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Sample records for dyspnea scale relationships

  1. MRC chronic Dyspnea Scale: Relationships with cardiopulmonary exercise testing and 6-minute walk test in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients: a prospective study

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    Roussos Charis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exertional dyspnea is the most prominent and disabling feature in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. The Medical Research Chronic (MRC chronic dyspnea score as well as physiological measurements obtained during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET and the 6-minute walk test (6MWT are shown to provide information on the severity and survival of disease. Methods We prospectively recruited IPF patients and examined the relationship between the MRC score and either CPET or 6MWT parameters known to reflect physiologic derangements limiting exercise capacity in IPF patients Results Twenty-five patients with IPF were included in the study. Significant correlations were found between the MRC score and the distance (r = -.781, p 2 at the initiation and the end (r = -.542, p = 0.005 and r = -.713, p VO2 peak/kg (r = -.731, p 2 at peak exercise (r = -. 682, p 2 slope (r = .731, p 2 at AT (r = .630, p = 0.002 and the Borg scale at peak exercise (r = .50, p = 0.01 for the CPET. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the only variable independently related to the MRC is the distance walked at the 6MWT. Conclusion In this population of IPF patients a good correlation was found between the MRC chronic dyspnoea score and physiological parameters obtained during maximal and submaximal exercise testing known to reflect ventilatory impairment and exercise limitation as well as disease severity and survival. This finding is described for the first time in the literature in this group of patients as far as we know and could explain why a simple chronic dyspnea score provides reliable prognostic information on IPF.

  2. Relationship between Dyspnea Descriptors and Underlying Causes of the Symptom; a Cross-sectional Study.

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    Sajadi, Seyyed Mohammad Ali; Majidi, Alireza; Abdollahimajd, Fahimeh; Jalali, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    History taking and physical examination help clinicians identify the patient's problem and effectively treat it. This study aimed to evaluate the descriptors of dyspnea in patients presenting to emergency department (ED) with asthma, congestive heart failure (CHF), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This cross-sectional study was conducted on all patients presenting to ED with chief complaint of dyspnea, during 2 years. The patients were asked to describe their dyspnea by choosing three items from the valid and reliable questionnaire or articulating their sensation. The relationship between dyspnea descriptors and underlying cause of symptom was evaluated using SPSS version 16. 312 patients with the mean age of 60.96±17.01 years were evaluated (53.2% male). Most of the patients were > 65 years old (48.7%) and had basic level of education (76.9%). "My breath doesn't go out all the way" with 83.1%, "My chest feels tight " with 45.8%, and "I feel that my airway is obstructed" with 40.7%, were the most frequent dyspnea descriptors in asthma patients. "My breathing requires work" with 46.3%, "I feel that I am suffocating" with 31.5%, and "My breath doesn't go out all the way" with 29.6%, were the most frequent dyspnea descriptors in COPD patients. "My breathing is heavy" with 74.4%, "A hunger for more air" with 24.4%, and "I cannot get enough air" with 23.2%, were the most frequent dyspnea descriptors in CHF patients. Except for "My breath does not go in all the way", there was significant correlation between studied dyspnea descriptors and underlying disease (p = 0.001 for all analyses). It seems that dyspnea descriptors along with other findings from history and physical examination could be helpful in differentiating the causes of the symptom in patients presenting to ED suffering from dyspnea.

  3. Evaluation of three scales of dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Chhabra, S K; Gupta, A K; Khuma, M Z

    2009-01-01

    The Modified Medical Research Council (MMRC) scale, baseline dyspnea index (BDI) and the oxygen cost diagram (OCD) are widely used tools for evaluation of limitation of activities due to dyspnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There is, however, limited information on how these relate with each other and with multiple parameters of physiological impairment. To study the interrelationships between MMRC, BDI and OCD scales of dyspnea and their correlation with multiple measures of physiological impairment. A retrospective analysis of pooled data of 88 male patients with COPD (GOLD stages 2, 3 and 4) was carried out. Dyspnea was evaluated using the MMRC, BDI and OCD scales. Physiological impairment was assessed by spirometry (FVC % predicted and FEV 1 % predicted), arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis and measurement of the 6-min walk distance (6MWD). The interrelationships between MMRC, BDI and OCD scales were moderately strong. The BDI and OCD scores had strong correlations with ABG abnormalities, weak correlations with spirometric parameters but none with 6MWD. MMRC grades were significantly associated with BDI and OCD scores but did not show clear associations with spirometric parameters, ABG abnormalities and 6MWD. The MMRC grades of dyspnea and the BDI and OCD scales are moderately interrelated. While the BDI and OCD scales have significant associations with parameters of physiological impairment, the MMRC scale does not. (author)

  4. [Development of an activity of daily living scale for patients with COPD: the Activity of Daily Living Dyspnea scale].

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    Yoza, Yoshiyasu; Ariyoshi, Koya; Honda, Sumihisa; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Senjyu, Hideaki

    2009-10-01

    Patients with COPD often experience restriction in their activities of daily living (ADL) due to dyspnea. This type of restriction is unique to patients with COPD and cannot be adequately evaluated by the generic ADL scales. This study developed an ADL scale (the Activity of Daily Living Dyspnea scale [ADL-D scale]) for patients with COPD and investigated its validity and internal consistency. Patients with stable COPD were recruited and completed a pilot 26-item questionnaire. Patients also performed the Incremental Shuttle Walk Test (ISWT), and completed the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnea grade. There were 83 male participants who completed the pilot questionnaire. Following the pilot, 8 items that were not undertaken by the majority of subjects, and 3 items judged to be of low clinical importance by physical therapists were removed from the pilot questionnaire. The final ADL-D scale contained 15 items. Scores obtained with the ADL-D scale were significantly correlated with the MRC dyspnea grades, distance walked on the ISWT and SGRQ scores. The ADL-D scores were significantly different across the five grades of the MRC dyspnea grade. The ADL-D scale showed high consistency (Chronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.96). The ADL-D scale is a useful scale for assessing impairments in ADL in Japanese male patients with COPD.

  5. Relationship Among Pulmonary Hypertension, Autoimmunity, Thyroid Hormones and Dyspnea in Patients With Hyperthyroidism.

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    Zuhur, Sayid Shafi; Baykiz, Derya; Kara, Sonat Pinar; Sahin, Ertan; Kuzu, Idris; Elbuken, Gulsah

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have reported conflicting results regarding the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension (PHT) in patients with hyperthyroidism. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the association between PHT and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody, thyroid peroxidase antibody, thyroglobulin antibody, TSH, fT3, fT4 and dyspnea during daily activities in a large population of patients with hyperthyroidism. A total of 129 consecutive patients with hyperthyroidism, 37 with hypothyroidism and 38 euthyroid controls were enrolled in this study. The modified medical research council scale was used for the assessment of dyspnea in daily activities. All the patients and euthyroid controls underwent transthoracic echocardiography for the assessment of PHT. Mild PHT was present in 35%, 36%, 13.5% and 5% of the patients with Graves׳ disease, toxic multinodular goiter, hypothyroidism and euthyroid controls, respectively. Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was higher in hyperthyroid patients with PHT than in those without PHT. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between modified medical research council scale and pulmonary artery systolic pressure as well as PVR in patients with hyperthyroidism. No association was found between PHT and serum TSH receptor antibody, thyroid peroxidase antibody, thyroglobulin antibody, TSH, fT3 and fT4 levels. Mild PHT is present in a significant proportion of patients with hyperthyroidism, regardless of etiology. PVR appears to be the main cause of PHT in patients with hyperthyroidism, and neither autoimmunity nor thyroid hormones are associated with PHT in these patients. Mild dyspnea during daily activities in patients with hyperthyroidism may be related to PHT; however, severe dyspnea requires further evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationship between anxiety and dyspnea on exertion in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    de Voogd, J.N.; Sanderman, R.; Postema, K.; van Sonderen, E.; Wempe, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Dyspnea limits exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is known to induce anxiety. Little is known whether anxiety contributes to exercise-induced dyspnea, which in turn might influence the outcome of diagnostic tests. The aim of the present study was to examine

  7. Psychogenic dyspnea

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    Tushar R Sahasrabudhe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyspnea is a very common presenting complaint of a patient. Though commonly due to an organic disease, dyspnea can be a manifestation of underlying anxiety disorder. Three typical patterns of psychogenic dyspnea, viz. panic attack, psychogenic hyperventilation, and compulsive sighing, have been reviewed in this article. The article also comments on the diagnostic features and treatment of these patterns. The overlap with organic causes of dyspnea such as bronchial asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD has also been discussed. For literature review, a Medline and Pubmed search was conducted using appropriate keywords. Articles were also identified from the authors′ own knowledge of the literature as well as reference lists in articles retrieved.

  8. Relationships between respiratory and airway resistances and activity-related dyspnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Plantier L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Mahut1,2, Aurore Caumont-Prim3,4, Laurent Plantier1,5, Karine Gillet-Juvin1,6, Etienne Callens1, Olivier Sanchez5,6, Brigitte Chevalier-Bidaud3, Plamen Bokov1, Christophe Delclaux1,5,71Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Service de Physiologie – Clinique de la Dyspnée, F-75015 Paris, France; 2Cabinet La Berma, 4 avenue de la Providence; F-92160 Antony, France; 3AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Unité d'Épidémiologie et de Recherche Clinique, F-75015 Paris, France; 4INSERM, Centre d'Investigation Épidémiologique 4, F-75015 Paris, France; 5Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, F-75015 Paris, France; 6AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Service de Pneumologie; F-75015 Paris, France; 7CIC 9201 Plurithématique, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, F-75015 Paris, FranceBackground: The aims of the study were: (1 to compare numerical parameters of specific airway resistance (total, sRawtot, effective, sRaweff and at 0.5 L • s-1, sRaw0.5 and indices obtained from the forced oscillation technique (FOT: resistance extrapolated at 0 Hz [Rrs0 Hz], mean resistance [Rrsmean], and resistance/frequency slope [Rrsslope] and (2 to assess their relationships with dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Methods: A specific statistical approach, principal component analysis that also allows graphic representation of all correlations between functional parameters was used. A total of 108 patients (mean ± SD age: 65 ± 9 years, 31 women; GOLD stages: I, 14; II, 47; III, 39 and IV, 8 underwent spirometry, body plethysmography, FOT, and Medical Research Council (MRC scale assessments.Results: Principal component analysis determined that the functional parameters were described by three independent dimensions (airway caliber, lung volumes and their combination, specific resistance and that resistance parameters of the two techniques

  9. Gender effect on the use of modified borg and visual analog scales in the evaluation of dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Ilgin, D.; Ozalevli, S.; Karaali, H.K.; Cimrin, A.H.; Ucan, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the gender effect on the use of Modified Borg Scale (MBS) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for the effort dyspnea evaluation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients. Fifty-two patients with severe COPD were included in this study. Pulmonary function (spirometry), quality of life (Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire-CRDQ), exercise capacity (6-minute walking test), and dyspnea severity (Modified Borg and Visual Analog Scales) were evaluated. The dyspnea severity scores were higher and walking distance was shorter in women (p<0.05). The scores of the both scales were correlated with each other in both genders (p<0.05). In men, the dyspnea scores obtained by MBS and VAS scales were significantly correlated with 6-minute walking distance (p=0.001) and total score of CRDQ (p=0.001). On the other hand, the dyspnea severity score of the women obtained by MBS was correlated with only the total score of CRDQ (p<0.05). The results of our study show that gender has an effect on dyspnea perception obtained by MBS and VAS. We suggest that MBS and VAS should be used for men whereas MBS may be more convenient for women in the evaluation of dyspnea in severe COPD. (author)

  10. Defining the minimal important difference for the visual analogue scale assessing dyspnea in patients with malignant pleural effusions.

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    Eleanor K Mishra

    Full Text Available The minimal important difference (MID is essential for interpreting the results of randomised controlled trials (RCTs. Despite a number of RCTs in patients with malignant pleural effusions (MPEs which use the visual analogue scale for dyspnea (VASD as an outcome measure, the MID has not been established.Patients with suspected MPE undergoing a pleural procedure recorded their baseline VASD and their post-procedure VASD (24 hours after the pleural drainage, and in parallel assessed their breathlessness on a 7 point Likert scale.The mean decrease in VASD in patients with a MPE reporting a 'small but just worthwhile decrease' in their dyspnea (i.e. equivalent to the MID was 19mm (95% CI 14-24mm. The mean drainage volume required to produce a change in VASD of 19mm was 760ml.The mean MID for the VASD in patients with a MPE undergoing a pleural procedure is 19mm (95% CI 14-24mm. Thus choosing an improvement of 19mm in the VASD would be justifiable in the design and analysis of future MPE studies.

  11. Diaphragmatic mobility: relationship with lung function, respiratory muscle strength, dyspnea, and physical activity in daily life in patients with COPD.

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    Rocha, Flávia Roberta; Brüggemann, Ana Karla Vieira; Francisco, Davi de Souza; Medeiros, Caroline Semprebom de; Rosal, Danielle; Paulin, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate diaphragmatic mobility in relation to lung function, respiratory muscle strength, dyspnea, and physical activity in daily life (PADL) in patients with COPD. We included 25 patients with COPD, classified according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease criteria, and 25 healthy individuals. For all of the participants, the following were evaluated: anthropometric variables, spirometric parameters, respiratory muscle strength, diaphragmatic mobility (by X-ray), PADL, and the perception of dyspnea. In the COPD group, diaphragmatic mobility was found to correlate with lung function variables, inspiratory muscle strength, and the perception of dyspnea, whereas it did not correlate with expiratory muscle strength or PADL. In patients with COPD, diaphragmatic mobility seems to be associated with airway obstruction and lung hyperinflation, as well as with ventilatory capacity and the perception of dyspnea, although not with PADL. Avaliar a relação da mobilidade diafragmática com a função pulmonar, força muscular respiratória, dispneia e atividade física de vida diária (AFVD) em pacientes com DPOC. Foram avaliados 25 pacientes com diagnóstico de DPOC, classificados de acordo com critérios da Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, e 25 indivíduos saudáveis. Todos foram submetidos às seguintes avaliações: mensuração antropométrica, espirometria, força muscular respiratória, mobilidade diafragmática (por radiografia), AFVD e percepção de dispneia. No grupo DPOC, houve correlações da mobilidade diafragmática com variáveis de função pulmonar, força muscular inspiratória e percepção de dispneia. Não houve correlações da mobilidade diafragmática com força muscular expiratória e AFVD. A mobilidade diafragmática parece estar associada tanto com a obstrução das vias aéreas quanto com a hiperinsuflação pulmonar em pacientes com DPOC, assim como com a capacidade ventilatória e percep

  12. The five-point Likert scale for dyspnea can properly assess the degree of pulmonary congestion and predict adverse events in heart failure outpatients

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    Cristina K. Weber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Proper assessment of dyspnea is important in patients with heart failure. Our aim was to evaluate the use of the 5-point Likert scale for dyspnea to assess the degree of pulmonary congestion and to determine the prognostic value of this scale for predicting adverse events in heart failure outpatients. METHODS: We undertook a prospective study of outpatients with moderate to severe heart failure. The 5-point Likert scale was applied during regular outpatient visits, along with clinical assessments. Lung ultrasound with ≥15 B-lines and an amino-terminal portion of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP level >1000 pg/mL were used as a reference for pulmonary congestion. The patients were then assessed every 30 days during follow-up to identify adverse clinical outcomes. RESULTS: We included 58 patients (65.5% male, age 43.5±11 years with a mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 27±6%. In total, 29.3% of these patients had heart failure with ischemic etiology. Additionally, pulmonary congestion, as diagnosed by lung ultrasound, was present in 58% of patients. A higher degree of dyspnea (3 or 4 points on the 5-point Likert scale was significantly correlated with a higher number of B-lines (p = 0.016. Patients stratified into Likert = 3-4 were at increased risk of admission compared with those in class 1-2 after adjusting for age, left ventricular ejection fraction, New York Heart Association functional class and levels of NT-proBNP >1000 pg/mL (HR = 4.9, 95% CI 1.33-18.64, p = 0.017. CONCLUSION: In our series, higher baseline scores on the 5-point Likert scale were related to pulmonary congestion and were independently associated with adverse events during follow-up. This simple clinical tool can help to identify patients who are more likely to decompensate and whose treatment should be intensified.

  13. Hemodynamic determinants of dyspnea improvement in acute decompensated heart failure.

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    Solomonica, Amir; Burger, Andrew J; Aronson, Doron

    2013-01-01

    Dyspnea relief constitutes a major treatment goal and a key measure of treatment efficacy in decompensated heart failure. However, there are no data with regard to the relationship between hemodynamic measurements during treatment and dyspnea improvement. We studied 233 patients assigned to right heart catheterization in the Vasodilation in the Management of Acute Congestive Heart Failure trial. Dyspnea (assessed using a 7-point Likert scale) and hemodynamic parameters were measured simultaneously at 15 and 30 minutes and 1, 2, 3, 6, and 24 hours. Dyspnea relief was defined as moderate or marked improvement. There was a time-dependent association between the reductions in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP; 25.4, 24.6, 24.0, 23.5, 23.4, 21.5, and 19.9 mm Hg) and the percentage of patients achieving dyspnea relief (17.7%, 24.6%, 32.2%, 36.2%, 37.8%, 47.4%, and 66.1%, in the respective time points). Multivariable logistic generalized estimating equations modeling demonstrated that reductions of both PCWP and mean pulmonary artery pressure were independently associated with dyspnea relief. Compared with the highest PCWP quartile, the adjusted odds ratios for dyspnea relief were 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-1.29), 1.07 (95% CI, 0.75-1.55), and 1.80 (95% CI, 1.22-2.65) in the third, second, and first PCWP quartiles, respectively (P(trend)=0.003). Compared with the highest mean pulmonary artery pressure quartile, the adjusted odds ratios for dyspnea relief were 2.0 (95% CI, 1.41-2.82), 2.23 (95% CI, 1.52-3.27), and 2.98 (95% CI, 1.91-4.66) in the third, second, and first mean pulmonary artery pressure quartiles, respectively (P(trend)<0.0001). A clinically significant improvement in dyspnea is associated with a reduction in both PCWP and mean pulmonary artery pressure.

  14. The Interpretation of Dyspnea in the Patient with Asthma

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    Marc H. Lavietes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians have noted dyspnea in severely ill asthmatic patients to be associated with fright or panic; in more stable patients dyspnea may reflect characteristics including lung function, personality and behavioral traits. This study evaluates the symptom of dyspnea in 32 asthmatic patients twice: first when acutely ill and again after an initial response to therapy. Spirometry was performed, dyspnea quantified (Borg scale, and panic assessed with a specialized measure of acute panic (the acute panic inventory (API in the 32 patients before and again after treatment. After treatment, questionnaires to evaluate somatization and panic disorder were also administered. When acutely ill, both the API and all spirometric measures (PEFR; FEV1; IC correlated with dyspnea. Multiple linear regression showed that measures of the API, the peak expiratory flow rate, and female sex taken together accounted for 41% of dyspnea in acute asthma. After treatment, the API again predicted dyspnea while spirometric data did not. Those subjects who described themselves as having chronic panic disorder reported high grades of dyspnea after treatment also. We conclude that interpretations of the self-report of asthma differ between acutely ill and stable asthmatic patients.

  15. Comparing dynamic hyperinflation and associated dyspnea induced by metronome-paced tachypnea versus incremental exercise.

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    Calligaro, Gregory L; Raine, Richard I; Bateman, Mary E; Bateman, Eric D; Cooper, Christopher B

    2014-02-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) during exercise is associated with both dyspnea and exercise limitation in COPD. Metronome-paced tachypnoea (MPT) is a simple alternative for studying DH. We compared MPT with exercise testing (XT) as methods of provoking DH, and assessed their relationship with dyspnea. We studied 24 patients with moderate COPD (FEV1 59 ± 9% predicted) after inhalation of ipratropium/salbutamol combination or placebo in a double-blind, crossover design. Inspiratory capacity (IC) was measured at baseline and after 30 seconds of MPT with breathing frequencies (fR) of 20, 30 and 40 breaths/min and metronome-defined I:E ratios of 1:1 and 1:2, in random sequence, followed by incremental cycle ergometry with interval determinations of IC. DH was defined as a decline in IC from baseline (∆IC) for both methods. Dyspnea was assessed using a Borg CR-10 scale. ∆IC during MPT was greater with higher fR and I:E ratio of 1:1 versus 1:2, and less when patients were treated with bronchodilator rather than placebo (P = 0.032). DH occurred during 19 (40%) XTs, and during 35 (73%) tests using MPT. Eleven of 18 (61%) non-congruent XTs (where DH occurred on MPT but not XT) terminated before fR of 40 breaths/min was reached. Although greater during XT, the intensity of dyspnea bore no relationship to DH during either MPT and XT. MPT at 40 breaths/min and I:E of 1:1 elicits the greatest ∆IC, and is a more sensitive method for demonstrating DH. The relationship between DH and dyspnea is complex and not determined by DH alone.

  16. Analysis of Depression and Anxiety Levels in Patients with Dyspnea

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    Servet Kayhan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of anxiety and depression in a sample of elderly patients with chronic respiratory failure and the relationships between these comorbidities and the severity of dyspnea. Material and Method: Sixty-four consecutive inpatients with asthma and chronic obstructive disease were evaluated in a chest disease hospital. A questionnaire including sociodemographic features was applied to patients and healthy control group. Anxiety was assessed by Spielberg state and trait anxiety scale, and depression by Beck depression inventory. Spirometric tests, respiratory symptoms and severity of dyspnea were evaluated in the study group. Results: The mean age of study group was 67.28±9.13 (range between 50-88 years. Of those 22 (34.4% were females and 42 (65.6% were males. The mean Beck depression inventory scores of the group was 18.42±10.00 (range between 5-47, the mean Spielberg’s state anxiety score was 40.20±8.13 and the mean Spielberg’s trait score was 44.70±7.94 these results were close to control group. Depression with Beck depression inventory scores was diagnosed in 24 (37.5%, absent or mild depression in 40 (62.5%, moderate depression in 13 (20.3% and severe depression in 11 (17.2% patients. There was a relation between age and depression scores (p=0.022. Depression scores, Spielberg’s state and trait inventory scores were found statistically related with each other. Discussion: The results of the present study support that anxiety and depressive disorders are found with a high incidence in patients with respiratory impairments but the severity of dyspnea measures does not affect the scores of depression and anxiety.

  17. Particle Bed Reactor scaling relationships

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    Slovik, G.; Araj, K.; Horn, F.L.; Ludewig, H.; Benenati, R.

    1987-01-01

    Scaling relationships for Particle Bed Reactors (PBRs) are discussed. The particular applications are short duration systems, i.e., for propulsion or burst power. Particle Bed Reactors can use a wide selection of different moderators and reflectors and be designed for such a wide range of power and bed power densities. Additional design considerations include the effect of varying the number of fuel elements, outlet Mach number in hot gas channel, etc. All of these variables and options result in a wide range of reactor weights and performance. Extremely light weight reactors (approximately 1 kg/MW) are possible with the appropriate choice of moderator/reflector and power density. Such systems are very attractive for propulsion systems where parasitic weight has to be minimized

  18. Brain Responses during the Anticipation of Dyspnea.

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    Stoeckel, M Cornelia; Esser, Roland W; Gamer, Matthias; Büchel, Christian; von Leupoldt, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is common in many cardiorespiratory diseases. Already the anticipation of this aversive symptom elicits fear in many patients resulting in unfavorable health behaviors such as activity avoidance and sedentary lifestyle. This study investigated brain mechanisms underlying these anticipatory processes. We induced dyspnea using resistive-load breathing in healthy subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Blocks of severe and mild dyspnea alternated, each preceded by anticipation periods. Severe dyspnea activated a network of sensorimotor, cerebellar, and limbic areas. The left insular, parietal opercular, and cerebellar cortices showed increased activation already during dyspnea anticipation. Left insular and parietal opercular cortex showed increased connectivity with right insular and anterior cingulate cortex when severe dyspnea was anticipated, while the cerebellum showed increased connectivity with the amygdala. Notably, insular activation during dyspnea perception was positively correlated with midbrain activation during anticipation. Moreover, anticipatory fear was positively correlated with anticipatory activation in right insular and anterior cingulate cortex. The results demonstrate that dyspnea anticipation activates brain areas involved in dyspnea perception. The involvement of emotion-related areas such as insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and amygdala during dyspnea anticipation most likely reflects anticipatory fear and might underlie the development of unfavorable health behaviors in patients suffering from dyspnea.

  19. Dyspnea assessment and adverse events during sputum induction in COPD

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    Moschandreas Joanna

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inhalation of normal or hypertonic saline during sputum induction (SI may act as an indirect bronchoconstrictive stimulus leading to dyspnea and lung function deterioration. Our aim was to assess dyspnea and adverse events in COPD patients who undergo SI following a safety protocol. Methods Sputum was induced by normal and hypertonic (4.5% saline solution in 65 patients with COPD of varying severity. In order to minimize saline-induced bronchoconstriction a protocol based on the European Respiratory Society sputum induction Task group report was followed. Dyspnea change was scored using the Borg scale and lung function was assessed by spirometry and oximetry. Results Borg score changes [median(IQR 1.5(0–2] were observed during SI in 40 subjects; 16 patients required temporary discontinuation of the procedure due to dyspnea-general discomfort and 2 did not complete the session due to dyspnea-wheezing. The change in Borg dyspnea score was significantly correlated with oxygen saturation and heart rate changes and with discontinuation of the procedure due to undesired symptoms. 19 subjects presented an hyperresponsive reaction (decline>20% from baseline FEV1. No significant correlation between Borg changes and FEV1decline was found. Patients with advanced COPD presented significantly greater Borg and oxygen saturation changes than patients with less severe disease (p = 0.02 and p = 0.001, respectively. Baseline FEV1, oxygen saturation and 6MWT demonstrated significant diagnostic values in distinguishing subjects who develop an adverse physiologic reaction during the procedure. Conclusion COPD patients undergoing SI following a safety protocol do not experience major adverse events. Dyspnea and oxygen desaturation is more likely to occur in patients with disease in advanced stages, leading to short discontinuation or less frequently to termination of the procedure. Baseline FEV1, oxygen saturation and 6MWT may have a

  20. Observational study to analyze patterns of treatment of breakthrough dyspnea in cancer patients in clinical practice.

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    Cabezón-Gutiérrez, Luis; Delgado-Mingorance, Ignacio; Nabal-Vicuña, María; Jiménez-López, Antonio Javier; Cabezón-Álvarez, Ana; Soler-López, Begoña

    2018-06-12

    Although breakthrough dyspnea is very frequent in cancer patients, there are no precise recommendations for treating it. The main objective of this study was to analyze what treatments are used in clinical practice for the management of breakthrough dyspnea in cancer patients in Spain and the secondary objectives were to describe the characteristics of cancer patients with breakthrough dyspnea and the attributes of the disorder. Cancer patients over 18 years of age, with breakthrough dyspnea and a Karnofsky performance score of ≥30, who were treated at departments of oncology in institutes across Spain were included in this cross-sectional observational study. The characteristics of breakthrough dyspnea, history of treatment, anthropometric variables, Mahler dyspnea index, Borg scale, Edmonton Symptoms Assessment Scale, and patient satisfaction with current breakthrough dyspnea treatment were assessed. The mean age of the 149 included patients was 66 years (95% confidence interval: 64.3 to 67.9), and 53 were females (35.6%). The mean breakthrough dyspnea intensity was 5.85 (95% confidence interval 5.48 to 6.22, Borg scale). A total of 55.1% of the first-choice treatments consisted of opioids, followed by oxygen (17.3%). A total of 119 patients (79.9%) received monotherapy for breakthrough dyspnea. Patients presenting with basal dyspnea received oxygen in a greater proportion of cases (21.1% vs 7.4%; p = 0.07). Patients with predictable dyspnea received a greater proportion of opioids (70.9% vs 44.4%; p = 0.01). Opioids constitute first-line therapy for breakthrough dyspnea in routine clinical practice, though the scientific evidence supporting their use is scarce. Further information derived from controlled clinical trials is needed regarding the comparative efficacy of the different treatments in order to justify their use.

  1. [Dyspnea in the terminal stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binsack, T

    2001-10-01

    From all symptoms in palliative medicine those concerning respiration are most excruciating and most difficult to treat. No other symptom is more dependent on psychosocial circumstances and on the atmosphere around the patient. Therefore the relief of respiratory problems is as important as the therapy of pain. A consequent therapy comprises besides drug therapy (adrenocortical steroids, brochodilators, opioids, sedatives and sometimes antibiotics) also physiotherapy and in special cases oncological treatment and radiotherapy. A team present twenty-four hours a day, the training of relatives and friends, the frank dealing with the patient's anxiety of suffocation are the basis of all therapeutic measures. Dyspnea often is the reason for a longer stay in a palliative care unit.

  2. Assessment of dyspnea in terminally III cancer patients. Role of the thoracic surgeon as a palliative care physician

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Kazuo; Nishiumi, Noboru; Masuda, Ryota; Iwazaki, Masayuki; Saito, Yuki; Tokuda, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Many cancer patients suffer from rapidly-progressing dyspnea that is difficult to relieve. The subjects were 26 patients who had dyspnea that was difficult to relieve. The Numeric Rating Scale was used to evaluate their dyspnea. For all patients, the cause of the dyspnea was investigated by CT and x-rays. The principal causes of the dyspnea were pleural effusion that increased daily, complications from pneumonia, massive ascites, multiple metastatic lung tumors and atelectasis, recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis and narrowing secondary airway compression. Dyspnea was caused by a variety of conditions that overlapped over time, intensifying patients' discomfort. Among 14 patients for whom we recommended treatment with sedation, only 8 of them consented. Among the patients who were treated with sedation, the median interval between the exacerbation of dyspnea and death was 16 days; among non-sedated patients it was 18 days. Palliative care physicians who specialize in the respiratory system can, to some extent, predict the occurrence of rapidly progressive dyspnea in cancer patients. It is important to explain the methods of relieving dyspnea to the patient, the patient's family, and the oncologist early, so that decisions on how to manage dyspnea can be made in advance. (author)

  3. Allometric scaling relationship between frequency of intestinal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-02-27

    Feb 27, 2013 ... 2Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Semnan University, Semnan, Iran. 3School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, ... The question is, what kind of relationship can be ... allometric scaling has been used to predict human clinical.

  4. Predicting Dyspnea Inducers by Molecular Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gálvez-Llompart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available QSAR based on molecular topology (MT is an excellent methodology used in predicting physicochemical and biological properties of compounds. This approach is applied here for the development of a mathematical model capable to recognize drugs showing dyspnea as a side effect. Using linear discriminant analysis, it was found a four-variable regression equations enabling a predictive rate of about 81% and 73% in the training and test sets of compounds, respectively. These results demonstrate that QSAR-MT is an efficient tool to predict the appearance of dyspnea associated with drug consumption.

  5. Scale Construction: Motivation and Relationship Scale in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Emre Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of Motivation and Relationship Scale (MRS, (Raufelder , Drury , Jagenow , Hoferichter & Bukowski , 2013.Participants were 526 students of secondary school. The results of confirmatory factor analysis described that the 21 items loaded three factor and the three-dimensional model was well fit (x2= 640.04, sd= 185, RMSEA= .068, NNFI= .90, CFI = .91, IFI=.91,SRMR=079, GFI= .90,AGFI=.87. Overall findings demonstrated that this scale is a valid and indicates that the adapted MRS is a valid instrument for measuring secondary school children’s motivation in Turkey.

  6. Postprandial dyspnea and malnutrition in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Donald, K; Carrey, Z; Martin, J G

    1998-06-01

    To compare ventilatory response, oxygen uptake and sense of dyspnea of underweight versus normal-weight patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after a standard meal, in order to investigate whether an increase in dyspnea due to diet-induced thermogenesis might lead to altered eating habits. Weight loss in patients with COPD leads to adverse health effects, but the reasons for this loss are not well understood. Prospective study. A total of 18 patients (14 men, 4 women) aged 46 to 83 with severe, stable COPD. Minute ventilation (VE), tidal volume (VT), frequency of breathing, oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide excretion (VCO2) and sense of dyspnea (using the Borg scale) were measured 15 minutes before a 2.5-MJ (600-kcal) balanced liquid meal and at four 15-minute intervals after the meal. Increases in VE, VT, VO2 and VCO2 were observed for all subjects. Corrected for body surface area, the maximum postprandial changes in these indicators did not differ between the underweight and the normal-weight subjects with COPD. Work of breathing (measured in 11 subjects) did not differ between the 2 groups, nor did the number of subjects reporting increased dyspnea. Since the increases in VE, VO2, VCO2 and perceived dyspnea did not differ between the normal-weight and underweight patients, this indicates that dyspnea at mealtimes is not likely to lead to decreased food intake.

  7. Perception of dyspnea in childhood asthma crisis by the patients and those in charge of them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Ana Alice Amaral Ibiapina; March, Maria Fátima Pombo; Evangelista, Lucia Araujo; Cunha, Antonio Ledo

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the correlation between perception of dyspnea during a mild to moderate asthma attack using the Modified Borg Scale (MBS) and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). This was a cross-sectional study conducted with children and adolescents who sought a pediatric emergency service due to an asthma attack. Data were collected from July 2005 to June 2006. Demographic data were recorded. Patients and those in charge of them were requested to grade, individually, the patient's dyspnea using the MBS; afterwards, the peak expiratory flow rate was measured. 181 asthmatic patients were evaluated, with a mean age of 7.2 (± 2.4) years (range, 4-12). The mother sought medical aid in 83.4% of the cases (151/181). Patient symptoms included coughing in 68.5% (124/181), dyspnea in 47.0% (85/181), and wheezing in 12.7% (23/181). Thirty-six percent (65/181) had a mild attack, and 64.1% (116/181) a moderate one. A significant negative correlation was found between the patients' and accompanying adults' perceptions of patient's dyspnea and the PEFR (% predicted; rs = -0.240 and rs = -0.385, respectively). Both the patients and those looking after them had a poor perception of the severity of the patient's dyspnea. This emphasizes the need to monitor objective measures such as the PEFR and to develop better ways of evaluating dyspnea.

  8. Scaling and constitutive relationships in downcomer modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, B.J.; Harlow, F.H.

    1978-12-01

    Constitutive relationships to describe mass and momentum exchange in multiphase flow in a pressurized water reactor downcomer are presented. Momentum exchange between the phases is described by the product of the flux of momentum available for exchange and the effective area for interaction. The exchange of mass through condensation is assumed to occur along a distinct condensation boundary separating steam at saturation temperature from water in which the temperature falls off roughly linearly with distance from the boundary. Because of the abundance of nucleation sites in a typical churning flow in a downcomer, we propose an equilibrium evaporation process that produces sufficient steam per unit time to keep the water perpetually cooled to the saturation temperature. The transport equations, constitutive models, and boundary conditions used in the K-TIF numerical method are nondimensionalized to obtain scaling relationships for two-phase flow in the downcomer. The results indicate that, subject to idealized thermodynamic and hydraulic constraints, exact mathematical scaling can be achieved. Experiments are proposed to isolate the effects of parameters that contribute to mass, momentum, and energy exchange between the phases

  9. Botulinum toxin injection in laryngeal dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woisard, Virginie; Liu, Xuelai; Bes, Marie Christine Arné; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2017-02-01

    Data, regarding the use of botulinum toxin (BT-A) in laryngeal dyspnea, are scarce, coming from some cases reports in the literature, including Vocal fold paralysis, laryngeal dystonia, vocal cord dysfunction also called paradoxical motion of the vocal fold (PMVF), and post-neuroleptic laryngeal dyskinesia. There is no consensus regarding the muscles and the doses to inject. The aim of this study is to present a retrospective review of patients treated in our ENT Department by BT-A injection in this indication. This study is a retrospective study describing patients who underwent an injection of botulinum toxin for laryngeal dyspnea in the ENT Department from 2005 to 2015 years. The inclusion criteria were a dyspnea associated with a laryngeal dysfunction, confirmed by flexible fiberoptic nasopharyngolaryngoscopy. Information concerning the causes of the dyspnea, the botulinum toxin BT-A injections procedure, post-injection follow-up, and respiratory outcome were collected for all patients included. In the group of 13 patients included, the main cause identified as principal factor linked with the short breath was: a bilateral VF paralysis (Patel et al., Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 130:686-689, 7), laryngeal dystonia (Balkissoon and Kenn, Semin Respir Crit Care Med 33:595-605, 2), Anxiety syndrome associated with unilateral vocal fold paralysis or asthma (Marcinow et al., Laryngoscope 124:1425-1430, 3), and an isolated asthma (Zwirner et al., Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 254:242-245, 1). Nine out of the thirteen patients were improved by the injections. A BT-A-induced stable benefit for four patients led them to stop the injections in the follow-up. Good outcome was observed in five other patients (main cause: bilateral VP paralysis), allowing a progressive lengthening of the delay between BT-A injections. Four patients did not report a positive risk/benefit ratio after BT-A injections; two of them (with bilateral VF paralysis), because of respiratory side effects and

  10. Impact of Blunted Perception of Dyspnea on Medical Care Use and Expenditure, and Mortality in Elderly People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru eEbihara

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dyspnea is an alarming symptom responsible for millions of patient visits each year. Poor perception of dyspnea might be reasonably attributed to an inappropriately low level of fear and inadequate earlier medical treatment for both patients and physicians, resulting in subsequent intensive care. This study was conducted to evaluate medical care use and cost, and mortality according to the perception of dyspnea in community-dwelling elderly people. We analyzed baseline data from a community-based Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA in 2002. The perception of dyspnea in 479 Japanese community-dwelling elderly people with normal lung function was measured in August 2002. The sensation of dyspnea during breathing with a linear inspiratory resistance of 10, 20 and 30 cmH2O/L/s was rated using the Borg scale. According to the perception of dyspnea, we divided the elderly into tertiles and compared all hospitalizations, out-patient visits, costs and death through computerized linkage with National Health Insurance (NHI beneficiaries claims history files between August 2002 and March 2008. In-patient hospitalization days and medical care costs significantly increased with the blunted perception of dyspnea, resulting in an increase in total medical-costs with blunted perception of dyspnea. With low perception group as reference, the hazard ratios of all cause mortality were 0.65 (95%CI 0.23-1.89 for intermediate perception group and 0.31(0.10-0.97 for high perception group, indicating the mortality rate also significantly increased with the blunted perception of dyspnea after multivariates adjustment (p=0.04. The blunted perception of dyspnea is related to hospitalization, large medical costs and all-cause mortality in community-dwelling elderly people. These findings provide a rational for preventing serious illness with careful monitoring of objective conditions in the elderly.

  11. Progressive dyspnea due to pulmonary carcinoid tumorlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Kallianos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case description of a female patient, 77 years-old, who presented with progressive dyspnea and cough. She had a mild hypoxemia in the arterial blood gases (PaO2 72 mmHg and normal spirometry. The chest computer tomography revealed diffuse “ground glass” opacities, segmental alveolitis, bronchiectasis, fibrotic lesions and numerous micronodules. A thoracoscopy was performed and the obtained biopsy showed carcinoid tumorlets, with positive CK8/18, CD56, TTF-1 and synaptophysin immunohistochemical markers. Pulmonary carcinoid tumorlets are rare, benign lesions and individuals with tumorlets are typically asymptomatic. Our report presents a symptomatic clinical case of carcinoid tumorlet.

  12. Translation and Validation of the Multidimensional Dyspnea-12 Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado Diago, Carlos Antonio; Puente Maestu, Luis; Abascal Bolado, Beatriz; Agüero Calvo, Juan; Hernando Hernando, Mercedes; Puente Bats, Irene; Agüero Balbín, Ramón

    2018-02-01

    Dyspnea is a multidimensional symptom, but this multidimensionality is not considered in most dyspnea questionnaires. The Dyspnea-12 takes a multidimensional approach to the assessment of dyspnea, specifically the sensory and the affective response. The objective of this study was to translate into Spanish and validate the Dyspnea-12 questionnaire. The original English version of the Dyspnea-12 questionnaire was translated into Spanish and backtranslated to analyze its equivalence. Comprehension of the text was verified by analyzing the responses of 10 patients. Reliability and validation of the questionnaire were studied in an independent group of COPD patients attending the pulmonology clinics of Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, diagnosed and categorized according to GOLD guidelines. The mean age of the group (n=51) was 65 years and mean FEV1 was 50%. All patients understood all questions of the translated version of Dyspnea-12. Internal consistency of the questionnaire was α=0.937 and intraclass correlation coefficient was=.969; P<.001. Statistically significant correlations were found with HADS (anxiety r=.608 and depression r=.615), mMRC dyspnea (r=.592), 6MWT (r=-0.445), FEV1 (r=-0.312), all dimensions of CRQ-SAS (dyspnea r=-0.626; fatigue r=-0.718; emotional function r=-0.663; mastery r=-0.740), CAT (r=0.669), and baseline dyspnea index (r=-0.615). Dyspnea-12 scores were 10.32 points higher in symptomatic GOLD groups (B and D) (P<.001). The Spanish version of Dyspnea-12 is a valid and reliable instrument to study the multidimensional nature of dyspnea. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Dyspnea: when the preliminary imaging is unconvincing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Moretti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old man was admitted to the Emergency Room (ER for dyspnea and cough from several months. In ER were performed blood sampling, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and arterial blood gas. A thoracic ultrasound (US revealed in the left side an abundant pleural effusion and a lung consolidation area of about 5 cm without air bronchogram. A thoracentesis showed the presence of hemorrhagic effusion. Chest computed tomography (CT revealed micro-pulmonary embolism, abundant left pleural effusion with atelectasis of the lower ipsilateral lobe. Meanwhile the chest CT revised by the pulmonologist appeared suspicious for the presence of cancer, the cytological examination of pleural fluid revealed the presence of an adenocarcinoma. While the patient was waiting for the bronchoscopy he had a stroke and died in a few days. In conclusion, we believe that thoracic US has to be considered an extension of the physical examination, it is a bedside tool and it represents a valid diagnostic and therapeutic method. Therefore thoracic US, if closely linked to the physician’s activity, can directly affect the decision-making process and management of the patient with dyspnea.

  14. Intrathoracic Caecal Perforation Presenting as Dyspnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Granier

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bochdalek hernia is a congenital defect of the diaphragm that is usually diagnosed in the neonatal period and incidentally in asymptomatic adults. Small bowel incarceration in a right-sided Bochdalek hernia is exceptional for an adult. Case Presentation. A 54-year-old woman was admitted for acute dyspnea, tachycardia, hypotension, and fever. Five days before, she had been experiencing an episode of diffuse abdominal pain. The admission chest X-ray was interpreted as right pleural effusion and pneumothorax with left mediastinal shift. Chest tube drainage was purulent. The thoracoabdominal CT examination suspected an intestinal incarceration through a right diaphragmatic defect. At laparotomy, a right-sided Bochdalek hernia was confirmed with a complete necrosis of the incarcerated caecum. Ileocaecal resection was performed, but the patient died from delayed septic complications. Conclusion. Intrathoracic perforation of the caecum is a rare occurrence; delayed diagnosis due to misleading initial symptoms may lead to severe complications and poor prognosis.

  15. Invariant relationships deriving from classical scaling transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bludman, Sidney; Kennedy, Dallas C.

    2011-01-01

    Because scaling symmetries of the Euler-Lagrange equations are generally not variational symmetries of the action, they do not lead to conservation laws. Instead, an extension of Noether's theorem reduces the equations of motion to evolutionary laws that prove useful, even if the transformations are not symmetries of the equations of motion. In the case of scaling, symmetry leads to a scaling evolutionary law, a first-order equation in terms of scale invariants, linearly relating kinematic and dynamic degrees of freedom. This scaling evolutionary law appears in dynamical and in static systems. Applied to dynamical central-force systems, the scaling evolutionary equation leads to generalized virial laws, which linearly connect the kinetic and potential energies. Applied to barotropic hydrostatic spheres, the scaling evolutionary equation linearly connects the gravitational and internal energy densities. This implies well-known properties of polytropes, describing degenerate stars and chemically homogeneous nondegenerate stellar cores.

  16. Intravenous Fentanyl for Dyspnea at the End of Life: Lessons for Future Research in Dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, G S; Qu, L M; Tan, Y Y; Yee, A C P

    2016-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of intravenous (IV) Fentanyl in dyspnoeic patients with advanced cancer. Dyspnoeic patients with advanced cancer satisfying the selection criteria received (IV) Fentanyl and were evaluated for response 24 hours post-administration in a prospective observational study. Altogether 36 patients were enrolled into the study. However, data from only 16 patients could be analysed as 20 patients had died or were too sick to self-report scores. Seven out of 16 patients responded to IV Fentanyl although the result was not statistically significant (non-responders versus responders: 56.3% vs 43.8%, p = 0.33). The strongest correlations for variables predictive of responder status were the absence of anxiety and lung metastases. This exploratory study shows that IV Fentanyl can alleviate dyspnea in some patients but is an example of the difficulties conducting dyspnea research. Future studies would benefit from novel developments in the areas of measuring dyspnea in dying patients and statistical analysis of small sample sizes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Correlation of chest computed tomography findings with dyspnea and lung functions in post-tubercular sequelae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Panda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To study the correlation between dyspnea, radiological findings, and pulmonary function tests (PFTs in patients with sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB. Materials and Methods: Clinical history, chest computed tomography (CT, and PFT of patients with post-TB sequelae were recorded. Dyspnea was graded according to the Modified Medical Research Council (mMRC scale. CT scans were analyzed for fibrosis, cavitation, bronchiectasis, consolidation, nodules, and aspergilloma. Semi-quantitative analysis was done for these abnormalities. Scores were added to obtain a total morphological score (TMS. The lungs were also divided into three zones and scores added to obtain the total lung score (TLS. Spirometry was done for forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1, and FEV1/FVC. Results: Dyspnea was present in 58/101 patients. A total of 22/58 patients had mMRC Grade 1, and 17/58 patients had Grades 2 and 3 dyspnea each. There was a significant difference in median fibrosis, bronchiectasis, nodules (P < 0.01 scores, TMS, and TLS (P < 0.0001 between dyspnea and nondyspnea groups. Significant correlations were obtained between grades of dyspnea and fibrosis (r = 0.34, P = 0.006, bronchiectasis (r = 0.35, P = 0.004, nodule (r = 0.24, P = 0.016 scores, TMS (r = 0.398, P = 0.000, and TLS (r = 0.35, P = 0.0003. PFTs were impaired in 78/101 (77.2% patients. Restrictive defect was most common in 39.6% followed by mixed in 34.7%. There was a negative but statistically insignificant trend between PFT and fibrosis, bronchiectasis, nodule scores, TMS, and TLS. However, there were significant differences in median fibrosis, cavitation, and bronchiectasis scores in patients with normal, mild to moderate, and severe respiratory defects. No difference was seen in TMS and TLS according to the severity of the respiratory defect. Conclusion: Both fibrosis and bronchiectasis correlated with dyspnea and with PFT. However, this correlation was not

  18. SIZE SCALING RELATIONSHIPS IN FRACTURE NETWORKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    2000-01-01

    The research conducted under DOE grant DE-FG26-98FT40385 provides a detailed assessment of size scaling issues in natural fracture and active fault networks that extend over scales from several tens of kilometers to less than a tenth of a meter. This study incorporates analysis of data obtained from several sources, including: natural fracture patterns photographed in the Appalachian field area, natural fracture patterns presented by other workers in the published literature, patterns of active faulting in Japan mapping at a scale of 1:100,000, and lineament patterns interpreted from satellite-based radar imagery obtained over the Appalachian field area. The complexity of these patterns is always found to vary with scale. In general,but not always, patterns become less complex with scale. This tendency may reverse as can be inferred from the complexity of high-resolution radar images (8 meter pixel size) which are characterized by patterns that are less complex than those observed over smaller areas on the ground surface. Model studies reveal that changes in the complexity of a fracture pattern can be associated with dominant spacings between the fractures comprising the pattern or roughly to the rock areas bounded by fractures of a certain scale. While the results do not offer a magic number (the fractal dimension) to characterize fracture networks at all scales, the modeling and analysis provide results that can be interpreted directly in terms of the physical properties of the natural fracture or active fault complex. These breaks roughly define the size of fracture bounded regions at different scales. The larger more extensive sets of fractures will intersect and enclose regions of a certain size, whereas smaller less extensive sets will do the same--i.e. subdivide the rock into even smaller regions. The interpretation varies depending on the number of sets that are present, but the scale breaks in the logN/logr plots serve as a guide to interpreting the

  19. Physiological mechanisms of dyspnea during exercise with external thoracic restriction: Role of increased neural respiratory drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Cassandra T.; Schaeffer, Michele R.; Riley, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that neuromechanical uncoupling of the respiratory system forms the mechanistic basis of dyspnea during exercise in the setting of “abnormal” restrictive constraints on ventilation (VE). To this end, we examined the effect of chest wall strapping (CWS) sufficient to mimic a “mild” restrictive lung deficit on the interrelationships between VE, breathing pattern, dynamic operating lung volumes, esophageal electrode-balloon catheter-derived measures of the diaphragm electromyogram (EMGdi) and the transdiaphragmatic pressure time product (PTPdi), and sensory intensity and unpleasantness ratings of dyspnea during exercise. Twenty healthy men aged 25.7 ± 1.1 years (means ± SE) completed symptom-limited incremental cycle exercise tests under two randomized conditions: unrestricted control and CWS to reduce vital capacity (VC) by 21.6 ± 0.5%. Compared with control, exercise with CWS was associated with 1) an exaggerated EMGdi and PTPdi response; 2) no change in the relationship between EMGdi and each of tidal volume (expressed as a percentage of VC), inspiratory reserve volume, and PTPdi, thus indicating relative preservation of neuromechanical coupling; 3) increased sensory intensity and unpleasantness ratings of dyspnea; and 4) no change in the relationship between increasing EMGdi and each of the intensity and unpleasantness of dyspnea. In conclusion, the increased intensity and unpleasantness of dyspnea during exercise with CWS could not be readily explained by increased neuromechanical uncoupling but likely reflected the awareness of increased neural respiratory drive (EMGdi) needed to achieve any given VE during exercise in the setting of “abnormal” restrictive constraints on tidal volume expansion. PMID:24356524

  20. University Students Leaving Relationships (USLR): Scale Development and Gender Differences in Decisions to Leave Romantic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendy, Helen M.; Can, S. Hakan; Joseph, Lauren J.; Scherer, Cory R.

    2013-01-01

    The University Students Leaving Relationships scale was developed to identify student concerns when contemplating dissolution of romantic relationships. Participants included 1,106 students who rated the importance of issues when deciding to leave relationships. Factor analysis produced three dimensions: Missing the Relationship, Social…

  1. The 10-item Remembered Relationship with Parents (RRP10) scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denollet, Johan; Smolderen, Kim G E; van den Broek, Krista C

    2007-01-01

    Dysfunctional parenting styles are associated with poor mental and physical health. The 10-item Remembered Relationship with Parents (RRP(10)) scale retrospectively assesses Alienation (dysfunctional communication and intimacy) and Control (overprotection by parents), with an emphasis...... on deficiencies in empathic parenting. We examined the 2-factor structure of the RRP(10) and its relationship with adult depression....

  2. Gender and perception of dyspnea: The role of the variation in the forced expiratory volume in one second

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Nigro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available During bronchoconstriction women perceive more breathlessness than men. The aims of study were 1 to evaluate if quality of dyspnea in bronchoconstriction was different in women and men 2 to assess if gender difference in the perception of dyspnea could be related to the level of bronchoconstriction. 457 subjects (257 women inhaled methacholine to a 20% decrease in FEV1, or 32 mg/ml. Dyspnea was evaluated using the modified Borg scale and a list of expressions of dyspnea. Borg scores were recorded immediately before the challenge test baseline and at the maximum FEV1 decrease. The prevalence of descriptors of dyspnea reported by women and men was similar. Dyspnea was related to the level of FEV1 (ΔFEV1: OR 1.05, 95%CI 1.01-1.09, p 0.0095, females (OR 2.90, 95%CI 1.33-6.33, p 0.0072, younger subjects (OR 0.93, 95%CI 0.89- 0.97, p 0.0013 and body mass index (BMI (OR 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.23, p 0.023. As the FEV1 fell less than 20% from baseline, only the ΔFEV1 was significantly associated with dyspnea (ΔFEV1:OR 1.15, 95%CI 1.07- 1.24, p 0.0002. Instead, if the FEV1 fell higher ≥ 20%, the presence of dyspnea was related to the degree of bronchoconstriction (ΔFEV1: OR 1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.09, p 0.0187, females (OR 3.02, 95%CI 1.36-6.72, p 0.0067, younger subjects (OR 0.92, 95%CI 0.88-0.96, p 0.0007 and BMI (OR 1.12, 95%CI 1.01-1.23, p 0.023. The quality of dyspnea during the bronchoconstriction was similar in women and men; women showed a higher perception of dyspnea than men only when the FEV1 fell more than 20% from baseline.

  3. Relationships between Organizations and Publics: Development of a Multi-Dimensional Organization-Public Relationship Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, Stephen D.; Ledingham, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to design a multiple-item, multiple-dimension organization/public relationship scale. Finds that organizations and key publics have three types of relationships: professional, personal, and community. Provides an instrument that can be used to measure the influence that perceptions of the organization/public relationship have on consumer…

  4. The brief family relationship scale: a brief measure of the relationship dimension in family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Carlotta Ching Ting; Allen, James; Henry, David

    2014-02-01

    The Relationship dimension of the Family Environment Scale, which consists of the Cohesion, Expressiveness, and Conflict subscales, measures a person's perception of the quality of his or her family relationship functioning. This study investigates an adaptation of the Relationship dimension of the Family Environment Scale for Alaska Native youth. The authors tested the adapted measure, the Brief Family Relationship Scale, for psychometric properties and internal structure with 284 12- to 18-year-old predominately Yup'ik Eskimo Alaska Native adolescents from rural, remote communities. This non-Western cultural group is hypothesized to display higher levels of collectivism traditionally organized around an extended kinship family structure. Results demonstrate a subset of the adapted items function satisfactorily, a three-response alternative format provided meaningful information, and the subscale's underlying structure is best described through three distinct first-order factors, organized under one higher order factor. Convergent and discriminant validity of the Brief Family Relationship Scale was assessed through correlational analysis.

  5. Cardiopulmonary laboratory biomarkers in the evaluation of acute dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Natalie R; Dietz, Brett W; Liang, Jackson J

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is a common chief complaint in the emergency department, with over 4 million visits annually in the US. Establishing the correct diagnosis can be challenging, because the subjective sensation of dyspnea can result from a wide array of underlying pathology, including pulmonary, cardiac, neurologic, psychiatric, toxic, and metabolic disorders. Further, the presence of dyspnea is linked with increased mortality in a variety of conditions, and misdiagnosis of the cause of dyspnea leads to poor patient-level outcomes. In combination with the history and physical, efficient, and focused use of laboratory studies, the various cardiopulmonary biomarkers can be useful in establishing the correct diagnosis and guiding treatment decisions in a timely manner. Use and interpretation of such tests must be guided by the clinical context, as well as an understanding of the current evidence supporting their use. This review discusses current standards and research regarding the use of established and emerging cardiopulmonary laboratory markers in the evaluation of acute dyspnea, focusing on recent evidence assessing the diagnostic and prognostic utility of various tests. These markers include brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal prohormone (NT-proBNP), mid-regional peptides proatrial NP and proadrenomedullin, cardiac troponins, D-dimer, soluble ST2, and galectin 3, and included is a discussion on the use of arterial and venous blood gases.

  6. Relationship status: Scales for assessing the vitality of late adolescents' relationships with their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, D S; Paddock, J R

    1978-12-01

    Three criteria for assessing relationship status were proposed: self-disclosure despite the risk of parental disapproval; openness to critical feedback from parents; constructive confrontation when angry with parents. These concepts were operationalized as narratives of nine interpersonal dilemmas, to which late adolescents responded by indicating "What would you do if you were in this situation?" Reliable example-anchored scales were constructed from the responses of one sample of college students and then cross-validated with two other samples. Social class had a significant but small effect on the relationship status scores; but age and sex of adolescent and sex of parent did not. The patterns of correlations of the Relationship Status Scales among themselves and with the Parent-Child Relations Questionnaire, the College Self-Expression Scale, the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale, and Hogan's Empathy Scale were interpreted as evidence of construct validity.

  7. Three-minute constant rate step test for detecting exertional dyspnea relief after bronchodilation in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borel B

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Benoit Borel,1,2 Courtney A Wilkinson-Maitland,3 Alan Hamilton,4 Jean Bourbeau,5 Hélène Perrault,6 Dennis Jensen,3,5,7 François Maltais2 1Laboratoire HAVAE, Université de Limoges, Limoges, France; 2Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, 3Clinical Exercise and Respiratory Physiology Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, McGill University, Montréal, QC, 4Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada Limited, Burlington, ON, 5Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Montreal Chest Institute, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, 6Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, 7Translational Research in Respiratory Diseases Program, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of the 3-minute constant rate step test (3-MST to detect the relief of exertional dyspnea (respiratory discomfort after acute bronchodilation in COPD patients. Patients and methods: A total of 40 patients with moderate-to-severe COPD (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 45.7 (±14.7, % predicted performed four 3-MSTs at randomly assigned stepping rates of 14, 16, 20 and 24 steps/min after inhalation of nebulized ipratropium bromide (500 µg/salbutamol (2.5 mg and saline placebo, which were randomized to order. Patients rated their intensity of perceived dyspnea at the end of each 3-MST using Borg 0–10 category ratio scale. Results: A total of 37 (92.5%, 36 (90%, 34 (85% and 27 (67.5% patients completed all 3 minutes of exercise at 14, 16, 20 and 24 steps/min under both treatment conditions, respectively. Compared with placebo, ipratropium bromide/salbutamol significantly decreased dyspnea at the end of the third minute of exercise at 14 steps/min (by 0.6±1.0 Borg 0–10 scale units, P<0.01 and 16 steps/min (by 0.7±1.3 Borg 0–10 scale

  8. Acupuncture Treatment for Dyspnea due to Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto-Miyazaki, Jun; Miyazaki, Nagisa; Nishiwaki, Ayuko; Endo, Junki; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Ohno, Yasushi; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2015-12-01

    Combined idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with pulmonary emphysema (CPFE) is a syndrome with a characteristic presentation of upper lobe emphysema and lower lobe fibrosis. Dyspnea on exertion (DOE) is a major symptom of CPFE. We report a patient with DOE due to CPFE who was successfully treated with acupuncture. Case report. A 72-year-old Japanese man with a 4-year history of DOE was diagnosed with CPFE 2 years previously in another hospital. He received standard Western medicine treatment, which included bronchodilators. However, his DOE did not improve. Consequently, he visited our hospital for acupuncture treatment and received acupuncture treatment once a week for 1 year. After 10 weeks of acupuncture treatment, the results of the 6-minute walk test (6-minute walking distance, 379 m; lowest oxygen saturation, 86%; modified Borg dyspnea scale score: 2 units) were better than those at baseline (352 m, 84%, 4 units, respectively). These values were sustained at both 30 weeks (470 m, 88%, 1 unit) and 60 weeks (473 m, 85%, 2 units). Serum interstitial biomarkers, Krebs von den Lungen and surfactant protein-D, decreased after commencement of acupuncture therapy. A patient with CPFE showed improvements in dyspnea scores, exercise tolerance, and serum biomarkers during a 1-year course of acupuncture treatment. Use of acupuncture might be an effective adjunct therapy in relieving DOE due to CPFE. A large, well-designed cohort study that includes patients with CPFE treated with acupuncture should be conducted.

  9. Designing for scale: How relationships shape curriculum change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie; Corbalan, Gemma; McKenney, Susan; Nieveen, Nienke; Van den Akker, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Pareja Roblin, N., Corbalan Perez, G., McKenney, S., Nieveen, N., & Van den Akker, J. (2012, 13-17 April). Designing for scale: How relationships shape curriculum change. Presentation at the AERA annual meeting, Vancouver, Canada. Please see also http://hdl.handle.net/1820/4679

  10. Designing for scale: How relationships shape curriculum change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie; Corbalan, Gemma; McKenney, Susan; Nieveen, Nienke; Van den Akker, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Pareja Roblin, N., Corbalan Perez, G., McKenney, S., Nieveen, N., & Van den Akker, J. (2012, 13-17 April). Designing for scale: How relationships shape curriculum change. Paper presentation at the AERA annual meeting, Vancouver, Canada. Please see also: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/4678

  11. Evaluation of the Appropriate Washout Period Following Fan Therapy for Dyspnea in Patients With Advanced Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kako, Jun; Morita, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Sekimoto, Asuko; Kobayashi, Masamitsu; Kinoshita, Hiroya; Ogawa, Asao; Zenda, Sadamoto; Uchitomi, Yosuke; Inoguchi, Hironobu; Matsushima, Eisuke

    2018-02-01

    To clarify the duration required for dyspnea to return to baseline severity after fan therapy, to evaluate whether fan-to-legs therapy or no fan therapy would be a suitable control therapy, and to investigate changes in patients' face surface temperature after fan therapy. In this pilot study, all participants received 3 interventions in the following order: no fan, fan to legs, and fan to face. Participants used a fan for 5 minutes, and they scored their dyspnea at 10-minute intervals for 60 minutes or until the score had returned to its baseline value, whichever occurred first. Nine patients with advanced cancer admitted to a palliative care unit were included; they had dyspnea at rest and rated its severity as at least 3 points on a 0- to 10-point numerical rating scale. Descriptive statistics and the Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to analyze the data. All patients completed the study. Of the 9 participants, 6 experienced a clinical benefit from using a fan to their faces. Of these patients, only 2 participants' (2 of 6) dyspnea scores returned to baseline by the end of the 60-minute assessment period after exposure to fan-to-face therapy. In fan-to-legs and no fan settings, there was no change in the dyspnea scores. There were significant differences between the baseline face surface temperature and that after fan-to-face and fan-to-legs settings. When using a crossover design to investigate the effect of fan therapy on dyspnea, 1 hour is an insufficient washout period.

  12. Differential Relationships Between Diabetes Knowledge Scales and Diabetes Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Aprill Z; Walker, Rebekah J; Egede, Leonard E

    2017-08-01

    Background Diabetes affects more than 29 million people in the US and requires daily self-management in addition to knowledge of the disease. Three knowledge assessments used are the Michigan Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test (DKT), Starr County Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ), and Kaiser DISTANCE Survey (DISTANCE). Purpose The purpose of the study was to test the discriminate validity of 3 diabetes knowledge scales and determine which is best associated with diabetes self-care and glycemic control. Methods Three hundred sixty-one adults with type 2 diabetes were recruited from primary care clinics. Four analyses were conducted to investigate the validity and relationships of the scale: alpha statistic to test internal validity, factor analysis to determine how much of the variance was explained, Pearson's correlation between the 3 scales, and Pearson's correlation between each scale, self-care, and outcomes. Results The DKQ had an alpha of 0.75, the DKT had an alpha of 0.49, and DISTANCE had an alpha of 0.36. The DKQ was significantly correlated with glycemic control. The DKT scale was significantly associated with general diet, the DISTANCE survey was significantly associated with exercise, and both DKT and DISTANCE were significantly associated with foot care. Conclusion Correlations among the 3 scales were modest, suggesting the scales are not measuring the same underlying construct. These findings indicate that researchers should carefully select scales appropriate for study goals or to appropriately capture the information being sought to inform practice.

  13. Cardiopulmonary laboratory biomarkers in the evaluation of acute dyspnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stokes NR

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natalie R Stokes,1 Brett W Dietz,1 Jackson J Liang2 1Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 2Cardiovascular Division, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Dyspnea is a common chief complaint in the emergency department, with over 4 million visits annually in the US. Establishing the correct diagnosis can be challenging, because the subjective sensation of dyspnea can result from a wide array of underlying pathology, including pulmonary, cardiac, neurologic, psychiatric, toxic, and metabolic disorders. Further, the presence of dyspnea is linked with increased mortality in a variety of conditions, and misdiagnosis of the cause of dyspnea leads to poor patient-level outcomes. In combination with the history and physical, efficient, and focused use of laboratory studies, the various cardiopulmonary biomarkers can be useful in establishing the correct diagnosis and guiding treatment decisions in a timely manner. Use and interpretation of such tests must be guided by the clinical context, as well as an understanding of the current evidence supporting their use. This review discusses current standards and research regarding the use of established and emerging cardiopulmonary laboratory markers in the evaluation of acute dyspnea, focusing on recent evidence assessing the diagnostic and prognostic utility of various tests. These markers include brain natriuretic peptide (BNP and N-terminal prohormone (NT-proBNP, mid-regional peptides proatrial NP and proadrenomedullin, cardiac troponins, D-dimer, soluble ST2, and galectin 3, and included is a discussion on the use of arterial and venous blood gases.Keywords: cardiopulmonary, emergency, heart failure, troponin, BNP, galectin 3, MR-proANP, MR-proADM

  14. Development of the cat-owner relationship scale (CORS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Tiffani J; Bowen, Jonathan; Fatjó, Jaume; Calvo, Paula; Holloway, Anna; Bennett, Pauleen C

    2017-08-01

    Characteristics of the human-animal bond can be influenced by both owner-related and pet-related factors, which likely differ between species. Three studies adapted the Monash Dog-Owner Relationship Scale (MDORS) to permit assessment of human-cat interactions as perceived by the cat's owner. In Study 1293 female cat owners completed a modified version of the MDORS, where 'dog' was replaced with 'cat' for all items. Responses were compared with a matched sample of female dog owners. A partial least squares discriminant analysis revealed systematic differences between cat and dog owners in the Dog (Cat)-Owner Interaction subscale (MDORS subscale 1), but not for Perceived Emotional Closeness or Perceived Costs (Subscales 2 and 3). Study 2 involved analysis of free-text descriptions of cat-owner interactions provided by 61 female cat owners. Text mining identified key words which were used to create additional questions for a new Cat-Owner Interaction subscale. In Study 3, the resulting cat-owner relationship scale (CORS) was tested in a group of 570 cat owners. The main psychometric properties of the scale, including internal consistency and factor structure, were evaluated. We propose that this scale can be used to accurately assess owner perceptions of their relationship with their cat. A modified scale, combining items from the CORS and MDORS (a C/DORS), is also provided for when researchers would find it desirable to compare human-cat and human-dog interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Development and validation of the Dyspnea Index (DI): a severity index for upper airway-related dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner-Schmidt, Jackie L; Shembel, Adrianna C; Zullo, Thomas G; Rosen, Clark A

    2014-11-01

    To (1) develop and validate the Dyspnea Index (DI); (2) quantify severity of symptoms in upper airway dyspnea; and (3) validate the DI as an outcome measure. Survey development and validation. Three hundred sixty-nine participants were recruited for different phases of the study. Two hundred participants with chief complaints of dyspnea were given a 41-item questionnaire addressing common symptoms of dyspnea related to the upper airway. The questions were then reduced based on principal component analysis (PCA) and internal consistency resulting in a 10-item questionnaire. Cognitive interviews were conducted with 15 participants. Test-retest reliability and discriminant validity were measured from 51 participants. The DI was further validated by administering the index to 57 healthy controls (HC). Validation of the DI as a treatment outcome tool occurred with 46 participants' pre- and post-treatment scores. PCA revealed that only a single factor was being measured in both the original 41- and 10-item questionnaires. Additional cognitive interviewing suggested that no modification was needed to the DI. Test-retest reliability was r = 0.83. Discriminant validity was r = 0.62. The Mann-Whitney test demonstrated significant differences between healthy/symptomatic participants. Scores from the HC cohort resulted in a mean of 3.12 (SEM = 0.484; SD = 3.65) for the normative values. The DI is an effective and efficient instrument to quantify patients' symptoms of upper airway dyspnea. It is a statistically robust index, with significant reliability and validity, and can be dependably used as a treatment outcome measure. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Severe dyspnea due to a giant antrochoanal polyp

    OpenAIRE

    Coloma-Milano M; Gil-Carcedo-Sañudo E; Gil-Carcedo-García LM.; Martín-Batista S; Madrigal-Revuelta M; Vallejo-Valdezate LA

    2012-01-01

    SummaryIntroduction: The antrochoanal polyp is a prevalent pathology in teenagers and young adults. It usually presents with nasal obstruction.Patient and method: Case report: An 80-year-old male with alcoholic encephalopathy, chronic bronchial disease of unknown etiology and polypoid chronic rhinosinusitis came to the emergency service with severe dyspnea without laryngeal features.Anterior rhinoscopy showed a polypoid mass in left nostril that prevented the visualization with nasal endoscop...

