norra Karr: 15,700t, etc.) compared to the present demand of Dy. Thus, Dy will be supplied from the deposits associated with peralkaline and alkaline deposits in future instead of ion adsorption type deposits in southern China.

  18. 49 CFR 172.400 - General labeling requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 172.411 1.6 EXPLOSIVES 1.6 172.411 2.1 FLAMMABLE GAS 172.417 2.2 NONFLAMMABLE GAS 172.415 2.3 POISON GAS 172.416 3 (flammable liquid) Combustible liquid FLAMMABLE LIQUID (none) 172.419 4.1 FLAMMABLE... B) POISON 172.430 6.2 INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE 1 172.432 7 (see § 172.403) RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I 172.436 7...

  19. Dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass irradiated by 6 MV photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Rasid, A.; Wagiran, H.; Hashim, S.; Ibrahim, Z.; Ali, H.

    2015-07-01

    Undoped and dysprosium doped lithium borate glass system with empirical formula (70-x) B2O3-30 Li2O-(x) Dy2O3 (x=0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0 mol%) were prepared using the melt-quenching technique. The dosimetric measurements were performed by irradiating the samples to 6 MV photon beam using linear accelerator (LINAC) over a dose range of 0.5-5.0 Gy. The glass series of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass produced the best thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve with the highest intensity peak from sample with 1.0 mol% Dy2O3 concentration. Minimum detectable dose was detected at 2.24 mGy, good linearity of regression coefficient, high reproducibility and high sensitivity compared to the undoped glass are from 1.0 mol% dysprosium doped lithium borate glass. The results indicated that the series of dysprosium doped lithium glasses have a great potential to be considered as a thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD).

  20. In situ characterization of the nitridation of dysprosium during mechanochemical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaques, Brian J.; Osterberg, Daniel D.; Alanko, Gordon A.; Tamrakar, Sumit; Smith, Cole R.; Hurley, Michael F.; Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: DarrylButt@BoiseState.edu

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • A nitridation reaction in a high energy planetary ball mill was monitored in situ. • Dysprosium mononitride was synthesized from Dy at low temperatures in short times. • Ideal gas law and in situ temperature and pressure used to assess reaction extent. • It is proposed that reaction rate is proportional to the creation of new surface. - Abstract: Processing of advanced nitride ceramics traditionally requires long durations at high temperatures and, in some cases, in hazardous atmospheres. In this study, dysprosium mononitride (DyN) was rapidly formed from elemental dysprosium in a closed system at ambient temperatures. An experimental procedure was developed to quantify the progress of the nitridation reaction during mechanochemical processing in a high energy planetary ball mill (HEBM) as a function of milling time and intensity using in situ temperature and pressure measurements, SEM, XRD, and particle size analysis. No intermediate phases were formed. It was found that the creation of fresh dysprosium surfaces dictates the rate of the nitridation reaction, which is a function of milling intensity and the number of milling media. These results show clearly that high purity nitrides can be synthesized with short processing times at low temperatures in a closed system requiring a relatively small processing footprint.

  1. A model for additive transport in metal halide lamps containing mercury and dysprosium tri-iodide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beks, M.L.; Haverlag, M.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of additives in a metal halide lamp is examined through numerical modelling. A model for a lamp containing sodium iodide additives has been modified to study a discharge containing dysprosium tri-iodide salts. To study the complex chemistry the method of Gibbs minimization is used

  2. Neutronography of an intermediate phase in dysprosium near the Neel point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessergenev, V G; Gogava, V V; Kovalevskaya, Yu A; Mandzhavidze, A G; Fedorov, V M; Shilo, S I

    1985-11-25

    Neutronographical study of dysprosium magnetic structure near the point of magnetic disordering depending on thermal prehistory of the sample is carried out. Intermediate vortex phase transformed then into the helical one is shown to occur from the paramagnetic phase under cooling.

  3. Synthesis and X-ray structure of the dysprosium(III) complex derived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis and X-ray structure of the dysprosium(III) complex derived from the ligand 5-chloro-1 ... Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia ... synthesized and its crystal structure determined by single X-ray diffraction at room temperature.

  4. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny

    2015-10-23

    A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  5. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny; Sá nchez Jimé nez, Cecilia; Gurinov, Andrei; Pé rez Centeno, Armando; Ceja Andrade, Israel; Carbajal Arí zaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  6. Dysprosium complexes with the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand; Complejos de disprosio con el ligante macrociclico tetrafenilporfirina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez M, V.; Padilla, J.; Ramirez, F.M

    1992-04-15

    In this report, the results obtained on the synthesis, characterization and study of the chemical behavior of dysprosium complex with the acetylacetone chelating agent (Hacac) and the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand (H{sub 2}TFP) are given. Based on the literature but according to our necessities and interest, the appropriate methodology settled down from the synthesis of prime matters until the obtaining and characterization of the products. The acetyl acetonate complex was obtained of mono hydrated dysprosium [Dy(acac){sub 3}. H{sub 2}0] and trihydrated [Dy(acac){sub 3} .3 H{sub 2}0], the mono tetra phenyl porphyrinate [Dy(TFP)(acac). 2 ac] the double sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP){sub 2}] and the triple sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP){sub 3}. 2 TCB] (TCB = trichlorobenzene). Its were characterized by their melting points, solubility, IR, UV, TGA and DTA both first and besides the techniques already mentioned for NMR'H, RPE and Magnetic susceptibility the three last complexes. From the spectroscopic point of view, IR and RPE its suggested the existence of a complex of inverse mixed valence [Dy(TFP){sup 2-} (TFP) {sup 1-}] for the Dy(TFP){sub 2} as a result of the existence of the free radical (TFP' {sup 1-} and that it was not in none of the other porphyrin compounds. In the NMR'H spectra of the compounds were not observed signals in the region from 0 to 10 ppm that which shows that the dysprosium complexes in special those of the porphyrin type are highly paramagnetic and its could be used as displacement reagents, creators of images and contrast agents of great utility in these days in studies of NMR, technique today by today used in medical diagnoses. (Author)

  7. Dysprosium complexes with the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand; Complejos de disprosio con el ligante macrociclico tetrafenilporfirina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez M, V; Padilla, J; Ramirez, F M

    1992-04-15

    In this report, the results obtained on the synthesis, characterization and study of the chemical behavior of dysprosium complex with the acetylacetone chelating agent (Hacac) and the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand (H{sub 2}TFP) are given. Based on the literature but according to our necessities and interest, the appropriate methodology settled down from the synthesis of prime matters until the obtaining and characterization of the products. The acetyl acetonate complex was obtained of mono hydrated dysprosium [Dy(acac){sub 3}. H{sub 2}0] and trihydrated [Dy(acac){sub 3} .3 H{sub 2}0], the mono tetra phenyl porphyrinate [Dy(TFP)(acac). 2 ac] the double sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP){sub 2}] and the triple sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP){sub 3}. 2 TCB] (TCB = trichlorobenzene). Its were characterized by their melting points, solubility, IR, UV, TGA and DTA both first and besides the techniques already mentioned for NMR'H, RPE and Magnetic susceptibility the three last complexes. From the spectroscopic point of view, IR and RPE its suggested the existence of a complex of inverse mixed valence [Dy(TFP){sup 2-} (TFP) {sup 1-}] for the Dy(TFP){sub 2} as a result of the existence of the free radical (TFP' {sup 1-} and that it was not in none of the other porphyrin compounds. In the NMR'H spectra of the compounds were not observed signals in the region from 0 to 10 ppm that which shows that the dysprosium complexes in special those of the porphyrin type are highly paramagnetic and its could be used as displacement reagents, creators of images and contrast agents of great utility in these days in studies of NMR, technique today by today used in medical diagnoses. (Author)

  8. Dysprosium, the balance problem, and wind power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshkaki, Ayman; Graedel, T.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate the impacts of the increasing market share of wind power on the demand and supply of REE. • The analysis is carried out using a dynamic material flow and stock model and three scenarios for Dy supply. • The supply of Dy from all deposits will likely lead to an oversupply of the total REEs, Nd, La, Ce and Y. • The supply of Dy from critical REE or Dy rich deposits will likely lead to an oversupply of Ce and Y only. • Large quantities of thorium will be co-produced as a result of Dy demand that needs to be managed carefully. - Abstract: Wind power technology is one of the cleanest electricity generation technologies that are expected to have a substantial share in the future electricity mix. Nonetheless, the expected increase in the market share of wind technology has led to an increasing concern of the availability, production capacity and geographical concentration of the metals required for the technology, especially the rear earth elements (REE) neodymium (Nd) and the far less abundant dysprosium (Dy), and the impacts associated with their production. Moreover, Nd and Dy are coproduced with other rare earth metals mainly from iron, titanium, zirconium, and thorium deposits. Consequently, an increase in the demand for Nd and Dy in wind power technology and in their traditional applications may lead to an increase in the production of the host metals and other companion REE, with possible implications on their supply and demand. In this regard, we have used a dynamic material flow and stock model to study the impacts of the increasing demand for Nd and Dy on the supply and demand of the host metals and other companion REE. In one scenario, when the supply of Dy is covered by all current and expected producing deposits, the increase in the demand for Dy leads to an oversupply of 255 Gg of total REE and an oversupply of the coproduced REE Nd, La, Ce and Y. In the second and third scenarios, however, when the supply of Dy is

  9. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny [Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Centro Universitario Tonalá, Universidad de Guadalajara, Av. Nuevo Periférico No. 555, C.P. 48525, Tonalá, Jalisco (Mexico); Sánchez Jiménez, Cecilia [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Gurinov, Andrey [Research Resources Center for Magnetic Resonance, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskiy pr. 26, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); NMR Core Lab, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Pérez Centeno, Armando; Ceja Andrade, Israel [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe, E-mail: gregoriocarbajal@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • LDH structure including dysprosium was prepared by co-precipitation. • LDH was capable to produce contrast in the T1 mode of MRI. • LDH were intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions. - Abstract: A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  10. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny; Sánchez Jiménez, Cecilia; Gurinov, Andrey; Pérez Centeno, Armando; Ceja Andrade, Israel; Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • LDH structure including dysprosium was prepared by co-precipitation. • LDH was capable to produce contrast in the T1 mode of MRI. • LDH were intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions. - Abstract: A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  11. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label must...

  12. 21 CFR 172.860 - Fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Fatty acids. 172.860 Section 172.860 Food and Drugs... Multipurpose Additives § 172.860 Fatty acids. The food additive fatty acids may be safely used in food and in... and their associated fatty acids manufactured from fats and oils derived from edible sources: Capric...

  13. 7 CFR 1427.172 - Settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Settlement. 1427.172 Section 1427.172 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.172 Settlement. (a...

  14. 21 CFR 172.814 - Hydroxylated lecithin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydroxylated lecithin. 172.814 Section 172.814 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.814 Hydroxylated lecithin. The food additive hydroxylated lecithin may be safely... obtained by the treatment of lecithin in one of the following ways, under controlled conditions whereby the...

  15. 40 CFR 172.11 - Publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Publication. 172.11 Section 172.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS EXPERIMENTAL USE PERMITS Federal Issuance of Experimental Use Permits § 172.11 Publication. (a) Notice of receipt of an...

  16. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  17. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing...

  18. 40 CFR 172.43 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions. 172.43 Section 172.43... PERMITS Notification for Certain Genetically Modified Microbial Pesticides § 172.43 Definitions. Terms... material of an isolate and any descendants derived under axenic culture conditions from that isolate. Small...

  19. 21 CFR 172.876 - Castor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Castor oil. 172.876 Section 172.876 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Multipurpose Additives § 172.876 Castor oil. The food additive castor oil may be safely used in accordance with...

  20. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color...

  1. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acetone peroxides. 172.802 Section 172.802 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.802 Acetone peroxides. The food additive acetone peroxides may be safely used in... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide...

  2. 49 CFR 172.450 - EMPTY label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false EMPTY label. 172.450 Section 172.450... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.450 EMPTY label. (a) Each EMPTY label, except for size, must be as follows....) in height. (2) The label must be white with black printing. (b) [Reserved] ...

  3. 49 CFR 172.441 - FISSILE label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FISSILE label. 172.441 Section 172.441... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.441 FISSILE label. (a) Except for size and color, the FISSILE label must be... FISSILE label must be white. [69 FR 3669, Jan. 26, 2004] ...

  4. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydroxypropyl cellulose. 172.870 Section 172.870... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.870 Hydroxypropyl cellulose. The food additive hydroxypropyl cellulose may be safely used in food, except standardized foods that do not provide for such use, in...

  5. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  6. Dysprosium-Catalyzed Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this letter, we report that dysprosium is an effective catalyst for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs growth via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD process for the first time. Horizontally superlong well-oriented SWNT arrays on SiO2/Si wafer can be fabricated by EtOH-CVD under suitable conditions. The structure and properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that the SWNTs from dysprosium have better structural uniformity and better conductivity with fewer defects. This rare earth metal provides not only an alternative catalyst for SWNTs growth, but also a possible method to generate high percentage of superlong semiconducting SWNT arrays for various applications of nanoelectronic device.

  7. Sandwich-type tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) dysprosium-cadmium quadruple-decker SMM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Qian, Kang; Wang, Kang; Bian, Yongzhong; Jiang, Jianzhuang; Gao, Song

    2011-09-14

    Homoleptic tetrakis[2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octa(butyloxy)phthalocyaninato] dysprosium-cadmium quadruple-decker complex 1 was isolated in relatively good yield of 43% from a simple one-pot reaction. This compound represents the first sandwich-type tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) rare earth-cadmium quadruple-decker SMM that has been structurally characterized. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  8. {Delta}I = 2 energy staggering in normal deformed dysprosium nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, M.A.; Brown, T.B.; Archer, D.E. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Very high spin states (I{ge}50{Dirac_h}) have been observed in {sup 155,156,157}Dy. The long regular band sequences, free from sharp backbending effects, observed in these dysprosium nuclei offer the possibility of investigating the occurence of any {Delta}I = 2 staggering in normal deformed nuclei. Employing the same analysis techniques as used in superdeformed nuclei, certain bands do indeed demonstrate an apparent staggering and this is discussed.

  9. Analysis of the x-ray spectrum emitted by laser-produced plasma of dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, Gilad; Louzon, Einat; Henis, Zohar; Maman, Shlomo; Mandelbaum, Pinchas

    2007-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the x-ray spectrum (5-10.2 A ring ) emitted by laser-produced plasma of dysprosium (Dy) is given using ab initio calculations with the HULLAC relativistic code and isoelectronic trends. Resonance 3d-4p, 3d-nf (n=4 to 7), 3p-4s, and 3p-4d transitions of Ni I-like Dy XXXIX and neighboring ion satellite transitions (from Dy XXXIV to Dy XL) are identified

  10. Phosphor Dysprosium-Doped Layered Double Hydroxides Exchanged with Different Organic Functional Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ricardo Martínez Vargas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The layers of a Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH were doped with Dy3+ cations. Among some compositions, the Zn2+ : Al3+ : Dy3+ molar ratio equal to 30 : 9 : 1 presented a single crystalline phase. Organic anions with carboxylic, amino, sulfate, or phosphate functional groups were intercalated as single layers between LDH layers as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Photoluminescence spectra of the nitrate intercalated LDH showed a wide emission band with strong intensity in the yellow region (around 574 nm, originated due to symmetry distortion of the octahedral coordination in dysprosium centers. Moreover, a broad red band emission was also detected apparently due to the presence of zinc oxide. The distorted symmetry of the dysprosium coordination environment, also confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, was modified after the intercalation with phenyl phosphonate (PP, aspartate (Asp, adipate (Adip, and serinate (Ser anions; the emission as measured from PL spectra of these LDH was more intense in the blue region (ca. 486 nm, thus indicating an increase in symmetry of dysprosium octahedrons. The red emission band from zinc oxide kept the same intensity after intercalation of dodecyl sulfate (DDS. An additional emission of unknown origin at λ = 767 nm was present in all LDHs.

  11. Synovectomy of the rheumatoid knee using intra-articular injection of dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Shortkroff, S.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Venkatesan, P.; Snyder, M.A.; Barrett, W.P.

    1987-01-01

    One hundred and eleven patients who had seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with intra-articular injection of 270 millicuries of dysprosium-165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregates. A two-year follow-up was available for fifty-nine of the treated knees. Thirty-nine had a good result; nine, a fair result; and eleven, a poor result. Of the twenty-five knees that had Stage-I radiographic changes, nineteen had a good result. Of the thirty-four knees that had Stage-II radiographic changes, twenty showed a good result. Systemic spread of the radioactivity from the injected joint was minimum. The mean whole-body dose was calculated to be 0.3 rad and that to the liver twenty-four hours after injection, 3.2 rads. The results indicated that dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for performing radiation synovectomy, particularly in knees that have Stage-I radiographic changes. Because of the minimum rate of systemic spread of the dysprosium-165, it offers a definite advantage over agents that previously have been used

  12. Development and mastering of production of dysprosium hafnate as absorbing material for control rods of promising thermal neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, A.V.; Risovany, V.D.; Muraleva, E.M.; Sokolov, V.F.

    2011-01-01

    The main advantages of dysprosium hafnate as an absorbing material for LWR control rods are the following: -) unlimited radiation resistance; - two absorbing components, Dy and Hf, increasing physical efficiency of the material compared to Dy 2 O 3 -TiO 2 and alloy 80% Ag - 15% In - 5% Cd; -) variability of physical efficiency by changing a composition, but maintaining other performance characteristics of the material; -) high process-ability due to the absence of phase transients and single-phase structure (solid solution); -) production of high density pellets. Lab-scale mastering of dysprosium hafnate pellets production showed a possibility of material synthesis using a solid-phase method, as well as of dysprosium hafnate pellets production by cold pressing and subsequent sintering. Within a whole range of examined compositions (23 mol% - 75 mol% Dy 2 O 3 ), a single-phase material with a highly radiation resistant fluorite-like structure was produced. Experiments on cold pressing and sintering of pellets confirmed a possibility of producing high quality dysprosium hafnate pellets from synthesized powder. A pilot batch of dysprosium hafnate pellets with standard sizes was produced. The standard sizes corresponded to the absorbing elements of the WWER-1000 control rods and met the main requirements to the absorbing element columns. The pilot batch size was approximately 6 kg. Acceptance testing of the pilot batch of dysprosium hafnate pellets was conducted, fulfillment of the requirements of technical conditions was checked and preirradiation properties of the pellets were examined. High quality of the produced pellets was confirmed, thus, demonstrating a real possibility of producing large batches of the dysprosium hafnate pellets. The next step is the production of test absorbing elements and cluster assemblies for the WWER-1000 control rods with their further installation for pilot operation at one of the Russian nuclear power plants

  13. Systematic study on surface and magnetostructural changes in Mn-substituted dysprosium ferrite by hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekha, G. [Department of Physics, College of Engineering Guindy, Anna University, Sardar Patel Road, Chennai 600025 (India); Tholkappiyan, R. [Department of Physics, College of Engineering Guindy, Anna University, Sardar Patel Road, Chennai 600025 (India); Department of Physics, College of Science, UAE University, Al-Ain 15551 (United Arab Emirates); Vishista, K., E-mail: raovishista@gmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Engineering Guindy, Anna University, Sardar Patel Road, Chennai 600025 (India); Hamed, Fathalla [Department of Physics, College of Science, UAE University, Al-Ain 15551 (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Garnet type Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5-x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 12} (x = 0–0.06) nanoparticles of 88.4–86.8 nm were synthesized by hydrothermal method. • The Dy, Mn, Fe and O elements in the ferrites were confirmed from XPS. • The multiple oxidation states of Fe and Mn ions, bonding energy and cationic distributions of the samples were examined by XPS. • The magnetic property shows ferromagnetic behavior from VSM technique. • The results from these studies are correlated with respect to Mn dopant. - Abstract: Dysprosium iron garnets are of scientific importance because of the wide range of magnetic properties that can be obtained in substituting dysprosium by a rare earth metal. In the present work, the effect of Mn substitution on magnetostructural changes in dysprosium ferrite nanoparticles is studied. Highly crystalline pure and Mn doped dysprosium ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The samples were calcined at 1100 °C for 2 h in air atmosphere which is followed by characterization using XRD, FT-IR analysis, SEM, XPS and VSM. The average crystallite size of synthesized samples were calculated by X-ray diffraction falls in the range of 88.4–86.8 nm and was found to be in cubic garnet structure. For further investigation of the structure and corresponding changes in the tetrahedral and octahedral stretching vibrational bonds, FT-IR was used. The synthesized samples consist of multiple oxidation (Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}) states for Fe ions and (Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+}) Mn ions analyzed in three ways of Fe 2p and Mn 2p spectra from the XPS analysis. With respect to Mn dopant in Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, the cationic distributions of elements were discussed from high resolution XPS spectra by peak position and shift, area, width. To find out the porous/void surface morphology of the sample, scanning electron microscopy was used. From XPS analysis, the presence of elements (Dy, Mn, Fe and O) and their composition in the

  14. 46 CFR 172.085 - Hull type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hull type. 172.085 Section 172.085 Shipping COAST GUARD... of This Chapter § 172.085 Hull type. If a cargo listed in Table 151.05 of part 151 of this chapter is to be carried, the tank barge must be at least the hull type specified in Table 151.05 of this...

  15. 21 CFR 172.804 - Aspartame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aspartame. 172.804 Section 172.804 Food and Drugs... Multipurpose Additives § 172.804 Aspartame. The food additive aspartame may be safely used in food in... conditions: (a) Aspartame is the chemical 1-methyl N- l-α-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine (C14H18N2O5). (b) The...

  16. Synthesis, structural characterization and in vitro testing of dysprosium containing silica particles as potential MRI contrast enhancing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiriac, L.B.; Trandafir, D.L. [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Turcu, R.V.F. [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Todea, M. [Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Simon, S., E-mail: simons@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Dysprosium containing silica microparticles obtained by freeze and spray drying. • Higher structural units interconnection achieved in freeze vs. spray dried samples. • Dy occurance on the outermost layer of the microparticles evidenced by XPS. • Enhanced MRI contrast observed for freeze dried samples with 5% mol Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}. - Abstract: The work is focused on synthesis and structural characterization of novel dysprosium-doped silica particles which could be considered as MRI contrast agents. Sol-gel derived silica rich particles obtained via freeze-drying and spray-drying processing methods were structurally characterized by XRD, {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR and XPS methods. The occurrence of dysprosium on the outermost layer of dysprosium containing silica particles was investigated by XPS analysis. The MRI contrast agent characteristics have been tested using RARE-T{sub 1} and RARE-T{sub 2} protocols. The contrast of MRI images delivered by the investigated samples was correlated with their local structure. Dysprosium disposal on microparticles with surface structure characterised by decreased connectivity of the silicate network units favours dark T{sub 2}-weighted MRI contrast properties.

  17. Synthesis, structural characterization and in vitro testing of dysprosium containing silica particles as potential MRI contrast enhancing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiriac, L.B.; Trandafir, D.L.; Turcu, R.V.F.; Todea, M.; Simon, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dysprosium containing silica microparticles obtained by freeze and spray drying. • Higher structural units interconnection achieved in freeze vs. spray dried samples. • Dy occurance on the outermost layer of the microparticles evidenced by XPS. • Enhanced MRI contrast observed for freeze dried samples with 5% mol Dy_2O_3. - Abstract: The work is focused on synthesis and structural characterization of novel dysprosium-doped silica particles which could be considered as MRI contrast agents. Sol-gel derived silica rich particles obtained via freeze-drying and spray-drying processing methods were structurally characterized by XRD, "2"9Si MAS-NMR and XPS methods. The occurrence of dysprosium on the outermost layer of dysprosium containing silica particles was investigated by XPS analysis. The MRI contrast agent characteristics have been tested using RARE-T_1 and RARE-T_2 protocols. The contrast of MRI images delivered by the investigated samples was correlated with their local structure. Dysprosium disposal on microparticles with surface structure characterised by decreased connectivity of the silicate network units favours dark T_2-weighted MRI contrast properties.

  18. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... alcohol in tableted foods for special dietary use, in an amount not greater than that required to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  19. 21 CFR 172.135 - Disodium EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., other than black-eyed peas) 165 Promote color retention. Mayonnaise 75 Preservative. Ready-to-eat cereal... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Disodium EDTA. 172.135 Section 172.135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  20. 40 CFR 172.1 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions. 172.1 Section 172.1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS EXPERIMENTAL USE... efficacious action on a pest. [73 FR 75599, Dec. 12, 2008] ...

  1. 34 CFR 668.172 - Financial ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... effect of changes in accounting principles, and the effect of changes in accounting estimates; (2) May... intangible assets defined as intangible in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles; and (5... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Financial ratios. 668.172 Section 668.172 Education...

  2. 21 CFR 172.655 - Furcelleran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (red seaweed). (b) The food additive conforms to the following: (1) It is a sulfated polysaccharide the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Furcelleran. 172.655 Section 172.655 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  3. 48 CFR 207.172 - Human research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Human research. 207.172... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION PLANNING Acquisition Plans 207.172 Human research. Any DoD component sponsoring research involving human subjects— (a) Is responsible for oversight of...

  4. 20 CFR 702.172 - Certification; definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certification; definitions. 702.172 Section 702.172 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LONGSHOREMEN'S... engaged in commerce but does not include military vessels or Coast Guard vessels. (b) “Federal Maritime...

  5. 12 CFR 563.172 - Financial derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... underlying assets, indices, or reference rates. The most common types of financial derivatives are futures, forward commitments, options, and swaps. A mortgage derivative security, such as a collateralized mortgage... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial derivatives. 563.172 Section 563.172...

  6. Synthesis, characterization and sup 23 Na NMR shift studies of a novel dysprosium(III) crown ether texaphyrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, J.L.; Mody, T.D. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Ramasamy, R.; Sherry, A.D. (Texas Univ., Dallas, TX (United States))

    1992-05-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a novel dysprosium(III) crown-ether texaphyrin (Dy(BCTxp)){sup 2+} is reported. This complex was designed to serve as a ditopic chelate for both dysprosium(III) and sodium cations. {sup 23}Sodium NMR spectroscopic studies indicates that titration of Na{sup +} with increasing concentrations of (Dy(BCTxp)){sup 2+} results in a shift toward higher frequency and gives a net hyperfine shift of 0.86 ppm. Sodium complexation is taking place into the crown subunit in (Dy(BCTxp)){sup 2+} and the degree of complexation is not reduced substantially by the positive charge on the dysprosium(III) portion of this binucleating system.

  7. Dysprosium disilicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Gangfeng; Nogami, Jun; Crimp, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure of self-assembled dysprosium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The studies focused on nanostructures that involve multiple atomic layers of the silicide. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy images and fast Fourier transform analysis showed that both hexagonal and orthorhombic/tetragonal silicide phases were present. Both the magnitude and the anisotropy of lattice mismatch between the silicide and the substrate play roles in the morphology and epitaxial growth of the nanostructures formed

  8. Major conformations of the ligand skeleton of a tetranuclear dysprosium (3) tartrate complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevela, V.V.; Semenov, V.Eh.; Bezryadin, S.G.; Savitskaya, T.V.; Kolesar, I.R.; Matveev, S.N.; Shamov, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    By the molecular mechanics method (MIND program, stoichiometry was studied and basic conformations of ligand frame of dysprosium (3) tetranuclear complex bis-(d-tartrato) bis-(l-tartrato)tetradysprosiate (3) - anion Dy 4 (d-L) 2 (l-L) 2 4- (1) (d-H 4 L = d-tartaric acid, l-H 4 L = l - tartaric acid) were revealed. It is shown that theoretically calculated mP τ constants for so-called compact conformations of 1, where tartratoligands are in gosh conformation, agree with experimentally obtained constant of paramagnetic birefringence (mP e ) of complex 1 [ru

  9. Incinerator carryover tests with dysprosium as a stand-in for plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, R.L.

    1981-11-01

    A full-scale (5 kg/h) incinerator is being tested with nonradioactive feed materials which simulate SRP-generator combustible transuranic wastes. The incinerator is two-stage and is designed to provide relatively quiescent conditions in the primary chamber where the ash is formed. This feature should minimize entrainment of Pu-bearing particles into the off-gas system. A series of runs have been completed in which incinerator feed was spiked with dysprosium to simulate Pu. Carryover of Dy into the off-gas system was found to be low (about 1/4%). 4 figures, 3 tables

  10. Incorporation of dysprosium ions into PbTiO3 ferroelectric ceramic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Peláiz-Barranco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A structural analysis concerning the incorporation of dysprosium into A- and/or B-sites of the lead titanate is shown. The two "boundary" refinements are presented, i.e., Dy2+ substitutes for Pb2+ (Dy3+ substitutes for Ti4+ and Dy3+ substitutes for Pb2+ (Dy3+ substitutes for Ti4+. The results offer quantitative information about the incorporation into both crystallographic sites. The increase of Dy3+ fraction into B-site provides the increase of the Ti4+ atomic displacement along the [001] direction and the tetragonal distortion.

  11. Dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium borate glass subjected to Co-60 gamma ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, R. S., E-mail: ratnasuffhiyanni@gmail.com; Wagiran, H., E-mail: husin@utm.my; Saeed, M. A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium borate (CMB:Dy) glass are presented. This study is deemed to understand the application of calcium as the modifier in magnesium borate glass with the presence of dysprosium as the activator to be performed as TL dosimeter (TLD). The study provides fundamental knowledge of a glass system that may lead to perform new TL glass dosimetry application in future research. Calcium magnesium borate glass systems of (70-y) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} − 20 CaO – 10 MgO-(y) Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} with 0.05  mol % ≤ y ≤ 0.7  mol % of dyprosium were prepared by melt-quenching technique. The amorphous structure and TL properties of the prepared samples were determined using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TL reader; model Harshaw 4500 respectively. The samples were irradiated to Co-60 gamma source at a dose of 50 Gy. Dosimetric properties such as annealing procedure, time temperature profile (TTP) setting, optimization of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration of 0.5 mol % were determined for thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) reader used.

  12. Treatment of rheumatoid synovitis of the knee with intraarticular injection of dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Zalutsky, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred eight knees of 93 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with an intraarticular injection of 270 mCi of dysprosium 165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregate. Leakage of radioactivity from the injected joint was minimal. Mean leakage to the venous blood 3 hours after injection was 0.11% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean whole body dose of 0.2 rads. Mean leakage to the liver 24 hours after injection was 0.64% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean liver dose of 3.2 rads. In 7 additional patients examined, there was negligible or near negligible activity found in the draining inguinal lymph nodes. One-year followup was possible for 74 knees (63 patients). Sixty-one percent of the knees had good results, 23% had fair results, and 16% had poor results. There was a direct correlation between the radiographic stage and response to treatment. In knees with stage I radiographic changes, 72% showed good results; 93% showed improvement. In knees with stage II changes, 59% showed good results; 81% showed improvement. These preliminary results indicate that dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for radiation synovectomy. The low leakage rates observed offer a definite advantage over agents previously used

  13. Dual responsive dysprosium-doped hydroxyapatite particles and toxicity reduction after functionalization with folic and glucuronic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez Lafarga, Ana Karen; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín P. [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Gurinov, Andrey [Research Resources Center for Magnetic Resonance, Saint Petersburg State University, Universitetskij pr. 26, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel [Laboratorio Desarrollo-Envejecimiento, Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Occidente (CIBO), Instituto Mexicano de Seguro Social (IMSS), Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe, E-mail: gregoriocarbajal@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2015-03-01

    The development of probes for biomedical applications demands materials with low toxicity levels besides fluorescence or magnetic properties to be detected by confocal microscopes or MRI resonators. Several drug delivery systems or other biomedical materials prepared with hydroxyapatite have been proposed, however, toxicity effects might arise when the size of particles is nanometric. In this study, hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic or folic acids presented lower oxidative stress, measured from lipoperoxides and nitric oxide indicators in rats than pure hydroxyapatite. In separated experiments, hydroxyapatite was doped with dysprosium cations by coprecipitation producing a single crystal phase with fluorescent properties easily visualized by confocal microscopy when excited at 488 nm. These particles also presented the ability to modify the proton relaxation time in T1 maps collected by magnetic resonance imaging. These modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles could be candidates to design bimodal probes with low toxicity. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic acid reduced oxidative stress in rats. • Functionalization with folic acid reduced oxidative stress in rats. • Dysprosium doping does not affect the crystalline structure of hydroxyapatite. • Dysprosium doped particles are visible in fluorescent microscope. • Dysprosium doped particles act as MRI contrast agents.

  14. Kinetic stability of the dysprosium(3) complex with tetraazaporphine in acetic acid-water and acetic acid-methanol mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelevina, O.G.; Vojnov, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    Water-soluble dysprosium tetraazaporphine with acetylacetonate-ion as extraligand is synthesized for the first time. Its kinetic stability in acetic acid solutions is investigated. It is shown that the complex is dissociated with formation of free tetraazaporphine. Kinetic parameters of dissociation reaction are determined [ru

  15. Dual responsive dysprosium-doped hydroxyapatite particles and toxicity reduction after functionalization with folic and glucuronic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez Lafarga, Ana Karen; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín P.; Gurinov, Andrey; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    The development of probes for biomedical applications demands materials with low toxicity levels besides fluorescence or magnetic properties to be detected by confocal microscopes or MRI resonators. Several drug delivery systems or other biomedical materials prepared with hydroxyapatite have been proposed, however, toxicity effects might arise when the size of particles is nanometric. In this study, hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic or folic acids presented lower oxidative stress, measured from lipoperoxides and nitric oxide indicators in rats than pure hydroxyapatite. In separated experiments, hydroxyapatite was doped with dysprosium cations by coprecipitation producing a single crystal phase with fluorescent properties easily visualized by confocal microscopy when excited at 488 nm. These particles also presented the ability to modify the proton relaxation time in T1 maps collected by magnetic resonance imaging. These modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles could be candidates to design bimodal probes with low toxicity. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic acid reduced oxidative stress in rats. • Functionalization with folic acid reduced oxidative stress in rats. • Dysprosium doping does not affect the crystalline structure of hydroxyapatite. • Dysprosium doped particles are visible in fluorescent microscope. • Dysprosium doped particles act as MRI contrast agents

  16. 21 CFR 172.867 - Olestra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prepackaged ready-to-eat savory (i.e., salty or piquant but not sweet) snacks and prepackaged, unpopped popcorn kernels that are ready-to-heat. In such foods, the additive may be used in place of fats and oils... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Olestra. 172.867 Section 172.867 Food and Drugs...

  17. 21 CFR 172.848 - Lactylic esters of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Lactylic esters of fatty acids. 172.848 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.848 Lactylic esters of fatty acids. Lactylic esters of fatty acids... prepared from lactic acid and fatty acids meeting the requirements of § 172.860(b) and/or oleic acid...

  18. Watt-level dysprosium fiber laser at 315 μm with 73% slope efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R. I.; Majewski, M. R.; Bharathan, G.; Hudson, D. D.; Fuerbach, A.; Jackson, S. D.

    2018-04-01

    Rare-earth-doped fiber lasers are emerging as promising high-power mid-infrared sources for the 2.6-3.0 {\\mu}m and 3.3-3.8 {\\mu}m regions based on erbium and holmium ions. The intermediate wavelength range, however, remains vastly underserved, despite prospects for important manufacturing and defense applications. Here, we demonstrate the potential of dysprosium-doped fiber to solve this problem, with a simple in-band pumped grating-stabilized linear cavity generating up to 1.06 W at 3.15 {\\mu}m. A slope efficiency of 73% with respect to launched power (77% relative to absorbed power) is achieved: the highest value for any mid-infrared fiber laser to date, to the best of our knowledge. Opportunities for further power and efficiency scaling are also discussed.

  19. Proton NMR relaxivity of blood samples in the presence of some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coroiu, I.; Darabont, Al.; Bogdan, M.

    1999-01-01

    The use of some new compounds in MRI tissue and blood characterisation based on nuclear spin relaxation time measurements cannot be sustained until the molecular sources of these variations are understood. Tissues and blood are complex molecular systems with complex NMR properties. A better comprehension of the molecular basis of relaxation offers the possibility to predict the changes expected for a given pathology. The purpose of this contribution is to evidence the different relaxation characteristics of some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds in the presence and absence of the blood and to give a possible explanation about the molecular processes that cause occurrence of changes. Some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds such as: Gd-CIT (gadolinium citrate), Dy-DTPA (DTPA-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid), iron oxide - gadolinium oxide (or dysprosium oxide)- dextran complexes were prepared. The longitudinal T 1 -1 and transverse T 2 -1 'relaxation rates' measurements have been carried out as a function of molar concentrations. All measurements have been made at room temperature (about 25 deg.C) and the proton Larmor frequency ν o = 90 MHz. The pulsed NMR spectrometer utilised was a commercial Bruker SXP4/100 spectrometer. Transverse relaxation rate measurements have been made using the Carr-Purcell method, while longitudinal relaxation rate measurements using the inversion recovery pulse sequence, 180 angle-τ-90 angle. The accuracy was about 2-3% for the longitudinal relaxation rates and about 5-7% for the transverse relaxation rates. R 1 and R 2 relaxivities, in mM -1 s -1 were determined from the least square determination of the slopes of plots 1/T 1,2 versus compound molar concentration, using at least five independent measurements at several concentrations between 0 and 2 mM. Increased R 2 relaxivity observed for dysprosium compounds in the blood presence can be explained by PRE effect. The largest gain in R 2 relaxivity seems to imply a noncovalent

  20. Investigation on rare earth magnets recycling by organophosphoric extractant encapsulated polymeric beads for separation of dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Kartikey K.; Singh, D.K.; Kain, V.

    2017-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are a basic requirement of the electronics and new industries including green technology. In the present work an organophosphoric extractant encapsulating polyethersulfone (PES) beads has been developed and employed for dysprosium (Dy) separation from aqueous stream. Polyethersulfonic beads encapsulating PC88A were prepared by phase inversion method. During the synthesis of the beads, preparatory parameters were also optimized to obtain best suited beads which were subsequently characterized for their encapsulation capacity and micro structural investigation. The results obtained in the present investigation suggested that PES/PVAJPC88A composite beads could be used for separation of rare earths from aqueous medium obtained from the solubilisation of magnetic scrap materials

  1. Design and validation of a photon insensitive multidetector neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Ros, J.M.; Bedogni, R.; Palermo, I.; Esposito, A.; Delgado, A.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.

    2011-01-01

    This communication describes a photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of Dysprosium (Dy) activation foils located along three perpendicular axes within a single moderating polyethylene sphere. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.6 was used to optimize the spatial arrangement of the detectors and to derive the spectrometer response matrix. Nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence for energies up to 20 MeV was obtained by combining the readings of the detectors located at the same radius value. The spectrometer was calibrated using a previously characterized 14 MeV neutron beam produced in the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG). The overall uncertainty of the spectrometer response matrix at 14 MeV, assessed on the basis of this experiment, was ±3%.

  2. Influence of modifiers on the separation of dysprosium from neodymium using organophosphorus acid derivates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elwert, Tobias; Schwarz, Sabrina; Goldmann, Daniel [TU Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Rohstoffaufbereitung und Recycling

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of three organophosphorus acid derivates (D2EHPA, EHEHPA and Cyanex 572) for the separation of terbium and dysprosium from praseodymium and neodymium from NdFeB magnets in chloride solution. A special focus was put on the effect of phase modifiers. The investigations revealed that all extractants show in general a similar extraction behavior but the extraction is shifted to higher pH values in the order D2EHPA < EHEHPA < Cyanex 572. Therefore, and due to higher realizable loadings, EHEHPA and Cyanex 572 are more suitable for the investigated separation problem than D2EHPA. Whereas EHEHPA requires 1-decanol as phase modifier, Cyanex 572 can be employed without modifier addition.

