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Sample records for dysphagia modifications involving

  1. Family Involvement in School-Based Dysphagia Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Maureen E.; Bailey, Rita L.; Nicholson, Joanna K.; Stoner, Julia B.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a practitioner-friendly synthesis of existing literature on family involvement in the management of dysphagia for school-age. Research reviewed includes family perspectives on programs, therapists, and characteristics that comprise effective family involvement in school-based dysphagia management programs. Also included are…

  2. Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscles and nerves used for swallowing may cause dysphagia. For example, people with diseases of the nervous system, such as cerebral palsy or Parkinson’s disease, often have problems swallowing. Additionally, stroke or ...

  3. The correlation between dysphagia and involvement of the ambiguous nucleus on MRI in acute-phase lateral medullary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurono, Hiroko; Uesaka, Yoshikazu; Kunimoto, Masanari; Imafuku, Ichirou

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the clinical features and MRI findings of 21 patients admitted for acute lateral medullary syndrome, including 10 patients with dysphagia, were examined. According to Cytoarchitecture of the Human Brain Stem (Olszewski, J and Baxter, D), MRI-identified lesions were classified into four groups based on their location (upper, middle-upper, middle-lower, and lower parts of the medulla oblongata). We also examined whether each lesion involved the ambiguous nucleus (AN). We then studied the correlation between dysphagia and involvement of the AN. Ten patients had dysphagia, which improved very quickly in all but one. In the horizontal plane, lesions of all patients with dysphagia exhibited AN involvement, suggesting that dysphagia is strongly correlated with AN involvement. Among the 8 patients with lesions in the upper part of the medulla oblongata, the lesions of 7 patients included the AN, and 6 of those 7 patients had dysphagia. Among the 5 patients with lesions in the middle-upper part of the medulla oblongata, the lesions of two contained the AN, and one of those two patients had dysphagia. Among the 6 patients with lesions in the middle-lower part of the medulla oblongata, all lesions contained the AN, but only 3 of the patients exhibited dysphagia. In both patients who had lesions in the lower part of the medulla oblongata, the lesions did not include the AN and neither patient had dysphagia. Patients who had lesions involving the AN in the rostral part of the medulla oblongata were more likely to have dysphagia than the other patients. On the other hand, half of the patients with lesions involving the AN in the middle-lower part of the medulla oblongata did not have dysphagia. This might suggest that the caudal part of the AN has little involvement in the mechanisms of dysphagia. (author)

  4. Study on viscosity modification of human and formula milk for infants with dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Bartha de Mattos Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: to analyze the modification of the viscosity of human milk and infant formula. Methods: three studies were performed to assess the viscosity and effect of time on infant formula with a thickener, at concentrations of 2, 3, and 5%, as well as raw and pasteurized human milk at concentrations of 2, 3, 5, and 7% at 37ºC, for 60 minutes. Rice cereal was used as a thickening agent. The viscosity was evaluated using a Ford Cup-type viscometer, and the samples were analyzed at 20-minute intervals. Significant differences were assessed using the ANOVA test. Results: no significant differences in viscosity were observed over time in concentrations of 2, 3, and 5%. There was a difference in the viscosity between human milk and infant formula, in concentrations of 2% and 5%, 2% and 7%, 3% and 5%, and 3% and 7%, independently of the time intervals evaluated. Conclusion: the findings of this study demonstrate the need for different concentrations of the thickening agent for human milk and infant formula. Rice cereal is a suitable therapeutic option for newborns presented with dysphagia in concentrations of 2, 3, 5, and 7%, due to its effect on the viscosity and flow reduction, provided that the feeding time is considered.

  5. [Transdisciplinary approach for sarcopenia. Sarcopenic Dysphagia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka

    2014-10-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is difficulty swallowing due to sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles. Presbyphagia refers to age-related changes in the swallowing mechanism in the elderly associated with a frailty in swallowing. Presbyphagia is different from dysphagia. The most common cause of dysphagia is stroke. However, sarcopenic dysphagia may be common in the elderly with sarcopenia and dysphagia. Frail elderly with aspiration pneumonia can simultaneously experience activity-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles, resulting in the development of sarcopenic dysphagia. Consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenic dysphagia were proposed at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Dysphagia Rehabilitation. The concept of rehabilitation nutrition as a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management is useful for treatment of sarcopenic dysphagia. Therapy for sarcopenic dysphagia includes dysphagia rehabilitation, nutrition improvement and sarcopenia treatment. The core components of dysphagia rehabilitation are oral health care, rehabilitative techniques, and food modification. Nutrition improvement is important, because malnutrition contributes to the etiology of secondary sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia. Assessment of the multi-factorial causes of primary and secondary sarcopenia is important because rehabilitation nutrition for sarcopenia differs depending on its etiology. Treatment of age-related sarcopenia should include resistance training and dietary supplements of amino acids. Therapy for activity-related sarcopenia includes reduced bed rest time and early mobilization and physical activity. Treatment for disease-related sarcopenia requires therapies for advanced organ failure, inflammatory disease, or malignancy, while therapy for nutrition-related sarcopenia involves appropriate nutrition management to increase muscle mass.

  6. Oropharyngeal dysphagia.

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    Cook, Ian J

    2009-09-01

    Although the aging process per se can produce measurable changes in the normal oropharyngeal swallow, these changes alone are rarely sufficient to cause clinically apparent dysphagia. The causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia in the elderly are predominantly neuromyogenic, with the most common cause being stroke. The evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in the elderly involves early exclusion of structural abnormalities, detection of aspiration by videofluoroscopy which might dictate early introduction of nonoral feeding, and exclusion of underlying systemic and neuromyogenic causes that have specific therapies in their own right. Such conditions include Parkinson disease, myositis, myasthenia, and thyrotoxicosis. Management is best delivered by a multidisciplinary team involving physician, speech pathologist, nutritionist and, at times, a surgeon.

  7. Promoting shared decision-making in rehabilitation: development of a framework for situations when patients with Dysphagia refuse diet modification recommended by the treating team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizer, Franceen; Spiridigliozzi, Anna-Maria; Hunt, Matthew R

    2012-03-01

    To address the risks of aspiration pneumonia, patients with dysphagia may be prescribed a modified diet. The goal of diet modification is to decrease the risk of patients aspirating food due to their diminished swallowing reflex. Some patients may not accept diet modification or may not adhere to the treatments identified by the interdisciplinary team. Such scenarios may result in important moral uncertainty and concern for clinicians. As a result of several ethics consultations related to this issue, a working group of the Clinical Ethics Committee at the Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital in Laval, Quebec, Canada, developed a framework for responding to situations when patients do not adhere to recommended diet modification. The goal of this tool is to facilitate discussion and collaboration between clinicians and patients, to clarify assumed versus real risk, and to promote shared decision-making in dysphagia care. In this article we examine the clinical context of diet modification for patients with dysphagia in rehabilitation hospitals, explore ethical aspects of this topic, present the clinical algorithm, and discuss our experience with developing and piloting this tool.

  8. Dysphagia in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlgemuth, M.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Kalf, J.G.; Joosten, F.B.M.; Vliet, A.M. van der; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Dysphagia is not considered a symptom of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In this study, the authors found that dysphagia does occur in patients with advanced FSHD showing mild involvement of the jaw and lingual muscles. Dysphagia is seldom life threatening in these patients. The

  9. [Dysphagia and swallowing rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Fujishima, Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Dysphagia is a life-threatening disorder caused by many medical conditions such as stroke, neurological disorders, tumors, etc. The symptoms of dysphagia are quite variable and diagnosed by observation or through screening involving instrumental swallowing examinations such as video-fluoroscopy and video-endoscopy, to determine functional severity and treatment-prognosis. Direct- and indirect-therapy is used with and without food, respectively. Swallowing rehabilitation is very effective, and could be used in conjunction with compensatory techniques. Here we present an overview of dysphagia and swallowing rehabilitation.

  10. Dysphagia in the Elderly

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    Aslam, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients are inherently predisposed to dysphagia predominately because of comorbid health conditions. With the aging of the population in the United States, along with the increased prevalence of obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease, healthcare providers will increasingly encounter older patients with either oropharyngeal or esophageal disease and complaints of dysphagia. Useful tests to evaluate dysphagia include the videofluoroscopic swallowing study and the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Swallow rehabilitation is useful to help patients compensate for swallowing difficulty and ultimately help strengthen the neuromusculature involved in swallowing. PMID:24772045

  11. Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrup, Inga; Warnecke, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    More than 80 % of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop dysphagia during the course of their disease. Swallowing impairment reduces quality of life, complicates medication intake and leads to malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. Although the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood, it has been shown that dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the development of dysphagia in PD. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in PD patients is challenging and often delivers unreliable results. A modified water test assessing maximum swallowing volume is recommended to uncover oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD. PD-specific questionnaires may also be useful to identify patients at risk for swallowing impairment. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and videofluoroscopic swallowing study are both considered to be the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. In addition, high-resolution manometry may be a helpful tool. These instrumental methods allow a reliable detection of aspiration events. Furthermore, typical patterns of impairment during the oral, pharyngeal and/or esophageal swallowing phase of PD patients can be identified. Therapy of dysphagia in PD consists of pharmacological interventions and swallowing treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs). Fluctuating dysphagia with deterioration during the off-state should be treated by optimizing dopaminergic medication. The methods used during swallowing treatment by SLTs shall be selected according to the individual dysphagia pattern of each PD patient. A promising novel method is an intensive training of expiratory muscle strength. Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinical relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. The goal of this review is giving an overview on current stages of epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of PD-associated dysphagia, which might be helpful for neurologists

  12. Dysphagia lusoria: a late onset presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Alice Louise; Cock, Charles; Heddle, Richard; Morcom, Russell Kym

    2013-04-21

    Dysphagia lusoria is a term used to describe dysphagia secondary to vascular compression of the oesophagus. The various embryologic anomalies of the arterial brachial arch system often remain unrecognised and asymptomatic, but in 30%-40% of cases can result in tracheo-oesophageal symptoms, which in the majority of cases manifest as dysphagia. Diagnosis of dysphagia lusoria is via barium swallow and chest Computed tomography scan. Manometric abnormalities are variable, but age-related manometric changes may contribute to clinically relevant dysphagia lusoria in patients who present later in life. Our report describes a case of late-onset dysphagia secondary to a right aortic arch with an aberrant left subclavian artery, which represents a rare variant of dysphagia lusoria. The patient had proven additional oesophageal dysmotility with solid bolus only and a clinical response to dietary modification.

  13. Consumer perceptions of food products involving genetic modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Lähteenmäki, L.; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    2001-01-01

    Product descriptions of cheese, candy and salmon products were presented to samples of respondents in four Nordic countries. The descriptions represented various applications of genetic modification (GM), varied along a "distance" dimension and a "what is modified" dimension, and were presented...... along with a conventionally produced product. Respondents ranked the products according to preference, and their perceptions were ascertained by the laddering method. Results indicate that respondents regard "non-GM" as a value in itself, and associate the use of GM with a host of negative consequences...... were product specific....

  14. Modeling of modification experiments involving neutral-gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments involve the injection of neutral gases into the upper atmosphere. Examples are critical velocity experiments, MHD wave generation, ionospheric hole production, plasma striation formation, and ion tracing. Many of these experiments are discussed in other sessions of the Active Experiments Conference. This paper limits its discussion to: (1) the modeling of the neutral gas dynamics after injection, (2) subsequent formation of ionosphere holes, and (3) use of such holes as experimental tools

  15. Cervical osteophyte induced dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.P.; Sage, M.R.; Brophy, B.P.

    1989-01-01

    Although cervical spondylosis is a common disorder, dysphagia induced by osteophyte formation is uncommon. Fewer than one hundred cases of cervical osteophyte induced dysphagia have been reported, with little attention to the diagnosis by barium swallow. The radiological features of two cases treated surgically with good results are described. Both cases complained of dysphagia while one had associated respiratory obstruction on forward flexion of his neck. The features on barium study of cervical osteophytes causing dysphagia include deformity at the level of osteophyte formation, in both AP and lateral projections. Tracheal aspirations due to deformity at the laryngeal inlet and interference with epiglottic retroversion may be present. 8 refs., 3 figs

  16. DYSPHAGIA AND SIALORRHEA:

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    Denise Hack NICARETTA

    Full Text Available ContextDysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease.ObjectiveThe aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease.MethodTwo Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by the scintigraphic method,ResultsVideofluoroscopic examination of the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing showed that 94% of Parkinson's diseases patients present, structural causes, not related to Parkinson's diseases, able to produce or intensify the observed disphagia. The scintigraphic examination of Parkinson's diseases patients with sialorrhea showed that there is no increase of serous saliva production. Nevertheless, showed a significantly higher velocity of saliva excretion in the Parkinson's diseases patients.ConclusionsDysphagia can be due to the muscular rigidity often present in the Parkinson's diseases patient, or more usually by non Parkinson's disease associated causes. In Parkinson's diseases patients, sialorrhea is produced by saliva retention. Nevertheless, sialorrhea can produce discomfort in swallowing, although without a formal complaint of dysphagia. In this case, subclinical dysphagia must be considered. Sialorrhea is indicative of dysphagia or at least of subclinical dysphagia. As final conclusion, Parkinson's diseases can be an isolated cause of dysphagia and/or sialorrhea, but frequently, a factor unrelated to Parkinson's diseases is the main cause of or at least aggravates the dysphagia.

  17. Dysphagia due to Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Ohki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH is usually asymptomatic. However, rarely, it causes dysphagia, hoarseness, dyspnea, snoring, stridor, and laryngeal edema. Herein, we present a patient with DISH causing dysphagia. A 70-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of sore throat, dysphagia, and foreign body sensation. Flexible laryngoscopy revealed a leftward-protruding posterior wall in the hypopharynx. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a bony mass pushing, anteriorly, on the posterior hypopharyngeal wall. Ossification included an osseous bridge involving 5 contiguous vertebral bodies. Dysphagia due to DISH was diagnosed. His symptoms were relieved by conservative therapy using anti-inflammatory drugs. However, if conservative therapy fails and symptoms are severe, surgical treatments must be considered.

  18. Dysphagia after Nissen fundoplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breumelhof, R.; Fellinger, H. W.; Vlasblom, V.; Jansen, A.; Smout, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Nissen fundoplication is a commonly used antireflux operation. After this operation symptoms such as dysphagia, inability to belch and vomit, and gas bloating are frequently reported in the literature. In 32 patients who underwent Nissen fundoplication 3.5-18 years ago, postprocedure dysphagia was

  19. Radiology of oesophageal dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A.J.; Nolan, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Dysphagia is defined as the sensation of difficulty in swallowing. The causes of dysphagia can be oropharyngeal or oesophageal. Oesophageal dysphagia develops as a result of mechanical obstruction or motility disorders and frequently causes distressing symptoms. Patients who develop oesophageal dysphagia can be easily and rapidly examined by routine barium techniques. The barium swallow remains a safe, accurate and widely available method for showing structural and functional oesophageal lesions, and for identifying those patients who require urgent endoscopic assessment and treatment. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) and endoscopic ultrasonography are available for the preoperative staging of oesophageal neoplasms. This article discusses the radiological appearances of the main oesophageal disorders that cause dysphagia in adults. (author). 15 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab

  20. Presbyphagia and Sarcopenic Dysphagia: Association between Aging, Sarcopenia, and Deglutition Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, H

    2014-01-01

    Presbyphagia refers to age-related changes in the swallowing mechanism in the elderly associated with a frailty in swallowing. Presbyphagia is different from dysphagia. Sarcopenic dysphagia is difficulty swallowing due to sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles. Age-related loss of swallowing muscle mass becomes evident in the geniohyoid muscle and tongue. Elderly subjects with both sarcopenia and dysphagia may have not only disease-related dysphagia but also sarcopenic dysphagia. In cases of aspiration pneumonia, deterioration in activity-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles may develop into sarcopenic dysphagia. Assessment of sarcopenic dysphagia includes evaluation of both dysphagia and sarcopenia. The 10-item Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and a water test combined with pulse oximetry are useful for dysphagia screening. Assessment of the multi-factorial causes of sarcopenia including nutritional review is important, because rehabilitation of sarcopenic dysphagia differs depending on its etiology. Consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenic dysphagia were proposed at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Dysphagia Rehabilitation. Rehabilitation for sarcopenic dysphagia includes treatment of both dysphagia and sarcopenia. The core components of dysphagia rehabilitation are oral health care, rehabilitative techniques, and food modification. The causes of adult malnutrition may also contribute to the etiology of secondary sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia. Therefore, nutrition management is indispensable for sarcopenic dysphagia rehabilitation. In cases of sarcopenia with numerous complicating causes, treatment should include pharmaceutical therapies for age-related sarcopenia and comorbid chronic diseases, resistance training, early ambulation, nutrition management, protein and amino acid supplementation, and non-smoking.

  1. Tongue pressure profile training for dysphagia post stroke (TPPT): study protocol for an exploratory randomized controlled trial.

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    Steele, Catriona M; Bayley, Mark A; Péladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Stokely, Shauna L

    2013-05-07

    It is estimated that approximately 50% of stroke survivors will experience swallowing difficulty, or dysphagia. The associated sequelae of dysphagia include dehydration, malnutrition, and aspiration pneumonia, all of which have can have serious medical consequences. To improve swallowing safety and efficiency, alternative nutritional intake methods (for example, a feeding tube) or a modified diet texture (such as pureed foods or thickened liquids) may be recommended but these modifications may negatively affect quality of life. An alternative approach to treating dysphagia has emerged over the past few years, targeting stronger lingual muscles through maximal isometric pressure tasks. Although these studies have shown promising results, thin-liquid bolus control continues to be challenging for patients with dysphagia. Previous work investigating lingual pressures when healthy participants swallow has suggested that greater task specificity in lingual exercises may yield improved results with thin liquids. This is a small, exploratory randomized clinical trial being conducted with post-stroke patients 4 to 20 weeks after onset of dysphagia secondary to impaired lingual control. At enrollment, participants are randomly assigned to one of two treatment protocols, either tongue pressure profile training (TPPT) or the control treatment, tongue pressure strength-and-accuracy training (TPSAT). Each treatment protocol consists of 24 sessions of treatment over 8 to 12 weeks with monitoring of tongue pressure as well as a baseline and outcome videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Tongue pressure measures, videofluoroscopic measures, and functional outcome measures will be obtained following training of 60 participants (30 in each condition), to determine whether TPPT yields better outcomes. This study will continue to explore options beyond tube feeding and modified diets for people with neurogenic dysphagia following stroke. Should the novel protocol, TPPT, prove to be more

  2. Dysphagia as initial presentation of primary amyloidosis

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    Piyush Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis involves all parts of the gastrointestinal tract including the esophagus. The esophageal involvement in amyloidosis has been reported to vary from 13% in a radiology study to 22% in an autopsy series; however, such patients have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. Dysphagia is an uncommon presentation of amyloidosis. We report a 64-year-old patient who presented with progressive dysphagia of 4 months duration which was confirmed to be due to primary amyloidosis with multiple myeloma. The esophageal involvement by amyloidosis was confirmed by esophageal mucosal biopsies, and 22-channel high-resolution manometry.

  3. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  4. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint

  5. A Rare Case of Esophageal Dysphagia in Children: Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery

    OpenAIRE

    Barone, Claudia; Carucci, Nicolina Stefania; Romano, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is an impairment of swallowing that may involve any structures from the mouth to the stomach. Esophageal dysphagia presents with the sensation of food sticking, pain with swallowing, substernal pressure, or chronic heartburn. There are many causes of esophageal dysphagia, such as motility disorders and mechanical and inflammatory diseases. Infrequently dysphagia arises from extrinsic compression of the esophagus from any vascular anomaly of the aortic arch. The most common embryolog...

  6. Dysphagia (Difficulty Swallowing)

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    ... Some of the causes of esophageal dysphagia include: Achalasia. When your lower esophageal muscle (sphincter) doesn't ... into your esophagus and cause frequent heartburn. Radiation therapy. This cancer treatment can lead to inflammation and ...

  7. Role of Epigenetic Histone Modifications in Diabetic Kidney Disease Involving Renal Fibrosis

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    Jing Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the commonest causes of end-stage renal disease is diabetic kidney disease (DKD. Renal fibrosis, characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in glomerular basement membranes and the tubulointerstitium, is the final manifestation of DKD. The TGF-β pathway triggers epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, which plays a key role in the accumulation of ECM proteins in DKD. DCCT/EDIC studies have shown that DKD often persists and progresses despite glycemic control in diabetes once DKD sets in due to prior exposure to hyperglycemia called “metabolic memory.” These imply that epigenetic factors modulate kidney gene expression. There is evidence to suggest that in diabetes and hyperglycemia, epigenetic histone modifications have a significant effect in modulating renal fibrotic and ECM gene expression induced by TGF-β1, as well as its downstream profibrotic genes. Histone modifications are also implicated in renal fibrosis through its ability to regulate the EMT process triggered by TGF-β signaling. In view of this, efforts are being made to develop HAT, HDAC, and HMT inhibitors to delay, stop, or even reverse DKD. In this review, we outline the latest advances that are being made to regulate histone modifications involved in DKD.

  8. Botulinum toxin alleviates dysphagia of patients with inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Aleksi; Airas, Laura; Jokela, Manu; Pulkkinen, Jaakko

    2017-09-15

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a disabling and undertreated symptom that often occurs in patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). In this study, we examined the effect of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) injections to the cricopharyngeus muscle (CPM) of patients with s-IBM and dysphagia. A single-center retrospective study involving 40 biopsy-proven s-IBM-patients treated in the District of Southwest Finland from 2000 to 2013. The incidence of dysphagia, rate of aspirations, rate of aspiration pneumonias and treatment results of dysphagia were analyzed. Patients treated for dysphagia were evaluated before and after surgery by video-fluoroscopy and/or using a questionnaire. Twenty-five of the 40 s-IBM patients (62.5%) experienced dysphagia. BoNT-A was injected a median of 2 times (range 1-7) in 12 patients with dysphagia. Before the injections 7 patients reported aspiration, none afterwards. The corresponding figures for aspiration pneumonia were 3 and 0. All of these patients had normal swallowing function 12months (median, range 2-60) after the last injection. BoNT-A injections to the CPM alleviate the dysphagia of s-IBM patients reversibly and appear to reduce the rate of aspiration effectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Progression of Dysphagia in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

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    Isono, Chiharu; Hirano, Makito; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Ueno, Shuichi; Kusunoki, Susumu; Nakamura, Yusaku

    2017-06-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant triplet repeat disease, predominantly affects the cerebellum with a late onset and generally good prognosis. Dysphagia is commonly associated with the outcomes of neurodegenerative diseases such as SCA6. Although the characteristics of dysphagia have been rarely reported in SCA6, our previous study indicated that dysphagia is generally milder in SCA6 than in SCA3, another inherited ataxia with multisystem involvement. However, abnormalities in the pharyngeal phase in SCA6 were indistinguishable from those in SCA3, with no explainable reason. To determine the reason, we repeatedly performed videofluoroscopic examinations (VF) in 14 patients with SCA6. The results showed that the gross progression of dysphagia was apparently slow, but four patients had progressive dysphagia at an early disease stage; dysphagia began within 10 years from the onset of ataxia and rapidly progressed. A common clinical feature of the four patients was a significantly older age at the onset of ataxia (74.0 vs. 60.3 years), associated with significantly shorter triplet repeats. This finding surprisingly indicated that patients who had shorter repeats and thereby later onset and potentially better prognoses were at risk for dysphagia-associated problems. Ischemic changes, homozygous mutation, and diabetes mellitus as well as aging might have contributed to the observed progressive dysphagia. We found that conventionally monitored somatosensory evoked potentials at least partly reflected progressive dysphagia. Despite the small study group, our findings suggest that clinicians should carefully monitor dysphagia in patients with SCA6 who are older at disease onset (>60 years).

  10. Dysphagia in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk-van den Berg, Willemien Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with an autosomal, dominant mode of inheritance. Patients with HD suffer from dysphagia which can have serious consequences, such as weight loss, dehydration, and pneumonia leading to death. Many patients with HD die of aspiration

  11. Enterobacter gergoviae membrane modifications are involved in the adaptive response to preservatives used in cosmetic industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périamé, Marina; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Davin-Regli, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the adaptive mechanisms in Enterobacter gergoviae which are involved in recurrent contaminations in cosmetic products that are incorporated with preservatives. Bacterial strains from two backgrounds were examined for a profound understanding of the mechanisms of adaptation against preservatives. It included a series of Ent. gergoviae strain-ATCC 33028 derivatives, isolated using increasing methylisothiazolinone-chloromethylisothiazolinone (MIT-CMIT) and triclosan concentrations. The other series was of Ent. gergoviae isolates from cosmetic products exhibiting MIT-CMIT and triclosan resistance. We evaluated the outer membrane protein modifications and efflux mechanisms activities responsible for the resistant trait via immunoblotting assays. Additionally, for understanding the efflux activity real-time efflux, experiments were performed. A cross-insusceptibility between preservatives and some disinfectants was observed in MIT-CMIT-resistant derivative isolates, but antibiotics susceptibility was not altered. Resistance to EDTA was significant in all preservatives insusceptible derivative strains, indicating modifications in the LPS layer. Furthermore, an array of real-time efflux assays indicated different activity levels while no variations were detected in porins and AcrAB-TolC pumps production. Overexpression of a specific flagellin-type protein was observed in one of the MIT-CMIT- and triclosan-resistant strains. Another candidate, a 25-kDa peroxiredoxin enzyme involved in oxidative detoxification, was identified to be overexpressed in MIT-CMIT derivative. A similar profile was also observed among strains isolated from cosmetic products. Our study highlights the existence of adaptive mechanisms such as overexpression of detoxifying enzymes, flagellin, modification of membrane structure/function in Ent. gergoviae. They might be involved in recurrent episodes of contaminations occurring in the cosmetic production

  12. Efficiency of cineradiography in the diagnosis of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelerich, M.; Mai, R.; Mueller-Miny, H.; Peters, P.E.

    1995-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom in clinical practice. Due to the broad spectrum of underlying diseases many disciplines are involved in the therapy and diagnosis of dysphagia, where radiology plays a central role. The radiologist is confronted with different diagnostic problems and has to choose the most appropriate type of investigation. In many cases no organic disorder can be demonstrated by clinical examination, endoscopy or conventional radiological techniques. In this setting cineradiography is an outstanding tool for finding functional or structural changes in the swallowing chain. This study underlines the efficiency of cineradiography in the diagnosis of dysphagia. (orig.) [de

  13. [Efficacy of high-frequency cinematography in diagnosis of dysphagia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelerich, M; Mai, R; Müller-Miny, H; Peters, P E

    1995-10-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom in clinical practice. Due to the broad spectrum of underlying diseases many disciplines are involved in the therapy and diagnosis of dysphagia, where radiology plays a central role. The radiologist is confronted with different diagnostic problems and has to choose the most appropriate type of investigation. In many cases no organic disorder can be demonstrated by clinical examination, endoscopy or conventional radiological techniques. In this setting cineradiography is an outstanding tool for finding functional or structural changes in the swallowing chain. This study underlines the efficiency of cineradiography in the diagnosis of dysphagia.

  14. The Use of Brain Stimulation in Dysphagia Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Andre; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2017-04-01

    Dysphagia is common sequela of brain injury with as many as 50% of patients suffering from dysphagia following stroke. Currently, the majority of guidelines for clinical practice in the management of dysphagia focus on the prevention of complications while any natural recovery takes place. Recently, however, non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques like transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have started to attract attention and are applied to investigate both the physiology of swallowing and influences on dysphagia. TMS allows for painless stimulation of the brain through an intact skull-an effect which would normally be impossible with electrical currents due to the high resistance of the skull. By comparison, tDCS involves passing a small electric current (usually under 2 mA) produced by a current generator over the scalp and cranium external to the brain. Initial studies used these techniques to better understand the physiological mechanisms of swallowing in healthy subjects. More recently, a number of studies have investigated the efficacy of these techniques in the management of neurogenic dysphagia with mixed results. Controversy still exists as to which site, strength and duration of stimulation yields the greatest improvement in dysphagia. And while multiple studies have suggested promising effects of NIBS, more randomised control trials with larger sample sizes are needed to investigate the short- and long-term effects of NIBS in neurogenic dysphagia.

  15. Dysphagia after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, Peter; Jacobsen, Bo

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency and severity of dysphagia during the first 8 weeks after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. So far, there have been no studies reporting data on day-to-day occurrence of dysphagia after laparoscopic fundoplication...... in a consecutive series of patients. This may explain why the frequency of dysphagia varies greatly in the literature (4-100%). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients, undergoing elective laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication, completed a standard dysphagia registration diary each day during the first 8...... weeks after surgery. Patients who preoperatively had suffered from dysphagia were excluded. Thus, none of the patients had dysphagia in the 2-month period before surgery. Ten patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy served as controls. Data were quantified, and a score value of 4 or more...

  16. Consumer perception of food products involving genetic modification: Results from a qualitative study in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Lähteenmäki, Liisa; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    2000-01-01

    1. The present study addresses consumer acceptance of food products involving the use of different applications of genetic modification in four Nordic countries. Three food products were used as examples: hard cheese, hard candy, and salmon. Three types of applications of genetic modification were...... in the final product has a clear impact on consumer acceptance. When the GM material is present and viable/able to function, acceptance is lowest. 5. The type of application of genetic modification has an impact on consumer acceptance as well, but it differs across products. Still, there is a clear tendency...

  17. IMRT for head and neck cancer: reducing xerostomia and dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, XiaoShen; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia and xerostomia are the main sequellae of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and the main factors in reducing long-term patient quality of life. IMRT uses advanced technology to focus the high radiation doses on the targets and avoid irradiation of non-involved tissues. The decisions about sparing organs and tissues whose damage causes xerostomia and dysphagia depends on the evidence for dose–response relationships for the organs causing these sequellae. This paper discusses the evidence for the contribution of radiotherapy to xerostomia via damage of the major salivary glands (parotid and submandibular) and minor salivary glands within the oral cavity, and the contribution of radiotherapy-related effect on important swallowing structures causing dysphagia. Recommendations for dose limits to these organs, based on measurements of xerostomia and dysphagia following radiotherapy, are provided here

  18. Nutritional Aspects of Dysphagia Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, C; Brito-de la Fuente, E; Clavé, P; Costa, A; Assegehegn, G

    This chapter describes the nutritional aspects of dysphagia management by starting with the definition of these two conditions (dysphagia and malnutrition) that share three main clinical characteristics: (a) their prevalence is very high, (b) they can lead to severe complications, and (c) they are frequently underrecognized and neglected conditions. From an anatomical standpoint, dysphagia can result from oropharyngeal and/or esophageal causes; from a pathophysiological perspective, dysphagia can be caused by organic or structural diseases (either benign or malignant) or diseases causing impaired physiology (mainly motility and/or perception disorders). This chapter gathers up-to-date information on the screening and diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia, the consequences of dysphagia (aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, and dehydration), and on the nutritional management of dysphagic patients. Concerning this last topic, this chapter reviews the rheological aspects of swallowing and dysphagia (including shear and elongational flows) and its influence on the characteristics of the enteral nutrition for dysphagia management (solid/semisolid foods and thickened liquids; ready-to-use oral nutritional supplements and thickening powders), with special focus on the real characteristics of the bolus after mixing with human saliva. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An overview of pediatric dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasse, Jane E; Kikano, George E

    2009-04-01

    Difficulty swallowing or dysphagia can be present in children and adults alike. Pediatric dysphagias have long been recognized in the literature. Certain groups of infants with specific developmental and/or medical conditions have been identified as being at high risk for developing dysphagia. Still others may present with a swallowing or feeding problem as their primary symptom. Left untreated, these problems in infants and children can lead to failure to thrive, aspiration pneumonias, gastroesophageal reflux, and/or the inability to establish and maintain proper nutrition and hydration. Awareness of the prevalence of pediatric dysphagia in today's population and the signs and symptoms of this condition aids in its treatment. Early detection of dysphagia in infants and children is important to prevent or minimize complications. This article provides a review of symptoms, etiologies, and resources available regarding management of this condition to help the primary care physician and the families of young children and infants in its management.

  20. Clinical Characteristics of Dysphagia in Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Arwen; Maybee, Jennifer; Moran, Maura K; Wolter-Warmerdam, Kristine; Hickey, Francis

    2016-10-01

    Aspiration is an often unrecognized comorbidity in children with Down syndrome with serious medical consequences. This retrospective chart review of swallow study reports characterizes oral and pharyngeal phase dysphagia and diet modifications on videofluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) in a large cohort of children with Down syndrome. A total of 158 pediatric patients (male = 95; female = 63; mean age 2.10 years, SD 3.17 years) received an initial VFSS at a pediatric teaching hospital as part of their medical care. A total of 56.3 % (n = 89) children had pharyngeal phase dysphagia with aspiration and deep laryngeal penetration occurring most frequently. Of the 61 patients who aspirated, 90.2 % (n = 55) did so silently with no cough or overt clinical symptoms. In 76.7 % of cases of pharyngeal phase dysphagia, a functional feeding plan, with use of thickened liquids or change in feeding system to control flow rate and/or bolus size, was able to be established, which allowed children to continue eating by mouth. Thickened liquids (76.7 %, n = 46) were the most effective adaptation, with change in feeding system alone effective in only 8.3 % (n = 5) cases. Oral phase dysphagia was reported in the majority of patients (63.8 %, n = 88/138); however, this was not predictive of pharyngeal phase dysphagia. Age, sex, and reason for referral, including prior clinical symptoms, did not have a statistically significant impact on the presence of dysphagia. This comprehensive review has application to clinical understanding and management of dysphagia in children with Down syndrome.