  17. Amygdala response to anticipation of dyspnea is modulated by 5-HTTLPR genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckel, M Cornelia; Esser, Roland W; Gamer, Matthias; Kalisch, Raffael; Büchel, Christian; von Leupoldt, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Dyspnea anticipation and perception varies largely between individuals. To investigate whether genetic factors related to negative affect such as the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism impact this variability, we investigated healthy, 5-HTTLPR stratified volunteers using resistive load induced dyspnea together with fMRI. Alternating blocks of severe and mild dyspnea ("perception") were differentially cued ("anticipation") and followed by intensity and unpleasantness ratings. In addition, volunteers indicated their anticipatory fear during the anticipation periods. There were no genotype-based group differences concerning dyspnea intensity and unpleasantness or brain activation during perception of severe vs. mild dyspnea. However, in risk allele carriers, higher anticipatory fear was paralleled by stronger amygdala activation during anticipation of severe vs. mild dyspnea. These results suggest a role of the 5-HTTLPR genotype in fearful dyspnea anticipation. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  18. Using the Karolinska Scales of Personality on male juvenile delinquents: relationships between scales and factor structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dåderman, Anna M; Hellström, Ake; Wennberg, Peter; Törestad, Bertil

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate relationships between scales from the Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP) and the factor structure of the KSP in a sample of male juvenile delinquents. The KSP was administered to a group of male juvenile delinquents (n=55, mean age 17 years; standard deviation=1.2) from four Swedish national correctional institutions for serious offenders. As expected, the KSP showed appropriate correlations between the scales. Factor analysis (maximum likelihood) arrived at a four-factor solution in this sample, which is in line with previous research performed in a non-clinical sample of Swedish males. More research is needed in a somewhat larger sample of juvenile delinquents in order to confirm the present results regarding the factor solution.

  19. [A case of laryngeal papilloma with sudden dyspnea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabiszczak, Maciej; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Borucki, Lukasz; Iwanik, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    Laryngeal papilloma is one of the most common non-malignant tumors of the larynx. In adult they are included to pre-cancerous diseases. In morphological examination, it is a solid tumor. Often it is possible to cure them during one surgical procedure. The disease is mostly localized on the anterior commissurae region, vocal fold, ventricules, and on the laryngeal surface of the epiglottis. If the malignant transformation is suspected, a large excision with margin has to be performed, completed by a histological evaluation. A case of a huge laryngeal papilloma with dyspnea is presented.

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of the Relationship Assessment Scale among Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    غلامرضا دهشیری

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research administrated to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Persian version of Relationship Assessment scale. Therefore, 315 married individuals (199 women and 116 men from Tehran city were volunteered to respond to four scales: the Relationship Assessment, the Kansas Marital Satisfaction, the Oxford Happiness and the Life Satisfaction. Results from exploratory & confirmatory factor analysis showed that factor structure of Relationship Assessment scale was unidimensional. The internal consistency of the scale in the total sample was 0.88. Significant correlations between scores of the Relationship Assessment scale with the scores of the Kansas Marital Satisfaction Scale, the Life Satisfaction Scale and the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire demonstrated good convergent validity of the scale. Also, the results showed that there was no significant gender difference between the mean scores of relationship satisfaction. In conclusion, the Relationship Assessment scale is a valid and reliable tool to measure marital satisfaction in Iran.

  1. Acute laryngeal dyspnea as first presentation of granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajor, Anna Maria; Kwiatkowska, Sylwia; Kroczyńska-Bednarek, Jadwiga; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a multi-organ disease which mostly affects lungs, kidney, and head and neck region. We report a rare case of acute laryngeal dyspnea and rapidly progressive pulmonary changes as first manifestations of disease. A 53 year-old woman presented with symptoms of two-week dyspnea, which aggravated rapidly in the preceding hours. Laryngological examination revealed subglottic infiltrations and vocal fold oedema which required urgent tracheotomy. During few days she developed gingival ulcerations and pulmonary infiltration with negative serum c-ANCA titers. The histopathological examination of subglottic and gingival biopsies and the clinical picture established the diagnosis of GPA. She was treated with prednisone and cyclophosphamide with recovery; however, during over 3 years of follow-up, pulmonary symptoms relapsed and subglottic stenosis persisted. The difficulties in diagnosis and treatment in this unusual presentation of GPA are outlined with conclusion that in patients with subglottic infiltration, which develops rapidly, even when this is a sole presentation of the disease, and when c-ANCA are negative, GPA should always be considered.

  2. Effect of body mass index on diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in patients with acute dyspnea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; van Kimmenade, Roland R. J.; Lainchbury, John G.; Richards, A. Mark; Ordoñez-Llanos, Jordi; Santaló, Miquel; Pinto, Yigal M.; Januzzi, James L.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amino (N)-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) testing is useful for diagnostic and prognostic evaluation in patients with dyspnea. An inverse relationship between body mass index (BMI); (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) and NT-proBNP

  3. Large Scale Relationship between Aquatic Insect Traits and Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Avit Kumar; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2015-01-01

    Climate is the predominant environmental driver of freshwater assemblage pattern on large spatial scales, and traits of freshwater organisms have shown considerable potential to identify impacts of climate change. Although several studies suggest traits that may indicate vulnerability to climate change, the empirical relationship between freshwater assemblage trait composition and climate has been rarely examined on large scales. We compared the responses of the assumed climate-associated traits from six grouping features to 35 bioclimatic indices (~18 km resolution) for five insect orders (Diptera, Ephemeroptera, Odonata, Plecoptera and Trichoptera), evaluated their potential for changing distribution pattern under future climate change and identified the most influential bioclimatic indices. The data comprised 782 species and 395 genera sampled in 4,752 stream sites during 2006 and 2007 in Germany (~357,000 km² spatial extent). We quantified the variability and spatial autocorrelation in the traits and orders that are associated with the combined and individual bioclimatic indices. Traits of temperature preference grouping feature that are the products of several other underlying climate-associated traits, and the insect order Ephemeroptera exhibited the strongest response to the bioclimatic indices as well as the highest potential for changing distribution pattern. Regarding individual traits, insects in general and ephemeropterans preferring very cold temperature showed the highest response, and the insects preferring cold and trichopterans preferring moderate temperature showed the highest potential for changing distribution. We showed that the seasonal radiation and moisture are the most influential bioclimatic aspects, and thus changes in these aspects may affect the most responsive traits and orders and drive a change in their spatial distribution pattern. Our findings support the development of trait-based metrics to predict and detect climate

  4. A Large Intra-Abdominal Hiatal Hernia as a Rare Cause of Dyspnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant hiatal hernias, generally seen at advanced ages, can rarely cause cardiac symptoms such as dyspnea and chest pain. Here, we aimed to present a case with a large hiatal hernia that largely protruded to intrathoracic cavity and caused dyspnea, particularly at postprandial period, by compressing the left atrium and right pulmonary vein. We considered presenting this case as large hiatal hernia is a rare, intra-abdominal cause of dyspnea.

  5. Severe dyspnea in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B. Poble

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is a genetic disease in which pulmonary complications are rare, but severe, especially pulmonary hypertension (PH. The mechanisms underlying the onset of PH in patients with NF1 are unclear and might be multifactorial. In particular, the frequent presence of pulmonary parenchymal lesions makes etiological diagnosis of PH difficult. We describe here the case of a patient with NF1 admitted to our clinic with dyspnea and right heart failure revealing severe pre-capillary PH. Parenchymal lesions were mild and PH was attributed to pulmonary vascular involvement. Clinical and hemodynamic conditions of the patient improved under pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific combination therapy. This case suggests that treatment of PH due to pulmonary vascular involvement in NF1 may be aligned with recommendations for PAH treatment.

  6. Acromegaly presented as a cause of laryngeal dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saussez, S; Mahillon, V; Chantrain, G; Thill, M P; Lequeux, T

    2007-12-01

    Acromegalic patients can develop obstructive sleep apnea syndrome or upper airflow obstruction. The development of dyspnea is unusual and the fixation of both vocal cords is exceptional. We report the case of a patient with bilateral vocal cord paralysis. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy and computed tomography (CT) of the neck showed a supra-glottic stenosis due to a swelling of the soft tissue. A tracheostomy was first performed. Thereafter, micro-laryngoscopy using laser vaporisation of the supra-glottic soft tissue was attempted but failed to remove the tracheostomy canula. Finally, blood tests and cerebral MRI revealed an acromegaly. The patient underwent a trans-sphenoidal resection of the pituitary adenoma. Fifteen months later, fiberoptic laryngoscopy showed bilateral restoration of vocal cord mobility and the tracheostomy canula was successfully removed after 18 months. Vocal cord fixation is probably due to hypopharyngeal and laryngeal soft tissue swelling and can be reversible after successful treatment of the adenoma.

  7. Dyspnea and dysphagia associated to hypopharyngeal fibrolipoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Mendez Saenz, MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fibrolipomas are benign lesions conformed by fat and connective tissue, classified as histologic variants of lipomas. They are rarely located in the head and neck and represent less than 0.6% of the benign tumors of the larynx and hypopharynx. Their clinical presentation depends on its location and size. We present the case of a 51-year-old male patient who reported progressive dyspnea, dysphagia and obstructive sleep symptoms with a duration of 3 months, without apparent cause. A pharyngolaryngeal fiberoptic endoscopy showed a smooth, rounded mass in the posterior wall of the hypopharynx, partially obstructing the laryngeal vestibule, creating a valve effect. Complete trans-cervical resection of the lesion was performed after the airway was secured by means of a tracheotomy. The final histopathology report was fibrolipoma. He is currently asymptomatic and without evidence of relapse one year after the procedure.

  8. Scale-Free Relationships between Social and Landscape Factors in Urban Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunzhu Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban planners and ecologists have long debated the relationship between the structure of urban landscapes and social activities. There have, however, been very few discussions as to whether any such relationships might depend on the scales of observation. This work applies a hierarchical zoning technique to data from the city of Quito, Ecuador, to examine how relationships between typical spatial landscape metrics and social indicators depend on zoning scales. Our results showed that the estimates of both landscape heterogeneity features and social indicators significantly depend on the zoning scale. The mean values of the typical landscape metrics and the social indicators all exhibited predictable responses to a changing zoning scale, suggesting a consistent and significant scaling relationship within the multiple zoning scales. Yet relationships between these pairs of variables remain notably invariant to scale. This quantitative demonstration of the scale-free nature of the relationship between landscape characteristics and social indicators furthers our understanding of the relationships between landscape structures and social aspects of urban spaces, including deprivation and public service accessibility. The relationships between social indicators and one typical landscape aggregation metric (represented as the percentage of like adjacencies were nevertheless significantly dependent on scale, suggesting the importance of zoning scale decisions for analyzing the relationships between the social indicators and the landscape characteristics related with landscape adjacency. Aside from this typical landscape aggregation metric, the general invariance to the zoning scale of relationships between landscape structures and socioeconomic indicators in Quito suggests the importance of applying these scale-free relationships in understanding complex socio-ecological systems in other cities, which are shaped by the conflated influences of both

  9. Evaluation of a combination of low-dose ketamine and low-dose midazolam in terminal dyspnea-attenuation of "double-effect"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Kanti Dam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Of all symptoms in palliative medicine those concerning respiration are most excruciating and difficult to treat. Reticence about the use of morphine for palliation of dyspnea is common, especially in nonmalignant diseases, as there is a fear of causing respiratory depression, particularly where Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD exists. This factor is also compounded by the lack of availability of morphine in parts of developing countries. Ketamine has excellent anesthetic and analgesic effects in addition to being easily available. It produces bronchodilatation and does not produce respiratory or cardiovascular depression. The author seeks to evaluate the role of low-dose (0.2 mg/kg ketamine and midazolam (0.02 mg/kg in the attenuation of terminal dyspnea. Methods: Sixteen patients with terminal dyspnea, admitted to the Critical Care Unit (CCU with cancer and other noncancer diagnoses were recruited. The subjective component of dyspnea was assessed using the Graphic Rating Scale (GRS, which has values from 0 - 10, 10 being maximum dyspnea. Each patient received a low-dose of ketamine and midazolam for relief of dyspnea. All the patients received low-flow (2 L/min. oxygen therapy via nasal cannula. Immediately after admission, all the patients were reassured and nursed in a decubitus position of their choice. The GRS was recorded at the point of admission, 10 minutes after starting oxygen therapy, and ten minutes after administration of low-dose ketamine and midazolam. Hemodynamic parameters were also recorded at these three points. Result: All the patients who enrolled in our study had significant dyspnea at admission, as was evident from the GRS scores of 8.250 (SD 0.91, respiratory rate of 28.56 (SD 5.0, mean arterial blood pressure (MABP of 102.7 (SD 14.63, pulse rate of 115.62 (SD 23.3, and SpO2 of 92.43 (SD 2.38. All the patients benefited from the combination of ketamine and midazolam, as evidenced by the statistically

  10. Multi scale habitat relationships of Martes americana in northern Idaho, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeidle N. Wasserman; Samuel A. Cushman; David O. Wallin; Jim Hayden

    2012-01-01

    We used bivariate scaling and logistic regression to investigate multiple-scale habitat selection by American marten (Martes americana). Bivariate scaling reveals dramatic differences in the apparent nature and strength of relationships between marten occupancy and a number of habitat variables across a range of spatial scales. These differences include reversals in...

  11. The Relationship Between the ATDP and ATHI Scales for Assessing Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, Robert; And Others

    Studied was the relationship between the Attitude Toward Disabled Persons (ATDP) scale and the Attitude Towards Handicapped Individuals (ATHI) scale. These scales were administered to 82 college students. Also determined was the coefficient of stability of the ATHI using a test-retest after 2 weeks with 54 Ss. The ATHI scale was thought to be more…

  12. Dyspnea in a nonagenarian: The usual suspects, an unexpected culprit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Sérgio; Raposo, Luís; David, Raquel; Marques, Alexandre; Andrade Gomes, José; Cardim, Nuno; Anjos, Rui

    2015-09-01

    Platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome (POS) is an uncommon syndrome characterized by dyspnea and hypoxemia triggered by orthostatism and relieved by recumbency. It is often associated with an interatrial shunt through a patent foramen ovale (PFO). We report the case of a 92-year-old woman initially admitted in the setting of a traumatic femoral neck fracture (successfully treated with hip replacement surgery) in whom a reversible decline in transcutaneous oxygen saturation from 98% (in the supine position) to 84% (in the upright position) was noted early post-operatively. Thoracic multislice computed tomography excluded pulmonary embolism and severe parenchymal lung disease. The diagnosis of POS was confirmed by tilt-table contrast transesophageal echocardiography, which demonstrated a dynamic and position-dependent right-to-left shunt (torrential when semi-upright and minimal in the supine position) through a PFO. The patient underwent percutaneous closure of the PFO with an Amplatzer device, which led to prompt symptom relief and full functional recovery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Observing relationships in Finnish adoptive families: Oulu Family Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienari, Pekka; Wynne, Lyman C; Sorri, Anneli; Lahti, Ilpo; Moring, Juha; Nieminen, Pentti; Joukamaa, Matti; Naarala, Mikko; Seitamaa, Markku; Wahlberg, Karl-Erik; Miettunen, Jouko

    2005-01-01

    Adoption studies were intended to separate genetic from environmental "causal" factors. In earlier adoption studies, psychiatric diagnostic labels for the adoptive parents were used as a proxy for the multiple dimensions of the family rearing environment. In the Finnish Adoption Study, research design provided the opportunity to study directly the adoptive family rearing environment. For this purpose 33 sub-scales were selected creating what we call Oulu Family Rating Scale (OPAS, Oulun PerheArviointiSkaala). In this paper, the manual for scoring of these sub-scales is presented.

  14. Basic Relationships among Scale, Quality, and Benefits in Sino-Foreign Cooperative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The basic relationships among scale, quality, and benefits in Sino-foreign cooperative education are key to the development of cooperative education. It is necessary to construct a theoretical framework for the basic relationships among scale, quality, and benefits in Sino-foreign cooperative education and analyze the questions faced in…

  15. Understanding relationships among ecosystem services across spatial scales and over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jiangxiao; Carpenter, Stephen R.; Booth, Eric G.; Motew, Melissa; Zipper, Samuel C.; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Loheide, Steven P., II; Turner, Monica G.

    2018-05-01

    Sustaining ecosystem services (ES), mitigating their tradeoffs and avoiding unfavorable future trajectories are pressing social-environmental challenges that require enhanced understanding of their relationships across scales. Current knowledge of ES relationships is often constrained to one spatial scale or one snapshot in time. In this research, we integrated biophysical modeling with future scenarios to examine changes in relationships among eight ES indicators from 2001–2070 across three spatial scales—grid cell, subwatershed, and watershed. We focused on the Yahara Watershed (Wisconsin) in the Midwestern United States—an exemplar for many urbanizing agricultural landscapes. Relationships among ES indicators changed over time; some relationships exhibited high interannual variations (e.g. drainage vs. food production, nitrate leaching vs. net ecosystem exchange) and even reversed signs over time (e.g. perennial grass production vs. phosphorus yield). Robust patterns were detected for relationships among some regulating services (e.g. soil retention vs. water quality) across three spatial scales, but other relationships lacked simple scaling rules. This was especially true for relationships of food production vs. water quality, and drainage vs. number of days with runoff >10 mm, which differed substantially across spatial scales. Our results also showed that local tradeoffs between food production and water quality do not necessarily scale up, so reducing local tradeoffs may be insufficient to mitigate such tradeoffs at the watershed scale. We further synthesized these cross-scale patterns into a typology of factors that could drive changes in ES relationships across scales: (1) effects of biophysical connections, (2) effects of dominant drivers, (3) combined effects of biophysical linkages and dominant drivers, and (4) artificial scale effects, and concluded with management implications. Our study highlights the importance of taking a dynamic

  16. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: assessment and palliative management of dyspnea crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mularski, Richard A; Reinke, Lynn F; Carrieri-Kohlman, Virginia; Fischer, Mark D; Campbell, Margaret L; Rocker, Graeme; Schneidman, Ann; Jacobs, Susan S; Arnold, Robert; Benditt, Joshua O; Booth, Sara; Byock, Ira; Chan, Garrett K; Curtis, J Randall; Donesky, Doranne; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Heffner, John; Klein, Russell; Limberg, Trina M; Manning, Harold L; Morrison, R Sean; Ries, Andrew L; Schmidt, Gregory A; Selecky, Paul A; Truog, Robert D; Wang, Angela C C; White, Douglas B

    2013-10-01

    In 2009, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) funded an assembly project, Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis, to focus on identification, management, and optimal resource utilization for effective palliation of acute episodes of dyspnea. We conducted a comprehensive search of the medical literature and evaluated available evidence from systematic evidence-based reviews (SEBRs) using a modified AMSTAR approach and then summarized the palliative management knowledge base for participants to use in discourse at a 2009 ATS workshop. We used an informal consensus process to develop a working definition of this novel entity and established an Ad Hoc Committee on Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis to further develop an official ATS document on the topic. The Ad Hoc Committee members defined dyspnea crisis as "sustained and severe resting breathing discomfort that occurs in patients with advanced, often life-limiting illness and overwhelms the patient and caregivers' ability to achieve symptom relief." Dyspnea crisis can occur suddenly and is characteristically without a reversible etiology. The workshop participants focused on dyspnea crisis management for patients in whom the goals of care are focused on palliation and for whom endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are not consistent with articulated preferences. However, approaches to dyspnea crisis may also be appropriate for patients electing life-sustaining treatment. The Ad Hoc Committee developed a Workshop Report concerning assessment of dyspnea crisis; ethical and professional considerations; efficient utilization, communication, and care coordination; clinical management of dyspnea crisis; development of patient education and provider aid products; and enhancing implementation with audit and quality improvement.

  17. Relationship Quality Time: The Validation of a Relationship Quality Scale in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Ingrid; Rikers, Remy M. J. P.; Wijnia, Lisette; Loyens, Sofie M. M.

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the overall "quality" of the interpersonal relationship students have with faculty and staff, that is, relationship quality (RQ). In relationship management research, RQ is paramount for the creation of bonds with customers, which in turn is necessary for the sustainability of organizations, that is, continuity…

  18. [Exercise laryngoscopy: a new method for the differential diagnosis of dyspnea on exertion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervonen, Hanna; Iljukov, Sergei; Niskanen, Minna-Liisa; Vilkman, Erkki; Sovijärvi, Anssi; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija

    2011-01-01

    Exertional dyspnea originating from the laryngeal level can be established with certainty only if the paradoxical vocal cord adduction is observed during dyspnea. We have developed a novel diagnostic method, exercise laryngoscopy, which involves observation of the larynx with a flexible endoscope applied via the nose during a bicycle ergometry test. It has been our aim to improve the differential diagnosis of dyspnea on exertion and thus also reduce unnecessary antiasthmatic medication. Exercise laryngoscopy allows examination in the out-patient clinics because the method is well tolerated.

  19. An Adaptation, Validity and Reliability of the Lifespan Sibling Relationship Scale to the Turkish Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, F. Selda

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to adapt the Lifespan Sibling Relationship Scale (LSRS) developed by Riggio (2000) to Turkish. The scale with its original form in English consists of 48 items in total. The original scale was translated into Turkish by three instructors who are proficient both in the field and the language. Later, the original and…

  20. Technical Basis of Scaling Relationships for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, William L.; Arm, Stuart T.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2008-07-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities. The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is being designed and constructed as part of a plan to respond to an issue raised by the WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) entitled “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” and numbered M12. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching process using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The approach for scaling PEP performance data to predict WTP performance is critical to the successful resolution of the EFRT issue. This report describes the recommended PEP scaling approach, PEP data interpretation and provides recommendations on test conduct and data requirements.

  1. Technical Basis of Scaling Relationships for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, William L.; Arm, Stuart T.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2008-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities. The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is being designed and constructed as part of a plan to respond to an issue raised by the WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) entitled 'Undemonstrated Leaching Processes' and numbered M12. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching process using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The approach for scaling PEP performance data to predict WTP performance is critical to the successful resolution of the EFRT issue. This report describes the recommended PEP scaling approach, PEP data interpretation and provides recommendations on test conduct and data requirements

  2. Phase-relationships between scales in the perturbed turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, I.; McKeon, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    The phase-relationship between large-scale motions and small-scale fluctuations in a non-equilibrium turbulent boundary layer was investigated. A zero-pressure-gradient flat plate turbulent boundary layer was perturbed by a short array of two-dimensional roughness elements, both statically, and under dynamic actuation. Within the compound, dynamic perturbation, the forcing generated a synthetic very-large-scale motion (VLSM) within the flow. The flow was decomposed by phase-locking the flow measurements to the roughness forcing, and the phase-relationship between the synthetic VLSM and remaining fluctuating scales was explored by correlation techniques. The general relationship between large- and small-scale motions in the perturbed flow, without phase-locking, was also examined. The synthetic large scale cohered with smaller scales in the flow via a phase-relationship that is similar to that of natural large scales in an unperturbed flow, but with a much stronger organizing effect. Cospectral techniques were employed to describe the physical implications of the perturbation on the relative orientation of large- and small-scale structures in the flow. The correlation and cospectral techniques provide tools for designing more efficient control strategies that can indirectly control small-scale motions via the large scales.

  3. Daily functioning of dyspnea, self-esteem and physical self in patients with moderate COPD before, during and after a first inpatient rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninot, Gregory; Moullec, Gregory; Desplan, Jacques; Prefaut, Christian; Varray, Alain

    2007-11-30

    Inpatient rehabilitation improves dyspnea and increases self-esteem between admission and discharge in patients with moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Some researchers nevertheless argue that the changes may be due to nursing effects and thus that scores will decrease quickly at home after discharge. This study assessed the change in dyspnea, self-esteem and physical self mean scores and stability in patients with moderate COPD during three consecutive four-week periods: at home, during an inpatient rehabilitation program, and again at home post-discharge. Twenty-three consecutive patients [63.9 years (SD 6.6)] with moderate COPD [FEV1 = 55.8% (SD 13.2)] were included. The participants responded to the Physical Self Inventory and rated dyspnea using a visual analogue scale twice a day. Exercise tolerance was assessed with the six-minute walk test (6MWT) at admission and discharge. 6MWT performance improved between admission and discharge [452.3 m. (SD 74.0) vs. 503.3 m. (SD 80.4), p self-esteem and physical self scores between the two home periods (p self-worth at home post-discharge compared to pre-admission (p self-esteem, the perceptions of physical condition and attractive body were all significant. After rehabilitation, the coefficients between dyspnea, and perceived physical condition, physical strength and sport competence were significant (p self scores in patients with moderate COPD and decreases their instability; the program also improves dyspnea. However, the impact of rehabilitation was greater on specific perceptions of physical abilities than on the global self-esteem. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these changes, which were probably due to rehabilitation program.

  4. Aggravation of dyspnea in stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients following stereotactic body radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan, Merete; Traberg Hansen, Anders; Petersen, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    the association of dose-volume histogram parameters with changes in dyspnea. The study concerns 28 medically inoperable stage I NSCLC patients that received SBRT at our department between 2000 and 2003. A central dose of 45 Gy/3 fractions was delivered in 5-8 days. WHO toxicity scoring of dyspnea...... consistent temporal variations of dyspnea after SBRT. We identified COPD as the factor showing the closest association with aggravation of dyspnea. The observed aggravation of dyspnea following SBRT reflects habitual exacerbations of COPD rather than treatment-related toxicity. Concern about pulmonary...

  5. Evidence for cognitive–behavioral strategies improving dyspnea and related distress in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norweg A

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Anna Norweg,1 Eileen G Collins2,3 1Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Rehabilitation Research and Development (RR&D, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, Hines, IL, USA Background: Dyspnea is a complex, prevalent, and distressing symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD associated with decreased quality of life, significant disability, and increased mortality. It is a major reason for referral to pulmonary rehabilitation. Methods: We reviewed 23 COPD studies to examine the evidence for the effectiveness of cognitive–behavioral strategies for relieving dyspnea in COPD. Results: Preliminary evidence from randomized controlled trials exists to support cognitive–behavioral strategies, used with or without exercise, for relieving sensory and affective components of dyspnea in COPD. Small to moderate treatment effects for relieving dyspnea were noted for psychotherapy (effect size [ES] = 0.08–0.25 for intensity; 0.26–0.65 for mastery and distractive auditory stimuli (ES = 0.08–0.33 for intensity; 0.09 to -0.61 for functional burden. Small to large dyspnea improvements resulted from yoga (ES = 0.2–1.21 for intensity; 0.67 for distress; 0.07 for mastery; and −8.37 for functional burden; dyspnea self-management education with exercise (ES = −0.14 to −1.15 for intensity; −0.62 to −0.69 for distress; 1.04 for mastery; 0.14–0.35 for self-efficacy; and slow-breathing exercises (ES = 4390.34 to −0.83 for intensity; -0.61 to -0.80 for distress; and 0.62 for self-efficacy. Cognitive–behavioral interventions may relieve dyspnea in COPD by (1 decreasing sympathetic nerve activity, dynamic hyperinflation, and comorbid anxiety, and (2 promoting arterial oxygen saturation, myelinated vagus nerve activity, a greater

  6. Observational Study on Safety of Prehospital BLS CPAP in Dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Novneet; Matthews, Patrick; Groner, Kathryn; Papas, Mia A; Megargel, Ross

    2017-12-01

    with appropriate training. Sahu N , Matthews P , Groner K , Papas MA , Megargel R . Observational study on safety of prehospital BLS CPAP in dyspnea. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(6):610-614.

  7. An Elderly Female with Dyspnea and Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Van Heukelom

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of Present Illness: A 55-year-old female presented via transfer from a referring hospital with 48 hours of abdominal pain, vomiting and dyspnea. She was found to be in severe distress. Her temperature was 37.5° C (99.5° F, heart rate 130 beats per minute, respiratory rate 47 breaths per minute, blood pressure 80/48, and oxygen saturation of 95% on a non-rebreather mask. She had distended neck veins, diminished breath sounds on the left hemi-thorax, and a distended abdomen. A chest x-ray that had been obtained at the referring hospital was immediately reviewed. The decision was made to intubate the patient. Following intubation, a nasogastric tube was placed with marked improvement in her hemodynamics. An abdomen-pelvis CT was obtained which showed a para-esophageal hernia with the majority of the stomach located in the left hemi-thorax and evidence of a bowel obstruction. Significant findings: Radiography shows a dilated, gas-filled structure that fills nearly the entire left hemi-thorax. Lung markings are visible in the uppermost portion of the left hemi-thorax. There is mediastinal shift to the right. In the visualized portion of the abdomen, dilated loops of bowel are also visualized. This constellation of findings is consistent with a tension gastrothorax. Discussion: Tension gastrothorax is a rare complication of blunt trauma, diaphragmatic hernias, and certain surgical procedures.1,2 Clinically, a tension gastrothorax may mimic that of a tension pneumothorax, making it difficult to diagnose.3,4 Stabilizing treatment includes decompressing the stomach by means of a nasogastric (NG tube.2 Placement may be difficult due the intra-thoracic position of the stomach leading to kinking of the tube. The attempt to place an NG tube can lead to hyperventilation and air swallowing, which can aggravate gastric distention.4 Failure to decompress the stomach, however, may lead to patient decompensation and cardiac arrest.5 Definitive treatment

  8. Use of post-exercise laryngoscopy to evaluate exercise induced dyspnea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNally, P

    2010-10-01

    We present the case of a child with asthma who continued to have marked exercise induced dyspnea despite appropriate treatment, and in the face of adequate control of all other asthma symptoms. Spirometry showed a marked truncation of inspiratory flow, and laryngoscopy performed immediately after exercise showed laryngomalacia with dynamic, partial inspiratory obstruction. Exercise induced laryngomalacia (EIL) is a rare cause of exercise induced dyspnea which is diagnosed by post exercise flexible laryngoscopy and may require supraglottoplasty.

  9. Pseudo-asthma: when cough, wheezing, and dyspnea are not asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Miles; Abu-Hasan, Mutasim

    2007-10-01

    Although asthma is the most common cause of cough, wheeze, and dyspnea in children and adults, asthma is often attributed inappropriately to symptoms from other causes. Cough that is misdiagnosed as asthma can occur with pertussis, cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia, airway abnormalities such as tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia, chronic purulent or suppurative bronchitis in young children, and habit-cough syndrome. The respiratory sounds that occur with the upper airway obstruction caused by the various manifestations of the vocal cord dysfunction syndrome or the less common exercise-induced laryngomalacia are often mischaracterized as wheezing and attributed to asthma. The perception of dyspnea is a prominent symptom of hyperventilation attacks. This can occur in those with or without asthma, and patients with asthma may not readily distinguish the perceived dyspnea of a hyperventilation attack from the acute airway obstruction of asthma. Dyspnea on exertion, in the absence of other symptoms of asthma or an unequivocal response to albuterol, is most likely a result of other causes. Most common is the dyspnea associated with normal exercise limitation, but causes of dyspnea on exertion can include other physiologic abnormalities including exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction, exercise-induced laryngomalacia, exercise-induced hyperventilation, and exercise-induced supraventricular tachycardia. A careful history, attention to the nature of the respiratory sounds that are present, spirometry, exercise testing, and blood-gas measurement provide useful data to sort out the various causes and avoid inappropriate treatment of these pseudo-asthma clinical manifestations.

  10. Continuous subcutaneous infusion of compound oxycodone for the relief of dyspnea in patients with terminally ill cancer: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Masahiro; Kaneishi, Keisuke

    2013-05-01

    Pain and dyspnea are the most prevalent and distressing symptoms in patients with terminally ill cancer. Evidences have accumulated for the effects of morphine on dyspnea, whereas little is known about the effects of oxycodone on dyspnea. We investigated the effectiveness of oxycodone for dyspnea in patients with terminally ill cancer. The injectable form of compound oxycodone (iOC) containing hydrocotarnine was administered continuously via subcutaneous route. We administered iOC to 136 patients. The effect on dyspnea was less conspicuous than pain, yet iOC was effective for dyspnea with varying degrees. None of the adverse effects observed were serious. These results suggest that continuous subcutaneous administration of oxycodone could be one of the reasonable alternatives in the management of dyspnea in patients with terminally ill cancer.

  11. SHORT TERM EFFECT OF ACUPUNCTURE-TENS ON LUNG FUNCTIONS AND DYSPNEA FOR SUBJECTS WITH MODERATE COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Babu. K

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acupuncture TENS is used to improve pain instead of invasive acupuncture. Acupuncture shown to improve dyspnoea and lung functions in COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease patients. The purpose of the study is to determine Short term effectiveness of Acupuncture-TENS in reducing dyspnea and improving lung functions for subjects with moderate COPD. Method: An experimental study design, selected 30 geriatric subjects with COPD randomized 15 subjects into each Study and Control group. Study group received Acu-TENS for 45 minutes for total 5 sessions, while control group received placebo TENS. Outcome measurements such as breathlessness using Modified Borg Scale (MBS, Lung functions using Pulmonary Function Test (PFT was measured before and after intervention. Results: Analysis from pre-intervention to post-intervention within study group found that there is statistically significant change in means of MBS, FEV1, FEV1/FVC ratio and within control group there is a statistically significant change in means of MBS, but there is no statistically significant change in means of FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC ratio. When post-intervention means were compared between the groups there is no statistically significant difference in means of MBS and FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC ratio. Conclusion: It is concluded that one week of Acu-TENS on EXL1 point found no significant effect on improving dyspnea and lung functions in subjects with moderate COPD in geriatric populations.

  12. Applying the Nominal Response Model within a Longitudinal Framework to Construct the Positive Family Relationships Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Kathleen Suzanne Johnson; Parral, Skye N.; Gottfried, Allen W.; Oliver, Pamella H.; Gottfried, Adele Eskeles; Ibrahim, Sirena M.; Delany, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    A psychometric analysis was conducted using the nominal response model under the item response theory framework to construct the Positive Family Relationships scale. Using data from the Fullerton Longitudinal Study, this scale was constructed within a long-term longitudinal framework spanning middle childhood through adolescence. Items tapping…

  13. Relationships between avian richness and landscape structure at multiple scales using multiple landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael S. Mitchell; Scott H. Rutzmoser; T. Bently Wigley; Craig Loehle; John A. Gerwin; Patrick D. Keyser; Richard A. Lancia; Roger W. Perry; Christopher L. Reynolds; Ronald E. Thill; Robert Weih; Don White; Petra Bohall Wood

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about factors that structure biodiversity on landscape scales, yet current land management protocols, such as forest certification programs, place an increasing emphasis on managing for sustainable biodiversity at landscape scales. We used a replicated landscape study to evaluate relationships between forest structure and avian diversity at both stand...

  14. Bedside Ultrasonography versus Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Detecting Cardiogenic Causes of Acute Dyspnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keihan Golshani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute dyspnea is a common cause of hospitalization in emergency departments (ED.Distinguishing the cardiac causes of acute dyspnea from pulmonary ones is a major challenge for responsible physicians in EDs. This study compares the characteristics of bedside ultrasonography with serum level of blood natriuretic peptide (BNP in this regard. Methods: This diagnostic accuracy study compares bedside ultrasonography with serum BNP levels in differentiating cardiogenic causes of acute respiratory distress. Echocardiography was considered as the reference test. A checklist including demographic data (age and sex, vital signs, medical history, underlying diseases, serum level of BNP, as well as findings of chest radiography, chest ultrasonography, and echocardiography was filled for all patients with acute onset of dyspnea. Screening characteristics of the two studied methods were calculated and compared using SPSS software, version 20. Results: 48 patients with acute respiratory distress were evaluated (50% female. The mean age of participants was 66.94 ± 16.33 (28-94 years. Based on the results of echocardiography and final diagnosis, the cause of dyspnea was cardiogenic in 20 (41.6% cases. Bedside ultrasonography revealed the cardiogenic cause of acute dyspnea in 18 cases (0 false positive and BNP in 44 cases (24 false positives. The area under the ROC curve for bedside ultrasonography and BNP for differentiating the cardiogenic cause of dyspnea were 86.4 (95% CI: 74.6-98.3 and 66.3 (95% CI: 49.8-89.2, respectively (p = 0.0021. Conclusion: It seems that bedside ultrasonography could be considered as a helpful and accurate method in differentiating cardiogenic causes of acute dyspnea in emergency settings. Nevertheless, more study is needed to make a runaway algorithm to evaluate patients with respiratory distress using bedside ultrasonography, which leads to rapid therapeutic decisions in a short time.

  15. Scale dependence of the diversity–stability relationship in a temperate grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunhai; He, Nianpeng; Loreau, Michel; Pan, Qingmin; Han, Xingguo

    2018-01-01

    A positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem stability has been reported in many ecosystems; however, it has yet to be determined whether and how spatial scale affects this relationship. Here, for the first time, we assessed the effects of alpha, beta and gamma diversity on ecosystem stability and the scale dependence of the slope of the diversity–stability relationship.By employing a long-term (33 years) dataset from a temperate grassland, northern China, we calculated the all possible spatial scales with the complete combination from the basic 1-m2 plots.Species richness was positively associated with ecosystem stability through species asynchrony and overyielding at all spatial scales (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 m2). Both alpha and beta diversity were positively associated with gamma stability.Moreover, the slope of the diversity–area relationship was significantly higher than that of the stability–area relationship, resulting in a decline of the slope of the diversity–stability relationship with increasing area.Synthesis. With the positive species diversity effect on ecosystem stability from small to large spatial scales, our findings demonstrate the need to maintain a high biodiversity and biotic heterogeneity as insurance against the risks incurred by ecosystems in the face of global environmental changes. PMID:29725139

  16. Scale dependence of the diversity-stability relationship in a temperate grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunhai; He, Nianpeng; Loreau, Michel; Pan, Qingmin; Han, Xingguo

    2018-05-01

    A positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem stability has been reported in many ecosystems; however, it has yet to be determined whether and how spatial scale affects this relationship. Here, for the first time, we assessed the effects of alpha, beta and gamma diversity on ecosystem stability and the scale dependence of the slope of the diversity-stability relationship.By employing a long-term (33 years) dataset from a temperate grassland, northern China, we calculated the all possible spatial scales with the complete combination from the basic 1-m 2 plots.Species richness was positively associated with ecosystem stability through species asynchrony and overyielding at all spatial scales (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 m 2 ). Both alpha and beta diversity were positively associated with gamma stability.Moreover, the slope of the diversity-area relationship was significantly higher than that of the stability-area relationship, resulting in a decline of the slope of the diversity-stability relationship with increasing area. Synthesis. With the positive species diversity effect on ecosystem stability from small to large spatial scales, our findings demonstrate the need to maintain a high biodiversity and biotic heterogeneity as insurance against the risks incurred by ecosystems in the face of global environmental changes.

  17. Ranolazine versus placebo in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and persistent chest pain or dyspnea despite optimal medical and revascularization therapy: randomized, double-blind crossover pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shammas NW

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas W Shammas,1 Gail A Shammas,1 Kathleen Keyes,2 Shawna Duske,1 Ryan Kelly,1 Michael Jerin3 1Midwest Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 2Cardiovascular Medicine, Private Corporation, 3St Ambrose University, Davenport, IA, USA Background: Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM may continue to experience persistent chest pain and/or dyspnea despite pharmacologic therapy and revascularization. We hypothesized that ranolazine would reduce anginal symptoms or dyspnea in optimally treated ICM patients.Methods: In this randomized, double-blind, crossover-design pilot study, 28 patients with ICM (ejection fraction less or equal 40% were included after providing informed consent. A total of 24 patients completed both placebo and ranolazine treatments and were analyzed. All patients were on treatment with a beta blocker, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (or angiotensin receptor blocker, and at least one additional antianginal drug. After randomization, patients received up to 1,000 mg ranolazine orally twice a day, as tolerated, versus placebo. The primary end point was change in angina as assessed by the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ, or in dyspnea as assessed by the Rose Dyspnea Scale (RDS. Change in the RDS and SAQ score from baseline was compared, for ranolazine and placebo, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test or paired t-test.Results: Patients had the following demographic and clinical variables: mean age of 71.5 years; male (82.1%; prior coronary bypass surgery (67.9%; prior coronary percutaneous intervention (85.7%; prior myocardial infarction (82.1%; diabetes (67.9%; and mean ejection fraction of 33.1%. No statistical difference was seen between baseline RDS score and that after placebo or ranolazine (n=20 (P≥0.05. There was however, an improvement in anginal frequency (8/10 patients (P=0.058, quality of life (8/10 patients (P=0.048, and mean score of all components of the SAQ questionnaire (n=10 (P=0.047 with ranolazine

  18. Cervical Hyperostosis Leading to Dyspnea, Aspiration and Dysphagia: Strategies to Improve Patient Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Psychogios

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH is a rare but well known cause of dysphagia. In very few cases aspiration and dyspnea are described as a clinical manifestation. An 82-year-old man presented himself in our clinic with severe dyspnea, aspiration, and pneumonia. After performing a microlaryngoscopy an emergency tracheotomy became necessary.In laryngoscopy a severe bulging of the posterior oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal wall was detected. The glottis area was not observable and immobilisation of the right vocal cord could be detected. The CT showed anterior osteophytes and ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament from C2–C7. We performed a panendoscopy in order to explore the upper aerodigestive area. Postoperatively an emergency tracheotomy was needed due to the development of laryngeal edema. The osteophytes were removed in cooperation with the department of orthopaedics. Three months postoperative the patient had no dyspnea or dysphagia, so the tracheotomy could be closed.Cervical hyperostosis is commonly described in elderly patients and usually presenting without symptoms, therefore a surgical treatment is usually not necessary. Nevertheless it can lead to severe morbidity and dyspnea with airway obstruction. Therefore it is essential that cervical hyperostosis is recognized early enough and appropriate treatment is initiated. Flexible endoscopy should be preferred over direct panendoscopy because it could lead to life-threatening edema and a prophylactic tracheostomy should be strongly considered in patients that present with severe dyspnea,

  19. A case of vogt-koyanagi-harada syndrome with persistent dyspnea secondary to laryngeal edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; deSilva, Brad W; Cebulla, Colleen M

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of laryngeal edema associated with the Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) syndrome. A 32-year-old African-American female presented with a 12-day prodrome, including headache, tinnitus and shortness of breath, which preceded sudden photophobia and bilateral visual loss. Examination and clinical testing were most consistent with VKH, and the patient improved with intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. The patient had persistent dyspnea, which was out of proportion to chest CT findings and which was exacerbated during a recurrence of VKH. Flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy with stroboscopy revealed diffuse laryngeal edema. Symptoms were alleviated with breathing exercises. Several autoimmune diseases may cause diffuse laryngeal edema. In this case, VKH was associated with the patient's glottic edema and dyspnea. We recommend that laryngeal edema be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients with dyspnea and VKH.

  20. A Case of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Syndrome with Persistent Dyspnea Secondary to Laryngeal Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimosthenis Mantopoulos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We report a case of laryngeal edema associated with the Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH syndrome. Patient and Methods: A 32-year-old African-American female presented with a 12-day prodrome, including headache, tinnitus and shortness of breath, which preceded sudden photophobia and bilateral visual loss. Examination and clinical testing were most consistent with VKH, and the patient improved with intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. Results: The patient had persistent dyspnea, which was out of proportion to chest CT findings and which was exacerbated during a recurrence of VKH. Flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy with stroboscopy revealed diffuse laryngeal edema. Symptoms were alleviated with breathing exercises. Conclusions: Several autoimmune diseases may cause diffuse laryngeal edema. In this case, VKH was associated with the patient's glottic edema and dyspnea. We recommend that laryngeal edema be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients with dyspnea and VKH.

  1. McArdle's Disease Presenting as Unexplained Dyspnea in a Young Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nha Voduc

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available McArdle's disease is a rare, inherited deficiency of myophosphorylase, an enzyme required for the utilization of glycogen. Patients with myophosphorylase deficiency classically present with exercise intolerance, leg pain and muscle fatigue. The case of a young woman with exertional dyspnea and leg cramps is described. Exercise testing confirmed the presence of exercise intolerance and demonstrated an accelerated heart rate response, despite the absence of an anaerobic threshold and a respiratory exchange ratio of less than 1.0. Subsequent ischemic forearm testing and muscle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of myophosphorylase deficiency. Evaluation of lung mechanics with esophageal pressure measurements demonstrated the presence of respiratory muscle weakness and early fatiguability, suggesting that the patient's dyspnea might have been attributable to an increased respiratory effort. Dyspnea is not a classic symptom associated with myophosphorylase deficiency, although subclinical respiratory muscle impairment may be present. No previous studies have evaluated respiratory muscle function during exercise in patients with myophosphorylase deficiency.

  2. DYSPNEA ASSOCIATED WITH ANXIETY: MISTAKES AND DIFFICULTIES IN THE DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Tyukalova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two clinical cases that demonstrate the difficulties diagnosing the causes of shortness of breath, coupled with anxiety, are analyzed. From the standpoint of modern neurophysiology it explains the relationship of these conditions. There were revealed typical diagnostic mistakes: «the effect of precocious focusing", "the negative effect of the narrow specialization

  3. Revisiting the investor sentiment-stock returns relationship: A multi-scale perspective using wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Jiashun; Nie, He; Jiang, Yonghong

    2018-06-01

    This paper employs SBW proposed by Baker and Wurgler (2006) to investigate the nonlinear asymmetric Granger causality between investor sentiment and stock returns for US economy while considering different time-scales. The wavelet method is utilized to decompose time series of investor sentiment and stock returns at different time-scales to focus on the local analysis of different time horizons of investors. The linear and nonlinear asymmetric Granger methods are employed to examine the Granger causal relationship on similar time-scales. We find evidence of strong bilateral linear and nonlinear asymmetric Granger causality between longer-term investor sentiment and stock returns. Furthermore, we observe the positive nonlinear causal relationship from stock returns to investor sentiment and the negative nonlinear causal relationship from investor sentiment to stock returns.

  4. Approaching a universal scaling relationship between fracture stiffness and fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.; Nolte, David D.

    2016-02-01

    A goal of subsurface geophysical monitoring is the detection and characterization of fracture alterations that affect the hydraulic integrity of a site. Achievement of this goal requires a link between the mechanical and hydraulic properties of a fracture. Here we present a scaling relationship between fluid flow and fracture-specific stiffness that approaches universality. Fracture-specific stiffness is a mechanical property dependent on fracture geometry that can be monitored remotely using seismic techniques. A Monte Carlo numerical approach demonstrates that a scaling relationship exists between flow and stiffness for fractures with strongly correlated aperture distributions, and continues to hold for fractures deformed by applied stress and by chemical erosion as well. This new scaling relationship provides a foundation for simulating changes in fracture behaviour as a function of stress or depth in the Earth and will aid risk assessment of the hydraulic integrity of subsurface sites.

  5. Relationships between aquatic vegetation and water turbidity: A field survey across seasons and spatial scales

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, ?sa N.; Hansen, Joakim P.; Donadi, Serena; Ekl?f, Johan S.

    2017-01-01

    Field surveys often show that high water turbidity limits cover of aquatic vegetation, while many small-scale experiments show that vegetation can reduce turbidity by decreasing water flow, stabilizing sediments, and competing with phytoplankton for nutrients. Here we bridged these two views by exploring the direction and strength of causal relationships between aquatic vegetation and turbidity across seasons (spring and late summer) and spatial scales (local and regional), using causal model...

  6. Using tank 107-AN caustic addition for confirmation of mixing scale relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.C.

    1995-05-01

    A subscale jet mixing program was carried out in two scale tanks to extend the basis of previous subscale tests to include in-tank geometry associated with tank AN-107. The laboratory data will be correlated with the data to be collected in the upcoming tank AN-107 mixing and caustic addition test. The objective is to verify the scaling relationship used in the MWTF mixer design

  7. On identifying relationships between the flood scaling exponent and basin attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhi, Hemanta; Tripathi, Shivam

    2015-07-01

    Floods are known to exhibit self-similarity and follow scaling laws that form the basis of regional flood frequency analysis. However, the relationship between basin attributes and the scaling behavior of floods is still not fully understood. Identifying these relationships is essential for drawing connections between hydrological processes in a basin and the flood response of the basin. The existing studies mostly rely on simulation models to draw these connections. This paper proposes a new methodology that draws connections between basin attributes and the flood scaling exponents by using observed data. In the proposed methodology, region-of-influence approach is used to delineate homogeneous regions for each gaging station. Ordinary least squares regression is then applied to estimate flood scaling exponents for each homogeneous region, and finally stepwise regression is used to identify basin attributes that affect flood scaling exponents. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is tested by applying it to data from river basins in the United States. The results suggest that flood scaling exponent is small for regions having (i) large abstractions from precipitation in the form of large soil moisture storages and high evapotranspiration losses, and (ii) large fractions of overland flow compared to base flow, i.e., regions having fast-responding basins. Analysis of simple scaling and multiscaling of floods showed evidence of simple scaling for regions in which the snowfall dominates the total precipitation.

  8. Regional processes in mangrove ecosystems: Spatial scaling relationships, biomass, and turnover rates following catastrophic disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, G.A.; Smith, T. J.; Whelan, K.R.T.; Doyle, T.W.

    2006-01-01

    Physiological processes and local-scale structural dynamics of mangroves are relatively well studied. Regional-scale processes, however, are not as well understood. Here we provide long-term data on trends in structure and forest turnover at a large scale, following hurricane damage in mangrove ecosystems of South Florida, U.S.A. Twelve mangrove vegetation plots were monitored at periodic intervals, between October 1992 and March 2005. Mangrove forests of this region are defined by a -1.5 scaling relationship between mean stem diameter and stem density, mirroring self-thinning theory for mono-specific stands. This relationship is reflected in tree size frequency scaling exponents which, through time, have exhibited trends toward a community average that is indicative of full spatial resource utilization. These trends, together with an asymptotic standing biomass accumulation, indicate that coastal mangrove ecosystems do adhere to size-structured organizing principles as described for upland tree communities. Regenerative dynamics are different between areas inside and outside of the primary wind-path of Hurricane Andrew which occurred in 1992. Forest dynamic turnover rates, however, are steady through time. This suggests that ecological, more-so than structural factors, control forest productivity. In agreement, the relative mean rate of biomass growth exhibits an inverse relationship with the seasonal range of porewater salinities. The ecosystem average in forest scaling relationships may provide a useful investigative tool of mangrove community biomass relationships, as well as offer a robust indicator of general ecosystem health for use in mangrove forest ecosystem management and restoration. ?? Springer 2006.

  9. Sampling scales define occupancy and underlying occupancy-abundance relationships in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenweg, Robin; Hebblewhite, Mark; Whittington, Jesse; Lukacs, Paul; McKelvey, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Occupancy-abundance (OA) relationships are a foundational ecological phenomenon and field of study, and occupancy models are increasingly used to track population trends and understand ecological interactions. However, these two fields of ecological inquiry remain largely isolated, despite growing appreciation of the importance of integration. For example, using occupancy models to infer trends in abundance is predicated on positive OA relationships. Many occupancy studies collect data that violate geographical closure assumptions due to the choice of sampling scales and application to mobile organisms, which may change how occupancy and abundance are related. Little research, however, has explored how different occupancy sampling designs affect OA relationships. We develop a conceptual framework for understanding how sampling scales affect the definition of occupancy for mobile organisms, which drives OA relationships. We explore how spatial and temporal sampling scales, and the choice of sampling unit (areal vs. point sampling), affect OA relationships. We develop predictions using simulations, and test them using empirical occupancy data from remote cameras on 11 medium-large mammals. Surprisingly, our simulations demonstrate that when using point sampling, OA relationships are unaffected by spatial sampling grain (i.e., cell size). In contrast, when using areal sampling (e.g., species atlas data), OA relationships are affected by spatial grain. Furthermore, OA relationships are also affected by temporal sampling scales, where the curvature of the OA relationship increases with temporal sampling duration. Our empirical results support these predictions, showing that at any given abundance, the spatial grain of point sampling does not affect occupancy estimates, but longer surveys do increase occupancy estimates. For rare species (low occupancy), estimates of occupancy will quickly increase with longer surveys, even while abundance remains constant. Our results

  10. Scaling relationships among drivers of aquatic respiration from the smallest to the largest freshwater ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ed K; Schoolmaster, Donald; Amado, A.M; Stets, Edward G.; Lennon, J.T.; Domaine, L.; Cotner, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    To address how various environmental parameters control or constrain planktonic respiration (PR), we used geometric scaling relationships and established biological scaling laws to derive quantitative predictions for the relationships among key drivers of PR. We then used empirical measurements of PR and environmental (soluble reactive phosphate [SRP], carbon [DOC], chlorophyll a [Chl-a)], and temperature) and landscape parameters (lake area [LA] and watershed area [WA]) from a set of 44 lakes that varied in size and trophic status to test our hypotheses. We found that landscape-level processes affected PR through direct effects on DOC and temperature and indirectly via SRP. In accordance with predictions made from known relationships and scaling laws, scale coefficients (the parameter that describes the shape of a relationship between 2 variables) were found to be negative and have an absolute value 1, others respiration from small pond catchments to the largest body of freshwater on the planet, Lake Superior, these findings should be applicable to controls of PR for the great majority of temperate aquatic ecosystems.

  11. An Examination of Relationships between Psychosocial Satisfaction Scales in an Online Student Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookout, James Marshall, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that students who are satisfied with their learning experiences are typically successful and there is a fundamental theory that suggests if the expectations of students are achieved they will be return customers. This study examined the relationships between the psychosocial satisfaction scales in an online student learning…

  12. Development and properties of a brief scale to assess intimate partner relationship in the postnatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynter, Karen; Tran, Thach Duc; Rowe, Heather; Fisher, Jane

    2017-06-01

    Poor quality intimate partner relationship is associated with postnatal depression and anxiety among women. Existing scales assessing the quality of this relationship are long and measure stable aspects of the relationship rather than specific behaviours which may respond to targeted interventions. The aim was to develop and investigate the properties of a brief, life stage-specific scale to assess potentially modifiable partner behaviours in the postpartum period. Participants were primiparous women from diverse geographical and socio-economic backgrounds in Victoria, Australia. Seven study-specific items were developed to assess potentially modifiable aspects of the intimate partner relationship at 6 months postpartum. Women's mental health was assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and the Patient Health Questionnaire depression and generalised anxiety modules. Factor analysis was conducted on the 7 items, and associations calculated between factor scores. Factor scores were compared for women with and without mental health problems. Mean inter-item correlations were computed to assess internal consistency. Factor analysis on data from 355 women revealed two factors with good internal consistency: Caring Partner Behaviours and Emotionally Abusive Partner Behaviours. Having mental health problems was associated with lower Caring Partner Behaviours and higher Emotionally Abusive Partner Behaviours scores. Interaction between partners was not observed; thus external criterion validity was not assessed. This brief scale is a promising means of assessing potentially modifiable aspects of the intimate partner relationship in the postnatal period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Right sided arcus aorta as a cause of dyspnea and chronic cough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkaya Sevket

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Right sided arcus aorta (RSAA is a rare condition that is usually asymptomatic. Patients may present with exertional dyspnea and chronic cough. A recent article suggested that RSAA should be included in the differential diagnosis of asthma, especially in patients with intractable exertional dyspnea. We aimed to present the clinical, radiologic and spirometric features of thirteen patients with RSAA observed in four years at the Rize Education and Research Hospital and Samsun Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Hospital. Methods The characteristics of patients with RSAA, including age, gender, symptoms, radiologic and spirometric findings, were retrospectively evaluated. Results A total of thirteen patients were diagnosed with RSAA. Their ages ranged from 17 to 86 years and the male to female ratio was 11:2. Seven of the patients (54% were symptomatic. The most common symptoms were exertional dyspnea, dysphagia and chronic cough. Five patients had received treatment for asthma with bronchodilators. Spirometry showed intrathoracic tracheal obstruction in five patients. Conclusions The RSAA anomaly occurs more frequently than might be estimated from the number of patients who are detected. Patients with intractable exertional dyspnea and chronic cough should be evaluated for the RSAA anomaly by thoracic CT.

  14. Prevalence of diastolic dysfunction as a possible cause of dyspnea in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Frants; Raymond, Ilan; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Symptoms in patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction may be caused by isolated diastolic dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of diastolic dysfunction as a potential cause of dyspnea in a sample of elderly subjects, as well as of ...

  15. Impulsive buying tendency: Measuring important relationships with a new perspective and an indigenous scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Jyoti Badgaiyan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With the opening up of the economy and the proliferation of mall culture, the economic relevance of impulsive buying behaviour has assumed significance. Impulsive buying behaviour is better understood by examining the impulsive buying tendency that shapes such behaviour, and since consumer behaviour differs across cultures, by incorporating an indigenous perspective in understanding and measuring the tendency. Studies were conducted to develop an Indian scale for measuring impulsive buying tendency and to validate it by examining its association with other relevant variables. A two factor, 8-item scale was developed; a significant positive relationship was seen between impulsive buying tendency and impulsive buying behaviour, and the relationship between impulsive buying tendency and self-control was found to be inversely significant. Results also showed significant relationship between impulsive buying tendency and the two personality constructs of Conscientiousness and Extraversion.

  16. Relationship between manual dexterity and the unified parkinson's disease rating scale-motor exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sujin; Song, Chiang-Soon

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between manual dexterity and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam as a clinical tool for quantifying upper extremity function in persons with Parkinson's disease. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two persons with idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated in this study. This study measured two clinical outcomes, the box-and-block test and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam, to investigate the relationships between manual dexterity and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam. [Results] The box-and-block test on the more affected side was positive relationship with the box-and-block test on the less affected side. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-motor exam score had a negative correlation with the box-and-block test results for both sides. [Conclusion] A positive association was noted between manual dexterity and motor function in patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease. The results of this study suggest that the box-and-block test and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Exam are good clinical measures that quantify upper extremity function and are necessary for the accurate evaluation of patients and to plan intervention strategies.

  17. Dyspnea descriptors developed in Brazil: application in obese patients and in patients with cardiorespiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Christiane Aires; Rodrigues Júnior, Antonio Luiz; Straccia, Luciana Cristina; Vianna, Elcio Dos Santos Oliveira; Silva, Geruza Alves da; Martinez, José Antônio Baddini

    2011-01-01

    To develop a set of descriptive terms applied to the sensation of dyspnea (dyspnea descriptors) for use in Brazil and to investigate the usefulness of these descriptors in four distinct clinical conditions that can be accompanied by dyspnea. We collected 111 dyspnea descriptors from 67 patients and 10 health professionals. These descriptors were analyzed and reduced to 15 based on their frequency of use, similarity of meaning, and potential pathophysiological value. Those 15 descriptors were applied in 50 asthma patients, 50 COPD patients, 30 patients with heart failure, and 50 patients with class II or III obesity. The three best descriptors, as selected by the patients, were studied by cluster analysis. Potential associations between the identified clusters and the four clinical conditions were also investigated. The use of this set of descriptors led to a solution with seven clusters, designated sufoco (suffocating), aperto (tight), rápido (rapid), fadiga (fatigue), abafado (stuffy), trabalho/inspiração (work/inhalation), and falta de ar (shortness of breath). Overlapping of descriptors was quite common among the patients, regardless of their clinical condition. Asthma was significantly associated with the sufoco and trabalho/inspiração clusters, whereas COPD and heart failure were associated with the sufoco, trabalho/inspiração, and falta de ar clusters. Obesity was associated only with the falta de ar cluster. In Brazil, patients who are accustomed to perceiving dyspnea employ various descriptors in order to describe the symptom, and these descriptors can be grouped into similar clusters. In our study sample, such clusters showed no usefulness in differentiating among the four clinical conditions evaluated.

  18. Point-of-Care Ultrasonography for Evaluation of Acute Dyspnea in the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanobetti, Maurizio; Scorpiniti, Margherita; Gigli, Chiara; Nazerian, Peiman; Vanni, Simone; Innocenti, Francesca; Stefanone, Valerio T; Savinelli, Caterina; Coppa, Alessandro; Bigiarini, Sofia; Caldi, Francesca; Tassinari, Irene; Conti, Alberto; Grifoni, Stefano; Pini, Riccardo

    2017-06-01

    Acute dyspnea is a common symptom in the ED. The standard approach to dyspnea often relies on radiologic and laboratory results, causing excessive delay before adequate therapy is started. Use of an integrated point-of-care ultrasonography (PoCUS) approach can shorten the time needed to formulate a diagnosis, while maintaining an acceptable safety profile. Consecutive adult patients presenting with dyspnea and admitted after ED evaluation were prospectively enrolled. The gold standard was the final diagnosis assessed by two expert reviewers. Two physicians independently evaluated the patient; a sonographer performed an ultrasound evaluation of the lung, heart, and inferior vena cava, while the treating physician requested traditional tests as needed. Time needed to formulate the ultrasound and the ED diagnoses was recorded and compared. Accuracy and concordance of the ultrasound and the ED diagnoses were calculated. A total of 2,683 patients were enrolled. The average time needed to formulate the ultrasound diagnosis was significantly lower than that required for ED diagnosis (24 ± 10 min vs 186 ± 72 min; P = .025). The ultrasound and the ED diagnoses showed good overall concordance (κ = 0.71). There were no statistically significant differences in the accuracy of PoCUS and the standard ED evaluation for the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome, pneumonia, pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, pneumothorax, and dyspnea from other causes. PoCUS was significantly more sensitive for the diagnosis of heart failure, whereas a standard ED evaluation performed better in the diagnosis of COPD/asthma and pulmonary embolism. PoCUS represents a feasible and reliable diagnostic approach to the patient with dyspnea, allowing a reduction in time to diagnosis. This protocol could help to stratify patients who should undergo a more detailed evaluation. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationship between Hounsfield Unit in CT Scan and Gray Scale in CBCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmineh Razi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT is an imaging system which has many advantages over computed tomography (CT. In CT scan, Hounsfield Unit (HU is proportional to the degree of x-ray attenuation by the tissue. In CBCT, the degree of x-ray attenuation is shown by gray scale (voxel value. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between gray scale in CBCT and Hounsfield Unit (HU in CT scan. Materials and methods. In this descriptive study, the head of a sheep was scanned with 3 CBCT and one medical CT scanner. Gray scales and HUs were detected on images. Reconstructed data were analyzed to investigate relationship between CBCT gray scales and HUs. Results. A strong correlation between gray scales of CBCT and HUs of CT scan was determined. Conclusion. Considering the fact that gray scale in CBCT is the criteria in measurement of bone density before implant treatments, it is recommended because of the lower dose and cost compared to CT scan.

  20. Relationships between aquatic vegetation and water turbidity: A field survey across seasons and spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Åsa N; Hansen, Joakim P; Donadi, Serena; Eklöf, Johan S

    2017-01-01

    Field surveys often show that high water turbidity limits cover of aquatic vegetation, while many small-scale experiments show that vegetation can reduce turbidity by decreasing water flow, stabilizing sediments, and competing with phytoplankton for nutrients. Here we bridged these two views by exploring the direction and strength of causal relationships between aquatic vegetation and turbidity across seasons (spring and late summer) and spatial scales (local and regional), using causal modeling based on data from a field survey along the central Swedish Baltic Sea coast. The two best-fitting regional-scale models both suggested that in spring, high cover of vegetation reduces water turbidity. In summer, the relationships differed between the two models; in the first model high vegetation cover reduced turbidity; while in the second model reduction of summer turbidity by high vegetation cover in spring had a positive effect on summer vegetation which suggests a positive feedback of vegetation on itself. Nitrogen load had a positive effect on turbidity in both seasons, which was comparable in strength to the effect of vegetation on turbidity. To assess whether the effect of vegetation was primarily caused by sediment stabilization or a reduction of phytoplankton, we also tested models where turbidity was replaced by phytoplankton fluorescence or sediment-driven turbidity. The best-fitting regional-scale models suggested that high sediment-driven turbidity in spring reduces vegetation cover in summer, which in turn has a negative effect on sediment-driven turbidity in summer, indicating a potential positive feedback of sediment-driven turbidity on itself. Using data at the local scale, few relationships were significant, likely due to the influence of unmeasured variables and/or spatial heterogeneity. In summary, causal modeling based on data from a large-scale field survey suggested that aquatic vegetation can reduce turbidity at regional scales, and that high

  1. Relationships between aquatic vegetation and water turbidity: A field survey across seasons and spatial scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa N Austin

    Full Text Available Field surveys often show that high water turbidity limits cover of aquatic vegetation, while many small-scale experiments show that vegetation can reduce turbidity by decreasing water flow, stabilizing sediments, and competing with phytoplankton for nutrients. Here we bridged these two views by exploring the direction and strength of causal relationships between aquatic vegetation and turbidity across seasons (spring and late summer and spatial scales (local and regional, using causal modeling based on data from a field survey along the central Swedish Baltic Sea coast. The two best-fitting regional-scale models both suggested that in spring, high cover of vegetation reduces water turbidity. In summer, the relationships differed between the two models; in the first model high vegetation cover reduced turbidity; while in the second model reduction of summer turbidity by high vegetation cover in spring had a positive effect on summer vegetation which suggests a positive feedback of vegetation on itself. Nitrogen load had a positive effect on turbidity in both seasons, which was comparable in strength to the effect of vegetation on turbidity. To assess whether the effect of vegetation was primarily caused by sediment stabilization or a reduction of phytoplankton, we also tested models where turbidity was replaced by phytoplankton fluorescence or sediment-driven turbidity. The best-fitting regional-scale models suggested that high sediment-driven turbidity in spring reduces vegetation cover in summer, which in turn has a negative effect on sediment-driven turbidity in summer, indicating a potential positive feedback of sediment-driven turbidity on itself. Using data at the local scale, few relationships were significant, likely due to the influence of unmeasured variables and/or spatial heterogeneity. In summary, causal modeling based on data from a large-scale field survey suggested that aquatic vegetation can reduce turbidity at regional scales

  2. Relationship Between the Functional Status Scale and the Pediatric Overall Performance Category and Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scales FREE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Murray M.; Holubkov, Richard; Funai, Tomohiko; Clark, Amy; Moler, Frank; Shanley, Thomas; Meert, Kathy; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Carcillo, Joseph; Berger, John T.; Doctor, Allan; Berg, Robert A.; Dalton, Heidi; Wessel, David L.; Harrison, Rick E.; Dean, J. Michael; Jenkins, Tammara L.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Functional status assessment methods are important as outcome measures for pediatric critical care studies. Objective To investigate the relationships between the 2 functional status assessment methods appropriate for large-sample studies, the Functional Status Scale (FSS) and the Pediatric Overall Performance Category and Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (POPC/PCPC) scales. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective cohort study with random patient selection at 7 sites and 8 children’s hospitals with general/medical and cardiac/cardiovascular pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. Participants included all PICU patients younger than 18 years. Main Outcomes and Measures Functional Status Scale and POPC/PCPC scores determined at PICU admission (baseline) and PICU discharge. We investigated the association between the baseline and PICU discharge POPC/PCPC scores and the baseline and PICU discharge FSS scores, the dispersion of FSS scores within each of the POPC/PCPC ratings, and the relationship between the FSS neurologic components (FSS-CNS) and the PCPC. Results We included 5017 patients. We found a significant (P < .001) difference between FSS scores in each POPC or PCPC interval, with an FSS score increase with each worsening POPC/PCPC rating. The FSS scores for the good and mild disability POPC/PCPC ratings were similar and increased by 2 to 3 points for the POPC/PCPC change from mild to moderate disability, 5 to 6 points for moderate to severe disability, and 8 to 9 points for severe disability to vegetative state or coma. The dispersion of FSS scores within each POPC and PCPC rating was substantial and increased with worsening POPC and PCPC scores. We also found a significant (P < .001) difference between the FSS-CNS scores between each of the PCPC ratings with increases in the FSS-CNS score for each higher PCPC rating. Conclusions and Relevance The FSS and POPC/PCPC system

  3. Inter-relationship between scaling exponents for describing self-similar river networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Soohyun; Paik, Kyungrock

    2015-04-01

    Natural river networks show well-known self-similar characteristics. Such characteristics are represented by various power-law relationships, e.g., between upstream length and drainage area (exponent h) (Hack, 1957), and in the exceedance probability distribution of upstream area (exponent ɛ) (Rodriguez-Iturbe et al., 1992). It is empirically revealed that these power-law exponents are within narrow ranges. Power-law is also found in the relationship between drainage density (the total stream length divided by the total basin area) and specified source area (the minimum drainage area to form a stream head) (exponent η) (Moussa and Bocquillon, 1996). Considering that above three scaling relationships all refer to fundamental measures of 'length' and 'area' of a given drainage basin, it is natural to hypothesize plausible inter-relationship between these three scaling exponents. Indeed, Rigon et al. (1996) demonstrated the relationship between ɛ and h. In this study, we expand this to a more general ɛ-η-h relationship. We approach ɛ-η relationship in an analytical manner while η-h relationship is demonstrated for six study basins in Korea. Detailed analysis and implications will be presented. References Hack, J. T. (1957). Studies of longitudinal river profiles in Virginia and Maryland. US, Geological Survey Professional Paper, 294. Moussa, R., & Bocquillon, C. (1996). Fractal analyses of tree-like channel networks from digital elevation model data. Journal of Hydrology, 187(1), 157-172. Rigon, R., Rodriguez-Iturbe, I., Maritan, A., Giacometti. A., Tarboton, D. G., & Rinaldo, A. (1996). On Hack's Law. Water Resources Research, 32(11), 3367-3374. Rodríguez-Iturbe, I., Ijjasz-Vasquez, E. J., Bras, R. L., & Tarboton, D. G. (1992). Power law distributions of discharge mass and energy in river basins. Water Resources Research, 28(4), 1089-1093.