  3. Automated spectrofluorimetric determinations of terbium and dysprosium in rare earth mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle, S.J.; Za' tar, N. (Kent Univ., Canterbury (UK))

    1983-12-01

    Several methods involving the use of water-soluble binary and ternary complexes have been proposed for the spectrofluorimetric determination based on terbium(III) emission at 545 nm. These are terbium(III) with (A) ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid), (B) o-hydroxyphenyliminodiacetic acid, (C) EDTA + 5-sulphosalicylic acid, (D) EDTA + 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-3,5-disulphonic acid disodium salt (Tiron), and (E) iminodiacetic acid (IDA) + Tiron. Two of the reagent mixtures (D and E) can also be used for the fluorimetric determination of dysprosium(III) at 582 nm. A comparison has been made of these methods in order to select the most satisfactory procedure with respect to selectivity, sensitivity and suitability for adaption to automatic operation. Results are given and discussed.

  4. Spectrographic determination of dysprosium in doped crystals of calcium sulfate used for dosimetric material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoletto, T.; Lordello, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A spectrographic method is described for the quantitative determination of dysprosium in doped crystals of calcium sulphate. The consequences of the changes in some parameters of the excitation conditions, such as arc current, electrode type and total or partial burning of sample, in the analytical results are discussed. Matrix effects are investigated. Variations in the intensity of the spectral lines are verified by recording the spectrum in distinct photographic plates. The role of internal standard in analytical reproducibility and in counterbalance of the variations in the arc current and in the weight of sample is studied. Accuracy is estimated by comparative analysis of two calcium sulphate samples by X-Ray Fluorescence, Neutron Activation and Inductive Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy. (M.A.C.) [pt

  5. Use of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for simultaneous preconcentration of samarium, europium, gadolinium and dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallah, M.H.; Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran; Shemirani, F.; Ghannadi Maragheh, M.

    2008-01-01

    A new preconcentration method of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was developed for simultaneous preconcentration of samarium, europium, gadolinium and dysprosium. DLLME technique was successfully used as a sample preparation method. In this preconcentration method, an appropriate mixture of extraction solvent, disperser solvent was injected rapidly into an aqueous solution containing Sm, Eu, Gd and Dy after complex formation using chelating reagent of the 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN). After phase separation, 0.5 mL of the settled phase containing enriched analytes was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The main factors affected the preconcentration of Sm, Eu, Gd and Dy were extraction and dispersive solvent type and their volume, extraction time, volume of chelating agent (PAN), centrifuge speed and drying temperature of the samples. Under the best operating condition simultaneous preconcentration factors of 80, 100, 103 and 78 were obtained for Sm, Eu, Gd and Dy, respectively. (author)

  6. A model for additive transport in metal halide lamps containing mercury and dysprosium tri-iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beks, M L; Haverlag, M; Mullen, J J A M van der

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of additives in a metal halide lamp is examined through numerical modelling. A model for a lamp containing sodium iodide additives has been modified to study a discharge containing dysprosium tri-iodide salts. To study the complex chemistry the method of Gibbs minimization is used to decide which species have to be taken into account and to fill lookup tables with the chemical composition at different combinations of elemental abundance, lamp pressure and temperature. The results from the model with dysprosium additives were compared with earlier results from the lamp containing sodium additives and a simulation of a pure mercury lamp. It was found that radial segregation creates the conditions required for axial segregation. Radial segregation occurs due to the unequal diffusion of atoms and molecules. Under the right conditions convection currents in the lamp can cause axial demixing. These conditions depend on the ratio of axial convection and radial diffusion as expressed by the Peclet number. At a Peclet number of unity axial segregation is most pronounced. At low Peclet numbers radial segregation is at its worst, while axial segregation is not present. At large Peclet numbers the discharge becomes homogeneously mixed. The degree of axial segregation at a Peclet number of unity depends on the temperature at which the additive under consideration fully dissociates. If the molecules dissociate very close to the walls no molecules are transported by the convective currents in the lamp, and hence axial segregation is limited. If they dissociate further away from the walls in the area where the downward convective currents are strongest, more axial segregation is observed

  7. Electrochemical behaviour of dysprosium in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at W and Al electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castrillejo, Y.; Bermejo, M.R.; Barrado, A.I.; Pardo, R.; Barrado, E.; Martinez, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of DyCl 3 was studied in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at different temperatures. The cathodic reaction can be written:Dy(III)+3e-bar Dy(0)which can be divided in two very close cathodic steps:Dy(III)+1e-bar Dy(II)andDy(II)+2e-bar Dy(0)Transient electrochemical techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and chronoamperometry were used in order to study the reaction mechanism and the transport parameters of electroactive species at a tungsten electrode. The results showed that in the eutectic LiCl-KCl, electrocrystallization of dysprosium seems to be the controlling electrochemical step. Chronoamperometric studies indicated instantaneous nucleation of dysprosium with three dimensional growth of the nuclei whatever the applied overpotential.Mass transport towards the electrode is a simple diffusion process, and the diffusion coefficient of the electroactive species, i.e. Dy(III), has been calculated. The validity of the Arrhenius law was also verified by plotting the variation of the logarithm of the diffusion coefficient versus 1/T.In addition, the electrode reactions of the LiCl-KCl-DyCl 3 solutions at an Al wire were also investigated by cyclic voltammetry and open circuit chronopotentiometry. The redox potential of the Dy(III)/Dy couple at the Al electrode was observed at more positive potentials values than those at the inert electrode. This potential shift was thermodynamically analyzed by a lowering of activity of Dy in the metal phase due to the formation of intermetallic compounds

  8. Dysprosium lithium borate glass mircrospheres for radiation synovectomy: The in vitro and in vivo performance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Di; Yu Jing [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Center for Advanced Materials and Nano-Biomedicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Huang Wenhai, E-mail: whhuang@tongji.edu.cn [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Center for Advanced Materials and Nano-Biomedicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Zhou Nai; Wang Deping [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Center for Advanced Materials and Nano-Biomedicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Yin Wei [Institute of Isotope Research, Sinitic Academy of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Chen Yaqing [The Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2010-08-30

    The radioactive dysprosium lithium borate glass (DyLB) microspheres with different glass compositions were prepared for radiation synovectomy. The biodegradability and biocompatibility of these DyLB microspheres were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The DyLB microspheres studied in this work were partially biodegradable in a simulated body fluid (SBF), with the final weight loss of the microspheres in the range of 24.6% and 55.0% (wt.%) after 8 days of immersion. The ICP results revealed that the dissolution of lithium significantly decreased from 100% to 53.7% with increasing content of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the microspheres from 18% to 22% (wt.%, from S-1 to S-3). However, for all of the three samples, nearly all of the dysprosium (> 99.997%, wt.%) remained in the microspheres, in the form of insoluble phosphates and carbonates, which was proved by the SEM and EDX analyses. The degradation of DyLB microspheres in SBF gradually decreased with immersion time and eventually reached equilibrium after 7 days of immersion. Compared to the other two samples, the S-3 sample with the lowest Dy{sup 3+} dissolution (about 0.002%) was considered more secure for clinical application. Furthermore, the S-3 DyLB microspheres exhibited good biocompatibility, since neither tissue damage nor inflammation was observed, after they were implanted in the liver of rat for two weeks. After neutron activation, the radionuclide purity of radioactive S-3 DyLB microspheres was 99.999%, which were suitable for radiation synovectomy.

  9. Photoluminescence study on amino functionalized dysprosium oxide-zinc oxide composite bifunctional nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Aswathy; Praveen, G.L; Abha, K.; Lekha, G.M [Department of Chemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Kerala 695581 (India); George, Sony, E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Kerala 695581 (India)

    2012-08-15

    An organic dispersion of 9-15 nm size stable dysprosium oxide incorporated zinc oxide nanocomposites exhibiting luminescence in the visible region has been synthesised by a wet chemical precipitation technique at room temperature. Tetraethoxysilane TEOS [(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O){sub 4}Si], (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTS) and a 1:1 mixture of TEOS-APTS have been used as capping agents to control the particle size as well as to achieve uniform dispersion of composite nanoparticles in methanol medium. X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis reveals the formation phase of amino-functionalised colloidal dysprosium oxide incorporated ZnO composite nanoparticles to be of zincite structure. The Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images show that the particles are spheroids in shape, having average crystalline sizes ranging from 9 to 15 nm. The photoluminescence (PL) observed in these composites has been attributed to the presence of near band edge excitonic emission and existence of defect centres. The time correlated single photon counting studies of the composite nanoparticles exhibited three decay pathways. The enhanced PL emission intensity of solid state fluorescence spectra of samples is attributed to the absence of vibrational relaxation process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano-composites are synthesised using a one step wet chemical precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significant fluorescence life time of 8.25 ns is obtained for the nano-composite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano-composite particles exhibited pale yellow fluorescence rather than blue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vibrational cascade free enhanced fluorescence is obtained for the dry sample.

  10. Simultaneous determination of dysprosium, holmium and erbium in high purity rare earth oxides by second order derivative spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbu, M.; Prasada Rao, T.; Iyer, C. S. P.; Damodaran, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    High purity individual rare earth oxides are increasingly used as major components in lasers (Y 2 O 3 ), phosphors (YVO 3 , Eu 2 O 3 ), magnetic bubble memory films (Gd 2 O 3 ) and refractive-index lenses and fibre optics (La 2 O 3 ). The determination of individual lanthanides in high purity rare earth oxides is a more important and difficult task. This paper reports the utilization of higher order derivative spectrophotometry for the simultaneous determination of dysprosium, holmium and erbium in high purity rare earth oxides. The developed procedure is simple, reliable and allows the determination of 0.001 to 0.2% of dysprosium, holmium and erbium in several rare earth. (author). 9 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  11. 21 CFR 172.260 - Oxidized polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to 19. (b) The additive is used or intended for use as a protective coating or component of protective coatings for fresh avocados, bananas, beets, coconuts, eggplant, garlic, grapefruit, lemons, limes... Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.260 Oxidized polyethylene. Oxidized polyethylene may be safely...

  12. 32 CFR 172.3 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SALES OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY § 172.3 Policy. (a) Cash or cash equivalents in the prescribed amounts shall accompany bid deposits for a bid to be considered responsive. Similarly, cash or cash...-level costs incurred in operation of the recyclable program. (2) After reimbursement of the cost...

  13. 21 CFR 172.830 - Succinylated monoglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.830 Succinylated monoglycerides. The food additive succinylated... a level not to exceed 3 percent by weight of the shortening. (2) As a dough conditioner in bread...

  14. 21 CFR 172.365 - Kelp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.365 Kelp. Kelp may be safely added to a food as a source of the...

  15. 21 CFR 172.395 - Xylitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.395 Xylitol. Xylitol may be safely used in foods for special...

  16. 21 CFR 172.715 - Calcium lignosulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.715 Calcium lignosulfonate. Calcium lignosulfonate may be...

  17. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.320 Amino acids. The food additive amino acids may be safely used...

  18. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be safely...

  19. 21 CFR 172.375 - Potassium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.375 Potassium iodide. The food additive potassium iodide may be...

  20. 49 CFR 172.200 - Applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... transportation shall describe the hazardous material on the shipping paper in the manner required by this subpart... marine pollutant, that is— (1) Identified by the letter “A” in column 1 of the § 172.101 table, except...

  1. 10 CFR 431.172 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... boiler, hot water supply boiler, commercial warm air furnace, instantaneous water heater, storage water heater, or unfired hot water storage tank. Flue loss means the sum of the sensible heat and latent heat... Provisions for Commercial HVAC & Water Heating Products § 431.172 Definitions. The following definitions...

  2. Mixed (phthalocyaninato)(Schiff-base) di-dysprosium sandwich complexes. Effect of magnetic coupling on the SMM behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Tao; Zeng, Suyuan; Cao, Wei; Ma, Qi; Duan, Chunying; Dou, Jianmin; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2013-11-21

    Reaction between Schiff-base ligand and half-sandwich complex M(Pc)(acac) led to the isolation of new sandwich-type mixed (phthalocyaninato)(Schiff-base) di-lanthanide compounds M2(Pc)2(L)H2O (M = Dy, Gd) (1, 2) [H2Pc = metal free phthalocyanine, Hacac = acetylacetone, H2L = N,N'-bis(3-methyloxysalicylidene)benzene-1,2-diamine] with the triple-decker molecular structure clearly revealed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. For the comparative studies, sandwich triple-decker analogues with pure Schiff-base ligand M2(L)3H2O (M = Dy, Gd) (3, 4) were also prepared. Dynamic magnetic measurement result reveals the single-molecule magnet (SMM) nature of the di-dysprosium derivative 1, while the static magnetic investigation over both pure and the diamagnetic diluted samples of this compound discloses the interionic ferromagnetic coupling between the two dysprosium ions, which in turn effectively suppresses the QTM and enhances the energy barrier of this SMM. Nevertheless, comparative studies over the static magnetic properties of the di-dysprosium triple-decker complexes 1 and 3 indicate the stronger magnetic coupling between the two lanthanide ions in mixed (phthalocyaninato)(Schiff-base) species than in the pure Schiff-base triple-decker analogue, suggesting the special coordination sphere around the dysprosium ions in the former compound over the latter one on the more intense inter-ionic ferromagnetic coupling. As a very small step towards understanding the structure-property relationship, the present result will be surely helpful for the design and synthesis of the multinuclear lanthanide-based SMMs with good properties.

  3. Evaluating United States and world consumption of neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium in final products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Matthew

    This paper develops scenarios of future rare-earth-magnet metal (neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium) consumption in the permanent magnets used in wind turbines and hybrid electric vehicles. The scenarios start with naive base-case scenarios for growth in wind-turbine and hybrid-electric-vehicle sales over the period 2011 to 2020, using historical data for each good. These naive scenarios assume that future growth follows time trends in historical data and does not depend on any exogenous variable. Specifically, growth of each technological market follows historical time trends, and the amount of rare earths used per unit of technology remains fixed. The chosen reference year is 2010. Implied consumptions of the rare earth magnet metals are calculated from these scenarios. Assumptions are made for the material composition of permanent magnets, the market share of permanent-magnet wind turbines and vehicles, and magnet weight per unit of technology. Different scenarios estimate how changes in factors like the material composition of magnets, growth of the economy, and the price of a substitute could affect future consumption. Each scenario presents a different method for reducing rare earth consumption and could be interpreted as potential policy choices. In 2010, the consumption (metric tons, rare-earth-oxide equivalent) of each rare-earth-magnet metal was as follows. Total neodymium consumption in the world for both technologies was 995 tons; dysprosium consumption was 133 tons; terbium consumption was 50 tons; praseodymium consumption was zero tons. The base scenario for wind turbines shows there could be strong, exponential growth in the global wind turbine market. New U.S. sales of hybrid vehicles would decline (in line with the current economic recession) while non-U.S. sales increase through 2020. There would be an overall increase in the total amount of magnetic rare earths consumed in the world. Total consumption of each rare earth in the short

  4. 21 CFR 172.863 - Salts of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Salts of fatty acids. 172.863 Section 172.863 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.863 Salts of fatty acids. The food additive salts of fatty acids may be safely..., magnesium, potassium, and sodium salts of the fatty acids conforming with § 172.860 and/or oleic acid...

  5. Dicty_cDB: CHK172 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CH (Link to library) CHK172 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11104-1 - (Link to Or...iginal site) CHK172F 626 - - - - - - Show CHK172 Library CH (Link to library) Clone ID CHK172 (Link to dicty...Base) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U11104-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.b...HEECKTQGNNYFKQSQYMDAIRCYTQAIELSNGTIA AYYGNRAAAYLAICTKSSLQDSIKDSLKAIELERSFIKGYTRASKAYIHLAQYDQAASII VRGLVFDPRN...KMDHEECKTQGNNYFKQSQYMDAIRCYTQAIELSNGTIA AYYGNRAAAYLAICTKSSLQDSIKDSLKAIELERSFIKGYT

  6. 7 CFR 457.172 - Coverage Enhancement Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage Enhancement Option. 457.172 Section 457.172..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.172 Coverage Enhancement Option. The Coverage Enhancement Option for the 2009 and succeeding crop years are as follows: FCIC policies: United...

  7. 49 CFR 172.446 - CLASS 9 label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the six white spaces between them. The lower half of the label must be white with the class number “9... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CLASS 9 label. 172.446 Section 172.446... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.446 CLASS 9 label. (a) Except for size and color, the “CLASS 9...

  8. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contiguous steel hull structure. 154.172 Section 154.172... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Hull Structure § 154.172 Contiguous steel hull structure. (a) Except as allowed in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this...

  9. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chewing gum base. 172.615 Section 172.615 Food and..., Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.615 Chewing gum base. The food additive chewing gum base... substances listed in paragraph (a) of this section, chewing gum base may also include substances generally...

  10. 21 CFR 172.585 - Sugar beet extract flavor base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sugar beet extract flavor base. 172.585 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.585 Sugar beet extract flavor base. Sugar beet extract flavor base may be safely used in food in accordance with the provisions of this section. (a...

  11. 21 CFR 172.822 - Sodium lauryl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium lauryl sulfate. 172.822 Section 172.822 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.822 Sodium lauryl sulfate. The food additive sodium lauryl sulfate may be safely... specifications: (1) It is a mixture of sodium alkyl sulfates consisting chiefly of sodium lauryl sulfate [CH2(CH2...

  12. 40 CFR 141.172 - Disinfection profiling and benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... benchmarking. 141.172 Section 141.172 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Disinfection-Systems Serving 10,000 or More People § 141.172 Disinfection profiling and benchmarking. (a... sanitary surveys conducted by the State. (c) Disinfection benchmarking. (1) Any system required to develop...

  13. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 172 - Trefoil Symbol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trefoil Symbol B Appendix B to Part 172... SECURITY PLANS Pt. 172, App. B Appendix B to Part 172—Trefoil Symbol 1. Except as provided in paragraph 2 of this appendix, the trefoil symbol required for RADIOACTIVE labels and placards and required to be...

  14. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout... prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived from...

  15. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.898 Bakers yeast glycan. Bakers yeast glycan may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast glycan is the comminuted, washed, pasteurized, and...

  16. 21 CFR 172.340 - Fish protein isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.340 Fish protein isolate. (a) The food additive fish... accordance with recognized good manufacturing practice for fish to be used as human food. (4) The additive... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Fish protein isolate. 172.340 Section 172.340 Food...

  17. 7 CFR 1150.172 - Books and records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Books and records. 1150.172 Section 1150.172... Order Reports, Books and Records § 1150.172 Books and records. Each person who is subject to this... employees of the Board and the Secretary such books and records as are necessary to carry out the provisions...

  18. 49 CFR 172.701 - Federal-State relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal-State relationship. 172.701 Section 172... TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNICATIONS, EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Training § 172.701 Federal-State relationship. This subpart and the parts...

  19. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents and Related Substances § 172.540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and L-alanine...

  20. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED VEGETABLES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Vegetables § 155.172 Canned dry...

  1. 21 CFR 172.723 - Epoxidized soybean oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Epoxidized soybean oil. 172.723 Section 172.723... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.723 Epoxidized soybean oil. Epoxidized soybean oil may be... reacting soybean oil in toluene with hydrogen peroxide and formic acid. (b) It meets the following...

  2. 26 CFR 1.172-13 - Product liability losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 3. Y, a professional medical association, is sued by B, a patient, in an action based on the malpractice of one of its doctors. B recovers $25,000. Because the suit was based on the services of B, the... 172(j)(3) not to have section 172(b)(1)(I) apply. (4) Relationship with section 172(b)(3)(C) election...

  3. 49 CFR 172.416 - POISON GAS label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON GAS label. 172.416 Section 172.416... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.416 POISON GAS label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON GAS label... POISON GAS label and the symbol must be white. The background of the upper diamond must be black and the...

  4. 21 CFR 172.770 - Ethylene oxide polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene oxide polymer. 172.770 Section 172.770... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.770 Ethylene oxide polymer. The polymer of ethylene oxide may... conditions. (a) It is the polymer of ethylene oxide having a minimum viscosity of 1,500 centipoises in a 1...

  5. 21 CFR 172.888 - Synthetic petroleum wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic petroleum wax. 172.888 Section 172.888... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.888 Synthetic petroleum wax. Synthetic petroleum wax may be safely used in or on foods in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Synthetic petroleum wax is a...

  6. 49 CFR 172.540 - POISON GAS placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON GAS placard. 172.540 Section 172.540... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.540 POISON GAS placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON GAS... the POISON GAS placard and the symbol must be white. The background of the upper diamond must be black...

  7. Spectrographic determination of dysprosium dopant in calcium sulphate used as dosimetric material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoletto, T.

    1982-01-01

    A spectrographic method is described for the quantitative determination of dysprosium in doped crystals of calcium sulphate. The consequences of the changes in some parameters of the excitation conditions, such as arc current, electrode type and total or partial burning of sample, in the analytical results are discussed. Matrix effects are investigated by comparison among analytical curves obtained from three different methods of standard preparations. Variations in the intensity of the spectral lines are verificated by recording the spectrum in distinct photographic plates (SA-1). The role of internal standard in analytical reproducibility and in counterbalance of the variations in the arc current and in the weight of sample are studied. The great similarity in excitation behavior of many of the rare earths is used to provide a high degree of internal standardization. Precision studies show a standard deviation of about + - 2,4 percent by use of lanthanum as an internal standard. Accuracy is estimate by comparative analysis of two calcium sulphate samples by X-Rays Fluorescence, Neutron Activation and Inductive Coupled Plasma (ICP) Emission Spectroscopy. (Author) [pt

  8. Combustion of gadolinium and dysprosium chelates as a cellular integrity marker in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericsson, A.; Bach-Gansmo, T.; Niklasson, F.; Hemmingsson, A.

    1995-01-01

    A combination of gadolinium (Gd) and dysprosium (Dy) chelates was investigated as a potential marker of cell-membrane integrity by means of a double-contrast effect in MR imaging. Blood samples with varying hematocrit (Hct) levels containing intact or lysed cells were used as model systems. With intact cells, the agents were assumed to be distributed solely extracellularly and the highest Hct studied (69%) was assumed to mimic the ratio of extracellular to intracellular water in tissue. The combined effect on image intensity of Gd (in a concentration corresponding to 0.2 mmol/kg b.w. in humans) and Dy (0.6 mmol/kg b.w.) applied simultaneously was a marked difference in signal intensity between samples with intact and lysed cells in both the T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images with a corresponding increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio. This was the result of a T1 reduction caused by Gd with a negligible Dy susceptibility effect in areas with lysed cells. On the other hand, the Dy susceptibility effect (i.e. reduced apparent T2) dominated in areas with intact cells. Thus, the combination of Gd and Dy may serve as a marker of cell-membrane integrity in MR examinations. (orig.)

  9. Isolation of {sup 163}Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne A.; Nortier, Francois M.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Pollington, Anthony D.; Kunde, Gerd J.; Rabin, Michael W.; Birnbaum, Eva R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Div.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J. [Univ. Wisconsinn, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Medical Physics

    2015-07-01

    The rare earth isotope {sup 163}Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of {sup 163}Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, {sup 163}Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm{sup -3} α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MS to determine the {sup 163}Ho/{sup 165}Ho ratio, {sup 163}Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4 x 10{sup 5} for Dy. The isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ± 1.3 ng of {sup 163}Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.

  10. Nuclear statistics of dysprosium resonance parameters in the energy range 10 - 1000 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, S. G.; Kye, Y. U.; Cho, M. H.; Kim, G. N.; Namkung, W.; Lee, M. W.; Kang, Y. R.; Roe, T. I.

    2016-01-01

    A resonance parameter analysis is often performed in the Resolved Resonance Region (RRR) in order to estimate the average level spacing, distribution of the reduced widths and so on. Neutron Capture experiments on dysprosium isotopes were performed at the electron linear accelerator (LINAC) facility of the Rensselear Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in the neutron energy region from 10 eV to 1 keV. The following nuclear statistics of the resonance parameters will be discussed in this paper. The D 0 for 161 Dy and 163 Dy were judged to be constant up to 120.6 and 163.9 eV, respectively. It was assumed that the D 0 of 162 Dy and 164 Dy is constant up to 1000 eV because they have few resonances. The results were compared with the values from Reference 11 as shown in Figure 1. Statistical distributions of reduced neutron were investigated for the three isotopes in the region from 0 to 1000 eV; 161 Dy, 162 Dy, and 163 Dy, but not for 164 Dy because of a few number of resonances. The reduced neutron widths Γ n 0 were divided by the unweighted average reduced neutron width < Γ n 0 > for each isotope. A cumulative distribution of these unitless ratios is compared with the integral of the Porter-Thomas distribution (χ 2 distribution with one degree of freedom). The results agree reasonably with the Porter Thomas distributions.

  11. Self-organized dysprosium-directed alginate hydrogels and its chemical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qianmin [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Gao, Jinwei [Institute for Advanced Materials, Academy of Advanced Optoelectronics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Peng, Huojun [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Qianming, E-mail: qmwang@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion and Storage, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Rational use of self-organized materials may contribute in developing new structures and devices in practical technology. Synthetic metallo-supramolecular gels are generally designed with transitional metal-directed process. However, the assembly of both lanthanide and sodium alginate in macromolecular systems would find a new way of utilizing its physical properties. The stimuli-responsive molecule (alginate) could firmly form stable hydrogels upon the encapsulation of dysprosium ions. In addition, the immobilization of YVO{sub 4}: Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticle in the soft matrix has been achieved and it has never been explored in the fabrication of phosphor-incorporated luminescent alginate gels. The key feature of the present soft matter is that its red emission could be switched off in the presence of sodium ascorbate and the results may have a tremendous impact on the extension of photophysical application based on soft nanoscale devices. - Highlights: • Dy{sup 3+} can be used for the gelation of the dissolved alginate. • Lanthanide hydrogels could exhibit red emissions under excitations. • Luminescence could be switched “off” in the presence of sodium ascorbate.

  12. Optical properties of zinc borotellurite glass doped with trivalent dysprosium ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ami Hazlin, M. N.; Halimah, M. K.; Muhammad, F. D.; Faznny, M. F.

    2017-04-01

    The zinc borotellurite doped with dysprosium oxide glass samples with chemical formula {[(TeO2) 0 . 7(B2O3) 0 . 3 ] 0 . 7(ZnO) 0 . 3 } 1 - x(Dy2O3)x (where x=0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05 M fraction) were prepared by using conventional melt quenching technique. The structural and optical properties of the proposed glass systems were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and UV-VIS spectroscopy. The amorphous nature of the glass systems is confirmed by using XRD technique. The infrared spectra of the glass systems indicate three obvious absorption bands which are assigned to BO3 and TeO4 vibrational groups. Based on the absorption spectra obtained, the direct and indirect optical band gaps, as well as the Urbach energy were calculated. It is observed that both the direct and indirect optical band gaps increase with the concentration of Dy3+ ions. On the other hand, the Urbach energy is observed to decrease as the concentration of Dy3+ ions increases.

  13. The liquid membrane for extraction of Yttrium and Dysprosium from Acid Nitric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johny, W.S.; Raldi-Artono-Koestoer; Kris-Tri-Basuki; Sudibyo

    1996-01-01

    The determination of surfactant in liquid membrane has been done. The surfactant is span-80 (sorbitol-monooleate), the liquid membrane phase was the organic phase (O), the internal liquid phase (W) with ratio O/W = 1, and surfactant. The organic phase using D 2 EHPA in the kerosene and the internal liquid phase using aqua des or acid nitric. The determination of surfactant with variation of span-80 (0,25 - 2%) in the liquid membrane volume. The speed of stirrer was 3500 rpm in 20 minute. The ratio of liquid membrane phase form and external phase (aqua des or acid nitric) was 1, the speed of stirrer was 350 rpm in 10 minute (permeation process). The liquid phase and the liquid membrane phase was separated and then determinated the volume of liquid membrane, the result of percentage of span-80 was 0,25 % volume. The extraction of yttrium and dysprosium in 2 M HNO 3 was Kd y = 2.945 and Kd D y = 0.019

  14. Custom Coordination Environments for Lanthanoids: Tripodal Ligands Achieve Near-Perfect Octahedral Coordination for Two Dysprosium-Based Molecular Nanomagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kwang Soo; Baldoví, José J; Jiang, ShangDa; Koo, Bong Ho; Kang, Dong Won; Lee, Woo Ram; Koh, Eui Kwan; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Coronado, Eugenio; Slota, Michael; Bogani, Lapo; Hong, Chang Seop

    2017-05-01

    Controlling the coordination sphere of lanthanoid complexes is a challenging critical step toward controlling their relaxation properties. Here we present the synthesis of hexacoordinated dysprosium single-molecule magnets, where tripodal ligands achieve a near-perfect octahedral coordination. We perform a complete experimental and theoretical investigation of their magnetic properties, including a full single-crystal magnetic anisotropy analysis. The combination of electrostatic and crystal-field computational tools (SIMPRE and CONDON codes) allows us to explain the static behavior of these systems in detail.

  15. Experimental and theoretical approach on the optical properties of zinc borotellurite glass doped with dysprosium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimah, M. K.; Ami Hazlin, M. N.; Muhammad, F. D.

    2018-04-01

    A series of glass samples with chemical formula {[(TeO2)0.7(B2O3)0.3]0.7(ZnO)0.3}1 - x(Dy2O3)x where x = 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05 M fraction were synthesized through conventional melt-quenching method. The most common way to fabricate a glass material is by fusion of two or more component oxides followed by their quenching. This technique is known as melt-quenching technique. Kaur et al. (2016) [1] highlighted that the melt-quenching method able to enhance the mechanical properties like hardness and flexural strength of the material. The nature of the glass systems is proven to be amorphous based on the XRD pattern. The FTIR spectra of the glass systems confirm the existence of five bands which are assigned for the BO4, BO3, TeO4 and TeO3 vibrational groups. The density of the glass systems is increased with the addition of Dy2O3 while the molar volume is found to be inversely proportional to the density of the proposed glass. The optical properties of the glasses are determined through the absorption spectra obtained from the UV-VIS spectrophotometer. From the absorption spectra, the indirect and direct optical band gaps and the Urbach energy are found to be inversely proportional to each other. As the molar fraction of the Dy2O3 increased, the optical band gaps are observed to increase as opposed to the Urbach energy. For this glass system, the values of refractive index, electronic polarizability, oxide ion polarizability and the optical basicity are found to decrease as the addition of the dysprosium oxide is increased. From the emission spectra, two intense blue and yellow emission bands are observed, which correspond to the 4F9/2 → 6H15/2 and 4F9/2 → 6H13/2 transitions of Dy3 + ions respectively. The CIE chromaticity coordinates of the zinc borotellurite glass systems are found to be located in the white light region. Generation of white light The generation of the white light can be achieved by using two emission bands which comprise of the yellow

  16. Textured dysprosium and gadolinium poles for high-field, short-period hybrid undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murokh, Alex; Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Agustsson, Ron; O'Shea, Finn H.; Chubar, Oleg; Chen, Yung; Grandsaert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the feasibility of enhancement of the gap field in a short-period hybrid undulator by using pole inserts with the saturation inductance B s , over that of iron, 2 T. Dysprosium metal, with the saturation inductance of 3.4 T below 90 K, and Gadolinium with B s =2.7 T, appear as good candidates as the optimized pole material. However, due to the high magnetic anisotropy of Dy, such a high level of magnetization can only be realized when the external field lies in the basal plane. This implies that the pole has to be single-crystalline or highly textured. Considering that growing large, >10mm, Dy single crystals is difficult, we propose secondary recrystallization as a method to induce the required texture in thin Dy and Gd foils. The textured foils can be stacked to produce pole inserts of the desired geometry and orientation. Results of small-scale processing and magnetic measurements of thin (20–60 μ) foils provide evidence that the required texture quality can be achieved by a relatively simple sequence of heat-treatments and cold rolling. The advantage of textured Dy and Gd poles is demonstrated in a several period test undulator. -- Highlights: • Textured rare-earth materials for use as undulator pole materials. • We measure the development of texture in Dy and Gd. • We compare the rare-earth materials with high saturation steel in undulators. • Thin sheets of Dy and Gd materials perform similar to single crystals

  17. 21 CFR 172.379 - Vitamin D2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Vitamin D2. 172.379 Section 172.379 Food and Drugs... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.379 Vitamin D2. Vitamin D2 may be used safely in foods as a... prescribed conditions: (a) Vitamin D2, also known as ergocalciferol, is the chemical 9,10-seco(5Z,7E,22E)-5,7...

  18. 21 CFR 172.872 - Methyl ethyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Methyl ethyl cellulose. 172.872 Section 172.872... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.872 Methyl ethyl cellulose. The food additive methyl ethyl cellulose... a cellulose ether having the general formula [C6H(10 -x-y)O5(CH3)x(C2H5)y]n, where x is the number...

  19. Electrocatalytic approach for the efficiency increase of electrolytic hydrogen production: Proof-of-concept using platinum-dysprosium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, D.M.F.; Šljukić, B.; Sequeira, C.A.C.; Macciò, D.; Saccone, A.; Figueiredo, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Development of electrocatalytic materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is attempted with the aim of reducing the water electrolysis overpotential and increasing its efficiency. Using linear scan voltammetry measurements of the hydrogen discharge enables evaluation of the electrocatalytic activity for the HER of platinum–dysprosium (Pt–Dy) intermetallic alloy electrodes of different compositions. Understanding of materials electrocatalytic performance is based on determination of several crucial kinetic parameters, including the Tafel coefficients, b, charge transfer coefficients, α, exchange current densities, j 0 , and activation energies, E a . Influence of temperature on HER is investigated by performing studies at temperatures ranging from 25 °C to 85 °C. The effect of the Dy amount in the efficiency of the HER on the Pt–Dy alloys is analysed. Results demonstrate that Dy can substantially increase the electrocatalytic activity of the Pt alloys, in comparison to the single Pt electrode. Efforts are made to correlate the microstructure of the alloys with their performance towards the HER. - Highlights: ► Development of electrocatalysts to increase efficiency of electrolytic hydrogen production. ► Synthesis and evaluation of composition and morphology of platinum–dysprosium (Pt–Dy) alloys. ► Hydrogen evolution reaction on Pt–Dy alloys electrodes studied using linear scan voltammetry in alkaline medium. ► Pt–Dy alloy with equiatomic composition enhances kinetics of hydrogen discharge compared to single Pt

  20. The application of x-ray spectrometry to isotopic-source activation analysis of dysprosium and holmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, A.E.; Mboweni, R.C.M.

    1990-01-01

    A novel aspect of activation analysis is described for the determination of dysprosium and holmium at low concentrations. The method involves the measurement of K x-rays from radionuclides produced by thermal neutron activation using a 1 mg 252 Cf source. The basis for elemental selection depends largely on the demand for analysis and on the existence of favourable nuclear properties for the production of a practicable x-ray yield. A full appraisal of the analytical potential of the method is presented with particular emphasis on its application to geological matrices. The sensitivity was optimised by employing a detector that was particularly effective at photon energies below 150 keV. Analytical conditions are demonstrated for the elements of interest over a wide range of concentrations in small powdered samples. The investigation formed the basis of a feasibility study to establish if the application could be developed for the routine off-line determination of dysprosium and holmium using an isotopic-neutron source. (author)

  1. Reduction of titanocene dichloride with dysprosium: access to a stable titanocene(ii) equivalent for phosphite-free Takeda carbonyl olefination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousrez, G; Déchamps, I; Vasse, J-L; Jaroschik, F

    2015-05-28

    The reduction of titanocene dichloride with dysprosium yields a new titanocene(ii) equivalent without the need for further stabilising ligands. This reagent can be employed in combination with dithioacetals for the olefination of different carbonyl groups and allows for a simplified all-in-one procedure.

  2. Acute dysprosium toxicity to Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and development of the biotic ligand approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukov, Oliver, E-mail: vuko3930@mylaurier.ca [Biology Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); Smith, D. Scott [Chemistry Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); McGeer, James C. [Biology Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    The toxicological understanding of rare earth elements (REEs) in the aquatic environment is very limited but of increasing concern. The objective of this research is to compare the toxicological effect of the REE dysprosium to the freshwater invertebrates Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and in the more sensitive organism, understand the toxicity modifying influence of Ca, Na, Mg, pH and dissolved organic matter (DOM). Standard methods (Environment Canada) were followed for testing and culture in media of intermediate hardness (60 mg CaCO{sub 3} mg/L) at pH 7.8 with Ca at 0.5, Na 0.5, Mg 0.125 (mM) and 23 °C. Acute toxicity tests were done with <24 h old neonates for 48 h in the case of D. pulex and with 2–9 days old offspring for 96 h tests with Hyalella. The potential protective effect of cationic competition was tested with Ca (0.5–2.0 mM), Na (0.5–2.0 mM) and Mg (0.125–0.5 mM). The effect of pH (6.5–8.0) and Suwannee River DOM complexation (at dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of 9 and 13 mg C/L) were evaluated. Dissolved Dy concentrations were lower than total (unfiltered) indicating precipitation, particularly at higher concentrations. Acute toxicity of Dy to H. azteca and D. pulex revealed Hyalella to be 1.4 times more sensitive than Daphnia. Additions of Ca and Na but not Mg provided significant protection against Dy toxicity to Hyalella. Similarly, low pH was associated with reduction in toxicity. Exposures which were pH buffered with and without MOPS were significantly different and indicated that MOPS enhanced Dy toxicity. DOM also mitigated Dy toxicity. Biotic ligand based parameters (Log K values) were calculated based on free ion relationships as determined by geochemical equilibrium modeling software (WHAM ver. 7.02). The log K value for Dy{sup 3+} toxicity to Hyalella was 7.75 while the protective influence of Ca and Na were 3.95 and 4.10, respectively. This study contributes data towards the development of site specific

  3. Synthesis and characterization of phosphors based on calcium and magnesium silicates doped with europium and dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misso, Agatha Matos

    2016-01-01

    Ca and Mg silicates based phosphors were prepared by sol-gel method combined with the molten salts process. The gel of silica was obtained from Na 2 SiO 3 solution by using europium, dysprosium, calcium and magnesium chloride solutions. Therefore, those chlorides were homogeneously dispersed into the gel. The obtained gel was dried and heat treated to 900° C for 1h to allow the fusion of the present salts. Then it was water washed until negative test for Cl - , and dried. The reduction of the europium to Eu 2+ was performed under atmosphere of 5% of H 2 and 95% of Ar to 900° C for 3h, to reach CaMgSi 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ and CaMgSi 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ :Dy 3+ phosphors. Diopside was identified as main crystalline phase and quartz, as secondary phase from XRD (X-ray diffraction) patterns. SEM (scanning electron microscopy) micrographs, of the samples showed needles, spheres, leaves and rods of particles and agglomerates. Thermal analysis (TGA-DTGA) curves revealed that the crystallization temperature of CaMgSi 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ lies around 765° C. Photoluminescence spectroscopy of the phosphors was studied based on interconfigurational 4f N → 4f N-1 5d transition of Eu 2+ ion. The spectra of excitation showed 4f N → 4f N-1 5d transition of Eu 2+ ion broad band, related to the ligand to metal charge transfer transition (LMCT) O 2- (2p) → Eu 3+ in the 250 nm region, when the emission is monitored at 583,5 nm. It also presents the 4f ↔ 4f transitions of Eu 3+ ion bands, showing the 7 F 0 → 5 L 6 transition at 393 nm. From emission spectra with excitation monitored at 393 nm, it can be observed fine peaks between 570 and 750 nm which are characteristics of 5 D 0 → 7 F J (J = 0 - 5) transition of Eu 3+ ion, indicating that the Eu 3+ ion occupies a site with center of inversion. Finally, the obtained results indicate that the developed method is suitable to synthesize CaMgSi 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ and CaMgSi 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ :Dy 3+ phosphors, as it has been proposed. (author)

  4. Luminescence properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium silicate phosphor by solid state reaction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Ishwar Prasad, E-mail: ishwarprasad1986@gmail.com [School of Studies in Physics & Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur, C.G. 492010 (India); Chandrakar, Priya; Baghel, R.N.; Bisen, D.P.; Brahme, Nameeta [School of Studies in Physics & Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur, C.G. 492010 (India); Tamrakar, Raunak Kumar [Department of Applied Physics, Bhilai Institute of Technology, Durg, C.G. 491001 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Dysprosium doped calcium magnesium silicate (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+}) white light emitting phosphor was synthesized by solid state reaction process. The crystal structure of sintered phosphor was monoclinic structure with space group C2/c. Chemical composition of the sintered CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor was confirmed by EDX. The prepared CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor was excited from 352 nm and their corresponding emission spectra were recorded at blue (470 nm), yellow (570 nm) and red (675 nm) line due to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} → {sup 6}H{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} → {sup 6}H{sub 13/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} → {sup 6}H{sub 11/2} transitions of Dy{sup 3+} ions. The combination of these three emissions constituted as white light confirmed by the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromatic coordinate diagram. The possible mechanism of the white light emitting long lasting CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor was also investigated. Investigation on afterglow property show that phosphor held fast and slow decay process. The peak of mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity increases linearly with increasing impact velocity of the moving piston. Thus the present investigation indicates that the local piezoelectricity-induced electron bombardment model is responsible to produce ML in prepared CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor is consistent with standard monoclinic structure. • CIE coordinates of CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor is suitable as white light emitting phosphor. • The local piezoelectricity-induced electron bombardment model is responsible to produce ML in CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor.