  1. A Targeted Swallow Screen for the Detection of Postoperative Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Erica; Lancaster, Elizabeth; Meltzer, Jospeh; Mendelsohn, Abie H; Benharash, Peyman

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative dysphagia leads to aspiration pneumonia, prolonged hospital stay, and is associated with increased mortality. A simple and sensitive screening test to identify patients requiring objective dysphagia evaluation is presently lacking. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of a novel targeted swallow screen evaluation. This was a prospective trial involving all adult patients who underwent elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at our institution over an 8-week period. Within 24 hours of extubation and before the initiation of oral intake, all postsurgical patients were evaluated using the targeted swallow screen. A fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing was requested for failed screenings. During the study, 50 postcardiac surgery patients were screened. Fifteen (30%) failed the targeted swallow screen, and ten of the fifteen (66%) failed the subsequent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing exam and were confirmed to have dysphagia. The screening test had 100 per cent sensitivity for detecting dysphagia in our patient population, and a specificity of 87.5 per cent. The overall incidence of dysphagia was 20 per cent. We have shown that a targeted swallow evaluation can efficiently screen patients during the postcardiac surgery period. Furthermore, we have shown that the true incidence of dysphagia after cardiac surgery is significantly higher than previously recognized in literature.

  2. Food Culture, Preferences and Ethics in Dysphagia Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Belinda

    2015-11-01

    Adults with dysphagia experience difficulties swallowing food and fluids with potentially harmful health and psychosocial consequences. Speech pathologists who manage patients with dysphagia are frequently required to address ethical issues when patients' food culture and/ or preferences are inconsistent with recommended diets. These issues incorporate complex links between food, identity and social participation. A composite case has been developed to reflect ethical issues identified by practising speech pathologists for the purposes of illustrating ethical concerns in dysphagia management. The case examines a speech pathologist's role in supporting patient autonomy when patients and carers express different goals and values. The case presents a 68-year-old man of Australian/Italian heritage with severe swallowing impairment and strong values attached to food preferences. The case is examined through application of the dysphagia algorithm, a tool for shared decision-making when patients refuse dietary modifications. Case analysis revealed the benefits and challenges of shared decision-making processes in dysphagia management. Four health professional skills and attributes were identified as synonymous with shared decision making: communication, imagination, courage and reflection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Dysphagia and Speech-Language Pathology Involvement Following Chemical Ingestion Injury: A Review of 44 Cases Admitted to a Quaternary Australian Hospital (2008-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbach, Anna F; Cremer, Rebecca

    2017-11-08

    This study aimed to explore the clinical characteristics of an adult chemical ingestion population and examine the course of return to oral intake post injury and speech-language pathologist (SLP) involvement during the initial acute-care admission. A retrospective chart review of adults admitted to a quaternary hospital for the treatment of an acute chemical ingestion injury between 2008 and 2012 was conducted. Forty-four adults (23 men, 21 women) were identified as receiving treatment for ingestion injury, of whom 18 (40.91%) required altered oral intake. Of those requiring altered oral intake, 50% were referred to SLPs. Individuals requiring altered oral intake were significantly (p < .05) older, more likely to be men, and present with more severe injuries requiring longer ICU and hospital admissions following intentional chemical ingestions than those who were able to commence a normal oral diet without any alteration or nonoral supplementation. By discharge, 15.91% (n = 7) of the total cohort had not resumed normal oral intake. Return to oral intake post chemical ingestion injury can be protracted and complex. Referrals to SLPs were limited. These data may aid prognostic insight as well as provide (a) collateral information to assist discharge planning and follow-up and (b) background for evaluating the potential for SLP involvement.

  4. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia...

  5. Dysphagia due to tardive dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pookala S Bhat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dyskinesia (TD, neuroleptic-induced delayed onset movement disorder, remains an enigmatic phenomenon and a therapeutic challenge. Only a few cases of dysphagia also have been reported in world literature and to the best knowledge of the authors no case of TD manifesting as isolated dysphagia has been reported so far from India. We report a case of TD consequent to prolonged exposure to typical neuroleptics, manifesting as isolated dysphagia who responded well to a combination of Quetiapine, Donepezil and Vit E.

  6. Provision of dysphagia services in a developing nation: Infrastructural challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustaffa Kamal, Rahayu; Ward, Elizabeth Celeste; Cornwell, Petrea; Sharma, Shobha

    2015-04-15

    The purpose of the current study was to explore infrastructure issues that may be barriers to the establishment and improvement of dysphagia services in Malaysia compared to settings with established dysphagia management services (i.e. Queensland, Australia). A mixed method design incorporating quantitative and qualitative data was used to increase credibility, validity and comprehensiveness of the results. Thirty-eight hospitals (Malaysia = 21, Queensland = 17) participated in Phase 1 (quantitative component) of the study involving completion of an infrastructure checklist by a speech-language pathologist from each hospital regarding availability of networking and communication, staffing and financial support, facilities and documentation of guidelines for dysphagia management. Subsequently, eight sub-samples from each cohort were then involved in Phase 2 (qualitative component) of the study involving a semi-structured interview on issues related to the impact of infrastructure availability or constraints on service provision. The current study reveals that multiple challenges exist with regard to dysphagia services in Malaysian government hospitals compared to Queensland public hospitals. Overall, it was identified that service improvement in Malaysia requires change at a systems and structures level, but also, more importantly, at the individual/personal level, particularly focusing on the culture, behaviour and attitudes among the staff regarding dysphagia services.

  7. Laryngopharyngeal abnormalities in hospitalized patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Gregory N; McGuirt, W Frederick; Butler, Susan G; Rees, Catherine J; Crandall, Heather L; Tansavatdi, Kristina

    2007-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of laryngopharyngeal (LP) abnormalities in hospitalized patients with dysphagia referred for flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). Retrospective, blinded review by two otolaryngologists of 100 consecutive FEES studies performed and video-recorded by a speech-language pathologist (SLP). Two otolaryngologists reviewed videos of 100 consecutive FEES studies on hospitalized patients with dysphagia for the presence of abnormal LP findings. Sixty-one male and 38 female patients comprised the hospital dysphagia cohort. The mean age was 62. One subject could not be evaluated because of the severity of the retained secretions, leaving 99 subjects in the cohort. Seventy-six percent had been previously intubated, with a mean intubation duration of 13 days. The overall prevalence of abnormal LP findings was 79%. Forty-five percent of the patients presented with two or more findings, which included arytenoid edema (33%), granuloma (31%), vocal fold paresis (24%), mucosal lesions (17%), vocal fold bowing (14%), diffuse edema (11%), airway stenosis (3%), and ulcer (6%). There was a significant difference in LP findings between those individuals who had or had not been intubated. Hospitalized patients with dysphagia are at high risk for LP abnormalities, particularly if they have been intubated, and may benefit from either 1) an initial joint examination by the SLP and otolaryngologist or 2) an otolaryngologist's review of the recorded examination conducted by the SLP. Such otolaryngology involvement could identify airway stenosis patients at an earlier stage, initiate granuloma treatment sooner, enable earlier biopsy of unexpected lesions, and allow follow-up of mucosal and neuromuscular findings that do not respond to medical management.

  8. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Heroes Among Us Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia) Updated:Nov 15,2016 Excerpted and adapted from "Swallowing Disorders After a Stroke," Stroke Connection Magazine July/August ...

  9. Prolonged refractory dysphagia in polymyositis

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Mathew; Mohan Muvvala; G R K Sarma; Raghunandan Nadig

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report a patient with polymyositis (biopsy proved) with dysphagia that did not improve with conventional treatment. An upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy showed esophageal stricture and a biopsy taken from the site revealed evidence of squamous cell carcinoma.

  10. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function.

  11. Recovery of Dysphagia in lateral medullary stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function.

  12. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function. PMID:25045555

  13. Oesophageal dysphagia: manifestations and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Frank; Omari, Taher

    2015-06-01

    Oesophageal dysphagia is a common symptom, which might be related to severe oesophageal diseases such as carcinomas. Therefore, an organic process must be ruled out in the first instance by endoscopy in all patients presenting with dysphagia symptoms. The most prevalent obstructive aetiologies are oesophageal cancer, peptic strictures and eosinophilic oesophagitis. Eosinophilic oesophagitis is one of the most common causes of dysphagia in adults and children, thus justifying the need to obtain oesophageal biopsy samples from all patients presenting with unexplained dysphagia. With the advent of standardized high-resolution manometry and specific metrics to characterize oesophageal motility, the Chicago classification has become a gold-standard algorithm for manometric diagnosis of oesophageal motor disorders. In addition, sophisticated investigations and analysis methods that combine pressure and impedance measurement are currently in development. In the future, these techniques might be able to detect subtle pressure abnormalities during bolus transport, which could further explain pathophysiology and symptoms. The degree to which novel approaches will help distinguish dysphagia caused by motor abnormalities from functional dysphagia still needs to be determined.

  14. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  15. Eighty-year-old man with 10 years dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Showkat A Kadla; Nisar Ahmad Shah; Shaheena Parveen; Bilal A Khan; Asif I Shah; Shaheen Nazir Lone; Sandeep Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is a sensation of food being "stuck" up in its passage from the mouth to stomach. It is of two main types, oropharyngeal dysphagia, and esophageal dysphagia. In oropharyngeal dysphagia, there is difficulty in transferring the food from the mouth to upper esophagus. Thus, this dysphagia is also called as transfer dysphagia. It occurs within 1 st 1-2 s of the swallow. We also call this dysphagia as instant dysphagia. It is almost always associated with sinobronchial symptoms. The seco...

  16. m6AVar: a database of functional variants involved in m6A modification

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yueyuan; Nie, Peng; Peng, Di; He, Zhihao; Liu, Mengni; Xie, Yubin; Miao, Yanyan; Zuo, Zhixiang; Ren, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Identifying disease-causing variants among a large number of single nucleotide variants (SNVs) is still a major challenge. Recently, N 6-methyladenosine (m6A) has become a research hotspot because of its critical roles in many fundamental biological processes and a variety of diseases. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the effect of variants on m6A modification, in order to gain a better understanding of them. Here, we report m6AVar (http://m6avar.renlab.org), a comprehensive da...

  17. [Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrup, I; Warnecke, T

    2016-07-01

    Oropharyngeal and esophageal dysphagia are a frequent, but seldom diagnosed symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). More than 80 % of patients with PD develop dysphagia during the course of their disease leading to a reduced quality of life, complicated medication intake, malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. The underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. Impaired dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms of the cortical swallowing network as well as peripheral neuromuscular involvement have been suggested to contribute to its multifactorial genesis. Diagnostic screening methods include PD-specific questionnaires and a modified water test. Fiber optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS), which complement each other, are the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. For evaluation of esophageal dysphagia, the high-resolution manometry (HRM) may be a helpful tool. In addition to dysphagia-specific treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs), optimized dopaminergic medication is a meaningful therapeutic option. A promising novel method is intensive training of expiratory muscle strength (EMST). Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinically relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Impact of dysphagia on quality of life after treatment of head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Frank, Cheryl; Moltz, Candace C.; Vos, Paul; Smith, Herbert J.; Karlsson, Ulf; Dutta, Suresh; Midyett, Allan; Barloon, Jessica; Sallah, Sabah

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the quality of life (QOL) associated with dysphagia after head-and-neck cancer treatment. Methods and materials: Of a total population of 104, a retrospective analysis of 73 patients who complained of dysphagia after primary radiotherapy (RT), chemoradiotherapy, and postoperative RT for head-and-neck malignancies were evaluated. All patients underwent a modified barium swallow examination to assess the severity of dysphagia, graded on a scale of 1-7. QOL was evaluated by the University of Washington (UW) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression questionnaires. The QOL scores obtained were compared with those from the 31 patients who were free of dysphagia after treatment. The QOL scores were also graded according to the dysphagia severity. Results: The UW and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scores were reduced and elevated, respectively, in the dysphagia group compared with the no dysphagia group (p = 0.0005). The UW scores were also substantially lower among patients with moderate-to-severe (Grade 4-7) compared with no or mild (Grade 2-3) dysphagia (p = 0.0005). The corresponding Hospital Anxiety (p = 0.005) and Depression (p = 0.0001) scores were also greater for the moderate-to-severe group. The UW QOL subscale scores showed a statistically significant decrease for swallowing (p = 0.00005), speech (p = 0.0005), recreation/entertainment (p = 0.0005), disfigurement (p = 0.0006), activity (p = 0.005), eating (p = 0.002), shoulder disability (p = 0.006), and pain (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Dysphagia is a significant morbidity of head-and-neck cancer treatment, and the severity of dysphagia correlated with a compromised QOL, anxiety, and depression. Patients with moderate-to-severe dysphagia require a team approach involving nutritional support, physical therapy, speech rehabilitation, pain management, and psychological counseling

  19. Treatment effects for dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooren, M R A; Baijens, L W J; Voskuilen, S; Oosterloo, M; Kremer, B

    2014-08-01

    Dysphagia remains a common problem in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous systematic reviews on therapy effects for oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD have shown a lack of evidence. In the past 5 years several placebo or sham-controlled trials with varying results have been published. The aim of this systematic literature review is to summarize and qualitatively analyze the published studies on this matter. Studies published up to December 2013 were found via a systematic comprehensive electronic database search using PubMed, Embase, and The Cochrane Library. Two reviewers independently assessed the studies using strict inclusion criteria. Twelve studies were included and qualitatively analyzed using critical appraisal items. The review includes rehabilitative (exercises, electrical stimulation, bolus modification etc.) and pharmacologic treatment. Some well-designed controlled trials were included. However, none of the included studies fulfilled all criteria for external and internal validity. A meta-analysis was not carried out as most of the studies were not of sufficient quality to warrant doing so. Expiratory Muscle Strength Training (EMST) and Video-Assisted Swallowing Therapy (VAST) may be effective dysphagia treatments solely or in addition to dopaminergic therapy for PD. However, these preliminary results warrant further investigation concerning their clinical applicability, and further research should be based on randomized sham-controlled trials to determine the effectiveness and long-term effects of different therapies for dysphagia in PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dysphagia Aortica: Diagnostic Dilemma and Therapeutic Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivanesan Pitchai

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Dysphagia due to vascular diseases in the thoracic domain is an uncommon clinical entity. Patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm presenting with severe dysphagia deserve open surgical repair to provide optimal symptomatic relief in addition to saving life. The state-of-the-art endovascular stent grafting may be considered in very elderly patient having severe comorbidities presenting with mild dysphagia.

  1. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Practice Guidelines: Evaluation of Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Cockeram, Alan W

    1998-01-01

    Dysphagia may be defined as difficulty in swallowing. Dysphagia may be classified as oropharyngeal or esophageal; oropharyngeal dysphagia arises from a structural or functional abnormality in the oropharynx, and esophageal dysphagia occurs as a result of structural or functional abnormalities in the esophagus. Esophageal dysphagia may be further subclassified symptomatically as dysphagia for solids alone, which usually suggests a mechanical problem, versus dysphagia for liquids and solids, wh...

  2. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Antonio; Mozzanica, Francesco; Sonzini, Giulia; Plebani, Daniela; Urbani, Emanuele; Pecis, Marica; Montano, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated that patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may present subclinical manifestations of dysphagia, in not one were different textures and volumes systematically studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) with boluses of different textures and volumes in a large cohort of patients with OSAS. A total of 72 OSAS patients without symptoms of dysphagia were enrolled. The cohort was divided in two groups: 30 patients with moderate OSAS and 42 patients with severe OSAS. Each patient underwent a FEES examination using 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquids and semisolids, and solids. Spillage, penetration, aspiration, retention, and piecemeal deglutition were considered. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), pooling score (PS), and dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) were used for quantitative analysis. Each patient completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire. Forty-six patients (64 %) presented spillage, 20 (28 %) piecemeal deglutition, 26 (36 %) penetration, and 30 (44 %) retention. No differences were found in the PAS, PS, and DOSS scores between patients with moderate and severe OSAS. Patients with severe OSAS scored higher General Burden and Food selection subscales of the SWAL-QOL. Depending on the DOSS score, the cohort of patients was divided into those with and those without signs of dysphagia. Patients with signs of dysphagia scored lower in the General Burden and Symptoms subscales of the SWAL-QOL. OSAS patients show signs of swallowing impairment in about half of the population; clinicians involved in the management of these patients should include questions on swallowing when taking the medical history.

  3. Clinical evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Machado-Joseph disease

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    Sabrina Mello Alves Corrêa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: In Machado-Joseph disease, poor posture, dystonia and peripheral neuropathy are extremely predisposing to oropharyngeal dysphagia, which is more commonly associated with muscular dystrophy. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical characteristics of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Machado-Joseph disease patients. METHOD: Forty individuals participated in this study, including 20 with no clinical complaints and 20 dysphagic patients with Machado-Joseph disease of clinical type 1, who were all similar in terms of gender distribution, average age, and cognitive function. The medical history of each patient was reviewed and each subject underwent a clinical evaluation of deglutition. At the end, the profile of dysphagia in patients with Machado-Joseph disease was classified according to the Severity Scale of Dysphagia, as described by O'Neil and collaborators. RESULTS: Comparison between dysphagic patients and controls did not reveal many significant differences with respect to the clinical evaluation of the oral phase of deglutition, since afflicted patients only demonstrated deficits related to the protrusion, retraction and tonus of the tongue. However, several significant differences were observed with respect to the pharyngeal phase. Dysphagic patients presented pharyngeal stasis during deglutition of liquids and solids, accompanied by coughing and/or choking as well as penetration and/or aspiration; these signs were absent in the controls. CONCLUSIONS: Oropharyngeal dysphagia is part of the Machado-Joseph disease since the first neurological manifestations. There is greater involvement of the pharyngeal phase, in relation to oral phase of the deglutition. The dysphagia of these patients is classified between mild and moderate.

  4. Histone Modification Is Involved in Okadaic Acid (OA Induced DNA Damage Response and G2-M Transition Arrest in Maize.

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    Hao Zhang

    Full Text Available Histone modifications are involved in regulation of chromatin structure. To investigate the relationship between chromatin modification and cell cycle regulation during plant cell proliferation, Okadaic acid (OA, a specific inhibitor of serine/threonine protein phosphatase, was applied in this study. The results showed that OA caused the cell cycle arrest at preprophase, leading to seedling growth inhibition. Western blotting assay revealed that the spatial distribution of phosphorylation of Ser10 histone H3 tails (H3S10ph signals was altered under OA treatment. Reactive oxygen species (ROS was found to be at higher levels and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay displayed DNA breaks happened at the chromatin after treatment with OA, companied with an increase in the acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 5 (H4K5ac level. From these observations, we speculated that the alteration of the spatial distribution of H3S10ph and the level of H4K5ac was involved in the procedure that OA induced DNA breaks and G2-M arrested by the accumulation of ROS, and that the histone H3S10ph and H4K5ac might facilitate DNA repair by their association with the chromatin decondensation.

  5. Prediction of novel families of enzymes involved in oxidative and other complex modifications of bases in nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Tahiliani, Mamta; Rao, Anjana; Aravind, L

    2009-06-01

    Modified bases in nucleic acids present a layer of information that directs biological function over and beyond the coding capacity of the conventional bases. While a large number of modified bases have been identified, many of the enzymes generating them still remain to be discovered. Recently, members of the 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase super-family, which modify diverse substrates from small molecules to biopolymers, were predicted and subsequently confirmed to catalyze oxidative modification of bases in nucleic acids. Of these, two distinct families, namely the AlkB and the kinetoplastid base J binding proteins (JBP) catalyze in situ hydroxylation of bases in nucleic acids. Using sensitive computational analysis of sequences, structures and contextual information from genomic structure and protein domain architectures, we report five distinct families of 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that we predict to be involved in nucleic acid modifications. Among the DNA-modifying families, we show that the dioxygenase domains of the kinetoplastid base J-binding proteins belong to a larger family that includes the Tet proteins, prototyped by the human oncogene Tet1, and proteins from basidiomycete fungi, chlorophyte algae, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates and bacteriophages. We present evidence that some of these proteins are likely to be involved in oxidative modification of the 5-methyl group of cytosine leading to the formation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. The Tet/JBP homologs from basidiomycete fungi such as Laccaria and Coprinopsis show large lineage-specific expansions and a tight linkage with genes encoding a novel and distinct family of predicted transposases, and a member of the Maelstrom-like HMG family. We propose that these fungal members are part of a mobile transposon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a eukaryotic transposable element that encodes its own DNA-modification enzyme with a

  6. Dysphagia: Thinking outside the box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Hamish; Garg, Mayur; Tomic, Dunya; Balasubramanian, Smrithya; Sweis, Rami

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom that is important to recognise and appropriately manage, given that causes include life threatening oesophageal neoplasia, oropharyngeal dysfunction, the risk of aspiration, as well as chronic disabling gastroesophageal reflux (GORD). The predominant causes of dysphagia varies between cohorts depending on the interplay between genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors, and is changing with time. Currently in white Caucasian societies adopting a western lifestyle, obesity is common and thus associated gastroesophageal reflux disease is increasingly diagnosed. Similarly, food allergies are increasing in the west, and eosinophilic oesophagitis is increasingly found as a cause. Other regions where cigarette smoking is still prevalent, or where access to medical care and antisecretory agents such as proton pump inhibitors are less available, benign oesophageal peptic strictures, Barrett’s oesophagus, adeno- as well as squamous cell carcinoma are endemic. The evaluation should consider the severity of symptoms, as well as the pre-test probability of a given condition. In young white Caucasian males who are atopic or describe heartburn, eosinophilic esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease will predominate and a proton pump inhibitor could be commenced prior to further investigation. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy remains a valid first line investigation for patients with suspected oesophageal dysphagia. Barium swallow is particularly useful for oropharyngeal dysphagia, and oesophageal manometry mandatory to diagnose motility disorders. PMID:29097867

  7. DYSPHAGIA – BEYOND MALIGNANT PATHOLOGY

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    Gabriel Constantinescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Esophageal dysphagia can be caused by functional or structural abnormalities of the esophagus like esophageal strictures due to acid reflux disease, eosinophilic esophagitis, tumors and extrinsic compression, or by neuromuscular disorders like achalasia and diffuse spasm. The true prevalence of esophageal dysphagia is unknown, although epidemiological studies estimate a prevalence rate of 16% to 22% among individuals over 50 years of age. Case presentation. We present the case of a 55-year-old man, admitted to our hospital with progressive dysphagia for solids and important weight loss over the last two months. The upper endoscopy revealed an extrinsic compression of the middle esophagus. At this point, a thorax and abdomen computed tomography scan was performed, that showed a retrohilar mass of 58/44/38 mm, which compressed the right inferior lobar bronchus at the origin and the thoracic esophagus in the middle part. Endoscopic ultrasound and fine needle aspiration were performed. The anatomopathological examination of the biopsy reveals elements of chronic inflammation with neutrophils and lymphocytes, and granulomas with areas of necrosis, highly suggestive for tuberculosis. Conclusions. Dysphagia is a rare manifestation of tuberculosis, most commonly caused by an extrinsic compression mechanism due to mediastinal adenopathies. The particularity of this case is related to the contradicting imaging studies, that suggested either an esophageal or a pulmonary tumor, with mediastinal adenopathies, and the importance of endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration in determining the benign or malignant nature of injuries that are hardly accessible to non-invasive diagnostic methods.

  8. Neck Pain and Acute Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, João; Romão, José; Cunha, Anita; Paiva, Sofia; Miguéis, António

    2017-02-01

    The acute tendinitis of the longus colli muscle is an unusual diagnosis in the cases of acute dysphagia with cervical pain. Is a self-limiting condition caused by abnormal calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the prevertebral space and can cause pharyngeal swelling with impaired swallow. It is absolutely critical to make the differential diagnosis with deep cervical infections in order to avoid invasive treatments.

  9. Ramsay Hunt syndrome with severe dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Crystal; Fozo, Michael; Rubin, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome, first described by J. Ramsay Hunt in 1907, encompassed the symptoms of otalgia, erythematous vesicular rash on the auricle, and facial paralysis. Although rare, in some cases, the varicella zoster virus responsible for the illness can also be associated with involvement of cranial nerves III-XII, cervical nerves, aseptic meningitis, and the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. We present a case of a patient with clinical evidence of Ramsay Hunt syndrome involving the cranial nerves V, VII, VIII, X, and, possibly, XII. Pharyngeal wall and vocal fold paralysis, and severely reduced laryngeal elevation, resulted in such significant dysphagia that percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement was required. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Churg-Strauss Syndrome as an Unusual Cause of Dysphagia: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihye; Im, Sun; Moon, Su-Jin; Park, Geun-Young; Jang, Yongjun; Kim, Yeonjin

    2015-06-01

    Systemic vasculitis is a rare disease, and the diagnosis is very difficult when patient shows atypical symptoms. We experienced an unusual case of dysphagia caused by Churg-Strauss syndrome with lower cranial nerve involvement. A 74-year-old man, with a past history of sinusitis, asthma, and hearing deficiency, was admitted to our department for evaluation of dysphagia. He also complained of recurrent bleeding of nasal cavities and esophagus. Brain magnetic resonance imaging did not show definite abnormality, and electrophysiologic findings were suggestive of mononeuritis multiplex. Dysphagia had not improved after conventional therapy. Biopsy of the nasal cavity showed extravascular eosinophilic infiltration. All these findings suggested a rare form of Churg-Strauss syndrome involving multiple lower cranial nerves. Dysphagia improved after steroid therapy.

  11. Observation the swallowing mechanism in elderly patients with pharyngeal dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ximena Campo-Cañar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Observation of the swallowing dynamics is an issue that demands close attention by the health professionals involved in the diagnosis and management of patients with dysphagia. This article is a review of the literature aimed to enhance the knowledge regarding the speech therapy assessment of pharyngeal dysphagia in elder adults. The disorder of the swallowing is called dysphagia and it is defined as difficulty swallowing. The dysphagia is often caused by affectation of mechanical or neuromuscular components of the swallowing mechanism. This type of disorder is likely to impact the the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of the swallowing. The speech therapist should take into account assessing aspects such as level of consciousness, vital signs, whether or not the patient is ventilator dependent, means of feeding, if intubated what type of cannula, whether or not the patient uses a speaking valve (if a trach tube is present, nutritional status, the patient’s expressive and receptive language, the anatomical and physiological state of the oral motor structures. When assessing swallowing clinicians should also make sure to develop an adequate beside clinical, voice assessment and videofluoroscopy.

  12. Analysis of dysphagia risk using the modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The elderly are susceptible to dysphagia, and complications can be minimized if high-risk groups are screened in early stages and properly rehabilitated. This study provides basic material for the early detection and prevention of dysphagia by investigating the risks of dysphagia and related factors in community-dwelling elders. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 325 community-dwelling elderly people aged 65 or older. The modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly was used to assess dysphagia risk. [Results] Approximately 52.6% (n=171) of participants belonged to the high-risk group for dysphagia. After adjusting for confounding variables, people aged 75+, who used dentures, and who needed partial help in daily living had a significantly higher risk of dysphagia. [Conclusion] It is necessary to develop guidelines for dysphagia for early detection and rehabilitation.

  13. Analysis of dysphagia risk using the modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The elderly are susceptible to dysphagia, and complications can be minimized if high-risk groups are screened in early stages and properly rehabilitated. This study provides basic material for the early detection and prevention of dysphagia by investigating the risks of dysphagia and related factors in community-dwelling elders. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 325 community-dwelling elderly people aged 65 or older. The modified dysphagia risk assessment for the communit...

  14. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Acute Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Faezeh Asadollahpour; Kowsar Baghban; Mojgan Asadi; Ehsan Naderifar; Maryam Dehghani

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of different kinds of swallowing disorder and it’s severity in patients after stroke. Patients and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 91 consecutive stroke patients were screened by the Northwestern Dysphagia Patient Check Sheet (NDPCS) and the Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). Results: Forty seven percent of those assessed demonstrated signs of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Mild dysphagia was seen in (10.98%) pat...

  15. Dysphagia in children with repaired oesophageal atresia

    OpenAIRE

    Coppens, C.H.; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Scharbatke, H.E.; Groot, S.A. de; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in children with repaired oesophageal atresia (OA). Abnormalities in the oropharyngeal and oesophageal phase have hardly been studied. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of dysphagia in children with repaired OA and to identify and differentiate oral and pharyngeal dysphagia based on videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) findings in a limited number of children in this cohort. Medical records of 111 patients, born between January 1996 and July ...

  16. Clinical Variables Associated with Hydration Status in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Shabbir, Yasmeen; Miller, Leslie; Silliman, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Acute stroke patients with dysphagia are at increased risk for poor hydration. Dysphagia management practices may directly impact hydration status. This study examined clinical factors that might impact hydration status in acute ischemic stroke patients with dysphagia. A retrospective chart review was completed on 67 ischemic stroke patients who participated in a prior study of nutrition and hydration status during acute care. Prior results indicated that patients with dysphagia demonstrated elevated BUN/Cr compared to non-dysphagia cases during acute care and that BUN/Cr increased selectively in dysphagic patients. This chart review evaluated clinical variables potentially impacting hydration status: diuretics, parenteral fluids, tube feeding, oral diet, and nonoral (NPO) status. Exposure to any variable and number of days of exposure to each variable were examined. Dysphagia cases demonstrated significantly more NPO days, tube fed days, and parenteral fluid days, but not oral fed days, or days on diuretics. BUN/Cr values at discharge were not associated with NPO days, parenteral fluid days, oral fed days, or days on diuretics. Patients on modified solid diets had significantly higher mean BUN/Cr values at discharge (27.12 vs. 17.23) as did tube fed patients (28.94 vs. 18.66). No difference was noted between these subgroups at baseline (regular diet vs. modified solids diets). Any modification of solid diets (31.11 vs. 17.23) or thickened liquids (28.50 vs. 17.81) resulted in significantly elevated BUN/Cr values at discharge. Liquid or diet modifications prescribed for acute stroke patients with dysphagia may impair hydration status in these patients.

  17. Dysphagia in infants after open heart procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sook-Hee; Kim, Sang-Jun; Huh, June; Jun, Tae-Gook; Cheon, Hee Jung; Kwon, Jeong-Yi

    2013-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and the clinical predictors of dysphagia and to determine the characteristics of videofluoroscopic swallowing study findings in infants after open heart procedures. This study is a retrospective review of 146 infants who underwent open heart surgery. The infants with dysphagia were compared with those without dysphagia. The videofluoroscopic swallowing study findings of the infants with dysphagia were also evaluated. Of the 146 infants who underwent open heart surgery, 35 (24.0%) had dysphagia symptoms. The infants with dysphagia had lower body weight at operation, more malformation syndromes, longer operation times, and more complex operations than did the infants without dysphagia. In addition, the infants with dysphagia required more time to achieve full oral feeding and had longer hospital stays. Thirty-three infants underwent videofluoroscopic swallowing study: 32 (97.0%) exhibited at least one abnormal finding among the videofluoroscopic swallowing study parameters and 21 (63.6%) exhibited tracheal aspiration. Given the high rate of aspiration in the infants who underwent open heart procedures, monitoring and prompt recognition of the signs and the risk factors of dysphagia may substantially improve infant care with oral feeding and reduce the duration of hospital stays.

  18. Duration and extent of dysphagia following pediatric airway reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Claire Kane; Linck, Jessica; Willging, Jay Paul

    2009-04-01

    Patients who undergo open airway reconstruction procedures are likely to experience some degree of post-operative dysphagia. This retrospective review describes the duration of post-operative dysphagia and the use of compensatory strategies in a group of 30 pediatric patients. A retrospective chart review of pediatric patients referred for post-operative swallowing assessment following airway reconstruction during a six-month period was completed. Age, sex, surgical procedure, stent type, co-morbid factors, duration of dysphagia, and use of compensatory dietary modifications and swallowing strategies was summarized and compared. Dysphagia was generally of short duration (1-5 days) in patients undergoing single stage procedures with anterior or anterior/posterior grafts. Duration of swallowing difficulty was increased in patients undergoing posterior grafts in combination with T tubes (10-14 days). The longest duration of difficulty (>2 weeks) occurred in patients who had anterior and posterior grafting with T tubes, combined with additional procedures such as vocal fold lateralization, epiglottic petiole repositioning, and/or arytenoidectomy. There was a greater likelihood of oral feeding difficulty post-operatively in patients presenting with pre-operative feeding issues such as oral aversion or specific texture refusal, and the pre-morbid need for supplemental tube feeding to supplement oral intake. Compensatory swallowing strategies were effective in decreasing aspiration associated with swallowing in oral feeders post-operatively, and in facilitating return to baseline swallowing skills. The duration of dysphagia overall was increased in patients undergoing anterior/posterior grafts in conjunction with in-dwelling T tubes, especially when combined with additional procedures. Compensatory strategies to assist with swallowing were found to be effective in the post-operative phase and included the use of a modified supraglottic swallowing sequence to assist with

  19. Cervical osteophytes presenting as unilateral vocal fold paralysis and dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoskovitch, A; Kantor, S

    2001-05-01

    Any process involving either the vagus nerve, its recurrent laryngeal branch or the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve may cause paralysis of the vocal fold. The most common cause is neoplasm. Clinically, the patients often present with a hoarse, breathy voice as well as symptoms of aspiration. The following represents a unique case of unilateral vocal fold paralysis and dysphagia caused by a degenerative disease of the cervical spine, resluting in extrinsic compression of the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

  20. Defining and Measuring Dysphagia Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Stephanie K.; Schroeder, Mae Fern; DeGeorge, Pamela C.; Corey, David M.; Foundas, Anne L.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To continue the development of a quantified, standard method to differentiate individuals with stroke and dysphagia from individuals without dysphagia. Method: Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) were completed on a group of participants with acute stroke (n = 42) and healthy age-matched individuals (n = 25). Calibrated liquid…

  1. Dysphagia in children with repaired oesophageal atresia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppens, C.H.; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Scharbatke, H.E.; Groot, S.A. de; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in children with repaired oesophageal atresia (OA). Abnormalities in the oropharyngeal and oesophageal phase have hardly been studied. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of dysphagia in children with repaired OA and to identify and differentiate oral

  2. Dysphagia following stroke: evaluation with digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Sung Nam; Kang, Heoung Keun; Joo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Chang Il; Park, Soo Min; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Seo, Jeong Jin; Chung, Tae Woong

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of digital radiography in the assessment of dysphagia following stroke. Eighteen stroke patients (8 men, 10 women) referred for dysphagia and ten controls without known pharyngeal swallowing difficulty underwent digital radiography using a 1:1 mixture of barium and water. We evaluated oropharyngeal transit time and the location and severity of dysphagia; transit time was defined as the time from the first movement of the bolus to the return of the epiglottis to its original position. We sought to observe specific patterns of oropharyngeal dysfunction; dysphagia was classified as mild, moderate, or severe. The dynamic image of the pharynx, as seen on a digital radiograph, may be diagnostically useful for defining the location and severity of dysphagia; in order to make feeding recommendations, this information is essential. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs

  3. Update on clinical trials in Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logemann, Jeri A

    2006-04-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are often known as the gold standard in treatment efficacy studies. This article defines the characteristics of RCTs and the factors that investigators must consider in designing clinical trials in dysphagia. Design issues unique to behavioral treatments often used in dysphagia are discussed. Ongoing RCTs in dysphagia are described including studies of (1) the effectiveness of the Shaker exercise versus standardized treatment in patients with severe dysphagia resulting from stroke or treatment for head and neck cancer who have been nonoral for at least three months; (2) the comparative effects of nectar- and honey-thickened liquids versus chin tuck posture and in patients with dementia or Parkinson's disease with or without dementia who aspirate on thin liquids; and (3) the comparative effects of muscle exercise versus sensory postural therapy for dysphagia resulting from treatment for head and neck cancer. Issues in generalizing from the results of clinical trials are also described.