  4. A universal scaling relationship between body mass and proximal limb bone dimensions in quadrupedal terrestrial tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campione, Nicolás E; Evans, David C

    2012-07-10

    Body size is intimately related to the physiology and ecology of an organism. Therefore, accurate and consistent body mass estimates are essential for inferring numerous aspects of paleobiology in extinct taxa, and investigating large-scale evolutionary and ecological patterns in the history of life. Scaling relationships between skeletal measurements and body mass in birds and mammals are commonly used to predict body mass in extinct members of these crown clades, but the applicability of these models for predicting mass in more distantly related stem taxa, such as non-avian dinosaurs and non-mammalian synapsids, has been criticized on biomechanical grounds. Here we test the major criticisms of scaling methods for estimating body mass using an extensive dataset of mammalian and non-avian reptilian species derived from individual skeletons with live weights. Significant differences in the limb scaling of mammals and reptiles are noted in comparisons of limb proportions and limb length to body mass. Remarkably, however, the relationship between proximal (stylopodial) limb bone circumference and body mass is highly conserved in extant terrestrial mammals and reptiles, in spite of their disparate limb postures, gaits, and phylogenetic histories. As a result, we are able to conclusively reject the main criticisms of scaling methods that question the applicability of a universal scaling equation for estimating body mass in distantly related taxa. The conserved nature of the relationship between stylopodial circumference and body mass suggests that the minimum diaphyseal circumference of the major weight-bearing bones is only weakly influenced by the varied forces exerted on the limbs (that is, compression or torsion) and most strongly related to the mass of the animal. Our results, therefore, provide a much-needed, robust, phylogenetically corrected framework for accurate and consistent estimation of body mass in extinct terrestrial quadrupeds, which is important for a

  5. A universal scaling relationship between body mass and proximal limb bone dimensions in quadrupedal terrestrial tetrapods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campione Nicolás E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body size is intimately related to the physiology and ecology of an organism. Therefore, accurate and consistent body mass estimates are essential for inferring numerous aspects of paleobiology in extinct taxa, and investigating large-scale evolutionary and ecological patterns in the history of life. Scaling relationships between skeletal measurements and body mass in birds and mammals are commonly used to predict body mass in extinct members of these crown clades, but the applicability of these models for predicting mass in more distantly related stem taxa, such as non-avian dinosaurs and non-mammalian synapsids, has been criticized on biomechanical grounds. Here we test the major criticisms of scaling methods for estimating body mass using an extensive dataset of mammalian and non-avian reptilian species derived from individual skeletons with live weights. Results Significant differences in the limb scaling of mammals and reptiles are noted in comparisons of limb proportions and limb length to body mass. Remarkably, however, the relationship between proximal (stylopodial limb bone circumference and body mass is highly conserved in extant terrestrial mammals and reptiles, in spite of their disparate limb postures, gaits, and phylogenetic histories. As a result, we are able to conclusively reject the main criticisms of scaling methods that question the applicability of a universal scaling equation for estimating body mass in distantly related taxa. Conclusions The conserved nature of the relationship between stylopodial circumference and body mass suggests that the minimum diaphyseal circumference of the major weight-bearing bones is only weakly influenced by the varied forces exerted on the limbs (that is, compression or torsion and most strongly related to the mass of the animal. Our results, therefore, provide a much-needed, robust, phylogenetically corrected framework for accurate and consistent estimation of body mass in

  6. Validation of the Scale of Preferences and Expectations in Close Interpersonal Relationships (EPERIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanil, Yolanda; Ezama, Esteban; Alonso, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    The most commonly used instruments for assessing adult attachment have shown differing combinations of items and divergences in the resulting sub-scales. This study presents the Scale of Preferences and Expectations in Close Interpersonal Relationships ( Escala de Preferencias y Expectativas en las Relaciones Interpersonales Cercanas, EPERIC), made up of 22 items, and based upon the Relationship Scales Questionnaire (RSQ) of Griffin and Bartholomew. Exploratory and confirmatory factorial analyses (EFA and CFA) were undertaken using data from a sample of 594 people. Factor analysis distinguishes three sub-scales: Fear of rejection or abandonment , Desire for closeness and Preference for independence , which explains 42.78% of the total variance. The alpha coefficients reveal a high internal consistency of the instrument and its sub-scales. Regarding validity, CFA showed an adequate fit for the trifactorial solution, and the expected correlations with other instruments for assessing attachment style in adults were found. EPERIC is also suitable for predicting affective states and psychological well-being. The EPERIC is a potentially useful and valid instrument for research and clinical purposes. The discussion focuses on the fact that our results support a model of three factors rather than two, as is usual in studies on adult attachment.

  7. [FINDRISC Test: Relationship between cardiovascular risk parameters and scales in Spanish Mediterranean population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-González, Ángel Arturo; García-Agudo, Sheila; Tomás-Salvá, Matías; Vicente-Herrero, María Teófila; Queimadelos-Carmona, Milagros; Campos-González, Irene

    2017-01-01

    The Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) questionnaire has been used to assess the risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The objetive was to assess the relationship between different scales related to cardiovascular risk and FINDRISC questionnaire. Values of different anthropometric and clinical parameters (body mass index, waist circumference, waist to height ratio, blood pressure), analytical parameters (lipid profile, blood glucose) and scales related to cardiovascular risk (atherogenic index, metabolic syndrome, REGICOR, SCORE, heart age and vascular age) were determined on the basis of the value of the FINDRISC questionnaire. All analyzed parameters related to cardiovascular risk were getting worse at the same time that the value of the FINDRISC questionnaire increased. There is a close relationship between FINDRISC questionnaire values and those obtained in the different parameters by which cardiovascular risk was measured directly or indirectly.

  8. Relationship between the Berg Balance Scale and Static Balance Test in Hemiplegic Patients with Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Makoto; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Machida, Yooichiro; Minakata, Shin

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between results of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Static Balance Test (SBT) in hemiplegic patients with stroke. [Subjects] The subjects were 39 hemiplegic patients (25 men, 14 women; mean age, 69.4 ? 11.0?years) with stroke that had occurred within the preceding 6 months and who had good understanding of verbal instructions. [Methods] The SBT consists of five posture-holding tasks (sitting, stride standing, close standing, ...

  9. Scale indicators of social exchange relationships: a comparison of relative content validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquitt, Jason A; Baer, Michael D; Long, David M; Halvorsen-Ganepola, Marie D K

    2014-07-01

    Although social exchange theory has become one of the most oft-evoked theories in industrial and organizational psychology, there remains no consensus about how to measure its key mechanism: social exchange relationships (Blau, 1964). Drawing on Cropanzano and Byrne's (2000) review of contemporary social exchange theorizing, we examined the content validity of perceived support, exchange quality, affective commitment, trust, and psychological contract fulfillment as indicators of social exchange relationships. We used Hinkin and Tracey's (1999) quantitative approach to content validation, which asks participants to rate the correspondence between scale items and definitions of intended (and unintended) constructs. Our results revealed that some of the most frequently utilized indicators of social exchange relationships--perceived support and exchange quality--were significantly less content valid than rarely used options like affect-based trust. Our results also revealed that 2 direct measures--Bernerth, Armenakis, Feild, Giles, and Walker's (2007) scale and a scale created for this study--were content valid. We discuss the implications of these results for future applications of social exchange theory.

  10. Dyspnea in the ambulance - etiology, mortality, and point-of-care diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Morten Thingemann

    2016-01-01

    dyspnea in the ambulance requires identification of high-risk groups and early correct treatment. Bringing forward simplified versions of advanced diagnostic modalities known from the hospital as point-of-care diagnostics already in the ambulance may aid the discrimination of underlying conditions causing......, we included all patients dialing the emergency number (1-1-2) due to a medical emergency in three of five Danish regions. For identification of highrisk patients and evaluation of electrocardiogram-based triage, we compared short-term mortality between patients included in the first study based...... that are highly prioritized in emergency medical services – including chest pain and trauma. Whether this increased mortality can be ascribed to an older age and comorbidity among patients suffering dyspnea, or if modifiable risk factors are also present, is unsettled. Improving outcome for patients suffering...

  11. Anterior cervical osteophytes causing dysphagia and dyspnea: an uncommon entity revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giger, Roland; Dulguerov, Pavel; Payer, Michael

    2006-10-01

    Large anterior cervical osteophytes can occur in degeneration of the cervical spine or in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). We present the case of an 83-year-old patient with progressive dysphagia and acute dyspnea, necessitating emergency tracheotomy. Voluminous anterior cervical osteophytes extending from C3 to C7 and narrowing the pharyngoesophageal segment by external compression and bilateral vocal fold immobility were diagnosed radiologically and by fiberoptic laryngoscopy. Surgical removal of all osteophytes led to the resolution of symptoms. Dyspnea with or without dysphagia caused by hypertrophic anterior cervical osteophytes is an uncommon entity. The exhaustive diagnostic workup proposed in the literature could be simplified by using fiberoptic laryngoscopy and dynamic videofluoroscopy. The causes, treatment, and outcome are discussed.

  12. Unexplained dyspnea in a patient of chronic arsenicosis: A diagnostic challenge and learning curve for physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitabha Sengupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic arsenic exposure causes cutaneous effects like hyperkeratosis, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, hepatomegaly, peripheral neuropathy, respiratory involvement, bad obstetrical outcome, hematological disturbances, and diabetes mellitus. Here we present a case of a 24-year-old lady, with chronic exposure to arsenic, presenting to us with progressive dyspnea. We found pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH as a cause of her dyspnea. PAH can occur in arsenicosis, secondary to arsenic-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, lung fibrosis, and portal hypertension, which we excluded by appropriate investigations in our case. We also excluded a familial or heritable form of PAH. Thus, with the exclusion of all these secondary causes of PAH, as well as a hereditary cause, we came to a conclusion that this PAH might be due to chronic arsenic exposure. To the best of our knowledge, no case of PAH in chronic arsenicosis has been reported to date.

  13. Relationships between the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Steven O; Weaver, Kenneth A

    2003-06-01

    The Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test detects learning problems of young students and is a screen for whether a more comprehensive test of intelligence is needed. A study to assess whether this test was valid as an adult intelligence test was conducted with 20 undergraduate psychology majors. The correlations between the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test's Composite, Vocabulary, and Matrices test scores and their corresponding Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition test scores, the Full Scale (r=.88), Verbal (r=.77), and Performance scores (r=.87), indicated very strong relationships. In addition, no significant differences were obtained between the Composite, Vocabulary, and Matrices means of the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test and the Full Scale, Verbal, and Performance means of the WAIS-III. The Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test appears to be a valid test of intelligence for adults.

  14. Perception of urge-to-cough and dyspnea in healthy smokers with decreased cough reflex sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Kanezaki, Masashi; Ebihara, Satoru; Nikkuni, Etsuhiro; Gui, Peijun; Suda, Chihiro; Ebihara, Takae; Yamasaki, Miyako; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Background Although cigarette smoking has been implicated as an important risk factor for the development of respiratory symptoms, the perceptional aspects of two symptoms in smokers have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we simultaneously evaluated the cough reflex sensitivity, the cognition of urge-to-cough and perception of dyspnea in both healthy smokers and non-smokers. Methods Fourteen male healthy never-smokers and 14 age-matched male healthy current-smokers were recruited via publ...

  15. Anterior Cervical Osteophytes Causing Dysphagia and Dyspnea: An Uncommon Entity Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Giger, Roland; Dulguerov, Pavel; Payer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Large anterior cervical osteophytes can occur in degeneration of the cervical spine or in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). We present the case of an 83-year-old patient with progressive dysphagia and acute dyspnea, necessitating emergency tracheotomy. Voluminous anterior cervical osteophytes extending from C3 to C7 and narrowing the pharyngoesophageal segment by external compression and bilateral vocal fold immobility were diagnosed radiologically and by fiberoptic laryngoscop...

  16. Laryngeal schwannoma in an 8-year-old boy with inspiratory dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognone, Elisa; Rossi, Andrea; Conte, Massimo; Nozza, Paolo; Tarantino, Vincenzo; Fibbi, Antonio; Saetti, Roberto; Cutrone, Cesare; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2007-10-01

    Schwannomas of the larynx are rare lesions in the pediatric age group. In this article, we report on the neuroimaging features of a schwannoma arising from the left aryepiglottic fold in an 8-year-old boy with a 6-month history of inspiratory dyspnea. Neuroimaging showed a well-defined, avoid mass originating from the left aryepiglottic fold. The lesion was removed endoscopically. Complete removal of laryngeal schwannomas is curative, and adjuvant treatment is not required.

  17. A Case of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Syndrome with Persistent Dyspnea Secondary to Laryngeal Edema

    OpenAIRE

    Dimosthenis Mantopoulos; Brad W. deSilva; Colleen M. Cebulla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We report a case of laryngeal edema associated with the Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) syndrome. Patient and Methods: A 32-year-old African-American female presented with a 12-day prodrome, including headache, tinnitus and shortness of breath, which preceded sudden photophobia and bilateral visual loss. Examination and clinical testing were most consistent with VKH, and the patient improved with intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. Results: The patient had persistent dyspnea, which wa...

  18. Exercise-induced dyspnea is a problem among the general adolescent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, H; Norlander, K; Hedenström, H; Janson, C; Nordang, L; Nordvall, L; Emtner, M

    2014-06-01

    Respiratory symptoms during exercise are common and might limit adolescents' ability to take part in physical activity. To estimate the prevalence, determinants and consequences of exercise-induced dyspnea (EID) on daily life in a general population of 12-13 year old adolescents. A letter was sent to the parents of all 12-13 year old adolescents in the city of Uppsala (n = 3838). Parents were asked to complete a questionnaire together with their child on EID, asthma and allergy, consequences for daily life (wheeze, day time- and nocturnal dyspnea) and physical activity. The response rate was 60% (n = 2309). Fourteen percent (n = 330) reported EID, i.e. had experienced an attack of shortness of breath that occurred after strenuous activity within the last 12 months. Female gender, ever-asthma and rhinitis were independently associated with an increased risk of EID. Ever-asthma was reported by 14.6% (n = 338), and 5.4% (n = 128) had both EID and ever-asthma. Sixty-one percent (n = 202) of the participants with EID did not have a diagnosis of asthma. In addition to rhinitis, participants with EID reported current wheeze and day-time as well as nocturnal dyspnea more often than the group without EID. No difference was found in the level of physical activity between participants with and without EID. Adolescents with undiagnosed exercise-induced dyspnea have respiratory symptoms and are affected in daily life but have the same level of physical activity as adolescents without exercise-induced respiratory symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A 68-Year-Old Man With Dyspnea on Exertion and Cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Abhinav; Sikachi, Rutuja R; Koenig, Seth; Khanijo, Sameer

    2018-06-01

    A 68-year-old man with a history of chronic lymphocytic leukemia well controlled on ibrutinib, hypertension, obesity, and a remote history of smoking (10 pack-years) presented with increasing dyspnea on exertion and cough. He had previously finished two courses of oral antibiotics for his symptoms without significant improvement. On presentation, he had no fevers or sputum production. Copyright © 2018 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Unexpected treatable dyspnea caused by intratracheal granuloma in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient with mechanical ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Shimon; Kimura, Fumiharu; Hosokawa, Takafumi; Satoh, Toshihiko; Furutama, Daisuke; Sugino, Masakazu

    2007-09-01

    Respiratory insufficiency is a problem that develops in nearly all people diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A 46-year-old man with ALS, who had been in a bedridden state with tracheal ventilation support, complained of faintness and dyspnea. The airway pressure of the ventilator had increased, and bleeding from the trachea had occurred several times. A fiberoptic bronchoscopy showed granulation located on the anterior wall of the trachea and severe airway obstruction of the tracheostomy tube. Although a long tracheostomy tube had been intubated for the initial management of the tracheal granulation, a tumor on the posterior tracheal wall had relapsed and occluded the tracheal lumen. A self-expandable metallic airway stent was placed into the tracheal stenosis. After stenting, his symptoms of dyspnea and syncope imploved, and the increased airway pressure of the ventilator was normalized. We speculated that the tracheal granuloma had occurred due to a tracheal mucosal injury related to endotracheal suctioning. We should pay attention to complaints of dyspnea in ALS patients with tracheostomy and make a careful consideration to airway care including suction management.

  1. An adult cystic fibrosis patient presenting with persistent dyspnea: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farinet Catherine L

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent dyspnea is a common finding in the cystic fibrosis patient that typically leads to further work up of an alternative pulmonary etiology. Adult cystic fibrosis patients; however, are growing in numbers and they are living into the ages in which coronary artery disease becomes prevalent. Coronary disease should be included in the consideration of diagnostic possibilities. Case presentation A 52-year-old white male with cystic fibrosis was evaluated for exertional dyspnea associated with vague chest discomfort. Diagnostic testing revealed normal white blood cell, hemoglobin and platelet count, basic metabolic panel, fasting lipid profile, HbA1c, with chest radiograph confirming chronic cystic findings unchanged from prior radiographs and an electrocardiogram that revealed sinus rhythm with left anterior fascicular block. Stress thallium testing demonstrated a reversible anteroseptal perfusion defect with a 55% left ventricular ejection fraction. Heart catheterization found a 99% occlusion of the left anterior descending artery extending into the two diagonal branches, with 100% obstruction of the left anterior descending artery at the trifurcation and 70% lesion affecting the first posterior lateral branch of the circumflex artery. Conclusion This case report represents the first description in the medical literature of a cystic fibrosis patient diagnosed with symptomatic coronary artery disease. Applying a standard clinical practice guide proved useful toward evaluating a differential diagnosis for a cystic fibrosis patient presenting with dyspnea and chest discomfort.

  2. Online Friendship, Romance, and Sex: Properties and Associations of the Online Relationship Initiation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Keith M; Aboujaoude, Elias

    2016-08-01

    Online relationships are increasingly central to many people's lives. As a result, there is a growing need to scientifically examine their psychosocial implications. This study developed and tested the Online Relationship Initiation Scale (ORIS) through classical and item response theory analyses to address this need. An anonymous online survey included 713 adults, aged 18-71 years. The ORIS was tested on psychometric properties and examined for associations with gender and several standardized psychosocial measures. Results demonstrated unidimensionality of nine items, strong factor loadings, and high internal consistency (α = 0.90, ωt = 0.94). All items captured significant information on the latent trait and none showed differential item functioning by sex, age group, or ethnicity. General linear modeling confirmed hypotheses that men were more likely than women to initiate online relationships. Online relationship initiation was not strongly associated with perceived social support, but was positively related to financial distress, and willingness to engage in infidelity or unprotected sex. The ORIS was negatively associated with age and satisfaction with life and showed modest interactions with ethnicity and hours online. This study provided empirical evidence for an interpersonal relationship initiation construct. The ORIS was shown to be a psychometrically sound instrument for evaluating online interpersonal behaviors and their associations with psychosocial and demographic factors. Such psychometrically sound instruments can be useful in exploring online interpersonal behaviors and their significance.

  3. Benefits of short inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity, dyspnea, and inspiratory fraction in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakat Shahin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Barakat Shahin1, Michele Germain2, Alzahouri Kazem3, Guy Annat41Department of Physiology, University of Claude Bernard Lyon I, Lyon, France; 2Chef of the Service of EFR, Hospital of the Croix-Rousse at Lyon, France; 3Department of Medical Informatics, Hospital of St. Julien, Nancy, France; 4Department of Physiology, UFR Médecine Lyon Grange-Blanche Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, INSERM ESPRI ERI 22, Lyon, FranceAbstract: Static lung hyperinflation has important clinical consequences in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Given that most of these patients have respiratory and peripheral muscle weakness, dyspnea and functional exercise capacity may improve as a result of inspiratory muscle training (IMT. The present study is designed to investigate the benefits of a short outpatient program of IMT on inspiratory muscle performance, exercise capacity, perception of dyspnea, and the inspiratory fraction (IF. Thirty patients (24 males, 6 females with significant COPD (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] = 46.21% ± 6.7% predicted, FEV1 = 33.6% ± 8.04% predicted were recruited for this study and had 3 months of IMT (30 minutes/day for 6 days/week in an outpatient clinic. Following IMT, there was a statistically significant increase in inspiratory muscle performance (an increase of the maximal inspiratory pressure from 59% ± 19.1% to 79% ± 21.85% predicted; p = 0.0342, a decrease in dyspnea (from 5.8 ± 0.78 to 1.9 ± 0.57; p = 0.0001, an increase in the distance walked during the 6 minute walk test, from 245 ± 52.37 m to 302 ± 41.30 m, and finally an increase in the IF (the new prognostic factor in COPD from 27.6 ± 9.7% to 31.4% ± 9.8%. The present study concludes that in patients with significant COPD, IMT results in improvement in performance, exercise capacity, sensation of dyspnea, and moreover an improvement in the IF prognostic factor.Keywords: inspiratory muscle training, dyspnea, inspiratory

  4. Relationship between the clinical global impression of severity for schizoaffective disorder scale and established mood scales for mania and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoz, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong-Jing; Bossie, Cynthia A; Sheehan, John J; Alphs, Larry

    2013-08-15

    This analysis explored the relationship between ratings on HAM-D-17 or YMRS and those on the depressive or manic subscale of CGI-S for schizoaffective disorder (CGI-S-SCA). This post hoc analysis used the database (N=614) from two 6-week, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of paliperidone ER versus placebo in symptomatic subjects with schizoaffective disorder assessed using HAM-D-17, YMRS, and CGI-S-SCA scales. Parametric and nonparametric regression models explored the relationships between ratings on YMRS and HAM-D-17 and on depressive and manic domains of the CGI-S-SCA from baseline to the 6-week end point. A clinically meaningful improvement was defined as a change of 1 point in the CGI-S-SCA score. No adjustment was made for multiplicity. Multiple linear regression models suggested that a 1-point change in the depressive domain of CGI-S-SCA corresponded to an average 3.6-point (SE=0.2) change in HAM-D-17 score. Similarly, a 1-point change in the manic domain of CGI-S-SCA corresponded to an average 5.8-point (SE=0.2) change in YMRS score. Results were confirmed using local and cumulative logistic regression models in addition to equipercentile linking. Lack of subjects scoring over the complete range of possible scores may limit broad application of the analyses. Clinically meaningful score changes in depressive and manic domains of CGI-S-SCA corresponded to approximately 4- and 6-point score changes on HAM-D-17 and YMRS, respectively, in symptomatic subjects with schizoaffective disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Addition of non-invasive ventilatory support to combined aerobic and resistance training improves dyspnea and quality of life in heart failure patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Hugo Souza; Cruz, Cristiano Gonçalves; David, Bruno Costa; Rodrigues, Erenaldo; Abade, Camille Magalhães; Junior, Roque Aras; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Dos Reis, Francisco Borges Faria; Gomes Neto, Mansueto

    2017-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that combined aerobic and resistance training and non-invasive ventilatory support result in additional benefits compared with combined aerobic and resistance training alone in heart failure patients. A randomized, single-blind, controlled study. Cardiac rehabilitation center. A total of 46 patients with New York Heart Association class II/III heart failure were randomly assigned to a 10-week program of combined aerobic and resistance training, plus non-invasive ventilatory support ( n = 23) or combined aerobic and resistance training alone ( n = 23). Before and after intervention, results for the following were obtained: 6-minute walk test, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at one second, maximal inspiratory muscle pressure, and maximal expiratory muscle pressure, with evaluation of dyspnea by the London Chest Activity of Daily Living scale, and quality of life with the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure questionnaire. Of the 46 included patients, 40 completed the protocol. The combined aerobic and resistance training plus non-invasive ventilatory support, as compared with combined aerobic and resistance training alone, resulted in significantly greater benefit for dyspnea (mean change: 4.8 vs. 1.3, p = 0.004), and quality of life (mean change: 19.3 vs. 6.8, p = 0.017 ). In both groups, the 6-minute walk test improved significantly (mean change: 45.7 vs. 44.1, p = 0.924), but without a statistically significant difference. Non-invasive ventilatory support combined with combined aerobic and resistance training provides additional benefits for dyspnea and quality of life in moderate heart failure patients. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02384798. Registered 03 April 2015.

  6. [When the cause of dyspnea is on larynx. Asthma of difficult control, resistant to treatment? Vocal cords dysfunction? or Both?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacre Hazouri, José Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Dyspnea is a symptom whose diagnosis requires the exclusion of other diseases with which it can be confused, such as asthma and a variety of pulmonary and heart diseases. Dyspnea originated in the larynx may occur due to obstruction by a tumor or other affections in situ, interfering the airway, such as: edema by infections or inflammatory processes, a traumatism, an abnormal movement of the larynx structures, such as the inappropriate or absent of the vocal cords or the laryngospasm. Severity of larynx dyspnea may be to mild to acute, risking the life. This paper reviews the normal laryngeal function and the anatomic, obstructive, and functional disorders that can lead to dyspnea. Some suggestions are also made to determine the cause and treat these diseases.

  7. Scale effects on spatially varying relationships between urban landscape patterns and water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanwei; Guo, Qinghai; Liu, Jian; Wang, Run

    2014-08-01

    Scientific interpretation of the relationships between urban landscape patterns and water quality is important for sustainable urban planning and watershed environmental protection. This study applied the ordinary least squares regression model and the geographically weighted regression model to examine the spatially varying relationships between 12 explanatory variables (including three topographical factors, four land use parameters, and five landscape metrics) and 15 water quality indicators in watersheds of Yundang Lake, Maluan Bay, and Xinglin Bay with varying levels of urbanization in Xiamen City, China. A local and global investigation was carried out at the watershed-level, with 50 and 200 m riparian buffer scales. This study found that topographical features and landscape metrics are the dominant factors of water quality, while land uses are too weak to be considered as a strong influential factor on water quality. Such statistical results may be related with the characteristics of land use compositions in our study area. Water quality variations in the 50 m buffer were dominated by topographical variables. The impact of landscape metrics on water quality gradually strengthen with expanding buffer zones. The strongest relationships are obtained in entire watersheds, rather than in 50 and 200 m buffer zones. Spatially varying relationships and effective buffer zones were verified in this study. Spatially varying relationships between explanatory variables and water quality parameters are more diversified and complex in less urbanized areas than in highly urbanized areas. This study hypothesizes that all these varying relationships may be attributed to the heterogeneity of landscape patterns in different urban regions. Adjustment of landscape patterns in an entire watershed should be the key measure to successfully improving urban lake water quality.

  8. Examination on Validity of Mothers' Parenting Skills Scale: The Relationship among Scale for Mother's Cognitive and Affective Attitudes on Adolescent and Mother's parenting Attitude toward Adolescent Child

    OpenAIRE

    渡邉, 賢二; 平石, 賢二; WATANABE, Kenji; HIRAISHI, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the validity of parenting skills scale, and the relationship among the parenting skills scale and scale for mother's cognitive and affective attitudes on adolescent and mother's parenting attitude toward adolescent child. 3 subscales of the parenting skills were positively related to "positive cognition and affection" and negatively related to "negative cognition and affection." They were negatively related to "sense of uncertainly" and positively rela...

  9. Dike intrusions during rifting episodes obey scaling relationships similar to earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    L., Passarelli; E., Rivalta; A., Shuler

    2014-01-01

    As continental rifts evolve towards mid-ocean ridges, strain is accommodated by repeated episodes of faulting and magmatism. Discrete rifting episodes have been observed along two subaerial divergent plate boundaries, the Krafla segment of the Northern Volcanic Rift Zone in Iceland and the Manda-Hararo segment of the Red Sea Rift in Ethiopia. In both cases, the initial and largest dike intrusion was followed by a series of smaller intrusions. By performing a statistical analysis of these rifting episodes, we demonstrate that dike intrusions obey scaling relationships similar to earthquakes. We find that the dimensions of dike intrusions obey a power law analogous to the Gutenberg-Richter relation, and the long-term release of geodetic moment is governed by a relationship consistent with the Omori law. Due to the effects of magma supply, the timing of secondary dike intrusions differs from that of the aftershocks. This work provides evidence of self-similarity in the rifting process. PMID:24469260

  10. Effect of slip-area scaling on the earthquake frequency-magnitude relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatorski, Piotr

    2017-06-01

    The earthquake frequency-magnitude relationship is considered in the maximum entropy principle (MEP) perspective. The MEP suggests sampling with constraints as a simple stochastic model of seismicity. The model is based on the von Neumann's acceptance-rejection method, with b-value as the parameter that breaks symmetry between small and large earthquakes. The Gutenberg-Richter law's b-value forms a link between earthquake statistics and physics. Dependence between b-value and the rupture area vs. slip scaling exponent is derived. The relationship enables us to explain observed ranges of b-values for different types of earthquakes. Specifically, different b-value ranges for tectonic and induced, hydraulic fracturing seismicity is explained in terms of their different triggering mechanisms: by the applied stress increase and fault strength reduction, respectively.

  11. The Femininity Ideology Scale (FIS): dimensions and its relationship to anxiety and feminine gender role stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Katherine; Levant, Ronald; Smalley, Bryant; Cook, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a confirmatory factor analytic investigation of the Femininity Ideology Scale (FIS) and to assess whether feminine gender role stress mediated the relationship between femininity ideology and anxiety. During the 2010-2011 academic year, a convenience sample of 606 college women were recruited from three universities and one college. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a four- versus the hypothesized five-factor model, resulting in the elimination of the Dependency/Deference factor. Mediation analysis using structural equation modeling indicated no direct relationship between Femininity Ideology and Anxiety, although an indirect one was observed, mediated through Feminine Gender Role Stress. The results are discussed in terms of possible changes in contemporary notions of femininity, and the utility of using the FIS in applied therapeutic settings.

  12. Impact of exercise capacity on dyspnea and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Frølich, Anne; Godtfredsen, Nina S

    2012-01-01

    To assess the impact of the amount of exercise training during pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) program for improvements in dyspnea and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).......To assess the impact of the amount of exercise training during pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) program for improvements in dyspnea and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)....

  13. Determining the minimal length scale of the generalized uncertainty principle from the entropy-area relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wontae; Oh, John J.

    2008-01-01

    We derive the formula of the black hole entropy with a minimal length of the Planck size by counting quantum modes of scalar fields in the vicinity of the black hole horizon, taking into account the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP). This formula is applied to some intriguing examples of black holes - the Schwarzschild black hole, the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole, and the magnetically charged dilatonic black hole. As a result, it is shown that the GUP parameter can be determined by imposing the black hole entropy-area relationship, which has a Planck length scale and a universal form within the near-horizon expansion

  14. The origin of dyspnea and its role in the reduction of exercise endurance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Vasil'evich Sheyanov

    2010-01-01

    Results. Dyspnea during exercise was reported by 54 (52% patients with RA and 9 (9% control patients (p < 0.001. Dyspnea was more frequently detected and more significant in RA patients with other symptoms of respiratory organ lesions (cough, sputum discharge, chest pain on breathing and coughing, anemia, and emotional disorders of the anxious-depressive type. The degree of dyspnea correlated with DAS 28 scores (r = 0.33; p < 0.01. No correlation was found between lung function parameters and blood gas composition. Pulmonary MSCT in RA patients with dyspnea more frequently revealed signs of bronchiolitis and lesion of the lung as its interstitial fibrotic type. Conclusion. Dyspnea is a common symptom and an important factor in reducing EE and QL in patients with RA. Dyspnea in these patients has a multifactorial origin. Of importance in its occurrence are the involvement of the lung and bronchi in the pathological process irrespective of the lung function, as well as RA-associated factors (including anemia, and nosogenic emotional disorders (anxiety and/or depression.

  15. Discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dysfunction in the general population with dyspnea by plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogelvang, R; Goetze, JP; Schnohr, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to determine whether measurement of plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (proBNP) could be used in discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dyspnea in the general population. BACKGROUND: Natriuretic peptides are useful markers in ruling out acute cardiac d......% to 17%). CONCLUSIONS: In the general population with dyspnea, plasma proBNP concentrations are increased in left ventricular dilatation, hypertrophy, systolic dysfunction, or diastolic dysfunction, but are unaffected by pulmonary dysfunction.......OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to determine whether measurement of plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (proBNP) could be used in discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dyspnea in the general population. BACKGROUND: Natriuretic peptides are useful markers in ruling out acute cardiac...... dyspnea in the emergency department, but their diagnostic significance in evaluating chronic dyspnea in the general population is unknown. METHODS: Within the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a large, community-based population study, dyspnea was evaluated by spirometry, oxygen saturation, echocardiography...

  16. Psycho-Physiological Associates of Dyspnea in Hospitalized Patients with Interstitial Lung Diseases: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan Hua; Mak, Yim Wah

    2017-10-24

    Dyspnea has been found to be an independent predictor of mortality among patients with respiratory diseases and is often regarded as a difficult symptom to control in patients with interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Previous studies have found an association of psychological and physiological factors with dyspnea among patients with chronic obstructive airway diseases. However, symptom management of hospitalized patients with ILDs has been hampered by difficulty in priority, since they are often admitted with multiple psycho-physiological needs. This study examined the prevalence of dyspnea and the psycho-physiological factors associated with it among hospitalized Chinese patients with ILDs. We studied 165 hospitalized patients with ILDs recruited consecutively over three months in a public hospital in Guangzhou, China. Dyspnea and common psycho-physiological factors, including cough symptoms, activity capacity, lung function, physical and mental health status, and anxiety and depression symptoms, were measured. By ordered logistic regression, level of dyspnea statistically significantly affected performance in a six-minute walk test and physical functioning in work or other regular daily activities in hospitalized patients with ILDs. Respiratory rehabilitation with an appropriate intensity of exercise training or other strategies for enhancing the physical functioning of this population with moderate and severe levels of dyspnea should be prioritized.

  17. Assessing client-caregiver relationships and the applicability of the 'student-teacher relationship scale' for people with intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeden, J.M.; Maaskant, M.A.; Koomen, H.M.Y.; Candel, M.J.J.M.; Curfs, L.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Improvements in client-caregiver relationships may lead to improvements in the quality of life of clients with intellectual disabilities (ID). For this reason, interventions aimed at influencing these relationships are important. To gain insight into the nature and intention of these relationships

  18. Nasal flaring as a clinical sign of respiratory acidosis in patients with dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorrilla-Riveiro, José Gregorio; Arnau-Bartés, Anna; Rafat-Sellarés, Ramón; García-Pérez, Dolors; Mas-Serra, Arantxa; Fernández-Fernández, Rafael

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether the presence of nasal flaring is a clinical sign of respiratory acidosis in patients attending emergency departments for acute dyspnea. Single-center, prospective, observational study of patients aged over 15 requiring urgent attention for dyspnea, classified as level II or III according to the Andorran Triage Program and who underwent arterial blood gas test on arrival at the emergency department. The presence of nasal flaring was evaluated by two observers. Demographic and clinical variables, signs of respiratory difficulty, vital signs, arterial blood gases and clinical outcome (hospitalization and mortality) were recorded. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression models. The sample comprised 212 patients, mean age 78years (SD=12.8), of whom 49.5% were women. Acidosis was recorded in 21.2%. Factors significantly associated with the presence of acidosis in the bivariate analysis were the need for pre-hospital medical care, triage level II, signs of respiratory distress, presence of nasal flaring, poor oxygenation, hypercapnia, low bicarbonates and greater need for noninvasive ventilation. Nasal flaring had a positive likelihood ratio for acidosis of 4.6 (95% CI 2.9-7.4). In the multivariate analysis, triage level II (aOR 5.16; 95% CI: 1.91 to 13.98), the need for oxygen therapy (aOR 2.60; 95% CI: 1.13-5.96) and presence of nasal flaring (aOR 6.32; 95% CI: 2.78-14.41) were maintained as factors independently associated with acidosis. Nasal flaring is a clinical sign of severity in patients requiring urgent care for acute dyspnea, which has a strong association with acidosis and hypercapnia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dyspnea, pulmonary function and exercise capacity in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alameri, Hatem F.; Alem, A.; Al-Momen, A.; Kardas, W.; Owais, M.; Jehangir, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to examine pulmonary function, dyspnea, and exercise capacity in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. The patients were recruited from the hematology clinic at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh from January to December 2005. The study involved 39 patients with stable SCD 20 women and 19 men, with a mean age of 22.7+/- 7.1 years, hemoglobin level of 95.5+/-14.6g/L and hemoglobin F level of 13.7+/08.6. Patients underwent pulmonary function tests PFT forced expiratory volume in first second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide [DLco] data are presented as a percentage of the normal prediction, a 6- minute walk test 6MWT and echocardiography. Dyspnea was assessed using the Borg score. The 6MWT data were compared to body mass index matched healthy controls. Forty-one percent of SCD patients had mild dyspnea at rest and this increased to 61% at the end of the 6MWT. Pulmonary function tests were abnormal in 51%, 36% of patients had a restrictive pattern, 10% had isolated decrease in DLco and 5% had a mixed restrictive-obstrutive pattern. The 6MWD was shorter in SCD patients compared to the controls 368+/-67 versus 407+/-47m, p=0.005. No hematological variables correlated with outcome variables. Chronic pulmonary complications in adult Saudi SCD patients are relatively mild but common. Pulmonary function in these patients differs from that published for African-origin SCD patients. The difference may reflect a different natural history of SCD in the 2 populations. (author)

  20. [Nasal flaring as a predictor of mortality in patients with severe dyspnea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorrilla Riveiro, José Gregorio; Arnau Bartés, Anna; García Pérez, Dolors; Rafat Sellarés, Ramón; Mas Serra, Arantxa; Fernández Fernández, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether the presence of nasal flaring is a clinical sign of severity and a predictor of hospital mortality in emergency patients with dyspnea. Prospective, observational, single-center study. We enrolled patients older than 15 years of age who required attention for dyspnea categorized as level II or III emergencies according to the Andorran Medical Triage system. Two observers evaluated the presence of nasal flaring. We recorded demographic and clinical variables, including respiratory effort, vital signs, arterial blood gases, and clinical course (hospital admission and mortality). Bivariable analysis was performed and multivariable logistic regression models were constructed. We enrolled 246 patients with a mean (SD) age of 77 (13) years; 52% were female. Nasal flaring was present in 19.5%. Patients with nasal flaring had triage levels indicating greater severity and they had more severe tachypnea, worse oxygenation, and greater acidosis and hypercapnia. Bivariable analysis detected that the following variables were associated with mortality: age (odds ratio [OR], 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.10), prehospital care from the emergency medical service (OR, 3.97; 95% CI, 1.39-11.39), triage level II (OR, 4.19; 95% CI, 1.63-10.78), signs of respiratory effort such as nasal flaring (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.65-8.69), presence of acidosis (OR, 7.09; 95% CI, 2.97-16.94), and hypercapnia (OR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1,11-6,45). The factors that remained independent predictors of mortality in the multivariable analysis were age, severity (triage level), and nasal flaring. In patients requiring emergency care for dyspnea, nasal flaring is a clinical sign of severity and a predictor of mortality.

  1. Magnitude scaling relationship from the first P-wave arrivals on Canada's west coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaghi, A.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2011-12-01

    The empirical magnitude scaling relationship from ground-motion period parameter τc is derived using vertical waveforms recorded in the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) along Canada's west coast. A high-pass filtered displacement amplitude parameter, Pd, is calculated from the initial 3 s of the P waveforms and the empirical relationship between Pd and peak ground velocity, PGV, is derived using the same data set. We selected earthquakes of M >3.0 recorded during 1996-2009 by the seismic network stations in the region operated by National Resources Canada (NRCan). In total, 90 events were selected and the vertical components of the earthquakes signals were converted to ground velocity and displacement. The displacements were filtered with a one-way Butterworth high-pass filter with a cut-off frequency of 0.075 Hz. Pd and τc are computed from the vertical seismogram components. While the average magnitude error was approximately 0.70 magnitude units when using the individual record, the error dropped to approximately 0.5 magnitude units when using the average τc for each event. In case of PGV, the average error is approximately 0.3. These relationships may be used for initial steps in establishing an earthquake early warning system for the CSZ.

  2. Dyspnea, Tachycardia, and New Onset Seizure as a Presentation of Wilms Tumor: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilms tumor is found in 1 in 10,000 children and most commonly presents in asymptomatic toddlers whose care givers notice a nontender abdominal mass in the right upper quadrant. This case of Wilms tumor presented as a critically ill eleven-year old with significant tachypnea, dyspnea, vague abdominal pain, intermittent emesis, new onset seizure, metabolic acidosis, and hypoxemia. This is the first case in the literature of Wilms Tumor with cavoatrial involvement and seizure and pulmonary embolism resulting in aggressive resuscitation and treatment. Treatment included anticoagulation, chemotherapy, nephrectomy, and surgical resection of thrombi, followed by adjunctive chemotherapy with pulmonary radiation.

  3. Dyspnea with anemia turned out to be a case of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitabha Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder of the vascular system. It can be asymptomatic but when symptomatic most common presentation being epistaxis. It can involve any organs of the body like lungs, skin, liver brain, GI mucosa etc. We are reporting a case of HHT presented to us with dyspnea and severe anemia. He had arteriovenous malformations of different visceral organs and telangiectasia of skin along with presence of similar history in first-degree relatives.

  4. A 26-year-old man with dyspnea and chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Mittal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old smoker male presented with a history of sudden onset dyspnea and right-sided chest pain. Chest radiograph revealed large right-sided pneumothorax which was managed with tube thoracostomy. High-resolution computed tomography thorax revealed multiple lung cysts, and for a definite diagnosis, a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery-guided lung biopsy was performed followed by pleurodesis. This clinicopathologic conference discusses the clinical and radiological differential diagnoses, utility of lung biopsy, and management options for patients with such a clinical presentation.

  5. A calibration-free formulation of the complementary relationship of evaporation for continental-scale hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Jozsef; Crago, Richard; Qualls, Russell

    2017-01-01

    An important scaling consideration is introduced into the formulation of the complementary relationship (CR) of land surface evapotranspiration (ET) by specifying the maximum possible evaporation rate (Epmax) of a small water body (or wet patch) as a result of adiabatic drying from the prevailing near-neutral atmospheric conditions. In dimensionless form the CR therefore becomes yB = f(Epmax-EpEpmax-EwxB) = f(X) = 2X2 - X3, where yB = ET/Ep, xB = Ew/Ep. Ew is the wet-environment evaporation rate as given by the Priestley-Taylor equation, Ep is the evaporation rate of the same small wet surface for which Epmax is specified and estimated by the Penman equation. With the help of North American Regional Reanalysis data, the CR this way yields better continental-scale performance than earlier, calibrated versions of it and is on par with current land surface model results, the latter requiring vegetation, soil information and soil moisture bookkeeping. Validation has been performed by Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model precipitation and United States Geological Survey runoff data. A novel approach is also introduced to calculate the value of the Priestley-Taylor parameter to be used with continental-scale data, making the new formulation of the CR completely calibration free.

  6. Conflict Resolution Styles Scale in Romantic Relationship: The Validity and Reliability Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayca Ozen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study is to test the reliability and validity of the 'Conflict Resolution Styles Scale' (CRSS, which was developed by the researchers. For this aim, two studies have been conducted. In the first study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants who are either married or involved in romantic relationship. A large item pool was generated with the items developed from the interviews and the items developed by the authors after reviewing the related literature. Exploratory factor analysis with 200 dating participants (M= 23.13, SD = 2.96 revealed that four factor solution is suitable for the CRSS. These factors were named as negative conflict resolution style, positive conflict resolution style, subordination, and retreat. In order to confirm the factor structure of the scale, 140 married couples (280 individuals; M = 38.09, SD = 10.35 were participated to the second study. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to test the factor structure of the scale. The results of these analyses and the correlations with the related variables showed that CRSS was reliable and valid measurement tool in the assessment of the conflict resolution styles.

  7. Determining Central Black Hole Masses in Distant Active Galaxies and Quasars. II. Improved Optical and UV Scaling Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Peterson, B. M.

    2006-01-01

    We present four improved empirical relationships useful for estimating the central black hole mass in nearby AGNs and distant luminous quasars alike using either optical or UV single-epoch spectroscopy. These mass-scaling relationships between line widths and luminosity are based on recently...

  8. Modelling cross-scale relationships between climate, hydrology, and individual animals: Generating scenarios for stream salamanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eGirard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid modelling provides a unique opportunity to study cross-scale relationships in environmental systems by linking together models of global, regional, landscape, and local-scale processes, yet the approach is rarely applied to address conservation and management questions. Here, we demonstrate how a hybrid modelling approach can be used to assess the effect of cross-scale interactions on the survival of the Allegheny Mountain Dusky Salamander (Desmognathus ochrophaeus in response to changes in temperature and water availability induced by climate change at the northern limits of its distribution. To do so, we combine regional climate modelling with a landscape-scale integrated surface-groundwater flow model and an individual-based model of stream salamanders. On average, climate scenarios depict a warmer and wetter environment for the 2050 horizon. The increase in average annual temperature and extended hydrological activity time series in the future, combined with a better synchronization with the salamanders’ reproduction period, result in a significant increase in the long-term population viability of the salamanders. This indicates that climate change may not necessarily limit the survivability of small, stream-dwelling animals in headwater basins located in cold and humid regions. This new knowledge suggests that habitat conservation initiatives for amphibians with large latitudinal distributions in Eastern North America should be prioritized at the northern limits of their ranges to facilitate species migration and persistence in the face of climate change. This example demonstrates how hybrid models can serve as powerful tools for informing management and conservation decisions.

  9. Analyse of the prevalence rate and risk factors of pulmonary embolism in the patients with dyspnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yanxia; Su Jian; Wang Bingsheng; Wu Songhong; Dai Ruiting; Cao Caixia

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the prevalence rate and risk factors of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with dyspnea and to explore the predisposing causes and its early clinical manifestations. Methods: Retrospective analysis was done in 461 patients with dyspnea performed 99 Tc m -macroaggregated albumin (MAA) lung perfusion imaging and 99 Tc m -DTPA ventilation imaging or 99 Tc m -MAA perfusion imaging and chest X-ray examination. Among them, 48 cases without apparent disease were considered as control group, whereas the remaining patients with other underlying illnesses as patients group. PEMS statistics software package was used for estimation of prevalence rate, χ 2 test and PE risk factor analysis. Results: There were 251 PE patients among 461 patients, the prevalence rate [ (π)=95% confidence interval (CI) ] was: lower extremity thrombosis and varicosity (80.79-95.47 ), post cesarean section (55.64-87.12), lower extremity bone surgery or fracture (52.76-87.27 ), cancer operation (52.19-78.19), atrial fibrillation or heart failure (53.30-74.88), obesity (23.14-50.20), post abdominal surgery (20.23-59.43), diabetes (19.12-63.95), chronic bronchitis (1.80-23.06), normal control group (3.47-22.66). Except chronic bronchitis, PE prevalence rate between patients group and control group had significant difference (P 99 Tc m -MAA and DTPA lung imaging should be done as early as possible. (authors)

  10. A Case of Frequent Arousal Following Nocturnal Dyspnea Caused by Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Wui Yoon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common disorder that is associated with many esophageal syndromes and complications. Most cases of reflux event occur during the day, but reflux during sleep can cause not only esophageal problems, but also sleep problems, such as arousal and poor sleep quality. We report the case of a 17-year-old man who had been referred to us with frequent arousal following sudden dyspnea. On polysomnography, no respiratory disturbances and periodic limb movements were found during the sleep study, but frequent events of arousal were reported (arousal index: 12.3/h. On a 24-hr esophageal pH monitoring test, his DeMeester score was 176.43 and the total reflux time was 1120.9 min (76.9%, indicating the presence of significant acid reflux. After treatment with a proton-pump inhibitor, the arousals following nocturnal dyspnea and fatigue in the morning disappeared in the patient. GERD should be considered as a cause of spontaneous arousal or awakening not accompanying respiratory disturbances.

  11. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves exercise capacity and dyspnea in air pollution-related respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Naomi; Senjyu, Hideaki; Tanaka, Takako; Asai, Masaharu; Yanagita, Yorihide; Yano, Yudai; Nishinakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Kotaki, Kenji; Kitagawa, Chika; Rikitomi, Naoto; Kozu, Ryo; Honda, Sumihisa

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution in Japan caused respiratory disease, such as chronic bronchitis and asthma, in many individuals in the 1960s. Although air pollution has decreased, many victims of air pollution-related respiratory disease are limited in their activities of daily living because of respiratory symptoms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation in victims of air pollution-related chronic bronchitis or asthma. Subjects were enrolled in a 12-week (2-week inpatient followed by 10-week outpatient) pulmonary rehabilitation program. The program comprised conditioning, strength training, endurance training, and patient education. We assessed the Modified Medical Research Council (MMRC) dyspnea grade, pulmonary function, peripheral muscle force, incremental shuttle walk distance (ISWD), and physical activity at baseline and immediately after the program. Twenty-nine subjects (mean age 74.2 ± 10.1 years, 11 males) completed the program, including 11 subjects with COPD and 18 subjects with asthma. Following rehabilitation, the participants (n = 29) showed significant improvements in MMRC dyspnea grade, vital capacity % predicted, quadriceps force and ISWD (all P pollution-related asthma. In conclusion, we recommend that patients with chronic bronchitis or asthma, resulting from exposure to air pollution, are referred for pulmonary rehabilitation.

  12. Evaluation of Dyspnea Outcomes After Endoscopic Airway Surgery for Laryngotracheal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Idris; Akst, Lee; Karatayli-Özgürsoy, Selmin; Teets, Kristine; Simpson, Marissa; Sharma, Ashwyn; Best, Simon R A; Hillel, Alexander T

    2016-11-01

    Endoscopic airway surgery is a frequently used procedure in the management of laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS); however, no established outcome measures are available to assess treatment response. To assess acoustics and aerodynamic measures and voice- and dyspnea-related quality of life (QOL) in adult patients with LTS who undergo endoscopic airway surgery. This case series compared preoperative measures and postoperative outcomes among adult patients who underwent endoscopic airway surgery for LTS from September 1, 2013, to September 30, 2015, at the tertiary care Johns Hopkins Voice Center. Patients were excluded if they did not undergo balloon dilation or if they had multilevel or glottic stenosis. The Phonatory Aerodynamic System was used to quantify laryngotracheal aerodynamic changes after surgery. Final follow-up was completed 2 to 6 weeks after surgery. The voice-related QOL instrument (V-RQOL), Dyspnea Index, and Clinical Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Questionnaire were completed before and after endoscopic surgery. Consensus auditory perceptual evaluation of voice, acoustic measurements, and aerodynamic outcomes were also assessed. Fourteen patients (1 man and 13 women; mean [SD] age, 45.4 [4.3] years) were enrolled. The mean postoperative V-RQOL scores (n = 14) increased from 74.3 to 85.5 (mean of difference, 11.3; 95% CI, 2.2 to 20.3). The mean postoperative Dyspnea Index (n = 14) decreased from 26.9 to 6.6 (mean of difference, -20.3; 95% CI, -27.9 to -12.7); the mean postoperative Clinical Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Questionnaire scores (n = 9) decreased from 3.2 to 1.0 (mean of difference, -2.2; 95% CI, -3.4 to -0.9). Postoperative mean vital capacity (n = 14) increased from 2.5 to 3.1 L (mean of difference, 0.6 L; 95% CI, 0.3-1.0 L), whereas mean laryngeal resistance (n = 14) decreased from 73.9 to 46.4 cm H2O/L/s (mean of difference, -27.5 cm H2O/L/s; 95% CI, -44.8 to -10.3 cm H2O/L/s) postoperatively. Patients

  13. Relationship between depression anxiety stress scale (DASS) and urinary hydroxyproline and proline concentrations in hospital workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keou Won; Kim, Soo Jeong; Park, Jae Beom; Lee, Kyung Jong

    2011-01-01

    Although increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) is caused by stress accelerates collagen degradation, there was no data on the relationship between stress and urinary hydroxyproline (Hyp) and proline (Pro), a good marker of collagen degradation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between depression, anxiety, and stress (DAS) and concentrations of urinary Hyp and Pro. 97 hospital employees aged 20 to 58 were asked to fill out comprehensive self-administrated questionnaires containing information about their medical history, lifestyle, length of the work year, shift-work and DAS. depression anxiety stress scale (DASS) was applied to evaluate chronic mental disorders. Urine samples were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with double derivatization for the assay of hydroxyproline and proline. The mean value of Hyp and Pro concentration in all subjects was 194.1 ± 113.4 μmol/g and 568.2 ± 310.7 μmol/g. DASS values and urinary Pro concentrations were differentiated by sex (female > male, p others, p < 0.05). In the stepwise multiple linear regressions, urinary Hyp and Pro concentrations were influenced by stress (Adjusted r2 = 0.051) and anxiety and job (Adjusted r2 = 0.199), respectively. We found that stress and anxiety were correlated with urinary Hyp and Pro concentrations. To identifying a definite correlation, further study in large populations will be needed.

  14. The relationship between sensory processing and anxiety on cars scale in autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković Neda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder is a neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by deficits in social interactions, social communication, stereotyped behavior associated with sensory disorders occurring before the age of 3. There has been a growing trend of this neurodevelopmental disorder in recent years. Although the sensory processing problems have been noticed since the first descriptions of autism spectrum disorders, it is only the DSM-5, diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, that includes sensory problems, as the crucial symptom in diagnostic profile of autism spectrum disorder. Objective: To establish the relationship between functional areas related to sensory processing and anxiety, as well as to determine the degree of autistic disorder in adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorder. Method: 42 participants, adolescents and adults with severe autism disorder and intellectual disability, aged 15-35, of both sexes from Belgrade were evaluated by Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS used to determine the degree of autistic disorder. The following functional areas were compared: sensory interests and anxiety in adolescents and adults with autistic spectrum of both sexes. Results: The results indicated the existence of the relationship between anxiety and unusual sensory interests and the severity of autism spectrum disorder. The results showed that there was a correlation between visual perception and the level of intellectual functioning, especially of the severity of autistic disorder and visual perception. Conclusion: These results indicate the reasons of the problems and difficulties in the field of general adaptation of the individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

  15. Improving extinction projections across scales and habitats using the countryside species-area relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Inês Santos; Pereira, Henrique Miguel

    2017-10-10

    The species-area relationship (SAR) has been often used to project species extinctions as a consequence of habitat loss. However, recent studies have suggested that the SAR may overestimate species extinctions, at least in the short-term. We argue that the main reason for this overestimation is that the classic SAR ignores the persistence of species in human-modified habitats. We use data collected worldwide to analyse what is the fraction of bird and plant species that remain in different human-modified habitats at the local scale after full habitat conversion. We observe that both taxa have consistent responses to the different land-use types, with strongest reductions in species richness in cropland across the globe, and in pasture in the tropics. We show that the results from these studies cannot be linearly scaled from plots to large regions, as this again overestimates the impacts of land-use change on biodiversity. The countryside SAR provides a unifying framework to incorporate both the effect of species persistence in the landscape matrix and the non-linear response of the proportion of species extinctions to sampling area, generating more realistic projections of biodiversity loss.

  16. GALAXY CLUSTER RADIO RELICS IN ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS: RELIC PROPERTIES AND SCALING RELATIONSHIPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skillman, Samuel W.; Hallman, Eric J.; Burns, Jack O.; Smith, Britton D.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Turk, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Cosmological shocks are a critical part of large-scale structure formation, and are responsible for heating the intracluster medium in galaxy clusters. In addition, they are capable of accelerating non-thermal electrons and protons. In this work, we focus on the acceleration of electrons at shock fronts, which is thought to be responsible for radio relics-extended radio features in the vicinity of merging galaxy clusters. By combining high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement/N-body cosmological simulations with an accurate shock-finding algorithm and a model for electron acceleration, we calculate the expected synchrotron emission resulting from cosmological structure formation. We produce synthetic radio maps of a large sample of galaxy clusters and present luminosity functions and scaling relationships. With upcoming long-wavelength radio telescopes, we expect to see an abundance of radio emission associated with merger shocks in the intracluster medium. By producing observationally motivated statistics, we provide predictions that can be compared with observations to further improve our understanding of magnetic fields and electron shock acceleration.

  17. Micro scale spatial relationships in urban studies : The relationship between private and public space and its impact on street life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nes, A.; Lopez, M.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Research on urban environment by means of space syntax theory and methods tends to focus on macro scale spatial conditions. However, micro scale conditions should not be neglected. In research on street life and dispersal of crime in urban areas, it became inevitable to pay attention to the

  18. Are trait-scaling relationships invariant across contrasting elevations in the widely distributed treeline species Nothofagus pumilio?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Alex

    2016-05-01

    The study of scaling examines the relative dimensions of diverse organismal traits. Understanding whether global scaling patterns are paralleled within species is key to identify causal factors of universal scaling. I examined whether the foliage-stem (Corner's rules), the leaf size-number, and the leaf mass-leaf area scaling relationships remained invariant and isometric with elevation in a wide-distributed treeline species in the southern Chilean Andes. Mean leaf area, leaf mass, leafing intensity, and twig cross-sectional area were determined for 1-2 twigs of 8-15 Nothofagus pumilio individuals across four elevations (including treeline elevation) and four locations (from central Chile at 36°S to Tierra del Fuego at 54°S). Mixed effects models were fitted to test whether the interaction term between traits and elevation was nonsignificant (invariant). The leaf-twig cross-sectional area and the leaf mass-leaf area scaling relationships were isometric (slope = 1) and remained invariant with elevation, whereas the leaf size-number (i.e., leafing intensity) scaling was allometric (slope ≠ -1) and showed no variation with elevation. Leaf area and leaf number were consistently negatively correlated across elevation. The scaling relationships examined in the current study parallel those seen across species. It is plausible that the explanation of intraspecific scaling relationships, as trait combinations favored by natural selection, is the same as those invoked to explain across species patterns. Thus, it is very likely that the global interspecific Corner's rules and other leaf-leaf scaling relationships emerge as the aggregate of largely parallel intraspecific patterns. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  19. An Instrument to Investigate Expectations about and Experiences of the Parent-Child Relationship: The Parent-Child Relationship Schema Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Dixson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the reasons for and process of creating and testing for reliability and constructing the validity of the Parent-Child Relationship Schema Scale (PCRSS. The instrument is based on the Model of Relationships Survey (MRS. However, where the MRS is an open-ended survey which takes 20–30 minutes to complete and longer to analyze, the PCRSS is a Likert scale survey which can be completed in less than half the time and offers more sophisticated analysis possibilities as well as new research opportunities. The paper explains the three-stage process used to create the PCRSS and the five tests of reliability and concurrent validity that it “passed”. We also discuss the potential for new areas of research about the parent-child relationship with the PCRSS.

  20. EMD-regression for modelling multi-scale relationships, and application to weather-related cardiovascular mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselot, Pierre; Chebana, Fateh; Bélanger, Diane; St-Hilaire, André; Abdous, Belkacem; Gosselin, Pierre; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2018-01-01

    In a number of environmental studies, relationships between natural processes are often assessed through regression analyses, using time series data. Such data are often multi-scale and non-stationary, leading to a poor accuracy of the resulting regression models and therefore to results with moderate reliability. To deal with this issue, the present paper introduces the EMD-regression methodology consisting in applying the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) algorithm on data series and then using the resulting components in regression models. The proposed methodology presents a number of advantages. First, it accounts of the issues of non-stationarity associated to the data series. Second, this approach acts as a scan for the relationship between a response variable and the predictors at different time scales, providing new insights about this relationship. To illustrate the proposed methodology it is applied to study the relationship between weather and cardiovascular mortality in Montreal, Canada. The results shed new knowledge concerning the studied relationship. For instance, they show that the humidity can cause excess mortality at the monthly time scale, which is a scale not visible in classical models. A comparison is also conducted with state of the art methods which are the generalized additive models and distributed lag models, both widely used in weather-related health studies. The comparison shows that EMD-regression achieves better prediction performances and provides more details than classical models concerning the relationship.

  1. The relationship of the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Billy L; McChristian, Chrystal L; Smith, Teresa D; Meaux, Julie

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare scores on the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS) with scores on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) in a group of college students diagnosed with a Learning Disability, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), or a combination of the two. The RIAS Composite Index score was significantly higher than the WAIS-III Full Scale IQ, although scores on both tests were in the average range. Correlations between the two tests were significant on all measures. Male students were significantly higher than female students on both the RIAS Composite Index and on the WAIS-III Full Scale IQ. Although the ADHD group was higher on IQ than the Learning Disabled and combined disorder groups on all IQ measures, no significant differences were found.

  2. Greater dyspnea is associated with lower health-related quality of life among European patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruenberger JB

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Bernard Gruenberger,1 Jeffrey Vietri,2 Dorothy L Keininger,1 Donald A Mahler3 1Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Basel-Stadt, Switzerland; 2Health Outcomes Practice, Kantar Health, Horsham, PA, 3Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA Objective: Dyspnea is a defining symptom in the classification and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, the degree of variation in burden among symptomatic COPD patients and the possible correlates of burden remain unclear. This study was conducted to characterize patients in Europe currently being treated for COPD according to the level of dyspnea in terms of sociodemographics, health-related quality of life, work productivity impairment, and health care resource use assessed by patient reports.Methods: Data were derived from the 5-EU 2013 National Health and Wellness Survey (N=62,000. Respondents aged ≥40 years who reported currently using a prescription for COPD were grouped according to their level of dyspnea as per the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines and compared on health status (revised Short Form 36 [SF-36]v2, work impairment (Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire, and number of health care visits in the past 6 months using generalized linear models with appropriate distributions and link functions.Results: Of the 768 respondents who met the inclusion criteria, 245 (32% were considered to have higher dyspnea (equivalent to modified Medical Research Council score ≥2. Higher dyspnea was associated with decrements ranging from 3.9 to 8.2 points in all eight domains of the SF-36 health profile after adjustment for sociodemographics, general health characteristics, and length of COPD diagnosis; mental component summary scores and Short Form-6D health utility scores were lower by 3.5 and 0.06 points, respectively. Adjusted mean activity impairment (55% vs 37%, P<0.001 and

  3. A 29-Year-Old Man With Nonproductive Cough, Exertional Dyspnea, and Chest Discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpenny, Darragh; Suh, James; Garofano, Suzette; Alpert, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    A 29-year-old man presented with a 5-month history of worsening dry cough, exertional dyspnea, chest tightness, and palpitations. He had been treated by his primary care physician with trials of guaifenesin/codeine, azithromycin, albuterol, and omeprazole without improvement. He denied wheezing, fever, sweats, anorexia, joint pain, swelling, or rash. He had no past medical history. He denied a history of tobacco smoking or IV drug use. He kept no pets, worked as a manager in an office environment, and had no history of occupational inhalational exposure. He reported using aerosolized insect spray to eradicate bed bugs in his house shortly before the cough began but did not report any acute symptoms when using the spray.