  5. An ICP AES method for determination of dysprosium and terbium in high purity yttrium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2011-01-01

    High purity yttrium finds interesting application in astronavigation, luminescence, nuclear energy and metallurgical industries. Most of these applications require yttrium oxide of highest purity. Consequently there is a need for production of high purity yttrium oxide. Separation and purification of yttrium from other rare earths is a challenging task due to their close chemical properties. Liquid-liquid extraction and ion exchange have been widely used in the production of yttrium oxide of highest purity. Determination of impurities, especially other rare earths, in ppm level is required for process development and chemical characterization of the high purity Y 2 O 3 . Many methods have been described in literature. However since the advent of ICP AES much work in this area has been carried out by this technique. This paper describes the work done for determination of dysprosium (Dy) and terbium (Tb) in yttrium oxide using a high resolution sequential ICP AES. Emission spectra of rare earth elements are very complex and due to this complexity it is important to select spectral interference free analyte lines for determination of rare earths in rare earth matrix. For the determination of Dy and Tb in Y 2 O 3 , sensitive lines of Dy and Tb are selected from the instrument wavelength table and spectral interference free emission lines for the determination is selected by scanning around the selected wavelengths using 5 g/L Y solution and 5 mg/L standard solutions of Dy and Tb prepared in 4% nitric acid. It is found 353.170 nm line of Dy and 350.917 nm line Tb is suitable for quantitative determination. The signal to background ratio increases with increase in matrix concentration, i.e. from 1 to 5 mg/L. The optimum forward power is determined and it is found to be 1100W for Dy and 1000W for Tb. The instrument is calibrated using matrix matched standards containing 5g/L of Y matrix. Samples are dissolved in nitric acid and Y concentration is maintained at 5g/L. Two

  6. Acute dysprosium toxicity to Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and development of the biotic ligand approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukov, Oliver; Smith, D. Scott; McGeer, James C.

    2016-01-01

    The toxicological understanding of rare earth elements (REEs) in the aquatic environment is very limited but of increasing concern. The objective of this research is to compare the toxicological effect of the REE dysprosium to the freshwater invertebrates Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and in the more sensitive organism, understand the toxicity modifying influence of Ca, Na, Mg, pH and dissolved organic matter (DOM). Standard methods (Environment Canada) were followed for testing and culture in media of intermediate hardness (60 mg CaCO 3 mg/L) at pH 7.8 with Ca at 0.5, Na 0.5, Mg 0.125 (mM) and 23 °C. Acute toxicity tests were done with <24 h old neonates for 48 h in the case of D. pulex and with 2–9 days old offspring for 96 h tests with Hyalella. The potential protective effect of cationic competition was tested with Ca (0.5–2.0 mM), Na (0.5–2.0 mM) and Mg (0.125–0.5 mM). The effect of pH (6.5–8.0) and Suwannee River DOM complexation (at dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of 9 and 13 mg C/L) were evaluated. Dissolved Dy concentrations were lower than total (unfiltered) indicating precipitation, particularly at higher concentrations. Acute toxicity of Dy to H. azteca and D. pulex revealed Hyalella to be 1.4 times more sensitive than Daphnia. Additions of Ca and Na but not Mg provided significant protection against Dy toxicity to Hyalella. Similarly, low pH was associated with reduction in toxicity. Exposures which were pH buffered with and without MOPS were significantly different and indicated that MOPS enhanced Dy toxicity. DOM also mitigated Dy toxicity. Biotic ligand based parameters (Log K values) were calculated based on free ion relationships as determined by geochemical equilibrium modeling software (WHAM ver. 7.02). The log K value for Dy 3+ toxicity to Hyalella was 7.75 while the protective influence of Ca and Na were 3.95 and 4.10, respectively. This study contributes data towards the development of site specific water quality

  7. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. 172.854 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.854 Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids, up to and including the decaglycerol esters, may be safely used in food in...

  8. 21 CFR 172.785 - Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... application to meat and poultry products that comply with the ready-to-eat definition in 9 CFR 430.1. Current... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation. 172.785 Section 172.785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  9. 21 CFR 172.878 - White mineral oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... yeast contamination during fermentation In an amount not to exceed good manufacturing practice. 4. As a... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true White mineral oil. 172.878 Section 172.878 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  10. 40 CFR 172.3 - Scope of requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of requirement. 172.3 Section 172.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... test does not expect to receive any benefit in pest control from the pesticide's use. (c) For purposes...

  11. 40 CFR 172.25 - Administration of State programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration of State programs. 172.25 Section 172.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE... upon the nature of the pest problem and the requirements of the testing program submitted. The...

  12. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 172.710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The...

  13. 21 CFR 172.315 - Nicotinamide-ascorbic acid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 172.315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.315 Nicotinamide-ascorbic acid complex...

  14. 19 CFR 172.32 - Authority to accept offers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Authority to accept offers. 172.32 Section 172.32 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE....32 Authority to accept offers. The authority to accept offers in compromise, subject to the...

  15. 21 CFR 172.275 - Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.275 Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives. Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives identified in this section may be safely...

  16. 49 CFR 172.555 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. 172.555 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.555 POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard must be as follows: ER22JY97.025 (b) In addition to...

  17. 49 CFR 172.429 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. 172.429 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.429 POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD label must be as follows: ER22JY97.023 (b) In addition to complying...

  18. Dual responsive dysprosium-doped hydroxyapatite particles and toxicity reduction after functionalization with folic and glucuronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Lafarga, Ana Karen; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín P; Gurinov, Andrey; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2015-03-01

    The development of probes for biomedical applications demands materials with low toxicity levels besides fluorescence or magnetic properties to be detected by confocal microscopes or MRI resonators. Several drug delivery systems or other biomedical materials prepared with hydroxyapatite have been proposed, however, toxicity effects might arise when the size of particles is nanometric. In this study, hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic or folic acids presented lower oxidative stress, measured from lipoperoxides and nitric oxide indicators in rats than pure hydroxyapatite. In separated experiments, hydroxyapatite was doped with dysprosium cations by coprecipitation producing a single crystal phase with fluorescent properties easily visualized by confocal microscopy when excited at 488nm. These particles also presented the ability to modify the proton relaxation time in T1 maps collected by magnetic resonance imaging. These modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles could be candidates to design bimodal probes with low toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic anisotropy of dysprosium(III) in a low-symmetry environment: a theoretical and experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernot, Kevin; Luzon, Javier; Bogani, Lapo; Etienne, Mael; Sangregorio, Claudio; Shanmugam, Muralidharan; Caneschi, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta; Gatteschi, Dante

    2009-04-22

    A mixed theoretical and experimental approach was used to determine the local magnetic anisotropy of the dysprosium(III) ion in a low-symmetry environment. The susceptibility tensor of the monomeric species having the formula [Dy(hfac)(3)(NIT-C(6)H(4)-OEt)(2)], which contains nitronyl nitroxide (NIT-R) radicals, was determined at various temperatures through angle-resolved magnetometry. These results are in agreement with ab initio calculations performed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method, validating the predictive power of this theoretical approach for complex systems containing rare-earth ions, even in low-symmetry environments. Susceptibility measurements performed with the applied field along the easy axis eventually permitted a detailed analysis of the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization, providing evidence that the Dy ion transmits an antiferromagnetic interaction between radicals but that the Dy-radical interaction is ferromagnetic.

  20. Watt-level dysprosium fiber laser at 3.15  μm with 73% slope efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R I; Majewski, M R; Bharathan, G; Hudson, D D; Fuerbach, A; Jackson, S D

    2018-04-01

    Rare-earth-doped fiber lasers are emerging as promising high-power mid-infrared sources for the 2.6-3.0 μm and 3.3-3.8 μm regions based on erbium and holmium ions. The intermediate wavelength range, however, remains vastly underserved, despite prospects for important manufacturing and defense applications. Here, we demonstrate the potential of dysprosium-doped fiber to solve this problem, with a simple in-band pumped grating-stabilized linear cavity generating up to 1.06 W at 3.15 μm. A slope efficiency of 73% with respect to launched power (77% relative to absorbed power) is achieved-the highest value for any mid-infrared fiber laser to date, to the best of our knowledge. Opportunities for further power and efficiency scaling are also discussed.

  1. 21 CFR 172.210 - Coatings on fresh citrus fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a 2:1 ratio. Sodium lauryl sulfate Complying with § 172.822. As a film former. Wood rosin Color of K... adjuvant. Potassium persulfate Do. Propylene glycol alginate Do. Sodium decylbenzenesulfonate Do. (4) In...

  2. On-line complexation/cloud point preconcentration for the sensitive determination of dysprosium in urine by flow injection inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Claudia; Cerutti, Soledad; Silva, Maria F.; Olsina, Roberto A.; Martinez, Luis D.

    2003-01-01

    An on-line dysprosium preconcentration and determination system based on the hyphenation of cloud point extraction (CPE) to flow injection analysis (FIA) associated with ICP-OES was studied. For the preconcentration of dysprosium, a Dy(III)-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol complex was formed on-line at pH 9.22 in the presence of nonionic micelles of PONPE-7.5. The micellar system containing the complex was thermostated at 30 C in order to promote phase separation, and the surfactant-rich phase was retained in a microcolumn packed with cotton at pH 9.2. The surfactant-rich phase was eluted with 4 mol L -1 nitric acid at a flow rate of 1.5 mL min -1 , directly in the nebulizer of the plasma. An enhancement factor of 50 was obtained for the preconcentration of 50 mL of sample solution. The detection limit value for the preconcentration of 50 mL of aqueous solution of Dy was 0.03 μg L -1 . The precision for 10 replicate determinations at the 2.0 μg L -1 Dy level was 2.2% relative standard deviation (RSD), calculated from the peak heights obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for dysprosium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 100 μg L -1 . The method was successfully applied to the determination of dysprosium in urine. (orig.)

  3. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with a tantalum boat for the determination of yttrium, samarium, and dysprosium in a mish metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daidoji, Hidehiro; Tamura, Shohei

    1982-01-01

    The determination of yttrium, samarium, and dysprodium by means of graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) was studied by a tantalum boat inserted into a graphite tube atomizer. These elements could not be determined by the use of a commercial graphite tube, In the atomization from a tantalum boat, better analytical sensitivities and negligible memory effects for these rare earths are obtained. The analytical sensitivities of yttrium, samarium, and dysprodium with the tantalum boat were 0.60 ng, 0.86 ng, and 0.17 ng respectively. This method was applied for the determination of yttrium, samarium, and dysprosium in a mish metal. The measurements were performed with slightly acidified solutions (0.01 mol dm 3 HCI or HNO 3 ). The sensitivities and the precisions for these elements decreased with increasing acid concentration. An enhancement in the sensitivities of yttrium and dysprosium upon the addition of a large excess of lanthanum, neodymium, and praseodymium salts were observed. The yttrium, samarium, and dysprosium in a mish metal were determined with both analytical curves of standard solutions containing an excess of lanthanum, cerium, and neodymium ions and of the standard addition. The precisions for this work were in the 3 - 9.3% range. (author)

  4. Workplace testing of the new single sphere neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils (Dy-SSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedogni, R.; Gómez-Ros, J.M.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Chiti, M.; Palacios-Pérez, L.; Angelone, M.; Tana, L.

    2012-01-01

    A photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of a single moderating polyethylene sphere with Dysprosium activation foils arranged along three perpendicular axes was designed by CIEMAT and INFN. The device is called Dy-SSS (Dy foil-based Single Sphere Spectrometer). It shows nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence up to 20 MeV. The first prototype, previously calibrated with 14 MeV neutrons, has been recently tested in workplaces having different energy and directional distributions. These are a 2.5 MeV nearly mono-chromatic and mono-directional beam available at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) and the photo-neutron field produced in a 15 MV Varian CLINAC DHX medical accelerator, located in the Ospedale S. Chiara (Pisa). Both neutron spectra are known through measurements with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer. In both cases the experimental response of the Dy-SSS agrees with the reference data. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the spectrometric capability of the new device are independent from the directional distribution of the neutron field. This opens the way to a new generation of moderation-based neutron instruments, presenting all advantages of the Bonner sphere spectrometer without the disadvantage of the repeated exposures. This concept is being developed within the NESCOFI@BTF project of INFN (Commissione Scientifica Nazionale 5).

  5. Workplace testing of the new single sphere neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils (Dy-SSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, R.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Chiti, M.; Palacios-Pérez, L.; Angelone, M.; Tana, L.

    2012-08-01

    A photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of a single moderating polyethylene sphere with Dysprosium activation foils arranged along three perpendicular axes was designed by CIEMAT and INFN. The device is called Dy-SSS (Dy foil-based Single Sphere Spectrometer). It shows nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence up to 20 MeV. The first prototype, previously calibrated with 14 MeV neutrons, has been recently tested in workplaces having different energy and directional distributions. These are a 2.5 MeV nearly mono-chromatic and mono-directional beam available at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) and the photo-neutron field produced in a 15 MV Varian CLINAC DHX medical accelerator, located in the Ospedale S. Chiara (Pisa). Both neutron spectra are known through measurements with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer. In both cases the experimental response of the Dy-SSS agrees with the reference data. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the spectrometric capability of the new device are independent from the directional distribution of the neutron field. This opens the way to a new generation of moderation-based neutron instruments, presenting all advantages of the Bonner sphere spectrometer without the disadvantage of the repeated exposures. This concept is being developed within the NESCOFI@BTF project of INFN (Commissione Scientifica Nazionale 5).

  6. Workplace testing of the new single sphere neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils (Dy-SSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedogni, R., E-mail: roberto.bedogni@lnf.infn.it [INFN-LNF (Frascati National Laboratories), Via E. Fermi n. 40-00044 Frascati (Italy); Gomez-Ros, J.M. [INFN-LNF (Frascati National Laboratories), Via E. Fermi n. 40-00044 Frascati (Italy); CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Chiti, M.; Palacios-Perez, L. [INFN-LNF (Frascati National Laboratories), Via E. Fermi n. 40-00044 Frascati (Italy); Angelone, M. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Tana, L. [A.O. Universitaria Pisana-Ospedale S. Chiara, Via Bonanno Pisano, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-08-21

    A photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of a single moderating polyethylene sphere with Dysprosium activation foils arranged along three perpendicular axes was designed by CIEMAT and INFN. The device is called Dy-SSS (Dy foil-based Single Sphere Spectrometer). It shows nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence up to 20 MeV. The first prototype, previously calibrated with 14 MeV neutrons, has been recently tested in workplaces having different energy and directional distributions. These are a 2.5 MeV nearly mono-chromatic and mono-directional beam available at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) and the photo-neutron field produced in a 15 MV Varian CLINAC DHX medical accelerator, located in the Ospedale S. Chiara (Pisa). Both neutron spectra are known through measurements with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer. In both cases the experimental response of the Dy-SSS agrees with the reference data. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the spectrometric capability of the new device are independent from the directional distribution of the neutron field. This opens the way to a new generation of moderation-based neutron instruments, presenting all advantages of the Bonner sphere spectrometer without the disadvantage of the repeated exposures. This concept is being developed within the NESCOFI@BTF project of INFN (Commissione Scientifica Nazionale 5).

  7. 21 CFR 172.712 - 1,3-Butylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.712 1,3-Butylene glycol. The food additive 1,3-butylene glycol (CAS...

  8. 21 CFR 172.345 - Folic acid (folacin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.345 Folic acid (folacin). Folic acid (CAS Reg. No. 59-30-3...

  9. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.372 N-Acetyl-L-methionine. The food additive N-acetyl-L...

  10. 21 CFR 172.325 - Bakers yeast protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.325 Bakers yeast protein. Bakers yeast protein may be...

  11. 21 CFR 172.335 - D-Pantothenamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.335 D-Pantothenamide. The food additive D-pantothenamide as a...

  12. 21 CFR 172.380 - Vitamin D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.380 Vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 may be used safely in foods as a...

  13. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline...

  14. 21 CFR 172.399 - Zinc methionine sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.399 Zinc methionine sulfate. Zinc methionine...

  15. 21 CFR 172.385 - Whole fish protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.385 Whole fish protein concentrate. The food additive whole fish protein concentrate may be safely used as a food supplement in accordance with the... fish that are used in other forms for human food. (b) The additive consists essentially of a dried fish...

  16. 40 CFR 172.48 - Data requirements for a notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS EXPERIMENTAL USE PERMITS Notification for Certain Genetically Modified Microbial Pesticides § 172... methods used to genetically modify the microbial pesticide. (h) The identity and location of the gene... organisms. (d) Information on survival and the ability of the microbial pesticide to increase in numbers...

  17. 21 CFR 172.846 - Sodium stearoyl lactylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.846 Sodium stearoyl lactylate. The food additive sodium stearoyl... emulsifier, stabilizer, or texturizer in snack dips, at a level not to exceed 0.2 percent by weight of the...

  18. Oxide perovskites with tetravalent dysprosium and compounds of the type Ba/sub 3/RE/sub 4/O/sub 9/ (RE = Rare Earth Element)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, G; Kristen, H [Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.)

    1980-03-01

    In analogy to our investigations concerning tetravalent Nd in oxide perovskites, we also tried to stabilize dysprosium(IV) by incorporation in host-lattices with the perovskite structure. As host-lattices we used BaCeO/sub 3/, BaTbO/sub 3/, and SrTbO/sub 3/. Only in Ba(Ce, Dy)O/sub 3/ we could trace Dy(IV) with certainty. Among the prepared mixed oxides, also the phase Ba/sub 3/Dy/sub 4/O/sub 9/ occured. The lattice parameters of several phases of this latter type were redetermined.

  19. Effect of solvents on relation of intensities of bands of luminescence spectra of terbium and dysprosium ions in solutions of their complexes with acetoacetic ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononenko, L.I.; Bel'tyukova, S.V.; Meshkova, S.B.; Kravchenko, T.B.; Poluehktov, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation is made of the effect of different solvents on the ratio of the intensity of luminescence spectrum bands of terbium and dysprosium ions, corresponding and not corresponding to ''supersensitive'' transitions in complex compounds with acetoacetic ether. A dependence is established between these values and the dielectric constant of the solvent, and also parallels in their changes, which indicate the similar manifestation of the effect of solvents in both elements. A correlation is observed between ratios of the intensity of luminescence spectrum bands and values of forces of neodymium complex absorption band oscillators in different solvents

  20. Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, R.H.; Schaffers, K.I.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1997-12-02

    Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 {micro}m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 {micro}m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy{sup 3+}-doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 {micro}m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available. 9 figs.

  1. Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Ralph H. (San Ramon, CA); Schaffers, Kathleen I. (Pleasanton, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 .mu.m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 .mu.m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy.sup.3+ -doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 .mu.m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available.

  2. Determination of Diclofenac on a Dysprosium Nanowire- Modified Carbon Paste Electrode Accomplished in a Flow Injection System by Advanced Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Moosavi-Movahedi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A new detection technique called Fast Fourier Transform Square-Wave Voltammetry (FFT SWV is based on measurements of electrode admittance as a function of potential. The response of the detector (microelectrode, which is generated by a redox processes, is fast, which makes the method suitable for most applications involving flowing electrolytes. The carbon paste electrode was modified by nanostructures to improve sensitivity. Synthesized dysprosium nanowires provide a more effective nanotube-like surface [1-4] so they are good candidates for use as a modifier for electrochemical reactions. The redox properties of diclofenac were used for its determination in human serum and urine samples. The support electrolyte that provided a more defined and intense peak current for diclofenac determination was a 0.05 mol L−1 acetate buffer pH = 4.0. The drug presented an irreversible oxidation peak at 850 mV vs. Ag/AgCl on a modified nanowire carbon paste electrode which produced high current and reduced the oxidation potential by about 100 mV. Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratio was significantly increased by application of a discrete Fast Fourier Transform (FFT method, background subtraction and two-dimensional integration of the electrode response over a selected potential range and time window. To obtain the much sensivity the effective parameters such as frequency, amplitude and pH was optimized. As a result, CDL of 2.0 × 10−9 M and an LOQ of 5.0 × 10−9 M were found for the determination for diclofenac. A good recovery was obtained for assay spiked urine samples and a good quantification of diclofenac was achieved in a commercial formulation.

  3. On the annealing behaviour of dysprosium ion implanted nickel: a combined study using Rutherford backscattering, transmission electron microscopy, and total current spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderton, L.T.; Johnson, E.

    1977-01-01

    Despite continuing improvements in applications of the analytical method of Rutherford backscattering (RBS) to solid state physics it is recognized that more complete information can be obtained if other techniques - for example transmission electron microscopy (TEM) - are employed simultaneously. Experiments are described in which a combined RBS and TEM study of the annealing of nickel, rendered amorphous by implantation of 20 keV dysprosium ions is supplemented with a completely new technique - total current spectroscopy (TCS). In TCS low energy electrons (0-15 eV) are used to probe the damaged nickel. Observations have been made during annealing of both the reappearance of the bulk band structure of the metal and of a 'surface peak' which is highly sensitive to the recovery process. Changes in the height of the surface peak reveal three sharp annealing stages, the first two being preceded by reverse annealing which correlates well with RBS and TEM results. The first annealing stage - following the amorphous to crystalline transition - may be associated with electronic effects in the vicinity of the Curie point. Changes in the position of the surface peak allow one to trace the diffusion of dysprosium to the surface. Quantum mechanical resonances at the damage/crystal interface have also been followed throughout annealing. The initially amorphous layer (approximately 2.2nm) increases in thickness slightly during recovery. (Auth.)

  4. 21 CFR 172.856 - Propylene glycol mono- and diesters of fats and fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fatty acids. 172.856 Section 172.856 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... diesters of fats and fatty acids. Propylene glycol mono- and diesters of fats and fatty acids may be safely... and/or fatty acids in compliance with § 172.860 and/or oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids in...

  5. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians. (a...

  6. 49 CFR 172.202 - Description of hazardous material on shipping papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... papers. 172.202 Section 172.202 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Shipping Papers § 172.202 Description of hazardous material on shipping papers. (a) The shipping description of a hazardous material on the shipping paper...

  7. 21 CFR 172.894 - Modified cottonseed products intended for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... consumption. 172.894 Section 172.894 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.894 Modified cottonseed products...

  8. 13 CFR 120.172 - Flood-plain and wetlands management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flood-plain and wetlands management. 120.172 Section 120.172 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Policies Applying to All Business Loans Requirements Imposed Under Other Laws and Orders § 120.172...

  9. 19 CFR 172.12 - Petitions acted on at Customs Headquarters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Petitions acted on at Customs Headquarters. 172.12 Section 172.12 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Petitions § 172.12 Petitions acted on at Customs Headquarters. Upon receipt of a petition for relief filed...

  10. 26 CFR 1.172-4 - Net operating loss carrybacks and net operating loss carryovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... years. (iv) Loss attributable to foreign expropriation. If the provisions of section 172(b)(3)(A) and § 1.172-9 are satisfied, the portion of a net operating loss attributable to a foreign expropriation... attributable to a foreign expropriation loss (as defined in section 172(h)) and if an election under paragraph...

  11. Four new dysprosium and neodymium octamolybdate hydrates: assembly of RE2(Mo8O27) sheets and topotactic transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xiaojun; Evans, Ivana R

    2010-07-05

    Four new Dy and Nd hydrated octamolybdate materials have been prepared: [Dy(2)(H(2)O)(12)](Mo(8)O(27)) x 8 H(2)O, [Dy(2)(H(2)O)(6)](Mo(8)O(27)), [Nd(2)(H(2)O)(12)](Mo(8)O(27)) x 6 H(2)O, and [Nd(2)(H(2)O)(6)]Mo(8)O(27) x 3 H(2)O. They adopt one known and three new structure types, which we have determined ab initio from powder X-ray diffraction data. The four compounds contain the same basic structural building block, in the form of RE(2)Mo(8)O(27) (RE = Dy, Nd) chains, which are arranged differently for the two rare earths in the fully hydrated precursor materials. [Dy(2)(H(2)O)(12)](Mo(8)O(27)) x 8 H(2)O comprises isolated Dy(2)Mo(8)O(27) chains assembled in a zigzag manner along the a axis with interspersed crystallized water molecules, which differs from the parallel arrangements of isolated Nd(2)Mo(8)O(27) chains in [Nd(2)(H(2)O)(12)](Mo(8)O(27)) x 6 H(2)O. Partial dehydration of the two precursors leads to new phases [Dy(2)(H(2)O)(6)](Mo(8)O(27)) and [Nd(2)(H(2)O)(6)]Mo(8)O(27) x 3 H(2)O, respectively, prior to complete dehydration, which leads to initially amorphous and eventually crystalline rare-earth molybdenum mixed metal oxides. Both initial transformations occur topotactically. Partial dehydration of the Dy phase condenses the assembly of the Dy(2)Mo(8)O(27) chains principally along the a axis, leading to a 3-dimensional (3D) framework, with each Dy bridging two (Mo(8)O(27))(6-) sheets in the product. The partial dehydration of the Nd precursor condenses the assembly of Nd(2)Mo(8)O(27) chains along the [110] axis, leading to a 3D framework where each Nd bridges three (Mo(8)O(27))(6-) units. Both new dysprosium octamolybdates adopt noncentrosymmetric polar structures in space group P2(1) and are second harmonic generation (SHG) active.

  12. Microstructure and thermal properties of dysprosium and thulium co-doped barium titanate ceramics for high performance multilayer ceramic capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinseong; Kim, Dowan; Noh, Taimin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byungmin [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0241 (United States); Lee, Heesoo, E-mail: heesoo@pusan.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Dy/Tm co-doping method in BaTiO{sub 3} was suggested to improve electrical properties and temperature stability simultaneously. > We examined these properties in terms of microstructural analysis and substitution rate. > Increase of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition enhanced dielectric constant. > Increase of Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition enhanced temperature stability. > Improved electrical properties and temperature stability through Dy/Tm co-doping were deduced from formation of electrons and core-shell structure. - Abstract: The co-doping characteristics on microstructure and thermal properties of barium titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}) were investigated to elucidate formation of core-shell structure by dysprosium (Dy) and thulium (Tm) addition in the BaTiO{sub 3}-Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. The dielectrics co-doped with 0.7 mol% Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 0.3 mol% Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} had the dielectric constant up to 2200 as a function of temperature, which was 30% higher than that of specimen containing only Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the room temperature. It could be explained by the fact that the increase of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition contributed to the improvement of dielectric constant. On the other hand, the rapid diffusion rate of Dy{sup 3+} ions in BaTiO{sub 3} showed an adverse effect on temperature stability caused by destruction of core-shell. As the compensation for shell expansion in BaTiO{sub 3}, the reinforcement of the core-shell structure through the addition of Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} was confirmed by TEM-EDS analysis and attributed the temperature coefficient of capacitance (TCC) in a reliability condition (-55 deg. C to 125 deg. C, {Delta}C = {+-}15% or less). The enhanced electrical properties and temperature stability could be deduced from the generation of electrons and the formation core-shell structure in co-doped BaTiO{sub 3} system respectively.

  13. Prenatal Diagnoses with Cordocentesis: Evaluation of 172 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Erdemoğlu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of 172 cordosentesis cases for chromosomal analysis in high risk pregnant patients which were performed in our clinic during 2001 and 2004. Cordosentesis procedure were performed mainly for, fetal anomaly, positive triplescreening test. Fetal chromosomal anomaly ratio was 7.5%. Trisomi 21,18,13 were found in fetal anomaly group. The invasive procedure success rate was %98.8. Cordosentes is a safe and easily performed prenatal diagnosis and treatment method in modern perinatology.

  14. Single-molecule magnet behavior in an octanuclear dysprosium(iii) aggregate inherited from helical triangular Dy3 SMM-building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Lang; Wu, Jianfeng; Guo, Mei; Tang, Jinkui

    2016-06-28

    An unprecedented octanuclear dysprosium(iii) cluster with the formula [Dy8L6(μ3-OH)4(μ2-CH3O)2(CH3OH)6(H2O)2]·6H2O·10CH3OH·2CH3CN () based on a nonlinearly tritopic aroylhydrazone ligand H3L has been isolated, realizing the successful linking of pairwise interesting triangular Dy3 SMMs. It is noteworthy that two enantiomers (Λ and Δ configurations) individually behaving as a coordination-induced chirality presented in the Dy3 helicate are connected in the meso Dy8 cluster. Remarkably, alternating-current magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed that the Dy8 cluster shows typical SMM behavior inherited from its Dy3 helical precursor. It is one of the rare polynuclear Lnn SMMs (n > 7) under zero dc field.

  15. Study for the determination of samarium, europium,terbium, dysprosium and yttrium in gadolinium oxide matrix by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caires, A.C.F.

    1985-01-01

    A study for determination of samarium, europium, terbium, dysprosium and yttrium in a gadolinium oxide matrix by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace is presented. The best charrring and atomization conditions were estabilished for each element, the most convenient ressonance lines being selected as well. The study was carried out for the mentioned lanthanides both when pure and when in binary mixtures with gadolinium, besides those where all for them were together with gadolinium. The determination limits for pure lanthanides were found to be between 1.3 and 9.6 ng assuming a 20% relative standard deviation as acceptable. The detection limits were in the range 0.51 and 7.5 ng, assuming as positive any answer higher than twofold the standard deviation. (author) [pt

  16. Synthesis and X-ray diffraction studies of dysprosium-calcium ferrites Dy1-xCaxFeO3-y (0≤x≤2/3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Song, D.; Su, Z.; Wang, T.M.

    1997-01-01

    Samples of dysprosium-calcium ferrites Dy 1-x Ca x FeO 3-y with x ranging from 0 to 2/3 were novelly prepared in air by solid state reaction and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. These samples are single-phased orthorhombic perovskite-type compounds belonging to the space group D 2h 16 -Pbnm. The lattice constants of the Dy 1-x Ca x FeO 3-y samples have been refined by Cohen's least-squares method. The initial substitution of Ca for Dy leads to a decrease of the lattice constants. Further substitution of Ca for Dy has hardly any influence on the lattice dimensions. (orig.)

  17. Pair truncation for rotational nuclei: j=17/2 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halse, P.; Jaqua, L.; Barrett, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The suitability of the pair condensate approach for rotational states is studied in a single j=17/2 shell of identical nucleons interacting through a quadrupole-quadrupole Hamiltonian. The ground band and a K=2 excited band are both studied in detail. A direct comparison of the exact states with those constituting the SD and SDG subspaces is used to identify the important degrees of freedom for these levels. The range of pairs necessary for a good description is found to be highly state dependent; S and D pairs are the major constituents of the low-spin ground-band levels, while G pairs are needed for those in the γ band. Energy spectra are obtained for each truncated subspace. SDG pairs allow accurate reproduction of the binding energy and K=2 excitation energy, but still give a moment of inertia which is about 30% too small even for the lowest levels

  18. 49 CFR 172.404 - Labels for mixed and consolidated packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Labels for mixed and consolidated packaging. 172..., TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.404 Labels for mixed and consolidated packaging. (a) Mixed packaging. When hazardous materials having different hazard classes are packed within the...

  19. 21 CFR 172.852 - Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids. 172.852... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.852 Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids. Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids (the lactic acid esters of mono- and diglycerides) may be safely used in food in...

  20. 21 CFR 172.866 - Synthetic glycerin produced by the hydrogenolysis of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of carbohydrates. 172.866 Section 172.866 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... produced by the hydrogenolysis of carbohydrates. Synthetic glycerin produced by the hydrogenolysis of carbohydrates may be safely used in food, subject to the provisions of this section: (a) It shall contain not in...

  1. 21 CFR 172.5 - General provisions for direct food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true General provisions for direct food additives. 172.5... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION General Provisions § 172.5 General provisions for direct food additives. (a...

  2. 49 CFR 172.201 - Preparation and retention of shipping papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preparation and retention of shipping papers. 172..., TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Shipping Papers § 172.201 Preparation and retention of shipping papers. (a) Contents. When a description of hazardous material is required to be included on a shipping...

  3. 49 CFR 173.172 - Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. 173.172... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.172 Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tanks containing a mixture of anhydrous hydrazine and monomethyl hydrazine (M86 fuel) and designed...

  4. 49 CFR 172.317 - KEEP AWAY FROM HEAT handling mark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false KEEP AWAY FROM HEAT handling mark. 172.317 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.317 KEEP AWAY FROM HEAT handling mark. (a) General. For... of Division 5.2 must be marked with the KEEP AWAY FROM HEAT handling mark specified in this section...

  5. 49 CFR 172.330 - Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.330..., TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.330 Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a... material— (1) In a tank car unless the following conditions are met: (i) The tank car must be marked on...

  6. 21 CFR 172.862 - Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.862 Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. The food additive oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids may be safely used in food and as...

  7. 21 CFR 172.816 - Methyl glucoside-coconut oil ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Methyl glucoside-coconut oil ester. 172.816 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.816 Methyl glucoside-coconut oil ester. Methyl glucoside-coconut oil ester may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) It is the...

  8. 21 CFR 172.350 - Fumaric acid and salts of fumaric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Fumaric acid and salts of fumaric acid. 172.350... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.350 Fumaric acid and salts of fumaric acid. Fumaric acid and its calcium, ferrous, magnesium, potassium, and sodium salts may be safely used...

  9. 21 CFR 172.510 - Natural flavoring substances and natural substances used in conjunction with flavors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Natural flavoring substances and natural substances used in conjunction with flavors. 172.510 Section 172.510 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....510 Natural flavoring substances and natural substances used in conjunction with flavors. Natural...

  10. Comparative evaluation of two methods for 172Tm production in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, I.M.; Hayes, Alejandro; Melcer, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of two methods for the production of 172 Tm in nuclear reactors is carried out. They are respectively based on two chains of double neutron capture reactions, 170 Er(n,γ) 171 Er(n,γ) 172 Er(β - ) 172 Tm and 170 Er(n,γ) 171 Er(β - ) 171 Tm(n,γ) 172 Tm, and a chain of triple neutron capture: 169 Tm(n,γ) 170 Tm(n,γ) 71 Tm(n,γ) 172 Tm. Theoretical considerations with respect to both ways of production are formulated and the mathematical equation are solved. Experiments of irradiation of Er 2 O 3 and Tm 2 O 3 were performed. Advantages and drawbacks of both methods are discussed. (author)

  11. Validation of the 172 group ENDFB7GX library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Suhail Ahmad; Raj, Devesh; Karthikeyan, R.; Jagannathan, V.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Five 172 group libraries, viz., IAEAGX, ENDFB6GX, JENDL3GX, JEFF31GX, and LWRPSGX were obtained as a part of the IAEA WIMS Library Update Project (WLUP). The first four libraries have data available for 173 nuclides up to 244 Cm. The LWRPSGX library based on JEFF3.1 point dataset is an extended library up to 252 Cf. Data for 12 more actinides and the related burnup chain were added. The five libraries were validated against known experiments in an earlier work. In general the LWRPSGX was found to be giving better results. Recently another version of 172 group library 'ENDFB7GX' has been released. In the present work we provide the results of validation of the ENDFB7GX library against the same set of experimental data and a comparison with results of other libraries. The experimental configuration data include a variety of uniform lattices with enriched UO 2 , U- metal, mixed oxide (UO 2 -PuO 2 ) fuels with H 2 O and D 2 O moderators for a wide range of enrichment, fuel diameter and ratio of moderator to fuel volume (V m /V f ). The calculations have been done using the code LATTEST which solves the single pin lattice cell problem by 1-D multi-group transport theory after cylindricalising the square or hexagonal cell boundary. The LATTEST code is an improved version of the MURLI code and is capable of providing a ready testing of any new cross section library against a set of experimental benchmark lattices collected from various sources. The calculated k eff values and certain spectral indices, where available, have been compared for all the libraries for more than hundred critical lattices. There is a general under prediction of k eff values by all libraries. The maximum under prediction is for ENDFB6GX library and the least is for JENDL3GX library. The ENDFB7GX library, in general, is found to over predict in comparison to the k eff values obtained using LWRPSGX library. While scrutinizing the basic nuclear data it was noted that the slowing down cross

  12. Influence of intramolecular f-f interactions on nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetizations in quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes containing two terbium or dysprosium magnetic centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takamitsu; Matsumura, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Naoto

    2013-10-10

    Nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) phenomena, which arise from admixture of more than two orthogonal electronic spin wave functions through the couplings with those of the nuclear spins, are one of the important magnetic relaxation processes in lanthanide single molecule magnets (SMMs) in the low temperature range. Although recent experimental studies have indicated that the presence of the intramolecular f-f interactions affects their magnetic relaxation processes, little attention has been given to their mechanisms and, to the best of our knowledge, no rational theoretical models have been proposed for the interpretations of how the nuclear spin driven QTMs are influenced by the f-f interactions. Since quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes with two terbium or dysprosium ions as the magnetic centers show moderate f-f interactions, these are appropriate to investigate the influence of the f-f interactions on the dynamic magnetic relaxation processes. In the present paper, a theoretical model including ligand field (LF) potentials, hyperfine, nuclear quadrupole, magnetic dipolar, and the Zeeman interactions has been constructed to understand the roles of the nuclear spins for the QTM processes, and the resultant Zeeman plots are obtained. The ac susceptibility measurements of the magnetically diluted quadruple-decker monoterbium and diterbium phthalocyanine complexes, [Tb-Y] and [Tb-Tb], have indicated that the presence of the f-f interactions suppresses the QTMs in the absence of the external magnetic field (H(dc)) being consistent with previous reports. On the contrary, the faster magnetic relaxation processes are observed for [Tb-Tb] than [Tb-Y] at H(dc) = 1000 Oe, clearly demonstrating that the QTMs are rather enhanced in the presence of the external magnetic field. Based on the calculated Zeeman diagrams, these observations can be attributed to the enhanced nuclear spin driven QTMs for [Tb-Tb]. At the H(dc) higher than 2000 Oe, the

  13. Dual-mode T_1 and T_2 magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent based on ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and in vivo application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegafaw, Tirusew; Xu, Wenlong; Ahmad, Md Wasi; Lee, Gang Ho; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong

    2015-01-01

    A new type of dual-mode T_1 and T_2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles was synthesized. Gd"3"+ ("8S_7_/_2) plays an important role in T_1 MRI contrast agents because of its large electron spin magnetic moment resulting from its seven unpaired 4f-electrons, and Dy"3"+ ("6H_1_5_/_2) has the potential to be used in T_2 MRI contrast agents because of its very large total electron magnetic moment: among lanthanide oxide nanoparticles, Dy_2O_3 nanoparticles have the largest magnetic moments at room temperature. Using these properties of Gd"3"+ and Dy"3"+ and their oxide nanoparticles, ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide (GDO) nanoparticles were synthesized and their potential to act as a dual-mode T_1 and T_2 MRI contrast agent was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The D-glucuronic acid coated GDO nanoparticles (d_a_v_g = 1.0 nm) showed large r_1 and r_2 values (r_2/r_1 ≈ 6.6) and as a result clear dose-dependent contrast enhancements in R_1 and R_2 map images. Finally, the dual-mode imaging capability of the nanoparticles was confirmed by obtaining in vivo T_1 and T_2 MR images. (paper)

  14. Extraction of Dysprosium Ions with DTPA Functionalized Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles Probed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence and TEM/High-Angle Annular Dark Field Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Fernando Menegatti de; Almeida, Sabrina da Nobrega; Uezu, Noemi Saori; Ramirez, Carlos Alberto Ospina; Santos, Antonio Domingues Dos; Toma, Henrique Eisi

    2018-06-01

    The extraction of dysprosium (Dy3+) ions from aqueous solution was carried out successfully, using magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles functionalized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (MagNP@DTPA). The process was monitored by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, as a function of concentration, proceeding according to a Langmuir isotherm with an equilibrium constant of 2.57 × 10-3 g(MagNP) L-1 and a saturation limit of 63.2 mgDy/gMagNP. The presence of paramagnetic Dy3+ ions attached to the superparamagnetic nanoparticles led to an overall decrease of magnetization. By imaging the nanoparticles surface using scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with high resolution elemental analysis, it was possible to probe the binding of the Dy3+ ions to DTPA, and to show their distribution in a region of negative magnetic field gradients. This finding is coherent with the observed decrease of magnetization, associated with the antiferromagnetic coupling between the lanthanide ions and the Fe3O4 core.