  4. Dysphagia following stroke: evaluation with digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Sung Nam; Kang, Heoung Keun; Joo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Chang Il; Park, Soo Min; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Seo, Jeong Jin; Chung, Tae Woong [Chonnam Univ., Kwanju (Korea, Republic of). Medical School

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of digital radiography in the assessment of dysphagia following stroke. Eighteen stroke patients (8 men, 10 women) referred for dysphagia and ten controls without known pharyngeal swallowing difficulty underwent digital radiography using a 1:1 mixture of barium and water. We evaluated oropharyngeal transit time and the location and severity of dysphagia; transit time was defined as the time from the first movement of the bolus to the return of the epiglottis to its original position. We sought to observe specific patterns of oropharyngeal dysfunction; dysphagia was classified as mild, moderate, or severe. The dynamic image of the pharynx, as seen on a digital radiograph, may be diagnostically useful for defining the location and severity of dysphagia; in order to make feeding recommendations, this information is essential. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Dysphagia in the Older Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Samia; Tulunay-Ugur, Ozlem E

    2018-05-17

    Dysphagia in older adults is a challenging problem and necessitates a team approach. The key to effective management is recognition. Patients tend to dismiss their symptoms as normal aging; therefore, early diagnosis depends on the diligence of the primary care doctors. No diagnostic technique can replace the benefits of a thorough history, with a detailed understanding of nutritional status and aspiration risk. Although one of the main goals in management is to ensure safe swallowing, the impact of a nonoral diet on the quality of life of patients should not be underestimated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics of dysphagia in older patients evaluated at a tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocdor, Pelin; Siegel, Eric R; Giese, Rachel; Tulunay-Ugur, Ozlem E

    2015-02-01

    To determine laryngoscopic and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) findings in geriatric patients with dysphagia; to evaluate management. Retrospective chart review. Patients over 65 years old complaining of dysphagia, seen at a tertiary laryngology clinic, were included. Head and neck cancer and stroke patients were excluded. Demographics, laryngoscopic findings, swallowing studies, and treatment modalities were reviewed. Sixty-five patients were included. Mean age was 75 years old (range = 66-97) with female predominance of 67.6%. Weight loss was seen in 9.2% of the patients. Whereas 52.3% of the patients complained of solid food dysphagia, 53.8% were choking on food. On laryngoscopy, 15.3% of the patients had pooling in the pyriform sinuses, 30.7% had glottic gap, 18.4% had vocal fold immobility, and 3% had hypomobility. VFSS showed that 38.4% of the patients had pharyngoesophageal dysphagia, 20% had oropharyngeal dysphagia, 20% had pharyngeal dysphagia, and 20% had a normal study. In addition, 41.5% of the patients showed laryngeal penetration and 18.4% showed aspiration. Surgical intervention was employed in 29.2% of the patients in the form of botulinum toxin injection, esophageal dilatation, cricopharyngeal myotomy, vocal fold injection, diverticulectomy, and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. Whereas 21.5% of the patients received swallowing therapy, 61.5% underwent diet modification. As a result, 80% of the patients needed some type of treatment. Swallowing problems in older patients are not uncommon. The clinician needs to be diligent to inquire about dysphagia because a large number of these patients will require treatment. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Creation and Initial Validation of the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M; Namasivayam-MacDonald, Ashwini M; Guida, Brittany T; Cichero, Julie A; Duivestein, Janice; Hanson, Ben; Lam, Peter; Riquelme, Luis F

    2018-05-01

    To assess consensual validity, interrater reliability, and criterion validity of the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale, a new functional outcome scale intended to capture the severity of oropharyngeal dysphagia, as represented by the degree of diet texture restriction recommended for the patient. Participants assigned International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale scores to 16 clinical cases. Consensual validity was measured against reference scores determined by an author reference panel. Interrater reliability was measured overall and across quartile subsets of the dataset. Criterion validity was evaluated versus Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) scores assigned by survey respondents to the same case scenarios. Feedback was requested regarding ease and likelihood of use. Web-based survey. Respondents (N=170) from 29 countries. Not applicable. Consensual validity (percent agreement and Kendall τ), criterion validity (Spearman rank correlation), and interrater reliability (Kendall concordance and intraclass coefficients). The International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale showed strong consensual validity, criterion validity, and interrater reliability. Scenarios involving liquid-only diets, transition from nonoral feeding, or trial diet advances in therapy showed the poorest consensus, indicating a need for clear instructions on how to score these situations. The International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale showed greater sensitivity than the FOIS to specific changes in diet. Most (>70%) respondents indicated enthusiasm for implementing the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale. This initial validation study suggests that the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale has strong consensual and criterion validity and can be used reliably by clinicians

  8. The cost of dysphagia in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westmark S

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Signe Westmark,1 Dorte Melgaard,1,2 Line O Rethmeier,3 Lars Holger Ehlers3 1Center for Clinical Research, North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring, Denmark; 2Department of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring, Denmark; 3Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Objectives: To estimate the annual cost at the hospital and in the municipality (social care due to dysphagia in geriatric patients.Design: Retrospective cost analysis of geriatric patients with dysphagia versus geriatric patients without dysphagia 1 year before hospitalization.Setting: North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring Municipality, Frederikshavn Municipality, and Brønderslev Municipality.Subjects: A total of 258 hospitalized patients, 60 years or older, acute hospitalized in the geriatric department.Materials and methods: Volume-viscosity swallow test and the Minimal Eating Observation Form-II were conducted for data collection. A Charlson Comorbidity Index score measured comorbidity, and functional status was measured by Barthel-100. To investigate the cost of dysphagia, patient-specific data on health care consumption at the hospital and in the municipality (nursing, home care, and training were collected from medical registers and records 1 year before hospitalization including the hospitalization for screening for dysphagia. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between dysphagia and hospital and municipality costs, respectively, adjusting for age, gender, and comorbidity.Results: Patients with dysphagia were significantly costlier than patients without dysphagia in both hospital (p=0.013 and municipality costs (p=0.028 compared to patients without dysphagia. Adjusted annual hospital costs in patients with dysphagia were 27,347 DKK (3,677 EUR, 4,282 USD higher than patients without dysphagia at the hospital, and annual health care costs in the

  9. Analysis of oropharyngeal dysphagia through fibroendoscopy evaluation of swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Flores, Melissa; Arch-Tirado, Emilio; Villeda-Miranda, Alicia; Rocha-Cacho, Karina Elizabeth; Verduzco-Mendoza, Antonio; Hernández-López, Xochiquetzal

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a high incidence in Mexico and is estimated at approximately 500,000 patients. One of the main clinical manifestations of PD is dysphagia, which is the difficult passage of food from the mouth to the stomach. The aim of this study was to assess oropharyngeal dysphagia through fibroendoscopy evaluation of swallowing in patients with PD. We conducted a census sample of patients with PD: 17 males and 10 females, aged >49 years. Clinical history, physical examination and neurological evaluation of swallowing fibroendoscopy were carried out. Of the symptomatic patients, 16 patients (59.25%) reported dysphagia. Fibroendoscopic evaluation demonstrated swallowing disorders in 25 patients (92.59%). The main findings were poor bolus control in 19 patients (70.37%), deficits in bolus propulsion in 25 patients (92.59%), impaired swallowing in 14 patients (51.85%), fractional swallowing in 11 patients (40.74%), reduced epiglottic tilting in 11 patients (48.14%), food residue in vallecula in 24 patients (88.88%) and piriform sinus in 19 patients (70.37%). There was no correlation between duration of PD and degree of involvement of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with PD is a common symptom and can range from the oral cavity to the upper esophageal sphincter. Early onset of severe dysphagia is exceptional in this disease and should alert the clinician to the diagnostic possibility of parkinsonism.

  10. Functional changes of neural circuits in stroke patients with dysphagia: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Xiao, Yuan; Zhang, Wenjing; Yao, Li; Gao, Xin; Chandan, Shah; Lui, Su

    2017-08-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in stroke patients with unclear pathogenesis. Several recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies had been carried out to explore the cerebral functional changes in dysphagic stroke patients. The aim of this study was to analysis these imaging findings using a meta-analysis. We used seed-based d mapping (SDM) to conduct a meta-analysis for dysphagic stroke patients prior to any kind of special treatment for dysphagia. A systematic search was conducted for the relevant studies. SDM meta-analysis method was used to examine regions of increased and decreased functional activation between dysphagic stroke patients and healthy controls. Finally, six studies including 81 stroke patients with dysphagia and 78 healthy controls met the inclusion standards. When compared with healthy controls, stroke patients with dysphagia showed hyperactivation in left cingulate gyrus, left precentral gyrus and right posterior cingulate gyrus, and hypoactivation in right cuneus and left middle frontal gyrus. The hyperactivity of precentral gyrus is crucial in stroke patients with dysphagia and may be associated with the severity of stroke. Besides the motor areas, the default-mode network regions (DMN) and affective network regions (AN) circuits are also involved in dysphagia after stroke. © 2017 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Oligosaccharide modification by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-V in macrophages are involved in pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Arisa; Yutani, Mizuki; Terao, Mika; Kimura, Akihiro; Itoi, Saori; Murota, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Eiji; Katayama, Ichiro

    2015-08-01

    Oligosaccharide modification by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-V (GnT-V), which catalyses the formation of β1,6 GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine) branches on N-glycans, is associated with various pathologies, such as cancer metastasis, multiple sclerosis and liver fibrosis. In this study, we demonstrated the involvement of GnT-V in the pathophysiology of scleroderma. High expression of GnT-V was observed in infiltrating cells in skin section samples from systemic and localized patients with scleroderma. Most of the infiltrating cells were T cells and macrophages, most of which were CD163(+) M2 macrophages. To determine the role of GnT-V in scleroderma, we next investigated skin sclerosis in GnT-V knockout (MGAT5(-/-) ) mice. Expression of GnT-V was also elevated in bleomycin (BLM)-injected sclerotic skin, and MGAT5(-/-) mice were resistant to BLM-induced skin sclerosis with reduced collagen type 1 α1 content, suggesting the biological significance of GnT-V in skin sclerosis. Furthermore, the number of CD163(+) M2 macrophages and CD3-positive T cells in BLM-induced skin sclerosis was significantly fewer in MGAT5(-/-) mice. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), IL-4-induced expressions of Fizz1 and Ym1 were significantly reduced in MGAT5(-/-) mice-derived BMDMs. Taken together, these results suggest the induction of GnT-V in skin sclerosis progression is possibly dependent on increased numbers of M2 macrophages in the skin, which are important for tissue fibrosis and remodelling. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Gene discovery for enzymes involved in limonene modification or utilization by the mountain pine beetle-associated pathogen Grosmannia clavigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Lim, Lynette; Madilao, Lina; Lah, Ljerka; Bohlmann, Joerg; Breuil, Colette

    2014-08-01

    To successfully colonize and eventually kill pine trees, Grosmannia clavigera (Gs cryptic species), the main fungal pathogen associated with the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), has developed multiple mechanisms to overcome host tree chemical defenses, of which terpenoids are a major component. In addition to a monoterpene efflux system mediated by a recently discovered ABC transporter, Gs has genes that are highly induced by monoterpenes and that encode enzymes that modify or utilize monoterpenes [especially (+)-limonene]. We showed that pine-inhabiting Ophiostomale fungi are tolerant to monoterpenes, but only a few, including Gs, are known to utilize monoterpenes as a carbon source. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that Gs can modify (+)-limonene through various oxygenation pathways, producing carvone, p-mentha-2,8-dienol, perillyl alcohol, and isopiperitenol. It can also degrade (+)-limonene through the C-1-oxygenated pathway, producing limonene-1,2-diol as the most abundant intermediate. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) data indicated that Gs may utilize limonene 1,2-diol through beta-oxidation and then valine and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolic pathways. The data also suggested that at least two gene clusters, located in genome contigs 108 and 161, were highly induced by monoterpenes and may be involved in monoterpene degradation processes. Further, gene knockouts indicated that limonene degradation required two distinct Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs), an epoxide hydrolase and an enoyl coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA) hydratase. Our work provides information on enzyme-mediated limonene utilization or modification and a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between an economically important fungal pathogen and its host's defense chemicals.

  13. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Dysphagia: A Systematic Review of Instrument Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dhyanesh A.; Sharda, Rohit; Hovis, Kristen L.; Nichols, Erin E.; Sathe, Nila; Penson, David F.; Feurer, Irene D.; McPheeters, Melissa L.; Vaezi, Michael F.; Francis, David O.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are commonly used to capture patient experience with dysphagia and to evaluate treatment effectiveness. Inappropriate application can lead to distorted results in clinical studies. A systematic review of the literature on dysphagia-related PRO measures was performed to 1) identify all currently available measures and 2) to evaluate each for the presence of important measurement properties that would affect their applicability. Design MEDLINE via the PubMed interface, the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and the Health and Psychosocial Instrument database were searched using relevant vocabulary terms and key terms related to PRO measures and dysphagia. Three independent investigators performed abstract and full text reviews. Each study meeting criteria was evaluated using an 18-item checklist developed a priori that assessed multiple domains: 1) conceptual model, 2) content validity, 3) reliability, 4) construct validity, 6) scoring and interpretation, and 7) burden and presentation. Results Of 4950 abstracts reviewed, a total of 34 dysphagia-related PRO measures (publication year 1987 – 2014) met criteria for extraction and analysis. Several PRO measures were of high quality (MADS for achalasia, SWAL-QOL and SSQ for oropharyngeal dysphagia, PROMIS-GI for general dysphagia, EORTC-QLQ-OG25 for esophageal cancer, ROMP-swallowing for Parkinson’s disease, DSQ-EoE for eosinophilic esophagitis, and SOAL for total laryngectomy-related dysphagia). In all, 17 met at least one criterion per domain. Thematic deficiencies in current measures were evident including: 1) direct patient involvement in content development, 2) empirically justified dimensionality, 3) demonstrable responsiveness to change, 4) plan for interpreting missing responses, and 5) literacy level assessment. Conclusion This is the first comprehensive systematic review assessing developmental properties of all available dysphagia

  14. Patient-reported outcome measures in dysphagia: a systematic review of instrument development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, D A; Sharda, R; Hovis, K L; Nichols, E E; Sathe, N; Penson, D F; Feurer, I D; McPheeters, M L; Vaezi, M F; Francis, David O

    2017-05-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are commonly used to capture patient experience with dysphagia and to evaluate treatment effectiveness. Inappropriate application can lead to distorted results in clinical studies. A systematic review of the literature on dysphagia-related PRO measures was performed to (1) identify all currently available measures and (2) to evaluate each for the presence of important measurement properties that would affect their applicability. MEDLINE via the PubMed interface, the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and the Health and Psychosocial Instrument database were searched using relevant vocabulary terms and key terms related to PRO measures and dysphagia. Three independent investigators performed abstract and full text reviews. Each study meeting criteria was evaluated using an 18-item checklist developed a priori that assessed multiple domains: (1) conceptual model, (2) content validity, (3) reliability, (4) construct validity, (6) scoring and interpretation, and (7) burden and presentation. Of 4950 abstracts reviewed, a total of 34 dysphagia-related PRO measures (publication year 1987-2014) met criteria for extraction and analysis. Several PRO measures were of high quality (MADS for achalasia, SWAL-QOL and SSQ for oropharyngeal dysphagia, PROMIS-GI for general dysphagia, EORTC-QLQ-OG25 for esophageal cancer, ROMP-swallowing for Parkinson's Disease, DSQ-EoE for eosinophilic esophagitis, and SOAL for total laryngectomy-related dysphagia). In all, 17 met at least one criterion per domain. Thematic deficiencies in current measures were evident including: (1) direct patient involvement in content development, (2) empirically justified dimensionality, (3) demonstrable responsiveness to change, (4) plan for interpreting missing responses, and (5) literacy level assessment. This is the first comprehensive systematic review assessing developmental properties of all available dysphagia-related PRO measures. We

  15. Efficacy of radiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yuri; Niibe, Yuzuru; Terahara, Atsuro; Shimada, Hideaki; Yajima, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively assess the efficacy of radiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia due to the primary lesion at our institute, by evaluating change of Mellow-Pinkas-dysphagia score and subjective symptom. We confarmed radiotherapy for esophageal cancer help improve dysphagia. Change of Mel-low-Pinkas-dysphagia score throughout radiotherapy did not match with change of subjective dysphagia, which have relevancy to patients' quality of life. New evaluation criterion is required. (author)

  16. Dysphagia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    control via the cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. Once sensory information .... Thyroid diseases. • Vascular abnormalities – aberrant vessels and compressive rings ... and is frequently a terminal event.6,7. Table II. Basic indicators of a ...

  17. Neuroprostheses for management of dysphagia resulting from cerebrovascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, D J

    2007-01-01

    Swallowing is a complicated process that involves intricate timing between many different muscles in the mouth and neck. The primary purpose of swallowing is to move food through the mouth and pharynx and into the esophagus for transport to the stomach for digestion. Dysphagia is a general term that refers to a disruption in any part of the process. The consequences of dysphagia include social embarrassment; malnutrition; and aspiration. Of these, aspiration is the most significant as it is associated with a significantly greater risk of pneumonia and death. If patients fail to adequately protect the airways with standard exercise and therapy, they are often disallowed from taking food by mouth and receive nutrition by alternate means. If patients still experience frequent pneumonia, more drastic surgical measures that permanently separate the airway from foodway are required. As an alternative to these surgical procedures, neuroprostheses can dynamically restore airway protection. There are two primary protective mechanisms that neuroprostheses seek to restore. The first is laryngeal elevation and the second is vocal fold closure. The present article is an introductory overview of the swallowing process, the primary muscles and nerves related to swallowing, the effects of dysphagia, the standard treatment options, and the neuroprosthetic options.

  18. Aphonia and dysphagia after gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Satako, Kimura; Mizutari, Kunio; Fujimine, Takekatsu; Fujii, Masato; Syunji, Ikeuchi; Matunaga, Tatsuo; Tsunoda, Koichi

    2005-11-01

    A 67-year-old male was referred to our otolaryngological clinic because of aphonia and dysphagia. His voice was breathy and he could not even swallow saliva following a total gastrectomy for gastric carcinoma performed 2 weeks previously. Laryngeal fiberscopy revealed major glottal incompetence when he tried to phonate. However, both vocal folds abducted over the full range during inhalation. The patient could not swallow saliva because of a huge glottal chink, even during phonation. Based on these findings, he was diagnosed as having bilateral incomplete cricoarytenoid dislocation after intubation. The patient underwent speech therapy; within 1 min his vocal fold movement recovered dramatically and he was able to phonate and swallow. There have been few case reports of bilateral cricoarytenoid dislocation, and no effective rehabilitation has been reported. We believe that our method of vocal rehabilitation serves as a useful reference for physicians and surgeons worldwide.

  19. Dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: a therapeutic challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michou, Emilia; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2010-06-01

    This article focuses on the current status and research directions on swallowing disorders (dysphagia) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Although epidemiological data are scarce, increased incidence of dysphagia in patients with PD leads to increased risk of mortality, secondary to aspiration pneumonia. Although studies show that aspiration pneumonia is a common cause of death in this group of patients, clinical practice lacks an evidence base and there is an increased need for randomized clinical trials. Importantly, the underlying mechanisms accounting for the progression of dysphagia in PD are still unclear. Furthermore, evidence shows that dopaminergic medication does not affect swallowing performance. Future research in the field is urgently needed and may result in improved management of dysphagia in patients with PD.

  20. [Dysphagia rehabilitation in visiting home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohara, Haruka; Iida, Takatoshi; Inoue, Motoharu; Sato, Mitsuyasu; Wada, Satoko; Sanpei, Ryuichi; Okada, Takeshi; Shimano, Takaya; Ebihara, Katsuko; Ueda, Koichiro

    2010-12-01

    Dysphagia can cause aspiration pneumonia. The condition of dysphagia is difficult to evaluate from outside. Therefore, a careful examination is necessary to grasp the state of swallowing of a patient accurately. However, it has been a difficult situation for a patient who cannot come to hospital for some reason to be examined by video fluoroscopy or video endoscopy. In recent years, a usefulness of video endoscopy in visiting home examination for dysphagia has been reported several times. And this video endoscopy examination is a valuable tool to detect a discrepancy between swallowing function and nutritional intake of the patient. Cooperative rehabilitation with such a careful examination is an important issue to be successful in dysphagia rehabilitation.

  1. Dysphagia lusorium in elderly: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarceken, Bulent; Bulbuloglu, Ertan; Yuksel, Murvet; Cetinkaya, Ali

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Late unset of dysphagia due to vascular abnormalities is a rare condition. We aimed to present a case of right subclavian artery abnormalities caused dysphagia in the elderly. METHODS: A 68-year-old female was admitted with dysphagia seven months ago. Upper endoscopic procedures and routine examinations could not demonstrate any etiology. Multislice computed thorax tomography was performed for probable extra- esophagial lesions. RESULTS: Multislice computed thorax tomography showed right subclavian artery abnormality and esophagial compression with this aberrant artery. CONCLUSION: Causes of dysphagia in the elderly are commonly malignancies, strictures and/or motility disorders. If routine examinations and endoscopic procedures fail to show any etiology, rare vascular abnormalities can be considered in such patients. Multislice computed tomography is a usefull choice in such conditions. PMID:15285045

  2. Cell cycle arrest induced by inhibitors of epigenetic modifications in maize (Zea mays) seedling leaves: characterization of the process and possible mechanisms involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Zhang, Hao; Hou, Haoli; Wang, Qing; Li, Yingnan; Huang, Yan; Xie, Liangfu; Gao, Fei; He, Shibin; Li, Lijia

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetic modifications play crucial roles in the regulation of chromatin architecture and are involved in cell cycle progression, including mitosis and meiosis. To explore the relationship between epigenetic modifications and the cell cycle, we treated maize (Zea mays) seedlings with six different epigenetic modification-related inhibitors and identified the postsynthetic phase (G2 ) arrest via flow cytometry analysis. Total H4K5ac levels were significantly increased and the distribution of H3S10ph signalling was obviously changed in mitosis under various treatments. Further statistics of the cells in different periods of mitosis confirmed that the cell cycle was arrested at preprophase. Concentrations of hydrogen peroxide were relatively higher in the treated plants and the antioxidant thiourea could negate the influence of the inhibitors. Moreover, all of the treated plants displayed negative results in the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labelling (TUNEL) and γ-H2AX immunostaining assays after exposure for 3 d. Additionally, the expression level of topoisomerase genes in the treated plants was relatively lower than that in the untreated plants. These results suggest that these inhibitors of epigenetic modifications could cause preprophase arrest via reactive oxygen species formation inhibiting the expression of DNA topoisomerase genes, accompanied by changes in the H4K5ac and H3S10ph histone modifications. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. [Awareness of dysphagia in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés-Rusiñol, Àngels; Forjaz, Maria J; Ayala, Alba; Crespo, M de la Cruz; Prats, Anna; Valles, Esther; Petit, Cristina; Casanovas, Mercè; Garolera-Freixa, Maite

    2011-12-01

    In order to be able to assess the level of awareness of swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD), a specific questionnaire was designed and validated: the Dysphapark questionnaire. A total of 470 persons with PD were asked whether they believe they have problems swallowing or not, and then they filled in a self-administered questionnaire that evaluates the effectiveness and safety of swallowing. The Dysphapark questionnaire was validated by means of Rasch analysis and classical psychometric methods. The safety and effectiveness dimensions of the Dysphapark fit the Rasch model well. The efficacy dimension showed significant differences for gender, length of the illness, awareness of dysphagia and length of meals. Significant differences were also found in the safety dimension for length and severity of illness, awareness of dysphagia, speech therapy and knowledge of thickening agents. Despite the fact that 90% of patients had problems concerning effectiveness and safety in swallowing, 79.45% were not aware that they suffered from dysphagia. The Dysphapark questionnaire is a suitable measure of dysphagia in PD, according to the Rasch analysis. A high proportion of patients with PD have dysphagia, although it has been observed that they have a low level of awareness of the condition, of the consequences it may have and of the possibility of using thickening agents. Given that some of the swallowing disorders in PD are asymptomatic and that the level of awareness of the disorder is low, we recommend including specific questionnaires as well as clinical and instrumental evaluation of dysphagia in clinical practice.

  4. Dysphagia as a manifestation of esophageal tuberculosis: a report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Aurora

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Esophageal involvement by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is rare and the diagnosis is frequently made by means of an esophageal biopsy during the evaluation of dysphagia. There are few cases reported in the literature. Case presentation We present two cases of esophageal tuberculosis in 85- and 65-year-old male Caucasian patients with initial complaints of dysphagia and epigastric pain. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy resulted in the diagnosis of esophageal tuberculosis following the biopsy of lesions of irregular mucosa in one case and a sessile polyp in the other. Pulmonary tuberculosis was detected in one patient. In one patient esophageal stricture developed as a complication. Antituberculous therapy was curative in both patients. Conclusion Although rare, esophageal tuberculosis has to be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Pulmonary involvement has important implications for contact screening.

  5. Treatment Effects for Dysphagia in Adults with Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Dalal; Ballard, Kirrie; Bogaardt, Hans

    2016-10-01

    Dysphagia or swallowing difficulties have been reported to be a concern in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). This problem can result in several complications including aspiration pneumonia, reduced quality of life and an increase in mortality rate. No previous systematic reviews on treatment effects for dysphagia in MS have been published. The main objective of this study is to summarise and qualitatively analyse published studies on treatment effects for dysphagia in MS. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were applied to conduct a systematic search of seven databases, using relevant key words, and subsequent analysis of the identified studies. The studies were required to meet all three inclusion criteria of including a statement on intention to treat, or measure the effects of treatment for dysphagia in adults with MS and data on treatment outcomes for at least one adult diagnosed with MS. Retained studies were evaluated by two independent reviewers using a critical appraisal tool. This study has not been registered. A total of 563 studies were identified from the database searches. After screening and assessment of full articles for eligibility, five studies were included in the review. Three examined electrical stimulation and two examined the use of botulinum toxin. One study testing electrical stimulation was a randomised controlled trial, two were well-designed case series and two were case series lacking experimental control. All studies reported some positive effects on dysphagia; however, treatments that involved the use of electrical stimulation showed larger effect sizes. There is a paucity of evidence to guide treatment of dysphagia in MS, with only electrical stimulation and botulinum toxin treatment represented in the literature search conducted here. While both treatments show initial promise for reducing the swallowing impairment, they require further research using well-controlled experimental

  6. Recovery from Dysphagia Symptoms after Oral Endotracheal Intubation in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Survivors. A 5-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Martin B; Huang, Minxuan; Shanholtz, Carl; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Palmer, Jeffrey B; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Needham, Dale M

    2017-03-01

    Nearly 60% of patients who are intubated in intensive care units (ICUs) experience dysphagia after extubation, and approximately 50% of them aspirate. Little is known about dysphagia recovery time after patients are discharged from the hospital. To determine factors associated with recovery from dysphagia symptoms after hospital discharge for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) survivors who received oral intubation with mechanical ventilation. This is a prospective, 5-year longitudinal cohort study involving 13 ICUs at four teaching hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland. The Sydney Swallowing Questionnaire (SSQ), a 17-item visual analog scale (range, 0-1,700), was used to quantify patient-perceived dysphagia symptoms at hospital discharge, and at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months after ARDS. An SSQ score greater than or equal to 200 was used to indicate clinically important dysphagia symptoms at the time of hospital discharge. Recovery was defined as an SSQ score less than 200, with a decrease from hospital discharge greater than or equal to 119, the reliable change index for SSQ score. Fine and Gray proportional subdistribution hazards regression analysis was used to evaluate patient and ICU variables associated with time to recovery accounting for the competing risk of death. Thirty-seven (32%) of 115 patients had an SSQ score greater than or equal to 200 at hospital discharge; 3 died before recovery. All 34 remaining survivors recovered from dysphagia symptoms by 5-year follow-up, 7 (23%) after 6 months. ICU length of stay was independently associated with time to recovery, with a hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.96 (0.93-1.00) per day. One-third of orally intubated ARDS survivors have dysphagia symptoms that persist beyond hospital discharge. Patients with a longer ICU length of stay have slower recovery from dysphagia symptoms and should be carefully considered for swallowing assessment to help prevent complications related to dysphagia.

  7. A Rare Case of Esophageal Dysphagia in Children: Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Barone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is an impairment of swallowing that may involve any structures from the mouth to the stomach. Esophageal dysphagia presents with the sensation of food sticking, pain with swallowing, substernal pressure, or chronic heartburn. There are many causes of esophageal dysphagia, such as motility disorders and mechanical and inflammatory diseases. Infrequently dysphagia arises from extrinsic compression of the esophagus from any vascular anomaly of the aortic arch. The most common embryologic abnormality of the aortic arch is aberrant right subclavian artery, clinically known as arteria lusoria. This abnormality is usually silent. Here, we report a case of six-year-old child presenting to us with a history of progressive dysphagia without respiratory symptoms. A barium esophagogram showed an increase of the physiological esophageal narrowing at the level of aortic arch, while at esophagogastroduodenoscopy there was an extrinsic pulsatile compression of the posterior portion of the esophagus suggesting an extrinsic compression by an aberrant vessel. Angio-CT (computed tomography scan confirmed the presence of an aberrant right subclavian artery.

  8. Hiatus Hernia as a Cause of Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Hamish; Sweis, Rami

    2017-08-01

    This review aims to discuss the putative relationship between hiatus hernia and dysphagia. Proposed mechanisms of dysphagia in patients with hiatus hernia are usually difficult to identify, but recent advances in technology (high-resolution manometry with or without concomitant impedance, ambulatory pH with impedance, videofluoroscopy, and the endoluminal functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP)) and methodology (inclusion of swallows of various consistencies and volumes or shifting position during the manometry protocol) can help induce symptoms and identify the underlying disorder. Chronic reflux disease is often associated with hiatus hernia and is the most common underlying etiology. Dysmotility because of impaired contractility and vigor can occur as a consequence of repeated acid exposure from the acid pocket within the hernia, and the resultant poor clearance subsequently worsens this insult. As such, dysphagia appears to be more common with increasing hiatus hernia size. Furthermore, mucosal inflammation can lead to fibrotic stricture formation and in turn obstruction. On the other hand, there appears to be a difference in the pathophysiology of smaller sliding hernias, in that those with dysphagia are more likely to have extrinsic compression at the crural diaphragm as compared to those with reflux symptoms only. Sliding hiatus hernia, especially when small, does not commonly lead to dysmotility and dysphagia; however, in those patients with symptoms, the underlying etiology can be sought with new technologies and, in particular, the reproduction of normal eating and drinking during testing.

  9. Interesting case of spontaneously resolved dysphagia in a young female due to complicated esophageal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval Choksi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis can affect any organ of the body. Gastrointestinal tubercular involvement is fairly common. Esophageal tuberculosis though is uncommon. Esophageal tuberculosis accounts for only 0.3% of gastrointestinal tuberculosis. It presents with dysphagia, retrosternal pain, cough or constitutional symptoms. Complications like hemorrhage from the ulcer and development of fistulas like esophagomediastinal fistula is extremely uncommon. We report a case of a 27 years old female who presented with retrosternal pain, dysphagia and hematemesis. The patient had esophageal ulcer secondary to erosion of the esophagus by the subcarinal lymph nodes. Imaging was suggestive of esophagomediastinal fistula. Esophageal ulcer biopsy showed chronic tubercular infection. Culture from the esophageal biopsy confirmed the presence of tubercular bacilli. Patient responded to anti-tubercular therapy. Spontaneous dysphagia resolution prior to starting therapy was likely due to the rupture of the lymph node into the esophagus, which was compressing it initially. Esophageal tuberculosis presenting with hematemesis and fistula is extremely uncommon.

  10. Control of peptide nanotube diameter by chemical modifications of an aromatic residue involved in a single close contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarabout, Christophe; Roux, Stéphane; Gobeaux, Frédéric; Fay, Nicolas; Pouget, Emilie; Meriadec, Cristelle; Ligeti, Melinda; Thomas, Daniel; IJsselstijn, Maarten; Besselievre, François; Buisson, David-Alexandre; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Petitjean, Michel; Valéry, Céline; Perrin, Lionel; Rousseau, Bernard; Artzner, Franck; Paternostre, Maité; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly is an attractive pathway for bottom-up synthesis of novel nanomaterials. In particular, this approach allows the spontaneous formation of structures of well-defined shapes and monodisperse characteristic sizes. Because nanotechnology mainly relies on size-dependent physical phenomena, the control of monodispersity is required, but the possibility of tuning the size is also essential. For self-assembling systems, shape, size, and monodispersity are mainly settled by the chemical structure of the building block. Attempts to change the size notably by chemical modification usually end up with the loss of self-assembly. Here, we generated a library of 17 peptides forming nanotubes of monodisperse diameter ranging from 10 to 36 nm. A structural model taking into account close contacts explains how a modification of a few Å of a single aromatic residue induces a fourfold increase in nanotube diameter. The application of such a strategy is demonstrated by the formation of silica nanotubes of various diameters. PMID:21518895

  11. Thyrotoxic Dysphagia in an 82-Year-Old Male

    OpenAIRE

    Parperis, Konstantinos; Dadu, Ramona; Hoq, Sheikh; Argento, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in elderly patients and a rare manifestation of Graves' disease. We report a case of an 82-year-old male who presented with a 4-week history of dysphagia and weight loss. Workup for his dysphagia with upper endoscopy, MRI brain, electromyography, acetyl-cholinesterase receptor antibodies, and voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. Modified Barium swallow test showed oropharyngeal dysphagia. Thyroid function tests that revealed hyperthyroidism and...