  4. An uncommon case of dyspnea with unilateral laryngeal paralysis in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerat, Justine; Lacoste, Marie; Prechoux, Jean-Marc; Aubry, Karine; Nadalon, Sylvie; Ly, Kim Heang; Bessede, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    A 61-year-old man with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and normal BMI complained of dyspnea. Nasofibroscopy revealed a global and major oedema of the glottis and supraglottis and also a paralysis of the left vocal fold. CT-scan pointed out a spontaneous hyperdensity of the left arytenoid cartilage. A tracheostomy was performed. Clinical examination revealed large hands and macroglossy with high IGF1 rate. MRI confirmed a supracentimetric pituitary adenoma. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a case of acute respiratory distress due to unilateral larynx paralysis leading to acromegaly diagnosis. This is due to submucosal hypertrophy and vocal cord immobility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: a clinical approach. Part 1: cervicofacial swelling, dysphagia, and dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea Álvarez, B; Tuñón Gómez, M; Esteban García, L; García Hidalgo, C Y; Ruiz Peralbo, R M

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck represent a challenge in the field of neuroradiology for two reasons: first, they affect an area where the thorax joins the cranial cavity and can thus compromise both structures; second, they are uncommon, so they are not well known. Various publications focus on nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck from the viewpoints of anatomic location or of particular diseases. However, these are not the most helpful viewpoints for dealing with patients in the emergency department, who present with particular signs and symptoms. We propose an analysis starting from the four most common clinical presentations of patients who come to the emergency department for nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: cervical swelling, dysphagia, dyspnea, and loss of vision. Starting from these entities, we develop an approach to the radiologic management and diagnosis of these patients. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing Weather-Yield Relationships in Rice at Local Scale Using Data Mining Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Delerce

    Full Text Available Seasonal and inter-annual climate variability have become important issues for farmers, and climate change has been shown to increase them. Simultaneously farmers and agricultural organizations are increasingly collecting observational data about in situ crop performance. Agriculture thus needs new tools to cope with changing environmental conditions and to take advantage of these data. Data mining techniques make it possible to extract embedded knowledge associated with farmer experiences from these large observational datasets in order to identify best practices for adapting to climate variability. We introduce new approaches through a case study on irrigated and rainfed rice in Colombia. Preexisting observational datasets of commercial harvest records were combined with in situ daily weather series. Using Conditional Inference Forest and clustering techniques, we assessed the relationships between climatic factors and crop yield variability at the local scale for specific cultivars and growth stages. The analysis showed clear relationships in the various location-cultivar combinations, with climatic factors explaining 6 to 46% of spatiotemporal variability in yield, and with crop responses to weather being non-linear and cultivar-specific. Climatic factors affected cultivars differently during each stage of development. For instance, one cultivar was affected by high nighttime temperatures in the reproductive stage but responded positively to accumulated solar radiation during the ripening stage. Another was affected by high nighttime temperatures during both the vegetative and reproductive stages. Clustering of the weather patterns corresponding to individual cropping events revealed different groups of weather patterns for irrigated and rainfed systems with contrasting yield levels. Best-suited cultivars were identified for some weather patterns, making weather-site-specific recommendations possible. This study illustrates the potential of

  7. Assessing Weather-Yield Relationships in Rice at Local Scale Using Data Mining Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delerce, Sylvain; Dorado, Hugo; Grillon, Alexandre; Rebolledo, Maria Camila; Prager, Steven D; Patiño, Victor Hugo; Garcés Varón, Gabriel; Jiménez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal and inter-annual climate variability have become important issues for farmers, and climate change has been shown to increase them. Simultaneously farmers and agricultural organizations are increasingly collecting observational data about in situ crop performance. Agriculture thus needs new tools to cope with changing environmental conditions and to take advantage of these data. Data mining techniques make it possible to extract embedded knowledge associated with farmer experiences from these large observational datasets in order to identify best practices for adapting to climate variability. We introduce new approaches through a case study on irrigated and rainfed rice in Colombia. Preexisting observational datasets of commercial harvest records were combined with in situ daily weather series. Using Conditional Inference Forest and clustering techniques, we assessed the relationships between climatic factors and crop yield variability at the local scale for specific cultivars and growth stages. The analysis showed clear relationships in the various location-cultivar combinations, with climatic factors explaining 6 to 46% of spatiotemporal variability in yield, and with crop responses to weather being non-linear and cultivar-specific. Climatic factors affected cultivars differently during each stage of development. For instance, one cultivar was affected by high nighttime temperatures in the reproductive stage but responded positively to accumulated solar radiation during the ripening stage. Another was affected by high nighttime temperatures during both the vegetative and reproductive stages. Clustering of the weather patterns corresponding to individual cropping events revealed different groups of weather patterns for irrigated and rainfed systems with contrasting yield levels. Best-suited cultivars were identified for some weather patterns, making weather-site-specific recommendations possible. This study illustrates the potential of data mining for

  8. The parsec-scale relationship between ICO and AV in local molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheoljong; Leroy, Adam K.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Indebetouw, Remy; Sandstrom, Karin; Schruba, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    We measure the parsec-scale relationship between integrated CO intensity (ICO) and visual extinction (AV) in 24 local molecular clouds using maps of CO emission and dust optical depth from Planck. This relationship informs our understanding of CO emission across environments, but clean Milky Way measurements remain scarce. We find uniform ICO for a given AV, with the results bracketed by previous studies of the Pipe and Perseus clouds. Our measured ICO-AV relation broadly agrees with the standard Galactic CO-to-H2 conversion factor, the relation found for the Magellanic clouds at coarser resolution, and numerical simulations by Glover & Clark (2016). This supports the idea that CO emission primarily depends on shielding, which protects molecules from dissociating radiation. Evidence for CO saturation at high AV and a threshold for CO emission at low AV varies remains uncertain due to insufficient resolution and ambiguities in background subtraction. Resolution of order 0.1 pc may be required to measure these features. We use this ICO-AV relation to predict how the CO-to-H2 conversion factor (XCO) would change if the Solar Neighbourhood clouds had different dust-to-gas ratio (metallicity). The calculations highlight the need for improved observations of the CO emission threshold and H I shielding layer depth. They are also sensitive to the shape of the column density distribution. Because local clouds collectively show a self-similar distribution, we predict a shallow metallicity dependence for XCO down to a few tenths of solar metallicity. However, our calculations also imply dramatic variations in cloud-to-cloud XCO at subsolar metallicity.

  9. Investigation of the relationship between convenient visits and doctors' fatigue using burnout and work engagement scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yuuki; Hoshiko, Michiko; Morimatsu, Yoshitaka; Mori, Mihoko; Kushino, Nanae; Ishitake, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue caused by high workload is often responsible for the high attrition among doctors, and has contributed to a disruption in community medicine. In order to address this problem, institutional mechanisms at the hospital level are required. Previous studies have shown that systemic measures at the hospital level and a change in the mindset of patients can help manage the problem. "Convenient visits" refer to emergency visits for non-emergency problems. It is an avoidable cause of high workload on doctors. Convenient visits also refer to emergency consultation for non-emergency symptoms. As this is a new phenomenon, its relationship with doctors' fatigue needs further research. We investigated the relationship between convenient visits and doctors' fatigue using burnout and work engagement scales. We selected 44 hospitals, with >200 beds each, in provincial cities of prefectures with a doctor-population ratio lower than the national average. These cities were considered likely to manifest the phenomenon of 24-hour society and include overworked doctors. Ordinance-designated cities were excluded from this study owing to wide population variability. Three doctors from each hospital were randomly selected from among physicians, surgeons, and pediatricians. We distributed questionnaires (a questionnaire concerning convenient visits, Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale) to 132 doctors. Forty-two doctors responded to the survey. The median proportion of convenient visits among emergency visits was 50%. Sixty percent of the doctors surveyed were annoyed by convenient visits. Other doctors indicated good collaboration between the hospitals and communities or that they were not currently annoyed by convenient visits, although they had been annoyed previously. The emotional exhaustion in doctors, who worked in hospitals that did not restrict convenient visits, was significantly higher than in those who worked in hospitals

  10. [Is BNP assay useful for the diagnosis of acute dyspnea in emergencies departments?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhdhar, Rim; Hamouda, Chokri; Ben Ammar, Lotfi; Majed, Kamel; Moncef, Fekih; Kaabachi, Naziha; Drissa, Habiba; Borsali Falfoul, Nebiha

    2013-01-01

    It would be interesting to the emergency doctor to have at his disposal a helpful diagnostic tool like brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Such assay is simple, available and reliable. To report our experience on the role of BNP in the etiological diagnosis of acute dyspnea (AD) in emergency room (ER) and to assess the cost-effectiveness ratio of such diagnosis strategy. A prospective study conducted in the ER of Rabta university teaching hospital of Tunis, from March 1st to June 20th 2010, involving 30 consecutive patients presenting to the emergency for AD. All patients underwent echocardiography in their acute phase and benefited from the dosage of BNP during the first 4 hours. The echocardiography parameters were collected by a single operator who was unaware of the results of the BNP dosage. The mean age of patients was 72.8years with a sex ratio of 1.5. AD was of orthopnea type in 9 cases and stage III NYHA dyspnea in the other patients. Clinical and radiological signs of left heart failure were noted in 30% of cases. Ultrasound data have objectified systolic dysfunction in 4 cases, diastolic in 3 cases and systolic plus diastolic in 10 cases. The BNP levels were below 100 pg/ml in 10 cases with pulmonary origin of the AD. A BNP level between 100 and 400 pg/ml was noted in 3 cases. In our study, the clinical probability of AHF prior to performing the test was estimated at 53% and estimated at 100% after the BNP assay. The BNP assay has reduced the length of stay in the emergency department 4 to 5 days and saved nearly 50% of the cost of care per patient. The BNP assay, has allowed us to confirm the AHF all cases. Given the prognostic value and economic benefit of this test we recommend its use in ER of our country.

  11. Atomic Scale Structure-Chemistry Relationships at Oxide Catalyst Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBriarty, Martin E.

    Oxide catalysts are integral to chemical production, fuel refining, and the removal of environmental pollutants. However, the atomic-scale phenomena which lead to the useful reactive properties of catalyst materials are not sufficiently understood. In this work, the tools of surface and interface science and electronic structure theory are applied to investigate the structure and chemical properties of catalytically active particles and ultrathin films supported on oxide single crystals. These studies focus on structure-property relationships in vanadium oxide, tungsten oxide, and mixed V-W oxides on the surfaces of alpha-Al2O3 and alpha-Fe2O 3 (0001)-oriented single crystal substrates, two materials with nearly identical crystal structures but drastically different chemical properties. In situ synchrotron X-ray standing wave (XSW) measurements are sensitive to changes in the atomic-scale geometry of single crystal model catalyst surfaces through chemical reaction cycles, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals corresponding chemical changes. Experimental results agree with theoretical calculations of surface structures, allowing for detailed electronic structure investigations and predictions of surface chemical phenomena. The surface configurations and oxidation states of V and W are found to depend on the coverage of each, and reversible structural shifts accompany chemical state changes through reduction-oxidation cycles. Substrate-dependent effects suggest how the choice of oxide support material may affect catalytic behavior. Additionally, the structure and chemistry of W deposited on alpha-Fe 2O3 nanopowders is studied using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements in an attempt to bridge single crystal surface studies with real catalysts. These investigations of catalytically active material surfaces can inform the rational design of new catalysts for more efficient and sustainable chemistry.

  12. Convergence of macroscopic tongue anatomy in ruminants and scaling relationships with body mass or tongue length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Andrea R; Schmuck, Ute; Meloro, Carlo; Clauss, Marcus; Hofmann, Reinhold R

    2016-03-01

    Various morphological measures demonstrate convergent evolution in ruminants with their natural diet, in particular with respect to the browser/grazer dichotomy. Here, we report quantitative macroanatomical measures of the tongue (length and width of specific parts) of 65 ruminant species and relate them to either body mass (BM) or total tongue length, and to the percentage of grass in the natural diet (%grass). Models without and with accounting for the phylogenetic structures of the dataset were used, and models were ranked using Akaike's Information Criterion. Scaling relationships followed geometric principles, that is, length measures scaled with BM to the power of 0.33. Models that used tongue length rather than BM as a body size proxy were consistently ranked better, indicating that using size proxies that are less susceptible to a wider variety of factors (such as BM that fluctuates with body condition) should be attempted whenever possible. The proportion of the freely mobile tongue tip of the total tongue (and hence also the corpus length) was negatively correlated to %grass, in accordance with concepts that the feeding mechanism of browsers requires more mobile tongues. It should be noted that some nonbrowsers, such as cattle, use a peculiar mechanism for grazing that also requires long, mobile tongues, but they appear to be exceptions. A larger corpus width with increasing %grass corresponds to differences in snout shape with broader snouts in grazers. The Torus linguae is longer with increasing %grass, a finding that still warrants functional interpretation. This study shows that tongue measures covary with diet in ruminants. In contrast, the shape of the tongue (straight or "hourglass-shaped" as measured by the ratio of the widest and smallest corpus width) is unrelated to diet and is influenced strongly by phylogeny. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Regional-scale relationships between aerosol and summer monsoon circulation, and precipitation over northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Sang-Woo; Choi, Suk-Jin; Choi, In-Jin

    2010-08-01

    We investigated the regional-scale relationships between columnar aerosol loads and summer monsoon circulation, and also the precipitation over northeast Asia using aerosol optical depth (AOD) data obtained from the 8-year MODIS, AERONET Sun/sky radiometer, and precipitation data acquired under the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). These high-quality data revealed the regional-scale link between AOD and summer monsoon circulation, precipitation in July over northeast Asian countries, and their distinct spatial and annual variabilities. Compared to the mean AOD for the entire period of 2001-2008, the increase of almost 40-50% in the AOD value in July 2005 and July 2007 was found over the downwind regions of China (Yellow Sea, Korean peninsula, and East Sea), with negative precipitation anomalies. This can be attributable to the strong westerly confluent flows, between cyclone flows by continental thermal low centered over the northern China and anticyclonic flows by the western North Pacific High, which transport anthropogenic pollution aerosols emitted from east China to aforementioned downwind high AOD regions along the rim of the Pacific marine airmass. In July 2002, however, the easterly flows transported anthropogenic aerosols from east China to the southwestern part of China in July 2002. As a result, the AOD off the coast of China was dramatically reduced in spite of decreasing rainfall. From the calculation of the cross-correlation coefficient between MODIS-derived AOD anomalies and GPCP precipitation anomalies in July over the period 2001-2008, we found negative correlations over the areas encompassed by 105-115°E and 30-35°N and by 120-140°E and 35-40°N (Yellow Sea, Korean peninsula, and East Sea). This suggests that aerosol loads over these regions are easily influenced by the Asian monsoon flow system and associated precipitation.

  14. Magnitude and Rupture Area Scaling Relationships of Seismicity at The Northwest Geysers EGS Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, D. S.; Boyd, O. S.; Taira, T.; Gritto, R.

    2017-12-01

    Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resource development requires knowledge of subsurface physical parameters to quantify the evolution of fracture networks. Spatio-temporal source properties, including source dimension, rupture area, slip, rupture speed, and slip velocity of induced seismicity are of interest at The Geysers geothermal field, northern California to map the coseismic facture density of the EGS swarm. In this investigation we extend our previous finite-source analysis of selected M>4 earthquakes to examine source properties of smaller magnitude seismicity located in the Northwest Geysers Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) demonstration project. Moment rate time histories of the source are found using empirical Green's function (eGf) deconvolution using the method of Mori (1993) as implemented by Dreger et al. (2007). The moment rate functions (MRFs) from data recorded using the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) short-period geophone network are inverted for finite-source parameters including the spatial distribution of fault slip, rupture velocity, and the orientation of the causative fault plane. The results show complexity in the MRF for the studied earthquakes. Thus far the estimated rupture area and the magnitude-area trend of the smaller magnitude Geysers seismicity is found to agree with the empirical relationships of Wells and Coppersmith (1994) and Leonard (2010), which were developed for much larger M>5.5 earthquakes worldwide indicating self-similar behavior extending to M2 earthquakes. We will present finite-source inversion results of the micro-earthquakes, attempting to extend the analysis to sub Mw, and demonstrate their magnitude-area scaling. The extension of the scaling laws will then enable the mapping of coseismic fracture density of the EGS swarm in the Northwest Geysers based on catalog moment magnitude estimates.

  15. The Relationship between the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III Scales and Subtests for Gifted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study determines the comparability of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III in relation to gifted children. Results indicate that both tests produce remarkably similar scale and subtest scores when administered under clinical conditions. (JPS)

  16. A validation of the Experiences in Close Relationships-Relationship Structures scale (ECR-RS) in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donbaek, Dagmar Feddern; Elklit, Ask

    2014-01-01

    structures in adults and, hence, moves beyond the traditional focus on romantic relationships. The present article explored the psychometric abilities of the ECR-RS across parental and best friend domains in a sample of 15 to 18-year-olds (n = 1999). Two oblique factors were revealed across domains...

  17. Symbiotic relationship analysis of predominant bacteria in a lab-scale anammox UASB bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujia; Hu, Xiaomin; Jiang, Binhui; Song, Zhenhui; Ma, Yongguang

    2016-04-01

    In order to provide the comprehensive insight into the key microbial groups in anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process, high-throughput sequencing analysis has been used for the investigation of the bacterial communities of a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) anammox bioreactor. Results revealed that 109 operational taxonomic units (OTUs; out of 14,820 reads) were identified and a domination of anammox bacteria of Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis (OTU474, 35.42 %), along with heterotrophs of Limnobacter sp. MED105 (OTU951, 14.98 %), Anerolinea thermophila UNI-1 (OTU465 and OTU833, 6.60 and 3.93 %), Azoarcus sp. B72 (OTU26, 9.47 %), and Ignavibacterium sp. JCM 16511 (OTU459, 8.33 %) were detected. Metabolic pathway analysis showed that Candidatus K. stuttgartiensis encountered gene defect in synthesizing a series of metabolic cofactors for growth, implying that K. stuttgartiensis is auxotrophic. Coincidentally, the other dominant species severally showed complete metabolic pathways with full set gene encoding to corresponding cofactors presented in the surrounding environment. Furthermore, it was likely that the survival of heterotrophs in the autotrophic system indicates the existence of a symbiotic and mutual relationship in anammox system.

  18. Relationship Between Ureteral Jet Flow, Visual Analogue Scale, and Ureteral Stone Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongun, Sakir; Teken, Abdurrazak; Yılmaz, Orkun; Süleyman, Sakir

    2017-06-01

    To contribute to the diagnosis and treatment of ureteral stones by investigating the relationship between the ureteral jet flow measurements of patients with ureteral stones and the size of the stones and the patients' pain scores. The sample consisted of patients who presented acute renal colic between December 2014 and 2015 and from a noncontrast computed tomography were found to have a urinary stone. The ureteral jet flow velocities were determined using Doppler ultrasonography. The patients were all assessed in terms of stone size, localization and area, anteroposterior pelvis (AP) diameter, and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. A total of 102 patients were included in the study. As the VAS score decreased, the peak jet flow velocity on the stone side increased, whereas the flow velocity on the other side, AP diameter, and stone area were reduced (P flow velocity was reduced and the AP diameter increased significantly (P flow was not observed in 17 patients on the stone side. A statistically significant difference was found between these patients and the remaining patients in terms of all parameters (P flow velocity of ureteral jet is low and with a severe level of pain or the peak flow velocity of ureteral jet cannot be measured, there is a low possibility of spontaneous passage and a high possibility of a large stone, and therefore the treatment should be started immediately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Many ways to be small: different environmental regulators of size generate distinct scaling relationships in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Shingleton, Alexander W.; Estep, Chad M.; Driscoll, Michael V.; Dworkin, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Static allometries, the scaling relationship between body and trait size, describe the shape of animals in a population or species, and are generated in response to variation in genetic or environmental regulators of size. In principle, allometries may vary with the different size regulators that generate them, which can be problematic since allometric differences are also used to infer patterns of selection on morphology. We test this hypothesis by examining the patterns of scaling in Drosop...

  20. A Systematic Review of the Psychometric Properties of the Sexual Relationship Power Scale in HIV/AIDS Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, James M.; Volpe, Ellen M.; Klostermann, Keith; Trabold, Nicole; Xue, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The Sexual Relationship Power Scale (SRPS) was developed over a decade ago to address the lack of reliable and valid measures of relationship power in social, behavioral and medical research. The SRPS and its two subscales (relationship control [RC], decision-making dominance [DMD]) have been used extensively in the field of HIV prevention and sexual risk behavior. We performed a systematic review of the psychometric properties of the SRPS and subscales as reported in the HIV/AIDS literature from 2000 to 2012. A total of 54 published articles were identified that reported reliability or construct validity estimates of the scales. Description of the psychometric properties of the SRPS and subscales are reported according to study population, and several cross-population trends were identified. In general, the SRPS and RC subscale exhibited sound psychometric properties across multiple study populations and research settings. By contrast, the DMD subscale had relatively weak psychometric properties, especially when used with specific populations and research settings. Factors that influenced the psychometric properties of the various scales and subscales included the study population, mean age of the sample, number of items retained in the scale, and modifications to the original scales. We conclude with recommendations for (a) the application and use of the SRPS and subscales, (b) reporting of psychometric properties of the scales in the literature, and (c) areas for future research. PMID:25331613

  1. Interactions between large-scale modes of climate and their relationship with Australian climate and hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whan, K. R.; Lindesay, J. A.; Timbal, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Williams, E.

    2010-12-01

    Australia’s natural environment is adapted to low rainfall availability and high variability but human systems are less able to adapt to variability in the hydrological cycle. Understanding the mechanisms underlying drought persistence and severity is vital to contextualising future climate change. Multiple external forcings mean the mechanisms of drought occurrence in south-eastern Australian are complex. The key influences on SEA climate are El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and the sub-tropical ridge (STR); each of these large-scale climate modes (LSCM) has been studied widely. The need for research into the interactions among the modes has been noted [1], although to date this has received limited attention. Relationships between LSCM and hydrometeorological variability are nonlinear, making linearity assumptions underlying usual statistical techniques (e.g. correlation, principle components analysis) questionable. In the current research a statistical technique that can deal with nonlinear interactions is applied to a new dataset enabling a full examination of the Australian water balance. The Australian Water Availability Project (AWAP) dataset models the Australian water balance on a fine grid [2]. Hydrological parameters (e.g. soil moisture, evaporation, runoff) are modelled from meteorological data, allowing the complete Australian water balance (climate and hydrology) to be examined and the mechanisms of drought to be studied holistically. Classification and regression trees (CART) are a powerful regression-based technique that is capable of accounting for nonlinear effects. Although it has limited previous application in climate research [3] this methodology is particularly informative in cases with multiple predictors and nonlinear relationships such as climate variability. Statistical relationships between variables are the basis for the decision rules in CART that are used to split

  2. Psychometric Properties of the Orgasm Rating Scale in Context of Sexual Relationship in a Spanish Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos-Romero, Ana Isabel; Moyano, Nieves; Sierra, Juan Carlos

    2018-05-01

    dysfunction. The ORS is an appropriate measure for its use for both research and clinical purposes. As limitations, quota sampling implies that the extent to which the results can be generalized is modest. Measurement invariance did not reach the level of weak invariance, and it was not tested across sexual orientation because most individuals identified themselves as heterosexual. The ORS is a multidimensional measure of the subjective experience of orgasm which has adequate psychometric properties; it is a reliable and valid scale. Arcos-Romero AI, Moyano N, Sierra JC. Psychometric Properties of the Orgasm Rating Scale in Context of Sexual Relationship in a Spanish Sample. J Sex Med 2018;15:741-749. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility of pleural and lung ultrasound in discriminating cardiogenic causes of acute dyspnea in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; Casoli, Giovanna; Elia, Fabrizio; Padoan, Monica; Pivetta, Emanuele; Lupia, Enrico; Goffi, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Dyspnea is a common symptom in patients admitted to the Emergency Department (ED), and discriminating between cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic dyspnea is often a clinical dilemma. The initial diagnostic work-up may be inaccurate in defining the etiology and the underlying pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility of pleural and lung ultrasound (PLUS), performed by emergency physicians at the time of a patient's initial evaluation in the ED, in identifying cardiac causes of acute dyspnea. Between February and July 2007, 56 patients presenting to the ED with acute dyspnea were prospectively enrolled in this study. In all patients, PLUS was performed by emergency physicians with the purpose of identifying the presence of diffuse alveolar-interstitial syndrome (AIS) or pleural effusion. All scans were later reviewed by two other emergency physicians, expert in PLUS and blinded to clinical parameters, who were the ultimate judges of positivity for diffuse AIS and pleural effusion. A random set of 80 recorded scannings were also reviewed by two inexperienced observers to assess inter-observer variability. The entire medical record was independently reviewed by two expert physicians (an emergency medicine physician and a cardiologist) blinded to the ultrasound (US) results, in order to determine whether, for each patient, dyspnea was due to heart failure, or not. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive/negative predictive values were obtained; likelihood ratio (LR) test was used. Cohen's kappa was used to assess inter-observer agreement. The presence of diffuse AIS was highly predictive for cardiogenic dyspnea (sensitivity 93.6%, specificity 84%, positive predictive value 87.9%, negative predictive value 91.3%). On the contrary, US detection of pleural effusion was not helpful in the differential diagnosis (sensitivity 83.9%, specificity 52%, positive predictive value 68.4%, negative predictive value 72.2%). Finally

  4. Relationship between Perceived and Actual Frequency Represented by Common Rating Scale Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woltz, Dan J.; Gardner, Michael K.; Kircher, John C.; Burrow-Sanchez, Jason J.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the relationship between subjective interpretation of frequency terms and corresponding objective values. Evidence supported the existence of a nonlinear relationship that is well described by a logarithmic function. The general form of this relationship was consistent across different methods of eliciting subjective…

  5. The Consequences of Perfectionism Scale: Factorial structure and relationships with perfectionism, performance perfectionism, affect, and depressive symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Stoeber, Joachim; Hoyle, Alison J.; Last, Freyja

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the Consequences of Perfectionism Scale (COPS) and its relationships with perfectionism, performance perfectionism, affect, and depressive symptoms in 202 university students using confirmatory factor analysis, correlations, and regression analyses. Results suggest that the COPS is a reliable and valid measure of positive and negative consequences of perfectionism.

  6. An Examination of Coach and Player Relationships According to the Adapted LMX 7 Scale: A Validity and Reliability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliskan, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to test the reliability and validity of the Leader-Member Exchange (LMX 7) scale with regard to coach--player relationships in sports settings. A total of 330 professional soccer players from the Turkish Super League as well as from the First and Second Leagues participated in this study. Factor analyses were performed to…

  7. Validation of the Oral Hygiene Habits Scale: Relationships with sociodemographic variables in the general and clinical population of Monterrey, Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Rodríguez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Several socioeconomic factors are associated with poor oral hygiene habits. A version of the Oral Hygiene Habits Scale (OHHS was developed in Mexico to measure these factors; however, its relationship with sociodemographic variables has not been studied. The verification of these relationships could contribute to the validation of the scale. Objective: To evaluate the relationship between oral hygiene habits and sociodemographic variables of sex, age, schooling, self-defined socioeconomic stratum, occupation and marital status in the general and clinical population of Monterrey, Mexico. Materials and Methods: A general population sample (GPS of 256 participants and a clinical sample (CPS of 240 participants were studied. The OHHS consisted of an eight-item Likert scale of 4 points ranging from 0 to 4. A descriptive correlational study was performed with a cross-sectional design. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, Spearman correlation coefficient, Cramer's V coefficient, and multivariate aligned rank test. Results: In GPS and CPS groups, OHHS was related to sex, schooling, socioeconomic stratum, occupation and marital status, but not to age. There were no significant interactions between the samples (GPS and CPS and sociodemographic variables. Conclusion: There is a statistically significant relationship between oral hygiene habits and some sociodemographic variables in the general and clinical population. This relationship supports the validity of the OHHS.

  8. Prognostic validation of the body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity (BODE) index in inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denehy, Linda; Hornsby, Whitney E; Herndon, James E; Thomas, Samantha; Ready, Neal E; Granger, Catherine L; Valera, Lauren; Kenjale, Aarti A; Eves, Neil D; Jones, Lee W

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the prognostic utility of the body mass index, severity of airflow obstruction, measures of exertional dyspnea, and exercise capacity (BODE) index in patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). One hundred consecutive patients with inoperable NSCLC and performance status 0 to 3 completed pulmonary function testing, the modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale, a 6-minute walk test, and body mass index-the multidimensional 10-point BODE index. Cox proportional models were used to estimate the risk of all-cause mortality according to the BODE index with or without adjustment for traditional prognostic factors. Median follow-up was 31.5 months; 61 deaths (61%) were reported during this period. There was a significant univariate association between the BODE index score and mortality (adjusted p(trend) = 0.027). Compared with patients with a BODE index of 0, the adjusted hazard ratio for risk of death was 1.37 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.74-2.55) for a BODE index of 1, 1.22 (95% CI, 0.45-3.25) for a BODE index of 2, and 2.44 (95% CI, 1.19-4.99) for a BODE index more than 2. The BODE index provided incremental prognostic information beyond that provided traditional markers of prognosis (adjusted p(trend) = 0.051). Every one-point increase in the BODE index, the risk of death increased by 25% (hazard ratio = 1.25; 95% CI, 1.27-4.64). The BODE index is a strong independent predictor of survival in inoperable NSCLC beyond traditional risk factors. Use of this multidimensional tool may improve risk stratification and prognostication in NSCLC.

  9. Injury Rehabilitation Overadherence: Preliminary Scale Validation and Relationships With Athletic Identity and Self-Presentation Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlog, Leslie; Gao, Zan; Kenow, Laura; Kleinert, Jens; Granquist, Megan; Newton, Maria; Hannon, James

    2013-01-01

    Context: Evidence suggests that nonadherence to rehabilitation protocols may be associated with worse clinical and functional rehabilitation outcomes. Recently, it has been recognized that nonadherence may not only reflect a lack of rehabilitation engagement but that some athletes may “overadhere” to their injury-rehabilitation regimen or risk a premature return to sport. Presently, no measure of overadherence exists, and correlates of overadherence and risking a premature return to sport remain uncertain. Objective: To provide initial validation of a novel injury-rehabilitation overadherence measure (study 1) and to examine correlates of overadherence and risking a premature return to sport (study 2). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: High school athletes (study 1) and collegiate athletes (study 2). Patients or Other Participants: In study 1, 118 currently injured US adolescent athletes competing in a range of high school sports participated. In study 2, 105 currently injured collegiate athletes (National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I–III) volunteered. Main Outcome Measure(s): The Rehabilitation Overadherence Questionnaire was a novel instrument developed to assess injured athletes' tendency toward overadherence behaviors and beliefs. We used an adapted version of the Injury Psychological Readiness to Return to Sport Scale to assess the tendency to risk a premature return to sport. Results: In study 1, the construct validity of the overadherence measure was supported using principal axis factoring. Moreover, bivariate correlation and regression analyses indicated that self-presentation concerns and athletic identity were positive predictors of adolescent rehabilitation overadherence and a premature return to sport. Study 2 provided support for the 2-factor structure of the overadherence measure found in study 1 via confirmatory factor analysis. Further support for the relationship among self-presentation concerns, athletic identity, and

  10. DOUBLE QUASARS: PROBES OF BLACK HOLE SCALING RELATIONSHIPS AND MERGER SCENARIOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foreman, G.; Volonteri, M.; Dotti, M.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the available sample of double quasars, and investigate their physical properties. Our sample comprises 85 pairs, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We derive physical parameters for the engine and the host, and model the dynamical evolution of the pair. First, we compare different scaling relationships between massive black holes and their hosts (bulge mass, velocity dispersion, and their possible redshift dependences), and discuss their consistency. We then compute dynamical friction timescales for the double quasar systems to investigate their frequency and their agreement with the m erger drivenscenario for quasar triggering. In optical surveys, such as the SDSS, N double,qso /N qso ∼ 0.1%. Comparing typical merging timescales to expected quasar lifetimes, the fraction of double quasars should be roughly a factor of 10 larger than observed. Additionally, we find that, depending on the correlations between black holes and their hosts, the occurrence of double quasars could be redshift dependent. Comparison of our models to the SDSS quasar catalog suggests that double quasars should be more common at high redshift. We compare the typical separations at which double quasars are observed to the predictions of merger simulations. We find that the distribution of physical separations peaks at ∼30 kpc, with a tail at larger separations (∼100-200 kpc). The peak of the distribution is roughly consistent with the first episode of quasar activity found in equal mass mergers simulations. The tail of the quasar pairs distribution at large separations is instead inconsistent with any quasar activity predicted by published simulations. These large separation pairs are instead consistent with unequal mass mergers where gas is dynamically perturbed during the first pericentric passage, but the gas reaches the black hole only at the next apocenter, where the pair is observed.

  11. Nonverbal cognitive development in children with cochlear implants: relationship between the Mullen Scales of Early Learning and later performance on the Leiter International Performance Scales-Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudle, Susan E; Katzenstein, Jennifer M; Oghalai, John S; Lin, Jerry; Caudle, Donald D

    2014-02-01

    Methodologically, longitudinal assessment of cognitive development in young children has proven difficult because few measures span infancy through school age. This matter is further complicated when the child presents with a sensory deficit such as hearing loss. Few measures are validated in this population, and children who are evaluated for cochlear implantation are often reevaluated annually. The authors sought to evaluate the predictive validity of subscales of the Mullen Scales of Early Learning (MSEL) on Leiter International Performance Scales-Revised (LIPS-R) Full-Scale IQ scores. To further elucidate the relationship of these two measures, comparisons were also made with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-Second Edition (VABS), which provides a measure of adaptive functioning across the life span. Participants included 35 children (14 female, 21 male) who were evaluated both as part of the precandidacy process for cochlear implantation using the MSEL and VABS and following implantation with the LIPS-R and VABS. Hierarchical linear regression revealed that the MSEL Visual Reception subdomain score significantly predicted 52% of the variance in LIPS-R Full-Scale IQ scores at follow-up, F(1, 34) = 35.80, p < .0001, R (2) = .52, β = .72. This result suggests that the Visual Reception subscale offers predictive validity of later LIPS-R Full-Scale IQ scores. The VABS was also significantly correlated with cognitive variables at each time point.

  12. The relationship between large-scale and convective states in the tropics - Towards an improved representation of convection in large-scale models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakob, Christian [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2015-02-26

    This report summarises an investigation into the relationship of tropical thunderstorms to the atmospheric conditions they are embedded in. The study is based on the use of radar observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Darwin run under the auspices of the DOE Atmospheric Systems Research program. Linking the larger scales of the atmosphere with the smaller scales of thunderstorms is crucial for the development of the representation of thunderstorms in weather and climate models, which is carried out by a process termed parametrisation. Through the analysis of radar and wind profiler observations the project made several fundamental discoveries about tropical storms and quantified the relationship of the occurrence and intensity of these storms to the large-scale atmosphere. We were able to show that the rainfall averaged over an area the size of a typical climate model grid-box is largely controlled by the number of storms in the area, and less so by the storm intensity. This allows us to completely rethink the way we represent such storms in climate models. We also found that storms occur in three distinct categories based on their depth and that the transition between these categories is strongly related to the larger scale dynamical features of the atmosphere more so than its thermodynamic state. Finally, we used our observational findings to test and refine a new approach to cumulus parametrisation which relies on the stochastic modelling of the area covered by different convective cloud types.

  13. An optimum city size? The scaling relationship for urban population and fine particulate (PM_2_._5) concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Lijian; Zhou, Weiqi; Pickett, Steward T.A.; Li, Weifeng; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    We utilize the distribution of PM_2_._5 concentration and population in large cities at the global scale to illustrate the relationship between urbanization and urban air quality. We found: 1) The relationship varies greatly among continents and countries. Large cities in North America, Europe, and Latin America have better air quality than those in other continents, while those in China and India have the worst air quality. 2) The relationships between urban population size and PM_2_._5 concentration in large cities of different continents or countries were different. PM_2_._5 concentration in large cities in North America, Europe, and Latin America showed little fluctuation or a small increasing trend, but those in Africa and India represent a “U” type relationship and in China represent an inverse “U” type relationship. 3) The potential contribution of population to PM_2_._5 concentration was higher in the large cities in China and India, but lower in other large cities. - Highlights: • Urban population and PM_2_._5 concentration varies greatly among regions. • Urban population size increase does not always enhances PM_2_._5 concentration. • Population's potential contribution to PM_2_._5 concentration higher in China. - We utilize the distribution of PM_2_._5 concentration and population in large cities at the global scale to illustrate the relationship between urbanization and urban air quality.

  14. Proportional Reasoning Ability and Concepts of Scale: Surface Area to Volume Relationships in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Amy; Jones, Gail

    2009-01-01

    The "National Science Education Standards" emphasise teaching unifying concepts and processes such as basic functions of living organisms, the living environment, and scale. Scale influences science processes and phenomena across the domains. One of the big ideas of scale is that of surface area to volume. This study explored whether or not there…

  15. Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Examples of disorders that ...

  16. Psychics, aliens, or experience? Using the Anomalistic Belief Scale to examine the relationship between type of belief and probabilistic reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prike, Toby; Arnold, Michelle M; Williamson, Paul

    2017-08-01

    A growing body of research has shown people who hold anomalistic (e.g., paranormal) beliefs may differ from nonbelievers in their propensity to make probabilistic reasoning errors. The current study explored the relationship between these beliefs and performance through the development of a new measure of anomalistic belief, called the Anomalistic Belief Scale (ABS). One key feature of the ABS is that it includes a balance of both experiential and theoretical belief items. Another aim of the study was to use the ABS to investigate the relationship between belief and probabilistic reasoning errors on conjunction fallacy tasks. As expected, results showed there was a relationship between anomalistic belief and propensity to commit the conjunction fallacy. Importantly, regression analyses on the factors that make up the ABS showed that the relationship between anomalistic belief and probabilistic reasoning occurred only for beliefs about having experienced anomalistic phenomena, and not for theoretical anomalistic beliefs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The relationship between 19th century BMIs and family size: Economies of scale and positive externalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Scott Alan

    2015-04-01

    The use of body mass index values (BMI) to measure living standards is now a well-accepted method in economics. Nevertheless, a neglected area in historical studies is the relationship between 19th century BMI and family size, and this relationship is documented here to be positive. Material inequality and BMI are the subject of considerable debate, and there was a positive relationship between BMI and wealth and an inverse relationship with inequality. After controlling for family size and wealth, BMI values were related with occupations, and farmers and laborers had greater BMI values than workers in other occupations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Belching, regurgitation, chest tightness and dyspnea: not gastroesophageal reflux disease but asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-Xi; Zhan, Xian-Bao; Bai, Chong; Li, Qiang

    2015-02-07

    Belching is a common symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease. If the symptoms are not relieved after anti-reflux treatment, another etiology should be considered. Here, we report a case of a 43-year-old man who presented with belching, regurgitation, chest tightness and dyspnea for 18 mo, which became gradually more severe. Gastroscopic examination suggested superficial gastritis. Twenty-four-hour esophageal pH monitoring showed that the Demeester score was 11.4, in the normal range. High-resolution manometry showed that integrated relaxation pressure and intrabolus pressure were higher than normal (20 mmHg and 22.4 mmHg, respectively), indicating gastroesophageal junction outflow tract obstruction. Pulmonary function test showed severe obstructive ventilation dysfunction [forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity 32%, FEV1 was 1.21 L, occupying 35% predicted value after salbuterol inhalation], and positive bronchial dilation test (∆FEV1 260 mL, ∆FEV1% 27%). Skin prick test showed Dermatophagoides farinae (++), house dust mite (++++), and shrimp protein (++). Fractional exhaled nitric oxide measurement was 76 ppb. All the symptoms were alleviated completely and pulmonary function increased after combination therapy with corticosteroids and long-acting β2-agonist. Bronchial asthma was eventually diagnosed by laboratory tests and the effect of anti-asthmatic treatment, therefore, physicians, especially the Gastrointestinal physicians, should pay attention to the belching symptoms of asthma.

  19. Validation of the dyspnea index in adolescents with exercise-induced paradoxical vocal fold motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guzman, Vanessa; Ballif, Catherine L; Maurer, Rie; Hartnick, Christopher J; Raol, Nikhila

    2014-09-01

    Paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM) affects almost 1 million adolescents in the United States. However, to date, no disease-specific objective measure exists to assess symptom severity and response to treatment in adolescents with exercise-induced PVFM. To validate the Dyspnea Index (DI) quality-of-life instrument (previously validated for adults with breathing disorders) in children aged 12 to 18 years with exercise-induced PVFM and to determine the minimum significant DI change corresponding to patient-reported or caregiver-reported improvement or worsening of symptoms. A longitudinal study of 56 patients (age range, 12-18 years) diagnosed as having exercise-induced PVFM and their caregivers from February 1, 2013, to September 30, 2013, in an outpatient pediatric otolaryngology office practice. The DI was administered to patients and caregivers, with items modified to reflect the perspective of caregivers. Appropriate DI change was measured to reflect improvement or worsening of symptoms. Test-retest reliability was accomplished by having a subset of patients and caregivers complete the instrument twice within 2 weeks before therapy. Internal consistency was assessed by calculation of Cronbach α. Discriminant validity and convergent validity were determined by comparing DIs with assessment of global change in symptoms. The patient and caregiver mean (SD) DI changes were -12.9 (9.6) and -14.7 (9.3), respectively (P therapy.

  20. Stethoscope versus point-of-care ultrasound in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Behzat; Ünlüer, Erden E; Akyol, Pinar Y; Karagöz, Arif; Bayata, Mehmet S; Akoğlu, Haldun; Oyar, Orhan; Dalli, Ayşe; Topal, Fatih E

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to determine the accuracies of point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) and stethoscopes as part of the physical examinations of patients with dyspnea. Three emergency medicine specialists in each of two groups of ultrasound and stethoscope performers underwent didactic and hands-on training on PoCUS and stethoscope usage. All the patients enrolled were randomized to one of two predetermined PoCUS or stethoscope groups. The diagnostic performance of ultrasonography was higher than that of the stethoscope in the diagnoses of heart failure (90 vs. 86%, 1.00 vs. 0.89, and 5.00 vs. 4.92, respectively) and pneumonia (90 vs. 86.7%, 0.75 vs. 0.73, and 16.50 vs. 13.82, respectively). No significant differences were observed in the utility parameters of these modalities in these diagnoses. Although some authors argue that it is time to abandon the 'archaic tools' of past centuries, we believe that it is too early to discontinue the use of the stethoscope.

  1. An unusual cause of severe dyspnea: A laryngeal live leech: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anajar, Said; Ansari, Rachid; Hassnaoui, Jawad; Abada, Reda; Roubal, Mohammed; Mahtar, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Foreign bodies in the upper airways are one of the most challenging otolaryngology emergencies, leeches present a very rare cause of airway foreign bodies around the world. A 6-year-old girl was referred to our otolaryngology department at a tertiary university hospital with a severe dyspnea and hemoptysis. Nasofibroscopy revealed a dark living leech in the supraglottic area which extends to the glottis. The patient was urgently admitted to the operating room, the leech was grasped and removed with a foreign body forceps with a full length of more than 6cm. All symptoms were relieved post operatively and she was discharged one day later. Leeches should be suspected as an airway foreign body in patients with a recent history of drinking from stream water. Prevention remains the best treatment for such cases based simply on hygiene measures like not drinking stream water directly and filtering drinking water before it is used. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Aerobic exercise training without weight loss reduces dyspnea on exertion in obese women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Vipa; Stickford, Jonathon L.; Bhammar, Dharini M.; Babb, Tony G.

    2015-01-01

    Dyspnea on exertion (DOE) is a common symptom in obesity. We investigated whether aerobic exercise training without weight loss could reduce DOE. Twenty-two otherwise healthy obese women participated in a 12-week supervised aerobic exercise training program, exercising 30 min/day at 70–80% heart rate reserve, 4 days/week. Subjects were grouped based on their Ratings of Perceived Breathlessness (RPB) during constant load 60W cycling: +DOE (n = 12, RPB ≥ 4, 37 ± 7 years, 34 ± 4kg/m2) and −DOE (n = 10, RPB ≤ 2, 32 ± 6 years, 33 ± 3kg/m2). No significant differences between the groups in body composition, pulmonary function, or cardiorespiratory fitness were observed pre-training. Post-training, peak was improved significantly in both groups (+DOE: 12 ± 7, −DOE: 14 ± 8%). RPB was significantly decreased in the + DOE (4.7 ± 1.0–2.5 ± 1.0) and remained low in the −DOE group (1.2 ± 0.6–1.3 ± 1.0) (interaction p exercise training improved cardiorespiratory fitness and DOE and thus appears to be an effective treatment for DOE in obese women. PMID:26593640

  3. General Relationships between Abiotic Soil Properties and Soil Biota across Spatial Scales and Different Land-Use Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhofer, Klaus; Schöning, Ingo; Alt, Fabian; Herold, Nadine; Klarner, Bernhard; Maraun, Mark; Marhan, Sven; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wubet, Tesfaye; Yurkov, Andrey; Begerow, Dominik; Berner, Doreen; Buscot, François; Daniel, Rolf; Diekötter, Tim; Ehnes, Roswitha B.; Erdmann, Georgia; Fischer, Christiane; Foesel, Bärbel; Groh, Janine; Gutknecht, Jessica; Kandeler, Ellen; Lang, Christa; Lohaus, Gertrud; Meyer, Annabel; Nacke, Heiko; Näther, Astrid; Overmann, Jörg; Polle, Andrea; Pollierer, Melanie M.; Scheu, Stefan; Schloter, Michael; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Schulze, Waltraud; Weinert, Jan; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Wolters, Volkmar; Schrumpf, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Very few principles have been unraveled that explain the relationship between soil properties and soil biota across large spatial scales and different land-use types. Here, we seek these general relationships using data from 52 differently managed grassland and forest soils in three study regions spanning a latitudinal gradient in Germany. We hypothesize that, after extraction of variation that is explained by location and land-use type, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in the abundance and diversity of soil biota. If the relationships between predictors and soil organisms were analyzed individually for each predictor group, soil properties explained the highest amount of variation in soil biota abundance and diversity, followed by land-use type and sampling location. After extraction of variation that originated from location or land-use, abiotic soil properties explained significant amounts of variation in fungal, meso- and macrofauna, but not in yeast or bacterial biomass or diversity. Nitrate or nitrogen concentration and fungal biomass were positively related, but nitrate concentration was negatively related to the abundances of Collembola and mites and to the myriapod species richness across a range of forest and grassland soils. The species richness of earthworms was positively correlated with clay content of soils independent of sample location and land-use type. Our study indicates that after accounting for heterogeneity resulting from large scale differences among sampling locations and land-use types, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in fungal and soil fauna abundance or diversity. However, soil biota was also related to processes that act at larger spatial scales and bacteria or soil yeasts only showed weak relationships to soil properties. We therefore argue that more general relationships between soil properties and soil biota can only be derived from future studies that consider

  4. Scaling up the diversity-resilience relationship with trait databases and remote sensing data: the recovery of productivity after wildfire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasojevic, Marko J; Bahlai, Christie A; Bradley, Bethany A; Butterfield, Bradley J; Tuanmu, Mao-Ning; Sistla, Seeta; Wiederholt, Ruscena; Suding, Katharine N

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying ecosystem resilience - why some systems have an irreversible response to disturbances while others recover - is critical for conserving biodiversity and ecosystem function in the face of global change. Despite the widespread acceptance of a positive relationship between biodiversity and resilience, empirical evidence for this relationship remains fairly limited in scope and localized in scale. Assessing resilience at the large landscape and regional scales most relevant to land management and conservation practices has been limited by the ability to measure both diversity and resilience over large spatial scales. Here, we combined tools used in large-scale studies of biodiversity (remote sensing and trait databases) with theoretical advances developed from small-scale experiments to ask whether the functional diversity within a range of woodland and forest ecosystems influences the recovery of productivity after wildfires across the four-corner region of the United States. We additionally asked how environmental variation (topography, macroclimate) across this geographic region influences such resilience, either directly or indirectly via changes in functional diversity. Using path analysis, we found that functional diversity in regeneration traits (fire tolerance, fire resistance, resprout ability) was a stronger predictor of the recovery of productivity after wildfire than the functional diversity of seed mass or species richness. Moreover, slope, elevation, and aspect either directly or indirectly influenced the recovery of productivity, likely via their effect on microclimate, while macroclimate had no direct or indirect effects. Our study provides some of the first direct empirical evidence for functional diversity increasing resilience at large spatial scales. Our approach highlights the power of combining theory based on local-scale studies with tools used in studies at large spatial scales and trait databases to

  5. Effects of dynamic heterogeneity and density scaling of molecular dynamics on the relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at the glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koperwas, K.; Grzybowski, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Wojnarowska, Z.; Paluch, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we define and experimentally verify thermodynamic characteristics of the liquid-glass transition, taking into account a kinetic origin of the process. Using the density scaling law and the four-point measure of the dynamic heterogeneity of molecular dynamics of glass forming liquids, we investigate contributions of enthalpy, temperature, and density fluctuations to spatially heterogeneous molecular dynamics at the liquid-glass transition, finding an equation for the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature, dTg/dp. This equation combined with our previous formula for dTg/dp, derived solely from the density scaling criterion, implies a relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at Tg. Since this relationship and both the equations for dTg/dp are very well validated using experimental data at Tg, they are promising alternatives to the classical Prigogine-Defay ratio and both the Ehrenfest equations in case of the liquid-glass transition

  6. Effects of dynamic heterogeneity and density scaling of molecular dynamics on the relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at the glass transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koperwas, K., E-mail: kkoperwas@us.edu.pl; Grzybowski, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Wojnarowska, Z.; Paluch, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Silesian Center for Education and Interdisciplinary Research, 75 Pulku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzow (Poland)

    2015-07-14

    In this paper, we define and experimentally verify thermodynamic characteristics of the liquid-glass transition, taking into account a kinetic origin of the process. Using the density scaling law and the four-point measure of the dynamic heterogeneity of molecular dynamics of glass forming liquids, we investigate contributions of enthalpy, temperature, and density fluctuations to spatially heterogeneous molecular dynamics at the liquid-glass transition, finding an equation for the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature, dTg/dp. This equation combined with our previous formula for dTg/dp, derived solely from the density scaling criterion, implies a relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at Tg. Since this relationship and both the equations for dTg/dp are very well validated using experimental data at Tg, they are promising alternatives to the classical Prigogine-Defay ratio and both the Ehrenfest equations in case of the liquid-glass transition.

  7. New insights about enzyme evolution from large scale studies of sequence and structure relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Babbitt, Patricia; Brown, SD; Babbitt, PC

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfami

  8. Personality and achievement motivation : relationship among Big Five domain and facet scales, achievement goals, and intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bipp, T.; Steinmayr, R.; Spinath, B.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study we examined the nomological network of achievement motivation and personality by inspecting the relationships between four goal orientations (learning, performance-approach, performance-avoidance, work avoidance), the Big Five personality traits, and intelligence. Within a

  9. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE, LARGE-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION, AND CONVECTION OVER THE TROPICAL INDIAN AND PACIFIC OCEANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orbita Roswintiarti

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the quantitative estimates of the effect of large-scale circulations on the sea surface temperature (SST-tropical convection relationship and the effect of SST on the large-scale circulation-convection relationship over the tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans are presented. Although convection tends to maximize at warm SSTs, increased deep convection is also determined by the divergence (DIV associated with large-scale circulation. An analysis of the relationship between SST and deep convection shows that under subsidence and clear conditions, there is a decrease in convection or increase in Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR at a maximum rate of 3.4 Wm-2 °C-1. In the SST range of 25°C to 29.5°C, a large increase in deep convection (decrease in OLR occurs in the tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans. The OLR reduction is found to be a strong function of the large-scale circulation in the Indian and western Pacific Oceans. Under a weak large-scale circulation, the rate of OLR reduction is about    -3.5 Wm-2 °C-1 to -8.1 Wm-2 °C-1. Under the influence of strong rising motions, the rate can increase to about -12.5 Wm-2 °C-1 for the same SST range. The overall relationship between large-scale circulation and deep convection is nearly linear. A maximum rate of OLR reduction with respect to DIV is -6.1 Wm-2 (10-6 s-1 in the western Pacific Ocean. It is also found that the DIV-OLR relationship is less dependent on SST. For example, the rate of OLR reduction over the western Pacific Ocean for 26°C < SST £ 27°C is -4.2 Wm-2 (10-6 s-1, while that for 28°C < SST £ 29°C is  -5.1 Wm-2 (10-6 s-1. These results are expected to have a great importance for climate feedback mechanisms associated with clouds and SST and for climate predictability.

  10. Family Triad Systemic Scale: An Instrument for Assessment of Relationships between Couple and Families of Origin

    OpenAIRE

    مونا چراغی; محمدعلی مظاهری; فرشته موتابی; لیلی پناغی; منصوره السادات صادقی; خدیجه سلمانی

    2017-01-01

    Because of noticeable role of relationships with in-laws in prediction of marital adjustment and satisfaction in Iran, it is necessary to provide an instrument based on Family Triad Systemic Model (FTSM) to assess the relationships between couple and two original families. The objective of present study was providing the instrument and checking the psychometric properties of it. An item pool (107 items) was created by using other related tools, interviews by experts and married people. Then 4...

  11. Supra-threshold scaling, temporal summation, and after-sensation: relationships to each other and anxiety/fear

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Michael E; Bialosky, Joel E; Bishop, Mark D; Price, Donald D; George, Steven Z

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship of thermal pain testing from three types of quantitative sensory testing (ie, supra-threshold stimulus response scaling, temporal summation, and after-sensation) at three anatomical sites (ie, upper extremity, lower extremity, and trunk). Pain ratings from these procedures were also compared with common psychological measures previously shown to be related to experimental pain responses and consistent with fear-avoidance models of pain. Results indicat...

  12. Subjective assessment of acute mountain sickness: investigating the relationship between the Lake Louise Self-Report, a visual analogue scale and psychological well-being scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frühauf, Anika; Burtscher, Martin; Pocecco, Elena; Faulhaber, Martin; Kopp, Martin

    2016-01-01

    There is an ongoing discussion how to assess acute mountain sickness (AMS) in real life conditions. Next to more-item scales with a cut off like the Lake Louise Self-Report (LLS), some authors suggested to use visual analog scales (VAS) to assess AMS. This study tried to contribute to this question using VAS items used for the Subjective Ratings of Drug Effects, including an additional single item for AMS. Furthermore, we investigated if instruments developed to assess psychological well-being might predict AMS assessed via LLS or VAS. 32 (19 Female) adult persons with known AMS susceptibility filled in questionnaires (Feeling Scale, Felt Arousal Scale, Activation Deactivation Check List, LLS, VAS) at a height of 3650 m above sea level. Correlation and regression analysis suggest a moderate to high relationship between the LLS score and the VAS items, including one VAS item asking for the severity of AMS, as well as psychological well-being. In conclusion, using VAS items to assess AMS can be a more precise alternative to questionnaires like LLS, for people knowledgeable with AMS. Furthermore, researchers should be aware that psychological well-being might be an important parameter influencing the assessment of AMS.

  13. The Relationship between Spatial and Temporal Magnitude Estimation of Scientific Concepts at Extreme Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Aaron; Lee, H.

    2010-01-01

    Many astronomical objects, processes, and events exist and occur at extreme scales of spatial and temporal magnitudes. Our research draws upon the psychological literature, replete with evidence of linguistic and metaphorical links between the spatial and temporal domains, to compare how students estimate spatial and temporal magnitudes associated with objects and processes typically taught in science class.. We administered spatial and temporal scale estimation tests, with many astronomical items, to 417 students enrolled in 12 undergraduate science courses. Results show that while the temporal test was more difficult, students’ overall performance patterns between the two tests were mostly similar. However, asymmetrical correlations between the two tests indicate that students think of the extreme ranges of spatial and temporal scales in different ways, which is likely influenced by their classroom experience. When making incorrect estimations, students tended to underestimate the difference between the everyday scale and the extreme scales on both tests. This suggests the use of a common logarithmic mental number line for both spatial and temporal magnitude estimation. However, there are differences between the two tests in the errors student make in the everyday range. Among the implications discussed is the use of spatio-temporal reference frames, instead of smooth bootstrapping, to help students maneuver between scales of magnitude and the use of logarithmic transformations between reference frames. Implications for astronomy range from learning about spectra to large scale galaxy structure.

  14. Dyspnea in a case of shoulder dislocation – to beware of this rare life-threatening symptom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Satyen Praful

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder dislocation is a common injury in orthopedic practice. In an acute presentation, closed reduction of the shoulder joint leads to an uneventful recovery. However, in the developing world neglected shoulder dislocation and treatments from quacks are not uncommon. Improper treatment and neglect can rarely become life threatening. We present one such case, emphasizing the need to investigate the symptom of dyspnea in a patient with history of shoulder dislocation.

  15. The 10-item Remembered Relationship with Parents (RRP10) scale: two-factor model and association with adult depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denollet, Johan; Smolderen, Kim G E; van den Broek, Krista C; Pedersen, Susanne S

    2007-06-01

    Dysfunctional parenting styles are associated with poor mental and physical health. The 10-item Remembered Relationship with Parents (RRP(10)) scale retrospectively assesses Alienation (dysfunctional communication and intimacy) and Control (overprotection by parents), with an emphasis on deficiencies in empathic parenting. We examined the 2-factor structure of the RRP(10) and its relationship with adult depression. 664 respondents from the general population (48% men, mean age 54.6+/-14.2 years) completed the RRP(10), Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), and Beck Depression Inventory. The Alienation and Control dimensions of the RRP(10) displayed a sound factor structure, good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.83-0.86), and convergent validity against the PBI scales. No significant gender differences were found on the RRP(10) scales. Stratifying by RRP(10) dimensions showed that respondents high in Alienation and Control, for both father (33.3% vs. 14.5%, pparental Alienation and Control. High Alienation and Control were independently related to increased risk of depressive symptoms. Given the brevity of the RRP(10), it can easily be used in epidemiological/clinical research on the link between the remembered relationship with parents and mental/physical health.

  16. Dyspnea and choking as presenting symptoms in primary medulla oblongata germinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Chi-Man; Tseng, Hui-Hwa; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Liao, Wei-Chuan; Chen, Jun-Yih; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chang, Chia-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The medulla oblongata is the lower half of the brainstem. It contains the cardiac, respiratory, vomiting, and vasomotor centers and deals with autonomic functions such as breathing, heartbeat, and blood pressure. Primary medulla oblongata germinoma is very rare and less than 20 cases have been reported in the English literature. A 22-year-old female without any particular past medical history presented to us in October 2012 with the chief complaint of dyspnea and frequent choking for 1 month. Neurological examination revealed lower cranial nerve palsies and nystagmus. Her brain computed tomography (CT) and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a mass lesion at the dorsal surface of medulla oblongata with extension into the inferior fourth ventricle and foramen magnum. She underwent bilateral suboccipital craniotomy and C1 laminoplasty with the grossly total resection of the tumor. The histological examination of the tumor proved germinoma. Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy was arranged. The latest brain MRI and whole spine MRI done 1 year after surgery showed neither residual nor recurrent tumor in the whole axis. She is regularly followed-up at our outpatient department and is doing well except having left vocal cord palsy, which occurred before surgery. Medulloblastoma, ependymoma, glioma, hemangioblastoma, and cavernous angioma are common intraaxial tumors in the medulla oblongata and fourth ventricle. Intracranial germ cell tumors originate from extragonadal seminal cells and have been found in 0.4-3.4% of patients with primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors in Western countries, while the incidence is reported to be 5-8 times greater in Japan and the Far East. Although germinoma of medulla oblongata is rare and difficult to diagnose preoperatively, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of medulla masses with fourth ventricle extension, especially in Asian population.

  17. Laryngeal dyspnea in relation to an interaction between acenocoumarol and topical econazole lotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Pierre-François; Petitjeans, Fabrice; Lions, Christophe; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Escarment, Jacques

    2008-08-01

    Bleeding is the most serious complication of oral anticoagulant therapy used for the prevention of thromboembolic complications. Drug-drug interactions are an important concern, as they may increase drug toxicity and, in the case of anticoagulant therapies, increase the risk of hemorrhage. An 84-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a bilateral cervical hematoma and symptoms of upper-airway obstruction that had been increasing for 72 hours, with dyspnea and difficulty speaking developing in the previous 24 hours. Transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy revealed a significant laryngeal hematoma, as well as a hematoma on the floor of the mouth and in the tonsil area. Laboratory abnormalities included a prothrombin time 120 seconds. The patient had been receiving acenocoumarol 4 mg/d for 10 years for episodes of atrial fibrillation and recurrent deep venous thrombosis. Seventeen days earlier, she had received a prescription for topical econazole lotion 1% to be applied 3 times daily for 1 month to treat a dermatitis affecting 12% of the body surface. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for treatment of respiratory failure, where oxygen was delivered by face mask. The coagulation disorders were treated with prothrombin complex concentrate 30 IU/kg IV and vitamin K1 10 mg IV, and values normalized within 36 hours. Surgical evacuation of the laryngeal hematoma was not necessary. After 48 hours, improvement in the patient's respiratory symptoms allowed transfer to the ear, nose, and throat unit, where daily endoscopic examination was performed. Aspirin was substituted for acenocoumarol, and the patient returned home after 10 days without sequelae. Based on a Naranjo score of 7, this episode was probably related to an interaction between acenocoumarol and econazole. This report describes a case of a probable interaction between topical econazole lotion 1% and acenocoumarol that resulted in overanticoagulation and a life-threatening laryngeal

  18. The role of voice therapy in the treatment of dyspnea and dysphonia in a patient with a vagal nerve stimulation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Amanda I; Helou, Leah B; Ingle, John W; Baldwin, Maria; Rosen, Clark A

    2014-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulators (VNS) are implanted to treat medically refractory epilepsy and depression. The VNS stimulates the vagus nerve in the left neck. Laryngeal side effects are common and include dysphagia, dysphonia, and dyspnea. The current case study represents a patient with severe dyspnea and dysphonia, persisting even with VNS deactivation. The case demonstrates the use of voice and respiratory retraining therapy for the treatment of VNS-induced dysphonia and dyspnea. It also highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach, including laryngology, neurology, and speech-language pathology, in the treatment of these challenging patients. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnostic performance of multi-organ ultrasound with pocket-sized device in the management of acute dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforza, Alfonso; Mancusi, Costantino; Carlino, Maria Viviana; Buonauro, Agostino; Barozzi, Marco; Romano, Giuseppe; Serra, Sossio; de Simone, Giovanni

    2017-06-19

    The availability of ultra-miniaturized pocket ultrasound devices (PUD) adds diagnostic power to the clinical examination. Information on accuracy of ultrasound with handheld units in immediate differential diagnosis in emergency department (ED) is poor. The aim of this study is to test the usefulness and accuracy of lung ultrasound (LUS) alone or combined with ultrasound of the heart and inferior vena cava (IVC) using a PUD for the differential diagnosis of acute dyspnea (AD). We included 68 patients presenting to the ED of "Maurizio Bufalini" Hospital in Cesena (Italy) for AD. All patients underwent integrated ultrasound examination (IUE) of lung-heart-IVC, using PUD. The series was divided into patients with dyspnea of cardiac or non-cardiac origin. We used 2 × 2 contingency tables to analyze sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the three ultrasonic methods and their various combinations for the diagnosis of cardiogenic dyspnea (CD), comparing with the final diagnosis made by an independent emergency physician. LUS alone exhibited a good sensitivity (92.6%) and specificity (80.5%). The highest accuracy (90%) for the diagnosis of CD was obtained with the combination of LUS and one of the other two methods (heart or IVC). The IUE with PUD is a useful extension of the clinical examination, can be readily available at the bedside or in ambulance, requires few minutes and has a reliable diagnostic discriminant ability in the setting of AD.

  20. Relationship between pedographic analysis and the Manchester scale in hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliou, Kalliopi; Paraskevas, George; Kanavaros, Panagiotis; Gekas, Christos; Barbouti, Alexandra; Kitsoulis, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the Manchester scale and foot pressure distribution in patients with hallux valgus deformity. The study included 152 feet of 87 patients with hallux valgus and a control group of 391 feet of 241 individuals without hallux valgus deformity. The severity of hallux valgus was determined using the Manchester scale grading system. Plantar loading patterns in 10 foot areas were determined for all participants. According to the Manchester scale, 72% of the participants had no, 12.9% mild, 10.7% moderate and 4.4% severe deformity. The Manchester scale grade was highly correlated with both hallux valgus angle and first intermetatarsal angle (p=0.00). Significant differences between the four grades were present for mean pressure under the hallux and the first and second metatarsal heads only (p=0.00). The load distribution under these areas was higher as the hallux valgus progressed from mild to more severe. In all groups, the highest pressure was observed under the second metatarsal head. The Manchester scale was strongly associated with both the hallux valgus angle and the first intermetatarsal angle. The progression from mild to moderate and severe deformation is associated with peak pressure raise at the hallux, first and second metatarsal heads. The Manchester scale appears to be a useful tool to provide information for the degree of deformity and the pressure under painful foot areas.

  1. Multi-scale analysis of relationship between landscape pattern and urban river water quality in different seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rui; Wang, Guofeng; Zhang, Qianwen; Zhang, Zhonghao

    2016-05-05

    Water quality is highly dependent on the landscape characteristics. In this study, we investigated the relationships between water quality and landscape pattern (composition and configuration) in Huzhou City, China. The water quality variables, including pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), chemical oxygen demand (CODMn), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), NH3-N, petroleum, dissolved total phosphorus (DTP), and total nitrogen (TN) in low water, normal water and flood periods were identified by investigating 34 sampling sites in Huzhou City during the period from 2001 to 2007. Landscape composition and landscape configuration metrics were calculated for different scales. It was found that scales and seasons both play important role when analyzing the relationships between landscape characteristics of different land use types. The results implied that some water quality parameters such as CODMn, petroleum are more polluted in flood period than the other two seasons at different scales, while DTP and TN are more polluted in low water period. Influences of different landscape metrics on water quality should operate at different spatial scales. The results shown in this paper will effectively provide scientific basis for the policy making in sustainable development of water environment.

  2. Upscaling Self-Sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation (STAR): Experimental Study of Scaling Relationships for Smouldering Combustion to Remediate Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsman, L.; Gerhard, J.; Torero, J.; Scholes, G.; Murray, C.

    2013-12-01

    scale experiments, including: peak temperatures, velocities and thicknesses of the smouldering front, rates of mass destruction of the contaminant, and rates of gaseous emissions during combustion. Additionally, upward and downward smouldering experiments were compared at the column scale to assess the significance of buoyant flow effects. An understanding of these scaling relationships will provide important information to aid in the design of field-scale applications of STAR.

  3. Sampling scales define occupancy and underlying occupancy-abundance relationships in animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin Steenweg; Mark Hebblewhite; Jesse Whittington; Paul Lukacs; Kevin McKelvey

    2018-01-01

    Occupancy-abundance (OA) relationships are a foundational ecological phenomenon and field of study, and occupancy models are increasingly used to track population trends and understand ecological interactions. However, these two fields of ecological inquiry remain largely isolated, despite growing appreciation of the importance of integration. For example, using...

  4. Scale effects and variability of forest–water yield relationships on the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Bi; Huaxing Bi; Ge Sun; Yifang Chang; Lubo Gao

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between forests and water yield on the Loess Plateau is a concern to forest hydrologists and local governments. Most research indicates that forests reduce runoff but the degree of reduction is different at different sites. Data on precipitation, runoff depth, evapotranspiration and forest cover were collected for 67 watersheds through synthesizing...

  5. Scaling Relationships for Adsorption Energies of C2 Hydrocarbons on Transition Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G

    2011-08-18

    Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C{sub 2}H{sub x}-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws for AH{sub x}-type adsorbates to unsaturated hydrocarbons and establishes a coherent simplified description of saturated as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A number of potential applications are discussed. We apply the model to the dehydrogenation of ethane over pure transition metal catalysts. Comparison with the corresponding full density functional theory calculations shows excellent agreement.

  6. Extrapolating population size from the occupancy-abundance relationship and the scaling pattern of occupancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hui, Cang; McGeoch, Melodie A.; Reyers, Belinda

    2009-01-01

    estimated as occurring in South Africa, Lesotho, and Swaziland. SPO models outperformed the OAR models, due to OAR models assuming environmental homogeneity and yielding scale-dependent estimates. Therefore, OAR models should only be applied across small, homogenous areas. By contrast, SPO models...