  15. [Review of 1,172 clinical cases with human communication disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Díaz, M R; de Pustilnik, N F; Tortolero, Y

    1976-01-01

    The study comprised 1,172 clinical cases that were classified according to sex, age and speech disorders. A review is made on the most common alterations that they present, the selective treatment in each type and their rehabilitation.

  16. Global use structures of the magnetic materials neodymium and dysprosium. A scenario-based analysis of the effect of the diffusion of electromobility on the demand for rare earths; Globale Verwendungsstrukturen der Magnetwerkstoffe Neodym und Dysprosium. Eine szenariobasierte Analyse der Auswirkung der Diffusion der Elektromobilitaet auf den Bedarf an Seltenen Erden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloeser-Chahoud, Simon; Kuehn, Andre; Tercero Espinoza, Luis

    2016-06-15

    Neodymium-iron-boron magnets (NdFeB) have experienced a significant demand as the most powerful permanent magnet in recent years, especially for the manufacture of compact electric servomotors with high efficiency and high power density, especially for mobile applications in hybrid traction motors and electric vehicles or for electric bikes. However, NdFeB magnets are also increasingly being used in general mechanical engineering (conveying and pumping systems, tools, air conditioning systems, lift motors, etc.), in the small electric motors of conventional passenger cars or in the generators of large wind power plants with permanent magnetic direct drive. Nevertheless, there is still high uncertainty in the use structures of NdFeB magnets and the contained rare earth elements neodymium and dysprosium. An effective instrument for increasing the market transparency and the understanding of complex anthropogenic material cycles is the dynamic material flow modeling. In the present work paper, this instrument is used for an in-depth analysis of the use structures of NdFeB magnets and the contained rare earths on a global scale. The dynamic modeling of product usage cycles reveals today's usage structures and quantifies future magnetic quantities in obsolete product flows. It could be shown that the magnets in today's scrap volume are mainly contained in obsolete electronics applications such as hard disks (HDD), CD and DVD drives, which makes the recycling hardly seem to be economical due to the small magnets and the high material spread, but in the foreseeable future with larger magnetic quantities from synchronous servomotors and generators can be expected, which significantly increases the recycling potential. In a further step, the effect of the diffusion of alternative drives in the automotive market on the dysprosium requirement is analyzed using a system dynamics model and possible adaptation mechanisms in the form of different substitution effects in

  17. POWERDRESS and diversified expression of the MIR172 gene family bolster the floral stem cell network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rae Eden Yumul

    Full Text Available Termination of the stem cells in the floral meristem (also known as floral determinacy is critical for the reproductive success of plants, and the molecular activities regulating floral determinacy are precisely orchestrated during the course of floral development. In Arabidopsis thaliana, regulators of floral determinacy include several transcription factor genes, such as APETALA2 (AP2, AGAMOUS (AG, SUPERMAN (SUP, and CRABSCLAW (CRC, as well as a microRNA (miRNA, miR172, which targets AP2. How the transcription factor and miRNA genes are coordinately regulated to achieve floral determinacy is unknown. A mutation in POWERDRESS (PWR, a previously uncharacterized gene encoding a SANT-domain-containing protein, was isolated in this study as an enhancer of the weakly indeterminate ag-10 allele. PWR was found to promote the transcription of CRC, MIR172a, b, and c and/or enhance Pol II occupancy at their promoters, without affecting MIR172d or e. A mutation in mature miR172d was additionally found to enhance the determinacy defects of ag-10 in an AP2-dependent manner, providing direct evidence that miR172d is functional in repressing AP2 and thereby contributes to floral determinacy. Thus, while PWR promotes floral determinacy by enhancing the expression of three of the five MIR172 members as well as CRC, MIR172d, whose expression is PWR-independent, also functions in floral stem cell termination. Taken together, these findings demonstrate how transcriptional diversification and functional redundancy of a miRNA family along with PWR-mediated co-regulation of miRNA and transcription factor genes contribute to the robustness of the floral determinacy network.

  18. Non-yrast states and shape co-existence in 172Os

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, P.M.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Kibedi, T.; Byrne, A.P.; Anderssen, S.S.; Baxter, A.M.; Fabricius, B.; Lane, G.J.; Stuchbery, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies of 172 Os noted an anomaly in the behaviour of the moment of inertia of the yrast band at low spin. A phenomenological model of shape coexistence based on interacting rotational bands was proposed to explain this anomaly and this model predicted low-lying non-yrast states. In order to test these predictions, the β-decay of 172 Ir has been used to populate 172 Os. Excited states have been observed and classified into positive-parity ''quasi-β'' and ''quasi-γ'' bands and a negative-parity band. The energies of the quasi-β band states are seen to be in general agreement with the predictions of the phenomenological model and the model is refined to take into account the new data. The bands involved are determined to have significantly different moments of inertia. (orig.)

  19. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF GX17+2: CONFIRMATION OF A PERIODIC SYNCHROTRON SOURCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Thomas E.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Bornak, Jillian; Gelino, Dawn M.; Wachter, Stefanie; Rupen, Michael P.; Gelino, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    GX17+2 is a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) that is also a member of a small family of LMXBs known as 'Z-sources' that are believed to have persistent X-ray luminosities that are very close to the Eddington limit. GX17+2 is highly variable at both radio and X-ray frequencies, a feature common to Z-sources. What sets GX17+2 apart is its dramatic variability in the near-infrared, where it changes by ΔK ∼ 3 mag. Previous investigations have shown that these brightenings are periodic, recurring every 3.01 days. Given its high extinction (A V ≥ 9 mag), it has not been possible to ascertain the nature of these events with ground-based observations. We report mid-infrared Spitzer observations of GX17+2 which indicate a synchrotron spectrum for the infrared brightenings. In addition, GX17+2 is highly variable in the mid-infrared during these events. The combination of the large-scale outbursts, the presence of a synchrotron spectrum, and the dramatic variability in the mid-infrared suggest that the infrared brightening events are due to the periodic transit of a synchrotron jet across our line of sight. An analysis of both new, and archival, infrared observations has led us to revise the period for these events to 3.0367 days. We also present new Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data for GX17+2 obtained during two predicted infrared brightening events. Analysis of these new data, and data from the RXTE archive, indicates that there is no correlation between the X-ray behavior of this source and the observed infrared brightenings. We examine various scenarios that might produce periodic jet emission.

  20. Lifetime of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 172}Hf and {sup 174}Hf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerst, Rosa-Belle; Stegemann, Simon; Jolie, Jan; Regis, Jean-Marc; Rudigier, Matthias; Saed-Samii, Nima; Zell, Karl Oskar [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Using the {sup 170}Yb(α,2n) and {sup 172}Yb(α,2n) reactions the lifetimes of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 172}Hf and {sup 174}Hf have been measured in fast-timing experiments using the Cologne Orange-Spectrometer and 6 LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)-Detectors. The lifetimes were obtained analyzing e{sup -}-γ-coincidence time-spectra with the slope method. The new and more precise lifetimes correct existing, outdated lifetimes in nuclear databases. Additionally, the systematics of the B(E2,2{sub 1}{sup +}→0{sub 1}{sup +}) is studied.

  1. X-ray bursts from GX 17+2: a new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztajno, M.; Langmeier, A.; Truemper, J.; Pietsch, W.; Paradijs, J. van; Lewin, W.H.G.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1986-01-01

    The detection of two X-ray bursts from GX 17+2 is reported; a short one (lasting about 10s), and a long one (which lasted about 5 min). These bursts reached a maximum intensity of only about 40 per cent above the persistent flux level. Like previous long bursts observed from GX 17+2 the long burst showed little softening during its decay, and it is difficult at first glance to classify it as either a type 1 or a type 2 burst. Following the recent results of two of the authors a time-dependent spectral analysis of these bursts has been made. (author)

  2. Synthesis and characterization of a family of structurally characterized dysprosium alkoxides for improved fatigue-resistance characteristics of PDyZT thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Timothy J; Bunge, Scott D; Clem, Paul G; Richardson, Jacob; Dawley, Jeffrey T; Ottley, Leigh Anna M; Rodriguez, Mark A; Tuttle, Bruce A; Avilucea, Gabriel R; Tissot, Ralph G

    2005-03-07

    Using either an ammoniacal route, the reaction between DyCl3, Na0, and HOR in liquid ammonia, or preferentially reacting Dy(N(SiMe3)2)3 with HOR in a solvent, we isolated a family of dysprosium alkoxides as [Dy(mu-ONep)2(ONep)]4 (1), (ONep)2Dy[(mu3-ONep)(mu-ONep)Dy(ONep)(THF)]2(mu-ONep) (2), (ONep)2Dy[(mu3-ONep)(mu-ONep)Dy(ONep)(py)]2(mu-ONep) (3), [Dy3(mu3-OBut)2(mu-OBut3(OBut)4(HOBut)2] (4), [Dy3(mu3-OBut)2(mu-OBut)3(OBut)4(THF)2] (5), [Dy3(mu3-OBut)2(mu-OBut)3(OBut)4(py)2] (6), (DMP)Dy(mu-DMP)4[Dy(DMP)2(NH3)]2 (7), [Dy(eta6-DMP)(DMP)2]2 (8), Dy(DMP)3(THF)3 (9), Dy(DMP)3(py)3 (10), Dy(DIP)3(NH3)2 (11), [Dy(eta6-DIP)(DIP)2]2 (12), Dy(DIP)3(THF)2 (13), Dy(DIP)3(py)3 (14), Dy(DBP)3(NH3) (15), Dy(DBP)3 (16), Dy(DBP)3(THF) (17), Dy(DBP)3(py)2 (18), [Dy(mu-TPS)(TPS2]2 (19), Dy(TPS)3(THF)3 (20), and Dy(TPS)3(py)3 (21), where ONep = OCH2CMe3, OBut) = OCMe3, DMP = OC6H3(Me)(2)-2,6, DIP = OC6H3(CHMe2)(2)-2,6, DBP = OC6H3(CMe3)(2)-2,6, TPS = OSi(C6H5)3, tol = toluene, THF = tetrahydrofuran, and py = pyridine. We were not able to obtain X-ray quality crystals of compounds 2, 8, and 9. The structures observed and data collected for the Dy compounds are consistent with those reported for its other congeners. A number of these precursors were used as Dy dopants in Pb(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3 (PZT 30/70) thin films, with compound 12 yielding the highest-quality films. The resulting Pb0.94Dy0.04(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3 [PDyZT (4/30/70)] had similar properties to PZT (30/70), but showed substantial resistance to polarization reversal fatigue.

  3. The role of dysprosium on the structural and magnetic properties of (Nd_1_−_xDy_x)_2Fe_1_4B nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, Hamed; Ghasemi, Ali; Mozaffarinia, Reza; Tavoosi, Majid

    2017-01-01

    In current work, Nd2Fe14B nanoparticles was synthesized by sol-gel method. Dysprosium powders were added into Nd2Fe14B nanoparticles by mechanical alloying process in order to enhancement of coercivity. The phase analysis, structure, and magnetic properties of annealed (Nd_1_−_xDy_x)_2Fe_1_4B nanoparticles with different Dy-content (x=0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6) were investigated by employing X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques. The results showed that with an increase in Dy amounts, the coercivity of particles increased from 2.9 kOe to 13.4 kOe and then decreased to 5.6 kOe. By adding an optimum amount of Dy (x=0.4), the coercivity was significantly increased from 2.9 kOe to 13.4 kOe. The average particle size of annealed (Nd_1_−_xDy_x)_2Fe_1_4B nanoparticles was below 10 nm. Magnetization reversal studies indicate that the coercivity of milled and annealed (Nd_1_−_xDy_x)_2Fe_1_4B nanoparticles is controlled by the nucleation of reversed magnetic domains. The experimental results in the angular dependence of coercivity for (Nd_1_−_xDy_x)_2Fe_1_4B permanent magnets showed that the normalized coercivity of the permanent magnets H_c(θ)/H_c(0) increases from 1 to about 1.2–1.5 with increasing θ from 0 to about π/3, for x=0.4–0.6. - Highlights: • Dy was added to Nd_2Fe_1_4B nanoparticles to improve the coercivity. • A maximum squareness ratio of 0.99 was obtained. • The average particle size decreased with an increase in Dy-content.

  4. miR172 down-regulates the translation of cleistogamy 1 in barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floret opening in barley is induced by the swelling of the lodicule, a trait under the control of the cleistogamy1 (cly1) gene. The product of cly1 is a member of the APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factor family, which inhibits lodicule development. A sequence polymorphism at the miR172 target site wi...

  5. 12 CFR 560.172 - Re-evaluation of real estate owned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Re-evaluation of real estate owned. 560.172... of real estate owned. A savings association shall appraise each parcel of real estate owned at the... under the particular circumstances. The foregoing requirement shall not apply to any parcel of real...

  6. 26 CFR 1.172-10 - Net operating losses of real estate investment trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net operating losses of real estate investment... (continued) § 1.172-10 Net operating losses of real estate investment trusts. (a) Taxable years to which a loss may be carried. (1) A net operating loss sustained by a qualified real estate investment trust (as...

  7. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may...

  8. 21 CFR 172.167 - Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.167 Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution... intended to be filtered through a silver-containing water filter. (g) Bottled water must meet the quality...

  9. 21 CFR 172.520 - Cocoa with dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.520 Cocoa with dioctyl... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cocoa with dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate for...

  10. 21 CFR 172.810 - Dioctyl sodium sulfo-suc-cinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.810 Dioctyl sodium sulfo-suc-cinate. The food additive... gums or hydrophilic colloids. (d) As an emulsifying agent for cocoa fat in noncarbonated beverages...

  11. Extremely Energetic 4B/X17.2 Flare and Associated Phenomena ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak,. Nainital 263 129 ... In this paper, we present the preliminary analysis of X17.2 flare, observed on. 28 October 2003. ... The Hα movie shows large scale .... we calculate the thermal energy (Eth) content of the flare applying the following formula:.

  12. 76 FR 13240 - National Endowment for the Arts; National Council on the Arts 172nd Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES National Endowment for the Arts; National Council on the Arts 172nd Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), as amended, notice is hereby given that a meeting of the National Council on the Arts...

  13. Water, Sanitation and Children’s Health : Evidence from 172 DHS Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Gunther, Isabel; Fink, Gunther

    2010-01-01

    This paper combines 172 Demography and Health Survey data sets from 70 countries to estimate the effect of water and sanitation on child mortality and morbidity. The results show a robust association between access to water and sanitation technologies and both child morbidity and child mortality. The point estimates imply, depending on the technology level and the sub-region chosen, that w...

  14. Global use structures of the magnetic materials neodymium and dysprosium. A scenario-based analysis of the effect of the diffusion of electromobility on the demand for rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeser-Chahoud, Simon; Kuehn, Andre; Tercero Espinoza, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Neodymium-iron-boron magnets (NdFeB) have experienced a significant demand as the most powerful permanent magnet in recent years, especially for the manufacture of compact electric servomotors with high efficiency and high power density, especially for mobile applications in hybrid traction motors and electric vehicles or for electric bikes. However, NdFeB magnets are also increasingly being used in general mechanical engineering (conveying and pumping systems, tools, air conditioning systems, lift motors, etc.), in the small electric motors of conventional passenger cars or in the generators of large wind power plants with permanent magnetic direct drive. Nevertheless, there is still high uncertainty in the use structures of NdFeB magnets and the contained rare earth elements neodymium and dysprosium. An effective instrument for increasing the market transparency and the understanding of complex anthropogenic material cycles is the dynamic material flow modeling. In the present work paper, this instrument is used for an in-depth analysis of the use structures of NdFeB magnets and the contained rare earths on a global scale. The dynamic modeling of product usage cycles reveals today's usage structures and quantifies future magnetic quantities in obsolete product flows. It could be shown that the magnets in today's scrap volume are mainly contained in obsolete electronics applications such as hard disks (HDD), CD and DVD drives, which makes the recycling hardly seem to be economical due to the small magnets and the high material spread, but in the foreseeable future with larger magnetic quantities from synchronous servomotors and generators can be expected, which significantly increases the recycling potential. In a further step, the effect of the diffusion of alternative drives in the automotive market on the dysprosium requirement is analyzed using a system dynamics model and possible adaptation mechanisms in the form of different substitution effects in the

  15. Spectral shapes and a beta-gamma directional correlation in the beta decay of 172Tm (Jpi = 2-)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregers Hansen, P.; Loft Nielsen, H.; Wilsky, K.

    1966-01-01

    The isotope 172Tm populates the 0+, 2+ and 4+ states of the 172Yb ground-state rotational band directly in beta decay. The shapes and intensities of the three beta groups have been measured by means of a six-gap magnetic spectrometer operated in coincidence with a Nal(Tl) crystal. The experimenta...

  16. 21 CFR 172.225 - Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... from edible fats and oils. 172.225 Section 172.225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils. Methyl esters and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils may be safely used in food, subject to the...

  17. 42 CFR 137.172 - Should the audit report be sent anywhere else to ensure receipt by the Secretary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Should the audit report be sent anywhere else to ensure receipt by the Secretary? 137.172 Section 137.172 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Audits...

  18. 40 CFR 429.172 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... technology (BCT). [Reserved] 429.172 Section 429.172 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Wood Furniture and Fixture Production With Water Wash Spray Booth(s) or With Laundry Facilities... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). [Reserved] ...

  19. 21 CFR 172.861 - Cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... kernel oil, or both oils. 172.861 Section 172.861 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils. The food additive, cocoa butter substitute from coconut oil, palm kernel oil, or both oils, may be safely used in food in accordance with the following...

  20. 26 CFR 1.172-9 - Election with respect to portion of net operating loss attributable to foreign expropriation loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... operating loss attributable to foreign expropriation loss. 1.172-9 Section 1.172-9 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... operating loss attributable to foreign expropriation loss. (a) In general. If a taxpayer has a net operating loss for a taxable year ending after December 31, 1958, and if the foreign expropriation loss for such...

  1. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-04-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides (159)Dy, (157)Dy, (155)Dy, (161)Tb, (160)Tb, (156)Tb, (155)Tb, (154m2)Tb, (154m1)Tb, (154g)Tb, (153)Tb, (152)Tb and (151)Tb are reported in the 36-65MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Dysprosium doping induced shape and magnetic anisotropy of Fe{sub 3−x}Dy{sub x}O{sub 4} (x=0.01–0.1) nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Richa [School of Sciences, Indira Gandhi National Open University, Maidan Garhi, New Delhi 110068 (India); Department of Physics, ARSD college, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110021 (India); Luthra, Vandna [Department of Physics, Gargi College, Siri Fort Road, New Delhi 110049 (India); Gokhale, Shubha, E-mail: sgokhale@ignou.ac.in [School of Sciences, Indira Gandhi National Open University, Maidan Garhi, New Delhi 110068 (India)

    2016-09-15

    The effect of dysprosium doping on evolution of structural and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles is reported. A standard route of co-precipitation was used for the synthesis of undoped and doped magnetite nanoparticles Fe{sub 3−x}Dy{sub x}O{sub 4} (x=0.0–0.1). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows formation of round shaped particles with diameter in the range of 8–14 nm for undoped sample. On doping beyond x=0.01, the formation of rod like structures is initiated along with the round shaped particles. The number of rods is found to increase with increasing doping concentration. Magnetic characterization using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) revealed doping dependent magnetic properties which can be correlated with the crystallite size as determined from X-ray diffraction (XRD). Enhancement in the saturation magnetization in the initial stages of doping can be explained on the basis of incorporation of Dy{sup 3+} ions in the inverse spinel structure at the octahedral site in place of Fe{sup 3+} ions. Subsequent decrease in saturation magnetization observed beyond x=0.03 could be attributed to precipitation of excess Dy in form of dysprosium ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Report on formation of nanorods in magnetite prompted by Dy doping. • Observation of anisotropic magnetic behaviour emanating from the shape anisotropy. • Evidence of Dy{sup 3+} ions occupying octahedral site in place of Fe{sup 3+} ions. • Nanorods envisaged to be useful as catalysts and in biomedical applications.

  3. Dysprosium selective potentiometric membrane sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamani, Hassan Ali, E-mail: haszamani@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridbod, Farnoush; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-01

    A novel Dy(III) ion-selective PVC membrane sensor was made using a new synthesized organic compound, 3,4-diamino-N Prime -((pyridin-2-yl)methylene)benzohydrazide (L) as an excellent sensing element. The electrode showed a Nernstian slope of 19.8 {+-} 0.6 mV per decade in a wide concentration range of 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}-1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} mol L{sup -1}, a detection limit of 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1}, a short conditioning time, a fast response time (< 10 s), and high selectivity towards Dy(III) ion in contrast to other cations. The proposed sensor was successfully used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Dy(III) ions with EDTA. The membrane sensor was also applied to the F{sup -} ion indirect determination of some mouth washing solutions and to the Dy{sup 3+} determination in binary mixtures. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novelty of this work is based on the high affinity of the ionophore toward the Dy{sup 3+} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique is very simple, fast and inexpensive and it is not necessary to use sophisticated equipment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The newly developed sensor is superior to the formerly reported Dy{sup 3+} sensors in terms of selectivity.

  4. High spin states in 63Cu. 17/2+ isomeric yrast state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsan Ung Chan; Bruandet, J.F.; Dauchy, A.; Giorni, A.; Glasser, F.; Morand, C.; Chambon, B.; Drain, D.

    1979-01-01

    The 63 Cu nucleus has been studied via the reaction 61 Ni(α, pnγ), using different in beam γ spectroscopy techniques. An isomeric high-spin Yrast state 17/2 + (tau = 6.1 +- 0.6ns) is located at 4498 keV. The gsub(9/2) shell must be involved to explain positive high-spin states established in this work [fr

  5. Measurement of triple gauge-boson couplings at 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Morawitz, P; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Vreeswijk, M; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Ward, J J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Coles, J; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Faïf, G; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Przysiezniak, H; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The triple gauge-boson couplings, Awp, Aw and Abp, have been measured using 34 semileptonically and 54 hadronically decaying WW candidate events. The events were selected in the data recorded during 1996 with the ALEPH detector at 172 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10.65 pb^-1. The triple gauge-boson couplings have been measured using optimal observables constructed from kinematic information of WW events. The results are in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  6. Page | 172

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    University Malaysia; Lecturer, Department of Law, College of Humanities, ... the opinion that dictatorships 'are methods other than competitive elections used for ..... for Enjoyment and Enforcement of Human Rights and General Law and.

  7. Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 Enhances Viral Replication in CD172a+ Monocytic Cells upon Adhesion to Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Kathlyn; Favoreel, Herman W; Poelaert, Katrien C K; Van Cleemput, Jolien; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-11-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a main cause of respiratory disease, abortion, and encephalomyelopathy in horses. Monocytic cells (CD172a(+)) are the main carrier cells of EHV-1 during primary infection and are proposed to serve as a "Trojan horse" to facilitate the dissemination of EHV-1 to target organs. However, the mechanism by which EHV-1 is transferred from CD172a(+) cells to endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate EHV-1 transmission between these two cell types. We hypothesized that EHV-1 employs specific strategies to promote the adhesion of infected CD172a(+) cells to EC to facilitate EHV-1 spread. Here, we demonstrated that EHV-1 infection of CD172a(+) cells resulted in a 3- to 5-fold increase in adhesion to EC. Antibody blocking experiments indicated that α4β1, αLβ2, and αVβ3 integrins mediated adhesion of infected CD172a(+) cells to EC. We showed that integrin-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK/MAPK signaling pathways were involved in EHV-1-induced CD172a(+) cell adhesion at early times of infection. EHV-1 replication was enhanced in adherent CD172a(+) cells, which correlates with the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In the presence of neutralizing antibodies, approximately 20% of infected CD172a(+) cells transferred cytoplasmic material to uninfected EC and 0.01% of infected CD172a(+) cells transmitted infectious virus to neighboring cells. Our results demonstrated that EHV-1 infection induces adhesion of CD172a(+) cells to EC, which enhances viral replication, but that transfer of viral material from CD172a(+) cells to EC is a very specific and rare event. These findings give new insights into the complex pathogenesis of EHV-1. Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a highly prevalent pathogen worldwide, causing frequent outbreaks of abortion and myeloencephalopathy, even in vaccinated horses. After primary replication in the respiratory tract, EHV-1 disseminates

  8. LOFT CIS analysis penetration S-7A 8'' WW - 172-AB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, W.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The 8'' WW - 172 - AB line from the containment penetration S-7A was analyzed to ASME Code, Subsection NC (Class 2) criteria. This section of piping is part of the LOFT Containment Isolation System. The model considered the line from the penetration S-7A outward through two horizontal-plane elbows and then through three valves to a wall penetration. Results of the analysis show that the system will meet Class 2 requirements if additional support/restraint is installed at three locations besides the existing restraints. The locations and loads for these supports/restraints are included in the body of the report

  9. Measurement of triple gauge-boson couplings at 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Morawitz, P.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Casper, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Ward, J. J.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Marinelli, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M. M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Coles, J.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faïf, G.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-03-01

    The triple gauge-boson couplings, αWΦ, αW and αBΦ, have been measured using 34 semileptonically and 54 hadronically decaying W+W- candidate events. The events were selected in the data recorded during 1996 with the ALEPH detector at 172 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10.65 pb-1. The triple gauge-boson couplings have been measured using optimal observables constructed from kinematic information of W+W- events. The results are in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  10. Fine physical and genetic mapping of powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW172 originating from wild emmer (Triticum dicoccoides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhong Ouyang

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most important wheat diseases in the world. In this study, a single dominant powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW172 was identified in the IW172 wild emmer accession and mapped to the distal region of chromosome arm 7AL (bin7AL-16-0.86-0.90 via molecular marker analysis. MlIW172 was closely linked with the RFLP probe Xpsr680-derived STS marker Xmag2185 and the EST markers BE405531 and BE637476. This suggested that MlIW172 might be allelic to the Pm1 locus or a new locus closely linked to Pm1. By screening genomic BAC library of durum wheat cv. Langdon and 7AL-specific BAC library of hexaploid wheat cv. Chinese Spring, and after analyzing genome scaffolds of Triticum urartu containing the marker sequences, additional markers were developed to construct a fine genetic linkage map on the MlIW172 locus region and to delineate the resistance gene within a 0.48 cM interval. Comparative genetics analyses using ESTs and RFLP probe sequences flanking the MlIW172 region against other grass species revealed a general co-linearity in this region with the orthologous genomic regions of rice chromosome 6, Brachypodium chromosome 1, and sorghum chromosome 10. However, orthologous resistance gene-like RGA sequences were only present in wheat and Brachypodium. The BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds that we have developed provide a framework for the physical mapping and map-based cloning of MlIW172.

  11. Prevaccination with SRL172 (heat-killed Mycobacterium vaccae) inhibits experimental periodontal disease in Wistar rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, T; Rook, G A W

    2000-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a bacterial dental plaque-induced destructive inflammatory condition of the tooth-supporting tissues, which is thought to be mediated by T lymphocytes secreting T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines, resulting in recruitment of high numbers of antibody-producing B lymphocytes/plasma cells as well as polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) secreting tissue-destructive components, such at matrix metalloproteinases and reactive oxygen metabolites into the gingival connective tissues. One treatment strategy may be to down-regulate the Th2 response to those dental plaque microorganisms which induce the destructive inflammatory response. In this study we have examined the effects of a potent down-regulator of Th2 responses on ligature-induced periodontal disease in an experimental rat model. A single s.c. injection into Wistar rats of 0·1 or 1 mg of SRL172, a preparation of heat-killed Mycobacterium vaccae (NCTC 11659), 13 days before application of the ligature, significantly reduced the subsequent destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues, as measured by loss of periodontal attachment fibres (P < 0·001) and bone (P < 0·002). This protective effect occurred not only on the experimental (ligatured) side but also on the control unligatured side. SRL172 has undergone extensive toxicological studies and safety assessments in humans, and it is suggested that it may provide a safe and novel therapeutic approach to periodontal disease. PMID:10844524

  12. Optimization of Acid Black 172 decolorization by electrocoagulation using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This paper utilizes a statistical approach, the response surface optimization methodology, to determine the optimum conditions for the Acid Black 172 dye removal efficiency from aqueous solution by electrocoagulation. The experimental parameters investigated were initial pH: 4–10; initial dye concentration: 0–600 mg/L; applied current: 0.5-3.5 A and reaction time: 3–15 min. These parameters were changed at five levels according to the central composite design to evaluate their effects on decolorization through analysis of variance. High R2 value of 94.48% shows a high correlation between the experimental and predicted values and expresses that the second-order regression model is acceptable for Acid Black 172 dye removal efficiency. It was also found that some interactions and squares influenced the electrocoagulation performance as well as the selected parameters. Optimum dye removal efficiency of 90.4% was observed experimentally at initial pH of 7, initial dye concentration of 300 mg/L, applied current of 2 A and reaction time of 9.16 min, which is close to model predicted (90%) result. PMID:23369574

  13. A mechanistic study of Toxoplasma gondii ROP18 inhibiting differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital infection of Toxoplasma gondii is an important factor causing birth defects. The neural stem cells (NSCs are found to be one of the target cells for the parasite during development of the brain. As a key virulence factor of the parasite that hijacks host cellular functions, ROP18 has been demonstrated to mediate the inhibition of host innate and adaptive immune responses through specific binding different host immunity related molecules. However, its pathogenic actions in NSCs remain elusive. Results In the present study, ROP18 recombinant adenovirus (Ad-ROP18 was constructed and used to infect C17.2 NSCs. After 3d- or 5d–culture in differentiation medium, the differentiation of C17.2 NSCs and the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway were detected. The results showed that the protein level of βIII-tubulin, a marker of neurons, in the Ad-ROP18-transfected C17.2 NSCs was significantly decreased, indicating that the differentiation of C17.2 NSCs was inhibited by the ROP18. The β-catenin level in the Ad-ROP18-transfected C17.2 NSCs was found to be lower than that in the Ad group. Also, neurogenin1 (Ngn1 and neurogenin2 (Ngn2 were downregulated significantly (P < 0.05 in the Ad-ROP18-transfected C17.2 NSCs compared to the Ad group. Accordingly, the TOP flash/FOP flash dual-luciferase report system showed that the transfection of Ad-ROP18 decreased the Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity in the C17.2 NSCs. Conclusions The inhibition effect of the ROP18 from T. gondii (TgROP18 on the neuronal differentiation of C17.2 NSCs was at least partly mediated through inhibiting the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, eventually resulting in the downregulation of Ngn1 and Ngn2. The findings help to better understand potential mechanisms of brain pathology induced by TgROP18.

  14. 172 nm excimer VUV-triggered photodegradation and micropatterning of aminosilane films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsner, Christian; Naumov, Sergej; Zajadacz, Joachim; Buchmeiser, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Emission from Xe 2 * excimers exhibiting photon energies between 7 and 10 eV can be used to induce strong surface modification effects on polymeric materials in the top 100 nm layer. In order to identify suitable monomers for this VUV-based process, the photodegradation mechanism of different organosilanes of the general structure R-CH 2 -Si(OCH 3 ) 3 was elucidated by quantum chemical calculations. Herein, the photodegradation of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane films by the use of a 172 nm excimer lamp under different irradiation conditions is described and completed by micropatterning experiments. The presence of 1000-5000 ppm oxygen was found to promote the transformation process to an inorganic-like surface. The films obtained were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle measurements and fluorescence microscopy after covalent attachment of a fluorescent dye to the remaining amino groups. Complementary, silver staining was used to visualize photopatterning.

  15. Lifetime of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 172}W and {sup 178}W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudigier, M., E-mail: rudigier@ikp.uni-koeln.d [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Regis, J.-M.; Jolie, J.; Zell, K.O.; Fransen, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2010-12-01

    The lifetime of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 172}W and {sup 178}W has been measured in fast timing experiments using the Cologne Double Orange Spectrometer for conversion electron spectroscopy. The B(E2,2{sub 1}{sup +{yields}}0{sub 1}{sup +}) values of the isotopes {sup 170-178}W are compared to calculations in the Interacting Boson Model (IBM) employing the consistent Q formalism. An analysis of the B(E2) value systematics in the rare earth nuclei around mass A=170 using the N{sub p}N{sub n}-scheme shows signatures of a structural change in the tungsten isotopes which is not reflected in the energy systematics.

  16. QCD studies with $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilation data at 172-189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauke, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tarem, S.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied hadronic events from e+e- annihilation data at centre-of-mass energies of sqrt{s}=172, 183 and 189 GeV. The total integrated luminosity of the three samples, measured with the OPAL detector, corresponds to 250 pb^-1. We present distributions of event shape variables, charged particle multiplicity and momentum, measured separately in the three data samples. From these we extract measurements of the strong coupling alpha_s, the mean charged particle multiplicity and the peak position xi_0 in the xi_p=ln(1/x_p) distribution. In general the data are described well by analytic QCD calculations and Monte Carlo models. Our measured values of alpha_s, and xi_0 are consistent with previous determinations at sqrt{s}=MZ.

  17. Hard-photon production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the process $e^+e^-{\\rightarrow}\\rm n {\\gamma}$ $(\\rm n{\\ge}2)$ at centre-of-mass energies of 161.3 GeV and 172.1 GeV. The analysis is based on a sample of events collected by the L3 detector in 1996 corresponding to total integrated luminosities of 10.7 ${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ and 10.1 ${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ respectively. The observed rates of events with two and more photons and the characteristic distributions are in good agreement with the Standard Model expectations. This is used to set lower limits on contact interaction energy scale parameters, on the QED cut-off parameters and on the mass of excited electrons.

  18. First step in developing SWNT nano-sensor for C17.2 neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Tetyana; Pirbhai, Massooma; Chandrasekar, Swetha; Rotkin, Slava V.; Jedlicka, Sabrina

    Nanomaterials are widely used for biomedical applications and diagnostics, including as drug and gene delivery agents, imaging objects, and biosensors. As single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess a size similar to intracellular components, including fibrillar proteins and some organelles, the potential for use in a wide variety of intracellular applications is significant. However, implementation of an SWNT based nano-sensor is difficult due to lack of understanding of SWNT-cell interaction on both the cellular and molecular level. In this study, C17.2 neural stem cells have been tested after uptake of SWNTs wrapped with ssDNA over a wide variety of time periods, allowing for broad localization of SWNTs inside of the cells over long time periods. The localization data is being used to develop a predictive model of how, upon uptake of SWNT, the cytoskeleton and other cellular structures of the adherent cells is perturbed.

  19. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Polyhydroxyalkanoates Production by Comamonas sp. EB172 Using Central Composite Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Azman Mohd Johar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Statistical approach, central composite design (CCD was used to investigate the complex interaction among temperature (25-37 °C, initial medium pH (5-9, inoculum size (4-10 % (v/v, concentration of (NH42SO4 (0-1 g/L and concentration of mixed organic acids (5-10 g/L in the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by Comamonas sp. EB172.Methodology and Results: Mixed organic acids derived from anaerobically treated palm oil mill effluent (POME containing acetic:propionic:butyric (ratio of 3:1:1 were used as carbon source in the batch culture of Comamonas sp. EB172 to produce polyhydoxyalkanoates (PHAs. The analysis of variance (ANOVA showed that all five factors were significantly important in the batch fermentation by shake flask with a P value of less than 0.001. The optimal temperature, initial medium pH, inoculum size, concentration of (NH42SO4 and concentration of mixed organic acids were 30 °C, 7.04, 4.0 % (v/v, 0.01 g/L and 5.05 g/L respectively.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: Optimization of the production medium containing mixed organic acids has improved the PHA production for more than 2 folds. Under optimal condition in the shake flask fermentation, the predicted growth is 2.98 g/L of dry cell weight (DCW with 47.07 wt % of PHA content. The highest yield of PHA was 0.28 g of PHA per g mixed organic acids.

  20. The Micro-RNA172c-APETALA2-1 Node as a Key Regulator of the Common Bean-Rhizobium etli Nitrogen Fixation Symbiosis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova-Franco, Bárbara; Íñiguez, Luis P.; Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Leija, Alfonso; Fuentes, Sara I.; Ramírez, Mario; Paul, Sujay

    2015-01-01

    Micro-RNAs are recognized as important posttranscriptional regulators in plants. The relevance of micro-RNAs as regulators of the legume-rhizobia nitrogen-fixing symbiosis is emerging. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the role of micro-RNA172 (miR172) and its conserved target APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factor in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium etli symbiosis. Our expression analysis revealed that mature miR172c increased upon rhizobial infection and continued increasing during nodule development, reaching its maximum in mature nodules and decaying in senescent nodules. The expression of AP2-1 target showed a negative correlation with miR172c expression. A drastic decrease in miR172c and high AP2-1 mRNA levels were observed in ineffective nodules. Phenotypic analysis of composite bean plants with transgenic roots overexpressing miR172c or a mutated AP2-1 insensitive to miR172c cleavage demonstrated the pivotal regulatory role of the miR172 node in the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis. Increased miR172 resulted in improved root growth, increased rhizobial infection, increased expression of early nodulation and autoregulation of nodulation genes, and improved nodulation and nitrogen fixation. In addition, these plants showed decreased sensitivity to nitrate inhibition of nodulation. Through transcriptome analysis, we identified 114 common bean genes that coexpressed with AP2-1 and proposed these as being targets for transcriptional activation by AP2-1. Several of these genes are related to nodule senescence, and we propose that they have to be silenced, through miR172c-induced AP2-1 cleavage, in active mature nodules. Our work sets the basis for exploring the miR172-mediated improvement of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in common bean, the most important grain legume for human consumption. PMID:25739700

  1. Search for charged Higgs bosons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; List, B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rembser, C.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    A search is described to detect charged Higgs bosons via the process e^+e^- -> H^+H^-, using data collected by the OPAL detector at center-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 25 pb^-1. The decay channels are assumed to be H^+ -> qq'(bar) and H^+ -> \\tau^+ \

  2. 30 CFR 206.172 - How do I value gas produced from leases in an index zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gas production that is not sold under an arm's-length dedicated contract is the index-based value... safety net prices calculated at § 206.172(e)(4)(i) exceeds the index-based value that applies to the gas... contract is the higher of the index-based value under paragraph (d) of this section or the value of that...

  3. Effects of IGFBP-2 on proliferation and differentiation in neural stem cell line C17.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Y

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Yujia Deng,1 Lei Wang,1,2 Lite Ge,1,3 Da Duan,1 Yi Zhuo,1 Ting Yuan,1 Weiping Yan,1 Peiqi Huang,1 Xiaohua Teng,1 Ming Lu1,3 1Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Hunan Normal University (163 Hospital of the People’s Liberation Army, Changsha, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Haikou Hospital, Xiangya School of Central South University, Haikou, 3Key Laboratory of Protein Chemistry and Developmental Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China Objective: Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2, a member of a highly conserved family of six insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs, can regulate several cellular processes through IGF-dependent or IGF-independent pathway. Recent studies have provided solid evidence for the importance to delineate that olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC-conditioned medium (OCM can not only facilitate the differentiation of neural stem cell line (C17.2 into neurons, but also promote the survival and proliferation. We have previously reported that IGFBP-2 was detected in OCM. This study is designed to investigate the roles of IGFBP-2 for the regulation of C17.2 differentiation and proliferation.Methods and results: IGFBP-2 was identified and upregulated in OCM to compare with astrocytes-conditioned medium by shotgun proteomics and semiquantitative proteomic analysis. In order to investigate whether exogenous IGFBP-2 could stimulate proliferation in C17.2 cells and differentiate it into glia or neuron, we used various concentrations of IGFBP-2 to induce C17.2 cells which were cultured in DMEM/F12. The results showed that exogenous IGFBP-2 can promote proliferation in C17.2 cells, but had little effect on differentiation. Interestingly, we also found that IGFBP-2 could induce C17.2 cells to differentiate into astrocytes, while inhibiting their differentiation into neurons in a dose

  4. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each person...