  12. Structural cause of dysphagia detected during videofluoroscopic swallow study

    OpenAIRE

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong; Kabuto, Syu

    2017-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Dysphagia can be caused by many different underlying conditions. The assessment and management of dysphagia depend on each individual patient, often requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Structural cause of dysphagia can be dealt with using endoscopic interventions before the patient's general status deteriorates.

  13. Engineering high Zn in tomato shoots through expression of AtHMA4 involves tissue-specific modification of endogenous genes

    OpenAIRE

    Kendziorek, Maria; Klimecka, Maria; Barabasz, Anna; Borg, S?ren; Rudzka, Justyna; Szcz?sny, Pawe?; Antosiewicz, Danuta Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background To increase the Zn level in shoots, AtHMA4 was ectopically expressed in tomato under the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter. However, the Zn concentration in the shoots of transgenic plants failed to increase at all tested Zn levels in the medium. Modification of Zn root/shoot distribution in tomato expressing 35S::AtHMA4 depended on the concentration of Zn in the medium, thus indicating involvement of unknown endogenous metal-homeostasis mechanisms. To determine these mechanisms, thos...

  14. Diagnostic value of "dysphagia limit" for neurogenic dysphagia: 17 years of experience in 1278 adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Kiylioglu, Nefati; Tarlaci, Sultan; Tanriverdi, Zeynep; Alpaydin, Sezin; Acarer, Ahmet; Baysal, Leyla; Arpaci, Esra; Yuceyar, Nur; Secil, Yaprak; Ozdemirkiran, Tolga; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2015-03-01

    Neurogenic dysphagia (ND) is a prevalent condition that accounts for significant mortality and morbidity worldwide. Screening and follow-up are critical for early diagnosis and management which can mitigate its complications and be cost-saving. The aims of this study are to provide a comprehensive investigation of the dysphagia limit (DL) in a large diverse cohort and to provide a longitudinal assessment of dysphagia in a subset of subjects. We developed a quantitative and noninvasive method for objective assessment of dysphagia by using laryngeal sensor and submental electromyography. DL is the volume at which second or more swallows become necessary to swallow the whole amount of bolus. This study represents 17 years experience with the DL approach in assessing ND in a cohort of 1278 adult subjects consisting of 292 healthy controls, 784 patients with dysphagia, and 202 patients without dysphagia. A total of 192 of all patients were also reevaluated longitudinally over a period of 1-19 months. DL has 92% sensitivity, 91% specificity, 94% positive predictive value, and 88% negative predictive value with an accuracy of 0.92. Patients with ALS, stroke, and movement disorders have the highest sensitivity (85-97%) and positive predictive value (90-99%). The clinical severity of dysphagia has significant negative correlation with DL (r=-0.67, pdysphagia and it can be performed in an EMG laboratory. Our study provides specific quantitative features of DL test that can be readily utilized by the neurologic community and nominates DL as an objective and robust method to evaluate dysphagia in a wide range of neurologic conditions. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in older persons – from pathophysiology to adequate intervention: a review and summary of an international expert meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Rainer; Dziewas, Rainer; Beck, Anne Marie; Clavé, Pere; Hamdy, Shaheen; Heppner, Hans Juergen; Langmore, Susan; Leischker, Andreas Herbert; Martino, Rosemary; Pluschinski, Petra; Rösler, Alexander; Shaker, Reza; Warnecke, Tobias; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Volkert, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a highly prevalent and growing condition in the older population. Although OD may cause very severe complications, it is often not detected, explored, and treated. Older patients are frequently unaware of their swallowing dysfunction which is one of the reasons why the consequences of OD, ie, aspiration, dehydration, and malnutrition, are regularly not attributed to dysphagia. Older patients are particularly vulnerable to dysphagia because multiple age-related changes increase the risk of dysphagia. Physicians in charge of older patients should be aware that malnutrition, dehydration, and pneumonia are frequently caused by (unrecognized) dysphagia. The diagnosis is particularly difficult in the case of silent aspiration. In addition to numerous screening tools, videofluoroscopy was the traditional gold standard of diagnosing OD. Recently, the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is increasingly utilized because it has several advantages. Besides making a diagnosis, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is applied to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic maneuvers and texture modification of food and liquids. In addition to swallowing training and nutritional interventions, newer rehabilitation approaches of stimulation techniques are showing promise and may significantly impact future treatment strategies. PMID:26966356

  16. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in older persons - from pathophysiology to adequate intervention: a review and summary of an international expert meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Rainer; Dziewas, Rainer; Beck, Anne Marie; Clavé, Pere; Hamdy, Shaheen; Heppner, Hans Juergen; Langmore, Susan; Leischker, Andreas Herbert; Martino, Rosemary; Pluschinski, Petra; Rösler, Alexander; Shaker, Reza; Warnecke, Tobias; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Volkert, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a highly prevalent and growing condition in the older population. Although OD may cause very severe complications, it is often not detected, explored, and treated. Older patients are frequently unaware of their swallowing dysfunction which is one of the reasons why the consequences of OD, ie, aspiration, dehydration, and malnutrition, are regularly not attributed to dysphagia. Older patients are particularly vulnerable to dysphagia because multiple age-related changes increase the risk of dysphagia. Physicians in charge of older patients should be aware that malnutrition, dehydration, and pneumonia are frequently caused by (unrecognized) dysphagia. The diagnosis is particularly difficult in the case of silent aspiration. In addition to numerous screening tools, videofluoroscopy was the traditional gold standard of diagnosing OD. Recently, the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is increasingly utilized because it has several advantages. Besides making a diagnosis, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is applied to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic maneuvers and texture modification of food and liquids. In addition to swallowing training and nutritional interventions, newer rehabilitation approaches of stimulation techniques are showing promise and may significantly impact future treatment strategies.

  17. The Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation Approach Applied to Patients With Neurogenic Dysphagia: A Case Series Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandraki, Georgia A; Rajappa, Akila; Kantarcigil, Cagla; Wagner, Elise; Ivey, Chandra; Youse, Kathleen

    2016-04-01

    To examine the effects of the Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation approach on physiological and functional swallowing outcomes in adults with neurogenic dysphagia. Intervention study; before-after trial with 4-week follow-up through an online survey. Outpatient university clinics. A consecutive sample of subjects (N=10) recruited from outpatient university clinics. All subjects were diagnosed with adult-onset neurologic injury or disease. Dysphagia diagnosis was confirmed through clinical and endoscopic swallowing evaluations. No subjects withdrew from the study. Participants completed the 4-week Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation protocol, including 2 oropharyngeal exercise regimens, a targeted swallowing routine using salient stimuli, and caregiver participation. Treatment included hourly sessions twice per week and home practice for approximately 45 min/d. Outcome measures assessed pre- and posttreatment included airway safety using an 8-point Penetration Aspiration Scale, lingual isometric pressures, self-reported swallowing-related quality of life (QOL), and level of oral intake. Also, patients were monitored for adverse dysphagia-related effects. QOL and adverse effects were also assessed at the 4-week follow-up (online survey). The Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation approach was effective in improving maximum and mean Penetration Aspiration Scale scores (PDysphagia Rehabilitation approach was safe and improved physiological and some functional swallowing outcomes in our sample; however, further investigation is needed before it can be widely applied. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Neurobiology of Swallowing and Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Arthur J.

    2008-01-01

    The neurobiological study of swallowing and its dysfunction, defined as dysphagia, has evolved over two centuries beginning with electrical stimulation applied directly to the central nervous system, and then followed by systematic investigations that have used lesioning, transmagnetic stimulation, magnetoencephalography, and functional magnetic…

  19. Palliation of Dysphagia from Esophageal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.Y.V. Homs (Marjolein)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe prognosis of esophageal cancer is poor with a 5-year survival of 10-15%. In addition, over 50% of patients with esophageal cancer already have an inoperable disease at presentation. The majority of these patients require palliative treatment to relieve progressive dysphagia. Metal

  20. Indicators of Dysphagia in Aged Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Dai; Murry, Thomas; Wong, May C. M.; Yiu, Edwin M. L.; Chan, Karen M. K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The current cross-sectional study aimed to investigate risk factors for dysphagia in elderly individuals in aged care facilities. Method: A total of 878 individuals from 42 aged care facilities were recruited for this study. The dependent outcome was speech therapist-determined swallowing function. Independent factors were Eating…

  1. Dysphagia due to diffuseidiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) or Forestier's disease isa form of degenerative arthritiswith unique spinal and extra spinal manifestations. Dysphagia due to DISH is uncommon but when present DISH should be suspected. Surgical decompression can relieve some of the symptoms. We report a case of a 60 ...

  2. Factors predicting dysphagia after anterior cervical surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Ma, Lei; Yang, Da-Long; Wang, Hui; Bai, Zhi-Long; Zhang, Li-Jun; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A multicenter retrospective study. The purpose of this study was to explore risk factors of dysphagia after anterior cervical surgery and factors affecting rehabilitation of dysphagia 2 years after surgery. Patients who underwent anterior cervical surgery at 3 centers from January 2010 to January 2013 were included. The possible factors included 3 aspects: demographic variables—age, sex, body mass index (BMI): hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, smoking, alcohol use, diagnose (cervical spondylotic myelopathy or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament), preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA), surgical-related variables—surgical option (ACDF, ACCF, ACCDF, or Zero profile), operation time, blood loss, operative level, superior fusion segment, incision length, angle of C2 to C7, height of C2 to C7, cervical circumference, cervical circumference/height of C2 to C7. The results of our study indicated that the rate of dysphagia at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery was 20%, 5.4%, 2.4%, 1.1%, and 0.4%, respectively. Our results showed that age (58.8 years old), BMI (27.3 kg/m2), course of disease (11.6 months), operation time (103.2 min), blood loss (151.6 mL), incision length (9.1 cm), cervical circumference (46.8 cm), angle of C2 to C7 (15.3°), cervical circumference/height of C2 to C7 (4.8), preoperative VAS (7.5), and ODI (0.6) in dysphagia group were significantly higher than those (52.0, 24.6, 8.6, 88.2, 121.6, 8.6, 42.3, 12.6, 3.7, 5.6, and 0.4, respectively) in nondysphagia group; however, height of C2 to C7 (9.9 vs 11.7 cm) and preoperative JOA (8.3 vs 10.7) had opposite trend between 2 groups. We could also infer that female, smoking, diabetes, ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, ACCDF, multilevel surgery, and superior fusion segment including C2 to C3 or C6 to C7 were the risk factors for dysphagia after surgery immediately. However

  3. Dysphonia and dysphagia after anterior cervical decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervonen, Hanna; Niemelä, Mika; Lauri, Eija-Riitta; Back, Leif; Juvas, Anja; Räsänen, Pirjo; Roine, Risto P; Sintonen, Harri; Salmi, Tapani; Vilkman, S Erkki; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the effects of anterior cervical decompression (ACD) on swallowing and vocal function. The study comprised 114 patients who underwent ACD. The early group (50 patients) was examined immediately pre- and postoperatively, and the late group (64 patients) was examined at only 3 to 9 months postoperatively. Fifty age- and sex-matched patients from the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery who had not been intubated in the previous 5 years were used as a control group. All patients in the early and control groups were examined by a laryngologist; patients in the late group were examined by a laryngologist and a neurosurgeon. Videolaryngostroboscopy was performed in all members of the patient and control groups, and the function of the ninth through 12th cranial nerves were clinically evaluated. Data were collected concerning swallowing, voice quality, surgery results, and health-related quality of life. Patients with persistent dysphonia were referred for phoniatric evaluation and laryngeal electromyography (EMG). Those with persistent dysphagia underwent transoral endoscopic evaluation of swallowing function and videofluorography. Sixty percent of patients in the early group reported dysphonia and 69% reported dysphagia at the immediate postoperative visit. Unilateral vocal fold paresis occurred in 12%. The prevalence of both dysphonia and dysphagia decreased in both groups 3 to 9 months postoperatively. All six patients with vocal fold paresis in the early group recovered, and in the late group there were two cases of vocal fold paresis. The results of laryngeal EMG were abnormal in 14 of 16 patients with persistent dysphonia. Neither intraoperative factors nor age or sex had any effect on the occurrence of dysphonia, dysphagia, or vocal fold paresis. Most patients were satisfied with the surgical outcome. Dysphonia, dysphagia, and vocal fold paresis are common but usually transient complications of ACD

  4. Hypertrophic anterior cervical osteophytes causing dysphagia and airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Harrison W; Quesnel, Alicia M; Holman, Allison S; Curry, William T; Rho, Michael B

    2009-10-01

    Hyperostosis of anterior cervical vertebral osteophytes can produce otolaryngological symptoms ranging from mild dysphagia, dysphonia, and foreign body sensation to severe food impaction and stridulous dyspnea. Airway compromise necessitating a tracheostomy is very rare. We discuss the case of an elderly man who presented with progressive dysphagia and a large hypopharyngeal mass as his initial manifestations of hypertrophic anterior cervical osteophytes. After a biopsy of the mass, the patient went into airway distress due to bilateral vocal fold fixation by the enlarging mass and consequently required a surgical airway. A combined team approach to the removal of the osteophytes successfully resolved his symptoms. The clinical, diagnostic, radiologic, and therapeutic principles involved in this case are presented and discussed. The recognition of hypertrophic osteophytes as a potential cause of common otolaryngological symptoms in the elderly population is paramount, as these symptoms can rapidly progress and lead to life-threatening airway obstruction. Medical and surgical interventions can be employed for the treatment of hypertrophic anterior cervical osteophytes, and they often result in favorable outcomes.

  5. Involvement of membrane sterols in hypergravity-induced modifications of growth and cell wall metabolism in plant stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, T.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Suzuki, M.; Muranaka, T.; Hoson, T.

    Organisms living on land resist the gravitational force by constructing a tough body Plants have developed gravity resistance responses after having first went ashore more than 500 million years ago The mechanisms of gravity resistance responses have been studied under hypergravity conditions which are easily produced on earth by centrifugation In Arabidopsis hypocotyls hypergravity treatment greatly increased the expression level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase HMGR which is involved in synthesis of terpenoids such as membrane sterols In the present study we examined the role of membrane sterols in gravity resistance in plants by analyzing sterol levels of stem organs grown under hypergravity conditions and by analyzing responses to hypergravity of the organs whose sterol level was modulated Hypergravity inhibited elongation growth but stimulated lateral expansion of Arabidopsis hypocotyls and azuki bean epicotyls Under hypergravity conditions sterol levels were kept high as compared with 1 g controls during incubation Lovastatin an inhibitor HMGR prevented lateral expansion as the gravity resistance response in azuki bean epicotyls Similar results were obtained in analyses with loss of function mutants of HMGR in Arabidopsis It has been shown that sterols play a role in cellulose biosynthesis probably as the primer In wild type Arabidopsis hypocotyls hypergravity increased the cellulose content but it did not influence the content in HMGR mutants These results suggest that hypergravity increases

  6. Identification of Candida glabrata genes involved in pH modulation and modification of the phagosomal environment in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Kasper

    Full Text Available Candida glabrata currently ranks as the second most frequent cause of invasive candidiasis. Our previous work has shown that C. glabrata is adapted to intracellular survival in macrophages and replicates within non-acidified late endosomal-stage phagosomes. In contrast, heat killed yeasts are found in acidified matured phagosomes. In the present study, we aimed at elucidating the processes leading to inhibition of phagosome acidification and maturation. We show that phagosomes containing viable C. glabrata cells do not fuse with pre-labeled lysosomes and possess low phagosomal hydrolase activity. Inhibition of acidification occurs independent of macrophage type (human/murine, differentiation (M1-/M2-type or activation status (vitamin D3 stimulation. We observed no differential activation of macrophage MAPK or NFκB signaling cascades downstream of pattern recognition receptors after internalization of viable compared to heat killed yeasts, but Syk activation decayed faster in macrophages containing viable yeasts. Thus, delivery of viable yeasts to non-matured phagosomes is likely not triggered by initial recognition events via MAPK or NFκB signaling, but Syk activation may be involved. Although V-ATPase is abundant in C. glabrata phagosomes, the influence of this proton pump on intracellular survival is low since blocking V-ATPase activity with bafilomycin A1 has no influence on fungal viability. Active pH modulation is one possible fungal strategy to change phagosome pH. In fact, C. glabrata is able to alkalinize its extracellular environment, when growing on amino acids as the sole carbon source in vitro. By screening a C. glabrata mutant library we identified genes important for environmental alkalinization that were further tested for their impact on phagosome pH. We found that the lack of fungal mannosyltransferases resulted in severely reduced alkalinization in vitro and in the delivery of C. glabrata to acidified phagosomes. Therefore

  7. Rice (Oryza sativa) Laccases Involved in Modification and Detoxification of Herbicides Atrazine and Isoproturon Residues in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meng Tian; Lu, Yi Chen; Zhang, Shuang; Luo, Fang; Yang, Hong

    2016-08-24

    Atrazine (ATR) and isoproturon (IPU) as herbicides have become serious environmental contaminants due to their overuse in crop production. Although ATR and IPU in soils are easily absorbed by many crops, the mechanisms for their degradation or detoxification in plants are poorly understood. This study identified a group of novel genes encoding laccases (EC 1.10.3.2) that are possibly involved in catabolism or detoxification of ATR and IPU residues in rice. Transcriptome profiling shows at least 22 differentially expressed laccase genes in ATR/IPU-exposed rice. Some of the laccase genes were validated by RT-PCR analysis. The biochemical properties of the laccases were analyzed, and their activities in rice were induced under ATR/IPU exposure. To investigate the roles of laccases in degrading or detoxifying ATR/IPU in rice, transgenic yeast cells (Pichia pastoris X-33) expressing two rice laccase genes (LOC_Os01g63180 and LOC_Os12g15680) were generated. Both transformants were found to accumulate less ATR/IPU compared to the control. The ATR/IPU-degraded products in the transformed yeast cells using UPLC-TOF-MS/MS were further characterized. Two metabolites, hydroxy-dehydrogenated atrazine (HDHA) and 2-OH-isopropyl-IPU, catalyzed by laccases were detected in the eukaryotic cells. These results indicate that the laccase-coding genes identified here could confer degradation or detoxification of the herbicides and suggest that the laccases could be one of the important enzymatic pathways responsible for ATR/IPU degradation/detoxification in rice.

  8. Behavior Modification in Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Annette Rutt; Stillman, Stephen M.

    1979-01-01

    An example of behavior modification used in athletic coaching is presented. The case study involves a member of a women's basketball team and details the use of behavior modification for both weight reduction and skill improvement. (JMF)

  9. Cortical processing of swallowing in ALS patients with progressive dysphagia--a magnetoencephalographic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga K Teismann

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a rare disease causing degeneration of the upper and lower motor neuron. Involvement of the bulbar motor neurons often results in fast progressive dysphagia. While cortical compensation of dysphagia has been previously shown in stroke patients, this topic has not been addressed in patients suffering from ALS. In the present study, we investigated cortical activation during deglutition in two groups of ALS patients with either moderate or severe dysphagia. Whole-head MEG was employed on fourteen patients with sporadic ALS using a self-paced swallowing paradigm. Data were analyzed by means of time-frequency analysis and synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM. Group analysis of individual SAM data was performed using a permutation test. We found a reduction of cortical swallowing related activation in ALS patients compared to healthy controls. Additionally a disease-related shift of hemispheric lateralization was observed. While healthy subjects showed bilateral cortical activation, the right sensorimotor cortex was predominantly involved in ALS patients. Both effects were even stronger in the group of patients with severe dysphagia. Our results suggest that bilateral degeneration of the upper motor neuron in the primary motor areas also impairs further adjusted motor areas, which leads to a strong reduction of 'swallowing related' cortical activation. While both hemispheres are affected by the degeneration a relatively stronger activation is seen in the right hemisphere. This right hemispheric lateralization of volitional swallowing observed in this study may be the only sign of cortical plasticity in dysphagic ALS patients. It may demonstrate compensational mechanisms in the right hemisphere which is known to predominantly coordinate the pharyngeal phase of deglutition. These results add new aspects to our understanding of the pathophysiology of dysphagia in ALS patients and beyond. The compensational

  10. Zero-profile anchored cage reduces risk of postoperative dysphagia compared with cage with plate fixation after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, ShanWen; Liang, ZhuDe; Wei, Wu; Ning, JinPei

    2017-04-01

    To compare the rate of postoperative dysphagia between zero-profile anchored cage fixation (ZPC group) and cage with plate fixation (CP group) after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). A meta-analysis of cohort studies between zero-profile anchored cage and conventional cage with plate fixation after ACDF for the treatment of cervical diseases from 2008 to May 2016. An extensive search of studies was performed in PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane library and Google Scholar. Dysphagia rate was extracted. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.2. Sixteen trials involving 1066 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The results suggested that the ZPC group were associated with lower incidences of dysphagia than the CP group at postoperative immediately, 2 weeks, 2, 3, 6 and 12 months. In subgroup analysis, although significant differences were only found in the mild dysphagia at 3 and 6 months postoperatively and in the moderate dysphagia at 2 weeks after surgery; the ZPC group had a lower rate of postoperative dysphagia than the CCP group in short, medium and long term follow-up periods. Zero-profile anchored cage had a lower risk of postoperative dysphagia than cage with plate.

  11. Electrical stimulation therapy for dysphagia: a follow-up survey of USA dysphagia practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barikroo, Ali; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare current application, practice patterns, clinical outcomes, and professional attitudes of dysphagia practitioners regarding electrical stimulation (e-stim) therapy with similar data obtained in 2005. A web-based survey was posted on the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Special Interest Group 13 webpage for 1 month. A total of 271 survey responses were analyzed and descriptively compared with the archived responses from the 2005 survey. Results suggested that e-stim application increased by 47% among dysphagia practitioners over the last 10 years. The frequency of weekly e-stim therapy sessions decreased while the reported total number of treatment sessions increased between the two surveys. Advancement in oral diet was the most commonly reported improvement in both surveys. Overall, reported satisfaction levels of clinicians and patients regarding e-stim therapy decreased. Still, the majority of e-stim practitioners continue to recommend this treatment modality to other dysphagia practitioners. Results from the novel items in the current survey suggested that motor level e-stim (e.g. higher amplitude) is most commonly used during dysphagia therapy with no preferred electrode placement. Furthermore, the majority of clinicians reported high levels of self-confidence regarding their ability to perform e-stim. The results of this survey highlight ongoing changes in application, practice patterns, clinical outcomes, and professional attitudes associated with e-stim therapy among dysphagia practitioners.

  12. Dysphagia associated with cervical spine and postural disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Soultana; Exarchakos, Georgios; Beris, Alexander; Ploumis, Avraam

    2013-12-01

    Difficulties with swallowing may be both persistent and life threatening for the majority of those who experience it irrespective of age, gender, and race. The purpose of this review is to define oropharyngeal dysphagia and describe its relationship to cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances due to either congenital or acquired disorders. The etiology and diagnosis of dysphagia are analyzed, focusing on cervical spine pathology associated with dysphagia as severe cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances largely have been held accountable for deglutition disorders. Scoliosis, kyphosis–lordosis, and osteophytes are the primary focus of this review in an attempt to elucidate the link between cervical spine disorders and dysphagia. It is important for physicians to be knowledgeable about what triggers oropharyngeal dysphagia in cases of cervical spine and postural disorders. Moreover, the optimum treatment for dysphagia, including the use of therapeutic maneuvers during deglutition, neck exercises, and surgical treatment, is discussed.

  13. Effects of therapy for dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baijens, Laura W J; Speyer, Renée

    2009-03-01

    This systematic review explores the effects of dysphagia treatment for Parkinson's disease. The review includes rehabilitative, surgical, pharmacologic, and other treatments. Only oropharyngeal dysphagia is selected for this literature search, excluding dysphagia due to esophageal or gastric disorders. The effects of deep brain stimulation on dysphagia are not included. In general, the literature concerning dysphagia treatment in Parkinson's disease is rather limited. Most effect studies show diverse methodologic problems. Multiple case studies and trials are identified by searching biomedical literature databases PubMed and Embase, and by hand-searching reference lists. The conclusions of most studies cannot be compared with one another because of heterogeneous therapy methods and outcome measures. Further research based on randomized controlled trials to determine the effectiveness of different therapies for dysphagia in Parkinson's disease is required.

  14. Thyrotoxic Dysphagia in an 82-Year-Old Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Parperis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is a common problem in elderly patients and a rare manifestation of Graves' disease. We report a case of an 82-year-old male who presented with a 4-week history of dysphagia and weight loss. Workup for his dysphagia with upper endoscopy, MRI brain, electromyography, acetyl-cholinesterase receptor antibodies, and voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. Modified Barium swallow test showed oropharyngeal dysphagia. Thyroid function tests that revealed hyperthyroidism and antibodies to TSH-receptor were positive. Based on the above findings, we considered Graves' disease as the most likely diagnosis. Patient was treated with methimazole and beta-blockers and subsequently his dysphagia resolved. This paper highlights the importance to clinicians of considering thyrotoxicosis as possible diagnosis in an elderly patient presenting with unexplained dysphagia.

  15. Mesothelioma - A rare cause of dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanathan Swati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 81-year-old elderly Caucasian male presented with progressive dysphagia and unintentional weight loss over four months. His history was significant for asbestos exposure; however there was no history of asbestos related lung disease. Barium swallow showed achalasia and a subsequent CT chest showed a posterior mediastinal mass 11.8×9.1×5.8cm, compressing the distal oesophagus. Laparoscopic biopsy of the mass showed an epitheloid mesothelioma. Mass was deemed unresectable and patient was started on chemotherapy with Cisplatin/Pemetrexed. Localised mesothelioma is extremely rare, and dysphagia can be uncommon presenting feature. 7.4 per cent of cases of Pseudoachalasia are attributed to mesothelioma

  16. Palliation of Dysphagia in Carcinoma Esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala; Malage, Somanath; Sreenath, G.S.; Kotlapati, Sudhakar; Cyriac, Sunu

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma has a special place in gastrointestinal carcinomas because it contains two main types, namely, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Carcinoma esophagus patients require some form of palliation because of locally advanced stage or distant metastasis, where it cannot be subjected to curable treatment with surgery and chemoradiation. Many modalities of palliation of dysphagia are available, but the procedure with least morbidity, mortality, and long-term palliation of...

  17. Approach to patients with esophageal Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Eubanks, Steve

    2015-06-01

    Patients frequently present to a physician with complaints of difficulty swallowing. The approach to systematically evaluating these problems can be challenging for those who do not manage this type of patient regularly. The potential for life-threatening malignancies is present and makes this evaluation a priority. Numerous excellent tools are available to aid with the determination of the cause of dysphagia and assist with the formulation of a logical treatment algorithm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Oropharyngeal dysphagia, an underestimated disorder in pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Vaquero-Sosa, Esther; Francisco-González, Laura; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Urbasos-Garzón, Cristina; Ruiz-de-León-San-Juan, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a rather frequent clinical entity in patients with neurological problems that can lead to serious complications such as aspiration pneumonia and other disorders like dehydration or malnutrition due to feeding difficulties. It should be suspected in children with splitting of food intake or prolonged feeding, coughing or choking during feeding, continuous drooling or repeated respiratory symptoms. For the diagnosis, apart from the examination of swallowing, additiona...

  19. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cumhur Ertekin

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic, neurodegenerative movement disorder that typically affects elderly patients. Swallowing disorders are highly prevalent in PD and can have grave consequences, including pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration and mortality. Neurogenic dysphagia in PD can manifest with both overt clinical symptoms or silent dysphagia. Regardless, early diagnosis and objective follow-up of dysphagia in PD is crucial for timely and appropriate care for these patients. In this r...

  20. The benefits of a 5-day dysphagia intensive placement

    OpenAIRE

    Cocks, N.; Harding, C.; Pritchard, M.

    2014-01-01

    Finding practical dysphagia opportunities for students pre-qualification is challenging. Discussions with clinicians led to the development of a new placement model. The placement was just five days and had an accompanying workbook. The current study aimed to evaluate the benefits of the placement. Data were analysed from 40 students who attended an adult dysphagia placement and 13 who attended a paediatric dysphagia placement. Measures included a pre and post self-rating questionnaire, quali...

  1. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: practical recommendations to guide management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Michel; Davidson, Zoe; Bouvoie, Veronique; Evenepoel, Nathalie; Haan, Jurn; Soudon, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disorder causing weakness of the skeletal, respiratory, cardiac and oropharyngeal muscles with up to one third of young men reporting difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). Recent studies on dysphagia in DMD clarify the pathophysiology of swallowing disorders and offer new tools for its assessment but little guidance is available for its management. This paper aims to provide a step-by-step algorithm to facilitate clinical decisions regarding dysphagia management in this patient population. This algorithm is based on 30 years of clinical experience with DMD in a specialised Centre for Neuromuscular Disorders (Inkendaal Rehabilitation Hospital, Belgium) and is supported by literature where available. Dysphagia can worsen the condition of ageing patients with DMD. Apart from the difficulties of chewing and oral fragmentation of the food bolus, dysphagia is rather a consequence of an impairment in the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. By contrast with central neurologic disorders, dysphagia in DMD accompanies solid rather than liquid intake. Symptoms of dysphagia may not be clinically evident; however laryngeal food penetration, accumulation of food residue in the pharynx and/or true laryngeal food aspiration may occur. The prevalence of these issues in DMD is likely underestimated. There is little guidance available for clinicians to manage dysphagia and improve feeding for young men with DMD. This report aims to provide a clinical algorithm to facilitate the diagnosis of dysphagia, to identify the symptoms and to propose practical recommendations to treat dysphagia in the adult DMD population. Implications for Rehabilitation Little guidance is available for the management of dysphagia in Duchenne dystrophy. Food can penetrate the vestibule, accumulate as residue or cause aspiration. We propose recommendations and an algorithm to guide management of dysphagia. Penetration/residue accumulation

  2. Dysphagia: Aspects of assessment and management for the Acute Physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A; Stacey, B

    2008-01-01

    The term Dysphagia originates from a Greek word meaning disordered eating. It is defined as difficulty in swallowing. Dysphagia should not be confused with globus senstation, a feeling of having a lump in the throat, which is unrelated to swallowing and occurs without impaired transit (see below). Although odynophagia (painful swallowing) and phagophobia (fear of swallowing) are symptoms that may be associated with dysphagia it is important to distinguish this in the history.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of dysphagia using scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seok Gun; Hyun, Jung Keun; Lee, Seong Jae

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate dysphagia objectively and quantitatively, and to clarify the effect of neck position and viscosity changes in patients with aspiration and laryngeal penetration. We studied 35 patients with dysphagia and 21 normal controls using videofluoroscopy and scintigraphy. Videofluoroscopy was performed with barium with three different viscosity, and scintigraphy was done with water, yogurt, and steamed egg mixed with Tc-99m tin colloid. If aspiration was found during videofluoroscopic examination, patient's neck position was changed and study repeated. Videofluoroscopy was analyzed qualitatively. We calculated 7 quantitative parameters from scintigraphy. According to the videofluoroscopic findings, we divided patients into 3 subgroups; aspiration, laryngeal penetration, and no-aspiration group. The result of videofluoroscopy revealed that the most common finding was the delay in triggering pharyngeal swallow. Pharyngeal transit time (PTT) and pharyngeal swallowing efficiency (PSE) in patients with aspiration were significantly different from other groups. After neck position change, aspiration could be reduced in all of 7 patients, and laryngeal penetration reduced by about 82%. PTT and PSE were also improved after position change. Aspiration and laryngeal penetration occurred more frequently in thin liquid swallowing than in thin liquid and solid swallowing. PTT and PSE were useful for the evaluation of dysphagia. Aspiration and laryngeal penetration could by reduced when appropriate position assumed. We could decrease the chance of aspiration by changing the patient diet consistency. Scintigraphy might be useful tool to quantitate and follow up these changes

  4. Quantitative evaluation of dysphagia using scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seok Gun; Hyun, Jung Keun; Lee, Seong Jae [College of Medicine, Dankook Univ., Cheonnon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate dysphagia objectively and quantitatively, and to clarify the effect of neck position and viscosity changes in patients with aspiration and laryngeal penetration. We studied 35 patients with dysphagia and 21 normal controls using videofluoroscopy and scintigraphy. Videofluoroscopy was performed with barium with three different viscosity, and scintigraphy was done with water, yogurt, and steamed egg mixed with Tc-99m tin colloid. If aspiration was found during videofluoroscopic examination, patient's neck position was changed and study repeated. Videofluoroscopy was analyzed qualitatively. We calculated 7 quantitative parameters from scintigraphy. According to the videofluoroscopic findings, we divided patients into 3 subgroups; aspiration, laryngeal penetration, and no-aspiration group. The result of videofluoroscopy revealed that the most common finding was the delay in triggering pharyngeal swallow. Pharyngeal transit time (PTT) and pharyngeal swallowing efficiency (PSE) in patients with aspiration were significantly different from other groups. After neck position change, aspiration could be reduced in all of 7 patients, and laryngeal penetration reduced by about 82%. PTT and PSE were also improved after position change. Aspiration and laryngeal penetration occurred more frequently in thin liquid swallowing than in thin liquid and solid swallowing. PTT and PSE were useful for the evaluation of dysphagia. Aspiration and laryngeal penetration could by reduced when appropriate position assumed. We could decrease the chance of aspiration by changing the patient diet consistency. Scintigraphy might be useful tool to quantitate and follow up these changes.