  7. Developing a Scale for Culturally Responsive Practice: Validation, Relationship with School Organizational Factors, and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jae-Bum

    2017-01-01

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to develop and provide preliminary validation for a new measure of culturally responsive practice. This instrument, which is called the Culturally Responsive Practice Scale (CRPS), includes items that reflect ways that teachers teach multicultural students in their classrooms. To accomplish the goal, three…

  8. Attachment Patterns in the Psychotherapy Relationship: Development of the Client Attachment to Therapist Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinckrodt, Brent; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes development of an instrument, the Client Attachment to Therapist Scale (CATS). CATS factors correlated in expected directions with survey measures of object relations, client-rated working alliance, social self-efficacy, and adult attachment. Cluster analysis revealed four types of client attachment. Discusses implications of attachment…

  9. The Development of a Sexual Harassment Proclivity Scale: Construct Validation and Relationship to Communication Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Shereen G.; Burleson, Brant R.

    1996-01-01

    Develops and assesses the validity of a self-report measure of sexual harassment proclivities in men. Demonstrates the validity of the scale by its moderate correlations with attitude measures relevant to sexual harassment, its nonsignificant correlation with the need to provide socially desirable responses, and by showing that potential victims…

  10. The relationship between the mercury concentration in fish muscles and scales/fins and its significance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červenka, R.; Bednařík, A.; Komárek, J.; Ondračková, Markéta; Jurajda, Pavel; Vítek, T.; Spurný, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2011), s. 1109-1116 ISSN 1895-1066 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Mercury determination * Fish muscle * Scale * Fin Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 1.073, year: 2011

  11. Validation of the Single-Factor Model of the Relationship Assessment Scale among Married and Cohabiting Persons from Monterrey, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Moral de la Rubia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of intimate partner relationships is particularly important because this union is the foundation of the family. Satisfaction with the relationship can be defined as the overall attitude to the relationship and the partner. The Hendrick's Relationship Assessment Scale (RAS is a instrument commonly used to assess the construct. Previous research papers have showed that this scale has high internal consistency and a single-factor structure. Although there are validation studies of the RAS, these studies used inappropriate statistical techniques to analyze its Likert-type items, and to determine the number of factors; likewise, its factor invariance across sex has not been previously contrasted. Therefore, this study posed the following research questions: Does the RAS have consistent and discriminating items? Basing the analysis on a polychoric correlation matrix, what is its level of internal consistency? How many factors emerge using rigorous empirical methods? Is the single-factor model invariant across sex? In order to answer these research questions, we used a random route probability sampling in this instrument validation study of the RAS. The sample was extracted from the population of married couples or the ones living in consensual union in Monterrey, Mexico. There were 431 female and 376 male participants in the study. The RAS’ items were consistent and discriminative. The internal consistency of the scale was excellent in the whole sample (ordinal α = .93, as well as among female (ordinal α = .94 and male participants (ordinal α = .92. Horn's parallel analysis and Velicer's  minimum average partial test suggested a one factor solution. Moreover, the single-factor model (with one correlation between the residuals of the two negatively worded items had a close fit to the data, and its properties of invariance across sex were very acceptable by the Unweighted Least Squares method. We conclude that the scale shows internal

  12. Analysis of the Relationship Between the Epidural Spinal Cord Compression (ESCC) Scale and Paralysis Caused by Metastatic Spine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uei, Hiroshi; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Maseda, Masafumi

    2018-04-15

    A retrospective, single-institute, and radiographic study. To evaluate the relationship between the epidural spinal cord compression (ESCC) scale and the severity of metastatic spine tumor-induced paralysis. The ESCC scale is used to evaluate the grade of spinal cord compression on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, few studies have investigated the relationship between such MRI findings and paralysis. The subjects were 467 patients with metastatic spine tumors and grade 1b or worse spinal cord compression according to the ESCC scale. Evaluations using this scale were performed by three spine surgeons, and results that were obtained by two or more surgeons were adopted. We also examined patients whose spinal cord compression deteriorated by one grade or more to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grade C or worse within the first 3 weeks after MRI. The kappa coefficients for inter- and intraexaminer variability were 0.90 and 0.95, respectively. ASIA grade D or worse paralysis developed in at least 50% of the patients with ESCC grade 1b or worse spinal cord compression at the C1-T2 and at least 50% of those with ESCC grade 1c or worse spinal cord compression at the T3-L5. The frequency of ASIA grade C or worse paralysis was high among the patients with ESCC grade 2 or worse spinal cord compression at the C7-L1. Nineteen patients experienced rapid deterioration of one grade or more to ASIA grade C or worse paralysis within the first 3 weeks after MRI. Of these, paralysis occurred in at least 30% of the patients with anterolateral or circumferential cord compression combined with ESCC grade 2 or 3 compression at the C7-L1. The severity of paralysis was not correlated with the ESCC scale. Patients with anterolateral or circumferential ESCC grade 2 or 3 cord compression at the C7-L1 are at high risk of rapidly progressive paralysis. 4.

  13. Predicting multi-scale relationships between geomorphology and bedrock geology of the rocky intertidal in Central and Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, A.; Aiello, I. W.

    2014-12-01

    Substratum geology is fundamental in shaping rocky shore morphology. Specific lithologies have various responses to wave action, tectonic features (e.g. fractures, faults) and sedimentary structures (e.g. bedding), creating distinctive weathering profiles. Along with local oceanography and climate forcing, different rock substrata create coastal morphologies that can vary distinctly between scales, ranging from mm to km. Despite the complexity of the system, qualitative observations show coastal areas with similar rock types share similar geomorphologies. Thus, a statistic relationship between geomorphology (expressed for instance by surface parameter rugosity) and geology can be envisaged. There are multiple benefits of finding such a relationship, as rocky intertidal geomorphology can be an important determinant in which organisms can settle, grow, and survive in near shore communities: allowing the prediction of geomorphologic parameters determining coastal ecology solely based on substratum geology, a crucial aspect in guiding the selection of marine protected areas. This study presents preliminary results of multi-scale geospatial surveys (cm to tens of meters) of rocky intertidal outcrops from Central to Northern California using a Terrestrial Laser Scanner. The outcrops investigated are representative of the most common igneous and sedimentary rocks in California (granitoids, conglomerates, sandstones, mudstones) and metamorphic units. The statistical analysis of the survey data support the hypothesis that surface properties can change significantly with changing scale, each rock type having distinct surface characteristics which are similar to comparable lithologies exposed at different locations. These scale dependent variations are controlled by different lithologic and structural characteristics of the outcrop in question. Our data also suggests lithologic variability within a rock unit could be a very significant factor in controlling changes in

  14. A study of energy-size relationship and wear rate in a lab-scale high pressure grinding rolls unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi Dashtbayaz, Samira

    This study is focused on two independent topics of energy-size relationship and wear-rate measurements on a lab-scale high pressure grinding rolls (HPGR). The first part of this study has been aimed to investigate the influence of the operating parameters and the feed characteristics on the particle-bed breakage using four different ore samples in a 200 mm x 100 mm lab-scale HPGR. Additionally, multistage grinding, scale-up from a lab-scale HPGR, and prediction of the particle size distributions have been studied in detail. The results obtained from energy-size relationship studies help with better understanding of the factors contributing to more energy-efficient grinding. It will be shown that the energy efficiency of the two configurations of locked-cycle and open multipass is completely dependent on the ore properties. A test procedure to produce the scale-up data is presented. The comparison of the scale-up factors between the data obtained on the University of Utah lab-scale HPGR and the industrial machine at the Newmont Boddington plant confirmed the applicability of lab-scale machines for trade-off studies. The population balance model for the simulation of product size distributions has shown to work well with the breakage function estimated through tests performed on the HPGR at high rotational speed. Selection function has been estimated by back calculation of population balance model with the help of the experimental data. This is considered to be a major step towards advancing current research on the simulation of particle size distribution by using the HPGR machine for determining the breakage function. Developing a technique/setup to measure the wear rate of the HPGR rolls' surface is the objective of the second topic of this dissertation. A mockup was initially designed to assess the application of the linear displacement sensors for measuring the rolls' weight loss. Upon the analysis of that technique and considering the corresponding sources of

  15. Relationship between toughness and the physical fracture process on a microscopic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, D.

    1975-01-01

    Cleavage occurs when a local stress reaches a critical level sigma-f which is a function of temperature and metallurgical factors such as grain size. Cleavages occur ahead of the main crack tip. It is possible to establish a relationship between the cleavage stress and toughness, involving the notch root radius. At higher temperatures, fracture is ductile and occurs at a critical elongation epsilon-f, which is a function of the distribution of inclusions and the strain hardening index. It is possible to establish a relationship between toughness and this elongation at rupture. The influence of temperature, which affects several parameters, is complex. On the other hand, pressure, modifying only elongation at rupture represents an attractive means for confirming this theories. Experimental results are presented [fr

  16. Self-efficacy scale for the establishment of good relationships with families in neonatal and pediatric hospital settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Cascaes Cruz

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Self-efficacy Scale for the Establishment of Good Relationships with Families in Neonatal and Pediatric Hospital Settings. METHOD Methodological study grounded on self-efficacy theory was conducted in three phases: conceptual and operational definition (review of the literature and interviews with the target population, content validity (opinion of five experts e three clinical nurses, and exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency reliability (cross-sectional survey with a valid sample of 194 nurses. RESULTS A ten-point Likert scale with 40-item was designed and one item was excluded after review by experts. Three factors emerged from the exploratory factor analysis. The Cronbach's alpha for all items was 0.983 with item-total correlations in the range 0.657 to 0.847. Cronbach's alpha value if item deleted were less than or equal to 0.983. CONCLUSION The final version of the scale demonstrated psychometric adequacy. It is a useful tool to be administered in the clinical, educational and research nursing fields to measure nurses’ self-efficacy beliefs concerning the establishment of good relationships with families.

  17. [Development of the pregnancy nutrition knowledge scale and its relationship with eating habits in pregnant women visiting community health center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Won

    2009-02-01

    This study was done to develop a pregnancy nutrition knowledge scale and to examine the relationships between pregnancy nutrition knowledge and eating habits in pregnant women. With convenient sampling, 189 pregnant women who used community health centers for their ante-natal care were recruited. Data were collected using a self administered questionnaire including items on pregnancy nutrition knowledge (18 items) developed by researcher and items on eating habits (14 items). Cronbach's alpha and exploratory factor analysis were examined to test reliability and construct validity of the scale. Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to identify the relationship between pregnancy nutrition knowledge and eating habits. Cronbach's alpha of 18 items was .80. In factor analysis using principal components, 6 factors explained 65% of the total variance. The level of pregnancy nutrition knowledge was not sufficient but correlations between pregnancy nutrition knowledge and some of eating habits were significant. Specifically, pregnancy nutrition knowledge was positively correlated with good eating habits and negatively with bad eating habits. The pregnancy nutrition knowledge scale developed in this study is acceptable for nutrition education led by nurses. Pregnancy nutrition knowledge and eating habits are considered as major variables for ante-natal nutrition education. In future studies, explorations are needed on dietary intake and physiological indices in pregnant women, comparison of women at risk with those not at risk, and development of nutritional education programs for pregnant women.

  18. Perspectives of patients, family caregivers and physicians about the use of opioids for refractory dyspnea in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocker, Graeme; Young, Joanne; Donahue, Margaret; Farquhar, Morag; Simpson, Catherine

    2012-06-12

    A recent national practice guideline recommends the use of opioids for the treatment of refractory dyspnea in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted two qualitative studies to explore the experiences of patients and family caregivers with opioids for refractory COPD-related dyspnea and the perspectives and attitudes of physicians toward opioids in this context. Patients (n = 8; 5 men, 3 women), their caregivers (n = 12; 5 men, 7 women) and physicians (n = 28, 17 men, 11 women) in Nova Scotia participated in the studies. Semistructured interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, coded conceptually and analyzed for emergent themes using interpretive description methodology. Patients reported that opioids provided a sense of calm and relief from severe dyspnea. Family caregivers felt that opioids helped patients to breathe more "normally," observed improvements in patients' symptoms of anxiety and depression, and experienced reductions in their own stress. Patients reported substantial improvements in their quality of life. All patients and family caregivers wanted opioid therapy to continue. Most physicians were reluctant to prescribe opioids for refractory dyspnea, describing a lack of related knowledge and experience, and fears related to the potential adverse effects and legal censure. Discrepancies between the positive experiences of patients and family caregivers with opioids and the reluctance of physicians to prescribe opioids for refractory dyspnea constitute an important gap in care. Bridging this gap will require initiatives to improve the uptake of practice guidelines and to increase confidence in prescribing opioids for dyspnea refractory to conventional treatment.

  19. Impulsive buying tendency: Measuring important relationships with a new perspective and an indigenous scale

    OpenAIRE

    Anant Jyoti Badgaiyan; Anshul Verma; Saumya Dixit

    2016-01-01

    With the opening up of the economy and the proliferation of mall culture, the economic relevance of impulsive buying behaviour has assumed significance. Impulsive buying behaviour is better understood by examining the impulsive buying tendency that shapes such behaviour, and since consumer behaviour differs across cultures, by incorporating an indigenous perspective in understanding and measuring the tendency. Studies were conducted to develop an Indian scale for measuring impulsive buying te...

  20. Scaling relationships between bed load volumes, transport distances, and stream power in steep mountain channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Johannes M.; Turowski, Jens M.; Rickenmann, Dieter; Hegglin, Ramon; Arrigo, Sabrina; Mao, Luca; Kirchner, James W.

    2014-03-01

    Bed load transport during storm events is both an agent of geomorphic change and a significant natural hazard in mountain regions. Thus, predicting bed load transport is a central challenge in fluvial geomorphology and natural hazard risk assessment. Bed load transport during storm events depends on the width and depth of bed scour, as well as the transport distances of individual sediment grains. We traced individual gravels in two steep mountain streams, the Erlenbach (Switzerland) and Rio Cordon (Italy), using magnetic and radio frequency identification tags, and measured their bed load transport rates using calibrated geophone bed load sensors in the Erlenbach and a bed load trap in the Rio Cordon. Tracer transport distances and bed load volumes exhibited approximate power law scaling with both the peak stream power and the cumulative stream energy of individual hydrologic events. Bed load volumes scaled much more steeply with peak stream power and cumulative stream energy than tracer transport distances did, and bed load volumes scaled as roughly the third power of transport distances. These observations imply that large bed load transport events become large primarily by scouring the bed deeper and wider, and only secondarily by transporting the mobilized sediment farther. Using the sediment continuity equation, we can estimate the mean effective thickness of the actively transported layer, averaged over the entire channel width and the duration of individual flow events. This active layer thickness also followed approximate power law scaling with peak stream power and cumulative stream energy and ranged up to 0.57 m in the Erlenbach, broadly consistent with independent measurements.

  1. Development of an early memories of warmth and safeness scale and its relationship to psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A; Gilbert, P; McEwan, K

    2009-06-01

    Experiences of early childhood have a major impact on physiological, psychological, and social aspects of maturation and functioning. One avenue of work explores the recall and memory of positive or negative rearing experiences and their association with psychopathology measures. However, while many self-report studies have focused on the recall of parental behaviours this study developed a new measure called the early memories of warmth and safeness scale (EMWSS), which focuses on recall of one's own inner positive feelings, emotions and experiences in childhood. Student participants (N = 180) completed the new scale and a series of self-report scales measuring different types of early recall, psychopathology, types of positive affect, and self-criticism/reassurance. The EMWSS was found to have good psychometric properties and reliability. Recall of parental behaviour and recall of positive emotional memories were highly related, but recall of positive emotional memories was a better predictor of psychopathology, styles of self-criticism/self-reassurance and disposition to experience positive affect, than recall of parental behaviour.

  2. The relationship between pneumonia and Glasgow coma scale assessment on acute stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritarwan, K.; Batubara, C. A.; Dhanu, R.

    2018-03-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most frequent medical complications of a stroke. Despite the well-documented association of a stroke associated infections with increased mortality and worse long-term outcome, on the other hand, the limited data available on independent predictors of pneumonia in acute stroke patients in an emergency unit. To determine the independentrelationship between pneumonia and Glasgow Coma Scale assessment on acute stroke patients. The cohort retrospective study observed 55 acute stroke patients who stayed in intensive care unit Adam Malik General Hospital from January until August 2017. Pneumonia was more frequent in patients with Ischemic stroke (OR 5.40; 95% CI: 1.28 – 6.40, p=0.003), higher National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (p=0.014) and lower Glasgow Coma Scale (p=0.0001). Analysis multivariate logistic regression identified NIHSS as an independent of predictors of pneumonia (95% CI : 1.047 – 1.326, p=0.001). Pneumonia was associated with severity and type of stroke and length of hospital stay. The severity of the deficits evaluated by the NIHSS was shown to be the only independent risk factor for pneumonia in acute stroke patients.

  3. Measuring Social Relationships in Different Social Systems: The Construction and Validation of the Evaluation of Social Systems (EVOS) Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Raab, Corina; Grevenstein, Dennis; Schweitzer, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Social interactions have gained increasing importance, both as an outcome and as a possible mediator in psychotherapy research. Still, there is a lack of adequate measures capturing relational aspects in multi-person settings. We present a new measure to assess relevant dimensions of quality of relationships and collective efficacy regarding interpersonal interactions in diverse personal and professional social systems including couple partnerships, families, and working teams: the EVOS. Theoretical dimensions were derived from theories of systemic family therapy and organizational psychology. The study was divided in three parts: In Study 1 (N = 537), a short 9-item scale with two interrelated factors was constructed on the basis of exploratory factor analysis. Quality of relationship and collective efficacy emerged as the most relevant dimensions for the quality of social systems. Study 2 (N = 558) confirmed the measurement model using confirmatory factor analysis and established validity with measures of family functioning, life satisfaction, and working team efficacy. Measurement invariance was assessed to ensure that EVOS captures the same latent construct in all social contexts. In Study 3 (N = 317), an English language adaptation was developed, which again confirmed the original measurement model. The EVOS is a theory-based, economic, reliable, and valid measure that covers important aspects of social relationships, applicable for different social systems. It is the first instrument of its kind and an important addition to existing measures of social relationships and related outcome measures in therapeutic and other counseling settings involving multiple persons. PMID:26200357

  4. Modelling relationships between lichen bioindicators, air quality and climate on a national scale: Results from the UK OPAL air survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, Lindsay; Wolseley, Pat; Gosling, Laura; Davies, Linda; Power, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution has many negative effects on the natural environment, from changes in plant growth patterns to loss of ecosystem function. This study uses citizen science to investigate national-scale patterns in the distribution and abundance of selected lichen species on tree trunks and branches, and to relate these to air pollution and climate. Volunteers collected data for nine lichen indicators on 19,334 deciduous trees. Submitted data provided information on species-level patterns, and were used to derive composite lichen indices. Multiple linear regression and ANCOVA were used to model the relationships between lichen response variables on Quercus spp. and pollution, climate and location. The study demonstrated significant relationships between patterns in indicator lichens and levels of N- and S-containing pollutants on trunks and twigs. The derived lichen indices show great potential as a tool to provide information on local, site-specific levels of air quality. -- Highlights: •Data on presence and abundance of selected lichens were collected by members of the public. •Indicator species and indices were modelled against air pollution and climate data. •Lichens and indices show significant relationships with nitrogenous air pollution. •Lichen indices are useful tools for providing information on local air quality. -- Data on selected lichen taxa collected by members of the public in England is used to show the relationship of indicator taxa and pollution indices to air pollution and climate data

  5. Measuring Social Relationships in Different Social Systems: The Construction and Validation of the Evaluation of Social Systems (EVOS Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Aguilar-Raab

    Full Text Available Social interactions have gained increasing importance, both as an outcome and as a possible mediator in psychotherapy research. Still, there is a lack of adequate measures capturing relational aspects in multi-person settings. We present a new measure to assess relevant dimensions of quality of relationships and collective efficacy regarding interpersonal interactions in diverse personal and professional social systems including couple partnerships, families, and working teams: the EVOS. Theoretical dimensions were derived from theories of systemic family therapy and organizational psychology. The study was divided in three parts: In Study 1 (N = 537, a short 9-item scale with two interrelated factors was constructed on the basis of exploratory factor analysis. Quality of relationship and collective efficacy emerged as the most relevant dimensions for the quality of social systems. Study 2 (N = 558 confirmed the measurement model using confirmatory factor analysis and established validity with measures of family functioning, life satisfaction, and working team efficacy. Measurement invariance was assessed to ensure that EVOS captures the same latent construct in all social contexts. In Study 3 (N = 317, an English language adaptation was developed, which again confirmed the original measurement model. The EVOS is a theory-based, economic, reliable, and valid measure that covers important aspects of social relationships, applicable for different social systems. It is the first instrument of its kind and an important addition to existing measures of social relationships and related outcome measures in therapeutic and other counseling settings involving multiple persons.

  6. The relationship between job satisfaction and general health in workers and workplace accidents in medium-scale industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khandan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objective: Job satisfaction and high levels of general health in workers can lead to their better performance, the reduction of workplace accidents and ultimately the improved productivity of the organization. The present study was therefore conducted to assess the relationship between these variables and the incidence of workplace accidents in medium-scale industries in 2014-15. Methods: : The entire population of workers in three medium-scale industries (n=163 entered the study. Data collection was conducted using Goldberg’s General Health Questionnaire, the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire and a demographic questionnaire containing items on age, gender and the number of workplace accidents. The data obtained were then analyzed in SPSS-20 using the multiple-linear and the Poisson regression models. Results: The general health scores obtained by the participants ranged from 4 to 68 and had a mean and standard deviation of 25.87±13.085. The job satisfaction scores obtained ranged from 31 to 100 and had a mean and standard deviation of 63.45±11.462. The Poisson regression model showed that the level of education, age, physical symptoms and anxiety and insomnia had a significant relationship with the rate of accidents (P<0.05. The model also showed a significant relationship between job satisfaction and general health ( =-0.417 and P =0.001. Conclusion: The general health of the study participants can be said to be unacceptable and their job satisfaction to be medium. Devising plans for controlling and improving psychological and psycho-social factors such as job satisfaction is essential for workplace decision-makers, particularly in small and medium-scale industries. These plans can facilitate the achievement of higher health and safety levels in workers.

  7. New Insights about Enzyme Evolution from Large Scale Studies of Sequence and Structure Relationships*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shoshana D.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, each representing a large set of sequences that evolved from a common ancestor and that retain conserved features of their structures and active sites. Using several examples, we describe the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve new reaction and substrate specificities in each unique superfamily. The results provide insight about enzyme evolution that is not easily obtained from studies of one or only a few enzymes. PMID:25210038

  8. New insights about enzyme evolution from large scale studies of sequence and structure relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shoshana D; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2014-10-31

    Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, each representing a large set of sequences that evolved from a common ancestor and that retain conserved features of their structures and active sites. Using several examples, we describe the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve new reaction and substrate specificities in each unique superfamily. The results provide insight about enzyme evolution that is not easily obtained from studies of one or only a few enzymes. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. [Development of the Feelings toward Nature Scale and relationship between feelings toward nature and proximity to nature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Seiji

    2016-04-01

    In the field of environmental psychology, there is rapidly growing interest in the concept of connectivity with nature, describing an individual's sense of being connected with nature. The author developed a new scale for assessing feelings toward nature, including connectedness. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated a five-factor model consisting of restorativeness, oneness, mystery, care, and aversion. Then, the relationships among availability of nature in respondents' neighborhood, age, and each subscale score of the Feelings toward Nature Scale, were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The availability of nature in neighborhoods was assessed using a geographic information system and respondents' subjective evaluations. Results indicate that overall connectedness to nature is weaker as availability of nature decreases, as assessed by subjective evaluation. Results also suggest that aversion toward nature in younger people is relatively stronger than in older generations.

  10. Atomistic simulation of solid solution hardening in Mg/Al alloys: Examination of composition scaling and thermo-mechanical relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Peng; Cammarata, Robert C.; Falk, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Dislocation mobility in a solid solution was studied using atomistic simulations of an Mg/Al system. The critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) for the dislocations on the basal plane was calculated at temperatures from 0 K to 500 K with solute concentrations from 0 to 7 at%, and with four different strain rates. Solute hardening of the CRSS is decomposed into two contributions: one scales with c 2/3 , where c is the solute concentration, and the other scales with c 1 . The former was consistent with the Labusch model for local solute obstacles, and the latter was related to the athermal plateau stress due to the long range solute effect. A thermo-mechanical model was then used to analyze the temperature and strain rate dependences of the CRSS, and it yielded self-consistent and realistic results. The scaling laws were confirmed and the thermo-mechanical model was successfully parameterized using experimental measurements of the CRSS for Mg/Al alloys under quasi-static conditions. The predicted strain rate sensitivity from the experimental measurements of the CRSS is in reasonable agreement with separate mechanical tests. The concentration scaling and the thermo-mechanical relationships provide a potential tool to analytically relate the structural and thermodynamic parameters on the microscopic level with the macroscopic mechanical properties arising from dislocation mediated deformation.

  11. Relationship between family history of alcohol addiction, parents' education level, and smartphone problem use scale scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beison, Ashley; Rademacher, David J

    2017-03-01

    Background and aims Smartphones are ubiquitous. As smartphones increased in popularity, researchers realized that people were becoming dependent on their smartphones. The purpose here was to provide a better understanding of the factors related to problematic smartphone use (PSPU). Methods The participants were 100 undergraduates (25 males, 75 females) whose ages ranged from 18 to 23 (mean age = 20 years). The participants completed questionnaires to assess gender, ethnicity, year in college, father's education level, mother's education level, family income, age, family history of alcoholism, and PSPU. The Family Tree Questionnaire assessed family history of alcoholism. The Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale (MPPUS) and the Adapted Cell Phone Addiction Test (ACPAT) were used to determine the degree of PSPU. Whereas the MPPUS measures tolerance, escape from other problems, withdrawal, craving, and negative life consequences, the ACPAT measures preoccupation (salience), excessive use, neglecting work, anticipation, lack of control, and neglecting social life. Results Family history of alcoholism and father's education level together explained 26% of the variance in the MPPUS scores and 25% of the variance in the ACPAT scores. The inclusion of mother's education level, ethnicity, family income, age, year in college, and gender did not significantly increase the proportion of variance explained for either MPPUS or ACPAT scores. Discussion and conclusions Family history of alcoholism and father's education level are good predictors of PSPU. As 74%-75% of the variance in PSPU scale scores was not explained, future studies should aim to explain this variance.

  12. Discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dysfunction in the general population with dyspnea by plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogelvang, R; Goetze, JP; Schnohr, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to determine whether measurement of plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (proBNP) could be used in discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dyspnea in the general population. BACKGROUND: Natriuretic peptides are useful markers in ruling out acute cardiac...... the expected concentration of plasma proBNP based on age and gender was established for dyspneic subjects: an actual plasma proBNP concentration below half of the expected value ruled out left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction (sensitivity 100%, 95% CI 100% to 100%; specificity 15%, 95% CI 12...

  13. The importance of the relationship between scale and process in understanding long-term DOC dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J M; Bottrell, S H; Evans, C D; Monteith, D T; Bartlett, R; Rose, R; Newton, R J; Chapman, P J

    2010-06-01

    Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon have increased in many, but not all, surface waters across acid impacted areas of Europe and North America over the last two decades. Over the last eight years several hypotheses have been put forward to explain these increases, but none are yet accepted universally. Research in this area appears to have reached a stalemate between those favouring declining atmospheric deposition, climate change or land management as the key driver of long-term DOC trends. While it is clear that many of these factors influence DOC dynamics in soil and stream waters, their effect varies over different temporal and spatial scales. We argue that regional differences in acid deposition loading may account for the apparent discrepancies between studies. DOC has shown strong monotonic increases in areas which have experienced strong downward trends in pollutant sulphur and/or seasalt deposition. Elsewhere climatic factors, that strongly influence seasonality, have also dominated inter-annual variability, and here long-term monotonic DOC trends are often difficult to detect. Furthermore, in areas receiving similar acid loadings, different catchment characteristics could have affected the site specific sensitivity to changes in acidity and therefore the magnitude of DOC release in response to changes in sulphur deposition. We suggest that confusion over these temporal and spatial scales of investigation has contributed unnecessarily to the disagreement over the main regional driver(s) of DOC trends, and that the data behind the majority of these studies is more compatible than is often conveyed. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between family history of alcohol addiction, parents’ education level, and smartphone problem use scale scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beison, Ashley; Rademacher, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Smartphones are ubiquitous. As smartphones increased in popularity, researchers realized that people were becoming dependent on their smartphones. The purpose here was to provide a better understanding of the factors related to problematic smartphone use (PSPU). Methods The participants were 100 undergraduates (25 males, 75 females) whose ages ranged from 18 to 23 (mean age = 20 years). The participants completed questionnaires to assess gender, ethnicity, year in college, father’s education level, mother’s education level, family income, age, family history of alcoholism, and PSPU. The Family Tree Questionnaire assessed family history of alcoholism. The Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale (MPPUS) and the Adapted Cell Phone Addiction Test (ACPAT) were used to determine the degree of PSPU. Whereas the MPPUS measures tolerance, escape from other problems, withdrawal, craving, and negative life consequences, the ACPAT measures preoccupation (salience), excessive use, neglecting work, anticipation, lack of control, and neglecting social life. Results Family history of alcoholism and father’s education level together explained 26% of the variance in the MPPUS scores and 25% of the variance in the ACPAT scores. The inclusion of mother’s education level, ethnicity, family income, age, year in college, and gender did not significantly increase the proportion of variance explained for either MPPUS or ACPAT scores. Discussion and conclusions Family history of alcoholism and father’s education level are good predictors of PSPU. As 74%–75% of the variance in PSPU scale scores was not explained, future studies should aim to explain this variance. PMID:28316252

  15. Relationships of sedimentation and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in headwater streams using systematic longitudinal sampling at the reach scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longing, S D; Voshell, J R; Dolloff, C A; Roghair, C N

    2010-02-01

    Investigating relationships of benthic invertebrates and sedimentation is challenging because fine sediments act as both natural habitat and potential pollutant at excessive levels. Determining benthic invertebrate sensitivity to sedimentation in forested headwater streams comprised of extreme spatial heterogeneity is even more challenging, especially when associated with a background of historical and intense watershed disturbances that contributed unknown amounts of fine sediments to stream channels. This scenario exists in the Chattahoochee National Forest where such historical timber harvests and contemporary land-uses associated with recreation have potentially affected the biological integrity of headwater streams. In this study, we investigated relationships of sedimentation and the macroinvertebrate assemblages among 14 headwater streams in the forest by assigning 30, 100-m reaches to low, medium, or high sedimentation categories. Only one of 17 assemblage metrics (percent clingers) varied significantly across these categories. This finding has important implications for biological assessments by showing streams impaired physically by sedimentation may not be impaired biologically, at least using traditional approaches. A subsequent multivariate cluster analysis and indicator species analysis were used to further investigate biological patterns independent of sedimentation categories. Evaluating the distribution of sedimentation categories among biological reach clusters showed both within-stream variability in reach-scale sedimentation and sedimentation categories generally variable within clusters, reflecting the overall physical heterogeneity of these headwater environments. Furthermore, relationships of individual sedimentation variables and metrics across the biological cluster groups were weak, suggesting these measures of sedimentation are poor predictors of macroinvertebrate assemblage structure when using a systematic longitudinal sampling design

  16. Long-Period Oscillations of Hydraulic Fractures: Attenuation, Scaling Relationships, and Flow Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovsky, B.; Dunham, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Long-period seismicity due to the excitation of hydraulic fracture normal modes is thought to occur in many geological systems, including volcanoes, glaciers and ice sheets, and hydrocarbon reservoirs. To better quantify the physical dimensions of fluid-filled cracks and properties of the fluid within them, we study wave motion along a thin hydraulic fracture waveguide. We present a linearized analysis that accounts for quasi-dynamic elasticity of the fracture wall, as well as fluid drag, inertia, and compressibility. We consider symmetric perturbations and neglect the effects of stratification and gravity. In the long-wavelength or thin-fracture limit, dispersive guided waves known as crack waves propagate with phase velocity cw=√(G*|k|w/ρ), where G* = G/(1-υ) for shear modulus G and Poisson ratio υ, w is the crack half-width, k is the wavenumber, and ρ is the fluid density. Restoring forces from elastic wall deformation drive wave motions. In the opposite, short-wavelength limit, guided waves are simply sound waves within the fluid and little seismic excitation occurs due to minimal fluid-solid coupling. We focus on long-wavelength crack waves, which, in the form of standing wave modes in finite-length cracks, are thought to be a common mechanism for long-period seismicity. The dispersive nature of crack waves implies several basic scaling relations that might be useful when interpreting statistics of long-period events. Seismic observations may constrain a characteristic frequency f0 and seismic moment M0~GδwR2, where δw is the change in crack width and R is the crack dimension. Resonant modes of a fluid-filled crack have associated frequencies f~cw/R. Linear elasticity provides a link between pressure changes δp in the crack and the induced opening δw: δp~G δw/R. Combining these, and assuming that pressure changes have no variation with crack dimension, leads to the scaling law relating seismic moment and oscillation frequency, M0~(Gwδp/ρ)f0

  17. Fractal scaling of particle size distribution and relationships with topsoil properties affected by biological soil crusts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Lei Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biological soil crusts are common components of desert ecosystem; they cover ground surface and interact with topsoil that contribute to desertification control and degraded land restoration in arid and semiarid regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts (algae, lichens, and mosses crust, as well as the referenced sandland in the Mu Us Desert, Northern China. Relationships between fractal dimensions of soil particle size distribution and selected soil properties were discussed as well. The results indicated that biological soil crusts had significant positive effects on soil physical structure (P<0.05; and soil organic carbon and nutrients showed an upward trend across the successional stages of biological soil crusts. Fractal dimensions ranged from 2.1477 to 2.3032, and significantly linear correlated with selected soil properties (R(2 = 0.494∼0.955, P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Biological soil crusts cause an important increase in soil fertility, and are beneficial to sand fixation, although the process is rather slow. Fractal dimension proves to be a sensitive and useful index for quantifying changes in soil properties that additionally implies desertification. This study will be essential to provide a firm basis for future policy-making on optimal solutions regarding desertification control and assessment, as well as degraded ecosystem restoration in arid and semiarid regions.

  18. Spatial patterns and scale-dependent relationships between macrozooplankton and fish in the Bay of Biscay: an acoustic study

    KAUST Repository

    Lezama-Ochoa, A

    2011-10-20

    Macrozooplankton plays a key role in pelagic ecosystems as a link between lower trophic levels and fish. However, although its ecological role is usually considered in polar ecosystems, it is rarely considered in temperate ones. To obtain comprehensive information on the macrozooplankton distribution in the Bay of Biscay we adapted a bi-frequency acoustic method developed for the Humboldt Current system. This method can be used to extract continuous and simultaneous high-resolution information on the spatiotemporal patterns of biomass distributions of macrozooplankton and pelagic fish throughout the diel cycle. The 2 distributions were mapped using geostatistical techniques. We applied kriging with external drifts, which accounts for both diel and across-shore changes in macrozooplankton biomass. We then used a cross-variogram to determine the scale-dependent relationships between macrozooplankton and fish. The results show how macrozooplankton and fish are distributed according to the different ecological domains (coast, shelf, shelf-break and offshore) along the Spanish and French coasts. Specific macrozooplankton hotspots were observed, but macrozooplankton was generally more abundant offshore than inshore, whereas fish showed the opposite trend. This pattern was confirmed by the aggregation sizes, which increased towards oceanic waters for macrozooplankton and decreased for fish. Finally, the correlation between fish and macrozooplankton was positive on a small scale (<30 nautical miles) and negative on a large scale (>30 nautical miles).

  19. Analytical Assessment of the Relationship between 100MWp Large-scale Grid-connected Photovoltaic Plant Performance and Meteorological Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jie; Zhu, Qiaoming; Cao, Shijie; You, Yang

    2017-05-01

    This paper helps in study of the relationship between the photovoltaic power generation of large scale “fishing and PV complementary” grid-tied photovoltaic system and meteorological parameters, with multi-time scale power data from the photovoltaic power station and meteorological data over the same period of a whole year. The result indicates that, the PV power generation has the most significant correlation with global solar irradiation, followed by diurnal temperature range, sunshine hours, daily maximum temperature and daily average temperature. In different months, the maximum monthly average power generation appears in August, which related to the more global solar irradiation and longer sunshine hours in this month. However, the maximum daily average power generation appears in October, this is due to the drop in temperature brings about the improvement of the efficiency of PV panels. Through the contrast of monthly average performance ratio (PR) and monthly average temperature, it is shown that, the larger values of monthly average PR appears in April and October, while it is smaller in summer with higher temperature. The results concluded that temperature has a great influence on the performance ratio of large scale grid-tied PV power system, and it is important to adopt effective measures to decrease the temperature of PV plant properly.

  20. Global scale climate-crop yield relationships and the impacts of recent warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobell, David B; Field, Christopher B

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the global production of major crops are important drivers of food prices, food security and land use decisions. Average global yields for these commodities are determined by the performance of crops in millions of fields distributed across a range of management, soil and climate regimes. Despite the complexity of global food supply, here we show that simple measures of growing season temperatures and precipitation-spatial averages based on the locations of each crop-explain ∼30% or more of year-to-year variations in global average yields for the world's six most widely grown crops. For wheat, maize and barley, there is a clearly negative response of global yields to increased temperatures. Based on these sensitivities and observed climate trends, we estimate that warming since 1981 has resulted in annual combined losses of these three crops representing roughly 40 Mt or $5 billion per year, as of 2002. While these impacts are small relative to the technological yield gains over the same period, the results demonstrate already occurring negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields at the global scale

  1. Estimation of Regional-Scale Actual Evapotranspiration in Okayama prefecture in Japan using Complementary Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroizumi, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Miura, T.

    2008-12-01

    It is important to estimate accurately a water balance in watershed for proposing a reuse of water resources and a proper settlement of water utilization. Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important factor of water balance. Therefore, it is needed to estimate accurately the actual ET. The objective of this study is to estimate accurately monthly actual ET in Yoshii, Asahi, and Takahashi River watersheds in Okayama prefecture from 1999 to 2000. The monthly actual ET was calculated by a Morton and a modified Brutsaert and Stricker (B&S) method, using Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition Systems (AMeDAS) in the basin. The actual ET was estimated using land covers which were classified in 11 categories. The land covers includes the effects of albedo. The actual ET was related to the elevation at each AMeDAS station. Using this relationship, the actual ET at the 1 or 5 km grid-interval mesh in the basin was calculated, and finally, the distribution of actual ET was mapped. The monthly ET estimated by the modified B&S method were smaller than that by Morton method which showed a same tendency as the Penman potential ET (PET). The annual values of Morton"fs ET, modified B&S"fs ET, and PET were estimated as 796, 645, and 800 mm, respectively. The ET by the modified B&S was larger in hilly and mountainous areas than in settlement or city. In general, it was a reasonable result because city or settlement areas were covered with concrete and asphalt and the ET was controlled.

  2. Intensive symptom control of opioid-refractory dyspnea in congestive heart failure: Role of milrinone in the palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Julio; Montoya, Maria; Bruera, Eduardo; Elsayem, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    We describe an exemplary case of congestive heart failure (CHF) symptoms controlled with milrinone. We also analyze the benefits and risks of milrinone administration in an unmonitored setting. We describe the case of a patient with refractory leukemia and end-stage CHF who developed severe dyspnea after discontinuation of milrinone. At that point, despite starting opioids, she had been severely dyspneic and anxious, requiring admission to the palliative care unit (PCU) for symptom control. After negotiation with hospital administrators, milrinone was administered in an unmonitored setting such as the PCU. A multidisciplinary team approach was also provided. Milrinone produced a dramatic improvement in the patient's symptom scores and performance status. The patient was eventually discharged to home hospice on a milrinone infusion with excellent symptom control. This case suggests that milrinone may be of benefit for short-term inpatient administration for dyspnea management, even in unmonitored settings and consequently during hospice in do-not-resuscitate (DNR) patients. This strategy may reduce costs and readmissions to the hospital related to end-stage CHF.

  3. Sediment budget variation at watershed scale due to anthropogenic pressures, and its relationship to coastal erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Antonello; Adamo, Maria; Canora, Filomena

    2014-05-01

    forecast coastline fluctuations caused by such anthropogenic interventions. These are valuable information for both the management of and development of future plans for coastal environments and for reducing exposure risk to coastal erosion. The purpose of this study was to compare and to evaluate the suitability of the RUSLE (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation), RUSLE 3D and USPED (Unit Stream Power-based Erosion Deposition) models in assessing the sediment budget variation at watershed scale. In order to assess the rate of net soil erosion, the three models were applied to the Bradano river basin and to the sub-basin subtended by the San Giuliano Dam. To this end, digital terrain model, products derived from satellite remote sensing (multi-temporal Landsat imagery), soil texture maps and ancillary data were integrated and processed in a GIS. To test the models, the computed soil erosion rates were integrated over the San Giuliano sub-basin surface, and compared with the dam silting value provided by an interregional authority responsible for its management. The three models have proven to be effective in quantifying the soil erosion at watershed scale.

  4. Task and relationship conflict at work: Development and construct validation of a German version of Jehn’s intragroup conflict scale.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Grohmann, A.; Kauffeld, S.

    2011-01-01

    The distinction between task and relationship conflict is well established. Based on Jehn’s (1995) intragroup conflict scale, we developed an economic six-item questionnaire for assessing relationship and task conflict in work groups. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed on data from a

  5. Relationship between the Arctic oscillation and surface air temperature in multi-decadal time-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi L.; Tamura, Mina

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a simple energy balance model (EBM) was integrated in time, considering a hypothetical long-term variability in ice-albedo feedback mimicking the observed multi-decadal temperature variability. A natural variability was superimposed on a linear warming trend due to the increasing radiative forcing of CO2. The result demonstrates that the superposition of the natural variability and the background linear trend can offset with each other to show the warming hiatus for some period. It is also stressed that the rapid warming during 1970-2000 can be explained by the superposition of the natural variability and the background linear trend at least within the simple model. The key process of the fluctuating planetary albedo in multi-decadal time scale is investigated using the JRA-55 reanalysis data. It is found that the planetary albedo increased for 1958-1970, decreased for 1970-2000, and increased for 2000-2012, as expected by the simple EBM experiments. The multi-decadal variability in the planetary albedo is compared with the time series of the AO mode and Barents Sea mode of surface air temperature. It is shown that the recent AO negative pattern showing warm Arctic and cold mid-latitudes is in good agreement with planetary albedo change indicating negative anomaly in high latitudes and positive anomaly in mid-latitudes. Moreover, the Barents Sea mode with the warm Barents Sea and cold mid-latitudes shows long-term variability similar to planetary albedo change. Although further studies are needed, the natural variabilities of both the AO mode and Barents Sea mode indicate some possible link to the planetary albedo as suggested by the simple EBM to cause the warming hiatus in recent years.

  6. Applying Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling to Examine the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale in a Representative Greek Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigilis, Nikolaos; Gregoriadis, Athanasios; Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis; Zachopoulou, Evridiki

    2018-01-01

    Teacher-child relationships in early childhood are a fundamental prerequisite for children's social, emotional, and academic development. The Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS) is one of the most widely accepted and used instruments that evaluate the quality of teacher-child relationships. STRS is a 28-item questionnaire that assess three relational dimensions, Closeness, Conflict, and Dependency. The relevant literature has shown a pattern regarding the difficulty to support the STRS factor structure with CFA, while it is well-documented with EFA. Recently, a new statistical technique was proposed to combine the best of the CFA and EFA namely, the Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling (ESEM). The purpose of this study was (a) to examine the factor structure of the STRS in a Greek national sample. Toward this end, the ESEM framework was applied in order to overcome the limitations of EFA and CFA, (b) to confirm previous findings about the cultural influence in teacher-child relationship patterns, and (c) to examine the invariance of STRS across gender and age. Early educators from a representative Greek sample size of 535 child care and kindergarten centers completed the STRS for 4,158 children. CFA as well as ESEM procedures were implemented. Results showed that ESEM provided better fit to the data than CFA in both groups, supporting the argument that CFA is an overly restrictive approach in comparison to ESEM for the study of STRS. All primary loadings were statistically significant and were associated with their respective latent factors. Contrary to the existing literature conducted in USA and northern Europe, the association between Closeness and Dependency yielded a positive correlation. This finding is in line with previous studies conducted in Greece and confirm the existence of cultural differences in teacher-child relationships. In addition, findings supported the configural, metric, scalar, and variance/covariance equivalence of the STRS

  7. Applying Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling to Examine the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale in a Representative Greek Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Tsigilis

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Teacher-child relationships in early childhood are a fundamental prerequisite for children's social, emotional, and academic development. The Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS is one of the most widely accepted and used instruments that evaluate the quality of teacher-child relationships. STRS is a 28-item questionnaire that assess three relational dimensions, Closeness, Conflict, and Dependency. The relevant literature has shown a pattern regarding the difficulty to support the STRS factor structure with CFA, while it is well-documented with EFA. Recently, a new statistical technique was proposed to combine the best of the CFA and EFA namely, the Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling (ESEM. The purpose of this study was (a to examine the factor structure of the STRS in a Greek national sample. Toward this end, the ESEM framework was applied in order to overcome the limitations of EFA and CFA, (b to confirm previous findings about the cultural influence in teacher-child relationship patterns, and (c to examine the invariance of STRS across gender and age. Early educators from a representative Greek sample size of 535 child care and kindergarten centers completed the STRS for 4,158 children. CFA as well as ESEM procedures were implemented. Results showed that ESEM provided better fit to the data than CFA in both groups, supporting the argument that CFA is an overly restrictive approach in comparison to ESEM for the study of STRS. All primary loadings were statistically significant and were associated with their respective latent factors. Contrary to the existing literature conducted in USA and northern Europe, the association between Closeness and Dependency yielded a positive correlation. This finding is in line with previous studies conducted in Greece and confirm the existence of cultural differences in teacher-child relationships. In addition, findings supported the configural, metric, scalar, and variance/covariance equivalence of

  8. Ecological relationships of meso-scale distribution in 25 neotropical vertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Lincoln José; Norris, Darren; de Oliveira, Tadeu Gomes; Michalski, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrates are a vital ecological component of Amazon forest biodiversity. Although vertebrates are a functionally important part of various ecosystem services they continue to be threatened by anthropogenic impacts throughout the Amazon. Here we use a standardized, regularly spaced arrangement of camera traps within 25km2 to provide a baseline assessment of vertebrate species diversity in a sustainable use protected area in the eastern Brazilian Amazon. We examined seasonal differences in the per species encounter rates (number of photos per camera trap and number of cameras with photos). Generalized linear models (GLMs) were then used to examine the influence of five variables (altitude, canopy cover, basal area, distance to nearest river and distance to nearest large river) on the number of photos per species and on functional groups. GLMs were also used to examine the relationships between large predators [Jaguar (Panthera onca) and Puma (Puma concolor)] and their prey. A total of 649 independent photos of 25 species were obtained from 1,800 camera trap days (900 each during wet and dry seasons). Only ungulates and rodents showed significant seasonal differences in the number of photos per camera. The number of photos differed between seasons for only three species (Mazama americana, Dasyprocta leporina and Myoprocta acouchy) all of which were photographed more (3 to 10 fold increase) during the wet season. Mazama americana was the only species where a significant difference was found in occupancy, with more photos in more cameras during the wet season. For most groups and species variation in the number of photos per camera was only explained weakly by the GLMs (deviance explained ranging from 10.3 to 54.4%). Terrestrial birds (Crax alector, Psophia crepitans and Tinamus major) and rodents (Cuniculus paca, Dasyprocta leporina and M. acouchy) were the notable exceptions, with our GLMs significantly explaining variation in the distribution of all species

  9. Ecological relationships of meso-scale distribution in 25 neotropical vertebrate species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincoln José Michalski

    Full Text Available Vertebrates are a vital ecological component of Amazon forest biodiversity. Although vertebrates are a functionally important part of various ecosystem services they continue to be threatened by anthropogenic impacts throughout the Amazon. Here we use a standardized, regularly spaced arrangement of camera traps within 25km2 to provide a baseline assessment of vertebrate species diversity in a sustainable use protected area in the eastern Brazilian Amazon. We examined seasonal differences in the per species encounter rates (number of photos per camera trap and number of cameras with photos. Generalized linear models (GLMs were then used to examine the influence of five variables (altitude, canopy cover, basal area, distance to nearest river and distance to nearest large river on the number of photos per species and on functional groups. GLMs were also used to examine the relationships between large predators [Jaguar (Panthera onca and Puma (Puma concolor] and their prey. A total of 649 independent photos of 25 species were obtained from 1,800 camera trap days (900 each during wet and dry seasons. Only ungulates and rodents showed significant seasonal differences in the number of photos per camera. The number of photos differed between seasons for only three species (Mazama americana, Dasyprocta leporina and Myoprocta acouchy all of which were photographed more (3 to 10 fold increase during the wet season. Mazama americana was the only species where a significant difference was found in occupancy, with more photos in more cameras during the wet season. For most groups and species variation in the number of photos per camera was only explained weakly by the GLMs (deviance explained ranging from 10.3 to 54.4%. Terrestrial birds (Crax alector, Psophia crepitans and Tinamus major and rodents (Cuniculus paca, Dasyprocta leporina and M. acouchy were the notable exceptions, with our GLMs significantly explaining variation in the distribution of all

  10. Hydroclimatic variability in the Lake Mondsee region and its relationships with large-scale climate anomaly patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbu, Norel; Ionita, Monica; Swierczynski, Tina; Brauer, Achim; Kämpf, Lucas; Czymzik, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Flood triggered detrital layers in varved sediments of Lake Mondsee, located at the northern fringe of the European Alps (47°48'N,13°23'E), provide an important archive of regional hydroclimatic variability during the mid- to late Holocene. To improve the interpretation of the flood layer record in terms of large-scale climate variability, we investigate the relationships between observational hydrological records from the region, like the Mondsee lake level, the runoff of the lake's main inflow Griesler Ache, with observed precipitation and global climate patterns. The lake level shows a strong positive linear trend during the observational period in all seasons. Additionally, lake level presents important interannual to multidecadal variations. These variations are associated with distinct seasonal atmospheric circulation patterns. A pronounced anomalous anticyclonic center over the Iberian Peninsula is associated with high lake levels values during winter. This center moves southwestward during spring, summer and autumn. In the same time, a cyclonic anomaly center is recorded over central and western Europe. This anomalous circulation extends southwestward from winter to autumn. Similar atmospheric circulation patterns are associated with river runoff and precipitation variability from the region. High lake levels are associated with positive local precipitation anomalies in all seasons as well as with negative local temperature anomalies during spring, summer and autumn. A correlation analysis reveals that lake level, runoff and precipitation variability is related to large-scale sea surface temperature anomaly patterns in all seasons suggesting a possible impact of large-scale climatic modes, like the North Atlantic Oscillation and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation on hydroclimatic variability in the Lake Mondsee region. The results presented in this study can be used for a more robust interpretation of the long flood layer record from Lake Mondsee sediments

  11. Relationship between synoptic scale weather systems and column averaged atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naja, M.; Yaremchuk, A.; Onishi, R.; Maksyutov, S.; Inoue, G.

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of the atmospheric CO2 observations with transport models contributes to the understanding of the geographical distributions of CO2 sources and sinks. Space-borne sensors could be advantageous for CO2 measurements as they can provide wider spatial and temporal coverage. Inversion studies have suggested requirement of better than 1% precision for the space-borne observations. Since sources and sinks are inferred from spatial and temporal gradients in CO2, the space-borne observations must have no significant geographically varying biases. To study the dynamical biases in column CO2 due to possible correlation between clouds and atmospheric CO2 at synoptic scale, we have made simulations of CO2 (1988-2003) using NIES tracer transport model. Model resolution is 2.5o x 2.5o in horizontal and it has 15 vertical sigma-layers. Fluxes for (1) fossil fuels, (2) terrestrial biosphere (CASA NEP), (3) the oceans, and (4) inverse model derived monthly regional fluxes from 11 land and 11 ocean regions are used. SVD truncation is used to filter out noise in the inverse model flux time series. Model reproduces fairly well CO2 global trend and observed time series at monitoring sites around the globe. Lower column CO2 concentration is simulated inside cyclonic systems in summer over North hemispheric continental areas. Surface pressure is used as a proxy for dynamics and it is demonstrated that anomalies in column averaged CO2 has fairly good correlation with the anomalies in surface pressure. Positive correlation, as high as 0.7, has been estimated over parts of Siberia and N. America in summer time. Our explanation is based on that the low-pressure system is associated the upward motion, which leads to lower column CO2 values over these regions due to lifting of CO2-depleted summertime PBL air, and higher column CO2 over source areas. A sensitivity study without inverse model fluxes shows same correlation. The low-pressure systems' induced negative biases are 0

  12. The Continuum of Conflict and Control Relationship Scale (CCC-RS): Psychometrics for a Measure Designed to Discriminate among Types of Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Ryan G.; Rogers, Tiffany L.; Wheeler, Naomi J.; Kelchner, Viki; Griffith, Sandy-Ann M.; Liu, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) classifications have treatment implications for couples. This study tested the psychometrics of the Continuum of Conflict and Control Relationship Scale (CCC-RS) and examined differences between violence severity and CCC-RS scales. A sample of 575 low-income, ethnically diverse participants contributed data. Results…

  13. Quantification of Emphysema with a Three-Dimensional Chest CT Scan: Correlation with the Visual Emphysema Scoring on Chest CT, Pulmonary Function Tests and Dyspnea Severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jeong; Hwang, Jung Hwa [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    We wanted to prospectively evaluate the correlation between the quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry with the visual emphysema score, pulmonary function tests (PFT) and the dyspnea score in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Non-enhanced chest CT with 3D reconstruction was performed in 28 men with COPD (age 54-88 years). With histogram analysis, the total lung volume, mean lung density and proportion of low attenuation lung volume below predetermined thresholds were measured. The CT parameters were compared with the visual emphysema score, the PFT and the dyspnea score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was well correlated with the DLco and FEV{sub 1}/FVC. A Low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU and -930 HU was correlated with visual the emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the dyspnea score, although the correlations between the other CT parameters and the dyspnea score were not significant. Objective quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry was correlated with the visual emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the DLco, the FEV{sub 1}/FVC and the dyspnea score.

  14. Quantification of Emphysema with a Three-Dimensional Chest CT Scan: Correlation with the Visual Emphysema Scoring on Chest CT, Pulmonary Function Tests and Dyspnea Severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Jeong; Hwang, Jung Hwa

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to prospectively evaluate the correlation between the quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry with the visual emphysema score, pulmonary function tests (PFT) and the dyspnea score in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Non-enhanced chest CT with 3D reconstruction was performed in 28 men with COPD (age 54-88 years). With histogram analysis, the total lung volume, mean lung density and proportion of low attenuation lung volume below predetermined thresholds were measured. The CT parameters were compared with the visual emphysema score, the PFT and the dyspnea score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was well correlated with the DLco and FEV 1 /FVC. A Low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU and -930 HU was correlated with visual the emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the dyspnea score, although the correlations between the other CT parameters and the dyspnea score were not significant. Objective quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry was correlated with the visual emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the DLco, the FEV 1 /FVC and the dyspnea score.

  15. Genome-scale regression analysis reveals a linear relationship for promoters and enhancers after combinatorial drug treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Rapakoulia, Trisevgeni

    2017-08-09

    Motivation: Drug combination therapy for treatment of cancers and other multifactorial diseases has the potential of increasing the therapeutic effect, while reducing the likelihood of drug resistance. In order to reduce time and cost spent in comprehensive screens, methods are needed which can model additive effects of possible drug combinations. Results: We here show that the transcriptional response to combinatorial drug treatment at promoters, as measured by single molecule CAGE technology, is accurately described by a linear combination of the responses of the individual drugs at a genome wide scale. We also find that the same linear relationship holds for transcription at enhancer elements. We conclude that the described approach is promising for eliciting the transcriptional response to multidrug treatment at promoters and enhancers in an unbiased genome wide way, which may minimize the need for exhaustive combinatorial screens.

  16. An Examination of Not-For-Profit Stakeholder Networks for Relationship Management: A Small-Scale Analysis on Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jamie; Kitchens, Brent; Kozary, Ben; Zaki, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Using a small-scale descriptive network analysis approach, this study highlights the importance of stakeholder networks for identifying valuable stakeholders and the management of existing stakeholders in the context of mental health not-for-profit services. We extract network data from the social media brand pages of three health service organizations from the U.S., U.K., and Australia, to visually map networks of 579 social media brand pages (represented by nodes), connected by 5,600 edges. This network data is analyzed using a collection of popular graph analysis techniques to assess the differences in the way each of the service organizations manage stakeholder networks. We also compare node meta-information against basic topology measures to emphasize the importance of effectively managing relationships with stakeholders who have large external audiences. Implications and future research directions are also discussed. PMID:27711236

  17. An Examination of Not-For-Profit Stakeholder Networks for Relationship Management: A Small-Scale Analysis on Social Media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Wyllie

    Full Text Available Using a small-scale descriptive network analysis approach, this study highlights the importance of stakeholder networks for identifying valuable stakeholders and the management of existing stakeholders in the context of mental health not-for-profit services. We extract network data from the social media brand pages of three health service organizations from the U.S., U.K., and Australia, to visually map networks of 579 social media brand pages (represented by nodes, connected by 5,600 edges. This network data is analyzed using a collection of popular graph analysis techniques to assess the differences in the way each of the service organizations manage stakeholder networks. We also compare node meta-information against basic topology measures to emphasize the importance of effectively managing relationships with stakeholders who have large external audiences. Implications and future research directions are also discussed.

  18. Constructing Model of Relationship among Behaviors and Injuries to Products Based on Large Scale Text Data on Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomori, Koji; Kitamura, Koji; Motomura, Yoichi; Nishida, Yoshifumi; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiro; Komatsubara, Akinori

    In Japan, childhood injury prevention is urgent issue. Safety measures through creating knowledge of injury data are essential for preventing childhood injuries. Especially the injury prevention approach by product modification is very important. The risk assessment is one of the most fundamental methods to design safety products. The conventional risk assessment has been carried out subjectively because product makers have poor data on injuries. This paper deals with evidence-based risk assessment, in which artificial intelligence technologies are strongly needed. This paper describes a new method of foreseeing usage of products, which is the first step of the evidence-based risk assessment, and presents a retrieval system of injury data. The system enables a product designer to foresee how children use a product and which types of injuries occur due to the product in daily environment. The developed system consists of large scale injury data, text mining technology and probabilistic modeling technology. Large scale text data on childhood injuries was collected from medical institutions by an injury surveillance system. Types of behaviors to a product were derived from the injury text data using text mining technology. The relationship among products, types of behaviors, types of injuries and characteristics of children was modeled by Bayesian Network. The fundamental functions of the developed system and examples of new findings obtained by the system are reported in this paper.

  19. Examination of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale factor structure and longitudinal relationships with functioning in early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Michael W; Grossman, Michael; Oyewumi, L Kola; Bowie, Christopher R

    2016-04-01

    We examined the factor structure of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) in early-episode psychosis and its relationships with functioning at baseline and follow-up. A total of 240 consecutive admissions to an early intervention in psychosis clinic were assessed at intake to the program with the PANSS, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) and Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS). Seventy individuals were reassessed at follow-up. A maximum likelihood factor analysis was conducted on baseline PANSS scores and the ability of each factor to predict baseline and follow-up GAF and SOFAS was examined. A five-factor model with varimax rotation was the best fit to our data and was largely congruent with factors found previously. The negative symptom factor was the best predictor of GAF and SOFAS at baseline and follow-up. Negative symptoms are the best symptomatic predictor of functioning in individuals with early psychosis and are an important treatment target to improve recovery. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Examining the relationship between intermediate-scale soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation within a semi-arid grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Jana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation affect water cycle behaviour and responses between the land surface and the atmosphere across scales. With strong heterogeneities at the land surface, the inherent spatial variability in soil moisture makes its representation via point-scale measurements challenging, resulting in scale mismatch when compared to coarser-resolution satellite-based soil moisture or evaporation estimates. The Cosmic Ray Neutron Probe (CRNP was developed to address such issues in the measurement and representation of soil moisture at intermediate scales. Here, we present a study to assess the utility of CRNP soil moisture observations in validating model evaporation estimates. The CRNP soil moisture product from a pasture in the semi-arid central west region of New South Wales, Australia, was compared to evaporation derived from three distinct approaches, including the Priestley–Taylor (PT-JPL, Penman–Monteith (PM-Mu, and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS models, driven by forcing data from local meteorological station data and remote sensing retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS sensor. Pearson's correlations, quantile–quantile (Q–Q plots, and analysis of variance (ANOVA were used to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the temporal distributions of soil moisture and evaporation over the study site. The relationships were examined against nearly 2 years of observation data, as well as for different seasons and for defined periods of analysis. Results highlight that while direct correlations of raw data were not particularly instructive, the Q–Q plots and ANOVA illustrate that the root-zone soil moisture represented by the CRNP measurements and the modelled evaporation estimates reflect similar distributions under most meteorological conditions. The PT-JPL and PM-Mu model estimates performed contrary to expectation when high soil moisture and cold

  1. Examining the relationship between intermediate-scale soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation within a semi-arid grassland

    KAUST Repository

    Jana, Raghavendra B.

    2016-09-30

    Interactions between soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation affect water cycle behaviour and responses between the land surface and the atmosphere across scales. With strong heterogeneities at the land surface, the inherent spatial variability in soil moisture makes its representation via point-scale measurements challenging, resulting in scale mismatch when compared to coarser-resolution satellite based soil moisture or evaporation estimates. The Cosmic Ray Neutron Probe (CRNP) was developed to address such issues in the measurement and representation of soil moisture at intermediate scales. Here, we present a study to assess the utility of CRNP soil moisture observations in validating model evaporation estimates. The CRNP soil moisture product from a pasture in the semi-arid central west region of New South Wales, Australia, was compared to evaporation derived from three distinct approaches, including the Priestley–Taylor (PT-JPL), Penman–Monteith (PM-Mu), and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) models, driven by forcing data from local meteorological station data and remote sensing retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Pearson’s correlations, quantile–quantile (Q–Q) plots, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the temporal distributions of soil moisture and evaporation over the study site. The relationships were examined against nearly 2 years of observation data, as well as for different seasons and for defined periods of analysis. Results highlight that while direct correlations of raw data were not particularly instructive, the Q–Q plots and ANOVA illustrate that the root-zone soil moisture represented by the CRNP measurements and the modelled evaporation estimates reflect similar distributions under most meteorological conditions. The PT-JPL and PM-Mu model estimates performed contrary to expectation when high soil moisture and cold temperatures were

  2. The Relationship Between Intradialytic Nutrition and Gastrointestinal Symptoms Using a Modified Version of the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Brandon M; Biruete, Annabel; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Wilund, Kenneth R

    2018-03-01

    Intradialytic nutrition has been shown to improve nutritional status in maintenance hemodialysis (HD) patients but remains controversial due in part to concerns over hemodynamic stability and gastrointestinal (GI) distress. There are limited data on the relationship between intradialytic nutrition and GI symptoms, possibly due to the lack of a validated tool. Therefore, we intended to validate a questionnaire to measure GI symptoms associated with a single HD treatment and determine the relationship between intradialytic nutrition and GI symptoms. Cross-sectional study. Forty-eight maintenance HD patients. GI symptoms and dietary intake during HD treatment. In general, we found acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha >0.5, exception reflux domain) and repeatability in all 5 domains of a modified version of the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. The prevalence of GI symptoms associated with a single HD treatment (generalized score greater than 1) was 54.2, 43.7, 6.2, 41.7, and 45.8% for the abdominal pain, indigestion, reflux, diarrhea, and constipation domains, respectively. More than two-thirds of patients chose to eat during treatment (168.6 ± 165.6 kcal) with the most commonly consumed items being candy, oral supplements, and cookies. There was no difference in GI symptoms among patients who did or did not eat (P > .05). However, the amount of total dietary fat and fiber consumed during treatment was associated with greater indigestion (P < .05) prior to accounting for outliers or multiple comparisons. In this sample, the modified version of the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale was a generally valid tool for measuring GI symptoms associated with a single HD treatment. Patients who ate during treatment did not experience greater GI symptoms than those who did not; however, high amounts of fat and fiber may be associated with greater GI symptoms. Prospective trials should examine the relationship between GI symptoms and dietary intake

  3. The influence of the allometric scale on the relationship between running economy and biomechanical variables in distance runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MP Tartaruga

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies have demonstrated the need for the use of parameters that diminish the effect of body mass, for intra and inter group comparison, in individuals with different masses in order to provide a different analysis on the behaviour of the relation between running economy (RE and biomechanical variables (BVs. The allometric scale is represented by a regression equation that indicates the behaviour of a physiological variable in relation to the variable mass (RE=a.xb, where x is body mass in (kg and the dimensionless coefficient a is characteristic of the species analysed, and the dimensionless exponent b determines the percentage of mass to be associated with the physiological variable. The influence of the allometric scale (b=-1; -0.75; -0.73; -0.67 on the relationship between RE and BVs - stride length (SL, relative stride length (RSL, stride rate (SR, stride time (ST, support time (SUPT and balance time (BALT - at 12 km.h-1, was analysed in nine elite runners. Factorial analysis and Pearson's Correlation Coefficient test (r with P<0.05 were used. A decrease in the explanation power of the RE was observed, with the use of the allometric exponent, due to the BVs, as well as a reduction of the correlation coefficients between SL versus RE, ST versus RE and SR versus RE. The BALT presented a higher correlation where b=-0.75. The RSL and SUPT presented non-significant correlations. The variables SL, ST, SR and BALT were the most effective predictors of the RE, Where: b=-1, the allometric scale was most efficient to predict the running performance.

  4. Examining the relationship between intermediate scale soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation within a semi-arid grassland

    KAUST Repository

    Jana, Raghavendra Belur

    2016-05-17

    Interactions between soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation affect water cycle behaviour and responses between the land surface and the atmosphere across scales. With strong heterogeneities at the land surface, the inherent spatial variability in soil moisture makes its representation via point-scale measurements challenging, resulting in scale-mismatch when compared to coarser-resolution satellite-based soil moisture or evaporation estimates. The Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS) was developed to address such issues in the measurement and representation of soil moisture at intermediate scales. Here we present an examination of the links observed between COSMOS soil moisture retrievals and evaporation estimates over a pasture in the semi-arid central-west region of New South Wales, Australia. The COSMOS soil moisture product was compared to evaporation derived from three distinct approaches, including the Priestley-Taylor (PT-JPL), Penman-Monteith (PM-Mu) and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) models, driven by forcing data from local meteorological station data and remote sensing retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Pearson’s Correlations, Quantile-Quantile (Q-Q) plots, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the temporal distributions of soil moisture and evaporation over the study site. The relationships were examined against nearly two years of observation data, as well as for different seasons and for defined periods of analysis. Results highlight that while direct correlations of raw data were not particularly instructive, the Q-Q plots and ANOVA illustrate that the root-zone soil moisture represented by the COSMOS measurements and the modelled evaporation estimates reflect similar distributions under most meteorological conditions. The PT-JPL and PM-Mu model estimates performed contrary to expectation when high soil moisture and cold

  5. The Uses of Text Messaging in Sexual Relationships Scale: Associations with risky sexual behavior among at-risk African American emerging adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broaddus, Michelle; Dickson-Gomez, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative research was used to create the Uses of Texting in Sexual Relationships scale. At-risk, predominantly African American emerging adults participated in qualitative interviews (N = 20) and quantitative surveys (N = 110) about their uses of text messaging within romantic and sexual relationships. Exploratory factor analysis of items generated from interviews resulted in four subscales: Sexting, Relationship Maintenance, Relationship Development, and Texting for Sexual Safety. Exploratory analyses indicated associations of Sexting with more instances of condomless sex, and Texting for Sexual Safety with fewer instances of condomless sex, which was moderated by relationship power. Further research on the connections between text messaging in relationships and sexual behavior among high-risk and minority young adults is warranted, and intervention efforts to decrease sexual risks need to incorporate these avenues of sexual communication. PMID:27710089

  6. The Uses of Texting in Sexual Relationships Scale: Associations With Risky Sexual Behavior Among At-Risk African American Emerging Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broaddus, Michelle; Dickson-Gomez, Julia

    2016-10-01

    Qualitative and quantitative research was used to create the Uses of Texting in Sexual Relationships scale. At-risk, predominantly African American emerging adults participated in qualitative interviews (N = 20) and quantitative surveys (N = 110) about their uses of text messaging within romantic and sexual relationships. Exploratory factor analysis of items generated from interviews resulted in four subscales: Sexting, Relationship Maintenance, Relationship Development, and Texting for Sexual Safety. Exploratory analyses indicated associations of Sexting with more instances of condomless sex, and Texting for Sexual Safety with fewer instances of condomless sex, which was moderated by relationship power. Further research on the connections between text messaging in relationships and sexual behavior among high-risk and minority young adults is warranted, and intervention efforts to decrease sexual risks need to incorporate these avenues of sexual communication.