  5. Survey of the effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract of white Morus alba leaf on apoptosis induction in a-172 GBM cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabili, Sheyda; Fallah, Soudabeh; Aein, Mojdeh; Vatannejad, Akram; Panahi, Ghodratollah; Fadaei, Reza; Moradi, Nariman; Shojaii, Asie

    2018-02-20

    In this study, the effect of doxorubicin, flavonoid extract of white Morus alba leaf (MFE) and a combination of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on Bax and Bcl2 levels and caspase 3 activity of cancer A-172 GBM cell line was investigated. Bax/Bcl2 levels of treated A-172 GBM cell line with flavonoid extract of white mulberry leaf were estimated by ELISA methods. Caspase 3 activity of treated A-172 GBM cells was determined by calorimetric assay. The flow cytometry assessment was used to estimate the apoptosis percent of treated A-172 GBM cells. Treatment of A-172 GBM cells with MFE, doxorubicin and a combination of MFE and doxorubicin caused a significant decrease in Bcl2 level and an increase in Bax level. The apoptosis percent of treated cells were also elevated significantly. Present results suggest that concomitant use of herbal medicine and chemotherapy may be an effective alternative method for the treatment of cancers.

  6. Crash Testing and Simulation of a Cessna 172 Aircraft: Hard Landing Onto Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2016-01-01

    A full-scale crash test of a Cessna 172 aircraft was conducted at the Landing and Impact Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center during the summer of 2015. The purpose of the test was to evaluate the performance of Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELTs) that were mounted at various locations in the aircraft and to generate impact test data for model validation. A finite element model of the aircraft was developed for execution in LSDYNA to simulate the test. Measured impact conditions were 722.4-in/s forward velocity and 276-in/s vertical velocity with a 1.5deg pitch (nose up) attitude. These conditions were intended to represent a survivable hard landing. The impact surface was concrete. During the test, the nose gear tire impacted the concrete, followed closely by impact of the main gear tires. The main landing gear spread outward, as the nose gear stroked vertically. The only fuselage contact with the impact surface was a slight impact of the rearmost portion of the lower tail. Thus, capturing the behavior of the nose and main landing gear was essential to accurately predict the response. This paper describes the model development and presents test-analysis comparisons in three categories: inertial properties, time sequence of events, and acceleration and velocity time-histories.

  7. Probing the diffusion of vacuum ultraviolet ({lambda} = 172 nm) induced oxidants by nanoparticles immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatri, Om P.; Hatanaka, Takeshi; Murase, Kuniaki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Sugimura, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hiroyuki.sugimura@materials.mbox.media.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2009-09-30

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, {lambda} = 172 nm) patterning of alkyl monolayer on silicon surface has been demonstrated with emphasis on the diffusion of VUV induced oxygen-derived active species, which are accountable for the pattern broadening. The VUV photons photo-dissociates the atmospheric oxygen and water molecules into the oxygen-derived active species (oxidants). These oxidants photo-oxidize the hexadecyl (HD) monolayer in VUV irradiated regions (Khatri et al., Langmuir. 24 (2008) 12077), as well as the little concentration of oxidants diffuses towards the masked areas. In this study, we performed VUV patterning at a vacuum pressure of 10 Pa to track the diffusion pathways for the oxidants with help of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs; {phi} = 10 nm) immobilization. At VUV irradiated sites AuNPs are found as uniformly distributed, but adjacent to the pattern boundary we observed quasi-linear arrays of AuNPs, which are determined by diffusion pathways of the oxidants. The diffusion of oxidants plays vital role in pattern broadening. The site selective anchoring of AuNPs demonstrates the utility of VUV photons for the construction of functional materials with microstructural architecture.

  8. Basal Cell Epithelioma (A Clinico-pathological Study of 172 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R L Solanki

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with a clinico-pathological analysis of 172 cases of basal cell epithelioma representing 28% of the total skin cancer case. 1.44% of the total malignant tumours, 1% of the total tumours and 0.24% of the hospital admissions. M:F ratio was 1.26:1. The mean age was 54.06 years with the maximum number of cases in the fifth decade., Most (94% of the lesions were seen on the head and neck region. Histopathologically it showed solid (60.5%, adenoid cystic (15,7%, keratotic (9.3%, pigmented (6.4%, basi-squamous (3.5% and morphoea patterns (2.3%. Perineural lymphatic invasion was seen in 52% of the adenoid cystic basal call epithelioma. Amyloid (12.8% and amyloid like deposits (29.65% were seen in 42% of the case. Amyloid deposits were seen as lichen amyloidosis in 10.46% cases and in or around the tumour cell masses in 16.8% cases. It appeared as structureless homogeneous eosinophilic material and showed congophilia with apple green birefringence on polarising microscopy. It was found to be KMN04 sensitive (AA type protein- secondary amyloidosis. Amyloid like deposits appeared as less homogeneous,, basophilic, fractured material which showed non-specific congophilia with apple- green birefringence and stained with acid orcein stain indicating degenerated collagen (elastoid-degeneration.

  9. Search for a massive diphoton resonance at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 91-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    A search for the resonant production of high mass photon pairs associated with a leptonic or hadronic system has been performed using a total data sample of 25.7 pb^-1 taken at centre-of-mass energies between 130 GeV and 172 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The observed number of events is consistent with the expected number from Standard Model processes. The observed candidates are combined with search results from sqrt{s} ~ M_Z to place limits on Br(H^0 -> gamma gamma) within the Standard Model for Higgs boson masses up to 77 GeV, and on the production cross section of any scalar resonance decaying into di-photons. Upper limits on Br(H^0 -> gamma gamma) x sigma(e^+e^- -> H^0 Z^0) of 290 - 830 fb are obtained over 40 < M_H < 160 GeV. Type-I two-Higgs-doublet scalars which couple only to gauge bosons are ruled out up to a mass of 76.5 GeV at the 95% confidence level.

  10. Penanganan Teror Bom Thamrin Ditinjau Berdasarkan Skep Kapolri Nomor: 172 Tahun 2014 tentang Penanganan Tempat Kejadian Perkara (PTKP Bom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedy Tabrani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Fenomena ISIS pasca Al-Qaeda telah memberikan harapan baru dan semangat baru kelompok radikal Islam di Indonesia. Salah satu aksi terorisme yang dilakukan oleh anggota ISIS di Indonesia adalah terror Bom Thamrin pada 14 Januari 2016 dengan pola dan modus berupa bom dan penembakan. Polri sebagai leading sector penanganan terorisme, telah merumuskan beberapa peraturan mengenai penanganan terorisme, misalnya, Keputusan Kepala Kepolisian Negara Republik Indonesia Nomor: 172 Tahun 2014 tentang Penanganan Tempat Kejadian Perkara Bom (PTKP. Keputusan tersebut menjadi landasan kepolisian dalam penanganan kasus teror di lapangan. Untuk itu, penelitian ini akan mengungkap sejauh mana penanganan terror bom Thamrin ditinjau berdasarkan Skep Kapolri Nomor: 172 Tahun 2014 Tentang Penanganan Tempat Kejadian Perkara Bom (PTKP. Kata kunci: terorisme, Teror Thamrin, ISIS, Polri   ISIS phenomena after Al-Qaeda have given new hope and spirit of Islamic radicalism groups in Indonesia. One of terrorism action by ISIS members was Thamrin bombing terror on January 14, 2016 with pattern and modus of bombings and shootings. Indonesian National Police as a leading sector in handling terrorism has formulated rules regarding terrorism handling, such as the Decree of the Indonesian National Police Chief (Perkap No. 172, 2014 on the Handling of the Crime Scene (PTKP of bomb. This decree becomes the base of police on handling terror scene. Therefore, this research can reveal how far the handling of Thamrin terror bombing based on Skep No. 173, 2014. Keywords: Terrorism, Terror of Thamrin, ISIS, Indonesian National Police

  11. Histomorphological and immunohistochemical characterization of 172 cutaneous round cell tumours in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Rios Araújo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of a panel of antibodies (CD117, CD3, CD79a, CD45, cytokeratin, vimentin and E-cadherin on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of canine cutaneous round cell tumours. Neoplastic tumours were diagnosed by histology and histochemical stains and included 107 mast cell tumours, 31 cutaneous histiocytomas, two localized histiocytic sarcomas, 21 cutaneous lymphomas, three plasma cell tumours, one transmissible venereal tumour and seven unclassified round cell tumours. The histologic diagnosis was modified in 39.5% of the total 172 neoplasms. The staining for CD45 and Ecadherin were variable, and therefore, the final diagnoses of cutaneous histiocytoma and localized histiocytic sarcoma were made based on histology in association with negative results for CD3, CD79a, CD117 and cytokeratin. The cellular origin of unclassified round cell tumours was defined in all cases. Cutaneous B-cell lymphoma and plasma cell tumours were CD79a-positive and could be distinguished from each other by the morphological characteristics. Mast cell tumours and T cell lymphoma were CD117 and CD3 positive, respectively. The positive staining for vimentin and the negative staining for CD3, CD79a, CD117 and cytokeratin favoured the diagnosis of transmissible venereal tumours. Thus, the final diagnosis of cutaneous round cell tumours should be based on the interpretation of immunohistochemical results together with the cellular morphology observed by histology. Therefore, more studies to optimize the specific markers in formalin-fixed, paraffinembedded tissues (especially for histiocytes are required for definitive diagnosis of round cell tumours in dogs.

  12. The role of dysprosium on the structural and magnetic properties of (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Hamed; Ghasemi, Ali, E-mail: ali13912001@yahoo.com; Mozaffarinia, Reza; Tavoosi, Majid

    2017-02-15

    In current work, Nd2Fe14B nanoparticles was synthesized by sol-gel method. Dysprosium powders were added into Nd2Fe14B nanoparticles by mechanical alloying process in order to enhancement of coercivity. The phase analysis, structure, and magnetic properties of annealed (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanoparticles with different Dy-content (x=0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6) were investigated by employing X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques. The results showed that with an increase in Dy amounts, the coercivity of particles increased from 2.9 kOe to 13.4 kOe and then decreased to 5.6 kOe. By adding an optimum amount of Dy (x=0.4), the coercivity was significantly increased from 2.9 kOe to 13.4 kOe. The average particle size of annealed (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanoparticles was below 10 nm. Magnetization reversal studies indicate that the coercivity of milled and annealed (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanoparticles is controlled by the nucleation of reversed magnetic domains. The experimental results in the angular dependence of coercivity for (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B permanent magnets showed that the normalized coercivity of the permanent magnets H{sub c}(θ)/H{sub c}(0) increases from 1 to about 1.2–1.5 with increasing θ from 0 to about π/3, for x=0.4–0.6. - Highlights: • Dy was added to Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanoparticles to improve the coercivity. • A maximum squareness ratio of 0.99 was obtained. • The average particle size decreased with an increase in Dy-content.

  13. Carbon ion beam is more effective to induce cell death in sphere-type A172 human glioblastoma cells compared with X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Momoko; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Yajima, Hirohiko; Izumi-Nakajima, Nakako; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Fujimori, Akira

    2014-12-01

    To obtain human glioblastoma cells A172 expressing stem cell-related protein and comparison of radiosensitivity in these cells with X-rays and carbon beam. Human monolayer-type A172 glioblastoma cells were maintained in normal medium with 10% bovine serum. In order to obtain sphere-type A172 cells the medium was replaced with serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors. Both types of A172 cells were irradiated with either X-rays or carbon ion beams and their radiosensitivity was evaluated. Serum-free medium induced expression of stem cell-related proteins in A172 cells along with the neurosphere-like appearance. These sphere-type cells were found resistant to both X-rays and carbon ion beams. Phosphorylation of histone H2A family member X persisted for a longer period in the cells exposed to carbon ion beams than in those exposed to X-rays and it disappeared quicker in the sphere type than in the monolayer type. Relative radioresistance of the sphere type cells was smaller for carbon ion beams than for X-rays. We demonstrated that glioblastoma A172 cells with induced stem cell-related proteins turned resistant to irradiation. Accelerated heavy ion particles may have advantage over X-rays in overcoming the tumor resistance due to cell stemness.

  14. Low-Cost Biodegradation and Detoxification of Textile Azo Dye C.I. Reactive Blue 172 by Providencia rettgeri Strain HSL1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Lade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study focuses on exploitation of agricultural waste wheat bran (WB as growth medium for degradation of textile azo dye C.I. Reactive Blue 172 (RB 172 using a single bacterium P. rettgeri strain HSL1 (GenBank accession number JX853768.1. The bacterium was found to completely decolorize 50 mg L−1 of dye RB 172 within 20 h at 30 ± 0.2°C under microaerophilic incubation conditions. Additionally, significant reduction in COD (85% and TOC (52% contents of dye decolorized medium was observed which suggested its mineralization. Induction in the activities of azoreductase (159% and NADH-DCIP reductase (88% provided an evidence for reductive cleavage of dye RB 172. The HPLC, FTIR, and GC-MS analysis of decolorized products confirmed the degradation of dye into various metabolites. The proposed metabolic pathway for biodegradation of RB 172 has been elucidated which showed the formation of 2 intermediate metabolites, namely, 4-(ethenylsulfonyl aniline and 1-amino-1-(4-aminophenyl propan-2-one. The acute and phytotoxicity evaluation of degraded metabolites suggests that bacterial strain favors the detoxification of dye RB 172. Thus, WB could be utilized as a low-cost growth medium for the enrichment of bacteria and their further use for biodegradation of azo dyes and its derivatives containing wastes into nontoxic form.

  15. A suggested periodic table up to Z≤ 172, based on Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyykkö, Pekka

    2011-01-07

    Extended Average Level (EAL) Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions agree with earlier work in that a rough shell-filling order for the elements 119-172 is 8s Periodic Table develops further that of Fricke, Greiner and Waber [Theor. Chim. Acta 1971, 21, 235] by formally assigning the elements 121-164 to (nlj) slots on the basis of the electron configurations of their ions. Simple estimates are made for likely maximum oxidation states, i, of these elements M in their MX(i) compounds, such as i = 6 for UF(6). Particularly high i are predicted for the 6f elements.

  16. Measurement of the W mass by direct reconstruction in e+e-collisions at 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J. P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M. N.; Nief, J. Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Morawitz, P.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Casper, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J. F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Ward, J. J.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; G. Hansper, N.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Marinelli, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M. M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Coles, J.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faïf, G.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-03-01

    The mass of the W boson is obtained from reconstructed invariant mass distributions in W-pair events. The sample of W pairs is selected from 10.65 pb-1 collected with the ALEPH detector at a mean centre-of-mass energy of 172.09 GeV. The invariant mass distribution of simulated events are fitted to the experimental distributions and the following W masses are obtained:The statistical errors are the expected errors for Monte Carlo samples of the same integrated luminosity as the data. The combination of these three measurements gives:

  17. Measurement of the W mass by direct reconstruction in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Morawitz, P; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Vreeswijk, M; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Ward, J J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Coles, J; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Faïf, G; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Przysiezniak, H; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The mass of the W boson is obtained from reconstructed invariant mass distributions in W-pair events. The sample of W pairs is selected from 10.65~pb$^{-1}$ collected with the ALEPH detector at a mean centre-of-mass energy of 172.09 \\GEV. The invariant mass distribution of simulated events are fitted to the experimental distributions and the following W masses are obtained: $WW \\to q\\overline{q}q\\overline{q } m_W = 81.30 +- 0.47(stat.) +- 0.11(syst.) GeV/c^2$, $WW \\to l\

  18. Direct traumatic carotid cavernous fistula: angiographic classification and treatment strategies. Study of 172 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Cuong Tran; Nguyen, Dang; Duc, Vo Tan; Chau, Huynh Hong; Son, Vo Tan

    2014-01-01

    We report our experience in treatment of traumatic direct carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) via endovascular intervention. We hereof recommend an additional classification system for type A CCF and suggest respective treatment strategies. Only type A CCF patients (Barrow's classification) would be recruited for the study. Based on the angiographic characteristics of the CCF, we classified type A CCF into three subtypes including small size, medium size and large size fistula depending on whether there was presence of the anterior carotid artery (ACA) and/or middle carotid artery (MCA). Angiograms with opacification of both ACA and MCA were categorized as small size fistula. Angiograms with opacification of either ACA or MCA were categorized as medium size fistula and those without opacification of neither ACA nor MCA were classified as large size fiatula. After the confirm angiogram, endovascular embolization would be performed impromptu using detachable balloon, coils or both. All cases were followed up for complication and effect after the embolization. A total of 172 direct traumatic CCF patients were enrolled. The small size fistula was accountant for 12.8% (22 cases), medium size 35.5% (61 cases) and large size fistula accountant for 51.7% (89 cases). The successful rate of fistula occlusion under endovascular embolization was 94% with preservation of the carotid artery in 70%. For the treatment of each subtype, a total of 21/22 cases of the small size fistulas were successfully treated using coils alone. The other single case of small fistula was defaulted. Most of the medium and large size fistulas were cured using detachable balloons. When the fistula sealing could not be obtained using detachable balloon, coils were added to affirm the embolization of the cavernous sinus via venous access. There were about 2.9% of patient experienced direct carotid artery puncture and 0.6% puncture after carotid artery cut-down exposure. About 30% of cases experienced

  19. Different effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors nicotinamide and trichostatin A (TSA) in C17.2 neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Cheng, Hua; Wang, Kai; Wen, Tieqiao

    2012-11-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors are involved in proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, mRNA transcription, and protein expression in various cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying such functions is still not fully clear. In this study, we used C17.2 neural stem cell (NSC) line as a model to evaluate the effects of nicotinamide and trichostatin A (TSA) on cell characteristics. Results show that nicotinamide and TSA greatly inhibit cell growth, lead to cell morphology changes, and effectively induce cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analyses confirmed that nicotinamide significantly decreases the expression of bcl-2 and p38. Further insight into the molecular mechanisms shows the suppression of phosphorylation in eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) by nicotinamide, whereas, an increased expression of bcl-2 and p38 and phosphorylation of 4EBP1 by TSA. However, both nicotinamide and TSA significantly increase the expression of cytochrome c (cyt c). These results strongly suggest that bcl-2, p38, cyt c, and p-4EBP1 could suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis of C17.2 NSCs mediated by histone deacetylase inhibitors, nicotinamide and TSA, involving different molecular mechanisms.

  20. A case of functional growth hormone deficiency and early growth retardation in a child with IFT172 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Herald, Angela K; Kinning, Esther; Iida, Aritoshi; Wang, Zheng; Miyake, Noriko; Ikegawa, Shiro; McNeilly, Jane; Ahmed, S Faisal

    2015-04-01

    Ciliopathies are a group of rare conditions that present through a wide range of manifestations. Given the relative common occurrence of defects of the GH/IGF-I axis in children with short stature and growth retardation, the association between ciliopathies and these defects needs further attention. Our patient is a boy who was born at term and noted to have early growth retardation and weight gain within the first 18 months of life. Biochemical tests demonstrated low IGF-I but a normal peak GH on stimulation and an adequate increase in IGF-I on administration of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). A magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed pituitary hypoplasia and an ectopic posterior pituitary. His growth responded well to rhGH therapy. Subsequently he also developed a retinopathy of his rods and cones, metaphyseal dysplasia, and hypertension with renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy. Whole-exome sequencing demonstrated compound heterozygous mutations of IFT172, thus consistent with a ciliopathy. This is the first reported case of a child with a mutation in IFT172 who presented with growth retardation in early childhood and was initially managed as a case of functional GH deficiency that responded to rhGH therapy. This case highlights the importance of ciliary function in pituitary development and the link between early onset growth failure and ciliopathies.

  1. The decay of hot dysprosium nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atac, A.; Rekstad, J.; Guttormsen, M.; Messelt, S.; Ramsoey, T.; Thorsteinsen, T.F.; Loevhoeiden, G.; Roedland, T.

    1987-03-01

    The γ-decay following the 162,163 Dy( 3 He,αxn) reactions with E 3 He =45 MeV has been studied. Non-statistical γ-radiation with energies of E γ ≅1 MeV and ≅2 MeV is found for various residual nuclei. The properties of these γ-ray bumps depend on the number of emitted neutrons and reveal an odd-even mass dependence. New techniques to extract average neutron energies as a function of excitation energy and of the number of emitted neutrons are employed. The deduced neutron energies are consistent with Fermi-gas model predictions

  2. A 172 $\\mu$W Compressively Sampled Photoplethysmographic (PPG) Readout ASIC With Heart Rate Estimation Directly From Compressively Sampled Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamula, Venkata Rajesh; Valero-Sarmiento, Jose Manuel; Yan, Long; Bozkurt, Alper; Hoof, Chris Van; Helleputte, Nick Van; Yazicioglu, Refet Firat; Verhelst, Marian

    2017-06-01

    A compressive sampling (CS) photoplethysmographic (PPG) readout with embedded feature extraction to estimate heart rate (HR) directly from compressively sampled data is presented. It integrates a low-power analog front end together with a digital back end to perform feature extraction to estimate the average HR over a 4 s interval directly from compressively sampled PPG data. The application-specified integrated circuit (ASIC) supports uniform sampling mode (1x compression) as well as CS modes with compression ratios of 8x, 10x, and 30x. CS is performed through nonuniformly subsampling the PPG signal, while feature extraction is performed using least square spectral fitting through Lomb-Scargle periodogram. The ASIC consumes 172  μ W of power from a 1.2 V supply while reducing the relative LED driver power consumption by up to 30 times without significant loss of relevant information for accurate HR estimation.

  3. Multi-photon final states in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    The process e^+e^- -> gamma gamma (gamma) is studied using data recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 25.38 pb^{-1} taken at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV. The measured cross-sections agree well with the expectation from QED. In a combined fit using data from all centre-of-mass energies, the angular distribution is used to obtain improved limits on the cut-off parameters: Lambda_+ > 195 GeV and Lambda_- > 210 GeV (95% CL). In addition, limits on non-standard e^+e^-gamma couplings and contact interactions, as well as a 95% CL mass limit for an excited electron, M_{e^*} > 194 GeV for an e^+e^-gamma coupling kappa = 1, are determined.

  4. CtBP1/BARS Gly172 → Glu mutant structure: Impairing NAD(H)-binding and dimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardini, Marco; Valente, Carmen; Ricagno, Stefano; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela; Bolognesi, Martino

    2009-01-01

    C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs) are multi-functional proteins involved in nuclear transcriptional co-repression, Golgi membrane fission, and synaptic ribbon formation. Binding of NAD(H) to CtBPs promotes dimerization. CtBP dimers act as a scaffold for multimeric protein complex formation, thus bridging transcriptional repressors and their targets in the nucleus. Based on size-exclusion chromatography experiments and on the crystal structure of the NAD(H)-free G172E CtBP mutant, we show here that absence of NAD(H) induces flexibility/backbone conformational changes at the dimerization interface and at the CtBP interdomain region. The results presented shed first light on the correlation between NAD(H)-binding and functional CtBP dimerization.

  5. Measurement of the W-pair cross section in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Ward, J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The e+e- --> W+W- cross section is measured in a data sample collected by ALEPH at a mean centre--of--mass energy of 172.09 GEV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10.65 pb-1. Cross sections are given for the three topologies, fully leptonic, semi-leptonic and hadronic of a W-pair decay. Under the assumption that no other decay modes are present, the W-pair cross section is measured to be 11.7 +- 1.2 (stat.) +- 0.3 (syst.) pb. The existence of the triple gauge boson vertex of the Standard Model is clearly preferred by the data. The decay branching ratio of the W boson into hadrons is measured to be B(W --> hadrons) = 67.7 +- 3.1 (stat.) +- 0.7 (syst.)%, allowing a determination of the CKM matrix element |Vcs|= 0.98 +- 0.14 (stat.) +- 0.03 (syst.).

  6. characterization and weldability of plasma nitrided P/M martensitic stainless steel X 20 Cr Ni 172

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Karim, R.A.; El-demellawy, M.A; Waheed, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    stainless steels are widely used in nuclear applications, as a construction material. in these applications stainless steels suffer from corrosion degradation due severe environment and operating conditions. improving the engineering properties of such material prolong the service life time.in the present study, powder metallurgy technique namely plasma rotating electrode process (PREP) was used to produce martensitic steel DIN X 20 Cr Ni 172 with 0.5 % N. this step was followed by hot isostatic pressing process (HIP) . the effect of N on the weldability of this steel has been investigated . this included microstructure characterization, hardness evaluation and ferrite content measurements. the results showed that the presence of high nitrogen content in this steel resulted in a pore free structure with improved the hardness across the welding area. A single phase with few precipitates was detected on the grain boundaries in the heat affected zone. the results were supplemented by x-ray diffraction patterns and EDAX analysis

  7. Measurement of the W-pair cross section in e+e- collisions at 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Ward, J.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-12-01

    The e+e--->W+W- cross section is measured in a data sample collected by ALEPH at a mean centre-of-mass energy of 172.09 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10.65 pb-1. Cross sections are given for the three topologies, fully leptonic, semi-leptonic and hadronic of a W-pair decay. Under the assumption that no other decay modes are present, the W-pair cross section is measured to be 11.7+/-1.2(stat.)+/-0.3(syst.) pb. The existence of the triple gauge boson vertex of the Standard Model is clearly preferred by the data. The decay branching ratio of the W boson into hadrons is measured to be B(W-->hadrons)=67.7+/-3.1(stat.)+/-0.7(syst.) %, allowing a determination of the CKM matrix element Vcs=0.98+/-0.14(stat.)+/-0.03(syst.).

  8. Altering F-Actin Structure of C17.2 Cells using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magers, Jay; Gillette, Nathan L. D.; Rotkin, Slava V.; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Pirbhai, Massooma; Lehigh Univesity Collaboration; Susquehanna University Collaboration

    Advancements in nanotechnology have become fundamental to the delivery of drugs to treat various diseases. One such advancement is that of carbon nanotubes and their possible implications on drug delivery. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential in the biomedical field as a means to deliver materials such as drugs and genes into the human body due to their size and chemistry. However, the effects of the nanotubes on cells they interact with are still unknown. Previous studies have shown that a low dosage of SWCNTs can affect differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells. In this experiment, we investigate how the tubes affect the structure of the cells. Specifically, we determined the impact on the cell by examining the actin filament length, protrusions along the edge of the cells, and actin distribution. Presenter/Author 1.

  9. Search for anomalous four-jet events in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A study of hadronic events with high jet-multiplicity is performed using the data sample collected by the L3 experiment at LEP at $\\sqrt{s}=130-172$ GeV. The observed event rates agree with the Standard Model predictions and upper limits are set on the production cross section of pairs of heavy particles that decay hadronically.

  10. Single and multi-photon events with missing energy in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at 161 GeV < $\\sqrt{s}$ < 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for single and multi-photon events with missing energy is performed using data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 161 GeV and 172 GeV for a total of 20.9 pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The results obtained are used to derive the value for the $\

  11. Biosorption of the metal-complex dye Acid Black 172 by live and heat-treated biomass of Pseudomonas sp. strain DY1: Kinetics and sorption mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Lin-Na; Wang, Bing [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, 310058, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Li, Gang [Department of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Wenzhou Vocational College of Science and Technology, 325006 Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Wang, Sheng [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, 310058, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Crowley, David E., E-mail: crowley@ucr.edu [Department of Environmental Science, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Zhao, Yu-Hua, E-mail: yhzhao225@zju.edu.cn [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, 310058, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China)

    2012-02-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The maximum amount of Acid Black 172 sorption was about 2.98 mmol/g biomass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amine groups played a major role in the biosorption of Acid Black 172. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reasons of increased dye sorption by heat-treated biomass were proposed. - Abstract: The ability of Pseudomonas sp. strain DY1 to adsorb Acid Black 172 was studied to determine the kinetics and mechanisms involved in biosorption of the dye. Kinetic data for adsorption fit a pseudo-second-order model. Increased initial dye concentration could significantly enhance the amount of dye adsorbed by heat-treated biomass in which the maximum amount of dye adsorbed was as high as 2.98 mmol/g biomass, whereas it had no significant influence on dye sorption by live biomass. As treated temperature increased, the biomass showed gradual increase of dye sorption ability. Experiments using potentiometric titration and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that amine groups (NH{sub 2}) played a prominent role in biosorption of Acid Black 172. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated that heat treatment of the biomass increased the permeability of the cell walls and denatured the intracellular proteins. The results of biosorption experiments by different cell components confirmed that intracellular proteins contributed to the increased biosorption of Acid Black 172 by heat-treated biomass. The data suggest that biomass produced by this strain may have application for removal of metal-complex dyes from wastewater streams generated from the dye products industry.

  12. Functional regulation of Q by microRNA172 and transcriptional co-repressor TOPLESS in controlling bread wheat spikelet density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pan; Liu, Jie; Dong, Huixue; Sun, Jiaqiang

    2018-02-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) spike architecture is an important agronomic trait. The Q gene plays a key role in the domestication of bread wheat spike architecture. However, the regulatory mechanisms of Q expression and transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this study, we show that overexpression of bread wheat tae-miR172 caused a speltoid-like spike phenotype, reminiscent of that in wheat plants with the q gene. The reduction in Q transcript levels in the tae-miR172 overexpression transgenic bread wheat lines suggests that the Q expression can be suppressed by tae-miR172 in bread wheat. Indeed, our RACE analyses confirmed that the Q mRNA is targeted by tae-miR172 for cleavage. According to our analyses, the Q protein is localized in nucleus and confers transcriptional repression activity. Meanwhile, the Q protein could physically interact with the bread wheat transcriptional co-repressor TOPLESS (TaTPL). Specifically, the N-terminal ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) (LDLNVE) motif but not the C-terminal EAR (LDLDLR) motif of Q protein mediates its interaction with the CTLH motif of TaTPL. Moreover, we show that the N-terminal EAR motif of Q protein is also essentially required for the transcriptional repression activity of Q protein. Taken together, we reveal the functional regulation of Q protein by tae-miR172 and transcriptional co-repressor TaTPL in controlling the bread wheat spike architecture. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Positive transcriptional regulation of the human micro opioid receptor gene by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and increase of its DNA binding affinity based on polymorphism of G-172 -> T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Takeshi; Kaneda, Toshio; Muto, Akihiro; Yoshida, Tadashi

    2009-07-24

    Micro opioid receptor (MOR) agonists such as morphine are applied widely in clinical practice as pain therapy. The effects of morphine through MOR, such as analgesia and development of tolerance and dependence, are influenced by individual specificity. Recently, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms on the human MOR gene to investigate the factors that contribute to individual specificity. In process of single nucleotide polymorphisms analysis, we found that specific nuclear proteins bound to G(-172) --> T region in exon 1 in MOR gene, and its affinity to DNA was increased by base substitution from G(-172) to T(-172). The isolated protein was identified by mass spectrometry and was confirmed by Western blotting to be poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). The overexpressed PARP-1 bound to G(-172) --> T and enhanced the transcription of reporter vectors containing G(-172) and T(-172). Furthermore, PARP-1 inhibitor (benzamide) decreased PARP-1 binding to G(-172) --> T without affecting mRNA or protein expression level of PARP-1 and down-regulated the subsequent MOR gene expression in SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, we found that tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhanced MOR gene expression as well as increased PARP-1 binding to the G(-172) --> T region and G(-172) --> T-dependent transcription in SH-SY5Y cells. These effects were also inhibited by benzamide. In this study, our data suggest that PARP-1 positively regulates MOR gene transcription via G(-172) --> T, which might influence individual specificity in therapeutic opioid effects.

  14. Bose-Einstein Correlations in $e^{+} e^{-} \\to W^{+}W^{-}$ at 172 and 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; de Roeck, A; Dervan, P J; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Graham, K; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hargrove, C K; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hobson, P R; Hoch, M; Höcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W F; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Surrow, B; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1999-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations between like-charge pions are studied in hadronic final states produced by e+e- annihilations at center-of-mass energies of 172 and 183 GeV. Three event samples are studied, each dominated by one of the processes W+W- to qqlnu, W+W- to qqqq, or (Z/g)* to qq. After demonstrating the existence of Bose-Einstein correlations in W decays, an attempt is made to determine Bose-Einstein correlations for pions originating from the same W boson and from different W bosons, as well as for pions from (Z/g)* to qq events. The following results are obtained for the individual chaoticity parameters lambda assuming a common source radius R: lambda_same = 0.63 +- 0.19 +- 0.14, lambda_diff = 0.22 +- 0.53 +- 0.14, lambda_Z = 0.47 +- 0.11 +- 0.08, R = 0.92 +- 0.09 +- 0.09. In each case, the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. At the current level of statistical precision it is not established whether Bose-Einstein correlations, between pions from different W bosons exist or not.

  15. Di-Jet Production in Photon-Photon Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{ee}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    Di-jet production is studied in collisions of quasi-real photons radiated by the LEP beams at e+e- centre-of-mass energies 161 and 172 GeV. The jets are reconstructed using a cone jet finding algorithm. The angular distributions of direct and double-resolved processes are measured and compared to the predictions of leading order and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD. The jet energy profiles are also studied. The inclusive two-jet cross-section is measured as a function of transverse energy and rapidity and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The inclusive two-jet cross-section as a function of rapidity is compared to the prediction of the leading order Monte Carlo generators PYTHIA and PHOJET. The Monte Carlo predictions are calculated with different parametrisations of the parton distributions of the photon. The influence of the `underlying event' has been studied to reduce the model dependence of the predicted jet cross-sections from the Monte Carlo generators.

  16. Search for chargino and neutralino production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 170 and 172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davies, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    A search for charginos and neutralinos, predicted by supersymmetric theories, has been performed using a data sample of 10.3 pb^-1 at centre-of-mass energies of sqrt(s) = 170 and 172 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. No evidence for these particles has been found. The results are combined with those from previous OPAL chargino and neutralino searches at lower energies to obtain limits. Exclusion regions at 95% C.L. of parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model are determined. Within this framework, for tan(beta) >= 1.0, lower mass limits are placed on the lightest chargino and the three lightest neutralinos. The 95% C.L. lower mass limit on the lightest chargino, assuming that it is heavier than the lightest neutralino by more than 10 GeV, is 84.5 GeV for the case of a large universal scalar mass (m_0 > ~1 TeV) and 65.7 GeV for the smallest m_0 compatible with current limits on the sneutrino and slepton masses. The lower limit on the lightest neutralino mass at 95% C.L. for tan(beta) >= 1.0 is 2...

  17. Measurement of triple gauge boson couplings from $W^+ W^-$ production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    We present measurements of triple gauge boson coupling parameters using data recorded by the OPAL detector at LEP2 at a centre-of-mass energy of 172 GeV. A total of 120 W-pair candidates has been selected in the q q(bar) q q(bar), q q(bar) l nu(bar)_l, and l nu(bar)_l l(bar)' nu_l' decay channels, for an integrated luminosity of 10.4 pb^-1. We use these data to determine several different anomalous coupling parameters using the measured cross-section and the distributions of kinematic variables. We measure alpha_B-phi = 0.35 + 1.29 - 1.07 +/- 0.38, alpha_W-phi = 0.00 + 0.30 - 0.28 +/- 0.11, alpha_W = 0.18 + 0.49 - 0.47 +/- 0.23, Delta(g_1^z) = -0.03 + 0.40 -0.37 +/- 0.14, Delta(kappa_gamma^(HISZ)) = 0.03 + 0.55 - 0.51 +/- 0.20, and Delta(kappa) = 0.03 + 0.49 - 0.46 +/- 0.21. Combining the alpha_W-phi result with our previous result obtained from the 161 GeV data sample we measure alpha_W-phi = -0.08 + 0.28 - 0.25 +/- 0.10. All of these measurements are consistent with the Standard Model.

  18. Searches for charginos and neutralinos in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Marumi, M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170, and 172 GeV are analysed for signals of chargino and neutralino production. No evidence of a signal is found, although candidate events consistent with the expectations from Standard Model processes are observed. Limits at 95% C.L. on the production cross sections are derived and bounds on the parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model are set. The lower limit on the mass of the lightest chargino is 85.5 GeV/c^2 for gaugino-like charginos (mu = -500 GeV/c^2), and 85.0 GeV/c^2 for Higgsino-like charginos (M_2 = 500 GeV/c^2), for heavy sneutrinos (M(snu) > 200 GeV/c^2) and tanb = sqrt(2). The effect of light sleptons on chargino and neutralino limits is investigated. The assumptions of a universal slepton mass and a universal gaugino mass are relaxed, allowing less model-dependent limits to be obtained.

  19. Search for anomalous production of dilepton events with missing transverse momentum in $e^{+} e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    Events containing a pair of charged leptons and significant missing transverse momentum are selected from a data sample corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 20.6 pb^-1 at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV. The observed number of events, four at 161 GeV and nine at 172 GeV, is consistent with the number expected from Standard Model processes, predominantly arising from W+W- production with each W decaying leptonically. This topology is also an experimental signature for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. Further event selection criteria are described that optimise the sensitivity to particular new physics channels. No evidence for new phenomena is observed and limits on the production of scalar charged lepton pairs and other new particles are presented.

  20. Search for sleptons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV were analysed to search for sleptons, the supersymmetric partners of leptons. No evidence for the production of these particles was found. The number of candidates observed is consistent with the background expected from four-fermion processes and gammagamma-interactions. Improved mass limits at 95% C.L. are reported.

  1. Search for sleptons in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Sau, Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-02-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV were analysed to search for sleptons, the supersymmetric partners of leptons. No evidence for the production of these particles was found. The number of candidates observed is consistent with the background expected from four-fermion processes and yy-interactions. Improved mass limits at 95% C.L. are reported.

  2. Characterization of a lactose-responsive promoter of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene from Lactobacillus acidophilus 05-172.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhu; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2017-09-01

    A novel lactose-responsive promoter of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene Lba1680 of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain 05-172 isolated from a traditionally fermented dairy product koumiss was characterized. In L. acidophilus 05-172, expression of Lba1680 was induced by lactose, with lactose-induced transcription of Lba1680 being 6.1-fold higher than that induced by glucose. This is in contrast to L. acidophilus NCFM, a strain isolated from human feces, in which expression of Lba1680 and Lba1679 is induced by glucose. Both gene expression and enzyme activity assays in L. paracasei transformed with a vector containing the inducible Lba1680 promoter (PLba1680) of strain 05-172 and a heme-dependent catalase gene as reporter confirmed that PLba1680 is specifically induced by lactose. Its regulatory expression could not be repressed by glucose, and was independent of cAMP receptor protein. This lactose-responsive promoter might be used in the expression of functional genes in L. paracasei incorporated into a lactose-rich environment, such as dairy products. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Ferromagnetic ordering in ThSi{sub 2} type CeAu{sub 0.28}Ge{sub 1.72}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, C. Peter, E-mail: s-peter@northwestern.ed [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 N. Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113 (United States); Kanatzidis, Mercouri G., E-mail: m-kanatzidis@northwestern.ed [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 N. Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The compound CeAu{sub 0.28}Ge{sub 1.72} crystallizes in the ThSi{sub 2} structure type in the tetragonal space group I4{sub 1}/amd with lattice parameters a=b=4.2415(6) A c=14.640(3) A. CeAu{sub 0.28}Ge{sub 1.72} is a polar intermetallic compound having a three-dimensional Ge/Au polyanion sub-network filled with Ce atoms. The magnetic susceptibility data show Curie-Weiss law behavior above 50 K. The compound orders ferromagnetically at {approx}8 K with estimated magnetic moment of 2.48 mu{sub B}/Ce. The ferromagnetic ordering is confirmed by the heat capacity data which show a rise at {approx}8 K. The electronic specific heat coefficient (gamma) value obtained from the paramagnetic temperature range 15-25 K is {approx}124(5) mJ/ mol K{sup 2}. The entropy change due to the ferromagnetic transition is {approx}4.2 J/mol K which is appreciably reduced compared to the value of R ln(2) expected for a crystal-field-split doublet ground state and/or Kondo exchange interactions. - Graphical abstract: CeAu{sub 0.28}Ge{sub 1.72} crystallizes in the ThSi{sub 2} structure type in the tetragonal space group I4{sub 1}/amd and orders ferromagnetically at {approx}8 K.