  5. Dysphagia Post Subcortical and Supratentorial Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ping; Chen, Xuhui; Zhu, Lequn; Xu, Shuangjin; Huang, Li; Li, Xiangcui; Ye, Qing; Ding, Ruiying

    2016-01-01

    Studies have recognized that the damage in the subcortical and supratentorial regions may affect voluntary and involuntary aspects of the swallowing function. The current study attempted to explore the dysphagia characteristics in patients with subcortical and supratentorial stroke. Twelve post first or second subcortical and supratentorial stroke patients were included in the study. The location of the stroke was ascertained by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The characteristics of swallowing disorder were assessed by video fluoroscopic swallowing assessment/fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. The following main parameters were analyzed: oral transit time, pharyngeal delay time, presence of cricopharyngeal muscle achalasia (CMA), distance of laryngeal elevation, the amounts of vallecular residue and pyriform sinus residue (PSR), and the extent of pharyngeal contraction. Eighty-three percent of the 12 patients were found suffering from pharyngeal dysphagia, with 50% having 50%-100% PSRs, 50% having pharyngeal delay, and 41.6% cases demonstrating CMA. Simple regression analysis showed PSRs were most strongly associated with CMA. Pharyngeal delay in the study can be caused by infarcts of basal ganglia/thalamus, infarcts of sensory tract, infarcts of swallowing motor pathways in the centrum semiovale, or a combination of the three. Subcortical and supratentorial stroke may result in pharyngeal dysphagia such as PSR and pharyngeal delay. PSR was mainly caused by CMA. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Practice Guidelines: Evaluation of Dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W Cockeram

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia may be defined as difficulty in swallowing. Dysphagia may be classified as oropharyngeal or esophageal; oropharyngeal dysphagia arises from a structural or functional abnormality in the oropharynx, and esophageal dysphagia occurs as a result of structural or functional abnormalities in the esophagus. Esophageal dysphagia may be further subclassified symptomatically as dysphagia for solids alone, which usually suggests a mechanical problem, versus dysphagia for liquids and solids, which is more suggestive of a neuromuscular problem. Dysphagia may be described by the patient as a sensation of food 'sticking' or as a sensation of food passing slowly through the esophagus. True dysphagia always indicates organic disease and always warrants investigation and consultation if no cause is found in initial studies. These symptoms should be distinguished from those of a persistent foreign body-type sensation or a sensation of a lump, which is more typical of globus sensation. Odynophagia, defined as pain with swallowing, may occur in association with esophageal dysmotility or as a result of mucosal disease in the esophagus.

  7. Dysphagia and sialorrhea: the relationship to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaretta, Denise Hack; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Mattos, James Pitágoras de; Maliska, Carmelindo; Costa, Milton M B

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease. The aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Two Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by the scintigraphic method, Videofluoroscopic examination of the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing showed that 94% of Parkinson's diseases patients present, structural causes, not related to Parkinson's diseases, able to produce or intensify the observed disphagia. The scintigraphic examination of Parkinson's diseases patients with sialorrhea showed that there is no increase of serous saliva production. Nevertheless, showed a significantly higher velocity of saliva excretion in the Parkinson's diseases patients. Dysphagia can be due to the muscular rigidity often present in the Parkinson's diseases patient, or more usually by non Parkinson's disease associated causes. In Parkinson's diseases patients, sialorrhea is produced by saliva retention. Nevertheless, sialorrhea can produce discomfort in swallowing, although without a formal complaint of dysphagia. In this case, subclinical dysphagia must be considered. Sialorrhea is indicative of dysphagia or at least of subclinical dysphagia. As final conclusion, Parkinson's diseases can be an isolated cause of dysphagia and/or sialorrhea, but frequently, a factor unrelated to Parkinson's diseases is the main cause of or at least aggravates the dysphagia.

  8. [Oropharyngeal dysphagia associated with Chiari I malformation and syringomyelia J].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Medina, Julio César; Cárdenas-Lara, Armando; Guerrero-Rascón, Carlos Alberto; Rodríguez-Bautista, Heber

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia associated with neurological disease is an important clinical manifestation in the diagnosis of injury that justifies the compression of the brainstem and lower cranial nerves. To emphasize the study of dysphagia in a patient with Chiari I malformation associated with syringomyelia in the absence of primary gastroenterological symptoms. We describe the case of a 62 year-old woman with oropharyngeal dysphagia of six years of evolution, cervicobrachialgia, ptosis and facial diplexia. Magnetic resonance imaging is an essential element for establishing the etiologic diagnosis of neurogenic dysphagia.

  9. Challenges in oral drug delivery in patients with esophageal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappelle, Wouter F W; Siersema, Peter D; Bogte, Auke; Vleggaar, Frank P

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is a commonly reported symptom with various benign and malignant causes. Esophageal dysphagia can impede intake of oral medication, which often poses a major challenge for both patients and physicians. The best way to address this challenge depends of the cause of dysphagia. The pathophysiology of esophageal dysphagia is discussed, diagnostic tools to determine its cause are reviewed and recent developments in the treatment of esophageal dysphagia are discussed. Alternative options to administer medication in dysphagia are discussed and the appropriateness of them reviewed. Two ways can be followed to allow medication intake in patients with esophageal dysphagia, i.e. altering medication or resolving dysphagia. The latter is generally preferred, since esophageal dysphagia rarely only impedes medication intake. Esophageal resection is possible in more advanced esophageal cancer stages due to advances in neo-adjuvant therapy. Due to recent improvements in intraluminal radiotherapy, it can be expected that this will be the primary treatment in a palliative setting. Temporary self-expandable metal stent placement is a promising new alternative for bougienage in difficult-to-treat benign strictures.

  10. Nonaneurysmatic Dysphagia Aortica in the Elderly: Three Case Reports and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Hsueh Chan; Chien-Yuan Hung; Tze-Yu Shieh; Horng-Yuan Wang; Ching-Wei Chang; Shou-Chuan Shih; Ming-Jen Chen

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is a remarkably prevalent disorder in the elderly. Both age-related changes in swallowing physiology and age-related diseases are predisposing factors for dysphagia in the elderly. Dysphagia aortica is a rare etiology of dysphagia resulting from extrinsic compression of the esophagus by an aneurysm or by a tortuous and elongated thoracic aorta. Clinical findings of dysphagia aortica resemble those of esophageal malignancy or esophageal motility disorders. Dysphagia aortica not relat...

  11. Granulocytic Sarcoma of the Stomach Presenting as Dysphagia during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Sekaran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulocytic sarcoma also known as extramedullary myeloid sarcoma or chloroma is an uncommon manifestation of leukemia and presents as a deposit of leukemic cells outside the bone marrow. We report a case of a twenty-five-year-old pregnant woman who presented with progressive dysphagia and recurrent postprandial vomiting. Upper GI endoscopy had shown large flat laterally spread nodular lesions in the cardia and proximal body of stomach. Biopsies from the gastric lesion showed granulocytic sarcoma of the stomach. Concurrent peripheral and bone marrow picture was suggestive of acute myeloid leukemia (AML–M4. There is limited reported literature on granulocytic sarcoma of the stomach. Concurrent gastric granulocytic sarcoma involving cardia and AML in pregnancy has not been reported till date.

  12. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis inducted stridor and dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burduk, Paweł K; Wierzchowska, Małgorzata; Grzelalak, Lech; Dalke, Krzysztof; Mierzwiński, Józef

    2008-01-01

    Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH) is a condition characterized by calcification and ossification of soft tissues, mainly ligaments and enthesis. Dysphagia is the commonest complaint, stridor secondary to osteophyte compression has rarely been documented. The osteophytes may cause symptoms by mechanical compression or by inducting inflammatory reaction. When an upper segment of the C-spine is involved, particular C3 - C4 level, the larynx may be affected. This could be result of hoarseness, stridor, laryngeal stenosis and obstruction. Sometimes vocal fold paralysis may result from injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Treatment of the breathing problems required first on stabilization the airway with tracheostomy. Next step is osteophysectomy which generally relief patients from symptoms.

  13. A functional study of the esophagus in patients with non-cardiac chest pain and dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Roberto; Inviati, Angela; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Di Paola, Valentina; Di Giovanni, Silvia; Scerrino, Gregorio; Gulotta, Gaspare; Bonventre, Sebastiano

    2015-03-01

    Nutcracker esophagus and non-specific motility disorders are the main causes of non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP), with gastroesophageal reflux in 60% of cases. Achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm are the most frequent anomalies described in patients with dysphagia. The goal of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of esophageal body and lower esophageal sphincter motor abnormalities in patients with dysphagia, NCCP, or both. This study is a retrospective analysis of 716 patients with NCCP and/or dysphagia tested between January 1994 and December 2010. 1023 functional studies were performed, 707 of which were esophageal manometries, 225 esophageal pH-meters, and 44 bilimetries. We divided the patients into three groups: group 1 was composed of patients affected with dysphagia, group 2 with NCCP and group 3 with NCCP and dysphagia. Manometric anomalies were detected in 84.4% of cases (p<0.001). The most frequent esophageal motility alteration was achalasia (36%). The lower esophageal sphincter was normal in 45.9% of patients (p<0.001). In all 3 groups, 80.9%, 98.8%, and 93.8, respectively, of patients showed normal upper esophageal sphincter (p=0.005). Our data differs from those of other studies because they were collected from and analyzed by a single tertiary level referral center by a single examiner. This could have eliminated the variability found in different hands and different experiences. The high percentage of symptomatic patients with non-pathologic esophageal motility pattern suggests an unclear origin of the disease, with possible neuromuscular involvement. As a result, these patients may need more-detailed diagnostic studies.

  14. Efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy as a palliative treatment in stage IVB esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Eiji; Kojima, Takashi; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively assess the efficacy and safety of palliative chemoradiotherapy in Stage IVB esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia due to the primary lesion. Forty patients with dysphagia caused by metastatic esophageal cancer, which had been treated between January 2004 and June 2009, were retrospectively investigated. The treatment consisted of two courses of chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) and concurrent irradiation of 40 Gy in 20 fractions to the esophageal primary tumor. The grade of dysphagia was evaluated; nutrition-support-free survival was evaluated using the status of nutritional support of patients. Response to treatment, overall survival, progression-free survival and toxicities were also evaluated. Dysphagia score improved in 75% of the patients. Seventeen of the 20 patients (85%) who had required nutritional support at baseline improved their oral intake to no longer need the support, in a median time of 43 days. The median nutrition-support-free survival was 301 days in the 20 patients who had had adequate oral intake before the treatment. Disease control rate of the primary lesion was 95%, including 12 patients (30%) who achieved a complete response. The overall response rate was 55%. The median survival was 308 days, and the 1-year-survival rate was 45.0%. The median progression-free survival was 139 days. Toxicities were generally well tolerated. Major toxicities (Grade 3 or 4) involved hemoglobin (23%), leukocytes (15%), neutrophils (20%), anorexia (10%), nausea (3%), esophageal perforation (5%) and febrile neutropenia (3%). Two patients (5%) died within 30 days of terminating radiotherapy. Palliative chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil plus cisplatin combined with concurrent 40 Gy irradiation effectively improved the symptom of dysphagia in Stage IVB esophageal cancer with acceptable toxicity and favorable survival. (author)

  15. Evaluation and Management of Neonatal Dysphagia: Impact of Pharyngoesophageal Motility Studies and Multidisciplinary Feeding Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan R.; Stoner, Erin; Gupta, Alankar; Bates, D. Gregory; Fernandez, Soledad; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Linscheid, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Abnormal swallowing (dysphagia) among neonates is commonly evaluated using the videofluoroscopic swallow study (VSS). Radiological findings considered high risk for administration of oral feeding include nasopharyngeal reflux, laryngeal penetration, aspiration, or pooling. Our aims were to determine pharyngoesophageal motility correlates in neonates with dysphagia and the impact of multidisciplinary feeding strategy. Methods Twenty dysphagic neonates (mean gestation ± standard deviation [SD] = 30.9 ± 4.9 weeks; median 31.1 weeks; range = 23.7–38.6 weeks) with abnormal VSS results were evaluated at 49.9 ± 16.5 weeks (median 41.36 weeks) postmenstrual age. The subjects underwent a swallow-integrated pharyngoesophageal motility assessment of basal and adaptive swallowing reflexes using a micromanometry catheter and pneumohydraulic water perfusion system. Based on observations during the motility study, multidisciplinary feeding strategies were applied and included postural adaptation, sensory modification, hunger manipulation, and operant conditioning methods. To discriminate pharyngoesophageal manometry correlates between oral feeders and tube feeders, data were stratified based on the primary feeding method at discharge, oral feeding versus tube feeding. Results At discharge, 15 of 20 dysphagic neonates achieved oral feeding success, and the rest required chronic tube feeding. Pharyngoesophageal manometry correlates were significantly different (P dysphagia or its consequences. Manometry may be a better predictor than VSS in identifying patients who are likely to succeed in vigorous intervention programs. PMID:19179881

  16. Engineering high Zn in tomato shoots through expression of AtHMA4 involves tissue-specific modification of endogenous genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziorek, Maria; Klimecka, Maria; Barabasz, Anna; Borg, Sören; Rudzka, Justyna; Szczęsny, Paweł; Antosiewicz, Danuta Maria

    2016-08-12

    To increase the Zn level in shoots, AtHMA4 was ectopically expressed in tomato under the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter. However, the Zn concentration in the shoots of transgenic plants failed to increase at all tested Zn levels in the medium. Modification of Zn root/shoot distribution in tomato expressing 35S::AtHMA4 depended on the concentration of Zn in the medium, thus indicating involvement of unknown endogenous metal-homeostasis mechanisms. To determine these mechanisms, those metal-homeostasis genes that were expressed differently in transgenic and wild-type plants were identified by microarray and RT-qPCR analysis using laser-assisted microdissected RNA isolated from two root sectors: (epidermis + cortex and stele), and leaf sectors (upper epidermis + palisade parenchyma and lower epidermis + spongy parenchyma). Zn-supply-dependent modification of Zn root/shoot distribution in AtHMA4-tomato (increase at 5 μM Zn, no change at 0.5 μM Zn) involved tissue-specific, distinct from that in the wild type, expression of tomato endogenous genes. First, it is suggested that an ethylene-dependent pathway underlies the detected changes in Zn root/shoot partitioning, as it was induced in transgenic plants in a distinct way depending on Zn exposure. Upon exposure to 5 or 0.5 μM Zn, in the epidermis + cortex of the transgenics' roots the expression of the Strategy I Fe-uptake system (ethylene-dependent LeIRT1 and LeFER) was respectively lower or higher than in the wild type and was accompanied by respectively lower or higher expression of the identified ethylene genes (LeNR, LeACO4, LeACO5) and of LeChln. Second, the contribution of LeNRAMP2 expression in the stele is shown to be distinct for wild-type and transgenic plants at both Zn exposures. Ethylene was also suggested as an important factor in a pathway induced in the leaves of transgenic plants by high Zn in the apoplast, which results in the initiation of loading of the excess Zn into the

  17. The Anxiety Level of Caregivers of Neurological Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serel Arslan, Selen; Demir, Numan; Karaduman, A Ayşe

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to investigate anxiety level of caregivers of neurological patients with dysphagia, and the relationship of patient-related factors to anxiety level of dysphagia caregivers. A total of 103 adult neurological patients with dysphagia (study group), 30 without dysphagia (control group), and their primary caregivers were included. Types of feeding, condition of dependency in eating and drinking, dysphagia duration, and history of previous dysphagia treatment were recorded for study group. In study group, the Turkish version of the Eating Assessment Tool-10 (T-EAT-10) was used to determine dysphagia symptom severity. Penetration and aspiration severity was determined with the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS). The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) that has two subscales including state anxiety (S-STAI) and trait anxiety (T-STAI) was used to determine anxiety level of caregivers. There was no difference between groups in terms of age, gender, weight, and height. The mean S-STAI was 42.56 ± 10.10 for the study group and 29.20 ± 6.64 for the control group (p dysphagia treatment (p = 0.01, r = 0.25). No correlation was found between STAI (in terms of both S-STAI and T-STAI) and T-EAT-10, PAS, types of feeding, condition of dependency in eating and drinking, dysphagia duration (p > 0.05). Caregivers of neurological patients with dysphagia have greater anxiety level than caregivers of neurological patients without dysphagia.

  18. Interesting case of spontaneously resolved dysphagia in a young female due to complicated esophageal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dhaval Choksi; Alisha Chaubal; Ruchir Patel; Chetan Rathi; Meghraj Ingle; Prabha Sawant

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can affect any organ of the body. Gastrointestinal tubercular involvement is fairly common. Esophageal tuberculosis though is uncommon. Esophageal tuberculosis accounts for only 0.3% of gastrointestinal tuberculosis. It presents with dysphagia, retrosternal pain, cough or constitutional symptoms. Complications like hemorrhage from the ulcer and development of fistulas like esophagomediastinal fistula is extremely uncommon. We report a case of a 27 years old female w...

  19. Palliation of dysphagia with radiotherapy for exophytic base tongue metastases in a case of renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabassum Wadasadawala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Base tongue involvement is a rare presentation of lingual metastases from renal cell carcinoma. A 48-year-old gentleman was treated with open radical nephrectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy for Stage II Furhman grade I clear cell carcinoma of the left kidney at an outside hospital. He presented metachronously 5 years later with progressive dysphagia and change of voice. Clinicoradiological evaluation revealed a large exophytic mass in the oropharynx with epicenter in the right base of tongue. Metastatic workup revealed widespread dissemination to multiple organs and bone. In view of predominant symptom of dysphagia, base tongue metastasis was treated with protracted course of palliative radiotherapy to a dose of 50 Gy in conventional fractionation over 5 weeks. This resulted in excellent and durable response at the base tongue lesion (till the time of last follow-up. Radiation therapy is an acceptable palliative strategy for advanced lingual metastasis as it produces prompt relief of pain, bleeding, and dysphagia.

  20. Dysphagia in healthy children: Characteristics and management of a consecutive cohort at a tertiary centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svystun, Orysya; Johannsen, Wendy; Persad, Rabin; Turner, Justine M; Majaesic, Carina; El-Hakim, Hamdy

    2017-08-01

    Whereas the literature is replete with reports on complex children with dysphagia (DP), the parameters characterizing non-neurologically impaired (NNI) children have been underreported, leaving a substantial knowledge gap. We set to characterize a consecutive cohort of NNI children, their management, and outcomes. We undertook a retrospective case series. Children (<18 years old) attending a tertiary multidisciplinary swallowing clinic were eligible. Patients with neuro-developmental, neuromuscular, or syndromic abnormalities were excluded. Primary outcomes included demographics, co-morbidities, presentations, McGill score, swallowing and airway abnormalities (and their predictors). Secondary outcomes were interventions and management response. From 171 consecutive patients (37-month period), 128 were included (69 males, median age 6.6 months (0.5-124.2)). Significant clinical presentations included recurrent pneumonias (20), cyanotic spells (14) and life-threatening events (10). Swallowing assessments revealed laryngeal penetration (67), aspiration (25). Other investigations included overnight oximetry (77), airway (70), and gastrointestinal endoscopy (24); revealing laryngomalacia (29), laryngeal mobility disorder (8), and subglottic stenosis (8). Non-surgical interventions involved oral diet modifications (85) and enteral nutrition (15). Surgical interventions included supraglottoplasties (18), endoscopic laryngeal cleft repair (14), and injection (19). 119 patients received intervention and at last follow-up (median 5.2 months (0.3-88.8)) 94 had improved. Of those treated 116 were on an unmodified oral diet, and 24 on a modified diet. ALTE and snoring predicted airway abnormalities, recurrent pneumonia predicted swallowing abnormalities, and age and airway lesions predicted the McGill score. a significant proportion of NNI children with DP harbor airway and swallowing abnormalities warranting endoscopic and instrumental assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  1. Dysphagia in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke: Early Dysphagia Screening May Reduce Stroke-Related Pneumonia and Improve Stroke Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaled, Mohamed; Matthis, Christine; Binder, Andreas; Mudter, Jonas; Schattschneider, Joern; Pulkowski, Ulrich; Strohmaier, Tim; Niehoff, Torsten; Zybur, Roland; Eggers, Juergen; Valdueza, Jose M; Royl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is associated with poor outcome in stroke patients. Studies investigating the association of dysphagia and early dysphagia screening (EDS) with outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) are rare. The aims of our study are to investigate the association of dysphagia and EDS within 24 h with stroke-related pneumonia and outcomes. Over a 4.5-year period (starting November 2007), all consecutive AIS patients from 15 hospitals in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, were prospectively evaluated. The primary outcomes were stroke-related pneumonia during hospitalization, mortality, and disability measured on the modified Rankin Scale ≥2-5, in which 2 indicates an independence/slight disability to 5 severe disability. Of 12,276 patients (mean age 73 ± 13; 49% women), 9,164 patients (74%) underwent dysphagia screening; of these patients, 55, 39, 4.7, and 1.5% of patients had been screened for dysphagia within 3, 3 to 72 h following admission. Patients who underwent dysphagia screening were likely to be older, more affected on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and to have higher rates of neurological symptoms and risk factors than patients who were not screened. A total of 3,083 patients (25.1%; 95% CI 24.4-25.8) had dysphagia. The frequency of dysphagia was higher in patients who had undergone dysphagia screening than in those who had not (30 vs. 11.1%; p dysphagia had a higher rate of pneumonia than those without dysphagia (29.7 vs. 3.7%; p dysphagia was associated with increased risk of stroke-related pneumonia (OR 3.4; 95% CI 2.8-4.2; p dysphagia was independently correlated with an increase in mortality (OR 3.2; 95% CI 2.4-4.2; p Dysphagia exposes stroke patients to a higher risk of pneumonia, disability, and death, whereas an EDS seems to be associated with reduced risk of stroke-related pneumonia and disability. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  3. Dysphagia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: prevalence and clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoppolo, G; Schettino, I; Frasca, V; Giacomelli, E; Prosperini, L; Cambieri, C; Roma, R; Greco, A; Mancini, P; De Vincentiis, M; Silani, V; Inghilleri, M

    2013-12-01

    To characterize swallowing deficits in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); investigate the delay in dysphagia onset; estimate correlations between dysphagia severity and patients' functional status; identify the symptom(s) most likely to predict dysphagia. A group of 49 consecutive patients with ALS, 14 with bulbar onset and 35 with spinal onset, underwent swallowing evaluation including bedside and fiberoptic endoscopic examination to detect dysphagia. Patients with dysphagia were more likely than those without to have bulbar onset ALS (P = 0.02); more severely impaired chewing (P = 0.01); and tongue muscle deficits (P = 0.001). The only variable measured at first examination significantly associated with dysphagia was a more than mild tongue muscle deficit. The only variable useful in predicting dysphagia was a chewing deficit. In 10 of the 49 patients studied, swallowing evaluation disclosed an impaired cough reflex. Dysphagia in patients with ALS correlates significantly with bulbar onset and with oral swallowing impairment. Fiberoptic swallowing evaluation is a useful tool for detecting swallowing deficits and laryngeal sensitivity in patients with ALS. An impaired cough reflex is an unexpected finding in many patients with ALS. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Frailty measurements and dysphagia in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Bridget; Vaezi, Alec; Egloff, Ann Marie; Smith, Libby; Wasserman-Wincko, Tamara; Johnson, Jonas T

    2014-09-01

    Deconditioning and frailty may contribute to dysphagia and aspiration. Early identification of patients at risk of aspiration is important. Aspiration prevention would lead to reduced morbidity and health care costs. We therefore wondered whether objective measurements of frailty could help identify patients at risk for dysphagia and aspiration. Consecutive patients (n = 183) were enrolled. Patient characteristics and objective measures of frailty were recorded prospectively. Variables tested included age, body mass index, grip strength, and 5 meter walk pace. Statistical analysis tested for association between these parameters and dysphagia or aspiration, diagnosed by instrumental swallowing examination. Of variables tested for association with grip strength, only age category (P = .003) and ambulatory status (P dysphagia or aspiration, ambulatory status was significantly associated with dysphagia and aspiration in multivariable model building. Nonambulatory status is a predictor of aspiration and should be included in risk assessments for dysphagia. The relationship between frailty and dysphagia deserves further investigation. Frailty assessments may help identify those at risk for complications of dysphagia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Pitfalls in the assessment of dysphagia by fibreoptic oesophagogastroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    We present a paper to highlight that the investigation of dysphagia by the standard methods of barium swallow and the now routinely used fibreoptic oesophagogastroscope may miss or inadequately assess pharyngeal and hypopharyngeal causes of dysphagia and to remind that if such a cause is suspected then rigid endoscopy is required to assess or exclude the pathology.

  6. Therapeutic endoscopy for dysphagia and delayed gastric emptying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirdes, M.M.C.

    2012-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on the endoscopic treatment of benign and malignant dysphagia and delayed gastric emptying. Dysphagia due to a benign anastomotic stricture occurs in 40% of patients after esophagectomy and often requires ongoing endoscopic dilations. We evaluated whether corticosteroid

  7. Analysis and surgical treatment of persistent dysphagia after Nissen fundoplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, J. E.; Wijnhoven, B. P.; Masclee, A. A.; Smout, A. J.; Gooszen, H. G.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After Nissen fundoplication, troublesome dysphagia develops in 5-10 per cent of patients. The mechanism of dysphagia has not been fully resolved, in spite of a number of studies focusing on oesophageal motility and lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) dynamics. Tightness and length of the

  8. Dysphagia screening and intensified oral hygiene reduce pneumonia after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Terp; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Overgaard, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia occurs in approximately 51%-78% of patients with acute stroke. The incidence of pneumonia caused by aspiration in dysphagic patients increases both mortality and the need for hospitalization. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the incidence of aspiration pneumonia could...... be reduced in such patients by an early screening for dysphagia and intensified oral hygiene....

  9. High dose rate brachytherapy for the palliation of malignant dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homs, Marjolein Y.V.; Eijkenboom, Wilhelmina M.H.; Coen, Veronique L.M.A.; Haringsma, Jelle; Blankenstein, Mark van; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a commonly used palliative treatment for esophageal carcinoma. We evaluated the outcome of HDR brachytherapy in patients with malignant dysphagia. Material and methods: A retrospective analysis over a 10-year period was performed of 149 patients treated with HDR brachytherapy, administered in one or two sessions, at a median dose of 15 Gy. Patients were evaluated for functional outcome, complications, recurrent dysphagia, and survival. Results: At 6 weeks after HDR brachytherapy, dysphagia scores had improved from a median of 3 to 2 (n=104; P<0.001), however, dysphagia had not improved in 51 (49%) patients. Procedure-related complications occurred in seven (5%) patients. Late complications, including fistula formation or bleeding, occurred in 11 (7%) patients. Twelve (8%) patients experienced minor retrosternal pain. Median survival of the patients was 160 days with a 1-year survival rate of 15%. Procedure-related mortality was 2%. At follow-up, 55 (37%) patients experienced recurrent dysphagia. In 34 (23%) patients a metal stent was placed to relieve persistent or recurrent dysphagia. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy is a moderately effective treatment for the palliation of malignant dysphagia. The incidence of early major complications is low, however, persistent and recurrent dysphagia occur frequently, and require often additional treatment

  10. Challenges in oral drug delivery in patients with esophageal dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappelle, W.F.; Siersema, P.D.; Bogte, A.; Vleggaar, F.P.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Esophageal dysphagia is a commonly reported symptom with various benign and malignant causes. Esophageal dysphagia can impede intake of oral medication, which often poses a major challenge for both patients and physicians. The best way to address this challenge depends of the cause of

  11. Recovery from severe dysphagia in systemic sclerosis - myositis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dysphagia is common in inflammatory myopathies and usually responds to corticosteroids. Severe dysphagia requiring feeding by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is associated with significant morbidity and high mortality. Clinical case: A 56-year old African Black woman initially presented with systemic ...

  12. Risks associated with suspected dysphagia in infants admitted to a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The prevalence of neonatal dysphagia is increasing, as medical advances contribute to the survival of critically ill and preterm infants. Additional factors such as low birth weight (LBW), gastro-oesoephageal reflux disorder, failure-to-thrive (FTT), and HIV may increase the complexity of dysphagia symptoms.

  13. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bath, Philip M W; Scutt, Polly; Love, Jo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials. METHODS...

  14. Can patients determine the level of their dysphagia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Hafiz Hamad; Palmer, Joanne; Dalton, Harry Richard; Waters, Carolyn; Luff, Thomas; Strugnell, Madeline; Murray, Iain Alexander

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine if patients can localise dysphagia level determined endoscopically or radiologically and association of gender, age, level and pathology. METHODS Retrospective review of consecutive patients presenting to dysphagia hotline between March 2004 and March 2015 was carried out. Demographics, clinical history and investigation findings were recorded including patient perception of obstruction level (pharyngeal, mid sternal or low sternal) was documented and the actual level of obstruction found on endoscopic or radiological examination (if any) was noted. All patients with evidence of obstruction including oesophageal carcinoma, peptic stricture, Schatzki ring, oesophageal pouch and cricopharyngeal hypertrophy were included in the study who had given a perceived level of dysphagia. The upper GI endoscopy reports (barium study where upper GI endoscopy was not performed) were reviewed to confirm the distance of obstructing lesion from central incisors. A previously described anatomical classification of oesophagus was used to define the level of obstruction to be upper, middle or lower oesophagus and this was compared with patient perceived level. RESULTS Three thousand six hundred and sixty-eight patients were included, 42.0% of who were female, mean age 70.7 ± 12.8 years old. Of those with obstructing lesions, 726 gave a perceived level of dysphagia: 37.2% had oesophageal cancer, 36.0% peptic stricture, 13.1% pharyngeal pouches, 10.3% Schatzki rings and 3.3% achalasia. Twenty-seven point five percent of patients reported pharyngeal level (upper) dysphagia, 36.9% mid sternal dysphagia and 25.9% lower sternal dysphagia (9.5% reported multiple levels). The level of obstructing lesion seen on diagnostic testing was upper (17.2%), mid (19.4%) or lower (62.9%) or combined (0.3%). When patients localised their level of dysphagia to a single level, the kappa statistic was 0.245 (P dysphagia were accurate in localising the obstructing pathology. With respect to

  15. Can patients determine the level of their dysphagia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Hafiz Hamad; Palmer, Joanne; Dalton, Harry Richard; Waters, Carolyn; Luff, Thomas; Strugnell, Madeline; Murray, Iain Alexander

    2017-02-14

    To determine if patients can localise dysphagia level determined endoscopically or radiologically and association of gender, age, level and pathology. Retrospective review of consecutive patients presenting to dysphagia hotline between March 2004 and March 2015 was carried out. Demographics, clinical history and investigation findings were recorded including patient perception of obstruction level (pharyngeal, mid sternal or low sternal) was documented and the actual level of obstruction found on endoscopic or radiological examination (if any) was noted. All patients with evidence of obstruction including oesophageal carcinoma, peptic stricture, Schatzki ring, oesophageal pouch and cricopharyngeal hypertrophy were included in the study who had given a perceived level of dysphagia. The upper GI endoscopy reports (barium study where upper GI endoscopy was not performed) were reviewed to confirm the distance of obstructing lesion from central incisors. A previously described anatomical classification of oesophagus was used to define the level of obstruction to be upper, middle or lower oesophagus and this was compared with patient perceived level. Three thousand six hundred and sixty-eight patients were included, 42.0% of who were female, mean age 70.7 ± 12.8 years old. Of those with obstructing lesions, 726 gave a perceived level of dysphagia: 37.2% had oesophageal cancer, 36.0% peptic stricture, 13.1% pharyngeal pouches, 10.3% Schatzki rings and 3.3% achalasia. Twenty-seven point five percent of patients reported pharyngeal level (upper) dysphagia, 36.9% mid sternal dysphagia and 25.9% lower sternal dysphagia (9.5% reported multiple levels). The level of obstructing lesion seen on diagnostic testing was upper (17.2%), mid (19.4%) or lower (62.9%) or combined (0.3%). When patients localised their level of dysphagia to a single level, the kappa statistic was 0.245 ( P dysphagia were accurate in localising the obstructing pathology. With respect to pathology, patients

  16. Dysphagia in the patient after stroke: consequences and nurse intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Frias

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to check the consequences of poststroke dysphagia and to reflect on the nurse’s intervention in dysphagia rehabilitation. Methodology: it was performed a systematic literature review of the topic in question; research based on international databases EBSCOhost, LILACS, SciELO.We were able to identify some studies publications between 2006 and 2014. We intend to answer the guiding question: What are the consequences of dysphagia in the patient after stroke? » Results vs. Discussion: after a thorough analysis, we have selected 11 articles and found that the most frequent consequences of dysphagia are the pulmonary complications by saliva and/or food suction. The nurse specialist still has a barely visible role, but his/her interventions are critical in these patients rehabilitation. Conclusions: rehabilitation is essential to avoid the consequences of poststroke dysphagia. The rehabilitation process must go through a multidisciplinary team of which nurses are an integral and essential part.

  17. Hamartoma of pyriform sinus presenting as dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Arunkumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A hamartoma is a benign, focal malformation that resembles a neoplasm in the tissue of its origin. This is not a malignant tumor, and it grows at the same rate as the surrounding tissues. We report a case of a 27-year-old male patient who presented with mild dysphagia and foreign body sensation in the throat of 1-year duration. On examination, there was a mucosal fold on the medial wall of pyriform sinus lateral to aryepiglottic fold that was acting like a sump where food particles used to get collected. Patient underwent microlaryngeal excision of the mucosal fold, and histopathological examination revealed features of hamartoma.