  7. [Evaluation of a revised "Ikigai" scale and the relationship between motivation for achievement of a purpose and mental health in senior high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K

    1994-12-01

    The term "ikigai" describes the state in which people have a positive purpose, a sense of being full and social support. In order to measure this condition and its effects on mental and physical health, an Ikigai scale was constructed. In this study, the Ikigai scale was revised by altering the number of choices for each item, and the revised scale was applied to a group of senior high school students. The purpose of the present study is to discuss the revised scale by comparing its results with those from the original scale. In addition, the relationship between motivation for achievement of a purpose and depression which is an index of mental health is studied. The results of this study are summarized as follows: 1) The revised Ikigai scale was more reliable than the original scale. 2) The correlation between the Ikigai scale and Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) demonstrated that our revised scale had greater validity than the original. 3) Male students who had strong motivation for achievement of a purpose were significantly less depressed than those who had no motivation. From these results, it is concluded that the revised Ikigai scale is better than the original scale and in male students, motivation for achievement of a purpose correlates to mental health.

  8. Do clouds save the great barrier reef? satellite imagery elucidates the cloud-SST relationship at the local scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah M Leahy

    Full Text Available Evidence of global climate change and rising sea surface temperatures (SSTs is now well documented in the scientific literature. With corals already living close to their thermal maxima, increases in SSTs are of great concern for the survival of coral reefs. Cloud feedback processes may have the potential to constrain SSTs, serving to enforce an "ocean thermostat" and promoting the survival of coral reefs. In this study, it was hypothesized that cloud cover can affect summer SSTs in the tropics. Detailed direct and lagged relationships between cloud cover and SST across the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR shelf were investigated using data from satellite imagery and in situ temperature and light loggers during two relatively hot summers (2005 and 2006 and two relatively cool summers (2007 and 2008. Across all study summers and shelf positions, SSTs exhibited distinct drops during periods of high cloud cover, and conversely, SST increases during periods of low cloud cover, with a three-day temporal lag between a change in cloud cover and a subsequent change in SST. Cloud cover alone was responsible for up to 32.1% of the variation in SSTs three days later. The relationship was strongest in both El Niño (2005 and La Niña (2008 study summers and at the inner-shelf position in those summers. SST effects on subsequent cloud cover were weaker and more variable among study summers, with rising SSTs explaining up to 21.6% of the increase in cloud cover three days later. This work quantifies the often observed cloud cooling effect on coral reefs. It highlights the importance of incorporating local-scale processes into bleaching forecasting models, and encourages the use of remote sensing imagery to value-add to coral bleaching field studies and to more accurately predict risks to coral reefs.

  9. Supra-threshold scaling, temporal summation, and after-sensation: relationships to each other and anxiety/fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Robinson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Robinson1, Joel E Bialosky2, Mark D Bishop2, Donald D Price3, Steven Z George21Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 3Dentistry and Neurosciences, University of Florida,  Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: This study investigated the relationship of thermal pain testing from three types of quantitative sensory testing (ie, supra-threshold stimulus response scaling, temporal summation, and after-sensation at three anatomical sites (ie, upper extremity, lower extremity, and trunk. Pain ratings from these procedures were also compared with common psychological measures previously shown to be related to experimental pain responses and consistent with fear-avoidance models of pain. Results indicated that supra-threshold stimulus response scaling, temporal summation, and after-sensation, were significantly related to each other. The site of stimulation was also an important factor, with the trunk site showing the highest sensitivity in all three quantitative sensory testing procedures. Supra-threshold response measures were highly related to measures of fear of pain and anxiety sensitivity for all stimulation sites. For temporal summation and after-sensation, only the trunk site was significantly related to anxiety sensitivity, and fear of pain, respectively. Results suggest the importance of considering site of stimulation when designing and comparing studies. Furthermore, psychological influence on quantitative sensory testing is also of importance when designing and comparing studies. Although there was some variation by site of stimulation, fear of pain and anxiety sensitivity had consistent influences on pain ratings.Keywords: experimental pain, temporal summation, after-sensation, fear/avoidance, anxiety

  10. Relationships between occupational functioning and stress among radio journalists--Assessment by means of the Psychosocial Risk Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najder, Anna; Merecz-Kot, Dorota; Wójcik, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Job characteristics and the consequences of everyday stress among radio journalists who are not exposed to traumatic events have not been studied sufficiently before. We aimed at determining the most common job characteristics and their stressfulness; relationships between stress exposure, health and occupational functioning; differences between radio journalists and other journalists, and also the psychosocial risk for health and functioning in this group. The studied group involved 208 journalists, 134 of whom worked in radio stations. The respondents filled in the Psychosocial Risks Scale (PRS) developed by the Department of Health and Work Psychology of the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź, Poland. Requirement of mental effort and readiness to response quickly for most of the time as well as limited possibilities for promotion were the most frequent journalists' complaints. We confirmed that higher levels of stress resulted in worse functioning--the radio journalists who experienced lower stress assessed their health status and ability to work better, were more satisfied with particular aspects of their work, and were more involved in their work. They also presented a significantly lower turnover intention. Moreover, the radio journalists were more involved in their work than other journalists, but experienced lower satisfaction, took more sick leaves and had more days of absence. Well-known relationships between stress level, satisfaction and occupational functioning were confirmed. The most important conclusion refers to the fact that psychosocial risks and stress analysis should be based on the understanding of specificity of each occupation or even position. It is so, because the same job characteristic may pose a challenge for one person, while for another--it can result in extreme discomfort and anxiety--such an attitude broadens understanding of the phenomenon. We also confirmed that the PRS is a well-designed method, appropriate to

  11. Yoga-based pulmonary rehabilitation for the management of dyspnea in coal miners with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashree Ranjita

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: Findings indicate that IAYT benefits coal miners with COPD, reducing dyspnea; fatigue and PR, and improving functional performance and peripheral capillary SpO2%. Yoga can now be included as an adjunct to conventional therapy for pulmonary rehabilitation programs for COPD patients.

  12. Self-efficacy scale for the establishment of good relationships with families in neonatal and pediatric hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andréia Cascaes; Angelo, Margareth; Santos, Bernardo Pereira Dos

    2017-05-25

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Self-efficacy Scale for the Establishment of Good Relationships with Families in Neonatal and Pediatric Hospital Settings. Methodological study grounded on self-efficacy theory was conducted in three phases: conceptual and operational definition (review of the literature and interviews with the target population), content validity (opinion of five experts e three clinical nurses), and exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency reliability (cross-sectional survey with a valid sample of 194 nurses). A ten-point Likert scale with 40-item was designed and one item was excluded after review by experts. Three factors emerged from the exploratory factor analysis. The Cronbach's alpha for all items was 0.983 with item-total correlations in the range 0.657 to 0.847. Cronbach's alpha value if item deleted were less than or equal to 0.983. The final version of the scale demonstrated psychometric adequacy. It is a useful tool to be administered in the clinical, educational and research nursing fields to measure nurses' self-efficacy beliefs concerning the establishment of good relationships with families. El propósito de este estudio fue desarrollar y probar las propiedades psicométricas de la Escala de Autoeficacia para el Establecimiento de Buenas Relaciones con las Familias en Ambientes Neonatales y Pediátricos. Estudio metodológico fundamentado en la teoría de la auto-eficacia se realizó en tres fases: conceptual y definición operacional (revisión de la literatura y entrevistas con la población objetivo), la validez de contenido (opinión de cinco expertos y tres enfermeras clínicas), y el factor de análisis exploratorio e fiabilidad interna de consistencia (estudio transversal con una muestra válida de 194 enfermeras). La escala de Likert de diez puntos con 40 ítems fue diseñada y un elemento fue excluido después de la revisión por expertos. Hay tres factores que

  13. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale in a French-Speaking Swiss Sample: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Personality and Work Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossier, Jerome; Zecca, Gregory; Stauffer, Sarah D.; Maggiori, Christian; Dauwalder, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) in a French-speaking Swiss sample and its relationship with personality dimensions and work engagement. The heterogeneous sample of 391 participants (M[subscript age] = 39.59, SD = 12.30) completed the CAAS-International and a short version…

  14. Min(d)ing the land: The relationship between artisanal and small-scale mining and surface land arrangements in the southern Philippines, eastern DRC and Liberia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbrugge, B.L.P.; Cuvelier, J.; Bockstael, S. van

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) and surface land tenure arrangements, through a comparison of mining areas in the southern Philippines, the eastern DRC and Liberia. In all three cases, ASM takes place in peripheral regions outside central state

  15. Development and Validation of the Relationship and Motivation (REMO) Scale to Assess Students' Perceptions of Peers and Teachers as Motivators in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufelder, Diana; Drury, Kate; Jagenow, Danilo; Hoferichter, Frances; Bukowski, William

    2013-01-01

    Factor analyses of a newly developed measure designed to measure early adolescents' perceptions of peers and teachers as sources of scholastic motivation were conducted with a diverse sample of 7th and 8th grade students (N = 1088) in secondary schools. The Relationship and Motivation (REMO) scales measure perceptions of peers (P-REMO) and…

  16. Relationships among the Y balance test, Berg Balance Scale, and lower limb strength in middle-aged and older females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Kyu Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Older females have less dynamic postural control and muscle strength than do middle-aged females. Aging-related strength losses may limit balancing performance. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of the Y Balance Test (YBT and lower limb strength to discriminate between females in 2 age groups, the relationship between YBT distance and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS, and the degree to which performance on YBT distance is related to lower limb strength in middle-aged and older females. Method: The 40 healthy, independently active females were divided into 2 groups: older and middle-aged. The participants underwent measurements of YBT distance using the YBT, maximal muscular strength of the lower limbs using a handheld dynamometer, and the BBS. Results: The YBT distance in 3 directions and lower limb muscle strength for both lower limbs were significantly lower in the older adults than in the middle-aged group. A moderate correlation but insignificant correlation was found between the YBT composite distance and the BBS score. In the older females, YBT distance was significantly positively correlated with strength of the knee flexor and hip abductor. In the middle-aged group, YBT distance was significantly positively correlated with strength of the knee flexor and hip extensor. Conclusions: Performance on the YBT was influenced by the strength of lower limb. We suggested that YBT can be used to alternative as a measurement of dynamic balance. Proper training programs for older people could include not only strengthening exercises but also YBT performance to improve balance.

  17. Geographic scale matters in detecting the relationship between neighbourhood food environments and obesity risk: an analysis of driver license records in Salt Lake County, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jessie X; Hanson, Heidi A; Zick, Cathleen D; Brown, Barbara B; Kowaleski-Jones, Lori; Smith, Ken R

    2014-08-19

    Empirical studies of the association between neighbourhood food environments and individual obesity risk have found mixed results. One possible cause of these mixed findings is the variation in neighbourhood geographic scale used. The purpose of this paper was to examine how various neighbourhood geographic scales affected the estimated relationship between food environments and obesity risk. Cross-sectional secondary data analysis. Salt Lake County, Utah, USA. 403,305 Salt Lake County adults 25-64 in the Utah driver license database between 1995 and 2008. Utah driver license data were geo-linked to 2000 US Census data and Dun & Bradstreet business data. Food outlets were classified into the categories of large grocery stores, convenience stores, limited-service restaurants and full-service restaurants, and measured at four neighbourhood geographic scales: Census block group, Census tract, ZIP code and a 1 km buffer around the resident's house. These measures were regressed on individual obesity status using multilevel random intercept regressions. Obesity. Food environment was important for obesity but the scale of the relevant neighbourhood differs for different type of outlets: large grocery stores were not significant at all four geographic scales, limited-service restaurants at the medium-to-large scale (Census tract or larger) and convenience stores and full-service restaurants at the smallest scale (Census tract or smaller). The choice of neighbourhood geographic scale can affect the estimated significance of the association between neighbourhood food environments and individual obesity risk. However, variations in geographic scale alone do not explain the mixed findings in the literature. If researchers are constrained to use one geographic scale with multiple categories of food outlets, using Census tract or 1 km buffer as the neighbourhood geographic unit is likely to allow researchers to detect most significant relationships. Published by the BMJ

  18. The Diagnostic Apathia Scale predicts a dose-remission relationship of T-PEMF in treatment-resistant depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Lunde, Marianne; Lauritzen, Lise

    2014-01-01

    . The remaining 31 patients received active T-PEMF twice daily. Duration of treatment was 8 weeks in both groups. The Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17) and the Bech-Rafaelsen Melancholia Scale (MES) were used to measure remission. We also focused on the Diagnostic Apathia Scale, which is based on a mixture...

  19. Urinothorax—An Underdiagnosed Cause of Acute Dyspnea: Report of a Bilateral and of an Ipsilateral Urinothorax Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonidas Laskaridis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinothorax (UT is a rare and often undiagnosed condition, defined as the presence of urine in the pleural cavity due to the retroperitoneal leakage of urine accumulation, known as urinoma, into the pleural space. UT usually is a transudative pleural effusion that presents in patients with obstructive uropathy and it may occur following surgical procedures in the ureter or kidney such as ESWL, PCNL, and URS. Its diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion since the respiratory symptoms tend to be absent or mild and the urological signs tend to dominate. However, UT may rarely present with severe and acute dyspnea as well. The objectives of this study are to describe two new cases of this rare entity, a bilateral case and an ipsilateral case focusing on the side that occurs according to the affected renal insult, and to alert the physicians to include UT in their differential diagnosis of pleural effusions especially in patients with recent urinary tract disorders.

  20. Decadal-scale relationship between measurements of aerosols, land-use change, and fire over Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake Cohen, Jason; Lecoeur, Eve; Loong Ng, Daniel Hui

    2017-01-01

    A simultaneous analysis of 13 years of remotely sensed data of land cover, fires, precipitation, and aerosols from the MODIS, TRMM, and MISR satellites and the AERONET network over Southeast Asia is performed, leading to a set of robust relationships between land-use change and fire being found on inter-annual and intra-annual scales over Southeast Asia, reflecting the heavy amounts of anthropogenic influence over land-use change and fires in this region of the world. First, we find that fires occur annually, but with a considerable amount of variance in their onset, duration, and intensity from year to year, and from two separate regions within Southeast Asia. Second, we show that a simple regression model of the land-cover, fire, and precipitation data can be used to recreate a robust representation of the timing and magnitude of measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multiple measurements sources of this region using either 8-day (better for onset and duration) or monthly (better for magnitude) measurements, but not daily measurements. We find that the reconstructed AOD matches the timing and intensity from AERONET measurements to within 70 to 90 % and the timing and intensity of MISR measurements to within 50 to 95 %. This is a unique finding in this part of the world since cloud-covered regions are large, yet the model is still robustly capable, including over regions where no fires are observed and hence no emissions would be expected to contribute to AOD. Third, we determine that while Southeast Asia is a source region of such intense smoke emissions, portions of it are also impacted by smoke transported from other regions. There are regions in northern Southeast Asia which have two annual AOD peaks, one during the local fire season and the other, smaller peak corresponding to a combination of some local smoke sources as well as transport of aerosols from fires in southern Southeast Asia and possibly even from anthropogenic sources in South Asia. Overall

  1. The relationship between small-scale and large-scale ionospheric electron density irregularities generated by powerful HF electromagnetic waves at high latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Tereshchenko

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite radio beacons were used in June 2001 to probe the ionosphere modified by a radio beam produced by the EISCAT high-power, high-frequency (HF transmitter located near Tromsø (Norway. Amplitude scintillations and variations of the phase of 150- and 400-MHz signals from Russian navigational satellites passing over the modified region were observed at three receiver sites. In several papers it has been stressed that in the polar ionosphere the thermal self-focusing on striations during ionospheric modification is the main mechanism resulting in the formation of large-scale (hundreds of meters to kilometers nonlinear structures aligned along the geomagnetic field (magnetic zenith effect. It has also been claimed that the maximum effects caused by small-scale (tens of meters irregularities detected in satellite signals are also observed in the direction parallel to the magnetic field. Contrary to those studies, the present paper shows that the maximum in amplitude scintillations does not correspond strictly to the magnetic zenith direction because high latitude drifts typically cause a considerable anisotropy of small-scale irregularities in a plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field resulting in a deviation of the amplitude-scintillation peak relative to the minimum angle between the line-of-sight to the satellite and direction of the geomagnetic field lines. The variance of the logarithmic relative amplitude fluctuations is considered here, which is a useful quantity in such studies. The experimental values of the variance are compared with model calculations and good agreement has been found. It is also shown from the experimental data that in most of the satellite passes a variance maximum occurs at a minimum in the phase fluctuations indicating that the artificial excitation of large-scale irregularities is minimum when the excitation of small-scale irregularities is maximum.

  2. Satisfaction with Relationship Status : Development of a New Scale and the Role in Predicting Well-Being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, Vicky; Tuinman, Marrit A.; Braeken, Johan; Vingerhoets, Ad. J. J. M.; Sanderman, Robbert; Hagedoorn, Mariet

    To develop a generic instrument assessing satisfaction with relationship status, and to examine the role of status satisfaction in explaining life satisfaction and distress beyond marital status. In two studies, we first examined the psychometric properties of the Satisfaction with Relationship

  3. Satisfaction with relationship status : Development of a new scale and the role in predicting well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, V.; Tuinman, M.A.; Braeken, J.; Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.; Sanderman, R.; Hagedoorn, M.

    2015-01-01

    To develop a generic instrument assessing satisfaction with relationship status, and to examine the role of status satisfaction in explaining life satisfaction and distress beyond marital status. In two studies, we first examined the psychometric properties of the Satisfaction with Relationship

  4. Satisfaction with Relationship Status: Development of a New Scale and the Role in Predicting Well-Being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, V.; Tuinman, M.A.; Braeken, J.; Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.; Sanderman, Robbert; Hagedoorn, M.

    2015-01-01

    To develop a generic instrument assessing satisfaction with relationship status, and to examine the role of status satisfaction in explaining life satisfaction and distress beyond marital status. In two studies, we first examined the psychometric properties of the Satisfaction with Relationship

  5. Nitrogen and phosphorus availabilities interact to modulate leaf trait scaling relationships across six plant functional types in a controlled-environment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crous, Kristine Y; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Zaragoza-Castells, Joana; Bloomfield, Keith J; Negrini, A Clarissa A; Meir, Patrick; Turnbull, Matthew H; Griffin, Kevin L; Atkin, Owen K

    2017-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) have key roles in leaf metabolism, resulting in a strong coupling of chemical composition traits to metabolic rates in field-based studies. However, in such studies, it is difficult to disentangle the effects of nutrient supply per se on trait-trait relationships. Our study assessed how high and low N (5 mM and 0.4 mM, respectively) and P (1 mM and 2 μM, respectively) supply in 37 species from six plant functional types (PTFs) affected photosynthesis (A) and respiration (R) (in darkness and light) in a controlled environment. Low P supply increased scaling exponents (slopes) of area-based log-log A-N or R-N relationships when N supply was not limiting, whereas there was no P effect under low N supply. By contrast, scaling exponents of A-P and R-P relationships were altered by P and N supply. Neither R : A nor light inhibition of leaf R was affected by nutrient supply. Light inhibition was 26% across nutrient treatments; herbaceous species exhibited a lower degree of light inhibition than woody species. Because N and P supply modulates leaf trait-trait relationships, the next generation of terrestrial biosphere models may need to consider how limitations in N and P availability affect trait-trait relationships when predicting carbon exchange. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. The NT-ProBNP Test in Subjects with End-Stage Renal Disease on Hemodialysis Presenting with Acute Dyspnea: Is Knowing Worth the Cost?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaffer R. S. Mok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The NT-ProBNP/BNP test has been validated as a marker for determining the etiology of acute dyspnea. In the setting of end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis (ESRD on HD, the utility of the NT-ProBNP/BNP test has not been validated. This study examines the clinical utility of the NT-ProBNP test in the setting of ESRD on HD patients presenting with acute dyspnea. Methods. A retrospective case series of 250 subjects were admitted to Cooper University Hospital, 07/2010-03/2011, with ESRD and HD presenting with dyspnea. The incidences of echocardiography, cardiology consultation, and NT-ProBNP elevated and normal were examined. Correlation coefficients were calculated for NT-ProBNP with age (years, estimated dry weight (kg, amount of fluid removed (L, and ejection fraction (EF in % among other echocardiography parameters. Results. Of the total sample 235 patients had NT-ProBNP levels performed. Cardiology consults were placed in 68.8% and 58% who underwent echocardiography. Of those for whom an echocardiography was performed estimated mean EFs of 54.6%, 50.8%, and 61.7% were observed among the NT-ProBNP elevated group, normal group, and no NT-ProBNP group, respectively. No differences were detected in all other echocardiography measurements. No correlation was observed between NT-ProBNP and age (, baseline EDW (, amount of fluid removed (, or EF (. Conclusion. In the setting of ESRD on HD, the NT-ProBNP test has no clinical utility in determining the etiology of acute dyspnea. This can be demonstrated through echocardiographic and therapeutic parameters measured in this study.

  7. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Netherlands Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Ability, Personality, and Regulatory Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vianen, Annelies E. M.; Klehe, Ute-Christine; Koen, Jessie; Dries, Nicky

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS)--Netherlands Form consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from…

  8. Patients with end-stage interstitial lung disease may have more problems with dyspnea than end-stage lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Matsunuma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with end-stage interstitial  lung disease (ILD do not appear to receive adequate palliative care despite apparent suffering before death. The aim of this study was to evaluate their signs, symptoms, and treatment received before death. Methods: Patients with ILD and lung cancer (LC who were hospitalized and died in our hospital were enrolled retrospectively. Signs and symptoms and treatments at 7 days, 3 days, and 1 day before death were evaluated and compared between the two groups of patients. Results: A total of 23 patients with ILD and 59 patients with LC group were eligible for participation. Significantly more LC patients had loss of consciousness than ILD patients on 7 days (ILD: LC = 1 [5.6%]:24 [41%], P = 0.013, 3 days (1 [5.6%]:33 [56%], P < 0.001. Significantly more ILD patients had dyspnea than LC patients on 3 days (16 [89%]:38 [64%], P = 0.047 1 day before death (21 [91%]:33 [56%], P = 0.001. On 1 day before death, significantly more LC patients received morphine than ILD patients (2 [8.7%]: 14 [24%], P = 0.015. More ILD patients received sedation (11 [48%]: 11 [19%], P = 0.007. Conclusions: End-stage ILD patients may experience dyspnea more frequently than terminal LC patients, and they need sedation. Morphine should be administered to ILD patients who have dyspnea. Additional prospective studies are needed.

  9. [Effects of an inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program on dyspnea, exercise capacity, and health related quality of life for patients with chronic lung disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Kwan

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program on dyspnea, exercise capacity, and health related quality of life in inpatients with chronic lung disease. This quasi experimental study was designed with a nonequivalent control group pre-post test time series. Twenty three patients were assigned to the experimental group and nineteen to the control group. The inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program was composed of upper and lower extremity exercise, breathing retraining, inspiratory muscle training, education, relaxation and telephone contacts. This program consisted of 4 sessions with inpatients and 4 weeks at home after discharge. The control group was given a home based pulmonary rehabilitation program at the time of discharge. The outcomes were measured by the Borg score, 6MWD and the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire(CRQ). There was a statistically significant difference in dyspnea between the experimental group and control group, but not among time sequence, or interaction between groups and time sequence. Also significant improvements in exercise capacity and health related quality of life were found only in the experimental group. An Inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program may be a useful intervention to reduce dyspnea, and increase exercise capacity and health related quality of life for chronic lung disease patients.

  10. Dyspnea during Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... cava syndrome in a child is a serious medical emergency because the child's windpipe can become blocked. ...

  11. Relationship between late-life depression and life stressors: large-scale cross-sectional study of a representative sample of the Japanese general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Tatsuhiko; Mishima, Kazuo; Kitamura, Shingo; Enomoto, Minori; Nagase, Yukihiro; Li, Lan; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Ohida, Takashi; Nishikawa, Toru; Uchiyama, Makoto

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the relationship between late-life depression and daily life stress in a representative sample of 10 969 Japanese subjects. Data on 10 969 adults aged > or =50 who participated in the Active Survey of Health and Welfare in 2000, were analyzed. The self-administered questionnaire included items on 21 reasons for life stressors and the magnitude of stress, as well as the Japanese version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The relationship between the incidence of life stressors and mild-moderate (D(16)) and severe (D(26)) depressive symptoms was examined using logistic regression analysis. A total of 21.9% of subjects had D(16) symptoms, and 9.3% had D(26) symptoms. Further, increased age and being female were associated with more severe depressive state. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the strongest relationship between both the incidence of D(16) and D(26) symptoms and life stressors stemmed from 'having no one to talk to' (odds ratio = 3.3 and 5.0, respectively). Late-life depression was also associated with 'loss of purpose in life', 'separation/divorce', 'having nothing to do', 'health/illness/care of self', and 'debt'. There is a relationship between late-life depression and diminished social relationships, experiences involving loss of purpose in life or human relationships, and health problems in the Japanese general population.

  12. The short version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale: Its validity, reliability, and relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Schepens, Stacey; Goldberg, Allon; Wallace, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    A shortened version of the ABC 16-item scale (ABC-16), the ABC-6, has been proposed as an alternative balance confidence measure. We investigated whether the ABC-6 is a valid and reliable measure of balance confidence and examined its relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults. Thirty-five community-dwelling older adults completed the ABC-16, including the six questions of the ABC-6. They also completed the following clinical balance tests: unipedal stance time (UST), functi...

  13. [Validation of a scale of sexuality (interests, emotions, relationships: IERS) in prime adolescence (12 to 15 years)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, R; Potard, C; Réveillère, C; Moltrecht, B

    2011-02-01

    Early adolescence, which we also call prime adolescence, is marked by the transformations of puberty and the sexualisation of the body, changes in cognition and the progressive involvement in sexuality. This study is the continuation of an earlier work dealing with the construction and validation of a questionnaire on sexuality during adolescence (Courtois et al., 1998) [8]. Population. The sample was composed of 312 middle-school students (7 to 9(th) grade) from four middle-schools in Tours and its suburbs (Indre-et-Loire, France): 164 girls (52.6%) and 148 boys (47.4%); with a mean age of 13.8 (S.D.=1.02; from 10.7 to 16.9) (without significant differences between boys and girls). Material. The material was composed of 22 items calling for true or false answers and including 13 items from the initial questionnaire by Courtois et al. (1998) [7,8] structured in three dimensions ("Behavioral engagement in sexuality", "Love and fidelity" and "Taste for flirting"). Procedure. The study was carried out in 2008 in the classroom (anonymity guaranteed). The results of the factorial analysis (as the main component and by the method which maximizes variance, Varimax) made it possible to find three factors which explain 41% of total variance: "Going out with someone" (value of 4.6, explaining 21% of the total variance); "Giving priority to love" (value of 2.8 explaining 13% of the variance); "Flirting with the aim of having sexual relations" (value of 1.6 explaining 7% of variance). The Cronbach alphas are 0.79, 0.70 and 0.66 respectively. The first and third factors are correlated. In order to obtain a shorter final instrument and to favor the orthogonality between factors, we only retained the items which are strongly saturated by the factors (>0.50). A confirmatory analysis revealed the good adequation of the model retained (Chi(2): 162, 87 dof, Psexuality significant in prime adolescence (in accordance with interests, emotions and relationships). The analyses were

  14. Self versus informant reports on the specific levels of functioning scale: Relationships to depression and cognition in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermel, Julia; Carter, Cameron S; Gold, James M; MacDonald, Angus W; Daniel Ragland, J; Silverstein, Steven M; Strauss, Milton E; Barch, Deanna M

    2017-09-01

    The goal of the current study was to examine the relationships between insight and both cognitive function and depression in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, and to determine if there were similar relationships across diagnostic categories. We examined discrepancies between self and informant reports of function on the Specific levels of function scale as a metric of insight for interpersonal, social acceptance, work and activities. We examined two samples of individuals with schizophrenia and/or schizoaffective disorder (Ns of 188 and 67 respectively). In Sample 1, cognition was measured using the Dot Probe Expectancy Task. In Sample 2, cognition was measured by averaging several subtests from the MATRICS consensus cognitive battery, as well as additional measures of working memory. In both samples, depression was measured using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. In both samples, we found significant relationships between worse cognition and overestimations of work function, as well as between higher depression levels and underestimation of interpersonal function. These relationships were specific to interpersonal and work function, with significantly stronger correlations with interpersonal and work function compared to the other areas of function. Similar results were found across diagnostic categories. These results have important implications for treatment planning, as they suggest the need to take into account depression and cognitive function when evaluating the patient's self-report of function, and highlight the utility of informant reports in evaluating function and treatment planning. Further, they add to the literature on the similarity across schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder in a variety of pathological mechanisms.

  15. Self versus informant reports on the specific levels of functioning scale: Relationships to depression and cognition in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Ermel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the current study was to examine the relationships between insight and both cognitive function and depression in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, and to determine if there were similar relationships across diagnostic categories. We examined discrepancies between self and informant reports of function on the Specific levels of function scale as a metric of insight for interpersonal, social acceptance, work and activities. We examined two samples of individuals with schizophrenia and/or schizoaffective disorder (Ns of 188 and 67 respectively. In Sample 1, cognition was measured using the Dot Probe Expectancy Task. In Sample 2, cognition was measured by averaging several subtests from the MATRICS consensus cognitive battery, as well as additional measures of working memory. In both samples, depression was measured using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. In both samples, we found significant relationships between worse cognition and overestimations of work function, as well as between higher depression levels and underestimation of interpersonal function. These relationships were specific to interpersonal and work function, with significantly stronger correlations with interpersonal and work function compared to the other areas of function. Similar results were found across diagnostic categories. These results have important implications for treatment planning, as they suggest the need to take into account depression and cognitive function when evaluating the patient's self-report of function, and highlight the utility of informant reports in evaluating function and treatment planning. Further, they add to the literature on the similarity across schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder in a variety of pathological mechanisms.

  16. Examining the relationship between intermediate scale soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation within a semi-arid grassland

    KAUST Repository

    Jana, Raghavendra Belur; Ershadi, Ali; McCabe, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation affect water cycle behaviour and responses between the land surface and the atmosphere across scales. With strong heterogeneities at the land surface, the inherent spatial variability

  17. Examining the relationship between intermediate-scale soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation within a semi-arid grassland

    KAUST Repository

    Jana, Raghavendra Belur; Ershadi, Ali; McCabe, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation affect water cycle behaviour and responses between the land surface and the atmosphere across scales. With strong heterogeneities at the land surface, the inherent spatial variability

  18. The O-C2 angle established at occipito-cervical fusion dictates the patient's destiny in terms of postoperative dyspnea and/or dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izeki, Masanori; Neo, Masashi; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Ito, Hiromu; Nagai, Koutatsu; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2014-02-01

    We have revealed that the cause of postoperative dyspnea and/or dysphagia after occipito-cervical (O-C) fusion is mechanical stenosis of the oropharyngeal space and the O-C2 alignment, rather than total or subaxial alignment, is the key to the development of dyspnea and/or dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to confirm the impact of occipito-C2 angle (O-C2A) on the oropharyngeal space and to investigate the chronological impact of a fixed O-C2A on the oropharyngeal space and dyspnea and/or dysphagia after O-C fusion. We reviewed 13 patients who had undergone O-C2 fusion, while retaining subaxial segmental motion (OC2 group) and 20 who had subaxial fusion without O-C2 fusion (SA group). The O-C2A, C2-C6 angle and the narrowest oropharyngeal airway space were measured on lateral dynamic X-rays preoperatively, when dynamic X-rays were taken for the first time postoperatively, and at the final follow-up. We also recorded the current dyspnea and/or dysphagia status at the final follow-up of patients who presented with it immediately after the O-C2 fusion. There was no significant difference in the mean preoperative values of the O-C2A (13.0 ± 7.5 in group OC2 and 20.1 ± 10.5 in group SA, Unpaired t test, P = 0.051) and the narrowest oropharyngeal airway space (17.8 ± 6.0 in group OC2 and 14.9 ± 3.9 in group SA, Unpaired t test, P = 0.105). In the OC2 group, the narrowest oropharyngeal airway space changed according to the cervical position preoperatively, but became constant postoperatively. In contrast, in the SA group, the narrowest oropharyngeal airway space changed according to the cervical position at any time point. Three patients who presented with dyspnea and/or dysphagia immediately after O-C2 fusion had not resolved completely at the final follow-up. The narrowest oropharyngeal airway space and postoperative dyspnea and/or dysphagia did not change with time once the O-C2A had been established at O-C fusion. The O-C2A established at O

  19. Developing a Social Enterprise Performance Scale and Examining the Relationship Between Entrepreneurs’ Personality Traits and Their Perceived Enterprise Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Tung Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the lack of measurement tools and the research gap regarding social entrepreneurship, three studies were conducted to develop a new measure of social enterprise (SE performance that is empirically valid and easy to administer. The purpose of this measure was to examine the relationship between entrepreneurs’ personality traits and their perceived SE performance. The results indicated that SE performance can be assessed using four dimensions: personal issues, social aspects, business elements, and service programmes. Extraversion positively influenced service programmes, and openness negatively affected service programmes. Neuroticism and conscientiousness positively predicted personal issues and service programmes, and agreeableness positively predicted all dimensions of perceived SE performance. The results also demonstrated the curvilinear relationship of the U-shaped curve between neuroticism and personal issues and the social aspects of SE performance. Furthermore, the results showed the curvilinear relationship of the inverted U-shaped curve between agreeableness and the four dimensions of SE performance.

  20. Variability of sea ice deformation rates in the Arctic and their relationship with basin-scale wind forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Herman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The temporal variability of the moments of probability distribution functions (pdfs of total sea ice deformation rates in the Arctic is analyzed in the context of the basin-scale wind forcing acting on the ice. The pdfs are estimated for 594 satellite-derived sea ice deformation maps from 11 winter seasons between 1996/1997 and 2007/2008, provided by the RADARSAT Geophysical Processor System. The temporal scale analyzed equals 3 days. The moments of the pdfs, calculated for a range of spatial scales (12.5–900 km, have two dominating components of variability: a seasonal cycle, with deformation rates decreasing throughout winter towards a minimum in March; and a short-term, synoptic variability, strongly correlated with the area-averaged magnitude of the wind stress over the Arctic, estimated based on the NCEP-DOE Reanalysis-2 data (correlation coefficient of 0.71 for the mean deformation rate. Due to scaling properties of the moments, logarithms of higher moments are strongly correlated with the wind stress as well. Exceptions are observed only at small spatial scales, as a result of extreme deformation events, not directly associated with large-scale wind forcing. By repeating the analysis within regions of different sizes and locations, we show that the wind–ice deformation correlation is largest at the basin scale and decreases with decreasing size of the area of study. Finally, we suggest that a positive trend in seasonally averaged correlation between sea ice deformation rates and the wind forcing, present in the analyzed data, may be related to an observed decrease in the multi-year ice area in the Arctic, indicating possibly even stronger correlations in the future.

  1. Gender and perception of dyspnea: The role of the variation in the forced expiratory volume in one second Género y percepción de disnea: el rol de la variación del volumen espiratorio forzado en un segundo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Nigro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available During bronchoconstriction women perceive more breathlessness than men. The aims of study were 1 to evaluate if quality of dyspnea in bronchoconstriction was different in women and men 2 to assess if gender difference in the perception of dyspnea could be related to the level of bronchoconstriction. 457 subjects (257 women inhaled methacholine to a 20% decrease in FEV1, or 32 mg/ml. Dyspnea was evaluated using the modified Borg scale and a list of expressions of dyspnea. Borg scores were recorded immediately before the challenge test baseline and at the maximum FEV1 decrease. The prevalence of descriptors of dyspnea reported by women and men was similar. Dyspnea was related to the level of FEV1 (ΔFEV1: OR 1.05, 95%CI 1.01-1.09, p 0.0095, females (OR 2.90, 95%CI 1.33-6.33, p 0.0072, younger subjects (OR 0.93, 95%CI 0.89- 0.97, p 0.0013 and body mass index (BMI (OR 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.23, p 0.023. As the FEV1 fell less than 20% from baseline, only the ΔFEV1 was significantly associated with dyspnea (ΔFEV1:OR 1.15, 95%CI 1.07- 1.24, p 0.0002. Instead, if the FEV1 fell higher ≥ 20%, the presence of dyspnea was related to the degree of bronchoconstriction (ΔFEV1: OR 1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.09, p 0.0187, females (OR 3.02, 95%CI 1.36-6.72, p 0.0067, younger subjects (OR 0.92, 95%CI 0.88-0.96, p 0.0007 and BMI (OR 1.12, 95%CI 1.01-1.23, p 0.023. The quality of dyspnea during the bronchoconstriction was similar in women and men; women showed a higher perception of dyspnea than men only when the FEV1 fell more than 20% from baseline.Durante la broncoconstricción las mujeres perciben más disnea que los hombres. Los objetivos del estudio fueron evaluar: 1 si la calidad de la disnea durante la broncoconstricción fue diferente en mujeres y hombres, 2 si la diferencia entre sexos en la percepción de disnea podría relacionarse al nivel de broncoconstricción. 457 sujetos (257 mujeres inhalaron metacolina hasta un descenso del FEV1 ≥ 20% o 32 mg/ml. La

  2. Relationship between Eurasian large-scale patterns and regional climate variability over the Black and Baltic Seas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankunavicius, G.; Pupienis, D. [Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania). Dept. of Hydrology and Climatology; Basharin, D. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Sevastopol (Ukraine). Sevastopol Marine Hydrophysical Inst.

    2012-11-01

    Using a NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis dataset and the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis approach we studied interannual to decadal variabilities of the sea-level air pressure (SLP) and the surface air temperature (SAT) fields over Eurasia during the 2nd part of the 20th century. Our results agree with those of the previous studies, which conclude that Eurasian trends are the result of storm-path changes driven by the interdecadal behaviour of the NAO-like meridional dipole pattern in the Atlantic. On interannual and decadal time scales, significant synchronous correlations between correspondent modes of SAT and SLP EOF patterns were found. This fact suggests that there is a strong and stable Eurasian interrelationship between SAT and SLP large-scale fields which affects the local climate of two sub-regions: the Black and Baltic Seas. The climate variability in these sub-regions was studied in terms of Eurasian large-scale surface-temperature and air-pressure patterns responses. We concluded that the sub-regional climate variability substantially differs over the Black and Baltic Seas, and depends on different Eurasian large-scale patterns. We showed that the Baltic Sea region is influenced by the patterns arising primary from NAO-like meridional dipole, as well as Scandinavian patterns, while the Black Sea's SAT/SLP variability is influenced mainly by the second mode EOF (eastern Atlantic) and large scale tropospheric wave structures. (orig.)

  3. Large-scale downy brome treatments alter plant-soil relationships and promote perennial grasses in salt desert shrublands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interrelationship between invasive annual grass abundance and soil resource availability varies spatially and temporally within ecosystems and may be altered by land treatments. We evaluated these relationships in two salt desert landscapes where the local abundance of Bromus tectorum L. (downy...

  4. You Do What You Are: The Relationship between the Scale of Creative Attributes and Behavior and Vocational Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kathryn E.; Kneipp, Lee B.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has found relationships between measures of creativity and Vocational Interests, especially the artistic type. To partially examine the validity of a new self-report measure of creativity, 115 college students were administered the Vocational Preference Inventory (Form C) (VPI-C; Holland, 1985; Lowman & Schurman, 1982) and…

  5. No relationship found between mercury and lead concentrations in muscle and scales of chub Squalius cephalus L

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valová, Zdenka; Hudcová, H.; Roche, Kevin Francis; Svobodová, J.; Bernardová, I.; Jurajda, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 185, č. 4 (2013), s. 3359-3368 ISSN 0167-6369 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Mercury * Lead * Chub * Nonlethal methods * Scales Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.679, year: 2013

  6. Relationship Between the DSM-5 Anxious Distress Specifier and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale Anxiety/Somatization Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Clark, Heather; McGonigal, Patrick; Harris, Lauren; Guzman Holst, Carolina; Martin, Jacob

    2018-02-01

    We examined the association between the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) approach to classifying depressed patients into anxious and nonanxious subgroups and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) anxious distress specifier subtyping. Two hundred two depressed patients were interviewed with semistructured diagnostic interviews. Patients were rated on the 17-item HAMD and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale and completed the Clinically Useful Anxiety Outcome Scale. Both approaches toward identifying anxiety in depressed patients resulted in most of the patients meeting the anxiety subtype. Both subtyping methods were significantly correlated with clinician-rated and self-report measures of anxiety, and scores on the anxiety scales were higher in the patients who met the anxious subtype. However, DSM-5 anxious distress subtyping was only marginally associated with the HAMD anxiety/somatization factor subtyping approach (k = 0.21), and dimensional scores were only moderately correlated (r = 0.50). These findings indicate that the DSM-5 and HAMD approaches toward identifying an anxious subtype of depression are not interchangeable.

  7. Differential Relationships between WISC-IV and WIAT-II Scales: An Evaluation of Potentially Moderating Child Demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konold, Timothy R.; Canivez, Gary L.

    2010-01-01

    Considerable debate exists regarding the accuracy of intelligence tests with members of different groups. This study investigated differential predictive validity of the "Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition". Participants from the WISC-IV--WIAT-II standardization linking sample (N = 550) ranged in age from 6 through…

  8. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN FLUID VORTICITY, KINETIC HELICITY, AND MAGNETIC FIELD ON SMALL-SCALES (QUIET-NETWORK) ON THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangeetha, C. R.; Rajaguru, S. P., E-mail: crsangeetha@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore-34 (India)

    2016-06-20

    We derive horizontal fluid motions on the solar surface over large areas covering the quiet-Sun magnetic network from local correlation tracking of convective granules imaged in continuum intensity and Doppler velocity by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory . From these we calculate the horizontal divergence, the vertical component of vorticity, and the kinetic helicity of fluid motions. We study the correlations between fluid divergence and vorticity, and between vorticity (kinetic helicity) and the magnetic field. We find that the vorticity (kinetic helicity) around small-scale fields exhibits a hemispherical pattern (in sign) similar to that followed by the magnetic helicity of large-scale active regions (containing sunspots). We identify this pattern to be a result of the Coriolis force acting on supergranular-scale flows (both the outflows and inflows), consistent with earlier studies using local helioseismology. Furthermore, we show that the magnetic fields cause transfer of vorticity from supergranular inflow regions to outflow regions, and that they tend to suppress the vortical motions around them when magnetic flux densities exceed about 300 G (from HMI). We also show that such an action of the magnetic fields leads to marked changes in the correlations between fluid divergence and vorticity. These results are speculated to be of importance to local dynamo action (if present) and to the dynamical evolution of magnetic helicity at the small-scale.

  9. On the relationship between large-scale climate modes and regional synoptic patterns that drive Victorian rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon-Kidd, D. C.; Kiem, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper regional (synoptic) and large-scale climate drivers of rainfall are investigated for Victoria, Australia. A non-linear classification methodology known as self-organizing maps (SOM) is used to identify 20 key regional synoptic patterns, which are shown to capture a range of significant synoptic features known to influence the climate of the region. Rainfall distributions are assigned to each of the 20 patterns for nine rainfall stations located across Victoria, resulting in a clear distinction between wet and dry synoptic types at each station. The influence of large-scale climate modes on the frequency and timing of the regional synoptic patterns is also investigated. This analysis revealed that phase changes in the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and/or the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) are associated with a shift in the relative frequency of wet and dry synoptic types on an annual to inter-annual timescale. In addition, the relative frequency of synoptic types is shown to vary on a multi-decadal timescale, associated with changes in the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). Importantly, these results highlight the potential to utilise the link between the regional synoptic patterns derived in this study and large-scale climate modes to improve rainfall forecasting for Victoria, both in the short- (i.e. seasonal) and long-term (i.e. decadal/multi-decadal scale). In addition, the regional and large-scale climate drivers identified in this study provide a benchmark by which the performance of Global Climate Models (GCMs) may be assessed.

  10. Developing a Social Enterprise Performance Scale and Examining the Relationship Between Entrepreneurs’ Personality Traits and Their Perceived Enterprise Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Chao-Tung; Peng, Li-Pei; Yao, Shu-Nung; Liang, Chaoyun

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of the lack of measurement tools and the research gap regarding social entrepreneurship, three studies were conducted to develop a new measure of social enterprise (SE) performance that is empirically valid and easy to administer. The purpose of this measure was to examine the relationship between entrepreneurs’ personality traits and their perceived SE performance. The results indicated that SE performance can be assessed using four dimensions: personal issues, so...

  11. Modeling and measuring the relationships between sediment transport processes, alluvial bedforms and channel-scale morphodynamics in sandy braided rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, A. P.; Ashworth, P. J.; Best, J.; Lane, S. N.; Parsons, D. R.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Simpson, C.; Strick, R. J. P.; Unsworth, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent years have seen significant advances in the development and application of morphodynamic models to simulate river evolution. Despite this progress, significant challenges remain to be overcome before such models can provide realistic simulations of river response to environmental change, or be used to determine the controls on alluvial channel patterns and deposits with confidence. This impasse reflects a wide range of factors, not least the fact that many of the processes that control river behaviour operate at spatial scales that cannot be resolved by such models. For example, sand-bed rivers are characterised by multiple scales of topography (e.g., dunes, bars, channels), the finest of which must often by parameterized, rather than represented explicitly in morphodynamic models. We examine these issues using a combination of numerical modeling and field observations. High-resolution aerial imagery and Digital Elevation Models obtained for the sandy braided South Saskatchewan River in Canada are used to quantify dune, bar and channel morphology and their response to changing flow discharge. Numerical simulations are carried out using an existing morphodynamic model based on the 2D shallow water equations, coupled with new parameterisations of the evolution and influence of alluvial bedforms. We quantify the spatial patterns of sediment flux using repeat images of dune migration and bar evolution. These data are used to evaluate model predictions of sediment transport and morphological change, and to assess the degree to which model performance is controlled by the parametrization of roughness and sediment transport phenomena linked to subgrid-scale bedforms (dunes). The capacity of such models to replicate the characteristic multi-scale morphology of bars in sand-bed rivers, and the contrasting morphodynamic signatures of braiding during low and high flow conditions, is also assessed.

  12. On the relationship between large-scale climate modes and regional synoptic patterns that drive Victorian rainfall

    OpenAIRE

    D. C. Verdon-Kidd; A. S. Kiem

    2009-01-01

    In this paper regional (synoptic) and large-scale climate drivers of rainfall are investigated for Victoria, Australia. A non-linear classification methodology known as self-organizing maps (SOM) is used to identify 20 key regional synoptic patterns, which are shown to capture a range of significant synoptic features known to influence the climate of the region. Rainfall distributions are assigned to each of the 20 patterns for nine rainfall stations located across Victoria, resulting in a cl...

  13. Accuracy of point-of-care lung ultrasonography for the diagnosis of cardiogenic pulmonary edema in dogs and cats with acute dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jessica L; Lisciandro, Gregory R; Keene, Bruce W; Tou, Sandra P; DeFrancesco, Teresa C

    2017-03-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the accuracy of a point-of-care lung ultrasonography (LUS) protocol designed to diagnose cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) in dyspneic dogs and cats. DESIGN Diagnostic test evaluation. ANIMALS 76 dogs and 24 cats evaluated for dyspnea. PROCEDURES Dogs and cats were evaluated by LUS; B lines were counted at 4 anatomic sites on each hemithorax. A site was scored as positive when > 3 B lines were identified. Animals with ≥ 2 positive sites identified on each hemithorax were considered positive for CPE. Medical records were evaluated to obtain a final diagnosis (reference standard) for calculation of the sensitivity and specificity of LUS and thoracic radiography for the diagnosis of CPE. RESULTS Dogs and cats with a final diagnosis of CPE had a higher number of positive LUS sites than did those with noncardiac causes of dyspnea. Overall sensitivity and specificity of LUS for the diagnosis of CPE were 84% and 74%, respectively, and these values were similar to those of thoracic radiography (85% and 87%, respectively). Use of LUS generally led to the misdiagnosis of CPE (ie, a false-positive result) in animals with diffuse interstitial or alveolar disease. Interobserver agreement on LUS results was high (κ > 0.85). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE LUS was useful for predicting CPE as the cause of dyspnea in dogs and cats, although this technique could not be used to differentiate CPE from other causes of diffuse interstitial or alveolar disease. Point-of-care LUS has promise as a diagnostic tool for dyspneic dogs and cats.

  14. Relationship between water quality and macro-scale parameters (land use, erosion, geology, and population density) in the Siminehrood River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostanmaneshrad, Farshid; Partani, Sadegh; Noori, Roohollah; Nachtnebel, Hans-Peter; Berndtsson, Ronny; Adamowski, Jan Franklin

    2018-10-15

    To date, few studies have investigated the simultaneous effects of macro-scale parameters (MSPs) such as land use, population density, geology, and erosion layers on micro-scale water quality variables (MSWQVs). This research focused on an evaluation of the relationship between MSPs and MSWQVs in the Siminehrood River Basin, Iran. In addition, we investigated the importance of water particle travel time (hydrological distance) on this relationship. The MSWQVs included 13 physicochemical and biochemical parameters observed at 15 stations during three seasons. Primary screening was performed by utilizing three multivariate statistical analyses (Pearson's correlation, cluster and discriminant analyses) in seven series of observed data. These series included three separate seasonal data, three two-season data, and aggregated three-season data for investigation of relationships between MSPs and MSWQVs. Coupled data (pairs of MSWQVs and MSPs) repeated in at least two out of three statistical analyses were selected for final screening. The primary screening results demonstrated significant relationships between land use and phosphorus, total solids and turbidity, erosion levels and electrical conductivity, and erosion and total solids. Furthermore, water particle travel time effects were considered through three geographical pattern definitions of distance for each MSP by using two weighting methods. To find effective MSP factors on MSWQVs, a multivariate linear regression analysis was employed. Then, preliminary equations that estimated MSWQVs were developed. The preliminary equations were modified to adaptive equations to obtain the final models. The final models indicated that a new metric, referred to as hydrological distance, provided better MSWQV estimation and water quality prediction compared to the National Sanitation Foundation Water Quality Index. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Relationship of the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-Second Edition and the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence in children referred for ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggio, Donald J; Scattone, Dorothy; May, Warren

    2010-04-01

    This study examines the relationship between the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) and the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-Second Edition (KBIT-2). Increasingly, psychologists are using brief measures of intelligence, but scant information exists regarding their clinical utility in various populations. 44 children referred for evaluation of ADHD were administered the KBIT-2 and WASI in counterbalanced order. Results of this study indicated the WASI to be a more stable measure of ADHD children's intelligence, that the KBIT-2 Vocabulary scores were significantly lower than the WASI Verbal score, and that there was significant variability within participants.

  16. Scaling relationship between corner frequencies and seismic moments of ultra micro earthquakes estimated with coda-wave spectral ratio -the Mponeng mine in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, N.; Kawakata, H.; Murakami, O.; Doi, I.; Yoshimitsu, N.; Nakatani, M.; Yabe, Y.; Naoi, M. M.; Miyakawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Ide, S.; Igarashi, T.; Morema, G.; Pinder, E.; Ogasawara, H.

    2011-12-01

    Scaling relationship between corner frequencies, fc, and seismic moments, Mo is an important clue to understand the seismic source characteristics. Aki (1967) showed that Mo is proportional to fc-3 for large earthquakes (cubic law). Iio (1986) claimed breakdown of the cubic law between fc and Mo for smaller earthquakes (Mw law holds even for micro earthquakes (-1 4) by using high quality data observed at a deep borehole (Abercrombie, 1995; Ogasawara et al., 2001; Hiramatsu et al., 2002; Yamada et al., 2007). In order to clarify the scaling relationship for smaller earthquakes (Mw Africa. We used 4 tri-axial accelerometers of three-component that have a flat response up to 25 kHz. They were installed to be 10 to 30 meters apart from each other at 3,300 meters deep. During the period from 2008/10/14 to 2008/10/30 (17 days), 8,927 events were recorded. We estimated fc and Mo for 60 events (-3 Common practice is using direct waves from adjacent events. However, there were only 5 event pairs with the distance between them less than 20 meters and Mw difference over one. In addition, the observation array is very small (radius less than 30 m), which means that effects of directivity and radiation pattern on direct waves are similar at all stations. Hence, we used spectral ratio of coda waves, since these effects are averaged and will be effectively reduced (Mayeda et al., 2007; Somei et al., 2010). Coda analysis was attempted only for relatively large 20 events (we call "coda events" hereafter) that have coda energy large enough for analysis. The results agree with those of the direct S-wave analysis for the same events, though the latter showed more scattering in fc-Mo trend. So, we combine the results from the both analyses to examine the fc-Mo trend down to very small events. Therefore, we adopted fc and (relative) Mo estimated from coda spectral ratios for coda events, while we adopted them from direct spectra for other events despite of their lower reliability. We

  17. An observational search for large-scale organization of five-minute oscillations on the sun. [coronal holes or sector structure relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmer, P. H.; Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The large-scale solar velocity field has been measured over an aperture of radius 0.8 solar radii on 121 days between April and September, 1976. Measurements are made in the line Fe I 5123.730 A, employing a velocity subtraction technique similar to that of Severny et al. (1976). Comparisons of the amplitude and frequency of the five-minute resonant oscillation with the geomagnetic C9 index and magnetic sector boundaries show no evidence of any relationship between the oscillations and coronal holes or sector structure.

  18. A very rare cause of dyspnea with a unique presentation on a computed tomography scan of the chest: macrophage activation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao-Neto, Rodrigo Antonio; Santana, Alfredo Nicodemos Cruz; Danilovic, Debora Lucia Seguro; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho de; Bernardi, Fabiola Del Carlo; Barbas, Carmen Silvia Valente

    2008-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome is a rare and potentially life-threatening disease. It occurs due to immune dysregulation manifested as excessive macrophage proliferation, typically causing hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia and hepatic dysfunction. Here, we report an unusual case of macrophage activation syndrome presenting as dyspnea, as well as (reported here for the first time) high resolution computed tomography findings of an excavated nodule, diffuse ground glass opacities and consolidations (mimicking severe pneumonia or alveolar hemorrhage). The patient was successfully treated with human immunoglobulin. We recommend that macrophage activation syndrome be considered in the differential diagnosis of respiratory failure. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are essential to achieving favorable outcomes in patients with this syndrome. (author)

  19. Using the Kannada version of the Connor Davidson Resilience Scale to assess resilience and its relationship with psychological distress among adolescent girls in Bangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidheek, K P Fasli; Satyanarayana, Veena A; Sowmya, H R; Chandra, Prabha S

    2017-12-01

    A widely used and accepted scale for assessing resilience is the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). The aim of the present study was to establish the psychometric properties of the Kannada version of the scale and assess the relationship between resilience and psychological distress in a sample of adolescent girls living in low-income settings. Data was obtained from a sample of 606 adolescent girls studying in a college meant for women from a socio-economically disadvantaged setting. The CD- RISC (25 item) was used to assess resilience and Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) was used to assess psychological distress. Exploratory factor analysis yielded four stable factors instead of the original five factors. Similar results have been obtained in other factor-analytic studies. A significant negative correlation was found between psychological distress and resilience. Our study shows that the CD-RISC is a valuable measure to assess resilience among adolescents in low-income settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigating the Relationships between Canopy Characteristics and Snow Depth Distribution at Fine Scales: Preliminary Results from the SnowEX TLS Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, N. F.; Uhlmann, Z.; Spaete, L.; Tennant, C.; Hiemstra, C. A.; McNamara, J.

    2017-12-01

    Predicting changes in forested seasonal snowpacks under altered climate scenarios is one of the most pressing hydrologic challenges facing today's society. Airborne- and satellite-based remote sensing methods hold the potential to transform measurements of terrestrial water stores in snowpack, improve process representations of snowpack accumulation and ablation, and to generate high quality predictions that inform potential strategies to better manage water resources. While the effects of forest on snowpack are well documented, many of the fine-scale processes influenced by the forest-canopy are not directly accounted for because most snow models don't explicitly represent canopy structure and canopy heterogeneity. This study investigates the influence of forest canopy on snowpack distribution at fine scales and quantifies the influence of canopy heterogeneity on snowpack accumulation and ablation processes. We use terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data collected during the SnowEX campaign to discover how the relationships between canopy and snow distributions change across scales. Our sample scales range from individual trees to patches of trees across the Grand Mesa, CO, SnowEx site.

  1. Large Scale Variability of Phytoplankton Blooms in the Arctic and Peripheral Seas: Relationships with Sea Ice, Temperature, Clouds, and Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Cota, Glenn F.

    2004-01-01

    Spatially detailed satellite data of mean color, sea ice concentration, surface temperature, clouds, and wind have been analyzed to quantify and study the large scale regional and temporal variability of phytoplankton blooms in the Arctic and peripheral seas from 1998 to 2002. In the Arctic basin, phytoplankton chlorophyll displays a large symmetry with the Eastern Arctic having about fivefold higher concentrations than those of the Western Arctic. Large monthly and yearly variability is also observed in the peripheral seas with the largest blooms occurring in the Bering Sea, Sea of Okhotsk, and the Barents Sea during spring. There is large interannual and seasonal variability in biomass with average chlorophyll concentrations in 2002 and 2001 being higher than earlier years in spring and summer. The seasonality in the latitudinal distribution of blooms is also very different such that the North Atlantic is usually most expansive in spring while the North Pacific is more extensive in autumn. Environmental factors that influence phytoplankton growth were examined, and results show relatively high negative correlation with sea ice retreat and strong positive correlation with temperature in early spring. Plankton growth, as indicated by biomass accumulation, in the Arctic and subarctic increases up to a threshold surface temperature of about 276-277 degree K (3-4 degree C) beyond which the concentrations start to decrease suggesting an optimal temperature or nutrient depletion. The correlation with clouds is significant in some areas but negligible in other areas, while the correlations with wind speed and its components are generally weak. The effects of clouds and winds are less predictable with weekly climatologies because of unknown effects of averaging variable and intermittent physical forcing (e.g. over storm event scales with mixing and upwelling of nutrients) and the time scales of acclimation by the phytoplankton.

  2. Parent-child relationship disorders. Part I. Parental overprotection and the development of the Parent Protection Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasgard, M; Metz, W P; Edelbrock, C; Shonkoff, J P

    1995-08-01

    There is a spectrum of parental protective behaviors promoting child safety and security, ranging from neglect to overprotection. This paper describes the development and psychometric properties of a new measure of parental protective behaviors toward children age 2 to 10 years, the Parent Protection Scale (PPS). Items were selected to represent key dimensions of protective behaviors. Factor analyses suggested four subscales: Supervision, Separation Problems, Dependence, and Control. The PPS has acceptable internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and clinical validity. Norms by child age in the form of cutoff points corresponding to +1 SD were determined. Clinical and research uses for the PPS are noted.

  3. NOAA's Regional Climate Services Program: Building Relationships with Partners and Customers to Deliver Trusted Climate Information at Usable Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecray, E. L.; Dissen, J.

    2016-12-01

    Federal agencies across multiple sectors from transportation to health, emergency management and agriculture, are now requiring their key stakeholders to identify and plan for climate-related impacts. Responding to the drumbeat for climate services at the regional and local scale, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) formed its Regional Climate Services (RCS) program to include Regional Climate Services Directors (RCSD), Regional Climate Centers, and state climatologists in a partnership. Since 2010, the RCS program has engaged customers across the country and amongst many of the nation's key economic sectors to compile information requirements, deliver climate-related products and services, and build partnerships among federal agencies and their regional climate entities. The talk will include a sketch from the Eastern Region that may shed light on the interaction of the multiple entities working at the regional scale. Additionally, we will show examples of our interagency work with the Department of Interior, the Department of Agriculture, and others in NOAA to deliver usable and trusted climate information and resources. These include webinars, print material, and face-to-face customer engagements to gather and respond to information requirements. NOAA/National Centers for Environmental Information's RCSDs work on-the-ground to learn from customers about their information needs and their use of existing tools and resources. As regional leads, the RCSDs work within NOAA and with our regional partners to ensure the customer receives a broad picture of the tools and information from across the nation.

  4. Data-driven multi-scale multi-physics models to derive process-structure-property relationships for additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wentao; Lin, Stephen; Kafka, Orion L.; Lian, Yanping; Yu, Cheng; Liu, Zeliang; Yan, Jinhui; Wolff, Sarah; Wu, Hao; Ndip-Agbor, Ebot; Mozaffar, Mojtaba; Ehmann, Kornel; Cao, Jian; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) possesses appealing potential for manipulating material compositions, structures and properties in end-use products with arbitrary shapes without the need for specialized tooling. Since the physical process is difficult to experimentally measure, numerical modeling is a powerful tool to understand the underlying physical mechanisms. This paper presents our latest work in this regard based on comprehensive material modeling of process-structure-property relationships for AM materials. The numerous influencing factors that emerge from the AM process motivate the need for novel rapid design and optimization approaches. For this, we propose data-mining as an effective solution. Such methods—used in the process-structure, structure-properties and the design phase that connects them—would allow for a design loop for AM processing and materials. We hope this article will provide a road map to enable AM fundamental understanding for the monitoring and advanced diagnostics of AM processing.

  5. Data-driven multi-scale multi-physics models to derive process-structure-property relationships for additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wentao; Lin, Stephen; Kafka, Orion L.; Lian, Yanping; Yu, Cheng; Liu, Zeliang; Yan, Jinhui; Wolff, Sarah; Wu, Hao; Ndip-Agbor, Ebot; Mozaffar, Mojtaba; Ehmann, Kornel; Cao, Jian; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2018-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) possesses appealing potential for manipulating material compositions, structures and properties in end-use products with arbitrary shapes without the need for specialized tooling. Since the physical process is difficult to experimentally measure, numerical modeling is a powerful tool to understand the underlying physical mechanisms. This paper presents our latest work in this regard based on comprehensive material modeling of process-structure-property relationships for AM materials. The numerous influencing factors that emerge from the AM process motivate the need for novel rapid design and optimization approaches. For this, we propose data-mining as an effective solution. Such methods—used in the process-structure, structure-properties and the design phase that connects them—would allow for a design loop for AM processing and materials. We hope this article will provide a road map to enable AM fundamental understanding for the monitoring and advanced diagnostics of AM processing.

  6. Large-scale determination of sequence, structure, and function relationships in cytosolic glutathione transferases across the biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiyama, Susan T; Malabanan, M Merced; Akiva, Eyal; Bhosle, Rahul; Branch, Megan C; Hillerich, Brandan; Jagessar, Kevin; Kim, Jungwook; Patskovsky, Yury; Seidel, Ronald D; Stead, Mark; Toro, Rafael; Vetting, Matthew W; Almo, Steven C; Armstrong, Richard N; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2014-04-01

    The cytosolic glutathione transferase (cytGST) superfamily comprises more than 13,000 nonredundant sequences found throughout the biosphere. Their key roles in metabolism and defense against oxidative damage have led to thousands of studies over several decades. Despite this attention, little is known about the physiological reactions they catalyze and most of the substrates used to assay cytGSTs are synthetic compounds. A deeper understanding of relationships across the superfamily could provide new clues about their functions. To establish a foundation for expanded classification of cytGSTs, we generated similarity-based subgroupings for the entire superfamily. Using the resulting sequence similarity networks, we chose targets that broadly covered unknown functions and report here experimental results confirming GST-like activity for 82 of them, along with 37 new 3D structures determined for 27 targets. These new data, along with experimentally known GST reactions and structures reported in the literature, were painted onto the networks to generate a global view of their sequence-structure-function relationships. The results show how proteins of both known and unknown function relate to each other across the entire superfamily and reveal that the great majority of cytGSTs have not been experimentally characterized or annotated by canonical class. A mapping of taxonomic classes across the superfamily indicates that many taxa are represented in each subgroup and highlights challenges for classification of superfamily sequences into functionally relevant classes. Experimental determination of disulfide bond reductase activity in many diverse subgroups illustrate a theme common for many reaction types. Finally, sequence comparison between an enzyme that catalyzes a reductive dechlorination reaction relevant to bioremediation efforts with some of its closest homologs reveals differences among them likely to be associated with evolution of this unusual reaction

  7. Large-scale determination of sequence, structure, and function relationships in cytosolic glutathione transferases across the biosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan T Mashiyama

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The cytosolic glutathione transferase (cytGST superfamily comprises more than 13,000 nonredundant sequences found throughout the biosphere. Their key roles in metabolism and defense against oxidative damage have led to thousands of studies over several decades. Despite this attention, little is known about the physiological reactions they catalyze and most of the substrates used to assay cytGSTs are synthetic compounds. A deeper understanding of relationships across the superfamily could provide new clues about their functions. To establish a foundation for expanded classification of cytGSTs, we generated similarity-based subgroupings for the entire superfamily. Using the resulting sequence similarity networks, we chose targets that broadly covered unknown functions and report here experimental results confirming GST-like activity for 82 of them, along with 37 new 3D structures determined for 27 targets. These new data, along with experimentally known GST reactions and structures reported in the literature, were painted onto the networks to generate a global view of their sequence-structure-function relationships. The results show how proteins of both known and unknown function relate to each other across the entire superfamily and reveal that the great majority of cytGSTs have not been experimentally characterized or annotated by canonical class. A mapping of taxonomic classes across the superfamily indicates that many taxa are represented in each subgroup and highlights challenges for classification of superfamily sequences into functionally relevant classes. Experimental determination of disulfide bond reductase activity in many diverse subgroups illustrate a theme common for many reaction types. Finally, sequence comparison between an enzyme that catalyzes a reductive dechlorination reaction relevant to bioremediation efforts with some of its closest homologs reveals differences among them likely to be associated with evolution of this

  8. The short version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale: its validity, reliability, and relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepens, Stacey; Goldberg, Allon; Wallace, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    A shortened version of the ABC 16-item scale (ABC-16), the ABC-6, has been proposed as an alternative balance confidence measure. We investigated whether the ABC-6 is a valid and reliable measure of balance confidence and examined its relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults. Thirty-five community-dwelling older adults completed the ABC-16, including the 6 questions of the ABC-6. They also completed the following clinical balance tests: unipedal stance time (UST), functional reach (FR), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and maximum step length (MSL). Participants reported 12-month falls history. Balance confidence on the ABC-6 was significantly lower than on the ABC-16, however scores were highly correlated. Fallers reported lower balance confidence than non-fallers as measured by the ABC-6 scale, but confidence did not differ between the groups with the ABC-16. The ABC-6 significantly correlated with all balance tests assessed and number of falls. The ABC-16 significantly correlated with all balance tests assessed, but not with number of falls. Test-retest reliability for the ABC-16 and ABC-6 was good to excellent. The ABC-6 is a valid and reliable measure of balance confidence in community-dwelling older adults, and shows stronger relationships to falls than does the ABC-16. The ABC-6 may be a more useful balance confidence assessment tool than the ABC-16. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Exploring the relationship between quality of management and safety climate in a large scale Danish cross‐sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderstrup-Andersen, Hans H. K.; Carlsen, Kathrine; Kines, Pete

    2011-01-01

    . In addition, we consider the impact of age, gender, education, job type and seniority as well as company size and industrial sector on the rating of safety climate. Predictors of safety climate ratings are analysed by use of multiple regression analysis. Our results show that the leadership style measured...... and transformational leadership and safety climate, and to explore how safety climate is affected by a number of socio-demographic factors and within different industries and company sizes. The analyses are based on data from a recent Danish work environment cross-sectional study including 3681 employees from a wide...... range of industries and who report that safety climate is relevant for their job. We use two safety climate items, (one regarding management safety empowerment; one regarding co-workers’ safety priority), one question about transactional leadership and two scales concerning transformational leadership...