  4. Increased oxidative stress and anaerobic energy release, but blunted Thr172-AMPKα phosphorylation, in response to sprint exercise in severe acute hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Alamo, David; Ponce-González, Jesús Gustavo; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Rodríguez-García, Lorena; Santana, Alfredo; Cusso, Maria Roser; Guerrero, Mario; Guerra, Borja; Dorado, Cecilia; Calbet, José A L

    2012-09-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major mediator of the exercise response and a molecular target to improve insulin sensitivity. To determine if the anaerobic component of the exercise response, which is exaggerated when sprint is performed in severe acute hypoxia, influences sprint exercise-elicited Thr(172)-AMPKα phosphorylation, 10 volunteers performed a single 30-s sprint (Wingate test) in normoxia and in severe acute hypoxia (inspired Po(2): 75 mmHg). Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained before and immediately after 30 and 120 min postsprint. Mean power output and O(2) consumption were 6% and 37%, respectively, lower in hypoxia than in normoxia. O(2) deficit and muscle lactate accumulation were greater in hypoxia than in normoxia. Carbonylated skeletal muscle and plasma proteins were increased after the sprint in hypoxia. Thr(172)-AMPKα phosphorylation was increased by 3.1-fold 30 min after the sprint in normoxia. This effect was prevented by hypoxia. The NAD(+)-to-NADH.H(+) ratio was reduced (by 24-fold) after the sprints, with a greater reduction in hypoxia than in normoxia (P exercise in human skeletal muscle is altered in severe acute hypoxia, which abrogated Thr(172)-AMPKα phosphorylation, likely due to lower LKB1 activation by SIRT1.

  5. Ureaplasma antigenic variation beyond MBA phase variation: DNA inversions generating chimeric structures and switching in expression of the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-02-01

    Phase variation of the major ureaplasma surface membrane protein, the multiple-banded antigen (MBA), with its counterpart, the UU376 protein, was recently discussed as a result of DNA inversion occurring at specific inverted repeats. Two similar inverted repeats to the ones within the mba locus were found in the genome of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3; one within the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172 and another in the adjacent intergenic spacer region. In this report, we demonstrate on both genomic and protein level that DNA inversion at these inverted repeats leads to alternating expression between UU172 and the neighbouring conserved hypothetical ORF UU171. Sequence analysis of this phase-variable 'UU172 element' from both U. parvum and U. urealyticum strains revealed that it is highly conserved among both species and that it also includes the orthologue of UU144. A third inverted repeat region in UU144 is proposed to serve as an additional potential inversion site from which chimeric genes can evolve. Our results indicate that site-specific recombination events in the genome of U. parvum serovar 3 are dynamic and frequent, leading to a broad spectrum of antigenic variation by which the organism may evade host immune responses. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Ureaplasma antigenic variation beyond MBA phase variation: DNA inversions generating chimeric structures and switching in expression of the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Phase variation of the major ureaplasma surface membrane protein, the multiple-banded antigen (MBA), with its counterpart, the UU376 protein, was recently discussed as a result of DNA inversion occurring at specific inverted repeats. Two similar inverted repeats to the ones within the mba locus were found in the genome of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3; one within the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172 and another in the adjacent intergenic spacer region. In this report, we demonstrate on both genomic and protein level that DNA inversion at these inverted repeats leads to alternating expression between UU172 and the neighbouring conserved hypothetical ORF UU171. Sequence analysis of this phase-variable ‘UU172 element’ from both U. parvum and U. urealyticum strains revealed that it is highly conserved among both species and that it also includes the orthologue of UU144. A third inverted repeat region in UU144 is proposed to serve as an additional potential inversion site from which chimeric genes can evolve. Our results indicate that site-specific recombination events in the genome of U. parvum serovar 3 are dynamic and frequent, leading to a broad spectrum of antigenic variation by which the organism may evade host immune responses. PMID:21255110

  7. The effect of sugar and processed food imports on the prevalence of overweight and obesity in 172 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tracy Kuo; Teymourian, Yasmin; Tursini, Maitri Shila

    2018-04-14

    Studies find that economic, political, and social globalization - as well as trade liberalization specifically - influence the prevalence of overweight and obesity in countries through increasing the availability and affordability of unhealthful food. However, what are the mechanisms that connect globalization, trade liberalization, and rising average body mass index (BMI)? We suggest that the various sub-components of globalization interact, leading individuals in countries that experience higher levels of globalization to prefer, import, and consume more imported sugar and processed food products than individuals in countries that experience lower levels of globalization. This study codes the amount of sugar and processed food imports in 172 countries from 1995 to 2010 using the United Nations Comtrade dataset. We employ country-specific fixed effects (FE) models, with robust standard errors, to examine the relationship between sugar and processed foods imports, globalization, and average BMI. To highlight further the relationship between the sugar and processed food import and average BMI, we employ a synthetic control method to calculate a counterfactual average BMI in Fiji. We find that sugar and processed food imports are part of the explanation to increasing average BMI in countries; after controlling for globalization and general imports and exports, sugar and processed food imports have a statistically and substantively significant effect in increasing average BMI. In the case of Fiji, the increased prevalence of obesity is associated with trade agreements and increased imports of sugar and processed food. The counterfactual estimates suggest that sugar and processed food imports are associated with a 0.5 increase in average BMI in Fiji.

  8. Measured performance of a 1.72 kW rooftop grid connected photovoltaic system in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayompe, L.M.; Duffy, A.; McCormack, S.J.; Conlon, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results obtained from monitoring a 1.72 kW p photovoltaic system installed on a flat roof of a 12 m high building in Dublin, Ireland (latitude 53.4 o N and longitude 6.3 o E). The system was monitored between November 2008 and October 2009 and all the electricity generated was fed into the low voltage supply to the building. Monthly average daily and annual performance parameters of the PV system evaluated include: final yield, reference yield, array yield, system losses, array capture losses, cell temperature losses, PV module efficiency, system efficiency, inverter efficiency, performance ratio and capacity factor. The maximum solar radiation, ambient temperature and PV module temperature recorded were 1241 W/m 2 in March, 29.5 o C and 46.9 o C in June respectively. The annual total energy generated was 885.1 kW h/kW p while the annual average daily final yield, reference yield and array yield were 2.41 kW h/kW p /day, 2.85 kW h/kW p /day and 2.62 kW h/kW p /day respectively. The annual average daily PV module efficiency, system efficiency and inverter efficiency were 14.9%, 12.6% and 89.2% respectively while the annual average daily performance ratio and capacity factor were 81.5% and 10.1% respectively. The annual average daily system losses, capture losses and cell temperature losses were 0.23 h/day, 0.22 h/day and 0.00 h/day respectively. Comparison of this system with other systems in different locations showed that the system had the highest annual average daily PV module efficiency, system efficiency and performance ratio of 14.9%, 12.6% and 81.5% respectively. The PV system's annual average daily final yield of 2.4 kW h/kW p /day is higher than those reported in Germany, Poland and Northern Ireland. It is comparable to results from some parts of Spain but it is lower than the reported yields in most parts of Italy and Spain. Despite low insolation levels, high average wind speeds and low ambient temperature improve Ireland

  9. $\\pi \\pi$ phase-shift analysis from an experiment $\\pi^{-}p \\rightarrow \\pi^{-} \\pi^{+} n$ at 17.2 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Grayer, G; Dietl, H; Hyams, Bernard David; Jones, C; Koch, W; Lorenz, E; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Meissburger, J; Ochs, W; Schlein, P E; Stierlin, U; Weilhammer, P

    1972-01-01

    The pi pi phase-shifts have been determined by a Chew-Low extrapolation in the pi pi mass region from 500 to 1500 MeV using data of a spark chamber experiment on pi /sup -/p to pi /sup -/ pi /sup +/n at 17.2 GeV/c, which yielded 318000 events. The authors find an I=0 s- wave phase shift which increases slowly, passing through 90 degrees near 900 MeV, and then rises very rapidly. The old 'up' solution is eliminated on the basis of fits in the mass region from 900-1000 MeV. (13 refs).

  10. Evaluation of concomitant use of non-specific immunopotentiator on 172 cases of primary lung cancer (Stage III, IV) treated with radiation combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Shuji; Imajo, Yoshinari; Hamada, Fumio; Miyaji, Chihiro

    1982-01-01

    The clinical effect of concomitant use of non-specific immunopotentiator OK-432 and/or PSK was studied about 172 cases of primary lung cancer (Stage III, IV). In 91 cases in stage III, fifty percent survival period was found to be 11.5 months for 63 cases with OK-432 and/or PSK, and 7.5 months for 28 cases without immunotherapy, respectively. In 81 cases in stage IV, fifty percent survival period was found to be 6.7 months for 45 cases with OK-432 and/or PSK, and 3.3 months for 36 cases without immunotherapy, respectively. (author)

  11. Search for anomalous production of photonic events with missing energy in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Feld, L; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J I; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rembser, C; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    Photonic events with large missing energy have been observed in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130, 136, 161 and 172 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Results are presented based on search topologies designed to select events with a single photon and missing transverse energy or events with a pair of acoplanar photons. In both search topologies, cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of the selection. These results are compared with the expectations from the Standard Model processes e+e- -> nu nu(bar) gamma (gamma) (single-photon) and e+e- -> \

  12. Observation of the scalar meson at 1260 MeV in the reaction Π-p→Π+Π-n at 17.2 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybicki, K.; Sakrejda, I.; Turnau, J.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the reaction Π - p↑→Π + Π - n at 17.2 GeV/c for |t|>0.2 GeV 2 yields relatively narrow scalar resonance well fitted by the Breit-Wigner formula. A fit to low and high |t| S-wave needs a new object which we call G (1260) with a width of (160+-10) MeV in addition to a broader Σ(1300) resonance. Unusual production properties of the former are tentatively explained in terms of a hybrid meson trajectory. An importance of the polarized target information is also discussed. (author)

  13. Neutral-Current Four-Fermion Production in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at 130 GeV $\\leq \\sqrt{s} \\leq$ 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A study of neutral-current four-fermion processes is performed, using data collected by the L3 detector at LEP during high-energy runs at centre-of-mass energies 130 - 136, 161 and 170 - 172 GeV, with integrated luminosities of 4.9, 10.7 and 10.1 pb$^{-1}$, respectively. The total cross sections for the final states $ \\ell\\ell \\ell^\\prime \\ell^\\prime $ and $\\rm \\ell\\ell qq $ ($\\ell$,~$\\ell^\\prime $ = e, $\\mu$ or $\\tau$) are measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model prediction.

  14. Measurement of hadron and lepton pair production at 161 GeV < $\\sqrt{s}$ < 172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schultze, K; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We report on measurements of $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ annihilation into hadrons and lepton pairs. The data have been taken with the L3 detector at LEP at centre--of--mass energies between 161~$\\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.12em V}$ and 172~$\\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.12em V}$. In a data sample corresponding to 21.2~pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity 2728 hadronic and 868 lepton--pair events are selected. The measured cross sections and leptonic forward--backward asymmetries agree well with the Standard Model predictions. \\end{abstract}

  15. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $161 \\leq \\sqrt{s} \\leq 172$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed with the L3 detector at LEP. The data sample was collected at three centre-of-mass energies, 161.3, 170.3 and 172.3 GeV with integrated luminosities of 10.8, 1.0 and 9.2 $pb^-1$, respectively. No Higgs signal is observed. In combination with previous data taken at the Z resonance, a lower Higgs mass limit, $M_H > 69.5$ GeV, is obtained at 95\\% confidence level.

  16. Long-lived K isomer and enhanced γ vibration in the neutron-rich nucleus 172Dy: Collectivity beyond double midshell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Watanabe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The level structure of 172Dy has been investigated for the first time by means of decay spectroscopy following in-flight fission of a 238U beam. A long-lived isomeric state with T1/2=0.71(5 s and Kπ=8− has been identified at 1278 keV, which decays to the ground-state and γ-vibrational bands through hindered electromagnetic transitions, as well as to the daughter nucleus 172Ho via allowed β decays. The robust nature of the Kπ=8− isomer and the ground-state rotational band reveals an axially-symmetric structure for this nucleus. Meanwhile, the γ-vibrational levels have been identified at unusually low excitation energy compared to the neighboring well-deformed nuclei, indicating the significance of the microscopic effect on the non-axial collectivity in this doubly mid-shell region. The underlying mechanism of enhanced γ vibration is discussed in comparison with the deformed Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation based on a Skyrme energy-density functional.

  17. Orbitally-driven evolution of Lake Turkana (Turkana Depression, Kenya, EARS) between 1.95 and 1.72 Ma: A sequence stratigraphy perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutz, Alexis; Schuster, Mathieu; Boës, Xavier; Rubino, Jean-Loup

    2017-01-01

    Lakes act as major archives for continental paleoenvironments, particularly when the evolution of lake levels over time serves as a guide for understanding regional paleohydrology and paleoclimate. In this paper, two sections from the Nachukui Formation (Turkana Depression, East African Rift System) provide a complete record of lake level variability and then paleohydrology for Lake Turkana between 1.95 and 1.72 Ma. This period corresponds to a key time during which important human evolutionary and technological innovations have occurred in East Africa and in the Turkana area. Based on sedimentary facies and sequence analyses on coastal deposits, one long-term regressive-transgressive cycle is identified between 1.95 and 1.72 Ma. Superimposed on this trend, five higher-frequency cycles of lake level change are identified between 1.87 and 1.76 Ma. Origins of these periodicities are attributed to orbital forcings. The extents of bathymetry change and shoreline migration during these periods are explored, suggesting that the period between 1.87 and 1.76 Ma was relatively dry and that climate experienced a relatively low variability. This finding differs strongly from most of the previous paleoenvironmental investigations in the region that argue high climate variability during a relatively wet period. This work emphasizes the importance of using sequence stratigraphy for analyzing lacustrine deposits.

  18. Search for Acoplanar Lepton Pair Events in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161, 172 and 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    A selection of di-lepton events with significant missing transverse momentum has been performed using a total data sample of 77.0 pb-1 at e+e- centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV, 172 GeV and 183 GeV. The observed numbers of events: four at 161 GeV, nine at 172 GeV, and 78 at 183 GeV, are consistent with the numbers expected from Standard Model processes, which arise predominantly from W+W- production with each W decaying leptonically. This topology is an experimental signature also for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. Further event selection criteria are described that optimise the sensitivity to particular new physics channels. No evidence for new phenomena is apparent and model independent limits on the production cross-section times branching ratio squared for various new physics processes are presented. Assuming a 100% branching ratio for the decay of a right-handed charged slepton to a charged lepton and the lightest neutr...

  19. Determination of Psub(K) values to the 172, 103 and 97 keV levels and the fluorescence yield. omega. sub(K) of Eu after electron capture by /sup 153/Gd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K; Grewal, B S; Sahota, H S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1985-03-01

    From an analysis of K x-ray-..gamma..-ray sum peaks observed with an intrinsic Ge detector the K-capture probabilities (Psub(K)) to the 172, 103 and 97 keV levels in the decay of /sup 153/Gd have been determined; these yield an electron-capture energy Qsub(EC)=245 +- 2. The K-capture probability to the 172 keV level differs significantly from that found in the literature. With these results the K-shell fluorescence yield of Eu is ..omega..sub(K)=0.935 +- 0.019.

  20. Search for Unstable Heavy and Excited Leptons in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 170-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    We have searched for unstable neutral and charged heavy leptons, N and L^+/-, and for excited states of neutral and charged leptons, nu*, e*, mu* and tau*, in e^+e^- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 170 and 172 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. No evidence for their existence was found. From the analysis of charged-current decays of pair-produced unstable heavy leptons, and of charged-current and photonic decays of pair-produced excited leptons, lower limits on their masses are derived. From the analysis of charged-current and photonic decays of singly-produced excited leptons, upper limits on the ratio of the coupling to the compositeness scale, f/Lambda, are determined for masses up to the kinematic limit.

  1. Search for the neutral Higgs bosons of the MSSM in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ from 130 to 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The process e+e- --> h A is used to search for the Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the bbbb and tautaubb final states. The search is performed in the data collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies between 130 and 172 GeV and with a total luminosity of 27.2 pb-1. No candidate events are found in either of the final states, in agreement with the expected background of 0.91 events from all Standard Model processes. Combined with searches for e+e- --> hZ, this results in a 95% C.L. lower limit on the masses of both h and A of 62.5 GeV/c2, for tan(beta) > 1.

  2. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=161, 170 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The reaction e+e- -> HZ is used to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The data sample consists of integrated luminosities of 10.9pb-1 1.1pb-1 and 9.5pb-1 collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP during 1996, at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172GeV, respectively. No candidate events were found, in agreement with the expected background of 0.84 events from all Standard Model processes. This search results in a 95%C.L. lower limit on the Higgs boson mass of 69.4GeV. When combined with earlier ALEPH searches performed at energies at and around the Z peak, this limit increases to 70.7GeV

  3. Searches for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J.M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I.C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J.A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A.O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D.E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S.J.; Halley, A.W.; Knowles, I.G.; Lynch, J.G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R.M.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A.M.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E.P.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lutjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Richter, Robert, 1; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, Ph.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Nikolic, Irina; Schune, M.H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Bryant, L.M.; Chambers, J.T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Wright, A.E.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C.A.J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W.M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J.M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-01-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 \\pb\\ at $\\sqrt{s} = 161 ~\\, \\rm GeV$, 1.1 \\pb\\ at 170 \\gev\\ and 9.5 \\pb\\ at 172 GeV. The \\eenunu\\ cross se ction is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 \\gevsq\\ at 95\\% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralin o ($\\tau_{\\chi_{1}^{0}} \\leq $ 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models.

  4. Search for charged Higgs bosons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies from 130 to 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Marumi, M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The data collected at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 172 GeV by ALEPH at LEP, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 27.5 pb-1, are analysed in a search for pair-produced charged Higgs bosons H+-. Three analyses are employed to select the tau nu tau nu, tau nu c s and c s c s final states. No evidence for a signal is found. Mass limits are set as a function of the branching fraction BR for H+- -> tau nu. Charged Higgs bosons with masses below 52 GeV are excluded at 95% C.L. independently of BR, thus significantly improving on existing mass limits from LEP1 searches.

  5. Missing mass spectra in hadronic events from $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=161-172 GeV and limits on invisible Higgs decays

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; Alessandro, R D; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1998-01-01

    Events characterised by large hadronic energy and transverse momentum are selected from the data collected by the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 161 and 172 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 21 $\\rm pb^{-1}$. The visible mass and the missing mass distributions of the selected events are consistent with those expected from Standard Model processes. This result is combined with that from data taken at the Z resonance to set an upper limit on the production rate and decay into invisible final states of a non-minimal Higgs boson, as a function of the Higgs mass. Assuming the non-minimal Higgs production cross section to be the same as for the Standard Model Higgs boson and the decay branching fraction into invisible final states to be 100\\%, a Higgs mass lower limit of 69.6 GeV is derived at 95\\% confidence level.

  6. QCD Studies and Determination of $\\alpha_s$ in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We present a study of the structure of hadronic events recorded by the L3 detector at LEP at the center of mass energies of 161 and 172 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 21.25 pb-1 collected during the high energy runs of 1996. The distributions of event shape variables and the energy dependence of their mean values are well reproduced by QCD models. From a comparison of the data with resummed second order QCD calculations, we determine the strong coupling constant at the two energies. Combining with our earlier measurements we find that the strong coupling constant decreases with increasing energy as expected in QCD.

  7. Search for charged Higgs bosons in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies from 130 to 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Marumi, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-02-01

    The data collected at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 172 GeV by ALEPH at LEP, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 27.5 pb-1, are analysed in a search for pair-produced charged Higgs bosons H+/-. Three analyses are employed to select the τ+νττ- ν¯τ, cs¯τ-ν¯τ and cs¯sc¯ final states. No evidence for a signal is found. Mass limits are set as a function of the branching fraction ℬ(τν) for H+/--->τν. Charged Higgs bosons with masses below 52 GeV/c2 are excluded at 95% C.L. independently of ℬ(τν), thus significantly improving on existing limits. © 1998

  8. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in e+e- collisions at sqrt(s)=161, 170 and 172GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino,, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kado, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-10-01

    The reaction e+e--->HZ is used to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The data sample consists of integrated luminosities of 10.9pb-1, 1.1pb-1, and 9.5pb-1 collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP during 1996, at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172GeV, respectively. No candidate events were found, in agreement with the expected background of 0.84 events from all Standard Model processes. This search results in a 95% C.L. lower limit on the Higgs boson mass of 69.4GeV/c2. When combined with earlier ALEPH searches performed at energies at and around the Z peak, this limit increases to 70.7GeV/c2.

  9. Search for the neutral Higgs bosons of the MSSM in e+e- collisions at sqrt(s) from 130 to 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino,, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kado, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-10-01

    The process e+e--->hA is used to search for the Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the bboverlinebboverline and τ+τ-bboverline final states. The search is performed in the data collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies between 130 and 172 GeV and with a total luminosity of 27.2 pb-1. No candidate events are found in either of the final states, in agreement with the expected background of 0.91 events from all Standard Model processes. Combined with searches for e+e--->hZ, this results in a 95% C.L. lower limit on the masses of both h and A of 62.5 GeV/c2, for tan β>1.

  10. Vortex phase diagram for extremely underdoped Bi2.2Sr1.72La0.08CaCu2O8+δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuij; Oka, Kunihiko; Mumtaz, Arif; Bando, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Vortex phase diagram for H parallel c of extremely underdoped Bi 2.2 Sr 1.72 La 0.08 CaCu 2 O 8+δ superconductor was determined from a magnetization measurement. In the magnetization curve, a second peak in the low temperature region and a sharp change in the high temperature region were observed. The second-peak field and the sharp-change field are explained based on the three-to-two dimensional crossover and the decoupling transition of the vortex lattice, respectively. For the most underdoped sample, which has the transition temperature T c =60.2 K, the anisotropy constant γ and the ab plane penetration length λ 0 have been deduced to be γ=320 and λ 0 ∼340 nm, respectively

  11. Elastic scattering of 120, 145 and 172.5 MeV α-particles by 12C, 24Mg and 27Al and optical model analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiktor, S.; Mayer-Boericke, C.; Kiss, A.; Rogge, M; Turek, P.

    1980-12-01

    The 120,145 and 172.5 MeV α-particle beams from JULIC were used to measure differential cross sections for elastic scattering on 12 C, 24 Mg and 27 Al in the angular range from about 5deg to 70deg (c.m. system). The angular distributions were analysed extensively in terms of the optical model using a variety of potential forms. Apart from the parametrized forms of potential, as Wood-Saxon (WS) or rather (WS)sup(ν) also a model independent representation of potential spline potential was employed. The analysis based on the parametrized forms of the potential made it possible to find the best fit parameter sets, which were than examined on their uniqueness and energy dependence. Emphasis was given to gaining information on the radial shape of the potential. (author)

  12. Maintenance and neuronal cell differentiation of neural stem cells C17.2 correlated to medium availability sets design criteria in microfluidic systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural stem cells (NSCs play an important role in developing potential cell-based therapeutics for neurodegenerative disease. Microfluidics has proven a powerful tool in mechanistic studies of NSC differentiation. However, NSCs are prone to differentiate when the nutrients are limited, which occurs unfavorable by fast medium consumption in miniaturized culture environment. For mechanistic studies of NSCs in microfluidics, it is vital that neuronal cell differentiation is triggered by controlled factors only. Thus, we studied the correlation between available cell medium and spontaneous neuronal cell differentiation of C17.2 NSCs in standard culture medium, and proposed the necessary microfluidic design criteria to prevent undesirable cell phenotype changes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A series of microchannels with specific geometric parameters were designed to provide different amount of medium to the cells over time. A medium factor (MF, defined as the volume of stem cell culture medium divided by total number of cells at seeding and number of hours between medium replacement successfully correlated the amount of medium available to each cell averaged over time to neuronal cell differentiation. MF smaller than 8.3×10(4 µm3/cell⋅hour produced significant neuronal cell differentiation marked by cell morphological change and significantly more cells with positive β-tubulin-III and MAP2 staining than the control. When MF was equal or greater than 8.3×10(4 µm3/cell⋅hour, minimal spontaneous neuronal cell differentiation happened relative to the control. MF had minimal relation with the average neurite length. SIGNIFICANCE: MFs can be controlled easily to maintain the stem cell status of C17.2 NSCs or to induce spontaneous neuronal cell differentiation in standard stem cell culture medium. This finding is useful in designing microfluidic culture platforms for controllable NSC maintenance and differentiation. This study also

  13. Alogliptin alleviates hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by promoting CPT1a expression via Thr172 phosphorylation of AMPKα in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, Hiroshi; Sato, Shuichi; Yazaki, Tomotaka; Mishiro, Tsuyoshi; Ishimura, Norihisa; Ishihara, Shunnji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2018-05-01

    Pioglitazone (PIO) has been reported to be effective for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alogliptin (ALO) may have efficacy against NAFLD progression in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study examined the effectiveness of ALO in a rodent model of NAFLD and diabetes mellitus. KK‑Ay mice were used to produce an NAFLD model via administration of a choline‑deficient (CD) diet. To examine the effects of alogliptin, KK‑Ay mice were provided with a CD diet with 0.03% ALO and/or 0.02% PIO orally for 8 weeks. Biochemical parameters, pathological alterations and hepatic mRNA levels associated with fatty acid metabolism were assessed. Severe hepatic steatosis was observed in KK‑Ay mice fed with a CD diet, which was alleviated by the administration of ALO and/or PIO. ALO administration increased the hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) mRNA expression level and enhanced the Thr172 phosphorylation of AMP‑activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) in the liver. PIO administration tended to decrease the hepatic fatty acid synthase mRNA expression level and increase the serum adiponectin level. Homeostasis model of assessment‑insulin resistance values tended to improve with ALO and PIO administration. ALO and PIO alleviated hepatic steatosis in KK‑Ay mice fed with a CD diet. ALO increased hepatic mRNA expression levels associated with fatty acid oxidation. In addition, the results of the present study suggested that ALO promotes CPT1a expression via Thr172 phosphorylation of AMPKα.

  14. Tg(Th-Cre)FI172Gsat (Th-Cre) defines neurons that are required for full hypercapnic and hypoxic reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jenny J; Ray, Russell S

    2017-08-15

    The catecholaminergic (CA) system has been implicated in many facets of breathing control and offers an important target to better comprehend the underlying etiologies of both developmental and adult respiratory pathophysiologies. Here, we used a noninvasive DREADD-based pharmacogenetic approach to acutely perturb Tg(Th-Cre)FI172Gsat ( Th-Cre )-defined neurons in awake and unrestrained mice in an attempt to characterize CA function in breathing. We report that clozapine-N-oxide (CNO)-DREADD-mediated inhibition of Th-Cre -defined neurons results in blunted ventilatory responses under respiratory challenge. Under a hypercapnic challenge (5% CO 2 /21% O 2 /74% N 2 ), perturbation of Th-Cre neurons results in reduced f R , [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] Under a hypoxic challenge (10% O 2 /90% N 2 ), we saw reduced f R , [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], in addition to instability in both interbreath interval and tidal volume, resulting in a Cheyne-Stokes-like respiratory pattern. These findings demonstrate the necessity of Th-Cre -defined neurons for the hypercapnic and hypoxic ventilatory responses and breathing stability during hypoxia. However, given the expanded non-CA expression domains of the Tg(Th-Cre)FI172Gsat mouse line found in the brainstem, full phenotypic effect cannot be assigned solely to CA neurons. Nonetheless, this work identifies a key respiratory population that may lead to further insights into the circuitry that maintains respiratory stability in the face of homeostatic challenges. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of phosphors based on calcium and magnesium silicates doped with europium and dysprosium; Síntese e caracterização de fósforos a base de silicatos de cálcio e magnésio dopados com európio e disprósio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misso, Agatha Matos

    2016-07-01

    Ca and Mg silicates based phosphors were prepared by sol-gel method combined with the molten salts process. The gel of silica was obtained from Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} solution by using europium, dysprosium, calcium and magnesium chloride solutions. Therefore, those chlorides were homogeneously dispersed into the gel. The obtained gel was dried and heat treated to 900° C for 1h to allow the fusion of the present salts. Then it was water washed until negative test for Cl{sup -}, and dried. The reduction of the europium to Eu{sup 2+} was performed under atmosphere of 5% of H{sub 2} and 95% of Ar to 900° C for 3h, to reach CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Eu{sup 2+} and CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Eu{sup 2+}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors. Diopside was identified as main crystalline phase and quartz, as secondary phase from XRD (X-ray diffraction) patterns. SEM (scanning electron microscopy) micrographs, of the samples showed needles, spheres, leaves and rods of particles and agglomerates. Thermal analysis (TGA-DTGA) curves revealed that the crystallization temperature of CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Eu{sup 2+} lies around 765° C. Photoluminescence spectroscopy of the phosphors was studied based on interconfigurational 4f{sup N} → 4f{sup N-1} 5d transition of Eu{sup 2+} ion. The spectra of excitation showed 4f{sup N} → 4f{sup N-1} 5d transition of Eu{sup 2+} ion broad band, related to the ligand to metal charge transfer transition (LMCT) O{sup 2-} (2p) → Eu{sup 3+} in the 250 nm region, when the emission is monitored at 583,5 nm. It also presents the 4f ↔ 4f transitions of Eu{sup 3+} ion bands, showing the {sup 7}F{sub 0} → {sup 5}L{sub 6} transition at 393 nm. From emission spectra with excitation monitored at 393 nm, it can be observed fine peaks between 570 and 750 nm which are characteristics of {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub J} (J = 0 - 5) transition of Eu{sup 3+} ion, indicating that the Eu{sup 3+} ion occupies a site with center of inversion. Finally, the obtained results indicate

  16. Photodissociation spectroscopy of the dysprosium monochloride molecular ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.dunning@gmail.com; Schowalter, Steven J.; Puri, Prateek; Hudson, Eric R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    We have performed a combined experimental and theoretical study of the photodissociation cross section of the molecular ion DyCl{sup +}. The photodissociation cross section for the photon energy range 35 500 cm{sup −1} to 47 500 cm{sup −1} is measured using an integrated ion trap and time-of-flight mass spectrometer; we observe a broad, asymmetric profile that is peaked near 43 000 cm{sup −1}. The theoretical cross section is determined from electronic potentials and transition dipole moments calculated using the relativistic configuration-interaction valence-bond and coupled-cluster methods. The electronic structure of DyCl{sup +} is extremely complex due to the presence of multiple open electronic shells, including the 4f{sup 10} configuration. The molecule has nine attractive potentials with ionically bonded electrons and 99 repulsive potentials dissociating to a ground state Dy{sup +} ion and Cl atom. We explain the lack of symmetry in the cross section as due to multiple contributions from one-electron-dominated transitions between the vibrational ground state and several resolved repulsive excited states.

  17. Influence of dysprosium addition on the structural, morphological ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave absorption properties of hexaferrite (70 wt%)–acrylic resin. (30 wt%) composites ... the RE ions were substituted for Sr (Ba) or Fe, taking into accounts the .... general the RE substitutions weaken the super exchange interactions ...

  18. Single molecule magnet behaviour in robust dysprosium-biradical complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernot, Kevin; Pointillart, Fabrice; Rosa, Patrick; Etienne, Mael; Sessoli, Roberta; Gatteschi, Dante

    2010-09-21

    A Dy-biradical complex was synthesized and characterized down to very low temperature. ac magnetic measurements reveal single molecule magnet behaviour visible without any application of dc field. The transition to the quantum tunneling regime is evidenced. Photophysical and EPR measurements provide evidence of the excellent stability of these complexes in solution.

  19. Scissors Mode of Dipolar Quantum Droplets of Dysprosium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Wenzel, Matthias; Böttcher, Fabian; Langen, Tim; Isoard, Mathieu; Stringari, Sandro; Pfau, Tilman

    2018-04-01

    We report on the observation of the scissors mode of a single dipolar quantum droplet. The existence of this mode is due to the breaking of the rotational symmetry by the dipole-dipole interaction, which is fixed along an external homogeneous magnetic field. By modulating the orientation of this magnetic field, we introduce a new spectroscopic technique for studying dipolar quantum droplets. This provides a precise probe for interactions in the system, allowing us to extract a background scattering length for 164Dy of 69 (4 )a0 . Our results establish an analogy between quantum droplets and atomic nuclei, where the existence of the scissors mode is also only due to internal interactions. They further open the possibility to explore physics beyond the available theoretical models for strongly dipolar quantum gases.

  20. Calorimetric investigation of an yttrium-dysprosium spin glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenger, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to compare the spin glass characteristics of yttrium--rare earth alloys with those of the noble-metal spin glasses, the susceptibility and heat capacity of Y/sub 0.98/Dy/sub 0.02/ have been measured in the temperature range 2.5--40 K. The low-field ac susceptibility measurement shows the characteristic cusp-like peak at 7.64 K. The magnetic specific heat of the same sample shows a peak at 7.0 K and may be qualitatively described as a semi-cusp. The magnetic entropy change from absolute zero to 7 K is approximately 0.52 of cR ln(2J+1). These results are qualitatively different than previous calorimetric results on the archetypal spin glasses, AuFe and CuMn, where rounded maxima are observed at temperatures above the spin glass transition temperatures

  1. Emission spectra of yttrium vanadate doped with bismuth and dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawar, B.V.; Patil, R.N.

    1975-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra of YVO 4 :Bi and YVO 4 :Bi:Dy phosphors under X-rays and ultra-violet radiation have been studied. The observations on the phosphors with constant Bi 3+ and varying Dy 3+ concentration can be attributed to radiationless transfer of energy from Bi 3+ to Dy 3+ coupled with non-radiative losses due to self-quenching at higher level of Dy 3+ concentration. While the observations on the phosphors with constant Dy 3+ and varying Bi 3+ concentration indicate that there is radiationless transfer from Bi 3+ to Dy 3+ under X-ray or UV irradiation. (author)

  2. Dysprosium-free melt-spun permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D N; Wu, Z; He, F; Miller, D J; Herchenroeder, J W

    2014-01-01

    Melt-spun NdFeB powders can be formed into a number of different types of permanent magnet for a variety of applications in electronics, automotive and clean technology industries. The melt-spinning process produces flake powder with a fine uniform array of nanoscale Nd 2 Fe 14 B grains. These powders can be net-shape formed into isotropic polymer-bonded magnets or hot formed into fully dense magnets. This paper discusses the influence of heavy rare earth elements and microstructure on the magnetic performance, thermal stability and material cost of NdFeB magnets. Evidence indicates that melt-spun nanocrystalline NdFeB magnets are less dependent on heavy rare earth elements for high-temperature performance than the alternative coarser-grained sintered NdFeB magnets. In particular, hot-pressed melt-spun magnets are an attractive low-cost solution for applications that require thermal stability up to 175–200 °C. (paper)

  3. Dysprosium-free melt-spun permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D N; Wu, Z; He, F; Miller, D J; Herchenroeder, J W

    2014-02-12

    Melt-spun NdFeB powders can be formed into a number of different types of permanent magnet for a variety of applications in electronics, automotive and clean technology industries. The melt-spinning process produces flake powder with a fine uniform array of nanoscale Nd2Fe14B grains. These powders can be net-shape formed into isotropic polymer-bonded magnets or hot formed into fully dense magnets. This paper discusses the influence of heavy rare earth elements and microstructure on the magnetic performance, thermal stability and material cost of NdFeB magnets. Evidence indicates that melt-spun nanocrystalline NdFeB magnets are less dependent on heavy rare earth elements for high-temperature performance than the alternative coarser-grained sintered NdFeB magnets. In particular, hot-pressed melt-spun magnets are an attractive low-cost solution for applications that require thermal stability up to 175-200 °C.

  4. Crystal and molecular structure of dysprosium (3) n-aminobenzoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khiyalov, M.S.; Amiraslanov, I.R.; Mamedov, Kh.S.; Movsumov, Eh.M.

    1981-01-01

    The X ray diffraction investigation of the Dy(NH 2 C 6 H 4 COO) 3 x3H 2 O complex is carried out. Triclinic crystals have lattice parameters α=11.095(15), b=9.099(17), c=12.780 (15)A, α=108.051(12), β=89.072(10); γ=104.954(12) 0 , space group P anti 1, Z=2. The structure consists of dimer molecules. The third water molecule in the formula is an outer spherical one. The average lengths of Dy-O and Dy-OH 2 are 2.39 and 2.40 A respectively, the average value of Dy-O in bridge carboxylates (2.26A) is remarkably shorter. Hydrogen bonds between amine ligand ends, carboxylic groups oxygen and water molecules bind complex molecules into the three-dimensional frame [ru

  5. Microscopic study of neutron-rich dysprosium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Velazquez, Victor; Lerma, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic studies in heavy nuclei are very scarce due to large valence spaces involved. This computational problem can be avoided by means of the use of symmetry-based models. Ground-state, γ and β bands, and their B(E2) transition strengths in 160-168 Dy isotopes, are studied in the framework of the pseudo-SU(3) model which includes the preserving symmetry Q . Q term and the symmetry-breaking Nilsson and pairing terms, systematically parametrized. Additionally, three rotor-like terms are considered, whose free parameters, fixed for all members of the chain, are used to fine tune the moment of inertia of rotational bands and the band head of γ and β bands. The model succesfully describes in a systematic way rotational features in these nuclei and allows to extrapolate toward the midshell nucleus 170 Dy. The results presented show that it is possible to study a full chain of isotopes or isotones in the region with the present model. (orig.)

  6. Microscopic study of neutron-rich dysprosium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Carlos E. [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Xalapa (Mexico); Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, Apartado Postal 70-542, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Velazquez, Victor [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, Apartado Postal 70-542, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Lerma, Sergio [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Xalapa (Mexico)

    2013-01-15

    Microscopic studies in heavy nuclei are very scarce due to large valence spaces involved. This computational problem can be avoided by means of the use of symmetry-based models. Ground-state, {gamma} and {beta} bands, and their B(E2) transition strengths in {sup 160-168}Dy isotopes, are studied in the framework of the pseudo-SU(3) model which includes the preserving symmetry Q . Q term and the symmetry-breaking Nilsson and pairing terms, systematically parametrized. Additionally, three rotor-like terms are considered, whose free parameters, fixed for all members of the chain, are used to fine tune the moment of inertia of rotational bands and the band head of {gamma} and {beta} bands. The model succesfully describes in a systematic way rotational features in these nuclei and allows to extrapolate toward the midshell nucleus {sup 170}Dy. The results presented show that it is possible to study a full chain of isotopes or isotones in the region with the present model. (orig.)

  7. Structural and magnetic study of dysprosium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Hemaunt, E-mail: hvatsal@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Srivastava, R.C. [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Pal Singh, Jitendra [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Negi, P. [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Agrawal, H.M. [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Das, D. [UGC-DAE CSR Kolkata Centre, Kolkata 700098 (India); Hwa Chae, Keun [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the magnetic behavior of Dy{sup 3+} substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction studies reveal presence of cubic spinel phases in these nanoparticles. Raman spectra of these nanoparticles show change in intensity of Raman bands, which reflects cation redistribution in cubic spinel lattice. Saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease with increase of Dy{sup 3+}concentration in these nanoparticles. Room temperature Mössbauer measurements show the cation redistribution in these nanoparticles and corroborates the results obtained from Raman Spectroscopic measurements. Decrease in magnetization of Dy{sup 3+} substituted cobalt ferrite is attributed to the reduction in the magnetic interaction and cation redistribution. - Highlights: • Slight decrease in crystallite size after Dy{sup 3+} doping. • Saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease after Dy{sup 3+} doping. • Mössbauer measurements show the cation redistribution in the samples.