  18. A collection of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes involved in modification and detoxification of herbicide atrazine in rice (Oryza sativa) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong Tan, Li; Chen Lu, Yi; Jing Zhang, Jing; Luo, Fang; Yang, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases constitute one of the largest families of protein genes involved in plant growth, development and acclimation to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, whether these genes respond to organic toxic compounds and their biological functions for detoxifying toxic compounds such as herbicides in rice are poorly understood. The present study identified 201 genes encoding cytochrome P450s from an atrazine-exposed rice transcriptome through high-throughput sequencing. Of these, 69 cytochrome P450 genes were validated by microarray and some of them were confirmed by real time PCR. Activities of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and p-nitroanisole O-demethylase (PNOD) related to toxicity were determined and significantly induced by atrazine exposure. To dissect the mechanism underlying atrazine modification and detoxification by P450, metabolites (or derivatives) of atrazine in plants were analyzed by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS). Major metabolites comprised desmethylatrazine (DMA), desethylatrazine (DEA), desisopropylatrazine (DIA), hydroxyatrazine (HA), hydroxyethylatrazine (HEA) and hydroxyisopropylatrazine (HIA). All of them were chemically modified by P450s. Furthermore, two specific inhibitors of piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and malathion (MAL) were used to assess the correlation between the P450s activity and rice responses including accumulation of atrazine in tissues, shoot and root growth and detoxification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Overexpression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MnmE, a GTPase involved in tRNA modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung Ho; Suh, Se Won

    2010-01-01

    MnmE from P. aeruginosa was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.69 Å resolution. MnmE, an evolutionarily conserved GTPase, is involved in modification of the uridine base (U34) at the wobble position of certain tRNAs. Previous crystal structures of MnmE suggest that it is a dimer with considerable conformational flexibility. To facilitate structural comparisons among MnmE proteins, structural analysis of MnmE from Pseudomonas aeruginosa encoded by the PA5567 gene was initiated. It was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized at 297 K using a reservoir solution consisting of 100 mM sodium ADA pH 6.5, 12%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 4000, 100 mM lithium sulfate, 2%(v/v) 2-propanol and 2.5 mM dithiothreitol. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.69 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 96.74, b = 204.66, c = 120.90 Å. Two monomers were present in the asymmetric unit, resulting in a crystal volume per protein mass (V M ) of 2.99 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 58.8%

  20. Brucella melitensis MucR, an orthologue of Sinorhizobium meliloti MucR, is involved in resistance to oxidative, detergent, and saline stresses and cell envelope modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabella, A; Terwagne, M; Zygmunt, M S; Cloeckaert, A; De Bolle, X; Letesson, J J

    2013-02-01

    Brucella spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti are alphaproteobacteria that share not only an intracellular lifestyle in their respective hosts, but also a crucial requirement for cell envelope components and their timely regulation for a successful infectious cycle. Here, we report the characterization of Brucella melitensis mucR, which encodes a zinc finger transcriptional regulator that has previously been shown to be involved in cellular and mouse infections at early time points. MucR modulates the surface properties of the bacteria and their resistance to environmental stresses (i.e., oxidative stress, cationic peptide, and detergents). We show that B. melitensis mucR is a functional orthologue of S. meliloti mucR, because it was able to restore the production of succinoglycan in an S. meliloti mucR mutant, as detected by calcofluor staining. Similar to S. meliloti MucR, B. melitensis MucR also represses its own transcription and flagellar gene expression via the flagellar master regulator ftcR. More surprisingly, we demonstrate that MucR regulates a lipid A core modification in B. melitensis. These changes could account for the attenuated virulence of a mucR mutant. These data reinforce the idea that there is a common conserved circuitry between plant symbionts and animal pathogens that regulates the relationship they have with their hosts.

  1. Involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits in zinc-mediated modification of CA1 long-term potentiation in the developing hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Itagaki, Kosuke; Ando, Masaki; Oku, Naoto

    2012-03-01

    Zinc is an endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker. It is possible that zinc-mediated modification of hippocampal CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) is linked to the expression of NMDA receptor subunits, which varies with postnatal development. In the present study, the effect of ZnCl(2) and CaEDTA, a membrane-impermeable zinc chelator, on CA1 LTP induction was examined in hippocampal slices from immature (3-week-old) and young (6-week-old) rats. Tetanus (10-100 Hz, 1 sec)-induced CA1 LTP was more greatly enhanced in 3-week-old rats. CA1 LTP was inhibited in the presence of 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV), an NMDA receptor antagonist, and CaEDTA in 3-week-old rats, as in the case of 6-week-old rats reported previously. In 3-week-old rats, on the other hand, 5 μM ZnCl(2) attenuated NMDA receptor-mediated EPSPs more than in 6-week-old rats and significantly attenuated CA1 LTP. Moreover, 5 μM ZnCl(2) significantly attenuated CA1 LTP in the presence of (2R,4S)-4-(3-phosphonopropyl)-2-piperidinecarboxylic acid (PPPA), an NR2A antagonist, in 3-week-old rats, but not that in the presence of ifenprodil, an NR2B antagonist, suggesting that zinc-mediated attenuation of CA1 LTP is associated with the preferential expression of NR2B subunit in 3-week-old rats. In 6-week-old rats, however, 5 μM ZnCl(2) significantly potentiated CA1 LTP and also CA1 LTP in the presence of PPPA. The present study demonstrates that endogenous zinc may participate in the induction of CA1 LTP. It is likely that the changes in expression of NMDA receptor subunits are involved in the zinc-mediated modification of CA1 LTP in the developing hippocampus. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dysphagia in Rett Syndrome: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzedimi, Chiara; Livi, Walter; De Felice, Claudio; Cocca, Serena

    2017-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder and the second major cause of mental retardation in females. The aim of this study was to evaluate swallowing problems of RS patients by endoscopic assessment and compile a list of suggestions for managing feeding and preventing complications. The sample consisted of 61 female patients (mean age = 13.6 years, range, 2-33 years) admitted to the Department of Neuropsychiatry, where they had previously been diagnosed with RS. Speech evaluation associated with observation during mealtimes was useful to formulate suggestions for caregivers. Progressive deterioration of feeding was commonly noted by caregivers. Fifty-four patients had a history of recurrent episodes of bronchitis. Oral apraxia, dyskinetic tongue movements, prolonged oral stage, and poor bolus formation were the most common findings in all patients. Dysphagia was primarily limited to oral preparatory phases, while the pharyngeal phase was normal in most patients. The high percentage of dysphagia suggests the need to accurately monitor the feeding capability of RS children. It is critical to correctly inform caregivers about safe swallowing procedures to reduce the incidence of fatal complications.

  3. PALLIATIVE TREATMENT OF DYSPHAGIA: FAILURES AND COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Drobyazgin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dysphagia is the main clinical symptom in patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma and proximal part of the stomach. Esophageal stenting is a highly effective and safe method to restore esophageal lumen patency. Published data indicate a high rate of stent-related complications. Material and methods. A retrospective, two-centered study included 166 patients (102 males and 64 females, who underwent endoscopically-guided esophageal stenting from 2004 to 2015. The age of the patients ranged from 36 to 92 years. Expandable metal stents were used for all patients. In most cases (81.3%, drug-eluting stents (22 mm diameter, 120 mm length were preferable. Treatment outcomes and complications were analyzed. Results. Complications during stent placement (incorrect stent disclosure were observed in 7 patients. All these complications were eliminated by relocating the stent to the desired position. Postoperative complications were noted in 29 patients (stent migration in 9 patients, stent fracture and migration in 2 patients, stent obstruction in 1 patient, destruction of stent coating and fragmentation in 5 patients, and dysphagia recurrence due to continuing tumor growth in 11 patients. All stent-related complications were corrected by re-endoscopy. Conclusions. The data obtained indicate the need for lifelong surveillance of patients after stenting.

  4. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: sonographic evaluation of dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrini, S; Solazzo, A; Sagnelli, A; Del Vecchio, L; Reginelli, A; Monsorrò, M; Grassi, R

    2010-08-01

    The authors sought to determine the role of video ultrasonography (VUS) in the diagnostic assessment of dysphagia in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Nine patients underwent simultaneous static and dynamic VUS examination and videofluoroscopy (VFS) of swallowing. At the static phase, VUS showed 5/9 patients had lingual atrophy. Abnormal bolus position was observed in 6/9 patients at VUS and 3/9 at VFS. Both techniques identified an inability to keep the bolus in the oral cavity in 4/9 patients. At the dynamic phase, reduced lingual movement was observed in 5/9 patients at VUS and 2/9 at VFS. Disorganised tongue movement was seen in 3/9 patients at VUS and in 2/9 at VFS. Fragmented swallowing was only visualised at VUS. Stagnation of ingested material was never visualised at VUS, whereas it was clearly depicted in 2/9 patients at VFS. VUS can be integrated into the diagnostic protocol for evaluating swallowing in patients with ALS, as it has higher sensitivity than VFS in assessing the dynamic factors that represent the early signs of dysphagia.

  5. Development of International Terminology and Definitions for Texture-Modified Foods and Thickened Fluids Used in Dysphagia Management: The IDDSI Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichero, Julie A Y; Lam, Peter; Steele, Catriona M; Hanson, Ben; Chen, Jianshe; Dantas, Roberto O; Duivestein, Janice; Kayashita, Jun; Lecko, Caroline; Murray, Joseph; Pillay, Mershen; Riquelme, Luis; Stanschus, Soenke

    2017-04-01

    Dysphagia is estimated to affect ~8% of the world's population (~590 million people). Texture-modified foods and thickened drinks are commonly used to reduce the risks of choking and aspiration. The International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative (IDDSI) was founded with the goal of developing globally standardized terminology and definitions for texture-modified foods and liquids applicable to individuals with dysphagia of all ages, in all care settings, and all cultures. A multi-professional volunteer committee developed a dysphagia diet framework through systematic review and stakeholder consultation. First, a survey of existing national terminologies and current practice was conducted, receiving 2050 responses from 33 countries. Respondents included individuals with dysphagia; their caregivers; organizations supporting individuals with dysphagia; healthcare professionals; food service providers; researchers; and industry. The results revealed common use of 3-4 levels of food texture (54 different names) and ≥3 levels of liquid thickness (27 different names). Substantial support was expressed for international standardization. Next, a systematic review regarding the impact of food texture and liquid consistency on swallowing was completed. A meeting was then convened to review data from previous phases, and develop a draft framework. A further international stakeholder survey sought feedback to guide framework refinement; 3190 responses were received from 57 countries. The IDDSI Framework (released in November, 2015) involves a continuum of 8 levels (0-7) identified by numbers, text labels, color codes, definitions, and measurement methods. The IDDSI Framework is recommended for implementation throughout the world.

  6. Nonaneurysmatic Dysphagia Aortica in the Elderly: Three Case Reports and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsueh Chan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is a remarkably prevalent disorder in the elderly. Both age-related changes in swallowing physiology and age-related diseases are predisposing factors for dysphagia in the elderly. Dysphagia aortica is a rare etiology of dysphagia resulting from extrinsic compression of the esophagus by an aneurysm or by a tortuous and elongated thoracic aorta. Clinical findings of dysphagia aortica resemble those of esophageal malignancy or esophageal motility disorders. Dysphagia aortica not related to an aneurysm is usually observed in the elderly, especially in female patients with hypertensive cardiomyopathy or kyphosis. However, dysphagia aortica may occur in the aging population without underlying aneurysm or kyphosis. Here, we report three cases of nonaneurysmatic dysphagia aortica and review the literature to report the diagnostic approach and treatments used for this condition. Dysphagia aortica should be considered in the differential diagnosis of dysphagia, especially in the growing elderly population with cardiovascular disease or hypertension.

  7. POSTFUNDOPLICATION DYSPHAGIA CAUSES SIMILAR WATER INGESTION DYNAMICS AS ACHALASIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Roberto Oliveira; Santos, Carla Manfredi; Cassiani, Rachel Aguiar; Alves, Leda Maria Tavares; Nascimento, Weslania Viviane

    2016-01-01

    - After surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease dysphagia is a symptom in the majority of patients, with decrease in intensity over time. However, some patients may have persistent dysphagia. - The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the dynamics of water ingestion in patients with postfundoplication dysphagia compared with patients with dysphagia caused by achalasia, idiopathic or consequent to Chagas' disease, and controls. - Thirty-three patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, assessed more than one year after surgery, together with 50 patients with Chagas' disease, 27 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 88 controls were all evaluated by the water swallow test. They drunk, in triplicate, 50 mL of water without breaks while being precisely timed and the number of swallows counted. Also measured was: (a) inter-swallows interval - the time to complete the task, divided by the number of swallows during the task; (b) swallowing flow - volume drunk divided by the time taken; (c) volume of each swallow - volume drunk divided by the number of swallows. - Patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia took longer to ingest all the volume, had an increased number of swallows, an increase in interval between swallows, a decrease in swallowing flow and a decrease in water volume of each swallow compared with the controls. There was no difference between the three groups of patients. There was no correlation between postfundoplication time and the results. - It was concluded that patients with postfundoplication dysphagia have similar water ingestion dynamics as patients with achalasia.

  8. RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0 modification for transient accident scenario of Test Blanket Modules in ITER involving helium flows into heavy liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freixa, J.; Pérez, M.; Mas de les Valls, E.; Batet, L.; Sandeep, T.; Chaudhari, V.; Reventós, F.

    2015-07-01

    The Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India, is currently involved in the design and development of its Test Blanket Module (TBM) for testing in ITER (International Thermo nuclear Experimental Reactor). The Indian TBM concept is a Lead-Lithium cooled Ceramic Breeder (LLCB), which utilizes lead-lithium eutectic alloy (LLE) as tritium breeder, neutron multiplier and coolant. The first wall facing the plasma is cooled by helium gas. In preparation of the regulatory safety files of ITER-TBM, a number of off-normal event sequences have been postulated. Thermal hydraulic safety analyses of the TBM system will be carried out with the system code RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0 which was initially designed to predict the behavior of light water reactor systems during normal and accidental conditions. In order to analyze some of the postulated off-normal events, there is the need to simulate the mixing of Helium and Lead-Lithium fluids. The Technical University of Catalonia is cooperating with IPR to implement the necessary changes in the code to allow for the mixing of helium and liquid metal. In the present study, the RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4 two-phase flow 6-equations structure has been modified to allow for the mixture of LLE in the liquid phase with dry Helium in the gas phase. Practically obtaining a two-fluid 6-equation model where each fluid is simulated with a set of energy, mass and momentum balance equations. A preliminary flow regime map for LLE and helium flow has been developed on the basis of numerical simulations with the OpenFOAM CFD toolkit. The new code modifications have been verified for vertical and horizontal configurations. (Author)

  9. Dysphagia associated with presumed pharyngeal dysfunction in 16 neonatal foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, S J; Hurcombe, S D; Barr, B S; Schott, H C

    2012-02-01

    Dysphagia due to pharyngeal dysfunction occurs in human neonates and is associated with prematurity and hypoxic episodes. This syndrome probably occurs in neonatal foals but has not been reported. The objectives of this study were to describe 1) a series of neonatal foals with dysphagia due to pharyngeal dysfunction; 2) the progression, treatment and resolution of the dysphagia; 3) the comorbidities; and 4) the prognosis for life and athleticism for affected foals. Records from 3 referral equine hospitals were reviewed from neonatal foals with dysphagia of pharyngeal origin. Inclusion criteria were a normal to strong suckle, dysphagia evidenced by milk at the nostrils after nursing the dam, and endoscopic examination of the airway. Foals with mechanical reasons for dysphagia, botulism or hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis were not included. Sixteen neonatal foals qualified for the study. Eight (50%) were premature and/or diagnosed with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. Twelve (75%) had aspiration pneumonia. Fifteen foals were discharged alive from the hospital, nursing the mare with no evidence of dysphagia (n = 14), or mild dysphagia (n = 1), a mean +/- s.d. of 7 +/- 6 days (median = 6.3 days, range 0-22 days) after hospital admission. One foal was subjectedto euthanasia in hospital. Follow-up nformation was available for 14 animals. Thirteen of 16 (81%) were alive and included one yearling and 12 horses >2 years old. Seven of the 14 (50%) were racing, training or in work, and 6 horses were pets, breeding animals or had unknown athletic status. Two had laryngeal deficits. One foal was subjected to euthanasia within weeks of discharge from the hospital due to aspiration pneumonia. Dysphagia related to pharyngeal dysfunction occurs in equine neonates and can resolve, but may require days to weeks of supportive care. Prognosis for life is favourable and for athleticism fair.

  10. Possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of melatonin against sleep deprivation-induced behaviour modification and oxidative damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, Anant

    2009-08-01

    Sleep is an important physiological process responsible for the maintenance of physical, mental and emotional health of a living being. Sleep deprivation is considered risky for several pathological diseases such as anxiety and motor and cognitive dysfunctions. Sleep deprivation has recently been reported to cause oxidative damage. This study has been designed to explore the possible involvement of the GABAergic mechanism in protective effects of melatonin against 72-h sleep deprivation-induced behaviour modification and oxidative damage in mice. Mice were sleep-deprived for a period of 72 h using the grid over water suspended method. Animals were divided into groups of 6-8 animals each. Melatonin (5 and 10 mg/kg), flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg), picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) and muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) were administered for 5 days starting 2 days before 72-h sleep deprivation. Various behavioural tests (plus maze, zero maze, mirror chamber, actophotometer) and body weight assessment followed by oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein) were carried out. The 72-h sleep deprivation caused significant anxiety-like behaviour, weight loss, impaired locomotor activity and oxidative damage as compared with naïve (without sleep deprivation). Treatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved locomotor activity, weight loss and antianxiety effect as compared with control (sleep-deprived). Biochemically, melatonin treatment significantly restored reduced glutathione, catalase activity, attenuated lipid peroxidation and nitrite level as compared with control animals (72-h sleep-deprived). Flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) pretreatments with a lower dose of melatonin (5 mg/kg) significantly antagonized the protective effect of melatonin. However, muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) pretreatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg, ip) potentiated the protective effect of melatonin which was significant as compared with their

  11. Optimising medication for Parkinson's disease patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krupa

    2015-07-01

    In addition to movement disorders, Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with several nonmotor symptoms, including dysphagia (swallowing difficulties). Dysphagia can make the consumption of solid medicines difficult, which potentially contributes to the poor adherence that is common among people with PD. However, patients may be reluctant to admit that they experience dysphagia. Community nurses should actively enquire into swallowing difficulties among all patients, not only those with PD, and should work with pharmacists and other members of the multidisciplinary team to help optimise medication management to help improve adherence.

  12. Efficiency of cineradiography in the diagnosis of dysphagia; Effizienz der Hochfrequenzkinematographie in der Diagnostik der Dysphagie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelerich, M. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie der Univ. Muenster (Germany); Mai, R. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie der Univ. Muenster (Germany); Mueller-Miny, H. [Radiologische Klinik der Univ. Bonn (Germany); Peters, P.E. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie der Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom in clinical practice. Due to the broad spectrum of underlying diseases many disciplines are involved in the therapy and diagnosis of dysphagia, where radiology plays a central role. The radiologist is confronted with different diagnostic problems and has to choose the most appropriate type of investigation. In many cases no organic disorder can be demonstrated by clinical examination, endoscopy or conventional radiological techniques. In this setting cineradiography is an outstanding tool for finding functional or structural changes in the swallowing chain. This study underlines the efficiency of cineradiography in the diagnosis of dysphagia. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Dysphagie ist in der klinischen Praxis ein haeufiges Symptom. Aufgrund des weiten Spektrums zugrundeliegender Erkrankungen sind zahlreiche Fachdisziplinen mit der Diagnostik und Therapie der Dysphagie befasst, wobei der Roentgendiagnostik eine zentrale Rolle zukommt. Der Radiologe wird mit unterschiedlichen Fragestellungen konfrontiert und muss die geeignete Untersuchungsstrategie festlegen. Haeufig ist durch klinische Untersuchung, Endoskopie und konventionelle Roentgenuntersuchung keine organische Erkrankung nachweisbar. Mit der Hochfrequenzkinematographie steht dann ein Verfahren zur Verfuegung, welches in hervorragender Weise funktionelle und strukturelle Veraenderungen der am Schluckakt beteiligten Organe aufzeigen kann. Die hohe Effizienz der Methode wird in dieser Studie belegt. (orig.)

  13. Surface electromyography as a screening method for evaluation of dysphagia and odynophagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Eviatar, Ephraim

    2009-01-01

    Objective Patients suspected of having swallowing disorders, could highly benefit from simple diagnostic screening before being referred to specialist evaluations. The article analyzes various instrumental methods of dysphagia assessment, introduces surface electromyography (sEMG) to carry out rapid assessment of such patients, and debates proposed suggestions for sEMG screening protocol in order to identify abnormal deglutition. Data sources Subject related books and articles from 1813 to 2007 were obtained through library search, MEDLINE (1949–2007) and EMBASE (1975–2007). Methods Specifics steps for establishing the protocol for applying the technique for screening purposes (e.g., evaluation of specific muscles), the requirements for diagnostic sEMG equipment, the sEMG technique itself, and defining the tests suitable for assessing deglutition (e.g., saliva, normal, and excessive swallows and uninterrupted drinking of water) are presented in detail. SEMG is compared with other techniques in terms of cost, timing, involvement of radiation, etc. Results According to the published data, SEMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable method for screening and preliminary differentiation among dysphagia and odynophagia of various origins. This noninvasive radiation-free examination has a low level of discomfort, and is simple, time-saving and inexpensive to perform. The major weakness of the method seems to be inability for precise diagnostic of neurologically induced dysphagia. Conclusion With standardization of the technique and an established normative database, sEMG might serve as a reliable screening method for optimal patient management but cannot serve for proper investigation of neurogenic dysphagia. PMID:19232090

  14. The anatomy and physiology of normal and abnormal swallowing in oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasegbon, A; Hamdy, S

    2017-11-01

    Eating and drinking are enjoyable activities that positively impact on an individual's quality of life. The ability to swallow food and fluid is integral to the process of eating. Swallowing occupies a dual role being both part of the enjoyment of eating and being a critically important utilitarian activity to enable adequate nutrition and hydration. Any impairment to the process of swallowing can negatively affect a person's perception of their quality of life. The process of swallowing is highly complex and involves muscles in the mouth, pharynx, larynx, and esophagus. The oropharynx is the anatomical region encompassing the oral cavity and the pharynx. Food must be masticated, formed into a bolus and transported to the pharynx by the tongue whereas fluids are usually held within the mouth before being transported ab-orally. The bolus must then be transported through the pharynx to the esophagus without any matter entering the larynx. The muscles needed for all these steps are coordinated by swallowing centers within the brainstem which are supplied with sensory information by afferent nerve fibers from several cranial nerves. The swallowing centers also receive modulatory input from higher centers within the brain. Hence, a swallow has both voluntary and involuntary physiologic components and the term dysphagia is given to difficult swallowing while oropharyngeal dysphagia is difficult swallowing due to pathology within the oropharynx. Problems affecting any point along the complex swallowing pathway can result in dysphagia. This review focuses on the anatomy and physiology behind normal and abnormal oropharyngeal swallowing. It also details the common diseases and pathology causing oropharyngeal dysphagia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [Dysphagia in a young woman from Somalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Suzanne; van Altena, Richard; van Steenwijk, Reindert P; Rauws, Erik A J; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, Jan Karel M

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is increasing worldwide. The determination of possible resistance is essential for adequate treatment. Tuberculosis is common amongst immigrants from Somalia and extra-pulmonary localisation is often seen. A 21-year-old woman from Somalia presented with progressive dysphagia and severe weight loss. Endoscopy revealed two ulcers in the mid-oesophagus. A chest x-ray showed enlarged lymph nodes in the right hilar and mediastinal regions. The Ziehl-Neelsen stain and PCR for mycobacteria were negative. Sputum samples and oesophageal biopsies were cultured. Quadruple tuberculostatic therapy was started empirically. After five weeks, a sputum culture grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which was resistant to rifampicin and isoniazid. She was treated with second-line anti-tuberculous therapy and eventually recovered. Tuberculosis can manifest in many ways. It is important to obtain patient material for culture; not only to confirm the diagnosis but also for the determination of possible resistance which is necessary for adequate therapy.

  16. Oropharyngeal dysphagia, an underestimated disorder in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Vaquero-Sosa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a rather frequent clinical entity in patients with neurological problems that can lead to serious complications such as aspiration pneumonia and other disorders like dehydration or malnutrition due to feeding difficulties. It should be suspected in children with splitting of food intake or prolonged feeding, coughing or choking during feeding, continuous drooling or repeated respiratory symptoms. For the diagnosis, apart from the examination of swallowing, additional tests can be run like the water-swallowing test, the viscosity-volume test (which determines what kind of texture and how much volume the patient is able to tolerate, a fiberoptic endoscopy of swallowing or a videofluoroscopic swallow study, which is the gold standard for the study of swallowing disorders. It requires a multidisciplinary approach to guarantee an adequate intake of fluids and nutrients with minimal risk of aspiration. If these two conditions cannot be met, a gastrostomy feeding may be necessary.

  17. Validation of the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale in various etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juyong; Oh, Byung-Mo; Kim, Jung Yoon; Lee, Goo Joo; Lee, Seung Ah; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2014-08-01

    The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) was developed as an objective predictor of the prognosis of dysphagia after stroke. We evaluated the clinical validity of the VDS for various diseases. We reviewed the medical records of 1,995 dysphagic patients (1,222 men and 773 women) who underwent videofluoroscopic studies in Seoul National University Hospital from April 2002 through December 2009. Their American Speech–Language–Hearing Association’s National Outcome Measurement System (ASHA NOMS) swallowing scale, clinical dysphagia scale (CDS), and VDS scores were evaluated on the basis of the clinical and/or videofluoroscopic findings by the consensus of two physiatrists. The correlations between the VDS and the other scales were calculated. The VDS displayed significant correlations with the ASHA NOMS swallowing scale and the CDS in every disease group (p dysphagia

  18. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Cumhur

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic, neurodegenerative movement disorder that typically affects elderly patients. Swallowing disorders are highly prevalent in PD and can have grave consequences, including pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration and mortality. Neurogenic dysphagia in PD can manifest with both overt clinical symptoms or silent dysphagia. Regardless, early diagnosis and objective follow-up of dysphagia in PD is crucial for timely and appropriate care for these patients. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the electrophysiological methods that can be used to objectively evaluate dysphagia in PD. We discuss the electrophysiological abnormalities that can be observed in PD, their clinical correlates and the pathophysiology underlying these findings. PMID:25360228

  19. Radiotherapy enhances laser palliation of malignant dysphagia: a randomised study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargeant, I.R.; Thorpe, S.; Glover, J.R.; Bown, S.G. [National Medical Laser Centre, London (United Kingdom); Tobias, J.S.; Blackman, G. [University Coll., London (United Kingdom). Meyerstein Inst. of Oncology

    1997-03-01

    A major drawback of laser endoscopy in the palliation of malignant dysphagia is the need for repeated treatments. This study was designed to test whether external beam radiotherapy would reduce the necessity for repeated laser therapy. (author).

  20. Persistent post-stroke dysphagia treated with cricopharyngeal myotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruthi S Nair

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-stroke dysphagia is a common problem after stroke. About 8-13% patients have persistent dysphagia and are unable to return to pre-stroke diet even after 6 months of stroke. Use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG may be required in these patients, which may be psychologically unacceptable and impair the quality of life. In those with cricopharyngeal dysfunction leading on to refractory post-stroke dysphagia, cricopharyngeal myotomy and injection of botulinum toxin are the treatment options. We present a case of vertebrobasilar stroke who had persistent dysphagia due to cricopharyngeal dysfunction with good recovery of swallowing function following cricopharyngeal myotomy 1.5 years after the stroke.

  1. Electrical stimulation in dysphagia treatment: a justified controversy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaardt, H. C. A.

    2008-01-01

    Electrical stimulation in dysphagia treatment: a justified controversy? Neuromuscular electrostimulation (LAMES) is a method for stimulating muscles with short electrical pulses. Neuromuscular electrostimulation is frequently used in physiotherapy to strengthen healthy muscles (as in sports

  2. An appraisal of current dysphagia diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaindlstorfer, Adolf; Pointner, Rudolph

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia is a common, serious health problem with a wide variety of etiologies and manifestations. This review gives a general overview of diagnostic and therapeutic options for oropharyngeal as well as esophageal swallowing disorders respecting the considerable progress made over recent years. Diagnosis can be challenging and requires expertise in interpretation of symptoms and patient history. Endoscopy, barium radiography and manometry are still the diagnostic mainstays. Classification of esophageal motor-disorders has been revolutionized with the introduction of high-resolution esophageal pressure topography and a new standardized classification algorithm. Automated integrated impedance manometry is a promising upcoming tool for objective evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia, in non-obstructive esophageal dysphagia and prediction of post fundoplication dysphagia risk. Impedance planimetry provides new diagnostic information on esophageal and LES-distensibility and allows controlled therapeutic dilatation without the need for radiation. Peroral endoscopic myotomy is a promising therapeutic approach for achalasia and spastic motility disorders.

  3. Radiotherapy enhances laser palliation of malignant dysphagia: a randomised study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargeant, I.R.; Thorpe, S.; Glover, J.R.; Bown, S.G.; Tobias, J.S.; Blackman, G.

    1997-01-01

    A major drawback of laser endoscopy in the palliation of malignant dysphagia is the need for repeated treatments. This study was designed to test whether external beam radiotherapy would reduce the necessity for repeated laser therapy. (author)

  4. Dysphagia as an unusual complication of pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.; But, N.; Bajwa, F.

    2008-01-01

    Dysphagia is an unusual presentation of pleural mesothelioma and carries a grim prognosis. A case of an elderly patient is presented herein, in whom the diagnosis was confirmed histologically, and the patient was still surviving 6 months after palliation. (author)

  5. Can patients determine the level of their dysphagia?

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf, Hafiz Hamad; Palmer, Joanne; Dalton, Harry Richard; Waters, Carolyn; Luff, Thomas; Strugnell, Madeline; Murray, Iain Alexander

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine if patients can localise dysphagia level determined endoscopically or radiologically and association of gender, age, level and pathology. METHODS Retrospective review of consecutive patients presenting to dysphagia hotline between March 2004 and March 2015 was carried out. Demographics, clinical history and investigation findings were recorded including patient perception of obstruction level (pharyngeal, mid sternal or low sternal) was documented and the actual level of obst...

  6. DYSPHAGIA AND SIALORRHEA: the relationship to Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Hack NICARETTA; Ana Lucia ROSSO; James Pitagoras de MATTOS; Carmelindo MALISKA; Milton M. B. COSTA

    2013-01-01

    Context Dysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease. Objective The aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Method Two Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by th...

  7. Dysphagia in Parkinson's disease is responsive to levodopa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, James P

    2013-03-01

    The role of levodopa in the treatment of dysphagia in Parkinson's disease (PD) has recently been questioned. There are good reasons, however, to "question the question." In this essay, evidence from published literature and clinical experience is presented, as well as a critical review of the first meta-analysis to explore this issue. The evidence presented supports the traditional view that PD dysphagia is responsive to levodopa. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Efficacy of radiology of the esophagus for evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.

    1981-05-15

    The efficacy of radiology in evaluating dysphagia was studied in 86 patients by comparison to endoscopic findings. In the 66 patients with endoscopic abnormalities radiology was correct in 54, for a sensitivity of 82%. Sensitivity of radiology improved to 95% if mild esophagitis was excluded. In the 20 patients with normal endoscopy, radiology was normal in 18 (90%). Thus radiology proved to be a reliable means of evaluating the esophagus in patients with dysphagia.

  9. A Non-Frequently Considered Diagnosis of Dysphagia; Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Ağın; Nilgün Uyduran Ünal; Serdar İskit

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis is infiltration of esophagus mucosa by eosinophil leucocyte. It is rarely observed in children and the symptoms are similar to gastroesophageal reflux. This case, which was applied esophagus balloon dilatation in the pediatric surgery due to dysphagia and diagnosed eosinophilic esophagitis, was presented in order to attract attention to the approach to the child with dysphagia. Total IgE=834 IU/mL and specific IgE (-), Fx5 (-) was found negative. In ...

  10. Predictors and Outcomes of Dysphagia Screening After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joundi, Raed A; Martino, Rosemary; Saposnik, Gustavo; Giannakeas, Vasily; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K

    2017-04-01

    Guidelines advocate screening all acute stroke patients for dysphagia. However, limited data are available regarding how many and which patients are screened and how failing a swallowing screen affects patient outcomes. We sought to evaluate predictors of receiving dysphagia screening after acute ischemic stroke and outcomes after failing a screening test. We used the Ontario Stroke Registry from April 1, 2010, to March 31, 2013, to identify patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke and determine predictors of documented dysphagia screening and outcomes after failing the screening test, including pneumonia, disability, and death. Among 7171 patients, 6677 patients were eligible to receive dysphagia screening within 72 hours, yet 1280 (19.2%) patients did not undergo documented screening. Patients with mild strokes were significantly less likely than those with more severe strokes to have documented screening (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-0.64). Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio, 4.71; 95% CI, 3.43-6.47), severe disability (adjusted odds ratio, 5.19; 95% CI, 4.48-6.02), discharge to long-term care (adjusted odds ratio, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.11-3.79), and 1-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 2.09-2.80). Associations were maintained in patients with mild strokes. One in 5 patients with acute ischemic stroke did not have documented dysphagia screening, and patients with mild strokes were substantially less likely to have documented screening. Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including in patients with mild strokes, highlighting the importance of dysphagia screening for all patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Metastatic Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer Presenting Clinically with Esophageal Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Lilit Karapetyan; Heather Laird-Fick; Reuben Cuison

    2017-01-01

    Background. Intra-abdominal metastases of invasive lobular breast cancer (ILBC) may be insidious. We report a case of metastatic ILBC that presented with dysphagia within weeks of a negative mammogram and before the development of intra-abdominal symptoms. Case. A 70-year-old female developed esophageal dysphagia. She underwent EGD which showed a short segment of stricture of the distal esophagus without significant mucosal changes. Biopsy was unremarkable and patient underwent lower esophage...

  12. Dysphagia produced by cervical spine osteophyte. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Silveri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 73-year-old male patient with progressive dysphagia, and hoarseness (irritability in the throat. He was studied with the appropriate imaging techniques, and esophagoscopy led to a diagnosis of extrinsic esophageal dysphagia for osteophyte obstruction of the cervical spine due to the arthrosis. A surgical resection was performed, without complications. Some considerations are given on this theme.

  13. Dysphagia after fast neutron therapy to the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, M.S.M.; Edelman, G.M.; Man, Kate; Randall, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    Nine patients presenting with dysphagia following successful treatment for head and neck cancer with neutron radiotherapy are reviewed. Combined clinical and videofluoroscopic investigation is used to analyse their deficits and provide indications for management. All patients show impairment of both the oral and pharyngeal phases of the swallow, with the exception of one subject who shows signs of focal neurological damage. It is suggested that fibrosis is the underlying cause of dysphagia in the remainder. (author)

  14. Dysphagia in Children with Esophageal Atresia: Current Diagnostic Options

    OpenAIRE

    Rayyan, Maissa; Allegaert, Karel; Omari, Taher; Rommel, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia or swallowing disorder is very common (range, 15-52%) in patients with esophageal atresia. Children present with a wide range of symptoms. The most common diagnostic tools to evaluate esophageal dysphagia, such as upper barium study and manometry, aim to characterize anatomy and function of the esophageal body and the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). Using these technologies, a variety of pathological motor patterns have been identified in children with esophageal atresia. However, t...