  10. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition profiles and their relationship to self-reported outcome following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman-Smith, Yasmin E; Mathias, Jane L; Bowden, Stephen C; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Bigler, Erin D

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychological assessments of outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are often unrelated to self-reported problems after TBI. The current study cluster-analyzed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) subtest scores from mild, moderate, and severe TBI (n=220) and orthopedic injury control (n=95) groups, to determine whether specific cognitive profiles are related to people's perceived outcomes after TBI. A two-stage cluster analysis produced 4- and 6-cluster solutions, with the 6-cluster solution better capturing subtle variations in cognitive functioning. The 6 clusters differed in the levels and profiles of cognitive performance, self-reported recovery, and education and injury severity. The findings suggest that subtle cognitive impairments after TBI should be interpreted in conjunction with patient's self-reported problems.

  11. Gauging policy-driven large-scale vegetation restoration programmes under a changing environment: Their effectiveness and socio-economic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Lü, Yihe; Fu, Bojie; Comber, Alexis J; Harris, Paul; Wu, Lianhai

    2017-12-31

    Large-scale ecological restoration has been widely accepted globally as an effective strategy for combating environmental crises and to facilitate sustainability. Assessing the effectiveness of ecological restoration is vital for researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers. However, few practical tools are available to perform such tasks, particularly for large-scale restoration programmes in complex socio-ecological systems. By taking a "before and after" design, this paper formulates a composite index (E j ) based on comparing the trends of vegetation cover and vegetation productivity to assess ecological restoration effectiveness. The index reveals the dynamic and spatially heterogenic process of vegetation restoration across different time periods, which can be informative for ecological restoration management at regional scales. Effectiveness together with its relationship to socio-economic factors is explored via structural equation modeling for three time periods. The results indicate that the temporal scale is a crucial factor in representing restoration effectiveness, and that the effects of socio-economic factors can also vary with time providing insight for improving restoration effectiveness. A dual-track strategy, which promotes the development of tertiary industry in absorbing the rural labor force together with improvements in agricultural practices, is proposed as a promising strategy for enhancing restoration effectiveness. In this process, timely and long-term ecological restoration monitoring is advocated, so that the success and sustainability of such programmes is ensured, together with more informative decision making where socio-ecological interactions at differing temporal scales are key concerns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Do Low-quality Leader-Member Relationships Matter for Subordinates? Evidence from Three Samples on the Validity of the Norwegian LMX Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trude Furunes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Theories on the relations between leaders and subordinates have been of interest to researchers for decades; however, these theories have received less attention in the Nordic countries. The aim of this study is twofold: to investigate the validity of the Leader-Member-Exchange Scale, LMX-7, in three Norwegian samples, and to explore potentially negative relationships between leader–member relationships and work-environment quality indicators. Data were collected from teachers (n = 409, industrial workers (n = 406, and bus drivers (n = 1024. All hypotheses were supported. Results supported use of the measure LMX-7 as indicated by factor structure, high construct validity, sufficient criterion-related validity, discriminant validity, and internal reliability as measured by Cronbach’s alpha above 0.90. Poor quality relationships were associated with higher levels of role conflict, stress, bullying, turnover intentions, age discrimination, and negative affectivity, and lower levels of job satisfaction, commitment, skills utilization, autonomy, participation, perceived fairness, and social support. Potential consequences of low-quality relations and implications of findings are discussed.

  13. Microeconomic relationships between and among fishers and traders influence the ability to respond to social-ecological changes in a small-scale fishery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Kininmonth

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the cross-scale nature of how natural resource trading links to local extraction patterns remains a topic of great relevance to stewardship and sustainable use of ecological systems. Microeconomic influences on a society's pattern of small-scale natural resources utilization can exacerbate resource overuse, especially under increased population pressure. In many rural communities that are based on a limited diversity of resource industries, quantifying the response of extractors and traders to market and environmental fluctuations is critical to understanding management constraints. We examine the fishing practices of a small lake in Uganda, East Africa, from the dual perspectives of the traders and the fishers using a Bayesian Belief Network approach based on detailed interview surveys. Fishers in this small lake target Nile perch (Lates niloticus and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, two fish species of high commercial and food security significance in East Africa. We combined data on financial, social, and ecological systems to understand how aspects of trading quantitatively relate to fish extraction patterns in Lake Nabugabo Uganda. Importantly, we find that the patron-client type relationships generate incentives to extract specific fish, whereas "freelancer" independent fishers are able to create responsive and flexible extraction practices that match market and environmental fluctuations. Management of fishing administered by local Beach Management Units will likely have a higher probability of success when in synchrony with trading relationships and ecological dynamics. We use this study in Uganda to reflect on methodological challenges and opportunities of combining multiple types of data sets for cross-scale analysis of social-ecological system dynamics.

  14. Testing the generalized complementary relationship of evaporation with continental-scale long-term water-balance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Jozsef; Crago, Richard; Qualls, Russell J.

    2016-09-01

    The original and revised versions of the generalized complementary relationship (GCR) of evaporation (ET) were tested with six-digit Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC6) level long-term (1981-2010) water-balance data (sample size of 334). The two versions of the GCR were calibrated with Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) mean annual precipitation (P) data and validated against water-balance ET (ETwb) as the difference of mean annual HUC6-averaged P and United States Geological Survey HUC6 runoff (Q) rates. The original GCR overestimates P in about 18% of the PRISM grid points covering the contiguous United States in contrast with 12% of the revised version. With HUC6-averaged data the original version has a bias of -25 mm yr-1 vs the revised version's -17 mm yr-1, and it tends to more significantly underestimate ETwb at high values than the revised one (slope of the best fit line is 0.78 vs 0.91). At the same time it slightly outperforms the revised version in terms of the linear correlation coefficient (0.94 vs 0.93) and the root-mean-square error (90 vs 92 mm yr-1).

  15. Relationship between thermodynamic parameter and thermodynamic scaling parameter for orientational relaxation time for flip-flop motion of nematic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Katsuhiko

    2013-03-07

    Thermodynamic parameter Γ and thermodynamic scaling parameter γ for low-frequency relaxation time, which characterize flip-flop motion in a nematic phase, were verified by molecular dynamics simulation with a simple potential based on the Maier-Saupe theory. The parameter Γ, which is the slope of the logarithm for temperature and volume, was evaluated under various conditions at a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and volumes. To simulate thermodynamic scaling so that experimental data at isobaric, isothermal, and isochoric conditions can be rescaled onto a master curve with the parameters for some liquid crystal (LC) compounds, the relaxation time was evaluated from the first-rank orientational correlation function in the simulations, and thermodynamic scaling was verified with the simple potential representing small clusters. A possibility of an equivalence relationship between Γ and γ determined from the relaxation time in the simulation was assessed with available data from the experiments and simulations. In addition, an argument was proposed for the discrepancy between Γ and γ for some LCs in experiments: the discrepancy arises from disagreement of the value of the order parameter P2 rather than the constancy of relaxation time τ1(*) on pressure.

  16. Concentration-Discharge relationships in a mine-impacted catchment, New River, Tennessee: Comparison across spatial and temporal scales using time-series analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2009-12-01

    Concentration-discharge (c-Q) relationships are useful in indentifying physical and chemical processes affecting stream water chemistry. Frequently used as a diagnostic tool, c-Q relationships can be used to infer particular mixing patterns that may occur in a catchment. However, much work has shown c-Q relationships are highly variable and often inconclusive, suggesting the catchment behavior they indicate cannot be readily recognized without supporting knowledge of system dynamics. For example, drainage area and location, in addition to changes in land use over time, affect many processes in catchments including flow routing and solute concentrations. The effect of spatial and temporal scales on c-Q relationships are explored using recursive time-series analysis of historic and recent water quality data. The New River encompasses 400 square miles of remote land on the Cumberland Plateau in middle Tennessee and is a major component of the headwaters of the Cumberland River. Current and historic coal mining, oil and gas extraction, and timber harvesting have impaired water quality in the watershed. Historically, the highest magnitude of degradation probably occurred during the mid-1900s with severe acid mine drainage throughout the watershed. In 1975, 56% of all coal mined in Tennessee was derived from the New River watershed. Over the past three decades most of the New River system has rebounded though some small tributaries still experience acid mine drainage and elevated metal loads. Sediment, in terms of quantity and sorption of metals, is currently considered the largest pollutant by many. Water pH is circum-neutral in the system and coal-mining pollution is best identified by elevated specific conductance and sulfate concentration. A combination of historic and recently collected water quality data were obtained for the Indian Fork, a small 4 square mile upland catchment in the New River watershed, and the New River main-stem, approximately 25 miles

  17. Patient profiles and their relationship with the CES-D scale at the Diabetes Center for Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, José R; Rodríguez, Rosa Janet; Disdier, Orville M

    2007-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Puerto Ricans has been identified and reported as being disproportionately higher as compared to other metabolic pathologies. Recently, diabetes has been identified as the third cause of mortality in Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico Health Department, Vital Statistics Annual Report, 1999-2001). The Research Center, Education and Medical Services for Diabetes in Puerto Rico (also known as the "Centro de Diabetes para Puerto Rico" [CDPR]) is a public corporation in the island created by the government to reduce diabetes prevalence, mortality and morbidity. The CDPR offers Diabetes Self Management Educational Training Program Schools for patients (DSMETPS) island wide. The research design was an ex-post facto. As part of the process, patients are administered an extensive sociodemographic and health information questionnaire, which also includes the CES-D (a symptomatology depressive scale). This study pretends to describe the diabetic patient profiles (n=27) using information from the DSMETPS of the CDPR and explore the association with the CES-D. Variables such as patients' needs, knowledge and understanding of the condition (i.e., pathology management, type and medications utilized and exercise and nutritional patterns), patient attitudes to diabetes and their relations with the CES-D were explored. Results show a negative association, controlling for age and gender, between patients diabetic education/knowledge and CES-D score. Diabetes educators in Puerto Rico need to identify depressive symptomatology in order to prevent mental health complications in their patients since this may affect their future treatment and prognosis. An interdisciplinary team is recommended to improve the effectivity of the intervention.

  18. Extreme hydrometeorological events in the Peruvian Central Andes during austral summer and their relationship with the large-scale circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulca, Juan C.

    In this Master's dissertation, atmospheric circulation patterns associated with extreme hydrometeorological events in the Mantaro Basin, Peruvian Central Andes, and their teleconnections during the austral summer (December-January-February-March) are addressed. Extreme rainfall events in the Mantaro basin are related to variations of the large-scale circulation as indicated by the changing strength of the Bolivian High-Nordeste Low (BH-NL) system. Dry (wet) spells are associated with a weakening (strengthening) of the BH-NL system and reduced (enhanced) influx of moist air from the lowlands to the east due to strengthened westerly (easterly) wind anomalies at mid- and upper-tropospheric levels. At the same time extreme rainfall events of the opposite sign occur over northeastern Brazil (NEB) due to enhanced (inhibited) convective activity in conjunction with a strengthened (weakened) Nordeste Low. Cold episodes in the Mantaro Basin are grouped in three types: weak, strong and extraordinary cold episodes. Weak and strong cold episodes in the MB are mainly associated with a weakening of the BH-NL system due to tropical-extratropical interactions. Both types of cold episodes are associated with westerly wind anomalies at mid- and upper-tropospheric levels aloft the Peruvian Central Andes, which inhibit the influx of humid air masses from the lowlands to the east and hence limit the potential for development of convective cloud cover. The resulting clear sky conditions cause nighttime temperatures to drop, leading to cold extremes below the 10-percentile. Extraordinary cold episodes in the MB are associated with cold and dry polar air advection at all tropospheric levels toward the central Peruvian Andes. Therefore, weak and strong cold episodes in the MB appear to be caused by radiative cooling associated with reduced cloudiness, rather than cold air advection, while the latter plays an important role for extraordinary cold episodes only.

  19. Highly Educated Men Establish Strong Emotional Links with Their Dogs: A Study with Monash Dog Owner Relationship Scale (MDORS) in Committed Spanish Dog Owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbena, Antoni; Tobeña, Adolf

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of the human-animal bond may be influenced by both owner-related and dog-related factors. A study was designed to explore the existence of different dog ownership patterns and their related factors. We created an on line questionnaire that included demographic questions about the dog and the owner, a Spanish version of the Monash Dog Owner Relationship Scale (MDORS) and a validated measure of satisfaction with life (Cantril’s ladder). We collected 1140 valid responses from adult dog owners, who were recruited using the client databases of Spanish veterinary practices. We explored the presence of groups within the population using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the MDORS variables combined with Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA). Two groups were found; Group I having a higher level of emotional involvement with their dogs compared with Group II. Binary logistic regression was used to explore demographic factors that influenced group membership. Four variables were significantly associated with membership of Group I (pdog-ownership may be present within a population of owner-dog dyads, and that certain owner characteristics are associated with the type of owner-dog relationship. Future research could apply a similar approach to different types of sample population in order to identify specific patterns of dog-ownership. PMID:28033397

  20. Highly Educated Men Establish Strong Emotional Links with Their Dogs: A Study with Monash Dog Owner Relationship Scale (MDORS) in Committed Spanish Dog Owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Paula; Bowen, Jonathan; Bulbena, Antoni; Tobeña, Adolf; Fatjó, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of the human-animal bond may be influenced by both owner-related and dog-related factors. A study was designed to explore the existence of different dog ownership patterns and their related factors. We created an on line questionnaire that included demographic questions about the dog and the owner, a Spanish version of the Monash Dog Owner Relationship Scale (MDORS) and a validated measure of satisfaction with life (Cantril's ladder). We collected 1140 valid responses from adult dog owners, who were recruited using the client databases of Spanish veterinary practices. We explored the presence of groups within the population using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the MDORS variables combined with Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA). Two groups were found; Group I having a higher level of emotional involvement with their dogs compared with Group II. Binary logistic regression was used to explore demographic factors that influenced group membership. Four variables were significantly associated with membership of Group I (pdog-ownership may be present within a population of owner-dog dyads, and that certain owner characteristics are associated with the type of owner-dog relationship. Future research could apply a similar approach to different types of sample population in order to identify specific patterns of dog-ownership.

  1. Relationship between the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale and the Biomechanical Measure in Assessing Knee Extensor Muscle Spasticity in Patients with Post-Stroke Hemiparesia:A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nakhostin Ansari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS is a clinical meas-ure that has been recently developed for the assessment of muscle spasticity. There is a dearth of research on the validity of the MMAS. The aim of the present study was to investi-gate the relationship between the MMAS and the biomechanical measure of work-velocity slope in assessing knee extensor muscle spasticity in patients with hemiparesia. Materials & Methods: Fourteen patients with post-stroke hemiparesia were included in this cross sectional study. Knee extensor spasticity was assessed with MMAS. An isokinetic dy-namometer was used to impose knee passive flexion with the angular velocity of 10, 30, 60, and 90 °/Sec to measure Torque-angle data. Work (Joule was calculated at each velocity to determine the slope of the work-velocity curves as the biomechanical measure of muscle spasticity. Results: The mean work decreased as the velocity increased but was not statistically signifi-cant (P = 0.07. The mean slope was – 0.35 [J /(°/Sec]. There was no significant correlation between the MMAS and the work-velocity slope (r =0.31, P = 0.28. Conclusion: There was no significant relationship between the MMAS and the biomechanical measure of work-velocity slope. Further studies with larger sample size are suggested. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2: 131-136

  2. Multiple sclerosis: Left advantage for auditory laterality in dichotic tests of central auditory processing and relationship of psychoacoustic tests with the Multiple Sclerosis Disability Scale-EDSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaloza López, Yolanda Rebeca; Orozco Peña, Xóchitl Daisy; Pérez Ruiz, Santiago Jesús

    2018-04-03

    To evaluate the central auditory processing disorders in patients with multiple sclerosis, emphasizing auditory laterality by applying psychoacoustic tests and to identify their relationship with the Multiple Sclerosis Disability Scale (EDSS) functions. Depression scales (HADS), EDSS, and 9 psychoacoustic tests to study CAPD were applied to 26 individuals with multiple sclerosis and 26 controls. Correlation tests were performed between the EDSS and psychoacoustic tests. Seven out of 9 psychoacoustic tests were significantly different (P<.05); right or left (14/19 explorations) with respect to control. In dichotic digits there was a left-ear advantage compared to the usual predominance of RDD. There was significant correlation in five psychoacoustic tests and the specific functions of EDSS. The left-ear advantage detected and interpreted as an expression of deficient influences of the corpus callosum and attention in multiple sclerosis should be investigated. There was a correlation between psychoacoustic tests and specific EDSS functions. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparisons of American, Israeli, Italian and Mexican physicians and nurses on the total and factor scores of the Jefferson scale of attitudes toward physician-nurse collaborative relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Gonnella, Joseph S; Nasca, Thomas J; Fields, Sylvia K; Cicchetti, Americo; Lo Scalzo, Alessandra; Taroni, Francesco; Amicosante, Anna Maria Vincenza; Macinati, Manuela; Tangucci, Massimo; Liva, Carlo; Ricciardi, Gualtiero; Eidelman, Shmuel; Admi, Hanna; Geva, Hana; Mashiach, Tanya; Alroy, Gideon; Alcorta-Gonzalez, Adelina; Ibarra, David; Torres-Ruiz, Antonio

    2003-05-01

    This cross-cultural study was designed to compare the attitudes of physicians and nurses toward physician-nurse collaboration in the United States, Israel, Italy and Mexico. Total participants were 2522 physicians and nurses who completed the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (15 Likert-type items, (Hojat et al., Evaluation and the Health Professions 22 (1999a) 208; Nursing Research 50 (2001) 123). They were compared on the total scores and four factors of the Jefferson Scale (shared education and team work, caring as opposed to curing, nurses, autonomy, physicians' dominance). Results showed inter- and intra-cultural similarities and differences among the study groups providing support for the social role theory (Hardy and Conway, Role Theory: Perspectives for Health Professionals, Appelton-Century-Crofts, New York, 1978) and the principle of least interest (Waller and Hill, The Family: A Dynamic Interpretation, Dryden, New York, 1951) in inter-professional relationships. Implications for promoting physician-nurse education and inter-professional collaboration are discussed.

  4. Intensity cut-points for the Respiratory Distress Observation Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Margaret L; Templin, Thomas N

    2015-01-01

    Background The Respiratory Distress Observation Scale© is an innovative solution to assessment when a dyspnea report cannot be elicited. The Respiratory Distress Observation Scale has acceptable reliability and validity psychometrics. Aim To identify distress-intensity cut-points of the Respiratory Distress Observation Scale. Design Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was conducted with inpatients stratified by four levels of respiratory distress—none, mild, moderate, or severe. Patients provided three self-report measures of dyspnea: dichotomous (yes/no); a ranking of none, mild, moderate, or severe; and a numerical rating scale. Respiratory distress was assessed using the Respiratory Distress Observation Scale instrument. Setting/participants Participants were 136 adult inpatients, mean age 61.8 years (standard deviation = 13.18 years), 89.7% African American, and 56.6% female, who were recruited from an urban, tertiary care hospital in the Midwest of the United States. Results In all, 47% (n = 64) self-reported dyspnea (yes/no). Ranking was distributed as follows: none = 36, mild = 35, moderate = 40, and severe = 25. Numerical rating scale scores ranged from 0 to 10, mean = 4.99 (standard deviation = 2.9). Respiratory Distress Observation Scale scores ranged from 0 to 7, median (interquartile range) = 2 (1–3). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis–determined Respiratory Distress Observation Scale score of 0–2 suggests little or no respiratory distress; score ≥3 signified moderate to severe distress. Conclusion A Respiratory Distress Observation Scale score ≥3 signifies a patient’s need for palliation of respiratory distress. An end-point for identifying responsiveness to treatment, in other words, respiratory comfort, is Respiratory Distress Observation Scale <3. Because patients with imminent respiratory failure, as typified by dying patients, were not represented yielding lower than expected Respiratory Distress

  5. Relationships between clinical scales and binge eating days in adults with moderate to severe binge eating disorder in two Phase III studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrome, Leslie; Kando, Judith C; Bliss, Caleb

    2018-01-01

    In two Phase III studies, lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) reduced binge eating (BE) days/week in adults with moderate to severe binge eating disorder (BED) and was associated with improvement based on the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. In this study, post hoc analyses examined the relationships between clinical observations and clinical rating scales in individuals with BED. NCT01718483 (ClinicalTrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01718483); NCT01718509 (ClinicalTrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01718509). Two 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies randomized (1:1) adults meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , Fourth Edition, Text Revision, BED criteria and with protocol-defined moderate to severe BED (study 1, N=383; study 2, N=390) to placebo or dose-optimized LDX (50 or 70 mg). Assessments included the number of BE days/week, CGI-Severity (CGI-S) and CGI-I scores, and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for Binge Eating (Y-BOCS-BE) total scores. For these post hoc analyses, data were pooled across studies and treatment arms. Statistical assessments included Spearman correlations and equipercentile linking analyses (ELA). Reported P -values are nominal (descriptive and not adjusted for multiplicity). At baseline, nominally significant correlations with CGI-S scores were reported for BE days/week ( r =0.374; P <0.0001) and Y-BOCS-BE total scores ( r =0.319; P <0.0001). Baseline ELA for CGI-S further characterized this relationship: a CGI-S score of 4 (moderately ill) corresponding to 3.504 BE days/week and a Y-BOCS-BE total score of 18.6. Nominally significant correlations with CGI-I scores were reported for changes from baseline at study endpoint for BE days/week ( r =0.647; P <0.0001) and Y-BOCS-BE total scores ( r =0.741; P <0.0001). ELA for CGI-I scores at study endpoint showed that a CGI-I score of 1 (very much improved) corresponds to a reduction from baseline of 4.504 BE days/week and 19.4 points for Y

  6. Particle bed reactor scaling relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovik, G.; Araj, K.; Horn, F. L.; Ludewig, H.; Benenati, R.

    The Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) concept can be used in several applications both as part of a power generating system or as a direct propulsion unit. In order to carry out optimization studies of systems involving a PBR, it is necessary to know the variation of the critical mass with pertinent system parameters such as weight, size, power level and thrust level. A parametric study is presented for all the practical combinations of fuel and moderating material. The PBR is described, the practical combinations of materials and dimensions are discussed, and an example is presented.

  7. Examining the relationship between personality and affect-related attributes and adolescents' intentions to try smoking using the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memetovic, Jasmina; Ratner, Pamela A; Gotay, Carolyn; Richardson, Christopher G

    2016-05-01

    Assessments of adolescents' smoking intentions indicate that many are susceptible to smoking initiation because they do not have resolute intentions to abstain from trying smoking in the future. Although researchers have developed personality and affect-related risk factor profiles to understand risk for the initiation of substance use and abuse (e.g., alcohol), few have examined the extent to which these risk factors are related to the tobacco use intentions of adolescents who have yet to try tobacco smoking. The objective of this study was to examine the relationships between personality and affect-related risk factors measured by the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) and smoking intentions in a sample of adolescents who have not experimented with tobacco smoking. Data is based on responses from 1352 participants in the British Columbia Adolescent Substance Use Survey (56% female, 76% in Grade 8) who had never tried smoking tobacco. Of these 1352 participants, 29% (n=338) were classified as not having resolute intentions to not try smoking. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the relationship between each SURPS dimension (Anxiety Sensitivity, Hopelessness, Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking) and the intention to try cigarettes in the future. Hopelessness (AOR 1.06, 95% CI [1.03, 1.10], p<.001), Impulsivity (AOR 1.07 [1.03, 1.11], p<.001) and Sensation Seeking (AOR 1.05 95% CI [1.02, 1.09], p<.01) had independent statistically significant associations with having an intention to try smoking. These findings may be used to inform a prevention-oriented framework to reduce susceptibility to tobacco smoking. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Comparison of the Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test with the Berg Balance Scale in relationship to walking speed and motor recovery post stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Sangeetha; Bishnoi, Alka

    2017-12-01

    The Mini-BESTest is a recently developed balance assessment tool that incorporates challenging dynamic balance tasks. Few studies have compared the psychometric properties of the Mini-BESTest to the commonly used Berg Balance Scale (BBS). However, the utility of these scales in relationship to post stroke walking speeds has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the Mini-BESTest and BBS to evaluate walking speeds in individuals with stroke. A retrospective exploratory design. Forty-one individuals with chronic stroke were evaluated with the Mini-BESTest, BBS, and 10-meter self-selected walk test (10MWT). Based on their self-selected gait speeds (below or above 0.8 m/s), participants were classified as slow and fast walkers. Significant linear correlations were observed between the Mini-BESTest vs. BBS (r = 0.72, p ≤ 0.001), Mini-BESTest vs. 10MWT (r = 0.58, p ≤ 0.001), and BBS vs. 10MWT (r = 0.30, p = 0.05). Independent t-tests comparing the balance scores for the slow and fast walkers revealed significant group differences for the Mini-BESTest (p = 0.003), but not for the BBS (p = 0.09). The Mini-BESTest demonstrated higher sensitivity (93%) and specificity (64%) compared to the BBS (sensitivity 81%, specificity 56%) for discriminating participants into slow and fast walkers. The Mini-BESTest has a greater discriminative ability than the BBS to categorize individuals with stroke into slow and fast walkers.

  9. A Picea crassifolia Tree-Ring Width-Based Temperature Reconstruction for the Mt. Dongda Region, Northwest China, and Its Relationship to Large-Scale Climate Forcing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    Full Text Available The historical May-October mean temperature since 1831 was reconstructed based on tree-ring width of Qinghai spruce (Picea crassifolia Kom. collected on Mt. Dongda, North of the Hexi Corridor in Northwest China. The regression model explained 46.6% of the variance of the instrumentally observed temperature. The cold periods in the reconstruction were 1831-1889, 1894-1901, 1908-1934 and 1950-1952, and the warm periods were 1890-1893, 1902-1907, 1935-1949 and 1953-2011. During the instrumental period (1951-2011, an obvious warming trend appeared in the last twenty years. The reconstruction displayed similar patterns to a temperature reconstruction from the east-central Tibetan Plateau at the inter-decadal timescale, indicating that the temperature reconstruction in this study was a reliable proxy for Northwest China. It was also found that the reconstruction series had good consistency with the Northern Hemisphere temperature at a decadal timescale. Multi-taper method spectral analysis detected some low- and high-frequency cycles (2.3-2.4-year, 2.8-year, 3.4-3.6-year, 5.0-year, 9.9-year and 27.0-year. Combining these cycles, the relationship of the low-frequency change with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO, North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO and Southern Oscillation (SO suggested that the reconstructed temperature variations may be related to large-scale atmospheric-oceanic variations. Major volcanic eruptions were partly reflected in the reconstructed temperatures after high-pass filtering; these events promoted anomalous cooling in this region. The results of this study not only provide new information for assessing the long-term temperature changes in the Hexi Corridor of Northwest China, but also further demonstrate the effects of large-scale atmospheric-oceanic circulation on climate change in Northwest China.

  10. The psychometric properties of the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS and Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory (FMI as measures of mindfulness and their relationship with burnout and work engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Kotzé

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Given the increasing interest in mindfulness in the workplace, recent research recommends that the psychometric properties of existing mindfulness measures be evaluated in terms of convergent and predictive validity. Research purpose: The research purpose was to assess the psychometric properties of the 15-item (short version Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS and the 14-item (short version Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory (FMI in parallel on a South African sample. Furthermore, the research aimed to investigate the convergent validity between the FMI and MAAS as well as their relationship to burnout and work engagement (predictive validity. Motivation for the study: Organisational scholars must investigate the most appropriate instruments for measuring mindfulness in the workplace. Doing so would allow an eventual meta-analysis on the construct and its relationships and utility in the workplace. Research design, approach and methodology: For this study, a quantitative cross-sectional survey research design was employed. Convenience sampling was chosen and 497 participants applying for admission to a management and leadership degree programme at a South African Business School participated in the study. All participants of the sample are employed at either private or public institutions. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to determine the convergent validity of the instruments. Cronbach’s alpha was utilised in determining the reliabilities of the instruments. The product–moment correlation by Pearson was used to compare the two instruments in terms of their relationship to burnout and work engagement. Stepwise multiple regression was used to determine whether the FMI and MAAS are significant predictors of burnout and work engagement (predictive validity. Main findings: The results showed that the short versions of both the FMI and the MAAS are valid and reliable unidimensional measures of mindfulness. The findings showed

  11. The impact of forest structure and spatial scale on the relationship between ground plot above ground biomass and GEDI lidar waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armston, J.; Marselis, S.; Hancock, S.; Duncanson, L.; Tang, H.; Kellner, J. R.; Calders, K.; Disney, M.; Dubayah, R.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) will place a multi-beam waveform lidar instrument on the International Space Station (ISS) to provide measurements of forest vertical structure globally. These measurements of structure will underpin empirical modelling of above ground biomass density (AGBD) at the scale of individual GEDI lidar footprints (25m diameter). The GEDI pre-launch calibration strategy for footprint level models relies on linking AGBD estimates from ground plots with GEDI lidar waveforms simulated from coincident discrete return airborne laser scanning data. Currently available ground plot data have variable and often large uncertainty at the spatial resolution of GEDI footprints due to poor colocation, allometric model error, sample size and plot edge effects. The relative importance of these sources of uncertainty partly depends on the quality of ground measurements and region. It is usually difficult to know the magnitude of these uncertainties a priori so a common approach to mitigate their influence on model training is to aggregate ground plot and waveform lidar data to a coarser spatial scale (0.25-1ha). Here we examine the impacts of these principal sources of uncertainty using a 3D simulation approach. Sets of realistic tree models generated from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data or parametric modelling matched to tree inventory data were assembled from four contrasting forest plots across tropical rainforest, deciduous temperate forest, and sclerophyll eucalypt woodland sites. These tree models were used to simulate geometrically explicit 3D scenes with variable tree density, size class and spatial distribution. GEDI lidar waveforms are simulated over ground plots within these scenes using monte carlo ray tracing, allowing the impact of varying ground plot and waveform colocation error, forest structure and edge effects on the relationship between ground plot AGBD and GEDI lidar waveforms to be directly assessed. We

  12. A modified scaled variable reduced coordinate (SVRC)-quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) model for predicting liquid viscosity of pure organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seongmin; Park, Kiho; Yang, Dae Ryook [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Yunkyung; Park, Taeyun [ChemEssen Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Liquid viscosity is an important physical property utilized in engineering designs for transportation and processing of fluids. However, the measurement of liquid viscosity is not always easy when the materials have toxicity and instability. In this study, a modified scaled variable reduced coordinate (SVRC)-quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) model is suggested and analyzed in terms of its performance of prediction for liquid viscosity compared to the conventional SVRC-QSPR model and the other methods. The modification was conducted by changing the initial point from triple point to ambient temperature (293 K), and assuming that the liquid viscosity at critical temperature is 0 cP. The results reveal that the prediction performance of the modified SVRC-QSPR model is comparable to the other methods as showing 7.90% of mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and 0.9838 of R{sup 2}. In terms of both the number of components and the performance of prediction, the modified SVRC-QSPR model is superior to the conventional SVRC-QSPR model. Also, the applicability of the model is improved since the condition of the end points of the modified model is not so restrictive as the conventional SVRC-QSPR model.

  13. Functional competency and cognitive ability in mild Alzheimer's disease: relationship between ADL assessed by a relative/ carer-rated scale and neuropsychological performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Osamu; Saito, Masahiko

    2005-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by multiple cognitive deficits and affects functional competency to perform daily activities (ADL). As this may contribute to the patient's overall disability, it is important to identify factors that compromise competency. The relationship between different cognitive domains and functional activities in AD was studied. The functional competency of 73 Japanese AD patients, most with mild dementia, was assessed using a 27-item relative/carer-rating scale covering 7 ADL: managing finances, using transportation, taking precautions, self-care, housekeeping, communication and taking medicine. Cognitive assessment used 16 neuropsychological tests from the Japanese version of the WAIS-R and COGNISTAT, covering 9 cognitive domains: orientation, attention, episodic memory, semantic memory, language, visuoperceptual and construction abilities, computational ability, abstract thinking, and psychomotor speed. Multiple regression analysis by the stepwise method indicated that functional competency could, for the most part, be predicted from test scores for orientation, abstract thinking and psychomotor speed. The results of this study suggest that impairment of these three cognitive domains plays an important role in the functional deterioration of AD.

  14. Short forms of the Utrecht-Management of Identity Commitments Scale (U-MICS) with the domains of job, romantic relationship, and region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubach, Elisabeth; Zimmermann, Julia; Noack, Peter; Neyer, Franz J

    2017-01-01

    The U-MICS is a self-report questionnaire designed to assess the identity dimensions from a domain-specific perspective. The present study reports on the development of a short-form version for the domains of job and romantic relationship in young adults from Germany and extends this scale to include the domain of region (n Sample1  = 95, 84% female, mean age 22.45 years; n Sample2  = 1,795, 71% female, mean age 24.53 years). We found the short form to possess adequate psychometric properties and to demonstrate a factor structure congruent to the long-form version. Regarding validity, the small correlations across domains within dimensions support a domain-specific approach to identity. The associations between the different identity domains with personality traits are similar, indicating a consistent pattern of convergent validity for all domains. We conclude that "region" provides a valuable complement to the established domains that can all be reliably assessed with the U-MICS-Short Form. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A modified scaled variable reduced coordinate (SVRC)-quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) model for predicting liquid viscosity of pure organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seongmin; Park, Kiho; Yang, Dae Ryook; Kwon, Yunkyung; Park, Taeyun

    2017-01-01

    Liquid viscosity is an important physical property utilized in engineering designs for transportation and processing of fluids. However, the measurement of liquid viscosity is not always easy when the materials have toxicity and instability. In this study, a modified scaled variable reduced coordinate (SVRC)-quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) model is suggested and analyzed in terms of its performance of prediction for liquid viscosity compared to the conventional SVRC-QSPR model and the other methods. The modification was conducted by changing the initial point from triple point to ambient temperature (293 K), and assuming that the liquid viscosity at critical temperature is 0 cP. The results reveal that the prediction performance of the modified SVRC-QSPR model is comparable to the other methods as showing 7.90% of mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and 0.9838 of R 2 . In terms of both the number of components and the performance of prediction, the modified SVRC-QSPR model is superior to the conventional SVRC-QSPR model. Also, the applicability of the model is improved since the condition of the end points of the modified model is not so restrictive as the conventional SVRC-QSPR model.

  16. Pharmacometric Analysis of the Relationship Between Absolute Lymphocyte Count and Expanded Disability Status Scale and Relapse Rate, Efficacy End Points, in Multiple Sclerosis Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, A M; Thorsted, A; Schindler, E; Jönsson, S; Munafo, A; Karlsson, M O

    2018-05-10

    The aim of this work was to assess the relationship between the absolute lymphocyte count (ALC), and disability (as measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS]) and occurrence of relapses, 2 efficacy endpoints, respectively, in patients with remitting-relasping multiple sclerosis. Data for ALC, EDSS, and relapse rate were available from 1319 patients receiving placebo and/or cladribine tablets. Pharmacodynamic models were developed to characterize the time course of the endpoints. ALC-related measures were then evaluated as predictors of the efficacy endpoints. EDSS data were best fitted by a model where the logit-linear disease progression is affected by the dynamics of ALC change from baseline. Relapse rate data were best described by the Weibull hazard function, and the ALC change from baseline was also found to be a significant predictor of time to relapse. Presented models have shown that once cladribine exposure driven ALC-derived measures are included in the model, the need for drug effect components is of less importance (EDSS) or disappears (relapse rate). This simplifies the models and theoretically makes them mechanism specific rather than drug specific. Having a reliable mechanism-specific model would allow leveraging historical data across compounds, to support decision making in drug development and possibly shorten the time to market. © 2018, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  17. Evolutionary Relationship of the Scale-Bearing Kraken (incertae sedis, Monadofilosa, Cercozoa, Rhizaria): Combining Ultrastructure Data and a Two-Gene Phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumack, Kenneth; Mylnikov, Alexander P; Bonkowski, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The genus Kraken represents a distinct lineage of filose amoebae within the Cercozoa. Currently a single species, Kraken carinae, has been described. SSU rDNA phylogeny showed an affiliation to the Cercomonadida, branching with weak support at its base, close to Paracercomonas, Metabolomonas, and Brevimastigomonas. Light microscopical analyses showed several unique features of the genus Kraken, but ultrastructure data were lacking. In this study, K. carinae has been studied by electron microscopy, these data conjoined with a two-gene phylogeny were used to give more insight into the evolutionary relationship of the genus Kraken within Cercozoa. The data confirmed the absence of flagella, but also showed novel characteristics, such as the presence of extrusomes, osmiophilic bodies, and mitochondria with flat cristae. Surprising was the presence of single-tier scales which are carried by cell outgrowths, much of what is expected of the last common ancestor of the class Imbricatea. The phylogenetic analyses however confirmed previous results, indicating Kraken as a sister group to Paracercomonas in Sarcomonadea with an increased but still low support of 0.98 PP/63 BP. Based on the unique features of Kraken we establish the Krakenidae fam. nov. that we, due to contradictory results in morphology and phylogeny, assign incertae sedis, Monadofilosa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. On the relationship between calcified neurocysticercosis and epilepsy in an endemic village: A large-scale, computed tomography-based population study in rural Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Arroyo, Gianfranco; Del Brutto, Victor J; Zambrano, Mauricio; García, Héctor H

    2017-11-01

    Using a large-scale population-based study, we aimed to assess prevalence and patterns of presentation of neurocysticercosis (NCC) and its relationship with epilepsy in community-dwellers aged ≥20 years living in Atahualpa (rural Ecuador). In a three-phase epidemiological study, individuals with suspected seizures were identified during a door-to-door survey and an interview (phase I). Then, neurologists evaluated suspected cases and randomly selected negative persons to estimate epilepsy prevalence (phase II). In phase III, all participants were offered noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for identifying NCC cases. The independent association between NCC (exposure) and epilepsy (outcome) was assessed by the use of multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, level of education, and alcohol intake. CT findings were subsequently compared to archived brain magnetic resonance imaging in a sizable subgroup of participants. Of 1,604 villagers aged ≥20 years, 1,462 (91%) were enrolled. Forty-one persons with epilepsy (PWE) were identified, for a crude prevalence of epilepsy of 28 per 1,000 population (95% confidence interval [CI] = 20.7-38.2). A head CT was performed in 1,228 (84%) of 1,462 participants, including 39 of 41 PWE. CT showed lesions consistent with calcified parenchymal brain cysticerci in 118 (9.6%) cases (95% CI = 8.1-11.4%). No patient had other forms of NCC. Nine of 39 PWE, as opposed to 109 of 1,189 participants without epilepsy, had NCC (23.1% vs. 9.2%, p = 0.004). This difference persisted in the adjusted logistic regression model (odds ratio = 3.04, 95% CI = 1.35-6.81, p = 0.007). This large CT-based study demonstrates that PWE had three times the odds of having NCC than those without epilepsy, providing robust epidemiological evidence favoring the relationship between NCC and epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. A scaling approach to Budyko's framework and the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration in humid environments: case study of the Amazon River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, A. M.; Poveda, G.; Sivapalan, M.; Vallejo-Bernal, S. M.; Bustamante, E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper studies a 3-D state space representation of Budyko's framework designed to capture the mutual interdependence among long-term mean actual evapotranspiration (E), potential evapotranspiration (Ep) and precipitation (P). For this purpose we use three dimensionless and dependent quantities: Ψ = E ⁄ P, Φ = Ep ⁄ P and Ω = E ⁄ Ep. This 3-D space and its 2-D projections provide an interesting setting to test the physical soundness of Budyko's hypothesis. We demonstrate analytically that Budyko-type equations are unable to capture the physical limit of the relation between Ω and Φ in humid environments, owing to the unfeasibility of Ep ⁄ P = 0 when E ⁄ Ep → 1. Using data from 146 sub-catchments in the Amazon River basin we overcome this inconsistency by proposing a physically consistent power law: Ψ = kΦe, with k = 0.66, and e = 0.83 (R2 = 0.93). This power law is compared with two other Budyko-type equations. Taking into account the goodness of fits and the ability to comply with the physical limits of the 3-D space, our results show that the power law is better suited to model the coupled water and energy balances within the Amazon River basin. Moreover, k is found to be related to the partitioning of energy via evapotranspiration in terms of Ω. This suggests that our power law implicitly incorporates the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration into the Budyko curve, which is a consequence of the dependent nature of the studied variables within our 3-D space. This scaling approach is also consistent with the asymmetrical nature of the complementary relationship of evapotranspiration. Looking for a physical explanation for the parameters k and e, the inter-annual variability of individual catchments is studied. Evidence of space-time symmetry in Amazonia emerges, since both between-catchment and between-year variability follow the same Budyko curves. Finally, signs of co-evolution of catchments are explored by linking spatial

  20. Patients with collagen vascular disease and dyspnea. The value of gallium scanning and bronchoalveolar lavage in predicting response to steroid therapy and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, N.B.; Solinger, A.M.; Baughman, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with collagen vascular disease with or without pulmonary symptoms were studied to determine the value of gallium scan and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in predicting clinical outcome and response to steroid therapy. Thirty-six subjects, 20 with progressive dyspnea, were studied. Gallium uptake was seen in the lung in 17 of the 20 progressively dyspneic patient's and none of the 16 nonprogressive patients. The BAL fluid in the progressive patients had a higher percentage of neutrophils (13.4 percent +/- 2.88) and lymphocytes (16.1 percent +/- 2.75) than in the nonprogressive patients (neutrophils = 3.3 +/- 1.30 percent; lymphocytes = 5.6 +/- 1.57 percent. Of the 19 progressive patients who were treated with steroids or cyclophosphamide, six had only increased neutrophils in their BAL fluid and all died. The remaining 13 treated progressive patients had increased lymphocytes or a normal BAL (two patients): six had improvement in their vital capacity, six have had stable function, and one died. We found gallium scan and BAL useful in assessing progressive pulmonary fibrosis in collagen vascular disease

  1. Nonlinearity and thresholds in dose-response relationships for carcinogenicity due to sampling variation, logarithmic dose scaling, or small differences in individual susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, W.K.; Gaylor, D.W.; Conolly, R.B.; Lutz, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Nonlinear and threshold-like shapes of dose-response curves are often observed in tests for carcinogenicity. Here, we present three examples where an apparent threshold is spurious and can be misleading for low dose extrapolation and human cancer risk assessment. Case 1: For experiments that are not replicated, such as rodent bioassays for carcinogenicity, random variation can lead to misinterpretation of the result. This situation was simulated by 20 random binomial samplings of 50 animals per group, assuming a true linear dose response from 5% to 25% tumor incidence at arbitrary dose levels 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 4. Linearity was suggested only by 8 of the 20 simulations. Four simulations did not reveal the carcinogenicity at all. Three exhibited thresholds, two showed a nonmonotonic behavior with a decrease at low dose, followed by a significant increase at high dose ('hormesis'). Case 2: Logarithmic representation of the dose axis transforms a straight line into a sublinear (up-bent) curve, which can be misinterpreted to indicate a threshold. This is most pronounced if the dose scale includes a wide low dose range. Linear regression of net tumor incidences and intersection with the dose axis results in an apparent threshold, even with an underlying true linear dose-incidence relationship. Case 3: Nonlinear shapes of dose-cancer incidence curves are rarely seen with epidemiological data in humans. The discrepancy to data in rodents may in part be explained by a wider span of individual susceptibilities for tumor induction in humans due to more diverse genetic background and modulation by co-carcinogenic lifestyle factors. Linear extrapolation of a human cancer risk could therefore be appropriate even if animal bioassays show nonlinearity

  2. Validation of the dyspnoea-12 scale into Portuguese speaking COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsic, Aline Aparecida; Yorke, Janelle; Regueiro, Eloisa Gatti; Di Lorenzo, Valeria Pires; Baddini-Martinez, José

    2018-01-08

    Dyspnoea-12 assesses dyspnea based on the physical and affective components of the symptom. The aim of this study was to translate the Dyspnoea-12 into Portuguese, and to obtain validation data regarding the use of this tool in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). The English version of the scale Dyspnoea-12 underwent a formal translation process into Portuguese as spoken in Brazil with the final version being called Dyspnoea-12-Pt. The latter was applied to 51 Portuguese-speaking patients with COPD (33 men; age: 66.4 ± 8.1 years; FEV 1 : 48.7% ± 17.2% pred). Participants also completed the Medical Research Council dyspnea scale (MRC), the Baseline Dyspnea Index (BDI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, the Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and performed spirometry and the Six-Minute Walk Test (6 MWT). Forty-five volunteers in stable clinical conditions also completed the Dyspnoea-12-Pt scale approximately 2 weeks after the first evaluation. Dyspnoea-12-Pt showed significant correlations with the scales MRC (r = 0.494), BDI (r = -0.511), SGRQ (r = 0.806), Anxiety (r = 0.471), Depression (0.414) and walked distance in the 6 MWT (r = 0.329). Cronbach's alpha of Dyspnoea-12-Pt total was 0.921 and the intraclass correlation coefficient between sequential measures was 0.829. The scale Dyspnoea-12-Pt exhibits acceptable psychometric properties and may be used as an evaluation tool of dyspnea in Portuguese speaking COPD patients. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Integrated orbital time scale of the Valanginian-Hauterivian (Early Cretaceous): Chronological relationships between Paraná-Etendeka LIP, Weissert and Faraoni events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Mathieu; Deconinck, Jean-François; Pellenard, Pierre; Riquier, Laurent; Company, Miguel; Moiroud, Mathieu; Reboulet, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    During the Valanginian and the Hauterivian stages, the Weissert and Faraoni Events recorded global perturbations of the carbon cycle, marine organic matter deposits and rapid ecosystem changes. Both events were successively attributed to the activity of the Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province (LIP). However, due to the scarcity of the radiometric ages available for this time interval, the chronological relationships between these events and the activity of the Paraná-Etendeka LIP remain unclear. Recently, the duration of the Valanginian Stage was calculated using a cyclostratigraphic approach on GSSP candidates and stratotypes (Martinez et al., 2013), but could not be anchored on a radiometric age. Here, we propose a duration assessment of the Hauterivian Stage using a similar cyclostratigraphic approach on the hemipelagic marl-limestone alternations from the La Charce section (Hauterivian GSSP candidate; SE France) and the Río Argos section (Barremian GSSP candidate; SE Spain). This duration could be anchored on an U/Pb age from a tuff level precisely dated using calcareous nannofossils and chemostratigraphy, to provide a refined geological time scale for the Valanginian and the Hauterivian stages. A total of 2000 spectral gamma-ray measurements were performed with a constant 0.20-m sample step. Spectral analyses were performed on the gamma-ray series to detect any sedimentary cycle. The precession, obliquity, 100-kyr and 405-kyr eccentricity cycles were identified by comparing sedimentary to orbital period ratios. The duration of the Hauterivian Stage could be assessed at 5.9 myr, using the 405-kyr eccentricity cycle as a reference. By anchoring the U/Pb age of Aguirre-Urreta et al. (2008) on the orbital time scale provided for the Valanginian-Hauterivian stages, the base of the Valanginian Stage could be dated at -140.2 ± 1.5 Ma, the base of the Hauterivian at -135.1 ± 1.5 Ma and the base of the Barremian at -129.2 ± 1.5 Ma. In addition, the Weissert

  4. A Large-Scale Investigation into the Relationship between Attendance and Attainment: A Study Using an Innovative, Electronic Attendance Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman-Ford, Loretta; Fitzgibbon, Karen; Lloyd, Stephen; Thomas, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The literature available on the relationship between student attendance and attainment is inconsistent. Nevertheless, there is some empirical evidence to suggest that attendance is a determinant of academic performance and progression. Colby published results of a study which examined the relationship within a single year 1 undergraduate module,…

  5. [Acute dyspnea in malignant melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, A M; Günzel, T

    2011-09-01

    Metastases to the larynx are rare. The current article presents the case of a 75-year-old patient with a history of shortness of breath due to a supraglottic exophytic lesion that was identified as a metastasis of a cutaneous melanoma treated 2.5 years previously. As a result of our medline analysis we found approximately 30 cases of metastatic melanoma to the larynx published to date. Primary tumors are always cutaneous in origin and spread over the whole integument of trunk and extremities. The time interval between diagnosis of the primary and the laryngeal metastasis is often several years. In most reports a supraglottic exophytic, red coloured lesion is described. Diagnosis can only be proven by histological examination. Laryngeal metastasis is usually an indication of tumor dissemination and always has a fatal prognosis.

  6. Relationship between the sensation of activity limitation and the results of functional assessment in asthma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Francois; Chirumberro, Audrey; Rummens, Peter; Bruyneel, Marie; Ninane, Vincent

    2017-08-01

    In asthma patients, the assessment of activity limitation is based on questions evaluating how limited the patient feels in their activities. However, the lack of functional data complicates the interpretation of the answers. We aimed to evaluate the intensity of relationships between the patient's perception of activity limitation and the results of several functional tests. Twenty patients complaining of asthma exacerbation were invited to complete three scores (Chronic Respiratory Disease questionnaire, Asthma Control Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale). They also underwent lung function measurements, a 6-minute walk test and a cardio-pulmonary exercise test. In addition, physical activity was studied by actigraphy. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between the patient's perception of activity limitation and each of the other parameters were analysed. Five parameters were significantly correlated with the perception of activity limitation: ACQ question 4, related to dyspnea (rs 0.74, p perception of activity limitation. In response to questions about limitation of activity, patients do not specifically answer mentioning physical limitation but rather the psychological burden associated with this constraint.

  7. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Italian Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Breadth of Interests, Quality of Life, and Perceived Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soresi, Salvatore; Nota, Laura; Ferrari, Lea

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS)-Italian Form consists of four 6-item scales, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. The 24-item CAAS-Italian Form is identical to the International Form 2.0. The factor structure was…

  8. Relationship between Barthel Index (BI and the Modified Rankin Scale (mRS Score in Assessing Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C S Mohanty

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study has demonstrated that stroke functional outcome can be predicted from the baseline BI and mRS scales. It is concluded thatBI and mRS Stroke scale can be used to prognosticate functional outcome at admission and at follow up.

  9. The Relationship between the "Childhood Autism Rating Scale: Second Edition" and Clinical Diagnosis Utilizing the DSM-IV-TR and the DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Tamara; Meyer, Allison T.; Van Bourgondien, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    "The Childhood Autism Rating Scale, Second Edition" (CARS2; 2010) includes two rating scales; the CARS2-Standard Version (CARS2-ST) and the newly developed CARS2-High Functioning Version (CARS2-HF). To assess the diagnostic agreement between the CARS2 and DSM-IV-TR versus DSM-5 criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), clinicians at…

  10. Relationship between the domains of the Multidimensional Students’ Life Satisfaction Scale, satisfaction with food-related life and happiness in university students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnettler, Berta; Orellana, Ligia; Lobos, Germán

    2015-01-01

    Aim: to characterize types of university students based on satisfaction with life domains that affect eating habits, satisfaction with food-related life and subjective happiness. Materials and methods: a questionnaire was applied to a nonrandom sample of 305 students of both genders in five...... universities in Chile. The questionnaire included the abbreviated Multidimensional Student’s Life Satisfaction Scale (MSLSS), Satisfaction with Food-related Life Scale (SWFL) and the Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS). Eating habits, frequency of food consumption in and outside the place of residence...

  11. Development and Evaluation of the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Media Literacy (SSB-ML) Scale and Its Relationship With SSB Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yvonnes; Porter, Kathleen J.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Zoellner, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how adults’ media literacy skill sets impact their sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake provides insight into designing effective interventions to enhance their critical analysis of marketing messages and thus improve their healthy beverage choices. However, a media literacy scale focusing on SSBs is lacking. This cross-sectional study uses baseline data from a large randomized controlled trial to (a) describe the psychometric properties of an SSB Media Literacy Scale (SSB-ML) ...

  12. Development and Evaluation of the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Media Literacy (SSB-ML) Scale and Its Relationship With SSB Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yvonnes; Porter, Kathleen J; Estabrooks, Paul A; Zoellner, Jamie

    2017-10-01

    Understanding how adults' media literacy skill sets impact their sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake provides insight into designing effective interventions to enhance their critical analysis of marketing messages and thus improve their healthy beverage choices. However, a media literacy scale focusing on SSBs is lacking. This cross-sectional study uses baseline data from a large randomized controlled trial to (a) describe the psychometric properties of an SSB Media Literacy Scale (SSB-ML) scale and its subdomains, (b) examine how the scale varies across demographic variables, and (c) explain the scale's concurrent validity to predict SSB consumption. Results from 293 adults in rural southwestern Virginia (81.6% female, 94.0% White, 54.1% receiving SNAP and/or WIC benefits, average 410 SSB kcal daily) show that overall SSB-ML scale and its subdomains have strong internal consistencies (Cronbach's alphas ranging from 0.65 to 0.83). The Representation & Reality domain significantly predicted SSB kilocalories, after controlling for demographic variables. This study has implications for the assessment and inclusion of context-specific media literacy skills in behavioral interventions.

  13. Variation in the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of plant biomass and its relationship to water-use efficiency at the leaf- and ecosystem-scales in a northern Great Plains grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Lawrence B; Farquhar, Graham D

    2014-02-01

    Measurements of the carbon (δ(13) Cm ) and oxygen (δ(18) Om ) isotope composition of C3 plant tissue provide important insights into controls on water-use efficiency. We investigated the causes of seasonal and inter-annual variability in water-use efficiency in a grassland near Lethbridge, Canada using stable isotope (leaf-scale) and eddy covariance measurements (ecosystem-scale). The positive relationship between δ(13) Cm and δ(18) Om values for samples collected during 1998-2001 indicated that variation in stomatal conductance and water stress-induced changes in the degree of stomatal limitation of net photosynthesis were the major controls on variation in δ(13) Cm and biomass production during this time. By comparison, the lack of a significant relationship between δ(13) Cm and δ(18) Om values during 2002, 2003 and 2006 demonstrated that water stress was not a significant limitation on photosynthesis and biomass production in these years. Water-use efficiency was higher in 2000 than 1999, consistent with expectations because of greater stomatal limitation of photosynthesis and lower leaf ci /ca during the drier conditions of 2000. Calculated values of leaf-scale water-use efficiency were 2-3 times higher than ecosystem-scale water-use efficiency, a difference that was likely due to carbon lost in root respiration and water lost during soil evaporation that was not accounted for by the stable isotope measurements. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Dynamical and multi scale approach of the relationships between the aquatic organisms and their environment; Approche multi-echelles des relations dynamiques entre les organismes aquatiques et leur environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daufresne, M

    2004-03-15

    Identifying the causes of spatio-temporal variations in communities has long been at the core of ecological research. I have studied the dynamic relationship between stream-living organisms and their environment. I have shown, for the first time in large stream ecosystems, the effect of climate change on fish and invertebrate community structures. At the population scale, I enhanced understanding of the influence of high discharge level during emergence on brown trout population dynamics. At the individual scale, an experimental study improved understanding of the influence of stream velocity on downstream displacement of emerging trout. Finally, this work highlighted that environmental constraints could have paradoxical effects at different biological or temporal scales. (author)

  15. Development and Evaluation of the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Media Literacy (SSB-ML) Scale and Its Relationship With SSB Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yvonnes; Porter, Kathleen J.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Zoellner, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how adults’ media literacy skill sets impact their sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake provides insight into designing effective interventions to enhance their critical analysis of marketing messages and thus improve their healthy beverage choices. However, a media literacy scale focusing on SSBs is lacking. This cross-sectional study uses baseline data from a large randomized controlled trial to (a) describe the psychometric properties of an SSB Media Literacy Scale (SSB-ML) scale and its subdomains, (b) examine how the scale varies across demographic variables, and (c) explain the scale’s concurrent validity to predict SSB consumption. Results from 293 adults in rural southwestern Virginia (81.6% female, 94.0% White, 54.1% receiving SNAP and/or WIC benefits, average 410 SSB kcal daily) show that overall SSB-ML scale and its subdomains have strong internal consistencies (Cronbach’s alphas ranging from 0.65 to 0.83). The Representation & Reality domain significantly predicted SSB kilocalories, after controlling for demographic variables. This study has implications for the assessment and inclusion of context-specific media literacy skills in behavioral interventions. PMID:27690635

  16. Voices in Suicide. The Relationship between the Firestone Voice Scale for Self-Destructive Behavior and Self-Destructive Life-Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Robert W.

    This article presents findings from recent research demonstrating a significant relationship between parental introjects or "voices," and self-destructive behavior. The "voice" is defined as a systematized, integrated pattern of negative thoughts accompanied by angry affect, that is the basis of an individual's maladaptive…

  17. The Skin Cancer and Sun Knowledge (SCSK) Scale: Validity, Reliability, and Relationship to Sun-Related Behaviors among Young Western Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Ashley K.; Wilson, Carlene; Roberts, Rachel M.; Hutchinson, Amanda D.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing public knowledge remains one of the key aims of skin cancer awareness campaigns, yet diagnosis rates continue to rise. It is essential we measure skin cancer knowledge adequately so as to determine the nature of its relationship to sun-related behaviors. This study investigated the psychometric properties of a new measure of skin cancer…

  18. Psychometric properties of the Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA) and its relationship with life-stress, anxiety and depression in a Hispanic Latin-American community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morote, Roxanna; Hjemdal, Odin; Martinez Uribe, Patricia; Corveleyn, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Resilience is a multi-dimensional construct associated with health and well-being. At present, we do not yet have a valid, scientific instrument that is designed to evaluate adult resilience in Spanish-speaking countries and that accounts for family, social and individual components. This study aimed at investigating the construct and cross-cultural validity of the Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA) by combining Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), Multidimensional Scaling (MDS) and Hierarchical Regression models in a Hispanic Latin-American group. A community sample of 805 adults answered the RSA, Spanish Language Stressful Life-Events checklist (SL-SLE), and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25). First-order CFA verified the six factors structure for the RSA (RMSEA = .037, SRMR = .047, CFI = .91, TLI = .90). Five RSA scales and total score have good internal consistency (scales α > .70; total score α = .90). Two second-order CFA verified the intrapersonal and interpersonal dimensions of the protector factors of resilience, as well as their commonality and uniqueness with affective symptoms (anxiety and depression). An exploratory MDS reproduced the relations of RSA items and factors at first and second-order levels against random simulated data, thereby providing initial evidence of its cross-cultural validity in a Spanish-speaking group. The Four-steps hierarchical model showed that the RSA scales are the strongest predictors of anxiety and depression-greater than gender, age, education and stressful life-events. Three RSA scales are significant unique predictors of affective symptoms. In addition, similar to findings in diverse cultural settings, resilience is positively associated with age but not with education. Women report higher scores of Social Resources and Social Competence and lower scores of Perception of the Self. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the construct and criterion-related validity of the RSA in broad, diverse and Spanish speaking

  19. Dimensionality of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and its relationships with the Three-and the Five-factor personality models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluja, Anton; Rolland, Jean-Pierre; García, Luis F; Rossier, Jérôme

    2007-04-01

    We investigated the dimensionality of the French version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES; Rosenberg, 1965) using confirmatory factor analysis. We tested models of 1 or 2 factors. Results suggest the RSES is a 1-dimensional scale with 3 highly correlated items. Comparison with the Revised NEO-Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R; Costa, McCrae, & Rolland, 1998) demonstrated that Neuroticism correlated strongly and Extraversion and Conscientiousness moderately with the RSES. Depression accounted for 47% of the variance of the RSES. Other NEO-PI-R facets were also moderately related with self-esteem.

  20. Up-scaling of water use efficiency from leaf to canopy as based on leaf gas exchange relationships and the modeled in-canopy light distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderson, Maj-Lena; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ibrom, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent to which water use efficiency (WUE) at leaf scale can be used to assess WUE at canopy scale, leaf WUE being assumed to be a constant function of vapor pressure deficit and to thus not be dependent upon other environmental factors or varying leaf...... properties. Leaf WUE and its variability and dependencies were assessed using leafgas-exchange measurements obtained during two growing seasons, 1999 and 2000, at the Soroe beech forest study site on Zealand in Denmark. It was found that the VPD-normalized leaf WUE, WUEnormleaf, although dependent...

  1. Hardiness scales in Iranian managers: evidence of incremental validity in relationships with the five factor model and with organizational and psychological adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Nima; Watson, P J

    2005-06-01

    This study examined the incremental validity of Hardiness scales in a sample of Iranian managers. Along with measures of the Five Factor Model and of Organizational and Psychological Adjustment, Hardiness scales were administered to 159 male managers (M age = 39.9, SD = 7.5) who had worked in their organizations for 7.9 yr. (SD=5.4). Hardiness predicted greater Job Satisfaction, higher Organization-based Self-esteem, and perceptions of the work environment as being less stressful and constraining. Hardiness also correlated positively with Assertiveness, Emotional Stability, Extraversion, Openness to Experience, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness and negatively with Depression, Anxiety, Perceived Stress, Chance External Control, and a Powerful Others External Control. Evidence of incremental validity was obtained when the Hardiness scales supplemented the Five Factor Model in predicting organizational and psychological adjustment. These data documented the incremental validity of the Hardiness scales in a non-Western sample and thus confirmed once again that Hardiness has a relevance that extends beyond the culture in which it was developed.

  2. Relationship of Level of Functioning of Institutionalized Women on a Task Analysis of Personal Care for Menstruation and the Adaptive Behavior Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Beverly W.; And Others

    A 40-item behavior analysis task, the Menstrual Care Scale, was developed and tested with 75 randomly selected institutionalized severely retarded women (13-59 years old). The need for developing personal care skills in menstruation habits had been identified as a priority area for sexuality instruction by staff and confirmed by analysis of…

  3. Further development and validation of the Unhelpful Thoughts and Beliefs About Stuttering (UTBAS) scales: relationship to anxiety and social phobia among adults who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverach, Lisa; Menzies, Ross; Jones, Mark; O'Brian, Sue; Packman, Ann; Onslow, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In an initial validation study, the Unhelpful Thoughts and Beliefs About Stuttering (UTBAS I) scale, demonstrated excellent psychometric properties as a self-report measure of the frequency of unhelpful cognitions associated with social anxiety for adults who stutter. The aim was to further validate the original UTBAS I scale, and to develop two additional scales to assess beliefs (UTBAS II) and anxiety (UTBAS III) associated with negative thoughts. A total of 140 adults seeking speech-restructuring treatment for stuttering completed the original UTBAS I scale, the newly developed UTBAS II and III scales, and self-report measures of psychological functioning. Participants also completed a first-stage screener for the presence of anxious personality disorder, and a diagnostic assessment to evaluate the presence of social phobia, according to criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). The mean UTBAS I score for the present sample did not differ significantly from the mean score reported in the original UTBAS I validation study. Convergent validity was confirmed by significant correlations between the UTBAS Total score and all anxiety-related measures. Discriminant validity was established by the absence of strong correlations between the UTBAS Total score and some of the self-report measures of unrelated constructs, although it was found to tap into the negative cognitions associated with depression and life problems. Approximately one-quarter of participants met criteria for a diagnosis of DSM-IV or ICD-10 social phobia (23.5% and 27.2% respectively), and nearly one-third met first-stage screening criteria for anxious personality disorder (30%). The mean UTBAS scores for participants who met criteria for these disorders were significantly higher than scores for participants who did not, confirming known-groups validity. The present study demonstrates the validity and

  4. Multi-scale, multi-modal analysis uncovers complex relationship at the brain tissue-implant neural interface: new emphasis on the biological interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Nicholas J.; Vazquez, Alberto L.; Eles, James R.; Salatino, Joseph W.; Purcell, Erin K.; Williams, Jordan J.; Cui, X. Tracy; Kozai, Takashi D. Y.

    2018-06-01

    Objective. Implantable neural electrode devices are important tools for neuroscience research and have an increasing range of clinical applications. However, the intricacies of the biological response after implantation, and their ultimate impact on recording performance, remain challenging to elucidate. Establishing a relationship between the neurobiology and chronic recording performance is confounded by technical challenges related to traditional electrophysiological, material, and histological limitations. This can greatly impact the interpretations of results pertaining to device performance and tissue health surrounding the implant. Approach. In this work, electrophysiological activity and immunohistological analysis are compared after controlling for motion artifacts, quiescent neuronal activity, and material failure of devices in order to better understand the relationship between histology and electrophysiological outcomes. Main results. Even after carefully accounting for these factors, the presence of viable neurons and lack of glial scarring does not convey single unit recording performance. Significance. To better understand the biological factors influencing neural activity, detailed cellular and molecular tissue responses were examined. Decreases in neural activity and blood oxygenation in the tissue surrounding the implant, shift in expression levels of vesicular transporter proteins and ion channels, axon and myelin injury, and interrupted blood flow in nearby capillaries can impact neural activity around implanted neural interfaces. Combined, these tissue changes highlight the need for more comprehensive, basic science research to elucidate the relationship between biology and chronic electrophysiology performance in order to advance neural technologies.

  5. The Relationship Between the Childhood Autism Rating Scale: Second Edition and Clinical Diagnosis Utilizing the DSM-IV-TR and the DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Tamara; Meyer, Allison T; Van Bourgondien, Mary E

    2016-10-01

    The Childhood Autism Rating Scale, Second Edition (CARS2; 2010) includes two rating scales; the CARS2-Standard Version (CARS2-ST) and the newly developed CARS2-High Functioning Version (CARS2-HF). To assess the diagnostic agreement between the CARS2 and DSM-IV-TR versus DSM-5 criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), clinicians at community based centers of the University of North Carolina TEACCH Autism Program rated participants seen for a diagnostic evaluation on symptoms of autism using both the DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria and either the CARS2-HF or the CARS2-ST. Findings suggest that overall, the diagnostic agreement of the CARS2 remains high across DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for autism.