  8. Dysprosium Acetylacetonato Single-Molecule Magnet Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Nakanishi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dy single-molecule magnets (SMMs, which have several potential uses in a variety of applications, such as quantum computing, were encapsulated in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by using a capillary method. Encapsulation was confirmed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In alternating current magnetic measurements, the magnetic susceptibilities of the Dy acetylacetonato complexes showed clear frequency dependence even inside the MWCNTs, meaning that this hybrid can be used as magnetic materials in devices.

  9. Measurement of the W-pair cross-section and of the W mass in e+ e- interactions at 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abreu, P.; et al.

    From a data sample of 9.98 pb-1 integrated luminosity, collected by DELPHI at a centre-of-mass energy of 172 GeV, 118 events were selected as W-pair candidates. From these, the branching fraction Br(W ->q ) was measured to be 0.660+0.036-0.037 ( {stat.}) +/- 0.009 ( {syst.}) and the cross-section for the doubly resonant process hrm e+ e- -> W+ W- to be 11.58+1.44-1.35 ( {stat.}) +/- 0.32 ( {syst.}) pb. The mass of the W boson, obtained from direct reconstruction of the invariant mass of the fermion pairs in the decays { WW -> lν q {q}} and { WW -> q {q}q {q}}, was determined to be mW = \\: 80.22 \\: +/- \\: 0.41 ( {stat.}) \\: +/- 0.04 ( {syst.}) \\: m 0.05 ( {int.}) \\: +/- 0.03 ( {LEP})\\: {GeV}/c2, where ``int.'' denotes the uncertainty from interconnection effects like colour reconnection and Bose-Einstein interference. Combined with the W mass obtained from the cross-sections measured by DELPHI at threshold, a value of mW = \\: 80.33 \\: +/- \\: 0.30 ( {stat.}) \\: +/- 0.05 ({syst.}) \\: +/- \\: 0.03 ( {int.}) \\: +/- \\: 0.03 ( {LEP}) \\: {GeV}/c2 was found.

  10. Depletion of intracellular calcium stores facilitates the influx of extracellular calcium in platelet derived growth factor stimulated A172 glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereb, G; Szöllösi, J; Mátyus, L; Balázs, M; Hyun, W C; Feuerstein, B G

    1996-05-01

    Calcium signaling in non-excitable cells is the consequence of calcium release from intracellular stores, at times followed by entry of extracellular calcium through the plasma membrane. To study whether entry of calcium depends upon the level of saturation of intracellular stores, we measured calcium channel opening in the plasma membrane of single confluent A172 glioblastoma cells stimulated with platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and/or bradykinin (BK). We monitored the entry of extracellular calcium by measuring manganese quenching of Indo-1 fluorescence. PDGF raised intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) after a dose-dependent delay (tdel) and then opened calcium channels after a dose-independent delay (tch). At higher doses (> 3 nM), BK increased [Ca2+]i after a tdel approximately 0 s, and tch decreased inversely with both dose and peak [Ca2+]i. Experiments with thapsigargin (TG), BK, and PDGF indicated that BK and PDGF share intracellular Ca2+ pools that are sensitive to TG. When these stores were depleted by treatment with BK and intracellular BAPTA, tdel did not change, but tch fell to almost 0 s in PDGF stimulated cells, indicating that depletion of calcium stores affects calcium channel opening in the plasma membrane. Our data support the capacitative model for calcium channel opening and the steady-state model describing quantal Ca2+ release from intracellular stores.

  11. Theoretical study of hyperfine interactions and optically detected magnetic resonance spectra by simulation of the C291[NV]-H172 diamond cluster hosting nitrogen-vacancy center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizovtsev, A P; Ya Kilin, S; Pushkarchuk, A L; Pushkarchuk, V A; Jelezko, F

    2014-01-01

    Single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond coupled to neighboring nuclear spins are promising candidates for room-temperature applications in quantum information processing, quantum sensing and metrology. Here we report on a systematic density functional theory simulation of hyperfine coupling of the electronic spin of the NV center to individual 13 C nuclear spins arbitrarily disposed in the H-terminated C 291 [NV] - H 172 cluster hosting the NV center. For the ‘families’ of equivalent positions of the 13 C atom in diamond lattices around the NV center we calculated hyperfine characteristics. For the first time the data are given for a system where the 13 C atom is located on the NV center symmetry axis. Electron paramagnetic resonance transitions in the coupled electron–nuclear spin system 14 NV- 13 C are analyzed as a function of the external magnetic field. Previously reported experimental data from Dréau et al (2012 Phys. Rev. B 85 134107) are described using simulated hyperfine coupling parameters. (paper)

  12. Measurement of the w boson mass and $w^{+} w^{-}$ production and decay properties in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at s**(1/2) = 172-GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davies, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the measurement of the W boson mass, M_W, and decay width, Gamma_W, from the direct reconstruction of the invariant mass of its decay products in W pair events collected at a mean centre-of-mass energy of sqrt{s} = 172.12 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. Measurements of the W pair production cross-section, the W decay branching fractions and properties of the W decay final states are also described. A total of 120 candidate W^+W^- events has been selected for an integrated luminosity of 10.36 pb^-1. The W^+W^- production cross-section is measured to be sigma_WW = 12.3 +/- 1.3(stat.) +/- 0.3(syst.) pb, consistent with the Standard Model expectation. The W^+W^- -> qq(bar) l nu and W^+W^- -> qq(bar)qq(bar) final states are used to obtain a direct measurement of Gamma_W = 1.30^{+0.62}_{-0.55}(stat.) +/- 0.18(syst.) GeV. Assuming the Standard Model relation between M_W and Gamma_W, the W boson mass is measured to be M_W = 80.32 +/- 0.30(stat.) +/- 0.09(syst.) GeV. The event properties of the...

  13. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using data from e^+e^- collisions collected at center-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172 GeV by the OPAL detector at LEP. The data collected at these energies correspond to integrated luminosities of 10.0, 1.0 and 9.4 pb^-1, respectively. The search is sensitive to the main final states from the process in which the Higgs boson is produced in association with a fermion anti-fermion pair, namely four jets, two jets with missing energy, and two jets produced together with a pair of electron, muon or tau leptons. One candidate event is observed, in agreement with the Standard Model background expectation. In combination with previous OPAL searches at center-of-mass energies close to the Z^0 resonance and the revised previous OPAL searches at 161 GeV, we derive a lower limit of 69.4 GeV for the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% confidence level.

  14. Tests of the Standard Model and Constraints on New Physics from Measurements of Fermion-pair Production at 130-172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davies, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    Production of events with hadronic and leptonic final states has been measured in e^+e^- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV, using the OPAL detector at LEP. Cross-sections and leptonic forward-backward asymmetries are presented, both including and excluding the dominant production of radiative Z \\gamma events, and compared to Standard Model expectations. The ratio R_b of the cross-section for bb(bar) production to the hadronic cross-section has been measured. In a model-independent fit to the Z lineshape, the data have been used to obtain an improved precision on the measurement of \\gamma-Z interference. The energy dependence of \\alpha_em has been investigated. The measurements have also been used to obtain limits on extensions of the Standard Model described by effective four-fermion contact interactions, to search for t-channel contributions from new massive particles and to place limits on chargino pair production with subsequent decay of the chargino into a light gluino and a quark pair.

  15. Measurement of W-pair cross sections in $e^+ e^-$ interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV and W decay branching fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We report on the measurement of W-boson pair-production with the L3 detector at LEP at an average centre-of-mass energy of 172.13~GeV. In a data sample corresponding to a total luminosity of 10.25~pb$^{-1}$ we select 110 four-fermion events with pairs of hadronic jets or leptons with high invariant masses. Branching fractions of W decays into different fermion-antifermion pairs are determined with and without the assumption of charged-current lepton universality. The branching fraction for hadronic W decays is measured to be: $ B(\\mathrm{W\\rightarrow hadrons}) = 64.2^{+3.7}_{-3.8}~(stat.) \\pm 0.5~(syst.)~\\%$. Combining all final states the total cross section for W-pair production is measured to be: $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{WW}} = 12.27^{+1.41}_{-1.32}~(stat.)\\pm0.23~(syst.)$~pb. The results are in good agreement with the Standard Model.

  16. Search for heavy neutral and charged leptons in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for unstable neutral and charged heavy leptons as well as for stable charged heavy leptons has been made at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV with the L3 detector at LEP. No evidence for their existence was found. We exclude unstable neutral leptons of Dirac (Majorana) type for masses below 78.0 (66.7), 78.0 (66.7) and 72.2 (58.2) GeV, if the heavy neutrino couples to the electron, muon or tau family, respectively. We exclude unstable charged heavy leptons for masses below 81.0 GeV for a wide mass range of the associated neutral heavy lepton. The production of stable charged heavy leptons with a mass less than 84.2 GeV is also excluded. If the unstable charged heavy lepton decays via mixing into a massless neutrino, we exclude masses below 78.7 GeV.

  17. Search for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at sqrt(s)=161 GeV and 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-02-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 pb-1 at sqrt(s)=161 GeV, 1.1 pb-1 at 170 GeV and 9.5 pb-1 at 172 GeV. The e+e--->νν¯γ(γ) cross section is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 GeV/c2 at 95% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralino (τχ10<= 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models. © 1998

  18. Search for Stable Heavy Charged Particles in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-136, 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djama, F; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chernyaev, E; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    A search for stable or long-lived heavy charged particles in $e^+e^-$ interactions at energies of 130-136, 161 and 172 GeV has been performed using the data taken by the DELPHI experiment at LEP. The search is based on particle identification provided by the Time Projection Chamber and the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. Upper limits at 95\\% confidence level are derived on the cross-section for heavy long-lived pair-produced charge $\\pm e$ and $\\pm 2/3e$ particles in the range of 0.4-2.3 pb for masses from 45 to 84 GeV/$c^2$. Within supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, long-lived charginos with masses from 45 to 84 (80)~GeV/$c^2$ for high (low) sneutrino masses can be excluded at 95\\% confidence level. %Mass limits for long-lived sleptons are obtained. %For selectrons no general mass limits can be given. Left-handed (right-handed) long-lived or stable smuons and staus with masses between 45 and 68 (65)~GeV/$c^2$ can be excluded at 95\\% confidence level.

  19. Evolution of E 2 transition strength in deformed hafnium isotopes from new measurements on 172Hf,174Hf, and 176Hf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudigier, M.; Nomura, K.; Dannhoff, M.; Gerst, R.-B.; Jolie, J.; Saed-Samii, N.; Stegemann, S.; Régis, J.-M.; Robledo, L. M.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Blazhev, A.; Fransen, Ch.; Warr, N.; Zell, K. O.

    2015-04-01

    Background: The available data for E 2 transition strengths in the region between neutron-deficient hafnium and platinum isotopes are far from complete. More and precise data are needed to enhance the picture of structure evolution in this region and to test state-of-the-art nuclear models. In a simple model, the maximum collectivity is expected at the middle of the major shell. However, for actual nuclei, particularly in heavy-mass regions, which should be highly complex, this picture may no longer be the case, and one should use a more realistic nuclear-structure model. We address this point by studying the spectroscopy of Hf as a representative case. Purpose: We remeasure the 21+ half-lives of 172,174,176Hf, for which there is some disagreement in the literature. The main goal is to measure, for the first time, the half-lives of higher-lying states of the rotational band. The new results are compared to a theoretical calculation for absolute transition strengths. Method: The half-lives were measured using γ -γ and conversion-electron-γ delayed coincidences with the fast timing method. For the determination of half-lives in the picosecond region, the generalized centroid difference method was applied. For the theoretical calculation of the spectroscopic properties, the interacting boson model is employed, whose Hamiltonian is determined based on microscopic energy-density functional calculations. Results: The measured 21+ half-lives disagree with results from earlier γ -γ fast timing measurements, but are in agreement with data from Coulomb excitation experiments and other methods. Half-lives of the 41+ and 61+ states were measured, as well as a lower limit for the 81+ states. Conclusions: This work shows the importance of a mass-dependent effective boson charge in the interacting boson model for the description of E 2 transition rates in chains of nuclei. It encourages further studies of the microscopic origin of this mass dependence. New experimental

  20. MicroRNA profiling of tomato leaf curl new delhi virus (tolcndv infected tomato leaves indicates that deregulation of mir159/319 and mir172 might be linked with leaf curl disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haq Qazi MR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tomato leaf curl virus (ToLCV, a constituent of the genus Begomovirus, infects tomato and other plants with a hallmark disease symptom of upward leaf curling. Since microRNAs (miRs are known to control plants developmental processes, we evaluated the roles of miRNAs in Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV induced leaf curling. Results Microarray analyses of miRNAs, isolated from the leaves of both healthy and ToLCNDV agroinfected tomato cv Pusa Ruby, revealed that ToLCNDV infection significantly deregulated various miRNAs representing ~13 different conserved families (e.g., miR319, miR172, etc.. The precursors of these miRNAs showed similar deregulated patterns, indicating that the transcription regulation of respective miRNA genes was perhaps the cause of deregulation. The expression levels of the miRNA-targeted genes were antagonistic with respect to the amount of corresponding miRNA. Such deregulation was tissue-specific in nature as no analogous misexpression was found in flowers. The accumulation of miR159/319 and miR172 was observed to increase with the days post inoculation (dpi of ToLCNDV agroinfection in tomato cv Pusa Ruby. Similarly, these miRs were also induced in ToLCNDV agroinfected tomato cv JK Asha and chilli plants, both exhibiting leaf curl symptoms. Our results indicate that miR159/319 and miR172 might be associated with leaf curl symptoms. This report raises the possibility of using miRNA(s as potential signature molecules for ToLCNDV infection. Conclusions The expression of several host miRNAs is affected in response to viral infection. The levels of the corresponding pre-miRs and the predicted targets were also deregulated. This change in miRNA expression levels was specific to leaf tissues and observed to be associated with disease progression. Thus, certain host miRs are likely indicator of viral infection and could be potentially employed to develop viral resistance strategies.

  1. The Extracellular Environment's Effect on Cellular Processes: An In Vitro Study of Mechanical and Chemical Cues on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and C17.2 Neural Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Meghan E.

    Stem cells are widely used in the area of tissue engineering. The ability of cells to interact with materials on the nano- and micro- level is important in the success of the biomaterial. It is well-known that cells respond to their micro- and nano-environments through a process termed chemo-mechanotransduction. It is important to establish standard protocols for cellular experiments, as chemical modifications to maintenance environments can alter long-term research results. In this work, the effects of different media compositions on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) throughout normal in vitro maintenance are investigated. Changes in RNA regulation, protein expression and proliferation are studied via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), immunocytochemistry (ICC) and cell counts, respectively. Morphological differences are also observed throughout the experiment. Results of this study illustrate the dynamic response of hMSC maintenance to differences in growth medium and passage number. These experiments highlight the effect growth medium has on in vitro experiments and the need of consistent protocols in hMSC research. A substantial opportunity exists in neuronal research to develop a material platform that allows for both the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells into neurons and the ability to quantify the secretome of neuronal cells. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes are fabricated in a two-step anodization procedure where voltage is varied to control the pore size and morphology of the membranes. C17.2 neural stem cells are differentiated on the membranes via serum-withdrawal. Cellular growth is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ICC and qPCR. ImageJ software is used to obtain phenotypic cell counts and neurite outgrowth lengths. Results indicate a highly tunable correlation between AAO nanopore sizes and differentiated cell populations. By selecting AAO membranes with specific pore size ranges, control of neuronal

  2. Search for Supersymmetry with a dominant R-Parity violating $LQ\\overline{D}$ Coupling in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV to 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Perrodo, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Morawitz, P.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I.C.; Pascual, A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Tournefier, E.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D.E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Ward, J.J.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Marinelli, N.; Martin, E.B.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, A.N.; Williams, M.I.; van Gemmeren, P.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Krocker, M.; Nurnberger, H.A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Chambers, J.T.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Wright, A.E.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faif, G.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Prange, G.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A.; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1999-01-01

    A search for pair-production of supersymmetric particles under the assumption that R-parity is violated via a dominant LQDbar coupling has been performed using the data collected by ALEPH at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV. The observed candidate events in the data are in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. This result is translated into lower limits on the masses of charginos, neutralinos, sleptons, sneutrinos and squarks. For instance, for m_0=500 GeV/c^2 and tan(beta)=sqrt(2) charginos with masses smaller than 81 GeV/c^2 and neutralinos with masses smaller than 29 GeV/c^2 are excluded at the 95% confidence level for any generation structure of the LQDbar coupling.

  3. Search for supersymmetry with a dominant R-parity violating $LL\\overline{E}$ coupling in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV to 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miguel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Morawitz, P.; Park, I.C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J.A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Casper, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Leahraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D.E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S.J.; Halley, A.W.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Thomson, F.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buek, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Whelan, E.P.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lutjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Richter, Robert, 1; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M.M.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Schune, M.H.; Serin, L.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Bryant, L.M.; Chambers, J.T.; Coles, J.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Wright, A.E.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faif, G.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Brew, C.A.J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.S.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J.M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-01-01

    A search for pair-production of supersymmetric particles under the assumption that R-parity is violated via a dominant LLE coupling has been performed using the data collected by ALEPH at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV. The observed candidate events in the data are in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. This is translated into lower limits on the mass of charginos, neutralinos, sleptons, sneutrinos and squarks. For instance, charginos with masses less than 73 GeV and neutralinos with masses less than 23 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for any generation structure of the LLE coupling, and for neutralino, slepton or sneutrino LSPs.

  4. Low-dose/dose-rate γ radiation depresses neural differentiation and alters protein expression profiles in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and C17.2 neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajinskis, Ainars; Lindegren, Heléne; Johansson, Lotta; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Forsby, Anna

    2011-02-01

    The effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on cellular development in the nervous system are presently unclear. The focus of the present study was to examine low-dose γ-radiation-induced effects on the differentiation of neuronal cells and on the development of neural stem cells to glial cells. Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to (137)Cs γ rays at different stages of retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation, and neurite formation was determined 6 days after exposure. When SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to low-dose-rate γ rays at the onset of differentiation, the number of neurites formed per cell was significantly less after exposure to either 10, 30 or 100 mGy compared to control cells. Exposure to 10 and 30 mGy attenuated differentiation of immature C17.2 mouse-derived neural stem cells to glial cells, as verified by the diminished expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein. Proteomic analysis of the neuroblastoma cells by 2D-PAGE after 30 mGy irradiation showed that proteins involved in neuronal development were downregulated. Proteins involved in cell cycle and proliferation were altered in both cell lines after exposure to 30 mGy; however, the rate of cell proliferation was not affected in the low-dose range. The radiation-induced attenuation of differentiation and the persistent changes in protein expression is indicative of an epigenetic rather than a cytotoxic mechanism.

  5. Cloning, expression and characterisation of P450-Hal1 (CYP116B62) from Halomonas sp. NCIMB 172: A self-sufficient P450 with high expression and diverse substrate scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Joanne L; Sabatini, Selina; Manning, Jack; Tavanti, Michele; Galman, James L; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2018-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are able to catalyse a range of synthetically challenging reactions ranging from hydroxylation and demethylation to sulfoxidation and epoxidation. As such they have great potential for biocatalytic applications but are underutilised due to often-poor expression, stability and solubility in recombinant bacterial hosts. The use of self-sufficient P450 s with fused haem and reductase domains has already contributed heavily to improving catalytic efficiency and simplifying an otherwise more complex multi-component system of P450 and redox partners. Herein, we present a new addition to the class VII family with the cloning, sequencing and characterisation of the self-sufficient CYP116B62 Hal1 from Halomonas sp. NCIMB 172, the genome of which has not yet been sequenced. Hal1 exhibits high levels of expression in a recombinant E. coli host and can be utilised from cell lysate or used in purified form. Hal1 favours NADPH as electron donor and displays a diverse range of activities including hydroxylation, demethylation and sulfoxidation. These properties make Hal1 suitable for future biocatalytic applications or as a template for optimisation through engineering. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 21 CFR 172.250 - Petroleum naphtha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... naphtha is used or intended for use as a solvent in protective coatings on fresh citrus fruit in... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Coatings...-oxidation, the entire procedure is to be carried out under subdued light. apparatus Separatory funnels. 250...

  7. 49 CFR 172.326 - Portable tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... petroleum gas (LPG) that is unodorized as authorized in § 173.315(b)(1) unless it is legibly marked NON... the portable tank are not visible. (d) NON-ODORIZED marking on portable tanks containing LPG. After...

  8. Search Results | Page 172 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Public Report on Basic Education (1996), a study that is widely known as the ... Community Based Governance of Wetlands in the Sand River Catchment Area ... province in Indonesia and the eastern and southern coasts of Sri Lanka.

  9. 49 CFR 172.102 - Special provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... may be made from polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate) or other polymeric material. 33Ammonium... hazard criteria level may be transported in Large Packagings. 43The membrane filters, including paper..., subsection 33.2.1 (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter), nitrocellulose membrane filters in the form in which...

  10. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... report the activity, time, and location to the appropriate Area Access Office or the Military Police (MP... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training Center...

  11. 21 CFR 172.140 - Ethoxyquin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... used as an antioxidant for preservation of color in the production of chili powder, paprika, and ground... or on the uncooked fat of meat from animals except poultry. 3 parts per million in or on the uncooked liver and fat of poultry. 0.5 part per million in or on the uncooked muscle meat of animals. 0.5 part...

  12. 21 CFR 172.809 - Curdlan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) produced by pure culture fermentation from the nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic bacterium Alcaligenes... Curdlan,” by Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd., 12-10 Nihonbashi, 2-Chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 103, Japan, 1996...

  13. 23 CFR 172.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Administrative Services Act of 1949 (Public Law 92-582, 86 Stat. 1278 (1972)); (2) Equivalent State... law prior to the enactment of Public Law 105-178 (TEA-21) on June 9, 1998. Consultant means the... project subject to 23 U.S.C. 112(a). One-year applicable accounting period means the annual accounting...

  14. 21 CFR 172.811 - Glyceryl tristearate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... crystallization accelerator in cocoa products, in imitation chocolate, and in compound coatings Not to exceed 1... product that complies with the limitations prescribed in paragraph (c) of this section. [53 FR 21632, June...

  15. Vegetation - San Felipe Valley [ds172

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This Vegetation Map of the San Felipe Valley Wildlife Area in San Diego County, California is based on vegetation samples collected in the field in 2002 and 2005 and...

  16. 25 CFR 172.1 - Acreage designated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... operation and maintenance and betterment assessments by the United States to the District, and section 24 of... as follows: Lands with recognized water rights not subject to operation and maintenance or betterment...

  17. 21 CFR 172.610 - Arabinogalactan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Gums... water from Western larch wood, having galactose units and arabinose units in the approximate ratio of...

  18. 21 CFR 172.535 - Disodium inosinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION... of water of crystallization. (b) The food additive is used as a flavoring adjuvant in food. ...

  19. 40 CFR 172.4 - Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... rates, and situation of application on or in which the pesticide is to be used; the States in which the... will be accomplished; (iv) The name, street address, telephone number, and qualifications of all... change participants; (v) The name and street address of all cooperators, if available at the time an...

  20. 49 CFR 172.204 - Shipper's certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the certification the words “herein-named” may be substituted for the words “above-named”. (2) “I... respects in proper condition for transport according to applicable international and national governmental... national governmental regulations. Note to paragraph (c)(1): In the certification, the word “packed” may be...

  1. 172-IJBCS-Article-Dr Wellington Oyibo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RHUMSIKI

    Trypanosomal genetic polymorphisms, Immune response polymorphisms. INTRODUCTION ... causes the West African sleeping sickness. The parasites invade the ..... of cell activation. Highly purified trypanosome DNA have been shown.

  2. 46 CFR 172.245 - Survival conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... seals to cargo hopper gates; or (ii) Guillotine doors in bulkheads in way of the conveyor belt. ... inches (50 mm) when the vessel is in the equilibrium position. (e) Progressive flooding. In the design...

  3. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is a high... and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call... container shall bear, in addition to other information required by the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act...

  4. 21 CFR 172.886 - Petroleum wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register... it is very hygroscopic and will react with some metal containers in the presence of air. Phosphoric... high enough to keep the wax melted. (Note: In preheating the sulfoxide-acid mixture, remove the stopper...

  5. 28 CFR 17.2 - Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... entrusted with classified national security information originated within or in the custody of the Department. This part does not affect the operation of the Department's participation in the National... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND ACCESS TO CLASSIFIED...

  6. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... preservative and color fixative, with sodium nitrate, in meat-curing preparations for the home curing of meat and meat products (including poultry and wild game), with directions for use which limit the amount of sodium nitrite to not more than 200 parts per million in the finished meat product, and the amount of...

  7. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... finished product. (2) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in meat-curing preparations for the home curing of meat and meat products (including poultry and wild game), with directions... finished meat product and the amount of sodium nitrite to not more than 200 parts per million in the...

  8. 21 CFR 172.110 - BHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... shreds 50 Active dry yeast 1 1,000 Beverages and desserts prepared from dry mixes 1 2 Dry breakfast cereals 50 Dry diced glazed fruit 1 32 Dry mixes for beverages and desserts 1 90 Emulsion stabilizers for... beverages and desserts shall bear adequate directions for use to provide that beverages and desserts...

  9. 40 CFR 82.172 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... behavioral disorders; dermatoxicity; pharmacological effects; mammalian absorption, distribution, metabolism..., critical life stage tests, behavioral tests, algal growth tests, seed germination tests, microbial function..., whether existing or new, intended for use as a replacement for a class I or II compound. Test marketing...

  10. 23 CFR 172.7 - Audits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with the requirements of the cost principles contained in 48 CFR part 31. Other procedures may be used... audit for the cost principles contained in 48 CFR part 31 for the consultant, if such rates are not... administrative or de facto ceilings. The consultant's indirect cost rates for its one-year applicable accounting...

  11. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Record the sample as “negative” for xanthan gum if no gel forms or if a soft or brittle gel forms both... more than 1.5 percent of pyruvic acid and “negative” for xanthan gum if the sample contains less than 1... preclude such use. (f) To assure safe use of the additive: (1) The label of its container shall bear, in...

  12. 32 CFR 172.5 - Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., the installation finance and accounting officer or the activity providing accounting support shall... required information. (2) The Military Department's finance and accounting office receiving the sales... TFO cycle. (3) The Military Department's finance and accounting office shall: (i) Report weekly...

  13. 49 CFR 172.407 - Label specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Design. (1) Except for size and color, the printing, inner border, and symbol on each label must be as... withstand, without deterioration or a substantial change in color, a 30-day exposure to conditions incident... shown in the appropriate section of this subpart. (d) Color. (1) The background color on each label must...

  14. 21 CFR 172.836 - Polysorbate 60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... monostearate, in the minimum quantity required to accomplish the intended effect, in formulations of white... exceed 0.5 percent on a dry-weight basis. (14) As an emulsifier in chocolate flavored syrups, whereby the...

  15. 49 CFR 172.704 - Training requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... recurrent training after March 25, 2003, and in no case later than March 24, 2006, each hazmat employee must... by each employee in the event of a security breach. (b) OSHA, EPA, and other training. Training...

  16. Publications | Page 172 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Rapid change in wetland cover has been hastened by increasing annual population ... during the establishment and management of four participatory plant nurseries. ... Huge postharvest (PH) losses are a threat to food security, incomes and ...

  17. 21 CFR 172.806 - Azodicarbonamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION... an aging and bleaching ingredient in cereal flour in an amount not to exceed 2.05 grams per 100...

  18. 21 CFR 172.115 - BHT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food... BHA and BHT) parts per million Dehydrated potato shreds 50 Dry breakfast cereals 50 Emulsion...

  19. 21 CFR 172.133 - Dimethyl dicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... treatment, filtration, or other technologies prior to the use of dimethyl dicarbonate: (1) In wine, dealcoholized wine, and low alcohol wine in an amount not to exceed 200 parts per million. (2) In ready-to-drink...

  20. Sulindac inhibits pancreatic carcinogenesis in LSL-KrasG12D-LSL-Trp53R172H-Pdx-1-Cre mice via suppressing aldo-keto reductase family 1B10 (AKR1B10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haonan; Yang, Allison L; Chung, Yeon Tae; Zhang, Wanying; Liao, Jie; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2013-09-01

    Sulindac has been identified as a competitive inhibitor of aldo-keto reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10), an enzyme that plays a key role in carcinogenesis. AKR1B10 is overexpressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and exhibits lipid substrate specificity, especially for farnesyl and geranylgeranyl. There have been no studies though showing that the inhibition of PDAC by sulindac is via inhibition of AKR1B10, particularly the metabolism of farnesyl/geranylgeranyl and Kras protein prenylation. To determine the chemopreventive effects of sulindac on pancreatic carcinogenesis, 5-week-old LSL-Kras(G12D)-LSL-Trp53(R172H)-Pdx-1-Cre mice (Pan(kras/p53) mice) were fed an AIN93M diet with or without 200 p.p.m. sulindac (n = 20/group). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that average animal survival in Pan(kras/p53) mice was 143.7 ± 8.8 days, and average survival with sulindac was increased to 168.0 ± 8.8 days (P < 0.005). Histopathological analyses revealed that 90% of mice developed PDAC, 10% with metastasis to the liver and lymph nodes. With sulindac, the incidence of PDAC was reduced to 56% (P < 0.01) and only one mouse had lymph node metastasis. Immunochemical analysis showed that sulindac significantly decreased Ki-67-labeled cell proliferation and markedly reduced the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), c-Raf and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and 2. In in vitro experiments with PDAC cells from Pan(kras/p53) mice, sulindac exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of AKR1B10 activity. By silencing AKR1B10 expression through small interfering RNA or by sulindac treatment, these in vitro models showed a reduction in Kras and human DNA-J homolog 2 protein prenylation, and downregulation of phosphorylated C-raf, ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 expression. Our results demonstrate that sulindac inhibits pancreatic carcinogenesis by the inhibition of Kras protein prenylation by targeting AKR1B10.

  1. A mathematical model for the study of lipid accumulation in oleaginous microorganisms. I. Lipid accumulation during growth of Mucor circinelloides CBS 172-27 on a vegetable oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggelis, G.

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available    The accumulation of lipids In microorganisms cultivated In growth media having as sole carbon and energy source vegetable or animal fat has been an object of research and industrial interest for many years. Interestingly, the accumulated fat often has a composition and structure much different from that of the fat present In the substrate.
       The present work describes a mathematical approach to the accumulation of fat by oleaginous microorganisms growing on medium containing vegetable oil as carbon source. A mathematical model, correlating the accumulation of reserve fat with the growth of microbial population and the available quantity of exocellular fat, is proposed. This model is verified by experimental data taken by cultivation of Mucor circinelloides CBS 172-27 on sunflower oil.
       The proposed model is described by the equation: XL = XLo + Lo(1-e-k2.t– (lnx-lnxo/k1    where XL(mg/l the concentration of reserve lipids at time t(h, XLo(mg/l the concentration of lipid reserves at time t=o, Lo(mg/l the initial concentration of exocellular fat (a t=o, X(mg/l the concentration of fat-free biomass at a given time t and Xo the concentration of fat-free biomass at time t=o; k1 and k2 constants.

       Durante muchos años la acumulación de lípidos en microorganismos desarrollados en medio de cultivo, tomando como única fuente de carbono y energía grasas vegetales o animales, ha sido objeto de investigación e Interés industrial.    Interesadamente, la grasa acumulada tiene a menudo una composición y estructura muy diferente de la que tiene la grasa presente en el sustrato.    El presente trabajo describe una aproximación matemática a la acumulaci

  2. Adsorption of dysprosium on the graphite (0001) surface: Nucleation and growth at 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Lii-Rosales, Ann; Lei, Huaping; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C.; Evans, James W.; Wallingford, Mark; Zhou, Yinghui; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied nucleation and growth of Dy islands on the basal plane of graphite at 300 K using scanning tunneling microscopy, density functional theory (DFT) in a form that includes van der Waals interactions, and analytic theory. The interaction of atomic Dy with graphite is strong, while the diffusion barrier is small. Experiment shows that at 300 K, the density of nucleated islands is close to the value predicted for homogeneous nucleation, using critical nucleus size of 1 and the DFT-derived diffusion barrier. Homogeneous nucleation is also supported by the monomodal shape of the island size distributions. Comparison with the published island density of Dy on graphene shows that the value is about two orders of magnitude smaller on graphite, which can be attributed to more effective charge screening in graphite. The base of each island is 3 atomic layers high and atomically ordered, forming a coincidence lattice with the graphite. Islands resist coalescence, probably due to multiple rotational orientations associated with the coincidence lattice. Upper levels grow as discernible single-atom layers. Analysis of the level populations reveals significant downward interlayer transport, which facilitates growth of the base. This island shape is metastable, since more compact three-dimensional islands form at elevated growth temperature.

  3. Dysprosium separation from aqueous phase by non-dispersive solvent extraction employing hollow fibre membrane module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Kartikey K.; Singh, D.K.; Kain, V.

    2017-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) consist of fourteen lanthanides and three elements which are Sc, Y and La resulting in total 17 REEs. In the last decade, these rare earths elements which have unique physical and chemical properties have been highly in demand for their application in almost all walks of life. Various methods such as ion exchange, precipitation and solvent extraction have been used to recover these elements from aqueous solutions. These traditional methods have some inherent disadvantages like handling of hazardous organic chemicals, ineffectiveness to recover a very low concentration of contaminated source etc. In this regard, an important method i.e. liquid membrane offers separation scheme; which combines the characteristics, of solvent extraction and solid membrane separation, to overcome the disadvantages of conventional techniques. Various experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of feed acidity, metal ion concentration, carrier concentration, feed composition, flow rates and phase ratio on the transport of rare earths metal ions across the membrane

  4. Manufacturing of Dysprosium-Iron Alloys by Electrolysis in Fluoride-Based Electrolytes: Oxide Solubility Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ana Maria; Støre, Anne; Osen, Karen Sende

    2018-04-01

    Electrolytic production of light rare earth elements and alloys takes place in a fluoride-based electrolyte using rare earth oxides as raw material. The optimization of this method, mainly in terms of the energy efficiency and environmental impact control, is rather challenging. Anode effects, evolution of fluorine-containing compounds, and side cathode reactions could largely be minimized by a good control of the amount of rare earth oxide species dissolved in the fluoride-based electrolyte and their dissolution rate. The oxide content of the fluoride melts REF3-LiF (RE = Nd, Dy) at different compositions and temperatures were experimentally determined by carbothermal analysis of melt samples. The highest solubility values of oxide species, added as Dy2O3 and Dy2(CO3)3, were obtained to be of ca. 3 wt pct (expressed as Dy2O3) in the case of the equimolar DyF3-LiF melt at 1323 K (1050 °C). The oxide saturation values increased with the amount of REF3 present in the molten bath and the working temperature.

  5. A naproxen complex of dysprosium intercalates into calf thymus DNA base pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Mengsi; Jin, Jianhua; Xu, Guiqing; Cui, Fengling; Luo, Hongxia

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Binding mode to ctDNA was studied by various methods. • Intercalation is the most possible binding mode. • Dynamic and static quenching occurred simultaneously. • Hydrophobic force played a major role. • Binding characteristic of rare earth complexes to DNA are dependent on the element. - Abstract: The binding mode and mechanism of dysprosium–naproxen complex (Dy–NAP) with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) were studied using UV–vis and fluorescence spectra in physiological buffer (pH 7.4). The results showed that more than one type of quenching process occurred and the binding mode between Dy–NAP with ctDNA might be intercalation. In addition, ionic strength, iodide quenching and fluorescence polarization experiments corroborated the intercalation binding mode between Dy–NAP and ctDNA. The calculated thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH and ΔS at different temperature demonstrated that hydrophobic interaction force played a major role in the binding process

  6. White light emission and color tunability of dysprosium doped barium silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Lokesh; Sharma, Anchal; Vishwakarma, Amit K.; Jha, Kaushal [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042 (India); Jayasimhadri, M., E-mail: jayaphysics@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042 (India); Ratnam, B.V.; Jang, Kiwan [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-77 (Korea, Republic of); Rao, A.S.; Sinha, R.K. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042 (India)

    2016-01-15

    The present work elucidates the synthesis of Dy{sup 3+} doped barium silicate glasses, along with the subsequent studies performed to evaluate its viability in solid state lighting applications. The synthesized photonic glasses were investigated via X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. The photoluminescence properties were examined under ultraviolet (UV)/near UV (NUV) excitation. Photoluminescence spectrum exhibited characteristic emission bands at λ{sub em}=483 nm (blue) and λ{sub em}=576 nm (yellow) which are ascribed to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 13/2} transitions of Dy{sup 3+} ion, respectively. The chromaticity coordinates under excitation of λ{sub ex}=348 nm are (0.31, 0.34), which lies in the white region of CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram and are in excellent proximity with the standard equal energy white illuminant (0.333, 0.333). The calculated correlated color temperature and the yellow to blue (Y/B) ratio are found to be 6602 K and 1.12, respectively for the optimized sample. The synthesized photonic glass also offered the possibility of tuning the color as exemplified through the variation in CIE coordinates, correlated color temperature and the Y/B ratio. The results confirm the possibility of color tunability from the proposed glass and may be useful for various photonic device applications. - Highlights: • Successfully synthesized Dy{sup 3+} doped barium silicate glasses. • Structural properties thoroughly discussed by using XRD and FT-IR. • Photoluminescence and colorimetry properties have been investigated. • Y/B ratio and the reason for color tunability have been successfully explained. • CIE coordinates of Dy{sup 3+}:BBS glass confirm its suitability for w-LEDs.

  7. New ultrasonic attenuation maxima for single crystal dysprosium in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treder, R.A.; Maekawa, S.; Levy, M.

    1976-01-01

    The temperatures and corresponding applied basal plane magnetic fields are reported for longitudinal ultrasonic attenuation maxima in a cylindrical Dy sample. Besides maxima at Tsub(N) and Tsub(C), two new maxima are observed and possible explanations for their existence are given. (Auth.)

  8. Adsorption of dysprosium on the graphite (0001) surface: Nucleation and growth at 300 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Lii-Rosales, Ann [The Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Lei, Huaping; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C.; Evans, James W. [The Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Wallingford, Mark; Zhou, Yinghui [The Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Thiel, Patricia A., E-mail: pthiel@iastate.edu [The Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2016-12-07

    We have studied nucleation and growth of Dy islands on the basal plane of graphite at 300 K using scanning tunneling microscopy, density functional theory (DFT) in a form that includes van der Waals interactions, and analytic theory. The interaction of atomic Dy with graphite is strong, while the diffusion barrier is small. Experiment shows that at 300 K, the density of nucleated islands is close to the value predicted for homogeneous nucleation, using critical nucleus size of 1 and the DFT-derived diffusion barrier. Homogeneous nucleation is also supported by the monomodal shape of the island size distributions. Comparison with the published island density of Dy on graphene shows that the value is about two orders of magnitude smaller on graphite, which can be attributed to more effective charge screening in graphite. The base of each island is 3 atomic layers high and atomically ordered, forming a coincidence lattice with the graphite. Islands resist coalescence, probably due to multiple rotational orientations associated with the coincidence lattice. Upper levels grow as discernible single-atom layers. Analysis of the level populations reveals significant downward interlayer transport, which facilitates growth of the base. This island shape is metastable, since more compact three-dimensional islands form at elevated growth temperature.