  15. Rehabilitation Nutrition for Possible Sarcopenic Dysphagia After Lung Cancer Surgery: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Uwano, Rimiko

    2016-06-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is characterized by the loss of swallowing muscle mass and function associated with generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. In this report, the authors describe a patient with possible sarcopenic dysphagia after lung cancer surgery and was treated subsequently by rehabilitation nutrition. A 71-year-old man with lung cancer experienced complications of an acute myocardial infarction and pneumonia after surgery. He was ventilated artificially, and a tracheotomy was performed. The patient received diagnoses of malnutrition, severe sarcopenia, and possible sarcopenic dysphagia. His dysphagia was improved by a combination of dysphagia rehabilitation including physical and speech therapy and an improvement in nutrition initiated by a nutrition support team. Finally, he no longer had dysphagia and malnutrition. Sarcopenic dysphagia should be considered in patients with sarcopenia and dysphagia. Rehabilitation nutrition using a combination of both rehabilitation and nutritional care management is presumptively useful for treating sarcopenic dysphagia.

  16. Management of acid-related disorders in patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, Colin W

    2004-09-06

    Dysphagia affects a large and growing number of individuals in the United States, particularly the elderly and those who are neurologically impaired. Swallowing difficulties may be due to age-related changes in oropharyngeal and esophageal functioning as well as central nervous system diseases such as stroke, Parkinson disease, and dementia. Among institutionalized individuals, dysphagia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. An appreciation of the physiology of swallowing and the pathophysiology of dysphagia is necessary for proper patient management. Careful history, physical examination, and evaluation of radiologic and endoscopic studies should differentiate oropharyngeal and esophageal etiologies of dysphagia and distinguish mechanical (anatomic) disorders from functional (motor) disorders. A significant percentage of patients with dysphagia have concomitant acid-related disorders that are managed best with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Three of the currently available PPIs are manufactured as capsules containing enteric-coated granules that may be mixed with soft foods or fruit juices before oral administration to those with swallowing difficulties. In addition, omeprazole and lansoprazole may be administered via gastrostomy or nasogastric feeding tubes as suspensions in sodium bicarbonate. Novel dosage formulations of lansoprazole that may be appropriate for patients with dysphagia include the commercially manufactured lansoprazole strawberry-flavored enteric-coated granules for suspension and lansoprazole orally disintegrating tablets.

  17. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Dysphagia in the Mild or Moderate Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Concept of Subclinical Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Yesim; Gürgör, Nevin; Çakır, Ahmet; Arıcı, Şehnaz; İncesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2015-06-01

    Swallowing mechanism and neurogenic dysphagia in MS have been rarely studied by electromyographical (EMG) methods. This study aims to evaluate the presence of subclinical dysphagia in patients with mild multiple sclerosis (MS) using electrophysiological methods. A prospective study of 51 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis and 18 age-matched healthy adults was investigated. We used electromyography to measure the activity of the submental muscles during swallowing. Electrophysiological recordings of patients were obtained during relapse, after relapse, and at any time in remission period. Clinical dysphagia was found in 12% of MS patients, while electrophysiological swallowing abnormalities were encountered in 33% of patients. Subclinical dysphagia was determined in 35% of patients during an MS relapse, in 20% of patients after a relapse, and in 25% of all 51 patients in the remission period based on EMG findings. Duration of swallowing signal of submental muscles in all MS patients was found to be longer than in normal subjects (p = 0.001). During swallowing of 50 ml of sequential water, the compensatory respiratory cycles occurred more often in MS patients than normal subjects, especially during a relapse (p = 0.005). This is the first study investigating swallowing abnormalities and subclinical dysphagia from the electrophysiological aspect in MS patients with mild disability. The electrophysiological tests described in this study are useful to uncover subclinical dysphagia since they have the advantage of being rapid, easy to apply, non-invasive, and without risk for the patients.

  18. The value of scintigraphy in the evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia

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    Argon, Murat; Duygun, Uelkem; Kocacelebi, Kenan; Ozkilic, Hayal [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ege University Medical School Hospital, 35100, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Secil, Yaprak; Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Ertekin, Cumhur [Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Ege University Medical School Hospital, Izmir (Turkey)

    2004-01-01

    Healthy adults can swallow boluses of 20 ml water in a single swallow. Individuals with impaired swallowing, however, may be unable to do so, instead requiring two or more swallows; this phenomenon is called ''piecemeal deglutition''. The term ''dysphagia limit'' refers to the volume at which piecemeal deglutition occurs. The aim of our study was to investigate the potential value of scintigraphic evaluation of piecemeal deglutition and dysphagia limit in patients with dysphagia, based on correlation with the results of submental electromyography (SM-EMG) and laryngeal sensor monitoring (LS). The study population comprised 24 patients with dysphagia secondary to neurological disorders and ten normal adults, who formed a control group. In the scintigraphic evaluation, subjects underwent four separate dynamic studies using 5, 10, 15 and 20 ml of water containing 0.5 mCi technetium-99m labelled sulphur colloid, and time-activity curves (TACs) were created for each study. Static thoracic images were also recorded in order to detect airway aspiration Observation of two or more peaks on TACs within the 10-s acquisition period was considered a sign of piecemeal deglutition. If piecemeal deglutition occurred at or below 20 ml, this volume was regarded as the dysphagia limit. Piecemeal deglutition was not found in any normal subjects; by contrast, it was observed in 14 of the 24 (58%) patients on scintigraphy and in 17 (71%) patients on EMG and LS. In three patients, signs of the airway aspiration were observed on static thoracic images. Scintigraphic and electrophysiological findings were in agreement in 19 patients (79%), and the correlation between scintigraphy and the electrophysiological methods for the evaluation of dysphagia was statistically significant (r=0.57, P=0.003). The novel finding of this study is the demonstration of piecemeal deglutition and dysphagia limit on scintigraphic studies in patients with neurogenic

  19. The value of scintigraphy in the evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argon, Murat; Duygun, Uelkem; Kocacelebi, Kenan; Ozkilic, Hayal; Secil, Yaprak; Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2004-01-01

    Healthy adults can swallow boluses of 20 ml water in a single swallow. Individuals with impaired swallowing, however, may be unable to do so, instead requiring two or more swallows; this phenomenon is called ''piecemeal deglutition''. The term ''dysphagia limit'' refers to the volume at which piecemeal deglutition occurs. The aim of our study was to investigate the potential value of scintigraphic evaluation of piecemeal deglutition and dysphagia limit in patients with dysphagia, based on correlation with the results of submental electromyography (SM-EMG) and laryngeal sensor monitoring (LS). The study population comprised 24 patients with dysphagia secondary to neurological disorders and ten normal adults, who formed a control group. In the scintigraphic evaluation, subjects underwent four separate dynamic studies using 5, 10, 15 and 20 ml of water containing 0.5 mCi technetium-99m labelled sulphur colloid, and time-activity curves (TACs) were created for each study. Static thoracic images were also recorded in order to detect airway aspiration Observation of two or more peaks on TACs within the 10-s acquisition period was considered a sign of piecemeal deglutition. If piecemeal deglutition occurred at or below 20 ml, this volume was regarded as the dysphagia limit. Piecemeal deglutition was not found in any normal subjects; by contrast, it was observed in 14 of the 24 (58%) patients on scintigraphy and in 17 (71%) patients on EMG and LS. In three patients, signs of the airway aspiration were observed on static thoracic images. Scintigraphic and electrophysiological findings were in agreement in 19 patients (79%), and the correlation between scintigraphy and the electrophysiological methods for the evaluation of dysphagia was statistically significant (r=0.57, P=0.003). The novel finding of this study is the demonstration of piecemeal deglutition and dysphagia limit on scintigraphic studies in patients with neurogenic dysphagia. Based on this finding we consider

  20. Persistent Dysphagia After Induction Chemotherapy in Patients with Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Predicts Poor Post-Operative Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Michael J; Adelstein, David J; Allende, Daniela S; Bodmann, Joanna W; Ives, Denise I; Murthy, Sudish C; Raymond, Daniel; Raja, Siva; Rodriguez, Cristina P; Sohal, Davendra; Stephans, Kevin L; Videtic, Gregory M M; Rybicki, Lisa A

    2017-06-01

    Preoperative therapy is frequently employed in the management of esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, many patients are found to have advanced pathologic stage and have poor outcomes. A prognostic factor which identifies this patient population before surgery would be desirable, as alternative treatment strategies may be warranted. Between 2/08 and 1/12, 60 evaluable patients with locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma enrolled in single-arm phase II trial of induction chemotherapy, surgery, and post-operative adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT). A clinical stage of T3, N1, or M1a (AJCC 6th) was required for eligibility. Induction chemotherapy with epirubicin 50 mg/m 2 d1, oxaliplatin 130 mg/m 2 d1, and fluorouracil 200 mg/m 2 /day continuous infusion for 3 weeks, was given every 21 days for 3 cycles and was followed by surgical resection. Adjuvant CRT consisted of 50-55 Gy @ 1.8-2.0 Gy/day and 2 cycles of cisplatin (20 mg/m 2 /day) and fluorouracil (1000 mg/m 2 /day) given as 96-h infusions during weeks 1 and 4 of radiotherapy. Dysphagia was assessed at baseline and after induction chemotherapy. Persistent dysphagia was associated with worse distant metastatic control [HR 3.48 (1.43-8.43), p = 0.006], recurrence free survival [HR 3.04 (1.34-6.92), p = 0.008], and overall survival [HR 3.31 (1.43-7.66), p = 0.005]. Persistent dysphagia was associated with more advanced pathologic T descriptor (pT) (p = 0.048) and N descriptor (pN) (p = 0.002), a greater median number of involved lymph nodes (3 v 1, p = 0.003), and greater residual tumor viability (p = 0.05). No patients with persistent dysphagia had pT0-T2 or pN0 disease. Persistent dysphagia after induction chemotherapy is associated with more advanced pathologic stage and inferior outcomes.

  1. POSTFUNDOPLICATION DYSPHAGIA CAUSES SIMILAR WATER INGESTION DYNAMICS AS ACHALASIA

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    Roberto Oliveira DANTAS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background - After surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease dysphagia is a symptom in the majority of patients, with decrease in intensity over time. However, some patients may have persistent dysphagia. Objective - The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the dynamics of water ingestion in patients with postfundoplication dysphagia compared with patients with dysphagia caused by achalasia, idiopathic or consequent to Chagas' disease, and controls. Methods - Thirty-three patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, assessed more than one year after surgery, together with 50 patients with Chagas' disease, 27 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 88 controls were all evaluated by the water swallow test. They drunk, in triplicate, 50 mL of water without breaks while being precisely timed and the number of swallows counted. Also measured was: (a inter-swallows interval - the time to complete the task, divided by the number of swallows during the task; (b swallowing flow - volume drunk divided by the time taken; (c volume of each swallow - volume drunk divided by the number of swallows. Results - Patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia took longer to ingest all the volume, had an increased number of swallows, an increase in interval between swallows, a decrease in swallowing flow and a decrease in water volume of each swallow compared with the controls. There was no difference between the three groups of patients. There was no correlation between postfundoplication time and the results. Conclusion - It was concluded that patients with postfundoplication dysphagia have similar water ingestion dynamics as patients with achalasia.

  2. Predictive factors for oropharyngeal dysphagia after prolonged orotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Carolina Martins de; Friche, Amélia Augusta de Lima; Salomão, Marina Silva; Bougo, Graziela Chamarelli; Vicente, Laélia Cristina Caseiro

    2017-09-13

    Lesions in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx due to endotracheal intubation can cause reduction in the local motility and sensitivity, impairing the swallowing process, resulting in oropharyngeal dysphagia. To verify the predictive factors for the development of oropharyngeal dysphagia and the risk of aspiration in patients with prolonged orotracheal intubation admitted to an intensive care unit. This is an observational, analytical, cross-sectional and retrospective data collection study of 181 electronic medical records of patients submitted to prolonged orotracheal intubation. Data on age; gender; underlying disease; associated comorbidities; time and reason for orotracheal intubation; Glasgow scale on the day of the Speech Therapist assessment; comprehension; vocal quality; presence and severity of dysphagia; risk of bronchoaspiration; and the suggested oral route were collected. The data were analyzed through logistic regression. The level of significance was set at 5%, with a 95% Confidence Interval. The prevalence of dysphagia in this study was 35.9% and the risk of aspiration was 24.9%. As the age increased, the altered vocal quality and the degree of voice impairment increased the risk of the presence of dysphagia by 5-; 45.4- and 6.7-fold, respectively, and of aspiration by 6-; 36.4- and 4.8-fold. The increase in the time of orotracheal intubation increased the risk of aspiration by 5.5-fold. Patients submitted to prolonged intubation who have risk factors associated with dysphagia and aspiration should be submitted to an early speech-language/audiology assessment and receive appropriate and timely treatment. The recognition of these predictive factors by the entire multidisciplinary team can minimize the possibility of clinical complications inherent to the risk of dysphagia and aspiration in extubated patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  3. Does Dysphagia Indicate Recurrence of Benign Esophageal Strictures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle Ekberg

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal dilatation in dysphagic patients with benign strictures is usually considered successful if the patients' dysphagia is alleviated. However, the relation between dysphagia and the diameter of a stricture is not well understood. Moreover, the dysphagia may also be caused by an underlying esophageal motor disorder. In order to compare symptoms and objective measurements of esophageal stricture, 28 patients were studied with interview and a radiologic esophagram. The latter included swallowing of a solid bolus. All patients underwent successful balloon dilatation at least one month prior to this study. Recurrence of a stricture with a diameter of less than 13 mm was diagnosed by the barium swallow in 21 patients. Recurrence of dysphagia was seen in 15 patients. Thirteen patients denied any swallowing symptoms. Chest pain was present in 9 patients. Of 15 patients with dysphagia 2 (13% had no narrowing but severe esophageal dysmotility. Of 13 patients without dysphagia 9 (69% had a stricture with a diameter of 13 mm or less. Of 21 patients with a stricture of 13 mm or less 14 (67% were symptomatic while 7 (33% were asymptomatic. Four of 11 patients with retrosternal pain had a stricture of less than 10 mm. Three patients with retrosternal pain and obstruction had severe esophageal dysmotility. Whether or not the patients have dysphagia may be more related to diet and eating habits than to the true diameter of their esophageal narrowing. We conclude that the clinical history is non-reliable for evaluating the results of esophageal stricture dilatation. In order to get an objective measurement of therapeutic outcome, barium swallow including a solid bolus is recommended.

  4. Chemical-modification studies of a unique sialic acid-binding lectin from the snail Achatina fulica. Involvement of tryptophan and histidine residues in biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S; Mandal, C; Allen, A K

    1988-01-01

    A unique sialic acid-binding lectin, achatininH (ATNH) was purified in single step from the haemolymph of the snail Achatina fulica by affinity chromatography on sheep submaxillary-gland mucin coupled to Sepharose 4B. The homogeneity was checked by alkaline gel electrophoresis, immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis. Amino acid analysis showed that the lectin has a fairly high content of acidic amino acid residues (22% of the total). About 1.3% of the residues are half-cystine. The glycoprotein contains 21% carbohydrate. The unusually high content of xylose (6%) and fucose (2.7%) in this snail lectin is quite interesting. The protein was subjected to various chemical modifications in order to detect the amino acid residues and carbohydrate residues present in its binding sites. Modification of tyrosine and arginine residues did not affect the binding activity of ATNH; however, modification of tryptophan and histidine residues led to a complete loss of its biological activity. A marked decrease in the fluorescence emission was found as the tryptophan residues of ATNH were modified. The c.d. data showed the presence of an identical type of conformation in the native and modified agglutinin. The modification of lysine and carboxy residues partially diminished the biological activity. The activity was completely lost after a beta-elimination reaction, indicating that the sugars are O-glycosidically linked to the glycoprotein's protein moiety. This result confirms that the carbohydrate moiety also plays an important role in the agglutination property of this lectin. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3140796

  5. Nutritional status, food intake, and dysphagia in long-term survivors with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Manon G A; Rütten, Heidi; Rasmussen-Conrad, Ellen L; Knuijt, Simone; Takes, Robert P; van Herpen, Carla M L; Wanten, Geert J A; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Merkx, Matthias A W

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate nutritional status, food intake, and dysphagia in long-term head and neck cancer survivors. Thirty-two patients with stage III-IV head and neck cancer treated by chemoradiotherapy were invited to evaluate nutritional status (malnutrition, relative weight loss), food intake (food modification; quality), and dysphagia. At a median follow up of 44 months, 6 of 32 patients were at risk for malnutrition. Women (p = .049) and patients with high body mass index before treatment (p = .024) showed more weight loss. None of the 32 patients could eat a "full diet." Six patients used nutritional supplements/tube feeding. Low dysphagia-related quality of life scores were significantly correlated to increased food modification (r = 0.405; p = .024). Nutritional advice in patients with head and neck cancer is still necessary years after chemoradiation and should focus on nutritional status, food modification, and quality, in accord with recommended food groups. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Prefrontal cortex activity during swallowing in dysphagia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun; Yamate, Chisato; Taira, Masato; Shinoda, Masamichi; Urata, Kentaro; Maruno, Mitsuru; Ito, Reio; Saito, Hiroto; Gionhaku, Nobuhito; Iinuma, Toshimitsu; Iwata, Koichi

    2018-05-24

    Prefrontal cortex activity is modulated by flavor and taste stimuli and changes during swallowing. We hypothesized that changes in the modulation of prefrontal cortex activity by flavor and taste were associated with swallowing movement and evaluated brain activity during swallowing in patients with dysphagia. To evaluate prefrontal cortex activity in dysphagia patients during swallowing, change in oxidized hemoglobin (z-score) was measured with near-infrared spectroscopy while dysphagia patients and healthy controls swallowed sweetened/unsweetened and flavored/unflavored jelly. Total z-scores were positive during swallowing of flavored/unsweetened jelly and negative during swallowing of unflavored/sweetened jelly in controls but negative during swallowing of sweetened/unsweetened and flavored/unflavored jelly in dysphagia patients. These findings suggest that taste and flavor during food swallowing are associated with positive and negative z-scores, respectively. Change in negative and positive z-scores may be useful in evaluating brain activity of dysphagia patients during swallowing of sweetened and unsweetened food.

  7. Dysphagia: current reality and scope of the problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavé, Pere; Shaker, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dysphagia is a symptom of swallowing dysfunction that occurs between the mouth and the stomach. Although oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent condition (occurring in up to 50% of elderly people and 50% of patients with neurological conditions) and is associated with aspiration, severe nutritional and respiratory complications and even death, most patients are not diagnosed and do not receive any treatment. By contrast, oesophageal dysphagia is less prevalent and less severe, but with better recognized symptoms caused by diseases affecting the enteric nervous system and/or oesophageal muscular layers. Recognition of the clinical relevance and complications of oesophageal and oropharyngeal dysphagia is growing among health-care professionals in many fields. In addition, the emergence of new methods to screen and assess swallow function at both the oropharynx and oesophagus, and marked advances in understanding the pathophysiology of these conditions, is paving the way for a new era of intensive research and active therapeutic strategies for affected patients. Indeed, a unified field of deglutology is developing, with new professional profiles to cover the needs of all patients with dysphagia in a nonfragmented way.

  8. Telehealth Stroke Dysphagia Evaluation Is Safe and Effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Kate; Hyers, Megan; Stuchiner, Tamela; Lucas, Lindsay; Schwartz, Karissa; Mako, Jenniffer; Spinelli, Kateri J; Yanase, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Rapid evaluation of dysphagia poststroke significantly lowers rates of aspiration pneumonia. Logistical barriers often significantly delay in-person dysphagia evaluation by speech language pathologists (SLPs) in remote and rural hospitals. Clinical swallow evaluations delivered via telehealth have been validated in a number of clinical contexts, yet no one has specifically validated a teleswallow evaluation for in-hospital post-stroke dysphagia assessment. A team of 6 SLPs experienced in stroke care and a telestroke neurologist designed, implemented, and tested a teleswallow evaluation for acute stroke patients, in which 100 patients across 2 affiliated, urban certified stroke centers were sequentially evaluated by a bedside and telehealth SLP. Inter-rater reliability was analyzed using percent agreement, Cohen's kappa, Kendall's tau-b, and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests. Logistic regression models accounting for age and gender were used to test the impact of stroke severity and stroke location on agreement. We found excellent agreement for both liquid (91% agreement; kappa = 0.808; Kendall's tau-b = 0.813, p Dysphagia evaluation by a remote SLP via telehealth is safe and effective following stroke. We plan to implement teleswallow across our multistate telestroke network as standard practice for poststroke dysphagia evaluation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Development and validation of the brief esophageal dysphagia questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, T H; Riehl, M; Sodikoff, J B; Kahrilas, P J; Keefer, L; Doerfler, B; Pandolfino, J E

    2016-12-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is common in gastroenterology practice and has multiple etiologies. A complication for some patients with dysphagia is food impaction. A valid and reliable questionnaire to rapidly evaluate esophageal dysphagia and impaction symptoms can aid the gastroenterologist in gathering information to inform treatment approach and further evaluation, including endoscopy. 1638 patients participated over two study phases. 744 participants completed the Brief Esophageal Dysphagia Questionnaire (BEDQ) for phase 1; 869 completed the BEDQ, Visceral Sensitivity Index, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for phase 2. Demographic and clinical data were obtained via the electronic medical record. The BEDQ was evaluated for internal consistency, split-half reliability, ceiling and floor effects, and construct validity. The BEDQ demonstrated excellent internal consistency, reliability, and construct validity. The symptom frequency and severity scales scored above the standard acceptable cutoffs for reliability while the impaction subscale yielded poor internal consistency and split-half reliability; thus the impaction items were deemed qualifiers only and removed from the total score. No significant ceiling or floor effects were found with the exception of 1 item, and inter-item correlations fell within accepted ranges. Construct validity was supported by moderate yet significant correlations with other measures. The predictive ability of the BEDQ was small but significant. The BEDQ represents a rapid, reliable, and valid assessment tool for esophageal dysphagia with food impaction for clinical practice that differentiates between patients with major motor dysfunction and mechanical obstruction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Exploratory Research on Latent Esophageal Motility Disorders in Dysphagia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Shinpei; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Inoue, Yousuke; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Ozaki, Haruhiko; Ota, Kazuhiro; Harada, Satoshi; Edogawa, Shoko; Kojima, Yuichi; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Fukuchi, Takumi; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) has been applied to assess esophageal motility disorders. However, the frequency and types of motility disorders in patients with dysphagia, which are frequently seen in clinical practice, are not clear. We evaluated latent esophageal motility disorders associated with dysphagia. The study included patients without erosive esophageal mucosal damage and with dysphagia symptoms refractory to at least 8 weeks of standard-dose proton pump inhibitors. After enrolment, HRM was used to evaluate for esophageal motility disorder based on the Chicago classification. Esophageal motility disorder was found in 58 of 100 patients and was classified based on the causes: achalasia (13%), esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (16%), distal esophageal spasms (3%), weak peristalsis (14%), frequently failed peristalsis (5%), and hypertensive peristalsis (7%). Primary esophageal motility disorder was found in approximately 50% of cases in dysphagia patients. Therefore, esophageal motility disorder is not an uncommon condition and should be sought for in order to elucidate precisely the cause of dysphagia. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Metastatic Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer Presenting Clinically with Esophageal Dysphagia

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    Lilit Karapetyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intra-abdominal metastases of invasive lobular breast cancer (ILBC may be insidious. We report a case of metastatic ILBC that presented with dysphagia within weeks of a negative mammogram and before the development of intra-abdominal symptoms. Case. A 70-year-old female developed esophageal dysphagia. She underwent EGD which showed a short segment of stricture of the distal esophagus without significant mucosal changes. Biopsy was unremarkable and patient underwent lower esophageal sphincter (LES dilation. Severe progressive dysphagia led to esophageal impaction and three LES dilatations. CT scan showed bilateral pleural effusions, more prominent on right side, and ascites. The pleural effusions were transudative. Repeat EGD with biopsy showed lymphocytic esophagitis, and she was started on swallowed fluticasone. Abdominal ultrasound with Doppler showed that the main portal vein had atypical turbulent flow that was felt to possibly be due to retroperitoneal process. The patient underwent diagnostic laparoscopy which revealed diffuse punctate lesions on the peritoneum. Pathology was consistent with metastatic ILBC. Conclusion. Dysphagia in the setting of peritoneal carcinomatosis from metastatic ILBC is a rare finding. The case highlights the importance of metastatic ILBC as a differential diagnosis for female patients with progressive dysphagia and associated ascites or pleural effusions.

  12. Compensatory recombination phenomena of neurological functions in central dysphagia patients

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    Xiao-dong Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We speculate that cortical reactions evoked by swallowing activity may be abnormal in patients with central infarction with dysphagia. The present study aimed to detect functional imaging features of cerebral cortex in central dysphagia patients by using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The results showed that when normal controls swallowed, primary motor cortex (BA4, insula (BA13, premotor cortex (BA6/8, supramarginal gyrus (BA40, and anterior cingulate cortex (BA24/32 were activated, and that the size of the activated areas were larger in the left hemisphere compared with the right. In recurrent cerebral infarction patients with central dysphagia, BA4, BA13, BA40 and BA6/8 areas were activated, while the degree of activation in BA24/32 was decreased. Additionally, more areas were activated, including posterior cingulate cortex (BA23/31, visual association cortex (BA18/19, primary auditory cortex (BA41 and parahippocampal cortex (BA36. Somatosensory association cortex (BA7 and left cerebellum in patients with recurrent cerebral infarction with central dysphagia were also activated. Experimental findings suggest that the cerebral cortex has obvious hemisphere lateralization in response to swallowing, and patients with recurrent cerebral infarction with central dysphagia show compensatory recombination phenomena of neurological functions. In rehabilitative treatment, using the favorite food of patients can stimulate swallowing through visual, auditory, and other nerve conduction pathways, thus promoting compensatory recombination of the central cortex functions.

  13. A 63 years old woman with progressive mechanical dysphagia and weight loss: a case presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Baghbanian, Mahmud; Salmanroghani, Hasan; Baghbanian, Ali; Samet, Mohammad; Amirbeigy, Mohammad Kazem

    2013-01-01

    When considering a patient with dysphagia, an attempt should be made to determine whether the patient has difficulty only with solid boluses (suggestive of mechanical dysphagia) or with liquids and solids (suggestive of a motility dysphagia). Lesions such as an oesophageal tumor and external pressure effect from a lung tumor or aberrant vessel can lead to mechanical dysphagia. Endoscopy and / or a barium swallow are helpful in identifying the anatomical disarrangement. In this study a patient...

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Swallowing Function Between Dysphagia Patients and Healthy Subjects Using High-Resolution Manometry

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Taek; Yi, Youbin; Lee, Jung-Sang; Kim, Kunwoo; Park, Jung Ho; Yoon, Kyung Jae

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare swallowing function between healthy subjects and patients with pharyngeal dysphagia using high resolution manometry (HRM) and to evaluate the usefulness of HRM for detecting pharyngeal dysphagia. Methods Seventy-five patients with dysphagia and 28 healthy subjects were included in this study. Diagnosis of dysphagia was confirmed by a videofluoroscopy. HRM was performed to measure pressure and timing information at the velopharynx (VP), tongue base (TB), and upper esophage...

  15. "I had no idea what a complicated business eating is…": a qualitative study of the impact of dysphagia during stroke recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Jennifer; Walshe, Margaret

    2018-06-01

    complex rehabilitation journey, involving the interaction of many physical, emotional and social considerations. Healthcare professionals should be aware of not only the physical, but also the significant psychosocial consequences of living with dysphagia following stroke. Further research is required in this field, so that the experiences of these persons can be better understood and findings can be used to contribute to high-quality and evidence-based service delivery.

  16. Dysarthria and dysphagia are highly prevalent among various types of neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuijt, Simone; Kalf, Johanna G.; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Drost, Gea; Hendricks, Henk T.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with a neuromuscular disease (NMD) can present with dysarthria and/or dysphagia. Literature regarding prevalence rates of dysarthria and dysphagia is scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence rates, severity and co-presence of dysarthria and dysphagia in adult

  17. Dysarthria and dysphagia are highly prevalent among various types of neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuijt, S.; Kalf, J.G.; Swart, B.J. de; Drost, G.; Hendricks, H.T.; Geurts, A.C.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with a neuromuscular disease (NMD) can present with dysarthria and/or dysphagia. Literature regarding prevalence rates of dysarthria and dysphagia is scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence rates, severity and co-presence of dysarthria and dysphagia in adult

  18. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Dermatomyositis: Associations with Clinical and Laboratory Features Including Autoantibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Mugii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Oohata, Sacihe; Okita, Hirokazu; Yahata, Tetsutarou; Someya, Fujiko; Inoue, Katsumi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dysphagia develops with low frequency in patients with dermatomyositis. Our objective was to determine the clinical and laboratory features that can estimate the development of dysphagia in dermatomyositis. Methods This study included 92 Japanese patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis. The associations between dysphagia and clinical and laboratory features including disease-specific autoantibodies determined by immunoprecipitation assays were analyzed. Results Videofluoroscopy sw...

  19. Oral muscles are progressively affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy : Implications for dysphagia treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bert de Swart; W. Klein; L. van den Engel-Hoek; S. Pillen; J. Hendriks; Alexander Geurts; I. de Groot; L. Sie; C. Erasmus

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is reported in advanced stages of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The population of DMD is changing due to an increasing survival. We aimed to describe the dysphagia in consecutive stages and to assess the underlying mechanisms of dysphagia in DMD, in order to develop mechanism based

  20. Oral muscles are progressively affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: implications for dysphagia treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Erasmus, C.E.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Klein, W.M.; Pillen, S.; Sie, L.T.L.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia is reported in advanced stages of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The population of DMD is changing due to an increasing survival. We aimed to describe the dysphagia in consecutive stages and to assess the underlying mechanisms of dysphagia in DMD, in order to develop mechanism based

  1. [Digestive disorders in Parkinson's disease: dysphagia and sialorrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, J; Prieto-Albin, R; Velasco-Palacios, L; Jorge-Roldán, S; Cubo-Delgado, E

    2010-02-08

    The non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease are a frequent and often under-diagnosed disorder. Two of the most significant non-motor symptoms are perhaps dysphagia and sialorrhea (which are relatively common in advanced stages of the disease) owing to their important functional repercussions and to the associated comorbidity. In recent years, different evaluation scales have been developed for clinical use and in screening the aforementioned symptoms. Of the different therapeutic options available, botulinum toxin represents the preferred treatment for sialorrhea. In contrast, speech therapy and an optimisation of the antiparkinsonian therapy are generally useful measures to treat dysphagia, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy being reserved for patients suffering from Parkinson who have severe dysphagia.

  2. Clozapine-induced dysphagia with secondary substantial weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Mugtaba; Devadas, Vekneswaran

    2016-08-19

    Dysphagia is listed as a 'rare' side effect following clozapine treatment. In this case report, we describe how significant clozapine-induced dysphagia has led to significant reduction of nutritional intake with subsequent substantial weight loss. An 18-year-old single man with an established diagnosis of treatment-resistant paranoid schizophrenia recovered well on a therapeutic dose of clozapine. However, he was noted to lose weight significantly (up to 20% of his original weight) as the dose was uptitrated. This was brought about by development of dysphagia, likely to be due to clozapine. Addition of nutritional supplementary liquids and initiation of a modified behavioural dietary/swallowing programme, while repeatedly mastering the Mendelsohn manoeuvre technique, alleviated the swallowing difficulties and restored his weight. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Value of radionuclide oesophageal transit in studies of functional dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llamas-Elvira, J.M.; Martinez-Parades, M.; Velasco-Lajo, T.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide oesophageal transit time was evaluated in 70 individuals, divided into three groups: normal individuals, patients with non-organic dysphagia and patients with primary oesophageal motility disorders treated with per-endoscopic forced pneumatic dilatation. In all of them the oesophageal transit time of a bolus of water with 18.5 MBq (500 μCi) of 99 Tcsup(m) sulphur colloid was assessed, as was the percentage of residual activity of the bolus in the oesophagus. There was a significant difference in these parameters between the control group and the group with non-organic dysphagia, the diagnostic capacity of this test being 93% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value and 90% negative predictive value, which suggests its inclusion in diagnostic protocols of dysphagias. In patients with primary oesophageal motility disorders, a significant decrease in values of residual activity has been observed after treatment with per-endoscopic forced pneumatic dilation. (author)

  4. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutt, Polly; Love, Jo; Clavé, Pere; Cohen, David; Dziewas, Rainer; Iversen, Helle K.; Ledl, Christian; Ragab, Suzanne; Soda, Hassan; Warusevitane, Anushka; Woisard, Virginie; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials. Methods— We randomly assigned 162 patients with a recent ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and dysphagia, defined as a penetration aspiration score (PAS) of ≥3 on video fluoroscopy, to PES or sham treatment given on 3 consecutive days. The primary outcome was swallowing safety, assessed using the PAS, at 2 weeks. Secondary outcomes included dysphagia severity, function, quality of life, and serious adverse events at 6 and 12 weeks. Results— In randomized patients, the mean age was 74 years, male 58%, ischemic stroke 89%, and PAS 4.8. The mean treatment current was 14.8 (7.9) mA and duration 9.9 (1.2) minutes per session. On the basis of previous data, 45 patients (58.4%) randomized to PES seemed to receive suboptimal stimulation. The PAS at 2 weeks, adjusted for baseline, did not differ between the randomized groups: PES 3.7 (2.0) versus sham 3.6 (1.9), P=0.60. Similarly, the secondary outcomes did not differ, including clinical swallowing and functional outcome. No serious adverse device-related events occurred. Conclusions— In patients with subacute stroke and dysphagia, PES was safe but did not improve dysphagia. Undertreatment of patients receiving PES may have contributed to the neutral result. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN25681641. PMID:27165955

  5. The effect of pneumatic dilation in management of postfundoplication dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunjaya, D; Podboy, A; Blackmon, S H; Katzka, D; Halland, M

    2017-06-01

    Fundoplication surgery is a commonly performed procedure for gastro-esophageal reflux disease or hiatal hernia repair. Up to 10% of patients develop persistent postoperative dysphagia after surgery. Data on the effectiveness of pneumatic dilation for treatment are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and identify clinical factors associated with successful response to pneumatic dilation among patients with persistent postfundoplication dysphagia (PPFD). We retrospectively evaluated patients who had undergone pneumatic dilation for PPFD between 1999 and 2016. Patients with dysphagia or achalasia prior to fundoplication were excluded. Demographic information, surgical history, severity of dysphagia, and clinical outcomes were collected. Data pertaining to esophagram, manometry, endoscopy, and pneumatic dilation were also collected. We identified 38 patients (82% female, 95% Caucasian, and median age 59 years) with PPFD who completed pneumatic dilation. The median postfundoplication dysphagia score was 2. Eleven patients had abnormal peristalsis on manometry. Seventeen patients reported response (seven complete) with an average decrease of 1 in their dysphagia score. Fifteen patients underwent reoperation due to PPFD. Hiatal hernia repair was the only factor that predicts a higher response rate to pneumatic dilation. Only one patient in our study developed complication (pneumoperitoneum) from pneumatic dilation. We found that pneumatic dilation to be a safe treatment option for PPFD with moderate efficacy. Patients who developed PPFD after a hiatal hernia repair may gain the greatest benefit after pneumatic dilation. We were not able to identify additional clinical, radiological, endoscopic, or manometric parameters that were predictive of response. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Endoscopic findings in patients presenting with oesophageal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Adil Naseer; Said, Khalid; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Ali, Kishwar; Hidayat, Rania; Latif, Humera

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia is the difficulty in swallowing and is often described by the patients as a 'perception' that there is an impediment to the normal passage of the swallowed material. It is frequently observed that there is an association of dysphagia with serious underlying disorders and warrants early evaluation. The current study aimed to determine the frequency of common endoscopic findings in patients presenting with oesophageal dysphagia. This cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out in the department of Gastroenterology, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad, from October 2012 to April 2013. Consecutive patients with dysphagia were included in the study and were subjected to endoscopy. A total of 139 patients presenting with dysphagia were studied, 81 (58.3%) were males and 58 (41.7%) were females. The mean age was 52.41 ± 16.42. Malignant oesophageal stricture was the most common finding noted in 38 (27.3%) patients with 28 (73.7%) males and 23 (60.5%) patients among them were above the age of 50 years. It was followed by normal upper Gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy in 29 (20.9%) patients and reflux esophagitis in 25 (18.0%) patients. Schatzki's ring was present in 14 (10.1%) patients; benign oesophageal strictures in 12 (8.6%) patients while achalasia was noted in 7 (5.0%) patients. 14(10.1%) patients had findings other than the ones mentioned above. Malignancies are a more common cause of dysphagia in our population and early diagnosis can result in proper treatment of many of these cases.