  6. Validation of the Greek Acceptance of Modern Myths about Sexual Aggression (AMMSA Scale: Examining Its Relationships with Sexist and Conservative Political Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Hantzi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Acceptance of Modern Myths about Sexual Aggression scale measures contemporary beliefs about sexual aggression that tend to blame victims and exonerate perpetrators. A Greek version of the thirty-item AMMSA scale was administered to two diverse convenience samples, one in Greece and one in Cyprus. Convergent and discriminant construct validity were assessed via correlations with other constructs that were hypothesized to be strongly related to AMMSA (Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance; hostile sexism or moderately related (benevolent sexism; social dominance orientation; right-wing authoritarianism. It was found that the Greek AMMSA was unidimensional, highly internally consistent, normally distributed, and showed good construct validity. When sociodemographic data were analyzed, age, gender, and nationality turned out to be significant predictors of AMMSA, with a U-shaped trend for age, higher scores for men than women, and higher scores for Cypriots than Greeks. In sum, the Greek AMMSA scale provides a highly useful instrument for further research on sexual aggression myths, their correlates, and effects on judgment and behavior.

  7. Relationship between the domains of the Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale, satisfaction with food-related life and happiness in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Berta; Orellana, Ligia; Lobos, Germán; Miranda, Horacio; Sepúlveda, José; Etchebarne, Soledad; Mora, Marcos; Adasme-Berríos, Cristian; Grunert, Klaus G

    2015-06-01

    To characterize types of university students based on satisfaction with life domains that affect eating habits, satisfaction with food-related life and subjective happiness. A questionnaire was applied to a nonrandom sample of 305 students of both genders in five universities in Chile. The questionnaire included the abbreviated Multidimensional Student's Life Satisfaction Scale (MSLSS), Satisfaction with Food-related Life Scale (SWFL) and the Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS). Eating habits, frequency of food consumption in and outside the place of residence, approximate height and weight and sociodemographic variables were measured. Using factor analysis, the five-domain structure of the MSLSS was confirmed with 26 of the 30 items of the abbreviated version: Family, Friends, Self, Environment and University. Using cluster analysis four types of students were distinguished that differ significantly in the MSLSS global and domain scores, SWFL and SHS scores, gender, ownership of a food allowance card funded by the Chilean government, importance attributed to food for well-being and socioeconomic status. Higher levels of life satisfaction and happiness are associated with greater satisfaction with food-related life. Other major life domains that affect students' subjective well-being are Family, Friends, University and Self. Greater satisfaction in some domains may counterbalance the lower satisfaction in others. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  8. Reliability and Validity of the Persian Version of Compulsive Eating Scale (CES in Overweight or Obese Women and its Relationship with Some Body Composition and Dietary Intake Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed-Ali Mostafavi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Compulsive or binge eating is a kind of disturbed eating behavior, which is mostly observed among dieting women, and is integrated with appetite disorder, and uncontrolled eating of plenty of junk food. The Compulsive Eating Scale (CES created first by Kagan & Squires in 1984, is an eight-item self-reporting instrument that is made to measure the severity of binge eating disorder. The aim of this study was to provide the reliability and validity of the Persian version of Compulsive Eating Scale (CES among overweight and obese women in Iran. Method: One hundred and twenty six (N = 126 overweight and obese women consented to participate in this study. We estimated the anthropometric indices, including body weight, height, waist and hip circumferences, a total body fat percentage, and visceral fat level with body analyzer all in standard situations. Then, the participants completed the CES. Next, to assess concurrent validity, Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberger anxiety scale, appetite visual analogue rating scale, Food Craving questionnaire, Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R18, and Restraint eating visual analogue rating scale were performed simultaneously. To assess test-retest reliability, CES was repeated for all the participants two weeks later. Moreover, we reported the internal consistency and factor analysis of this questionnaire. Furthermore, we estimated the concurrent correlation of CES with logically relevant questionnaires and body composition and anthropometric indices.Results: Based on the reliability analysis and factor analysis of the principal component by Varimax rotation, we extracted two factors: eating because of negative feelings, and overeating. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha of the CES was 0.85 (Cronbach alpha of the factors was 0.85, and 0.74, respectively. The test-retest correlation of the CES was 0.89. Also, the split-half reliability of the questionnaire was established with the correlation

  9. Relationship between the climbing up and climbing down stairs domain scores on the FES-DMD, the score on the Vignos Scale, age and timed performance of functional activities in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian A. Y. Fernandes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knowing the potential for and limitations of information generated using different evaluation instruments favors the development of more accurate functional diagnoses and therapeutic decision-making. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the number of compensatory movements when climbing up and going down stairs, age, functional classification and time taken to perform a tested activity (TA of going up and down stairs in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. METHOD: A bank of movies featuring 30 boys with DMD performing functional activities was evaluated. Compensatory movements were assessed using the climbing up and going down stairs domain of the Functional Evaluation Scale for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (FES-DMD; age in years; functional classification using the Vignos Scale (VS, and TA using a timer. Statistical analyses were performed using the Spearman correlation test. RESULTS: There is a moderate relationship between the climbing up stairs domain of the FES-DMD and age (r=0.53, p=0.004 and strong relationships with VS (r=0.72, p=0.001 and TA for this task (r=0.83, p<0.001. There were weak relationships between the going down stairs domain of the FES-DMD-going down stairs with age (r=0.40, p=0.032, VS (r=0.65, p=0.002 and TA for this task (r=0.40, p=0.034. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that the evaluation of compensatory movements used when climbing up stairs can provide more relevant information about the evolution of the disease, although the activity of going down stairs should be investigated, with the aim of enriching guidance and strengthening accident prevention. Data from the FES-DMD, age, VS and TA can be used in a complementary way to formulate functional diagnoses. Longitudinal studies and with broader age groups may supplement this information.

  10. The relationship between social, policy and physical venue features and social cohesion on condom use for pregnancy prevention among sex workers: a safer indoor work environment scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Putu; Shoveller, Jean; Dobrer, Sabina; Ogilvie, Gina; Montaner, Julio; Chettiar, Jill; Shannon, Kate

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to report on a newly developed Safer Indoor Work Environmental Scale that characterises the social, policy and physical features of indoor venues and social cohesion; and using this scale, longitudinally evaluate the association between these features on sex workers' (SWs') condom use for pregnancy prevention. Drawing on a prospective open cohort of female SWs working in indoor venues, a newly developed Safer Indoor Work Environment Scale was used to build six multivariable models with generalised estimating equations (GEE), to determine the independent effects of social, policy and physical venue-based features and social cohesion on condom use. Of 588 indoor SWs, 63.6% used condoms for pregnancy prevention in the last month. In multivariable GEE analysis, the following venue-based features were significantly correlated with barrier contraceptive use for pregnancy prevention: managerial practices and venue safety policies (adjusted OR (AOR)=1.09; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.17), access to sexual and reproductive health services/supplies (AOR=1.10; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.20), access to drug harm reduction (AOR=1.13; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.28) and social cohesion among workers (AOR=1.05; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.07). Access to security features was marginally associated with condom use (AOR=1.13; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.29). The findings of the current study highlight how work environment and social cohesion among SWs are related to improved condom use. Given global calls for the decriminalisation of sex work, and potential legislative reforms in Canada, this study points to the critical need for new institutional arrangements (eg, legal and regulatory frameworks; labour standards) to support safer sex workplaces. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Uso de descritores de dispneia desenvolvidos no Brasil em pacientes com doenças cardiorrespiratórias ou obesidade Dyspnea descriptors developed in Brazil: application in obese patients and in patients with cardiorespiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Aires Teixeira

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um conjunto de termos descritores de dispneia para uso no Brasil. Investigar a utilidade desses descritores em quatro condições distintas que cursam com dispneia. MÉTODOS: Um conjunto de 111 frases descritivas da sensação de falta de ar foi coletado a partir das informações de 67 pacientes e de 10 profissionais da saúde. Tais frases foram analisadas e reduzidas a 15 expressões, em função de sua frequência de citação, similaridade de significados e potencial importância fisiopatológica. O conjunto de expressões foi aplicado a 50 pacientes com asma, 50 com DPOC, 30 com insuficiência cardíaca e 50 com obesidade graus II ou III. Os três melhores termos selecionados pelos pacientes foram estudados por análise de agrupamentos. Também foram investigadas as possíveis associações entre os agrupamentos encontrados e as quatro condições clínicas incluídas. RESULTADOS: O emprego dessa lista de descritores levou a uma solução com sete agrupamentos, denominados sufoco, aperto, rápido, fadiga, abafado, trabalho/inspiração e falta de ar. Houve grande superposição no uso de descritores pelos pacientes com as quatro condições clínicas. A asma mostrou associações expressivas com sufoco e trabalho/inspiração, enquanto DPOC e insuficiência cardíaca, com sufoco, trabalho/inspiração e falta de ar; e obesidade, com falta de ar apenas. CONCLUSÕES: Pacientes no Brasil habituados a sentir dispneia utilizam diferentes termos para descrever seu sintoma, e tais descrições podem ser agrupadas em conjuntos por similaridade. Tais agrupamentos não mostraram utilidade na distinção diagnóstica entre os grupos avaliados neste estudo.OBJECTIVE: To develop a set of descriptive terms applied to the sensation of dyspnea (dyspnea descriptors for use in Brazil and to investigate the usefulness of these descriptors in four distinct clinical conditions that can be accompanied by dyspnea. METHODS: We collected 111

  12. Mid-point for open-ended income category and the effect of equivalence scales on the income-health relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Keller Celeste

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the mid-point of an open-ended income category and to assess the impact of two equivalence scales on income-health associations. Data were obtained from the 2010 Brazilian Oral Health Survey ( Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde Bucal – SBBrasil 2010. Income was converted from categorical to two continuous variables ( per capita and equivalized for each mid-point. The median mid-point was R$ 14,523.50 and the mean, R$ 24,507.10. When per capita income was applied, 53% of the population were below the poverty line, compared with 15% with equivalized income. The magnitude of income-health associations was similar for continuous income, but categorized equivalized income tended to decrease the strength of association.

  13. Validation of patient and nurse short forms of the Readiness for Hospital Discharge Scale and their relationship to return to the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Marianne E; Costa, Linda L; Yakusheva, Olga; Bobay, Kathleen L

    2014-02-01

    To validate patient and nurse short forms for discharge readiness assessment and their associations with 30-day readmissions and emergency department (ED) visits. A total of 254 adult medical-surgical patients and their discharging nurses from an Eastern US tertiary hospital between May and November, 2011. Prospective longitudinal design, multinomial logistic regression analysis. Nurses and patients independently completed an eight-item Readiness for Hospital Discharge Scale on the day of discharge. Patient characteristics, readmissions, and ED visits were electronically abstracted. Nurse assessment of low discharge readiness was associated with a six- to nine-fold increase in readmission risk. Patient self-assessment was not associated with readmission; neither was associated with ED visits. Nurse discharge readiness assessment should be added to existing strategies for identifying readmission risk. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  14. Mid-point for open-ended income category and the effect of equivalence scales on the income-health relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeste, Roger Keller; Bastos, João Luiz

    2013-12-01

    To estimate the mid-point of an open-ended income category and to assess the impact of two equivalence scales on income-health associations. Data were obtained from the 2010 Brazilian Oral Health Survey (Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde Bucal--SBBrasil 2010). Income was converted from categorical to two continuous variables (per capita and equivalized) for each mid-point. The median mid-point was R$ 14,523.50 and the mean, R$ 24,507.10. When per capita income was applied, 53% of the population were below the poverty line, compared with 15% with equivalized income. The magnitude of income-health associations was similar for continuous income, but categorized equivalized income tended to decrease the strength of association.

  15. Psychometric properties of a Chinese version of the Stigma Scale: examining the complex experience of stigma and its relationship with self-esteem and depression among people living with mental illness in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Andy H Y; Potash, Jordan S; Fong, Ted C T; Ho, Vania F L; Chen, Eric Y H; Lau, Robert H W; Au Yeung, Friendly S W; Ho, Rainbow T H

    2015-01-01

    Stigma of mental illness is a global public health concern, but there lacks a standardized and cross-culturally validated instrument for assessing the complex experience of stigma among people living with mental illness (PLMI) in the Chinese context. This study examines the psychometric properties of a Chinese version of the Stigma Scale (CSS), and explores the relationships between stigma, self-esteem and depression. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a community sample of 114 Chinese PLMI in Hong Kong. Participants completed the CSS, the Chinese Self-Stigma of Mental Illness Scale, the Chinese Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Chinese Patient Health Questionnaire-9. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted to identify the underlying factors of the CSS; concurrent validity assessment was performed via correlation analysis. The original 28-item three-factor structure of the Stigma Scale was found to be a poor fit to the data, whereas a revised 14-item three-factor model provided a good fit with all 14 items loaded significantly onto the original factors: discrimination, disclosure and positive aspects of mental illness. The revised model also displayed moderate to good internal consistency and good construct validity. Further findings revealed that the total stigma scale score and all three of its subscale scores correlated negatively with self-esteem; but only total stigma, discrimination and disclosure correlated positively with depression. The CSS is a short and user-friendly self-administrated questionnaire that proves valuable for understanding the multifaceted stigma experiences among PLMI as well as their impact on psychiatric recovery and community integration in Chinese communities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Factor structure and internal consistency of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 and the Subjective Vitality Scale (VS, and the relationship between them: a study from France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaïl Amany

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of this study were to test the factor structure and internal consistency of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 and the Subjective Vitality Scale (VS in elderly French people, and to test the relationship between these two questionnaires. Methods Using a standard 'forward-backward' translation procedure, the English language versions of the two instruments (i.e. the 12-item General Health Questionnaire and the Subjective Vitality Scale were translated into French. A sample of adults aged 58–72 years then completed both questionnaires. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The factor structures of the two instruments were extracted by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA. Finally, the relationship between the two instruments was assessed by correlation analysis. Results In all, 217 elderly adults participated in the study. The mean age of the respondents was 61.7 (SD = 6.2 years. The mean GHQ-12 score was 17.4 (SD = 8.0, and analysis showed satisfactory internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient = 0.78. The mean VS score was 22.4 (SD = 7.4 and its internal consistency was found to be good (Cronbach's alpha coefficient = 0.83. While CFA showed that the VS was uni-dimensional, analysis for the GHQ-12 demonstrated a good fit not only to the two-factor model (positive vs. negative items but also to a three-factor model. As expected, there was a strong and significant negative correlation between the GHQ-12 and the VS (r = -0.71, P Conclusion The results showed that the French versions of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 and the Subjective Vitality Scale (VS are reliable measures of psychological distress and vitality. They also confirm a significant negative correlation between these two instruments, lending support to their convergent validity in an elderly French population. The findings indicate that both measures have good structural

  17. From hub proteins to hub modules: the relationship between essentiality and centrality in the yeast interactome at different scales of organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimin Song

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have suggested that hub proteins in the S. cerevisiae physical interaction network are more likely to be essential than other proteins. The proposed reasons underlying this observed relationship between topology and functioning have been subject to some controversy, with recent work suggesting that it arises due to the participation of hub proteins in essential complexes and processes. However, do these essential modules themselves have distinct network characteristics, and how do their essential proteins differ in their topological properties from their non-essential proteins? We aimed to advance our understanding of protein essentiality by analyzing proteins, complexes and processes within their broader functional context and by considering physical interactions both within and across complexes and biological processes. In agreement with the view that essentiality is a modular property, we found that the number of intracomplex or intraprocess interactions that a protein has is a better indicator of its essentiality than its overall number of interactions. Moreover, we found that within an essential complex, its essential proteins have on average more interactions, especially intracomplex interactions, than its non-essential proteins. Finally, we built a module-level interaction network and found that essential complexes and processes tend to have higher interaction degrees in this network than non-essential complexes and processes; that is, they exhibit a larger amount of functional cross-talk than their non-essential counterparts.

  18. Solid/solution Cu fractionations/speciation of a Cu contaminated soil after pilot-scale electrokinetic remediation and their relationships with soil microbial and enzyme activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Quanying; Zhou Dongmei; Cang Long; Li Lianzhen; Wang Peng

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed metal speciation/fractionations of a Cu contaminated soil before and after electrokinetic remediation as well as their relationships with the soil microbial and enzyme activities. Significant changes in the exchangeable and adsorbed-Cu fractionations occurred after electrokinetic treatment, while labile soil Cu in the solution had a tendency to decrease from the anode to the cathode, and the soil free Cu 2+ ions were mainly accumulated in the sections close to the cathode. The results of regression analyses revealed that both the soil Cu speciation in solution phase and the Cu fractionations in solid phase could play important roles in the changes of the soil microbial and enzyme activities. Our findings suggest that the bioavailability of soil heavy metals and their ecotoxicological effects on the soil biota before and after electroremediation can be better understood in terms of their chemical speciation and fractionations. - The assessment of the roles of soil solution speciation and solid-phase fractionations in metal bioavailability after electrokinetic remediation deserves close attention.

  19. Phylogeny of the gymnosperm genus Cycas L. (Cycadaceae) as inferred from plastid and nuclear loci based on a large-scale sampling: Evolutionary relationships and taxonomical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Shouzhou; Nagalingum, Nathalie S; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Lindstrom, Anders J; Gong, Xun

    2018-05-18

    The gymnosperm genus Cycas is the sole member of Cycadaceae, and is the largest genus of extant cycads. There are about 115 accepted Cycas species mainly distributed in the paleotropics. Based on morphology, the genus has been divided into six sections and eight subsections, but this taxonomy has not yet been tested in a molecular phylogenetic framework. Although the monophyly of Cycas is broadly accepted, the intrageneric relationships inferred from previous molecular phylogenetic analyses are unclear due to insufficient sampling or uninformative DNA sequence data. In this study, we reconstructed a phylogeny of Cycas using four chloroplast intergenic spacers and seven low-copy nuclear genes and sampling 90% of extant Cycas species. The maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenies suggest: (1) matrices of either concatenated cpDNA markers or of concatenated nDNA lack sufficient informative sites to resolve the phylogeny alone, however, the phylogeny from the combined cpDNA-nDNA dataset suggests the genus can be roughly divided into 13 clades and six sections that are in agreement with the current classification of the genus; (2) although with partial support, a clade combining sections Panzhihuaenses + Asiorientales is resolved as the earliest diverging branch; (3) section Stangerioides is not monophyletic because the species resolve as a grade; (4) section Indosinenses is not monophyletic as it includes Cycas macrocarpa and C. pranburiensis from section Cycas; (5) section Cycas is the most derived group and its subgroups correspond with geography. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A taxonomic framework for emerging groups of ecologically important marine gammaproteobacteria based on the reconstruction of evolutionary relationships using genome-scale data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eSpring

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a large number of isolates were obtained from saline environments that are phylogenetically related to distinct clades of oligotrophic marine gammaproteobacteria, which were originally identified in seawater samples using cultivation independent methods and are characterized by high seasonal abundances in coastal environments. To date a sound taxonomic framework for the classification of these ecologically important isolates and related species in accordance with their evolutionary relationships is missing.In this study we demonstrate that a reliable allocation of members of the oligotrophic marine gammaproteobacteria (OMG group and related species to higher taxonomic ranks is possible by phylogenetic analyses of whole proteomes but also of the RNA polymerase beta subunit, whereas phylogenetic reconstructions based on 16S rRNA genes alone resulted in unstable tree topologies with only insignificant bootstrap support. The identified clades could be correlated with distinct phenotypic traits illustrating an adaptation to common environmental factors in their evolutionary history. Genome wide gene-content analyses revealed the existence of two distinct ecological guilds within the analyzed lineage of marine gammaproteobacteria which can be distinguished by their trophic strategies. Based on our results a novel order within the class Gammaproteobacteria is proposed, which is designated Cellvibrionales ord. nov. and comprises the five novel families Cellvibrionaceae fam. nov., Halieaceae fam. nov., Microbulbiferaceae fam. nov., Porticoccaceae fam. nov., and Spongiibacteraceae fam. nov.

  1. Relationship between human resource ability and market access capacity on business performance. (case study of wood craft micro- and small-scale industries in Gianyar Regency, Bali)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukartini, N. W.; Sudarmini, N. M.; Lasmini, N. K.

    2018-01-01

    The aims of this research are to: (1) analyze the influence of Human Resource Ability on market access capacity in Wood Craft Micro and Small Industry; (2) to analyze the effect of market access capacity on business performance; (3) analyze the influence of Human Resources ability on business performance. Data were collected using questionnaires, interviews, observations, and literature studies. The resulting data were analyzed using Struture Equation Modeling (SEM). The results of the analysis show that (1) there is a positive and significant influence of the ability of Human Resources on market access capacity in Wood Craft Micro-and Small-Scale Industries in Gianyar; (2) there is a positive and significant influence of market access capacity on business performance; and (3) there is a positive and significant influence of Human Resource ability on business performance. To improve the ability to access the market and business performance, it is recommended that human resource ability need to be improved through training; government and higher education institutions are expected to play a role in improving the ability of human resources (craftsmen) through provision of training programs

  2. Quantifying the relationship between the plasmapause and the inner boundary of small-scale field-aligned currents, as deduced from Swarm observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, Balázs; Lühr, Hermann

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a statistical study of the equatorward boundary of small-scale field-aligned currents (SSFACs) and investigates the relation between this boundary and the plasmapause (PP). The PP data used for validation were derived from in situ electron density observations of NASA's Van Allen Probes. We confirmed the findings of a previous study by the same authors obtained from the observations of the CHAMP satellite SSFAC and the NASA IMAGE satellite PP detections, namely that the two boundaries respond similarly to changes in geomagnetic activity, and they are closely located in the near midnight MLT sector, suggesting a dynamic linkage. Dayside PP correlates with the delayed time history of the SSFAC boundary. We interpreted this behaviour as a direct consequence of co-rotation: the new PP, formed on the night side, propagates to the dayside by rotating with Earth. This finding paves the way toward an efficient PP monitoring tool based on an SSFAC index derived from vector magnetic field observations at low-Earth orbit.

  3. Interstitial diffusion and the relationship between compartment modelling and multi-scale spatial-temporal modelling of (18)F-FLT tumour uptake dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Chalkidou, Anastasia; Landau, David B; Marsden, Paul K; Fenwick, John D

    2014-09-07

    Tumour cell proliferation can be imaged via positron emission tomography of the radiotracer 3'-deoxy-3'-18F-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT). Conceptually, the number of proliferating cells might be expected to correlate more closely with the kinetics of 18F-FLT uptake than with uptake at a fixed time. Radiotracer uptake kinetics are standardly visualized using parametric maps of compartment model fits to time-activity-curves (TACs) of individual voxels. However the relationship between the underlying spatiotemporal accumulation of FLT and the kinetics described by compartment models has not yet been explored. In this work tumour tracer uptake is simulated using a mechanistic spatial-temporal model based on a convection-diffusion-reaction equation solved via the finite difference method. The model describes a chain of processes: the flow of FLT between the spatially heterogeneous tumour vasculature and interstitium; diffusion and convection of FLT within the interstitium; transport of FLT into cells; and intracellular phosphorylation. Using values of model parameters estimated from the biological literature, simulated FLT TACs are generated with shapes and magnitudes similar to those seen clinically. Results show that the kinetics of the spatial-temporal model can be recovered accurately by fitting a 3-tissue compartment model to FLT TACs simulated for those tumours or tumour sub-volumes that can be viewed as approximately closed, for which tracer diffusion throughout the interstitium makes only a small fractional change to the quantity of FLT they contain. For a single PET voxel of width 2.5-5 mm we show that this condition is roughly equivalent to requiring that the relative difference in tracer uptake between the voxel and its neighbours is much less than one.

  4. Investigating the Causal Relationship of C-Reactive Protein with 32 Complex Somatic and Psychiatric Outcomes: A Large-Scale Cross-Consortium Mendelian Randomization Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram P Prins

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is associated with immune, cardiometabolic, and psychiatric traits and diseases. Yet it is inconclusive whether these associations are causal.We performed Mendelian randomization (MR analyses using two genetic risk scores (GRSs as instrumental variables (IVs. The first GRS consisted of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CRP gene (GRSCRP, and the second consisted of 18 SNPs that were significantly associated with CRP levels in the largest genome-wide association study (GWAS to date (GRSGWAS. To optimize power, we used summary statistics from GWAS consortia and tested the association of these two GRSs with 32 complex somatic and psychiatric outcomes, with up to 123,865 participants per outcome from populations of European ancestry. We performed heterogeneity tests to disentangle the pleiotropic effect of IVs. A Bonferroni-corrected significance level of less than 0.0016 was considered statistically significant. An observed p-value equal to or less than 0.05 was considered nominally significant evidence for a potential causal association, yet to be confirmed. The strengths (F-statistics of the IVs were 31.92-3,761.29 and 82.32-9,403.21 for GRSCRP and GRSGWAS, respectively. CRP GRSGWAS showed a statistically significant protective relationship of a 10% genetically elevated CRP level with the risk of schizophrenia (odds ratio [OR] 0.86 [95% CI 0.79-0.94]; p < 0.001. We validated this finding with individual-level genotype data from the schizophrenia GWAS (OR 0.96 [95% CI 0.94-0.98]; p < 1.72 × 10-6. Further, we found that a standardized CRP polygenic risk score (CRPPRS at p-value thresholds of 1 × 10-4, 0.001, 0.01, 0.05, and 0.1 using individual-level data also showed a protective effect (OR < 1.00 against schizophrenia; the first CRPPRS (built of SNPs with p < 1 × 10-4 showed a statistically significant (p < 2.45 × 10-4 protective effect with an OR of 0.97 (95% CI 0.95-0.99. The CRP GRSGWAS showed that a

  5. Scaling of Metabolic Scaling within Physical Limits

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    Douglas S. Glazier

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Both the slope and elevation of scaling relationships between log metabolic rate and log body size vary taxonomically and in relation to physiological or developmental state, ecological lifestyle and environmental conditions. Here I discuss how the recently proposed metabolic-level boundaries hypothesis (MLBH provides a useful conceptual framework for explaining and predicting much, but not all of this variation. This hypothesis is based on three major assumptions: (1 various processes related to body volume and surface area exert state-dependent effects on the scaling slope for metabolic rate in relation to body mass; (2 the elevation and slope of metabolic scaling relationships are linked; and (3 both intrinsic (anatomical, biochemical and physiological and extrinsic (ecological factors can affect metabolic scaling. According to the MLBH, the diversity of metabolic scaling relationships occurs within physical boundary limits related to body volume and surface area. Within these limits, specific metabolic scaling slopes can be predicted from the metabolic level (or scaling elevation of a species or group of species. In essence, metabolic scaling itself scales with metabolic level, which is in turn contingent on various intrinsic and extrinsic conditions operating in physiological or evolutionary time. The MLBH represents a “meta-mechanism” or collection of multiple, specific mechanisms that have contingent, state-dependent effects. As such, the MLBH is Darwinian in approach (the theory of natural selection is also meta-mechanistic, in contrast to currently influential metabolic scaling theory that is Newtonian in approach (i.e., based on unitary deterministic laws. Furthermore, the MLBH can be viewed as part of a more general theory that includes other mechanisms that may also affect metabolic scaling.

  6. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIAL, POLICY AND PHYSICAL VENUE FEATURES AND SOCIAL COHESION ON CONDOM USE FOR PREGNANCY PREVENTION AMONG SEX WORKERS: A SAFER INDOOR WORK ENVIRONMENT SCALE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Putu; Shoveller, Jean; Dobrer, Sabina; Ogilvie, Gina; Montaner, Julio; Chettiar, Jill; Shannon, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aims to: report on a newly developed ‘Safer Indoor Work Environmental Scale’ that characterizes the social, policy and physical features of indoor venues and social cohesion; and using this scale, longitudinally evaluate the association between these features on sex workers’ (SWs’) condom use for pregnancy prevention. Methods Drawing on a prospective open cohort of female SWs working in indoor venues, a newly-developed ‘Safer Indoor Work Environment Scale’ was used to build six multivariable models with generalized estimating equations (GEE), to determine the independent effects of social, policy and venue-based features and social cohesion on condom use. Results Of 588 indoor SWs, 63.6% used condoms for pregnancy prevention in the last month. In multivariable GEE analysis, the following venue-based features were significantly correlated with barrier contraceptive use for pregnancy prevention: managerial practices and venue safety policies (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.09; 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) 1.01–1.17) access to sexual and reproductive health services/supplies (AOR=1.10; 95%CI 1.00–1.20) access to drug harm reduction (AOR=1.13; 95%CI 1.01–1.28), and social cohesion among workers (AOR=1.05; 95%CI 1.03–1.07). Access to security features was marginally associated with condom use (AOR=1.13; 95%CI 0.99–1.29). Conclusion The findings of the current study highlight how work environment and social cohesion among SWs are related to improved condom use. Given global calls for the decriminalization of sex work, and potential legislative reforms in Canada, this study points to the critical need for new institutional arrangements (e.g., legal and regulatory frameworks; labour standards) to support safer sex workplaces. PMID:25678713

  7. The relationship between the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale and its revised form and child outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Brunsek

    Full Text Available The Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale (ECERS and its revised version (ECERS-R were designed as global measures of quality that assess structural and process aspects of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC programs. Despite frequent use of the ECERS/ECERS-R in research and applied settings, associations between it and child outcomes have not been systematically reviewed. The objective of this research was to evaluate the association between the ECERS/ECERS-R and children's wellbeing. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were completed up to July 3, 2015. Eligible studies provided a statistical link between the ECERS/ECERS-R and child outcomes for preschool-aged children in ECEC programs. Of the 823 studies selected for full review, 73 were included in the systematic review and 16 were meta-analyzed. The combined sample across all eligible studies consisted of 33, 318 preschool-aged children. Qualitative systematic review results revealed that ECERS/ECERS-R total scores were more generally associated with positive outcomes than subscales or factors. Seventeen separate meta-analyses were conducted to assess the strength of association between the ECERS/ECERS-R and measures that assessed children's language, math and social-emotional outcomes. Meta-analyses revealed a small number of weak effects (in the expected direction between the ECERS/ECERS-R total score and children's language and positive behavior outcomes. The Language-Reasoning subscale was weakly related to a language outcome. The enormous heterogeneity in how studies operationalized the ECERS/ECERS-R, the outcomes measured and statistics reported limited our ability to meta-analyze many studies. Greater consistency in study methodology is needed in this area of research. Despite these methodological challenges, the ECERS/ECERS-R does appear to capture aspects of quality that are important for children

  8. The relationship between the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale and its revised form and child outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsek, Ashley; Perlman, Michal; Falenchuk, Olesya; McMullen, Evelyn; Fletcher, Brooke; Shah, Prakesh S

    2017-01-01

    The Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale (ECERS) and its revised version (ECERS-R) were designed as global measures of quality that assess structural and process aspects of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) programs. Despite frequent use of the ECERS/ECERS-R in research and applied settings, associations between it and child outcomes have not been systematically reviewed. The objective of this research was to evaluate the association between the ECERS/ECERS-R and children's wellbeing. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were completed up to July 3, 2015. Eligible studies provided a statistical link between the ECERS/ECERS-R and child outcomes for preschool-aged children in ECEC programs. Of the 823 studies selected for full review, 73 were included in the systematic review and 16 were meta-analyzed. The combined sample across all eligible studies consisted of 33, 318 preschool-aged children. Qualitative systematic review results revealed that ECERS/ECERS-R total scores were more generally associated with positive outcomes than subscales or factors. Seventeen separate meta-analyses were conducted to assess the strength of association between the ECERS/ECERS-R and measures that assessed children's language, math and social-emotional outcomes. Meta-analyses revealed a small number of weak effects (in the expected direction) between the ECERS/ECERS-R total score and children's language and positive behavior outcomes. The Language-Reasoning subscale was weakly related to a language outcome. The enormous heterogeneity in how studies operationalized the ECERS/ECERS-R, the outcomes measured and statistics reported limited our ability to meta-analyze many studies. Greater consistency in study methodology is needed in this area of research. Despite these methodological challenges, the ECERS/ECERS-R does appear to capture aspects of quality that are important for children's wellbeing

  9. Evaluation of neck pain by using a visual analog scale before and after laminoplasty in patients with cervical myelopathy: relationship with clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Tsuyoshi; Iizuka, Haku; Sorimachi, Yasunori; Iizuka, Yoichi; Nakajima, Takashi; Nishinome, Masahiro; Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Takagishi, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    In this study the authors investigated the neck pain of patients with cervical myelopathy by using a visual analog scale (VAS) before and after laminoplasty, and they analyzed the association of amount of neck pain with the clinical results. A retrospective review was conducted in 41 patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent cervical laminoplasty. The patients were assessed using questionnaires to evaluate the neck pain intensity before surgery, and 2 years after surgery, the outcome was assessed using a VAS. The degree of cervical lordosis and range of motion (ROM) of the cervical spine were evaluated before and after laminoplasty. The neurological status was also evaluated before and after surgery. The patients were classified into 2 groups according to their preoperative neck pain: 1) the pain (PA) group, which included patients whose preoperative VAS score was more than 1 mm; and 2) the no pain (NP) group, which included patients whose preoperative VAS score was 0 mm. Inclusion in the PA group indicated a restriction of the cervical ROM before laminoplasty; however, the improvement of neck pain in this group and the deterioration of pain status in the NP group eliminated this difference after laminoplasty. Thereafter, the PA group was classified into 2 subgroups according to the improvement of the preoperative neck pain: 1) the improved group, which included patients whose postoperative VAS score decreased; and 2) the no improvement group, which included patients who were not in the improved group. No significant differences were observed in the average recovery and radiographic results between these 2 subgroups. Neck pain before surgery in the PA group indicated a restriction of the cervical ROM; however, the improvement of neck pain in this group and the deterioration of pain status in the NP group indicated the disappearance of this difference postoperatively. Moreover, improvement of preoperative neck pain was not associated with the radiographic

  10. MO-A-BRD-09: A Data-Mining Algorithm for Large Scale Analysis of Dose-Outcome Relationships in a Database of Irradiated Head-And-Neck (HN) Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, SP; Quon, H; Kiess, AP; Moore, JA; Yang, W; Cheng, Z; Sharabi, A; McNutt, TR [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for automatic extraction of clinically meaningful dosimetric-outcome relationships from an in-house, analytic oncology database. Methods: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) and clinical outcome-related structured data elements have been routinely stored to our database for 513 HN cancer patients treated from 2007 to 2014. SQL queries were developed to extract outcomes that had been assessed for at least 100 patients, as well as DVH curves for organs-at-risk (OAR) that were contoured for at least 100 patients. DVH curves for paired OAR (e.g., left and right parotids) were automatically combined and included as additional structures for analysis. For each OAR-outcome combination, DVH dose points, D(V{sub t}), at a series of normalized volume thresholds, V{sub t}=[0.01,0.99], were stratified into two groups based on outcomes after treatment completion. The probability, P[D(V{sub t})], of an outcome was modeled at each V{sub t} by logistic regression. Notable combinations, defined as having P[D(V{sub t})] increase by at least 5% per Gy (p<0.05), were further evaluated for clinical relevance using a custom graphical interface. Results: A total of 57 individual and combined structures and 115 outcomes were queried, resulting in over 6,500 combinations for analysis. Of these, 528 combinations met the 5%/Gy requirement, with further manual inspection revealing a number of reasonable models based on either reported literature or proximity between neighboring OAR. The data mining algorithm confirmed the following well-known toxicity/outcome relationships: dysphagia/larynx, voice changes/larynx, esophagitis/esophagus, xerostomia/combined parotids, and mucositis/oral mucosa. Other notable relationships included dysphagia/pharyngeal constrictors, nausea/brainstem, nausea/spinal cord, weight-loss/mandible, and weight-loss/combined parotids. Conclusion: Our database platform has enabled large-scale analysis of dose-outcome relationships. The current data

  11. Abusive Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Abusive Relationships KidsHealth / For Teens / Abusive Relationships Print en español Relaciones de maltrato Healthy Relationships = Respect & Trust Healthy relationships involve respect, trust, and ...

  12. Relações entre uso do solo, relevo e fertilidade do solo em escala de microbacia Relationships among land use, relief and soil fertility at watershed scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. dos Santos

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A produtividade em sistemas agrícolas de subsistência depende do nível de fertilidade natural do solo. Em condições de relevo forte ondulado, espera-se que a fertilidade do solo se modifique não apenas pelo tipo de uso mas, também, devido à sua posição no relevo. Para avaliar essas modificações, 260 amostras simples de solo (0-20 cm da microbacia Vaca Brava, PB, representando combinações de três usos do solo, cinco posições no relevo e cinco classes texturais, foram analisadas quanto aos teores de P disponível, bases e acidez trocáveis. Ca e Mg compreenderam 75-80% dos cátions trocáveis, K e Na, de 10 a 15%, e H+Al, 10%; o valor de pH médio foi 5,5, enquanto P Mehlich-1 foi, em média, 3,8 mg kg-1 solo. Apesar dos efeitos significativos (p Productivity in subsistence agricultural systems relies on natural soil fertility levels. Under strongly undulated relief conditions, it is expected that soil fertility will be determined not only by land use, but also by the position in the landscape. To study these relationships 260 single soil samples (0-20 cm from the Vaca Brava watershed, Paraiba, representing combinations of three land uses, five positions in the landscape and five textures were analyzed for extractable P, exchangeable bases and soil acidity. Ca and Mg comprised 75-80% of exchangeable cations, K and Na between 10 and 15% and H+Al 10%. The average pH was 5.5, while extractable P (Mehlich-1 averaged 3.8 mg kg-1 soil. Although land use, relief and texture exerted significant effects (p < 0.05 upon certain nutrient concentrations, in a broad sense the watershed appeared relatively uniform. The main effect of land use resulted from the use of animal manure in areas of subsistence agriculture and fodder, which were preferentially located at the base of stopes and low lands positions. Approximately 80% of the samples were low in extractable P, while 70% had medium levels of extractable K. However, when available K was

  13. Pre-Kindergarten Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Tim

    This 25-item scale for rating prekindergarten children concerns personal and cognitive skills. Directions for using the scale are provided. Personal skills include personal hygiene, communication skills, eating habits, relationships with the teacher, peer relations, and personal behavior. Cognitive skills rated are verbal skills, object…

  14. Variability in warm-season atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns over subtropical South America: relationships between the South Atlantic convergence zone and large-scale organized convection over the La Plata basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Kyle S.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2017-01-01

    Warm-season precipitation variability over subtropical South America is characterized by an inverse relationship between the South Atlantic convergence zone (SACZ) and precipitation over the central and western La Plata basin of southeastern South America. This study extends the analysis of this "South American Seesaw" precipitation dipole to relationships between the SACZ and large, long-lived mesoscale convective systems (LLCSs) over the La Plata basin. By classifying SACZ events into distinct continental and oceanic categories and building a logistic regression model that relates LLCS activity across the region to continental and oceanic SACZ precipitation, a detailed account of spatial variability in the out-of-phase coupling between the SACZ and large-scale organized convection over the La Plata basin is provided. Enhanced precipitation in the continental SACZ is found to result in increased LLCS activity over northern, northeastern, and western sections of the La Plata basin, in association with poleward atmospheric moisture flux from the Amazon basin toward these regions, and a decrease in the probability of LLCS occurrence over the southeastern La Plata basin. Increased oceanic SACZ precipitation, however, was strongly related to reduced atmospheric moisture and decreased probability of LLCS occurrence over nearly the entire La Plata basin. These results suggest that continental SACZ activity and large-scale organized convection over the northern and eastern sections of the La Plata basin are closely tied to atmospheric moisture transport from the Amazon basin, while the warm coastal Brazil Current may also play an important role as an evaporative moisture source for LLCSs over the central and western La Plata basin.

  15. Detecting the Spatio-temporal Distribution of Soil Salinity and Its Relationship to Crop Growth in a Large-scale Arid Irrigation District Based on Sampling Experiment and Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, D.; Huang, G., Sr.; Xu, X.; Huang, Q., Sr.; Xiong, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Soil salinity analysis on a regional scale is of great significance for protecting agriculture production and maintaining eco-environmental health in arid and semi-arid irrigated areas. In this study, the Hetao Irrigation District (Hetao) in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, with suffering long-term soil salinization problems, was selected as the case study area. Field sampling experiments and investigations related to soil salt contents, crop growth and yields were carried out across the whole area, during April to August in 2015. Soil salinity characteristics in space and time were systematically analyzed for Hetao as well as the corresponding impacts on crops. Remotely sensed map of soil salinity distribution for surface soil was also derived based on the Landsat OLI data with a 30 m resolution. The results elaborated the temporal and spatial dynamics of soil salinity and the relationships with irrigation, groundwater depth and crop water consumption in Hetao. In addition, the strong spatial variability of salinization was clearly presented by the remotely sensed map of soil salinity. Further, the relationship between soil salinity and crop growth was analyzed, and then the impact degrees of soil salinization on cropping pattern, leaf area index, plant height and crop yield were preliminarily revealed. Overall, this study can provide very useful information for salinization control and guide the future agricultural production and soil-water management for the arid irrigation districts analogous to Hetao.

  16. Jealousy and Relationship Closeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Attridge

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study confirmed a hypothesis from the Emotion-in-Relationships conceptual model, which predicts that greater interdependence between relationship partners—or closeness—creates the potential for jealousy. The study also sought to better define the positive side of romantic jealousy in addition to its more negative attributes. College students in premarital relationships (N = 229 completed a questionnaire, including 27 different measures and the Multidimensional Jealousy Scale. Select data were obtained from 122 cases at 3-month follow-up. Each jealousy scale was tested for associations with demographic (age, sex, and race, person (life satisfaction, loneliness, romantic attachment styles, love styles, and romantic beliefs, and relationship (affective, closeness, and social exchange theory constructs. Results clearly distinguished emotional/reactive jealousy as mostly “good” and cognitive/suspicious jealousy as “bad.” Behavioral jealousy was associated with few measures. Implications are discussed for the interdependence model of relationships and the transactional model of jealousy.

  17. İlişkide Karar Verme Ölçeğinin Türk Kültürüne Uyarlanması / The Turkish Adaptation of Relationship Deciding Scale

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    Cansu Tosun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of Relationship Deciding Scale (Vennum & Fincham, 2011 for Turkish culture. The sample of the study consisted of 880 students (EFA=439, CFA=441 studying at Karadeniz Technical University. Criterion-related validity, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted for the validity of RDS while internal consistency, split half and test-retest techniques were performed to examine the reliability of RDS. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA revealed that the scale had two-factor structures. However, two items were removed from the scale because they didn't have appropriate factor loadings. The scale consisting of 10 items explained 58.97% of the total variance. The results of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA indicated that the model was compatible with the data. In the reliability analysis for EFA and CFA samples, Cronbach alpha coefficients were found as .87 and .86 respectively. Internal consistency coefficients of subscales were found as .83 and .80 for “Relationship Confidence”, .82 and .84 for “Directing Relationship”. According to test-retest reliability analysis results, the whole scale’s coefficient was r= .67. In addition, as a result of criterion validity analysis, correlations (r= .33 between Self-Control Scale (Duyan, Gülden & Gelbal, 2012 and Relationship Deciding Scale (RDS were found to be statistically significant. In conclusion, these findings suggest that RDS, which has two-factor structures with 10 items, can be suggested as a valid and reliable instrument in Turkish culture. Öz Bu araştırmanın amacı, Vennum ve Fincham (2011 tarafından geliştirilen İlişkide Karar Verme Ölçeği’nin (Relationship Deciding Scale Türk kültürüne uyarlanması ile ilgili geçerlik ve güvenirlik işlemlerini yapmaktır. Araştırma grubu Karadeniz Teknik Üniversitesi’nde öğrenim gören 880 öğrenciden (AFA=439, DFA=441 olu

  18. Customer relationship management scale for the B2C market: a cross-cultural comparison / Escala de relacionamento com clientes para o mercado B2C: uma comparação transcultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Demo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objectives of this study were to validate the Customer Relationship Management Scale (CRMS in France, and to compare the French model to both Brazilian and American ones. Originality/gap/relevance/implications: Based on the premise that scientific measurement instruments may be used to reflect customers' perception about the organization actions and effectiveness, it is important to validate a scale within a multidimensional cultural context. Therefore, the applicability of the instrument shall be possible in different contexts, longitudinally, with diverse subjects, thus providing external validity and generalization. Key methodological aspects: This is a descriptive, instrumental, quantitative, cross-sectional survey where we used the Customer Relationship Management Scale (CRMS. The sampling method was non-probabilistic convenience and the total of answered questionnaires added up to 454. We carried out a quantitative research through Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Summary of key results: The results obtained in the analyses allow us to conclude that the relation between clients and companies is really two-dimensional and it involves two distinct factors, namely Loyalty and Customer Service. The scale validated in Brazil and in the United States remained stable, in terms of validity (quality of items and reliability, when validated in a distinct context, that is, France. This makes its application in French organizations possible, improving its external validity and generalization. Key considerations/conclusions: The main objective of this study was reached and an instrument to assess what aspects French customers rank as relevant regarding CRM was produced showing theoretical consistency, reliability and construct validity as well. Objetivo: O objetivo deste trabalho foi validar a Escala de Relacionamento com Clientes (ERC na França, e comparar a escala francesa com a brasileira e americana. Originalidade

  19. Machiavellianism, Relationship Satisfaction, and Romantic Relationship Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle Brewer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Machiavellianism is characterised by a manipulative interpersonal style, willingness to exploit others, and a preference for emotionally detached relationships. The present studies investigate the extent to which Machiavellianism influences relationship satisfaction and romantic relationship quality. In Study 1, 194 heterosexual partnered women completed Machiavellianism and Relationship Satisfaction measures. Women with higher levels of Machiavellianism reported lower levels of relationship satisfaction. In Study 2, 132 heterosexual partnered women completed Machiavellianism, Trust, Commitment, Control, and Emotional Abuse scales. Women with higher levels of Machiavellianism perceived their partners to be less dependable, reported less faith in their partners, and were less willing to persist with the relationship than those with low levels of Machiavellianism. With regards to negative behavior, Machiavellianism predicted each form of control and emotional abuse investigated, such that those with high levels of Machiavellianism were more likely to engage in controlling behavior and emotional abuse. Findings have important implications for the prediction of romantic relationship quality and in particular for negative behavior such as control and abuse.

  20. Relationship Between Level Of Education Of Farmers And Use Of Information And Communication Technologies In Marketing Of Farm Produce By Small Scale Farmers In Manga Sub-County Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morwani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Limited access to accurate and timely market information continues to be a major impediment in the marketing of farm produce by farmers in Africa and in Kenya especially in Manga Sub-County Nyamira County. This limited access to market information has led to high cost of transaction and emergence of middlemen. Information and Communication Technologies ICTs have the potential to assist in addressing this problem by creating awareness linking and distributing information on marketing. It is evident that farmers in Kenya have focused their attention in acquisition of ICT resources because of widespread coverage of mobile telephony low call rates affordable data bundles increasing internet connectivity and other forms of ICT applications for example the M-pesa services with little application in marketing. This study aimed to determine the relationship between level of education of farmers and use of ICTs in marketing of farm produce by small scale farmers in Manga Sub-County in Nyamira County Kenya. Descriptive research design was adopted in the study. The target population of the study was 11040 commercial farmers in Manga Sub-County from which a sample size of 109 small scale farmers was selected using stratified random sampling technique. A questionnaire administered to farmers in the Sub-County was used to collect data. Validity of the instrument was enhanced by subjecting the instrument to examination by three experts in the Department of Agricultural Education and Extension of Egerton University. Analysis of piloting results using Cronbachs coefficient alpha method yielded a reliability index of 0.896 indicating the instrument was reliable. The collected data were analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. The descriptive statistics used were the frequency and percentages. Pearsons correlation coefficient analysis was used to test the hypotheses. Statistical Package for Social Sciences was used in data analysis. The

  1. Quinone 1 e and 2 e /2 H + Reduction Potentials: Identification and Analysis of Deviations from Systematic Scaling Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, Mioy T.; Anson, Colin W.; Cavell, Andrew C.; Stahl, Shannon S.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-11-10

    Quinones participate in diverse electron transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer processes in chemistry and biology. An experimental study of common quinones reveals a non-linear correlation between the 1 e and 2 e/2 H+ reduction potentials. This unexpected observation prompted a computational study of 128 different quinones, probing their 1 e reduction potentials, pKa values, and 2 e/2 H+ reduction potentials. The density functional theory calculations reveal an approximately linear correlation between these three properties and an effective Hammett constant associated with the quinone substituent(s). However, deviations from this linear scaling relationship are evident for quinones that feature halogen substituents, charged substituents, intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the hydroquinone, and/or sterically bulky substituents. These results, particularly the different substituent effects on the 1 e versus 2 e /2 H+ reduction potentials, have important implications for designing quinones with tailored redox properties.

  2. What Matters More About the Interpersonal Reactivity Index and the Jefferson Scale of Empathy? Their Underlying Constructs or Their Relationships With Pertinent Measures of Clinical Competence and Patient Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Gonnella, Joseph S

    2017-06-01

    In their study published in this issue of Academic Medicine, Costa and colleagues confirmed the underlying constructs of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) and the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) in medical students. The authors of this Commentary propose that in comparing two instruments that both purport to measure empathy, researchers or test users must pay close attention to the target populations, the conceptualizations of empathy, and the validity evidence in relation to pertinent criterion measures. The Commentary's authors draw attention to the fact that the IRI was developed for administration to the general population, whereas the JSE was developed specifically for administration to students and practitioners of health professions. Also, the author of the IRI conceptualized empathy as a combination of cognitive and emotional attributes, whereas the authors of the JSE defined empathy as a predominantly cognitive attribute. These differences are reflected in the content of the items, which determines the underlying constructs of the two instruments. The Commentary authors suggest that any empathy-measuring instrument in the context of health professions education and patient care requires the crucial evidence of significant relationships with indicators of clinical competence and positive patient outcomes. Such validity evidence is readily available for the JSE, and the Commentary authors recommend that researchers make efforts to provide pertinent validity support for any other instrument measuring empathy in health professionals-in-training and in-practice.

  3. The relationship of thermospheric density anomaly with electron temperature, small-scale FAC, and ion up-flow in the cusp region, as observed by CHAMP and DMSP satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Kervalishvili

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present in a statistical study a comparison of thermospheric mass density enhancements (ρrel with electron temperature (Te, small-scale field-aligned currents (SSFACs, and vertical ion velocity (Vz at high latitudes around noon magnetic local time (MLT. Satellite data from CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload and DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program sampling the Northern Hemisphere during the years 2002–2005 are used. In a first step we investigate the distribution of the measured quantities in a magnetic latitude (MLat versus MLT frame. All considered variables exhibit prominent peak amplitudes in the cusp region. A superposed epoch analysis was performed to examine causal relationship between the quantities. The occurrence of a thermospheric relative mass density anomaly, ρrel >1.2, in the cusp region is defining an event. The location of the density peak is taken as a reference latitude (Δ MLat = 0°. Interestingly, all the considered quantities, SSFACs, Te, and Vz are co-located with the density anomaly. The amplitudes of the peaks exhibit different characters of seasonal variation. The average relative density enhancement of the more prominent density peaks considered in this study amounts to 1.33 during all seasons. As expected, SSFACs are largest in summer with average amplitudes equal to 2.56 μA m−2, decaying to 2.00 μA m−2 in winter. The event related enhancements of Te and Vz are both largest in winter (Δ Te =730 K, Vz =136 m s−1 and smallest in summer (Δ Te = 377 K, Vz = 57 m s−1. Based on the similarity of the seasonal behaviour we suggest a close relationship between these two quantities. A correlation analysis supports a linear relation with a high coefficient greater than or equal to 0.93, irrespective of season. Our preferred explanation is that dayside reconnection fuels Joule heating of the thermosphere causing air upwelling and at the same time heating of the electron gas that pulls up ions

  4. Scale Pretesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Matt C.

    2018-01-01

    Scale pretests analyze the suitability of individual scale items for further analysis, whether through judging their face validity, wording concerns, and/or other aspects. The current article reviews scale pretests, separated by qualitative and quantitative methods, in order to identify the differences, similarities, and even existence of the…

  5. Respuesta al entrenamiento en EPOC: Diferencia entre limitación por fatiga muscular y por disnea Training response in COPD: Differences between fatigue-limited and dyspnea-limited patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Sívori

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio comparó la respuesta post entrenamiento al ejercicio en pacientes limitados por fatiga muscular (LF vs. disnea (LD. Se incluyeron pacientes con EPOC moderada y grave (definición GOLD, clasificándolos en LF si la respuesta a cicloergometría máxima tenía ≥ 2 puntos en la escala de Borg para fatiga muscular vs. disnea; LD a la inversa. Se realizaron ergometría submáxima, 6 minutos y pruebas de calidad de vida mediante cuestionario. Fueron entrenados 3 veces/semana, 90 min/sesión con ejercicios de fuerza y aeróbicos por 8 semanas, evaluándolos de la misma manera. Fueron estudiados 14 pacientes del grupo LF y 11 del LD. El promedio de edad fue 69 y 66 años respectivamente. Presentaban grave obstrucción bronquial (FEV1: 49%. No existían diferencias basales entre ambos grupos, excepto en el índice masa-corporal (IMC, menor en los LF. Luego del entrenamiento, ambos grupos mejoraron significativamente en variables de ejercicio y calidad de vida, excepto carga máxima en los LD. Comparando ambos grupos, se observó mejor respuesta en los LF en carga máxima (48.7 ± 9.2 vs. 40.04 ± 15.48 watts, p = 0.033, prueba de 6 minutos (505.42 ± 50.75 vs. 454.9 ± 64.3 metros, p = 0.048 y ergometría submáxima (14.57 ± 9.55 vs. 6.71 ± 4.18min, p = 0.025, respectivamente. Como conclusión, los pacientes LF tuvieron mayor respuesta al entrenamiento en ejercicios submáximos y carga máxima, presentando menor IMC. Posiblemente, deberían instrumentarse diferentes estrategias de entrenamiento para diferentes fenotipos de pacientes con EPOC.Our objective was to study the post-training response to exercise, comparing fatigue-limited (FL vs. dyspnea-limited (DL COPD patients. Moderate and severe COPD patients (GOLD definition were included. They were classified as FL if Borg score of fatigue at maximal exercise testing was ≥ 2 points vs. dyspnea; and DL if it was the reverse. Also, each patient was evaluated with submaximal

  6. Psychogenic Dyspnea and Therapeutic Chest Radiograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Kenneth R.; Endres, Jennifer K.; Kaufman, Nathaniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Conversion disorders, the physical expression of unresolved psychological pain, can be associated with mourning. This case report is third in a series of articles by the authors on childhood mourning reflecting the effects of multiple losses (K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2005; K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2006). In this case report, perception…

  7. Dyspnea in Pregnancy: An Unusual Cause

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    outcome. REFERENCES. 1. Calvinho P, Bastos C, Bernardo JE, Eugénio L, Antunes MJ. Diaphragmmatic eventration: Long‑term follow‑up and results of open‑chest plicature. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2009;36:883‑7. 2. Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Kenneth LM. Pediatric surgery. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery ...

  8. Maslowian Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, C.; And Others

    The development of the Maslowian Scale, a method of revealing a picture of one's needs and concerns based on Abraham Maslow's levels of self-actualization, is described. This paper also explains how the scale is supported by the theories of L. Kohlberg, C. Rogers, and T. Rusk. After a literature search, a list of statements was generated…

  9. Contribution to Validation of the Student–Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS Italian Version in the Italian Educational Setting Contribución para la validación de la Escala de relaciones entre estudiantes-profesores (STRS versión italiana en el entorno educativo italiano.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Fraire

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the relationship teacher-pupil represents a relatively new field of research, both nationally and internationally. Our principal objective is the development and the evaluation of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (Pianta, 1996, which aims to assess the quality of the teacher-pupil relationship from the point of view of the latter; our own goal is consequently to recognize the applicability of the STRS to an Italian context, especially by analysing in depth the psychometric characteristics of the Scale. Thanks to the use of the STRS, it is possible to identify precise relational patterns between teacher and pupil, therefore the questionnaire is of decisive importance both for teachers and for whoever else is involved in the field of primary education. Key words: Teacher-pupil relationship, STRS, educational contexts, test.

    La calidad de la relación maestro-alumno es un tema de investigación relativamente reciente, tanto en el contexto nacional, como en el ámbito internacional. Nuestro objetivo es desarrollar y validar el cuestionario Student-Teacher Relationship Scale, instrumento que se propone valorar la calidad de la relación maestro-alumno desde el punto de vista del maestro. La finalidad es, por lo tanto, descubrir la aplicabilidad del instrumento al contexto italiano, analizando las cualidades psicométricas de la escala. Gracias al uso del STRS, es posible localizar estilos relacionales específicos entre el maestro y el alumno. El cuestionario se presenta como un instrumento útil para los maestros y para los que trabajan en el campo educativo.

    Palabras clave: Relación maestro-alumno, STRS, contextos escolares, test.

  10. Framing scales and scaling frames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lieshout, M.; Dewulf, A.; Aarts, N.; Termeer, K.

    2009-01-01

    Policy problems are not just out there. Actors highlight different aspects of a situation as problematic and situate the problem on different scales. In this study we will analyse the way actors apply scales in their talk (or texts) to frame the complex decision-making process of the establishment

  11. Allometric Scaling in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banavar, Jayanth

    2009-03-01

    The unity of life is expressed not only in the universal basis of inheritance and energetics at the molecular level, but also in the pervasive scaling of traits with body size at the whole-organism level. More than 75 years ago, Kleiber and Brody and Proctor independently showed that the metabolic rates, B, of mammals and birds scale as the three-quarter power of their mass, M. Subsequent studies showed that most biological rates and times scale as M-1/4 and M^1/4 respectively, and that these so called quarter-power scaling relations hold for a variety of organisms, from unicellular prokaryotes and eukaryotes to trees and mammals. The wide applicability of Kleiber's law, across the 22 orders of magnitude of body mass from minute bacteria to giant whales and sequoias, raises the hope that there is some simple general explanation that underlies the incredible diversity of form and function. We will present a general theoretical framework for understanding the relationship between metabolic rate, B, and body mass, M. We show how the pervasive quarter-power biological scaling relations arise naturally from optimal directed resource supply systems. This framework robustly predicts that: 1) whole organism power and resource supply rate, B, scale as M^3/4; 2) most other rates, such as heart rate and maximal population growth rate scale as M-1/4; 3) most biological times, such as blood circulation time and lifespan, scale as M^1/4; and 4) the average velocity of flow through the network, v, such as the speed of blood and oxygen delivery, scales as M^1/12. Our framework is valid even when there is no underlying network. Our theory is applicable to unicellular organisms as well as to large animals and plants. This work was carried out in collaboration with Amos Maritan along with Jim Brown, John Damuth, Melanie Moses, Andrea Rinaldo, and Geoff West.

  12. Relationships matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyanja, Tabitha Alexandria Njeri; Tulinius, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    -depth interviews and focus group discussions with 37 sexually active HIV-positive women aged between 20 and 44 years, attending three health facilities within Dar-es-Salaam. The theoretical framework was a patient centred model. Four barriers were identified: the influence of the women’s spousal relationships...... women experienced conflicts, violence, abandonment and rejection. The loss in negotiating power for the women was in relation to their intimate partners, but also in the patient–healthcare provider relationship. The role of the male partner as a barrier to contraceptive use cannot be understated...

  13. Scaling down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald L Breiger

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available While “scaling up” is a lively topic in network science and Big Data analysis today, my purpose in this essay is to articulate an alternative problem, that of “scaling down,” which I believe will also require increased attention in coming years. “Scaling down” is the problem of how macro-level features of Big Data affect, shape, and evoke lower-level features and processes. I identify four aspects of this problem: the extent to which findings from studies of Facebook and other Big-Data platforms apply to human behavior at the scale of church suppers and department politics where we spend much of our lives; the extent to which the mathematics of scaling might be consistent with behavioral principles, moving beyond a “universal” theory of networks to the study of variation within and between networks; and how a large social field, including its history and culture, shapes the typical representations, interactions, and strategies at local levels in a text or social network.

  14. Horizontal Variability of Water and Its Relationship to Cloud Fraction near the Tropical Tropopause: Using Aircraft Observations of Water Vapor to Improve the Representation of Grid-scale Cloud Formation in GEOS-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Molod, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale models such as GEOS-5 typically calculate grid-scale fractional cloudiness through a PDF parameterization of the sub-gridscale distribution of specific humidity. The GEOS-5 moisture routine uses a simple rectangular PDF varying in height that follows a tanh profile. While below 10 km this profile is informed by moisture information from the AIRS instrument, there is relatively little empirical basis for the profile above that level. ATTREX provides an opportunity to refine the profile using estimates of the horizontal variability of measurements of water vapor, total water and ice particles from the Global Hawk aircraft at or near the tropopause. These measurements will be compared with estimates of large-scale cloud fraction from CALIPSO and lidar retrievals from the CPL on the aircraft. We will use the variability measurements to perform studies of the sensitivity of the GEOS-5 cloud-fraction to various modifications to the PDF shape and to its vertical profile.

  15. KNO scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golokhvastov, A.I.; )

    2001-01-01

    A correct version of the KNO scaling of multiplicity distributions is discussed in detail. Some assertions on KNO-scaling violation based on the misinterpretation of experimental data behavior are analyzed. An accurate comparison with experiment is presented for the distributions of negative particles in e + e - annihilation at √S = 3 - 161 GeV, in inelastic pp interactions at √S = 2.4 - 62 GeV and in nucleus-nucleus interactions at p lab = 4.5 - 520 GeV/c per nucleon. The p-bar p data at √S 546 GeV are considered [ru

  16. The Relationship Between Religiosity and Narcissism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, P. J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Sought to clarify the intrinsic narcissistic relationship with religiosity using the Narcissistic Personality Disorder Scale, the Allport-Ross religious Orientation Scale and the Machiavellian Scale. Intrinsic religiosity correlated negatively and specifically with the maladaptive exploitiveness dimension of narcissism. Data are discussed in terms…

  17. Scaling laws for coastal overwash morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Eli D.

    2016-12-01

    Overwash is a physical process of coastal sediment transport driven by storm events and is essential to landscape resilience in low-lying barrier environments. This work establishes a comprehensive set of scaling laws for overwash morphology: unifying quantitative descriptions with which to compare overwash features by their morphological attributes across case examples. Such scaling laws also help relate overwash features to other morphodynamic phenomena. Here morphometric data from a physical experiment are compared with data from natural examples of overwash features. The resulting scaling relationships indicate scale invariance spanning several orders of magnitude. Furthermore, these new relationships for overwash morphology align with classic scaling laws for fluvial drainages and alluvial fans.

  18. Scale dependent inference in landscape genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman; Erin L. Landguth

    2010-01-01

    Ecological relationships between patterns and processes are highly scale dependent. This paper reports the first formal exploration of how changing scale of research away from the scale of the processes governing gene flow affects the results of landscape genetic analysis. We used an individual-based, spatially explicit simulation model to generate patterns of genetic...

  19. Scaling satan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K M; Huff, J L

    2001-05-01

    The influence on social behavior of beliefs in Satan and the nature of evil has received little empirical study. Elaine Pagels (1995) in her book, The Origin of Satan, argued that Christians' intolerance toward others is due to their belief in an active Satan. In this study, more than 200 college undergraduates completed the Manitoba Prejudice Scale and the Attitudes Toward Homosexuals Scale (B. Altemeyer, 1988), as well as the Belief in an Active Satan Scale, developed by the authors. The Belief in an Active Satan Scale demonstrated good internal consistency and temporal stability. Correlational analyses revealed that for the female participants, belief in an active Satan was directly related to intolerance toward lesbians and gay men and intolerance toward ethnic minorities. For the male participants, belief in an active Satan was directly related to intolerance toward lesbians and gay men but was not significantly related to intolerance toward ethnic minorities. Results of this research showed that it is possible to meaningfully measure belief in an active Satan and that such beliefs may encourage intolerance toward others.

  20. Plague and Climate: Scales Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ari, Tamara; Neerinckx, Simon; Gage, Kenneth L.; Kreppel, Katharina; Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    2011-01-01

    Plague is enzootic in wildlife populations of small mammals in central and eastern Asia, Africa, South and North America, and has been recognized recently as a reemerging threat to humans. Its causative agent Yersinia pestis relies on wild rodent hosts and flea vectors for its maintenance in nature. Climate influences all three components (i.e., bacteria, vectors, and hosts) of the plague system and is a likely factor to explain some of plague's variability from small and regional to large scales. Here, we review effects of climate variables on plague hosts and vectors from individual or population scales to studies on the whole plague system at a large scale. Upscaled versions of small-scale processes are often invoked to explain plague variability in time and space at larger scales, presumably because similar scale-independent mechanisms underlie these relationships. This linearity assumption is discussed in the light of recent research that suggests some of its limitations. PMID:21949648

  1. Changes in the sense of agency during hypnosis: The Hungarian version of the Sense of Agency Rating Scale (SOARS-HU) and its relationship with phenomenological aspects of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Költő, András; Polito, Vince

    2017-03-01

    Changes in the sense of agency are defining feature of hypnosis. The Sense of Agency Rating Scale (SOARS) is a 10-item questionnaire, administered after a hypnosis session to assess alteration in the sense of agency. In the present study, a Hungarian version of the measure (SOARS-HU) is presented. The SOARS-HU and the Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory (PCI) were administered to 197 subjects following hypnotizability screening with the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form A (HGSHS:A). Confirmatory factor analysis and correlations with hypnotizability demonstrate the reliability and validity of the SOARS-HU. Changes in the Involuntariness and Effortlessness subscales of the SOARS-HU were associated with alterations in subjective conscious experience, as measured by the PCI. These changes in subjective experience remained significant after controlling for HGSHS:A scores. These results indicate that changes in the sense of agency during hypnosis are associated with alterations of consciousness that are independent of hypnotizability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the π-γ force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted

  3. Nuclear scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  4. Uso de descritores de dispneia traduzidos da língua inglesa em pacientes com doenças cardiorrespiratórias ou obesidade Dyspnea descriptors translated from English to Portuguese: application in obese patients and in patients with cardiorespiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Aires Teixeira

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar a utilidade de descritores de dispneia, desenvolvidos em língua inglesa e traduzidos para o português falado no Brasil, em pacientes com quatro condições distintas que cursam com dispneia. MÉTODOS: Uma lista de 15 descritores de dispneia construída em um estudo nos EUA foi traduzida para o português. Esse conjunto de descritores foi aplicado a 50 pacientes com asma, 50 com DPOC, 30 com insuficiência cardíaca e 50 com obesidade graus II ou III. Os termos selecionados como os três melhores para descrever a sensação de dispneia pelos pacientes foram estudados por análise de agrupamentos. Também foram investigadas as possíveis associações entre os agrupamentos encontrados e as quatro condições clínicas incluídas. RESULTADOS: O emprego dessa lista levou a uma solução com nove agrupamentos, denominados expiração, fome de ar, sufoco, superficial, rápido, aperto, falta de ar, trabalho e inspiração. Houve acentuada superposição no uso de descritores pelos pacientes com as quatro condições clínicas. Asma, DPOC e insuficiência cardíaca mostraram associações relevantes com inspiração. Insuficiência cardíaca mostrou associação adicional com trabalho, enquanto nenhum agrupamento se associou de maneira expressiva com obesidade. CONCLUSÕES: O uso de descritores de dispneia traduzidos da língua inglesa por pacientes no Brasil levou a identificação de agrupamentos distintos, os quais guardaram semelhança com aqueles obtidos em um estudo nos EUA. Esses descritores traduzidos foram menos úteis do que um grupo de descritores desenvolvi