  9. An operationally simple method for separating the rare-earth elements neodymium and dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogart, Justin A.; Lippincott, Connor A.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-07-06

    Rare-earth metals are critical components of electronic materials and permanent magnets. Recycling of consumer materials is a promising new source of rare earths. To incentivize recycling there is a clear need for simple methods for targeted separations of mixtures of rare-earth metal salts. Metal complexes of a tripodal nitroxide ligand [{(2-"tBuNO)C_6H_4CH_2}{sub 3}N]{sup 3-} (TriNOx{sup 3-}), feature a size-sensitive aperture formed of its three η{sup 2}-(N,O) ligand arms. Exposure of metal cations in the aperture induces a self-associative equilibrium comprising [M(TriNOx)thf]/[M(TriNOx)]{sub 2} (M=rare-earth metal). Differences in the equilibrium constants (K{sub eq}) for early and late metals enables simple Nd/Dy separations through leaching with a separation ratio S{sub Nd/Dy}=359. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. An Operationally Simple Method for Separating the Rare-Earth Elements Neodymium and Dysprosium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Justin A; Lippincott, Connor A; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2015-07-06

    Rare-earth metals are critical components of electronic materials and permanent magnets. Recycling of consumer materials is a promising new source of rare earths. To incentivize recycling there is a clear need for simple methods for targeted separations of mixtures of rare-earth metal salts. Metal complexes of a tripodal nitroxide ligand [{(2-(t) BuNO)C6 H4 CH2 }3 N](3-) (TriNOx(3-) ), feature a size-sensitive aperture formed of its three η(2) -(N,O) ligand arms. Exposure of metal cations in the aperture induces a self-associative equilibrium comprising [M(TriNOx)thf]/ [M(TriNOx)]2 (M=rare-earth metal). Differences in the equilibrium constants (Keq ) for early and late metals enables simple Nd/Dy separations through leaching with a separation ratio SNd/Dy =359. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Cerium: an unlikely replacement of dysprosium in high performance Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Arjun K; Khan, Mahmud; Gschneidner, Karl A; McCallum, Ralph W; Zhou, Lin; Sun, Kewei; Dennis, Kevin W; Zhou, Chen; Pinkerton, Frederick E; Kramer, Matthew J; Pecharsky, Vitalij K

    2015-04-24

    Replacement of Dy and substitution of Nd in NdFeB-based permanent magnets by Ce, the most abundant and lowest cost rare earth element, is important because Dy and Nd are costly and critical rare earth elements. The Ce, Co co-doped alloys have excellent high-temperature magnetic properties with an intrinsic coercivity being the highest known for T ≥ 453 K. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A Linear Tetranuclear Dysprosium(III) Compound Showing Single-Molecule Magnet Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Hongshan; Xu, Gong Feng; Guo, Yun-Nan; Gamez, Patrick; Beavers, Christine M; Teat, Simon J; Tang, Jinkui

    2010-04-20

    Although magnetic measurements reveal a single-relaxation time for a linear tetranuclear Dy(III) compound, the wide distribution of the relaxation time observed clearly suggests the presence of two slightly different anisotropic centres, therefore opening new avenues for investigating the relaxation dynamics of lanthanide aggregates.

  13. Experimental study of induced staggered magnetic fields in dysprosium gallium garnet (DGG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Corliss, L.M.; Hastings, J.M.; Blume, M.; Giordano, N.; Wolf, W.P.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron diffraction techniques have been used to study induced staggered magnetic field effects in DGG. The application of a uniform magnetic field at temperatures much greater than the Neel temperature induces a significant amount of antiferromagnetic order. The temperature and field dependences of this effect are in good agreement with recent theoretical predicions

  14. Influence of dysprosium and terbium additions on aluminium structure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridlyander, I.N.; Sokolovskaya, E.M.; Zimina, E.N.; Tkachenko, E.A.; Artemova, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of 0.3%Dy and 0.3%Tb additions were investigated on grain size in aluminium ingots and on recrystallization and mechanical properties in 1.5 mm thick sheets. Grain refinement in ingots was revealed along with an increase of sheet recrystallization temperature and grain growth retardation in the process of secondary recrystallization. Ultimate strength was found to rise at some decrease of specific elongation

  15. Improvement of high-frequency characteristics of Z-type hexaferrite by dysprosium doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Chunhong; Liu Yingli; Song Yuanqiang; Wang Liguo; Zhang Huaiwu

    2011-01-01

    Z-type hexaferrite has great potential applications as anti-EMI material for magnetic devices in the GHz region. In this work, Dy-doped Z-type hexaferrites with nominal stoichiometry of Ba 3 Co 2 Dy x Fe 24-x O 41 (x 0.0, 0.05, 0.5, 1.0) were prepared by an improved solid-state reaction method. The effects of rare earth oxide (Dy 2 O 3 ) addition on the phase composition, microstructure and electromagnetic properties of the ceramics were investigated. Structure and micromorphology characterizations indicate that certain content of Dy doping will cause the emergence of the second phase Dy 3 Fe 5 O 12 at the grain boundaries of the majority phase Z-type hexaferrite, due to which the straightforward result is the grain refinement during the successive sintering process. Permeability spectra measurements show that the initial permeability reaches its maximum of 17 at 300 MHz with x = 0.5, while the cutoff frequency keeps above 800 MHz. The apparent specific anisotropy field H K of Dy-doped Z-type hexaferrites decreases with x increasing. The relationships among phase composition, grain size, permeability spectra, and anisotropy are theoretically investigated, and according to the analysis, Dy doping effects on its magnetic properties can be well explained and understood.

  16. Synthesis, photoluminescence and intramolecular energy transfer model of a dysprosium complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Aiqin; Zhang Jiuli; Pan Qiliang; Wang Shuhua [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, No. 79 West Yingze Street, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Jia Husheng, E-mail: Jia_Husheng@126.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, No. 79 West Yingze Street, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China) and Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Xu Bingshe [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, No. 79 West Yingze Street, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China)

    2012-04-15

    The energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital as well as their energy gaps, and the singlet and triplet state energy levels of 4-benzoylbenzoic acid (HL=4-BBA) and triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) were calculated with the Gaussian03 program package. The singlet state and triplet state energy levels were also estimated from the UV-vis absorption spectra and phosphorescence spectra. The results suggest that the calculated values approximately coincided with the experimental values. A Dy(III) complex was synthesized with 4-BBA as primary ligand and TPPO as neutral ligand. The structure of the complex was characterized by elemental analysis, {sup 1}H NMR spectrometry, and FTIR spectrometry. TG-DTG analysis indicates that the complex kept stable up to 305 Degree-Sign C. The photoluminescence properties were studied by fluorescence spectrometry. The results show that Dy(III) ion sensitized by 4-BBA and TPPO emitted characteristic peaks at 572 nm ({sup 4}F{sub 9/2}-{sup 6}H{sub 13/2}) and 480 nm ({sup 4}F{sub 9/2}-{sup 6}H{sub 15/2}), and its Commission Internationale de L'Eclairge coordinates were calculated as x=0.33 and y=0.38, being located in the white range. Intermolecular energy transfer process was discussed and energy transfer model was also proposed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum calculation provides theoretical method of ligand choice for rare earth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complex Dy(L){sub 3}(TPPO){sub 2} emitted white light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CIE coordinates were calculated as x=0.33 and y=0.38. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer in Dy(L){sub 3}(TPPO){sub 2} followed Dexter electron exchange theory.

  17. Crystal-field magnetic anisotropy of dilute dysprosium or erbium in yttrium single crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, J.; Touborg, P.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetization measurements have been performed between 1.3 and 300 K in fields up to 50 × 105 A/m in the a, b, and c directions of hcp crystals of pure Y and Y doped with 0.14-at.% Dy or 0.14-at.% Er, using the Faraday method and a vibrating-sample method. The characteristic behavior of both...

  18. Extraction and stripping of neodymium (III) and dysprosium (III) by TRUEX solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, Alok; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    McCabe-Thiele diagram for the extraction and stripping of Nd (III) and Dy (III) by TRUEX solvent has been constructed to determine the number of stages required for complete extraction and stripping. (author)

  19. Retracted: Addition of a single methyl group to a small molecule sodium channel inhibitor introduces a new mode of gating modulation, by L Wang, SG Zellmer, DM Printzenhoff and NA Castle. British Journal of Pharmacology, volume 172(20): 4905-4918, published in October 2015; DOI 10.1111/bph.13259.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-07-01

    The above article, published by the British Journal of Pharmacology in October 2015 (https://bpspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bph.13259), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief and John Wiley & Sons Limited. The retraction has been agreed owing to the discovery of errors in the chemical structure of the synthetic compounds generated. The corrected structure is now available in the article PF-06526290 can both enhance and inhibit conduction through voltage gated sodium channels by L Wang, SG Zellmer, DM Printzenhoff and NA Castle, 2018, https://bpspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bph.14338. Reference Wang L, Zellmer SG, Printzenhoff DM, Castle NA (2015). Addition of a single methyl group to a small molecule sodium channel inhibitor introduces a new mode of gating modulation. Br J Pharmacol 172: 4905-4918. https://doi.org/10.1111/bph.13259. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. 5.7  W cw single-frequency laser at 671  nm by single-pass second harmonic generation of a 17.2  W injection-locked 1342  nm Nd : YVO4 ring laser using periodically poled MgO : LiNbO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Peter; Ruebel, Felix; Bartschke, Juergen; L'huillier, Johannes A

    2015-11-20

    We demonstrate a continuous wave single-frequency laser at 671.1 nm based on a high-power 888 nm pumped Nd:YVO4 ring laser at 1342.2 nm. Unidirectional operation of the fundamental ring laser is achieved with the injection-locking technique. A Nd:YVO4 microchip laser serves as the injecting seed source, providing a tunable single-frequency power of up to 40 mW. The ring laser emits a single-frequency power of 17.2 W with a Gaussian beam profile and a beam propagation factor of M2beam profile and a beam propagation factor of M2lasers. This work opens possibilities in cold atoms experiments with lithium, allowing the use of larger ensembles in magneto-optical traps or higher diffraction orders in atomic beam interferometers.

  1. Antiferroquadrupolar ordering and anisotropic magnetic phase diagram of dysprosium palladium bronze, DyPd3S4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Eiichi; Tayama, Takashi; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Hiroi, Zenji; Takeda, Naoya; Ishikawa, Masayasu; Shirakawa, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    From the measurements of magnetization and specific heat, we constructed B-T phase diagrams of single-crystalline DyPd 3 S 4 which is known to exhibit antiferroquadrupolar (AFQ) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering at low temperatures. The phase diagrams are found to be highly anisotropic and re-entrant, which are typical of rare-earth compounds exhibiting multipolar ordering. The crystalline electric field (CEF) scheme of Dy 3+ in DyPd 3S4 was deduced from the specific heat and magnetization measurements of the Y-diluted compounds Dy 1-x Y x Pd 3 S 4 (0.1≤x≤0.9) and discussed in detail. The CEF ground state was determined to be the orbitally-degenerated quartet Γ 67 (1) , and the overall splitting width was estimated to be about 104 K. No correlation was found between the anisotropy of T Q and that of the Zeeman splitting width of the ground quartet Γ 67 (1) . (author)

  2. Effect of Ligand Field Tuning on the SMM Behavior for Three Related Alkoxide-Bridged Dysprosium Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yan; Mereacre, Valeriu; Baniodeh, Amer; Lan, Yanhua; Schlageter, Martin; Kostakis, George E; Powell, Annie K

    2016-01-04

    The synthesis and characterization of three Dy2 compounds, [Dy2(HL1)2(NO3)4] (1), [Dy2(L2)2(NO3)4] (2), and [Dy2(HL3)2(NO3)4] (3), formed using related tripodal ligands with a central tertiary amine bearing picolyl and alkoxy arms, 2-[(2-hydroxy-ethyl)-pyridin-2-ylmethylamino]-ethanol (H2L1), 2-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethylamino)-ethanol (HL2), and 2-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethylamino)-propane-1,3-diol (H2L3), are reported. The compounds are rare examples of alkoxide-bridged {Dy2} complexes and display capped square antiprism coordination geometry around each Dy(III) ion. Changes in the ligand field environment around the Dy(III) ions brought about through variations in the ligand donors can be gauged from the magnetic properties, with compounds 1 and 2 showing antiparallel coupling between the Dy(III) ions and 3 showing parallel coupling. Furthermore, slow relaxation of the magnetization typical of SMM behavior could be observed for compounds 2 and 3, suggesting that small variations in the ligand field can have a significant influence on the slow relaxation processes responsible for SMM behavior of Dy(III)-based systems.

  3. Effects of magnetic annealing on structure and multiferroic properties of pure and dysprosium substituted BiFeO 3

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Shuxia; Yao, Yingbang; Chen, Yao; Wang, Dongliang; Zhang, Xianping; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo; Ma, Yanwei

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the effects of magnetic annealing on crystal structure and multiferroic properties of BiFeO 3 and Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 have been investigated. It is found that the X-ray diffraction patterns of pure BiFeO 3 samples are obviously broadened after magnetic annealing, whereas those of Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 samples are almost unchanged. Magnetic field annealing did not affect the magnetic properties of these two kinds of samples much. However, ferroelectric properties of the two materials exhibited different behaviors after magnetic field annealing. For pure BiFeO 3 samples, the remnant polarizations (P r) are suppressed; in contrast, for Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 samples, P r is greatly enhanced. Possible mechanisms for the effects of magnetic field annealing have been discussed. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A rational approach to the modulation of the dynamics of the magnetisation in a dysprosium-nitronyl-nitroxide radical complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poneti, Giordano; Bernot, Kevin; Bogani, Lapo; Caneschi, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Gatteschi, Dante

    2007-05-14

    A control of the dynamics of the magnetisation is chemically achieved in a ring-like Dy-radical based molecule, allowing the estimation of the quantum tunneling frequency with a (4)He-cooled susceptometer.

  5. Manufacturing of Dysprosium-Iron Alloys by Electrolysis in Fluoride-Based Electrolytes. Electrolysis in a Laboratory-Scale Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ana Maria; Osen, Karen Sende; Støre, Anne; Gudbrandsen, Henrik; Kjos, Ole Sigmund; Solheim, Asbjørn; Wang, Zhaohui; Oury, Alexandre; Namy, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Electrolytic production of light rare earth elements and rare earth alloys with transition elements takes place in a fluoride-based electrolyte using rare earth oxides as raw material. The optimization of this method, mainly in terms of the energy efficiency and environmental impact control, is rather challenging. Anode effects, evolution of fluorine-containing compounds and side cathode reactions could largely be minimized by good control of the amount of rare earth oxide species dissolved in the fluoride-based electrolyte and their dissolution rate. The Dy2O3 feed rate needed for stable cell operation was studied by following up the anode voltage and gas analysis. On-line analysis of the cell off-gases by FTIR showed that the electrochemical reaction for the formation of Dy-Fe alloy gives mainly CO gas and that CF4 is starting to evolve gradually at anode voltages of ca. 3.25 V. The limiting current density for the discharge of the oxide ions at the graphite anode was in the range of 0.1 to 0.18 A cm-2 at dissolved Dy2O3 contents of ca. 1 wt pct. Modeling of the laboratory cell reactor was also carried out by implementing two models, i.e., an electrical model simulating the current density distribution at the electrodes and a laminal bubbly flow model that explains the electrolyte velocity induced by gas bubble production at the anode.

  6. Sol-gel synthesis and crystallization kinetics of dysprosium-titanate Dy2Ti2O7 for photonic applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázek, Jan; Potel, M.; Buršík, Jiří; Mráček, A.; Kallistová, Anna; Jonášová, Šárka; Boháček, Jan; Kašík, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 168, November (2015), s. 159-167 ISSN 0254-0584 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:68081723 ; RVO:67985831 Keywords : Ceramics * Inorganic compounds * Optical materials Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; JG - Metallurgy (UFM-A); CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation (GLU-S) Impact factor: 2.101, year: 2015

  7. Critical Rare Earths, National Security, and U.S.-China Interactions: A Portfolio Approach to Dysprosium Policy Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    from Donald and Susan Rice , both funds which enabled me to focus on the dissertation. I thank Dean Susan Marquis for her dedication to the growth of...quota of 89,2000 tonnes (Table 2.2). The sprawling black market not only prevents Beijing’s efforts to bring the production under its levers to...yttrium are often used for pigmentation for consumer products such as paint and sunglasses. REE-based lasers are used for cosmetic , epidermal, and

  8. White- and blue-light-emitting dysprosium(III) and terbium(III)-doped gadolinium titanate phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antić, Ž; Kuzman, S; Đorđević, V; Dramićanin, M D; Thundat, T

    2017-06-01

    Here we report the synthesis and structural, morphological, and photoluminescence analysis of white- and blue-light-emitting Dy 3 + - and Tm 3 + -doped Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 nanophosphors. Single-phase cubic Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 nanopowders consist of compact, dense aggregates of nanoparticles with an average size of ~25 nm for Dy 3 + -doped and ~50 nm for Tm 3 + -doped samples. The photoluminescence results indicated that ultraviolet (UV) light excitation of the Dy 3 + -doped sample resulted in direct generation of white light, while a dominant yellow emission was obtained under blue-light excitation. Intense blue light was obtained for Tm 3 + -doped Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 under UV excitation suggesting that this material could be used as a blue phosphor. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Isothermal sections of phase equilibria diagrams for systems (terbium, dysprosium, holmium)-molybdenum-boron at 1273 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'ma, Yu.B.; Zakharchuk, N.P.; Maksimova, L.T.

    1988-01-01

    The methods of X-ray analysis are used to study the R-Mo-B (R-Tb, Dy, Ho) systems and isothermal sections of phase equilibria diagrams at 1273 K are plotted. A formation of RMoB 4 (structure of the YCrB 4 type) is confirmed and borides R 3 MoB 7 (structure of the Er 3 CrB 7 type) and ∼ RMo 4 B 8 (of the unknown structure) are obtained for the first time. Borides DyMoB 3 and HoMoB 3 are of the ErMoB 3 structure. Lattice periods of new compounds are indicated. Diffractogrammes of borides Dy 3 MoB 7 and DyMoB 3 are calculated. A peculiarity of components interaction in the systems rare-earth metal-molybdenum-boron is considered

  10. Effects of magnetic annealing on structure and multiferroic properties of pure and dysprosium substituted BiFeO 3

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Shuxia

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the effects of magnetic annealing on crystal structure and multiferroic properties of BiFeO 3 and Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 have been investigated. It is found that the X-ray diffraction patterns of pure BiFeO 3 samples are obviously broadened after magnetic annealing, whereas those of Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 samples are almost unchanged. Magnetic field annealing did not affect the magnetic properties of these two kinds of samples much. However, ferroelectric properties of the two materials exhibited different behaviors after magnetic field annealing. For pure BiFeO 3 samples, the remnant polarizations (P r) are suppressed; in contrast, for Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 samples, P r is greatly enhanced. Possible mechanisms for the effects of magnetic field annealing have been discussed. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Generation of White Light from Dysprosium-Doped Strontium Aluminate Phosphor by a Solid-State Reaction Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ishwar Prasad; Bisen, D. P.; Brahme, N.; Tamrakar, Raunak Kumar

    2016-04-01

    A single-host lattice, white light-emitting SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure of prepared SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was in a monoclinic phase with space group P21. The chemical composition of the sintered SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was confirmed by the energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy technique. Under ultra-violet excitation, the characteristic emissions of Dy3+ are peaking at 475 nm, 573 nm and 660 nm, originating from the transitions of 4F9/2 → 6H15/2, 4F9/2 →&!nbsp; 6H13/2 and 4F9/2 → 6H11/2 in the 4f9 configuration of Dy3+ ions. Commission International de I'Eclairage color coordinates of SrAl2O4:Dy3+ are suitable for white light-emitting phosphor. In order to investigate the suitability of the samples as white color light sources for industrial uses, correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI) values were calculated. Values of CCT and CRI were found well within the defined acceptable range. Mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity of SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor increased linearly with increasing impact velocity of the moving piston. Thus, the present investigation indicates piezo-electricity was responsible for producing ML in sintered SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor. Decay rates of the exponential decaying period of the ML curves do not change significantly with impact velocity. The photoluminescence and ML results suggest that the synthesized SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was useful for the white light-emitting diodes and stress sensor respectively.

  12. Complexes of lanthanum(III), cerium(III), samarium(III) and dysprosium(III) with substituted piperidines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manhas, B S; Trikha, A K; Singh, H; Chander, M

    1983-11-01

    Complexes of the general formulae M/sub 2/Cl/sub 6/(L)/sub 3/.C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH and M/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 6/(L)/sub 2/.CH/sub 3/OH have been synthesised by the reactions of chlorides and nitrates of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Dy(III) with 2-methylpiperidine, 3-methylpiperidine and 4-methylpiperidine. These complexes have been characterised on the basis of their elemental analysis, and IR and electronic reflectance spectra. IR spectral data indicate the presence of coordinated ethanol and methanol molecules and bidentate nitrate groups. Coordination numbers of the metal ions vary from 5 to 8. 19 refs.

  13. Study of the optical and magnetostatic properties of thin platelets of dysprosium and holmium ortho-ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challeton, Didier

    1970-07-01

    Device applications of cylindrical magnetic domains - sometimes referred to as 'bubbles' - was first demonstrated by A.H. Bobeck in the rare earth ortho-ferrites. General magnetic and optical properties of the rare earth ortho-ferrites are considered. The theoretical study of the cylindrical magnetic domains and their stability conditions are presented in this paper. The single crystals were grown by the PbO flux method. The thin platelets (≅ 50 microns thick) preparation is specified and the magneto-optical measurements are presented. Absorption, birefringence and Faraday rotation were measured in HoFeO 3 and DyFeO 3 . The utilisation conditions of these materials are characterized by the measurements of the smallest stable domain diameter. (author) [fr

  14. Dicty_cDB: SLE172 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d/ 1126 0.0 VHJ195 (VHJ195Q) /CSM/VH/VHJ1-D/VHJ195Q.Seq.d/ 1102 0.0 SLD492 (SLD492Q) /CSM/SL/SLD4-D/SLD492... 0.0 1 ( AU052538 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLD492. 817 0.0 1 ( C83939 ) Dictyostelium dis

  15. 48 CFR 217.172 - Multiyear contracts for supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... law. For additional policies that apply only to multiyear contracts for weapon systems, see 217.173... requirements of law are met and there are no other statutory restrictions on using a multiyear contract for the... provisions in the contract do not include consideration of recurring manufacturing costs of the contractor...

  16. 21 CFR 172.882 - Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... coating on shell eggs Do. 5. As a float on fermentation fluids in the manufacture of vinegar and wine and... with wild organisms during fermentation Do. [42 FR 14491, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 47 FR 11838, Mar...

  17. 21 CFR 172.884 - Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... chapter. As a float on fermentation fluids in the manufacture of vinegar and wine to prevent or retard access of air, evaporation, and wild yeast contamination during fermentation In an amount not to exceed...

  18. 21 CFR 172.864 - Synthetic fatty alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... syringe. 1-milliliter capacity, with 3-inch, 22-gauge needle. Volumetric flask. 5-milliliter capacity.... Pipet 100 milliliters of 1,2-dichloroethane into a 1-liter glass-stoppered volumetric flask and adjust... into a 1-liter glass-stoppered volumetric flask and adjust to volume with hexane, with mixing. n...

  19. What we do | Page 172 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC supports research in developing countries to create real and lasting change. ... Far East Asia, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Central Asia, South Asia ... it was reported that mangrove wetlands and other thick coastal vegetation served to reduce ...

  20. Final report Hanford environmental compliance project 89-D-172

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Compliance (HEC) Project is unique in that it consisted of 14 subprojects which varied in project scope and were funded from more that one program. This report describes the HEC Project from inception to completion and the scope, schedule, and cost of the individual subprojects. Also provided are the individual subproject Cost closing statements and Project completion reports accompanied by construction photographs and illustrations

  1. 49 CFR 172.402 - Additional labeling requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 30, 2001, such as, a label without the hazard class or division number displayed in the lower corner... this section); and (2)For other than Class 1 or Class 2 materials (for subsidiary labeling requirements for Class 1 or Class 2 materials see paragraph (e) or paragraphs (f) and (g), respectively, of this...

  2. 172 Networks, Micro Small Enterprises (MSE'S) and Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    It is no doubt that the role of entrepreneurship in the emerging economies such like Kenya ... understand networking and small business performance as there is no single general ... solution for small firm development (Borg 1991, Donckels and Lambrecht. 1995 ..... Scandinavian Journal of Management , 31 (3/4), 83-99.

  3. What we do | Page 172 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Launched in 2001, the Regional Network on HIV/AIDS, Rural Livelihoods and Food Security (RENEWAL) is a growing network of networks made up of national food ... In Pratapura Industrial Area (Tikamgarh district, Bundelkhand region, Madhya Pradesh), stone quarrying and crushing is carried out by labor-intensive units ...

  4. 49 CFR 172.310 - Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... industrial, Type A, Type B(U), or Type B(M) package must be legibly and durably marked on the outside of the... package which conforms to an IP-1, IP-2, IP-3 or a Type A package design must be legibly and durably... origin of the design. The international vehicle registration code for packages designed by a United...

  5. 21 CFR 172.826 - Sodium stearyl fumarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... nonyeast-leavened bakery products in an amount not to exceed 1 percent by weight of the flour used. (4) As... maleate. (b) The additive is used or intended for use: (1) As a dough conditioner in yeast-leavened bakery products in an amount not to exceed 0.5 percent by weight of the flour used. (2) As a conditioning agent in...

  6. 49 CFR 172.802 - Components of a security plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... from origin to destination, including shipments stored incidental to movement. (b) The security plan must also include the following: (1) Identification by job title of the senior management official... business and must make the security plan available upon request, at a reasonable time and location, to an...

  7. 172 ANALYSIS OF URBAN DECAY FROM LOW RESOLUTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    temporal pattern of urban decay in different parts of a traditional organic city through ... c. Twenty percent or more of the residential structures were in need of major ... the body of the city which must be removed through surgical blades of urban ... Figure 1. Pay-off matrix of urban blight development. (Adapted from Sule 1980).

  8. 21 CFR 172.270 - Sulfated butyl oleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION... edible vegetable oil using 1-butanol. Following sulfation, the reaction mixture is washed with water and...

  9. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...). Copies may be examined at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Library, Food and Drug... ingredient is used as a thickener, emulsifier, or stabilizer in alcoholic beverages at a use level not to exceed 20 percent in the final beverage. [70 FR 8034, Feb. 17, 2005] ...

  10. All projects related to | Page 172 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Data on sexual violence against women and men, both during and after conflicts, shows alarming levels of abuse across the globe. Start Date: April 1, 2013. End Date: December 22, 2015. Topic: SOCIAL PROBLEMS, VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN, SEXUAL ABUSE, INFORMATION DISSEMINATION, CONFLICT ...

  11. 21 CFR 172.230 - Microcapsules for flavoring substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Glutaraldehyde—As cross-linking agent for insolubilizing a coacervate of gum arabic and gelatin. n-Octyl alcohol... only for encapsulating lemon oil, distilled lime oil, orange oil, peppermint oil, and spearmint oil for...

  12. 21 CFR 172.120 - Calcium disodium EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... malt beverages 25 Antigushing agent. French dressing 75 Preservative. Legumes (all cooked canned, other... Promote color and flavor retention. Spreads, artificially colored and lemon-flavored or orange-flavored...

  13. 12 CFR 308.172 - Eligibility of applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for remuneration for the applicant, under its direction and control, on the date the adversary... indirectly owns or controls a majority of the voting shares. The Board of Directors may, however, on the... addition, the Board of Directors may determine that financial relationships of the applicant other than...

  14. 21 CFR 172.892 - Food starch-modified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... treatment with the following enzymes: Enzyme Limitations Alpha-amylase (E.C. 3.2.1.1) The enzyme must be... 3 percent, followed by treatment with a beta-amylase enzyme that is either an approved food additive... nutritive saccharide polymer has a dextrose equivalent of less than 20. Beta-amylase (E.C. 3.2.1.2...

  15. 21 CFR 172.560 - Modified hop extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., ethyl alcohol, or isopropyl alcohol acidified with hydrochloric or sulfuric acid; oxidation with peracetic acid; isomerization by calcium chloride or magnesium chloride treatment in ethylene dichloride...

  16. What we do | Page 172 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Economic Reform, Firm Survival and Competitiveness (Middle East and North Africa). During the 1980s, it was thought that liberalizing trade and exposing industries to competition would result in the loss of some firms but a more productive and competitive industrial sector as a whole. Middle East, North Of Sahara, South Of ...

  17. 32 CFR 172.2 - Applicability and scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... scrap or discarded as waste, but are capable of being reused after undergoing some type of physical or... recognition of the types of materials being processed and the applicable regulation governing the handling and... been routinely sold with the proceeds being used to offset customer costs. (iv) Bones, fats, and meat...

  18. 42 CFR 413.172 - Principles of prospective payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End... methodology used to establish payment rates and the changes specified in § 413.196(b) in the Federal Register...

  19. 40 CFR 97.172 - Out of control periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Out of control periods. (a) Whenever any monitoring system fails to meet the quality-assurance and... appendix E to, part 75 of this chapter. (b) Audit decertification. Whenever both an audit of a monitoring... the time of the audit, the Administrator will issue a notice of disapproval of the certification...

  20. 49 CFR 172.800 - Purpose and applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... packaging such as a cargo tank motor vehicle, portable tank, tank car, or other bulk container. (1) Any... emulsions, suspensions, or gels; (11) Any quantity of organic peroxide, Type B, liquid or solid, temperature...

  1. 21 CFR 172.515 - Synthetic flavoring substances and adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... 3-Octanol. 2-Octanone; methyl hexyl ketone. 3-Octanone; ethyl amyl ketone. 3-Octanon-1-ol. 1-Octen-3...; isodecylaldehyde. 3,7-Dimethyl-1-octanol; tetrahydrogeraniol. α,α-Dimethylphenethyl acetate; benzylpropyl acetate...)-nonanamide; pelargonyl vanillylamide. 5-Hydroxy-4-octanone; butyroin. 4-(p-Hydroxyphenyl)-2-butanone; p-hy...

  2. 21 CFR 172.859 - Sucrose fatty acid esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... as safe in food or regulated for such use by an appropriate section in this part. Ethyl acetate or... fresh apples, avocados, bananas, banana plantains, limes, melons (honeydew and cantaloupe), papaya...

  3. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to the Division of Credit Practices, Bureau of Consumer Protection. Such interpretations represent informal staff... the matter. Administrative action to effect correction of minor infractions on a voluntary basis is...

  4. Dicty_cDB: SSJ172 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cDNA library MtBC from arbuscular mycorrhiza of cultivar Jemalong of Medicago tru...te cds. 494 e-147 3 AL386374 |AL386374.1 Medicago truncatula EST MtBC34C06F1 : T3 end of clone MtBC34C06 of

  5. 21 CFR 172.834 - Ethoxylated mono- and diglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... percent by weight of the finished icings. 5. As an emulsifier in frozen desserts Not to exceed 0.2 percent by weight of the finished frozen desserts. 6. As an emulsifier in edible vegetable fat-water...

  6. Road Materials and Pavement Design volume 17(2)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Materials and Pavement Design Volume 17, 2016 - Issue 2 Editorial Board Page ebi | Published online: 03 Oct 2016  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14680629.2016.1244475 Editors-in-Chief Hervé DI BENEDETTO - University of Lyon/ENTPE, Vaulx-en-Velin, France...

  7. 40 CFR 172.24 - State issuance of permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... animals for testing purposes, or otherwise disposed of in a manner which will not endanger man or the... Cosmetic Act; and (ii) The proposed program would not reasonably be expected to result in residues of the..., Drug and Cosmetic Act; and (iii) All inert ingredients in the pesticide are exempted from the...

  8. Dicty_cDB: SSE172 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available trep. 216 3e-54 2 X85119 |X85119.1 Artificial sequences cloning vector DNA pDXA-3...H. 216 3e-54 2 X85122 |X85122.1 Artificial sequences cloning vector DNA pDXA-HY. 216 3e-54 2 AJ510165 |AJ510...165.1 Cloning vector pDXA-3FLAG. 216 3e-54 2 X85118 |X85118.1 Artificial sequences cloning vector DNA pDXA-3...C. 216 3e-54 2 X85123 |X85123.1 Artificial sequences cloning vector DNA pDXA-HC. ...216 3e-54 2 AF269236 |AF269236.1 Cloning vector pDXA-FLAG, complete sequence. 216 3e-54 2 X85120 |X85120.1 Artificial sequences cloni

  9. 21 CFR 172.215 - Coumarone-indene resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... examined at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of... fresh-weight basis. (d) To assure safe use of the additive: (1) The label of the market package or any...

  10. 1935 15' Quad #172 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  11. 30 CFR 62.172 - Evaluation of audiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... diagnoses unrelated to the miner's hearing loss due to occupational noise or the wearing of hearing... audiogram is valid; and (ii) Determine if a standard threshold shift or a reportable hearing loss, as... hearing loss, the mine operator may provide one retest within 30 calendar days of receiving the results of...

  12. 29 CFR 1952.172 - Level of Federal enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., and Ron Rinaldi, Director, California Department of Industrial Relations, effective October 5, 1989... access of the shore). (iii) All afloat marine ship building and repair from the foot of the gangway. (iv) All ship building and repair in graving docks or dry docks. (v) All ship repairing done in marine...

  13. 49 CFR 172.510 - Special placarding provisions: Rail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) White square background. The following must have the specified placards placed on a white square... Hazard Zone A or 6.1 Packing Group I Hazard Zone A which require POISON GAS or POISON placards affixed to... this subchapter) must be placarded EXPLOSIVES 1.1 or EXPLOSIVES 1.2 and POISON GAS or POISON INHALATION...

  14. 49 CFR 172.203 - Additional description requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... label applied to each package in the shipment. For example: “RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I.” (5) The transport... poisonous by inhalation (see § 171.8 of this subchapter), the words “Poison-Inhalation Hazard” or “Toxic... description. The word “Poison” or “Toxic” need not be repeated if it otherwise appears in the shipping...

  15. Practice Bulletin No. 172: Premature Rupture of Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Preterm delivery occurs in approximately 12% of all births in the United States and is a major factor that contributes to perinatal morbidity and mortality (1, 2). Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PROM) complicates approximately 3% of all pregnancies in the United States (3). The optimal approach to clinical assessment and treatment of women with term and preterm PROM remains controversial. Management hinges on knowledge of gestational age and evaluation of the relative risks of delivery versus the risks of expectant management (eg, infection, abruptio placentae, and umbilical cord accident). The purpose of this document is to review the current understanding of this condition and to provide management guidelines that have been validated by appropriately conducted outcome-based research when available. Additional guidelines on the basis of consensus and expert opinion also are presented.

  16. Publications | Page 172 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Participatory Research and Development for Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management - A Sourcebook Volume 1 : Understanding Participatory Research and ... Plus tard, ce processus s'est approfondi et ancré à la faveur des négociations de l'Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) et il.

  17. Hexanuclear, heterometallic, Ni₃Ln₃ complexes possessing O-capped homo- and heterometallic structural subunits: SMM behavior of the dysprosium analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goura, Joydeb; Guillaume, Rogez; Rivière, Eric; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2014-08-04

    The reaction of hetero donor chelating mannich base ligand 6,6'-{(2-(dimethylamino)ethylazanediyl)bis(methylene)}bis(2-methoxy-4-methylphenol) with Ni(ClO4)2·6H2O and lanthanide(III) salts [Dy(III) (1); Tb(III) (2); Gd (III) (3); Ho(III) (4); and Er(III) (5)] in the presence of triethylamine and pivalic acid afforded a series of heterometallic hexanuclear Ni(II)-Ln(III) coordination compounds, [Ni3Ln3(μ3-O)(μ3-OH)3(L)3(μ-OOCCMe3)3]·(ClO4)·wCH3CN·xCH2Cl2·yCH3OH·zH2O [for 1, w = 8, x = 3, y = 0, z = 5.5; for 2, w = 0, x = 5, y = 0, z = 6.5; for 3, w = 15, x = 18, y = 3, z = 7.5; for 4, w = 15, x = 20, y = 6, z = 9.5; and for 5, w = 0, x = 3, y = 2, z = 3]. The molecular structure of these complexes reveals the presence of a monocationic hexanuclear derivative containing one perchlorate counteranion. The asymmetric unit of each of the hexanuclear derivatives comprises the dinuclear motif [NiLn(L)(μ3-O)(μ3-OH)(μ-Piv)]. The cation contains three interlinked O-capped clusters: one Ln(III)3O and three Ni(II)Ln(III)2O. Each of the lanthanide centers is eight- coordinated (distorted trigonal-dodecahedron), while the nickel centers are hexacoordinate (distorted octahedral). The study of the magnetic properties of all compounds are reported and suggests single molecule magnet behavior for the Dy(III) derivative (1).

  18. Enhancement of lanthanide evaporation by complexation: Dysprosium tri-iodide mixed with indium iodide and thulium tri-iodide mixed with thallium iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, J. J.; Henins, A.; Hardis, J. E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Estupiñán, E. G. [OSRAM SYLVANIA Inc., 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States); Lapatovich, W. P. [Walter Lapatovich Consulting, 51 Pye Brook Lane, Boxford, Massachusetts 01921 (United States); Shastri, S. D. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2013-09-28

    The vapors in equilibrium with condensates of DyI{sub 3}, DyI{sub 3}/InI, TmI{sub 3}, and TmI{sub 3}/TlI were observed over the temperature range from 900 K to 1400 K using x-ray induced fluorescence. The total densities of each element (Dy, Tm, In, Tl, and I) in the vapor, summed over all atomic and molecular species, were determined. Dramatic enhancements in the total vapor densities of Dy and Tm were observed in the vapors over DyI{sub 3}/InI and TmI{sub 3}/TlI as compared to the vapors over pure DyI{sub 3} and pure TmI{sub 3}, respectively. An enhancement factor exceeding 10 was observed for Dy at T≈ 1020 K, decreasing to 0 at T≈ 1250 K. An enhancement factor exceeding 20 was observed for Tm at T≈ 1040 K, decreasing to 0 at T≈ 1300 K. Such enhancements are expected from the formation of the vapor-phase hetero-complexes DyInI{sub 4} and TmTlI{sub 4}. Numerical simulations of the thermo-chemical equilibrium suggest the importance of additional complexes in liquid phases. A description of the measurement technique is given. Improvements in the absolute calibration lead to an approximately 40% correction to previously reported preliminary results [J. J. Curry et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 507, 52 (2011); Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 083505 (2012)].

  19. Complexation behaviour of DADCA and DAPDA with dysprosium-166/holmium-166 parent daughter system and its potential for use in radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsini, S.; University of Technology, Broadway, NSW; Di Bartolo, N.; Smith, S.; Baker, T.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A novel approach for the delivery of therapeutic doses from 166 Ho to cancerous tissue is via the decay of its parent, 166 Dy. When designing radioimmunoconjugte, a crucial question is to determine whether the ligand used in the radiolabeling process is capable of holding the 166 Ho on decay of the parent, 166 Dy. In this study, two pendant arm macrocycles 1, 10-Diaza-4, 7, 13, 16-tetraoxacyclooctadecane-N, N'-diacetic acid, (DACDA) and 1, 10-Diaza-4, 7, 13-trioxacyclopentadecane-N, N'-diacetic acid, (DAPDA) that were reported to forms reasonably stable complexes with Dy and Ho, were synthesised. The synthesis of the two pendant arm macrocycles was first attempted using methods outlined by Chang and Rowland. The yields obtained through this method were low (10 % for both ligands) and it was considered important to investigate alternative approaches to the synthesis. The new method involved an alkylation reaction in the presence of acetonitrile and sodium bicarbonate. The method took considerably less time and the yields increased to 88 %. The ligands were characterised using 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR and mass spectrometry. The chemical and radiolytic stabilities of 166 Dy and 166 Ho complexes of the two ligands were investigated at pH = 5 and the ligands potential for use in the in vivo generator system evaluated

  20. CCDC 1402057: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : pentakis(tetra-n-butylammonium) tetrakis(mu-oxalato)-dodecachloro-tetranitrosyl-ethanol-tetra-ruthenium-dysprosium sesquihydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Kuhn, Paul-Steffen; Cremer, Laura; Gavriluta, Anatolie; Jovanović, Katarina K.; Filipović, Lana; Hummer, Alfred A.; Bü chel, Gabriel E.; Dojčinović, Biljana P.; Meier, Samuel M.; Rompel, Annette; Radulović, Siniša; Tommasino, Jean Bernard; Luneau, Dominique; Arion, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.