  7. Dysphagia in a middle-aged female: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Shafiq, Syed; B., Ramathilakam

    2013-01-01

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome (PVS) is characterized by a hypopharyngeal or postcricoid web causing progressive dysphagia and iron deficiency anemia. We report the case of a middle-aged female who presented to us with complaints of easy fatuigability and progressive dysphagia mainly to solids for six months.  The patient had marked pallor.  Her upper endoscopy showed hypopharyngeal web, which was confirmed by barium swallow study.  A diagnosis of Plummer-Vinson syndrome was made.  The patient was i...

  8. [Dysphagia caused by Zenker's diverticulum after total laryngectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Salas, M; Ventura, J; Ruiz Carmona, E; Muñoz, F

    2000-10-01

    Zenker's diverticulum is a mucosal lined outpouching of pharynx through Lainert's space that causes dysphagia of the upper digestive tract. Multiples theories try to explain the acquired etiology of this entity, attributing its origin to a disfunction of pharynx-esophageal sphincter. A case of total larynguectomy with hypopharyngeal diverticulum and progressive dysphagia to solid food is presented. We analyze the etiopathogenic mechanisms and the definitive characteristics of this entity. We review mundial literature, being exceptional the fact of finding clinical manifestations in diverticulum of larynguectomized patients.

  9. Dysphagia caused by a lateral medullary infarction syndrome (Wallenberg's syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mekkaoui, Amine; Irhoudane, Hanane; Ibrahimi, Adil; El Yousfi, Mounia

    2012-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was referred to our hospital for a dysphagia evolving for 10 days. Clinical examination had found neurological signs as contralateral Horner's syndrome, ipsilateral palatal paresis, gait ataxia and hoarseness. Video-fluoroscopy showed a lack of passage of contrast medium to the distal esophagus. Esogastroduodenoscopy was normal. The cranial MRI had shown an acute ischemic stroke in the left lateral medullar region and the diagnosis of Wallenberg syndrome (WS) was established. WS remains an unknown cause of dysphagia in the clinical practice of the gastroenterologist. PMID:23077713

  10. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presenting with dysphagia: a rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fazal; Hamid, Arsalan; Fatima, Benish; Hashmi, Shiraz; Fatimi, Saulat

    2017-01-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of dysphagia and past history of pulmonary and intestinal tuberculosis. A barium swallow showed a point of constriction 42 mm above the gastroesophageal junction. Computed tomography revealed large opacities in bilateral lung fields, encroaching more on the esophagus. The lesion progressively compressed the esophagus as it moved inferiorly. A right posterolateral thoracotomy was performed for sub-anatomical resection of the mass. A biopsy revealed homogenous whirling hyalinized collagen fibers, highly suggestive of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma, with no evidence of malignancy. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of longstanding dysphagia.

  11. The challenges of dysphagia in treating motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesey, Siobhan

    2017-07-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND) is a relatively rare degenerative disorder. Its impacts are manifested in progressive loss of motor function and often accompanied by wider non-motor changes. Swallowing and speech abilities are frequently severely impaired. Effective management of dysphagia (swallowing difficulty) symptoms and nutritional care requires a holistic multidisciplinary approach. Care must be patient focused, facilitate patient decision making, and support planning towards end of life care. This article discusses the challenges of providing effective nutritional care to people living with motor neurone disease who have dysphagia.

  12. Food Habits, Lifestyle Factors, and Risk of Prostate Cancer in Central Argentina: A Case Control Study Involving Self-Motivated Health Behavior Modifications after Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Sandaly O S; Pacheco, Fabio J; Zapata, Gimena M J; Garcia, Julieta M E; Previale, Carlos A; Cura, Héctor E; Craig, Winston J

    2016-07-09

    Cancer is the second most important non-communicable disease worldwide and disproportionately impacts low- to middle-income countries. Diet in combination with other lifestyle habits seems to modify the risk for some cancers but little is known about South Americans. Food habits of Argentinean men pre- and post-diagnosis of prostate cancer (n = 326) were assessed along with other lifestyle factors. We studied whether any of the behaviors and risk factors for prostate cancer were found in men with other cancers (n = 394), compared with control subjects (n = 629). Before diagnosis, both cases reported a greater mean consumption of meats and fats and lower intakes of fruits, green vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds, and whole grains than the controls (all p modifications with increased consumption of fish, fruits (including red fruits in prostate cancer), cruciferous vegetables, legumes, nuts, and black tea (all p habits and other lifestyle factors after cancer diagnosis.

  13. Central cholinergic dysfunction could be associated with oropharyngeal dysphagia in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Duck; Koo, Jung Hoi; Song, Sun Hong; Jo, Kwang Deog; Lee, Moon Kyu; Jang, Wooyoung

    2015-11-01

    Dysphagia is an important issue in the prognosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although several studies have reported that oropharyngeal dysphagia may be associated with cognitive dysfunction, the exact relationship between cortical function and swallowing function in PD patients is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between an electrophysiological marker of central cholinergic function, which reflected cognitive function, and swallowing function, as measured by videofluoroscopic studies (VFSS). We enrolled 29 early PD patients. Using the Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire (SDQ), we divided the enrolled patients into two groups: PD with dysphagia and PD without dysphagia. The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) was applied to explore the nature of the dysphagia. To assess central cholinergic dysfunction, short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was evaluated. We analyzed the relationship between central cholinergic dysfunction and oropharyngeal dysphagia and investigated the characteristics of the dysphagia. The SAI values were significantly different between the two groups. The comparison of each VFSS component between the PD with dysphagia group and the PD without dysphagia group showed statistical significance for most of the oral phase components and for a single pharyngeal phase component. The total score on the VDS was higher in the PD with dysphagia group than in the PD without dysphagia group. The Mini-Mental State Examination and SAI values showed significant correlations with the total score of the oral phase components. According to binary logistic regression analysis, SAI value independently contributed to the presence of dysphagia in PD patients. Our findings suggest that cholinergic dysfunction is associated with dysphagia in early PD and that an abnormal SAI value is a good biomarker for predicting the risk of dysphagia in PD patients.

  14. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Dermatomyositis: Associations with Clinical and Laboratory Features Including Autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Oohata, Sacihe; Okita, Hirokazu; Yahata, Tetsutarou; Someya, Fujiko; Inoue, Katsumi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia develops with low frequency in patients with dermatomyositis. Our objective was to determine the clinical and laboratory features that can estimate the development of dysphagia in dermatomyositis. This study included 92 Japanese patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis. The associations between dysphagia and clinical and laboratory features including disease-specific autoantibodies determined by immunoprecipitation assays were analyzed. Videofluoroscopy swallow study (VFSS) was performed for all patients with clinical dysphagia (n = 13, 14.1%) but not for patients without clinical dysphagia. Typical findings of dysphagia (pharyngeal pooling, n = 11 and/or nasal regurgitation, n = 4) was detected by VFSS in all patients with clinical dysphagia. Eleven patients with dysphagia (84.6%) had anti-transcription intermediary factor 1γ (TIF-1γ) antibody. By univariate analysis, the average age and the male to female ratio, internal malignancy, and anti-TIF-1γ antibody were significantly higher and the frequency of interstitial lung diseases and manual muscle testing (MMT) scores of sternomastoid and dertoid muscles were significantly lower in patients with dysphagia than in patients without dysphagia. Among patients with anti-TIF-1γ antibody, the mean age, the ratios of male to female and internal malignancy were significantly higher and mean MMT scores of sternomastoid muscle were significantly lower in patients with dysphagia compared with patients without dysphagia. By multivariable analysis, the risk of dysphagia was strongly associated with the existence of internal malignancy and ant-TIF-1γ antibody and was also associated with reduced scores of manual muscle test of sternomastoid muscle. Dysphagia was markedly improved after the treatment against myositis in all 13 patients. These findings indicate that dysphagia can develop frequently in patients with internal malignancy, anti-TIF-1γ antibody, or severe muscle weakness of sternomastoid muscle.

  15. Carers' experiences of dysphagia in people treated for head and neck cancer: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-08-01

    The implication of dysphagia for people treated nonsurgically for head and neck cancer (HNC) and its detrimental effects on functioning and quality of life has been well documented. To date, however, there has been a paucity of research on the effects of dysphagia following HNC on carers, independent of the consequences of a gastrostomy. The objective of this qualitative study was to report on the experiences of carers of people with dysphagia (non-gastrostomy dependent) following nonsurgical treatment for HNC and to identify the support needs of this group. A purposive, maximum-variation sampling technique was adopted to recruit 12 carers of people treated curatively for HNC since 2007. Each participated in an in-depth interview, detailing their experience of caring for someone with dysphagia and the associated impact on their life. Thematic analysis was adopted to search the transcripts for key phases and themes that emerged from the discussions. Analysis of the transcripts revealed four themes: (1) dysphagia disrupts daily life, (2) carers make adjustments to adapt to their partner's dysphagia, (3) the disconnect between carers' expectations and the reality of dysphagia, and (4) experiences of dysphagia-related services and informal supports. Carers generally felt ill-prepared for their role in dysphagia management. The qualitative methodology successfully described the impact of dysphagia on the everyday lives of carers, particularly in regard to meal preparation, social events, and family lifestyle. Clinicians should provide adequate and timely training and support to carers and view carers as copartners in dysphagia management.

  16. A Descriptive Investigation of Dysphagia in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia has rarely been investigated in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) despite being a serious condition affecting health and quality of life. Method: This study collected information about 101 adults with ID, living in community settings, referred for an assessment of their eating and drinking. Ninety-nine people were…

  17. Effectiveness of Dysphagia Training for Adult Learning Disabilities Support Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredinnick, Gerlind; Cocks, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a 1-day dysphagia training package delivered to support workers who work with adults with a learning disability. Thirty-eight support staff took part in this study. Twenty-five support staff received training, and 13 did not receive training and therefore acted as a control group. Three questionnaires…

  18. Inspiratory stridor and dysphagia because of prolonged oesophageal foreign body

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, G. D.; Heymans, H. S.; Urbanus, N. A.

    1987-01-01

    A 2-year-old boy with severe inspiratory stridor and dysphagia is described. The delay in the diagnosis of an impacted foreign body resulted in severe deformation of the oesophagus. After surgical extraction of the foreign body the oesophagus was splinted for 4 months by a nasogastric tube because

  19. Esophageal peristaltic defects in adults with functional dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratuapli, Shiva K; Hansel, Stephanie L; Umar, Sarah B; Burdick, George E; Ramirez, Francisco C; Fleischer, David E; Harris, Lucinda A; Lacy, Brian E; DiBaise, John K; Crowell, Michael D

    2014-08-01

    Functional dysphagia (FD) is characterized by the presence of dysphagia without evidence of mechanical esophageal obstruction, GERD, and histopathology-based esophageal motor disorders. Dysphagia is common in older patients; however, there is a paucity of information regarding the type and frequency of peristaltic abnormalities compared to younger patients. Based on recently validated criteria for classification of weak peristalsis using high-resolution manometry (HRM), we hypothesized that older patients with FD would have more peristaltic defects detected by HRM compared to younger FD patients. A retrospective review of our motility database yielded 65 patients that met inclusion criteria. Patients were divided into two groups based on age (younger: dysphagia, or quality of life. Dyspeptic symptoms, including nausea (p 5 cm) (p < 0.001). The mean contraction amplitude was also lower in the older group (p < 0.05). These data support the hypothesis that older patients with FD have a higher frequency of peristaltic abnormalities on HRM compared to younger patients. Older age was associated with increased frequency of weak peristalsis with small and large peristaltic defects.

  20. Suprahyoid Muscle Complex: A Reliable Neural Assessment Tool For Dysphagia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Stubbs, Peter William; Pedersen, Asger Roer

    be a non-invasive reliable neural assessment tool for patients with dysphagia. Objective: To investigate the possibility of using the suprahyoid muscle complex (SMC) using surface electromyography (sEMG) to assess changes to neural pathways by determining the reliability of measurements in healthy...

  1. Dysphagia: A Short Review of the Current State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koidou, Irene; Kollias, Nikolaos; Sdravou, Katerina; Grouios, George

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia is the clinical expression of disruption of the synchronized activity surrounding the normal swallowing mechanism. It results from a large number of causes including neurologic, myopathic, metabolic, inflammatory/autoimmune, infectious, structural, iatrogenic, and psychiatric diseases. It can have a significant impact on social and…

  2. Dysphagia lusoria: clinical aspects, manometric findings, diagnosis, and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.; Baggen, M. G.; Veen, H. F.; Smout, A. J.; Bekkers, J. A.; Jonkman, J. G.; Ouwendijk, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The lusorian artery is a rare anomaly of the right subclavian artery. This artery arises from the aortic arch distal of the left subclavian artery, crossing the midline behind the esophagus. Normally this anomaly causes no symptoms. Sometimes dysphagia first appears above the age of 40

  3. Impaired bolus transit across the esophagogastric junction in postfundoplication dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, R. C. H.; Samsom, M.; Haverkamp, A.; Oors, J.; Hebbard, G. S.; Gooszen, H. G.

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of fundoplication on liquid and solid bolus transit across the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) in relation to EGJ dynamics and dysphagia. Twelve patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) were studied before and after fundoplication. Concurrent

  4. Dysphagia, a reversible cause not to be forgotten.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, M.; Haigh, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    An 84-year-old man presented with dysphagia two years after the onset of symptoms. Repeated assessments at both ENT and neurology clinics had not recorded any of the more classical signs of Parkinson's disease and these did not become apparent until intercurrent illness had been treated. Once diagnosed, treatment was started and dramatic improvement was seen.

  5. Role of videofluoroscopy in evaluation of neurologic dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugiu, MG

    2007-01-01

    Summary For many years, videofluoroscopy was considered the gold standard for studies on swallowing disorders, and only recently has its role been challenged, due primarily to the widespread use of videoendoscopy in the evaluation of dysphagia. Albeit, videofluoroscopy still maintains its key role in this area and, in particular, in studies on dysphagia of neurological origin, on account not only of the possibility, with this procedure, to achieve complete and dynamic evaluation of all phases of deglutition, but also the high sensitivity and specificity in revealing the presence of inhalation. Aim of the present investigation was to analyse the technical procedure of videofluoroscopy and the principal indications in the study of dysphagia of neurological origin, in the attempt to reveal the advantages and disadvantages occurring in this examination, also with respect to other methods adopted in the evaluation of dyphagia. In conclusion, at present, no instrumental examination can be defined as ideal for the study of swallowing, but it can be seen that, with each of these procedures, the information forthcoming is actually complementary, thus achieving the aim to proceed as correctly and rapidly as possible, with the management of patients with dysphagia. PMID:18320837

  6. Risks associated with suspected dysphagia in infants admitted to a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    11 No. 2. Dysphagia in children is ever-increasing, mostly due to the improved survival rate of infants and children with life-threatening ... infants presented with feeding difficulties secondary to other conditions such as LBW and prematurity, ... or under-nutrition, severe irritability during feeding, history of ..... Learning, 2001.

  7. Dysphagia is present but mild in myotonic dystrophy type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Ensink; Bert de Swart; J. van Vliet; A. Tieleman; Baziel van Engelen; S. Knuijt

    2009-01-01

    The phenotype of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) shows similarities as well as differences to that of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Dysphagia, a predominant feature in DM1, has not yet been examined in DM2. In a recent nationwide questionnaire survey of gastrointestinal symptoms in DM2, 12 out of

  8. Dysphagia in postpolio patients: a videofluorographic follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanyi, B.; Phoa, S. S.; de Visser, M.

    1994-01-01

    In patients with a history of acute paralytic poliomyelitis (APP), late progressive muscle weakness may arise, known as the progressive postpoliomyelitis muscular atrophy (PPMA). In 43 patients with PPMA, 8 were evaluated for recent or late progressive dysphagia. The mean interval between APP and

  9. Dysphagia caused by a fibrovascular polyp: a case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacha, M.M.; Sloots, C.E.J.; Munster, I.P. van; Wobbes, T.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: A 73-year old man presented with dysphagia for liquid and solid food. Barium contrast study of the esophagus and esophagoscopy demonstrated a fibrovascular polyp. This, almost 10 cm benign esophageal tumor, was removed surgically by a cervical esophagotomy. A fibrovascular polyp is a rare

  10. An uncommon cause of dysphagia in pediatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Aquino

    2014-09-01

    Comments: Achalasia is a rare disease associated with a challenging and delayed diagnosis. The normality of the upper digestive endoscopy and the hypothesis of an eating behavior disorder both led to a delayed diagnosis. It is important to proceed with investigation in the presence of unremitting dysphagia symptoms.

  11. Surprising cause of dysphagia in an elderly male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Bennett

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 73 year old man presented to his primary care physician with sudden onset dysphagia to solids and liquids. He urgently completed a barium swallow study showing what was believed to be a coin. Endoscopic removal subsequently revealed it was a lithium battery. Consequences and management of lithium battery ingestion are discussed.

  12. A case if dysphagia lusoria | Fynn | SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 4 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. A case if dysphagia lusoria. E Fynn, NZ Makhanya, Lm Ntlhe ...

  13. Evaluation of neurogenic dysphagia in Iraqi patients with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Zeki N; Al-Shimmery, Ehsan K; Taha, Mufeed A

    2010-04-01

    To clinically assess neurogenic dysphagia, and to correlate its presence with demographic features, different stroke risk factors, anatomical arterial territorial stroke types, and pathological stroke types. Seventy-two stroke inpatients were studied between July 2007 and February 2008, at the Departments of Medicine and Neurology at Al-Yarmouk Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, and Rizgary Teaching Hospital, Erbil, Iraq. All patients were assessed using the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability score (MASA), Modified Rankin Scale, and the Stroke Risk Scorecard. All patients were reassessed after one month. There were 40 males and 32 females. Sixty-eight patients had ischemic stroke, and 4 had primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). According to the MASA score, 55% of anterior circulation stroke (ACS) cases were associated with dysphasia, and 91% of lateral medullary syndrome cases were associated with dysphagia. Fifty-six percent of ACS dysphagic cases improved within the first month. Forty percent of dysphagic patients died in the one month follow up period, and in most, death was caused by aspiration pneumonia. We observed no significant differences regarding demographic features of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be an indicator of the severity of stroke causing higher mortality and morbidity in affected patients. It was not related to the stroke risk factors and the type of stroke. It is essential from a prognostic point of view to assess swallowing, and to treat its complications early.

  14. Dysphagia in Children with Esophageal Atresia: Current Diagnostic Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayyan, Maissa; Allegaert, Karel; Omari, Taher; Rommel, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    Dysphagia or swallowing disorder is very common (range, 15-52%) in patients with esophageal atresia. Children present with a wide range of symptoms. The most common diagnostic tools to evaluate esophageal dysphagia, such as upper barium study and manometry, aim to characterize anatomy and function of the esophageal body and the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). Using these technologies, a variety of pathological motor patterns have been identified in children with esophageal atresia. However, the most challenging part of diagnosing patients with esophageal dysphagia lies in the fact that these methods fail to link functional symptoms such as dysphagia with the esophageal motor disorders observed. A recent method, called pressure-flow analysis (PFA), uses simultaneously acquired impedance and manometry measurements, and applies an integrated analysis of these recordings to derive quantitative pressure-flow metrics. These pressure-flow metrics allow detection of the interplay between bolus flow, motor patterns, and symptomatology by combining data on bolus transit and bolus flow resistance. Based on a dichotomous categorization, flow resistance at the EGJ and ineffective esophageal bolus transit can be determined. This method has the potential to guide therapeutic decisions for esophageal dysmotility in pediatric patients with esophageal atresia. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Exploring factors that influence the spread and sustainability of a dysphagia innovation: an instrumental case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilott, Irene; Gerrish, Kate; Eltringham, Sabrina A; Taylor, Carolyn; Pownall, Sue

    2016-08-18

    Swallowing difficulties challenge patient safety due to the increased risk of malnutrition, dehydration and aspiration pneumonia. A theoretically driven study was undertaken to examine the spread and sustainability of a locally developed innovation that involved using the Inter-Professional Dysphagia Framework to structure education for the workforce. A conceptual framework with 3 spread strategies (hierarchical control, participatory adaptation and facilitated evolution) was blended with a processual approach to sustaining organisational change. The aim was to understand the processes, mechanism and outcomes associated with the spread and sustainability of this safety initiative. An instrumental case study, prospectively tracked a dysphagia innovation for 34 months (April 2011 to January 2014) in a large health care organisation in England. A train-the-trainer intervention (as participatory adaptation) was deployed on care pathways for stroke and fractured neck of femur. Data were collected at the organisational and clinical level through interviews (n = 30) and document review. The coding frame combined the processual approach with the spread mechanisms. Pre-determined outcomes included the number of staff trained about dysphagia and impact related to changes in practice. The features and processes associated with hierarchical control and participatory adaptation were identified. Leadership, critical junctures, temporality and making the innovation routine were aspects of hierarchical control. Participatory adaptation was evident on the care pathways through stakeholder responses, workload and resource pressures. Six of the 25 ward based trainers cascaded the dysphagia training. The expected outcomes were achieved when the top-down mandate (hierarchical control) was supplemented by local engagement and support (participatory adaptation). Frameworks for spread and sustainability were combined to create a 'small theory' that described the interventions, the

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Swallowing Function Between Dysphagia Patients and Healthy Subjects Using High-Resolution Manometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare swallowing function between healthy subjects and patients with pharyngeal dysphagia using high resolution manometry (HRM) and to evaluate the usefulness of HRM for detecting pharyngeal dysphagia. Methods Seventy-five patients with dysphagia and 28 healthy subjects were included in this study. Diagnosis of dysphagia was confirmed by a videofluoroscopy. HRM was performed to measure pressure and timing information at the velopharynx (VP), tongue base (TB), and upper esophageal sphincter (UES). HRM parameters were compared between dysphagia and healthy groups. Optimal threshold values of significant HRM parameters for dysphagia were determined. Results VP maximal pressure, TB maximal pressure, UES relaxation duration, and UES resting pressure were lower in the dysphagia group than those in healthy group. UES minimal pressure was higher in dysphagia group than in the healthy group. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were conducted to validate optimal threshold values for significant HRM parameters to identify patients with pharyngeal dysphagia. With maximal VP pressure at a threshold value of 144.0 mmHg, dysphagia was identified with 96.4% sensitivity and 74.7% specificity. With maximal TB pressure at a threshold value of 158.0 mmHg, dysphagia was identified with 96.4% sensitivity and 77.3% specificity. At a threshold value of 2.0 mmHg for UES minimal pressure, dysphagia was diagnosed at 74.7% sensitivity and 60.7% specificity. Lastly, UES relaxation duration of dysphagia. Conclusion We present evidence that HRM could be a useful evaluation tool for detecting pharyngeal dysphagia. PMID:29201816

  17. Chemical Modification of a Dehydratase Enzyme Involved in Bacterial Virulence by an Ammonium Derivative: Evidence of its Active Site Covalent Adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bello, Concepción; Tizón, Lorena; Lence, Emilio; Otero, José M; van Raaij, Mark J; Martinez-Guitian, Marta; Beceiro, Alejandro; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R

    2015-07-29

    The first example of an ammonium derivative that causes a specific modification of the active site of type I dehydroquinase (DHQ1), a dehydratase enzyme that is a promising target for antivirulence drug discovery, is described. The resolution at 1.35 Å of the crystal structure of DHQ1 from Salmonella typhi chemically modified by this ammonium derivative revealed that the ligand is covalently attached to the essential Lys170 through the formation of an amine. The detection by mass spectroscopy of the reaction intermediates, in conjunction with the results of molecular dynamics simulations, allowed us to explain the inhibition mechanism and the experimentally observed differences between S. typhi and Staphylococcus aureus enzymes. The results presented here reveal that the replacement of Phe225 in St-DHQ1 by Tyr214 in Sa-DHQ1 and its hydrogen bonding interaction with the conserved water molecule observed in several crystal structures protects the amino adduct against further dehydration/aromatization reactions. In contrast, for the St-DHQ1 enzyme, the carboxylate group of Asp114, with the assistance of this water molecule, would trigger the formation of a Schiff base that can undergo further dehydration reactions until full aromatization of the cyclohexane ring is achieved. Moreover, in vitro antivirulence studies showed that the reported compound is able to reduce the ability of Salmonella Enteritidis to kill A459 respiratory cells. These studies have identified a good scaffold for the design of irreversible inhibitors that can be used as drugs and has opened up new opportunities for the development of novel antivirulence agents by targeting the DHQ1 enzyme.

  18. Recurrent dysphagia after Heller myotomy: is esophagectomy always the answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loviscek, Maximiliano F; Wright, Andrew S; Hinojosa, Marcelo W; Petersen, Rebecca; Pajitnov, Dmitry; Oelschlager, Brant K; Pellegrini, Carlos A

    2013-04-01

    Esophagectomy has been recommended for patients when recurrent dysphagia develops after Heller myotomy for achalasia. My colleagues and I prefer to correct the specific anatomic problem with redo myotomy and preserve the esophagus. We examined the results of this approach. We analyzed the course of 43 patients undergoing redo Heller myotomy for achalasia between 1994 and 2011 with at least 1-year of follow-up. In 2012, a phone interview and a symptoms questionnaire were completed by 24 patients. Forty-three patients underwent redo Heller myotomy. All patients had dysphagia, 80% had had multiple dilations. Manometry confirmed the diagnosis, lower esophageal sphincter pressure averaged 17 mmHg; 24-hour pH monitoring was not useful because of fermentation; patients were divided into 4 groups according to findings on upper gastrointestinal series. Three patients underwent take down of previous fundoplication only, the remainder 40 had that and a redo myotomy with 3-cm gastric extension. Two mucosal perforations were repaired with primary closure and Dor fundoplication. At a median follow-up of 63 months, 19 of 24 patients reported improvement in dysphagia, with median overall satisfaction rating of 7 (range 3 to 10); 4 patients required esophagectomy for persistent dysphagia. The majority of failures after Heller myotomy present with dysphagia associated with esophageal narrowing. Upper gastrointestinal series is most useful to plan therapy and predicts outcomes. With few exceptions, patients improve substantially with redo myotomy, which can be accomplished laparoscopically with relatively low risk. These findings challenge the previously held concept that all myotomy failures need to be treated by an esophagectomy. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Omission of Dysphagia Therapies in Hospital Discharge Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Amy; Anderson, Paul; Hind, Jacqueline; Robbins, JoAnne; Smith, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the wide implementation of dysphagia therapies, it is unclear whether these therapies are successfully communicated beyond the inpatient setting. Objective To examine the rate of dysphagia recommendation omissions in hospital discharge summaries for high-risk sub-acute care (i.e., skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation, long-term care) populations. Design Retrospective cohort study Subjects All stroke and hip fracture patients billed for inpatient dysphagia evaluations by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and discharged to sub-acute care in 2003-2005 from a single large academic medical center (N=187). Measurements Dysphagia recommendations from final SLP hospital notes and from hospital (physician) discharge summaries were abstracted, coded, and compared for each patient. Recommendation categories included: dietary (food and liquid), postural/compensatory techniques (e.g., chin-tuck), rehabilitation (e.g., exercise), meal pacing (e.g., small bites), medication delivery (e.g., crush pills), and provider/supervision (e.g., 1-to-1 assist). Results 45% of discharge summaries omitted all SLP dysphagia recommendations. 47%(88/186) of patients with SLP dietary recommendations, 82%(93/114) with postural, 100%(16/16) with rehabilitation, 90%(69/77) with meal pacing, 95%(21/22) with medication, and 79%(96/122) with provider/supervision recommendations had these recommendations completely omitted from their discharge summaries. Conclusions Discharge summaries omitted all categories of SLP recommendations at notably high rates. Improved post-hospital communication strategies are needed for discharges to sub-acute care. PMID:20098999

  20. Endoscopic findings and treatment outcome in cases presenting with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Muhammad; Salamat, Amjad; Saeed, Farrukh; Zafar, Hafiz; Hassan, Fayyaz; Farooq, Asif

    2011-01-01

    Dysphagia results from impeded transport of liquids, solids, or both from the pharynx to the stomach. Among the malignant lesions, carcinoma of oesophagus is the commonest cause. Our objective was to find out the frequency of different endoscopic lesions and outcome of the endoscopic therapeutic interventions in patients presenting with dysphagia. This descriptive study was conducted at Department of Gastroenterology, Military Hospital Rawalpindi from June 2008 to May 2009. Patients of dysphagia after their consent were interviewed about the symptoms. Relevant biochemical investigations were done. Barium swallow and upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Endoscopy were carried out. Benign strictures were dilated with Savary Gilliard Dilators. Malignant strictures were further evaluated to decide treatment plan. In patients considered to have oesophageal dysmotility, pressure manometery was done before specific therapy. Seventy nine patients were enrolled. Twenty-five had malignant strictures, out of those commonest was adenocarcinoma 14 (56%). Twenty-nine had benign strictures the commonest being Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) related peptic stricture 9 (31%). Fifteen had oesophageal dysmotility, and achalasia was present in 10 out of them. After evaluation 12 out of 25 patients with malignant strictures were considered fit for surgery. Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) were passed in 5. All benign strictures were dilated with Savary-Gillard dilators. Pneumatic balloon dilation was done in patients of achalasia. The commonest malignant lesion resulting in dysphagia was adenocarcinoma while in benign it was GERD related peptic stricture. Achalasia was most frequent in oesophageal motility disorders. Standard of treatment for early oesophageal malignancy is surgical resection. SEMS is a reliable way to allay dysphagia in inoperable cases. Savary Gillard dilatation in benign, and pneumatic balloon achalasia dilatations are effective ways of treatment.

  1. A case of dysphagia induced by irradiation to the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Akira; Moriyama, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    This report deals with a case of dysphagia induced by the irradiation of a malignant lymphoma of the neck. The patient was a 55-year-old male with dysphagia who had undergone irradiation to the neck for a malignant lymphoma ten years previously. The dysphagia that had gradually worsened in ten years made him enable to eat and drink orally. He often contracted by pneumonia. On first examination, atrophic changes were observed in the soft palates, and the epiglottis, and the improvement of the tongue was bilaterally impaired. These findings were diagnosed as the causes of the dysphagia. A barium study showed that the movement of the tongue and the pharynx were impaired. The barium was aspirated. A plain X-ray film of the mandible showed ostitis. The impairment of the tongue movement was due to bilateral hypopharyngeal nerve palsies induced by the irradiation. Laryngeal suspension and cricopharyngeal myotomy were not suitable because they could have aggravated the radiation necrosis of the thyroid cartilage which will be expected in the future. A total laryngectomy, which sacrifies the phonation, was out of the question, because the patient's dysarthria was not so hard to understand. He was instructed in the self-insertion of a feeding tube to get enough nutrition, the physical therapy of the lung with the aid of his wife to prevent aspiration pneumonia. The loss of phonation lowers the QOL of such patients. In the cases with dysphagia which do not recover with surgical treatments, rehabilitation should mainly stress the conservation of phonation and the prevention of pneumonia to maintain the higher QOL of patients. (author)

  2. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in neurodegeneration (CADN): development, validity and reliability of a bedside tool for dysphagia assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P; Rommel, Natalie; Sauer, Carina; Horger, Marius; Krumm, Patrick; Himmelbach, Marc; Synofzik, Matthis

    2017-06-01

    Screening assessments for dysphagia are essential in neurodegenerative disease. Yet there are no purpose-built tools to quantify swallowing deficits at bedside or in clinical trials. A quantifiable, brief, easy to administer assessment that measures the impact of dysphagia and predicts the presence or absence of aspiration is needed. The Clinical Assessment of Dysphagia in Neurodegeneration (CADN) was designed by a multidisciplinary team (neurology, neuropsychology, speech pathology) validated against strict methodological criteria in two neurodegenerative diseases, Parkinson's disease (PD) and degenerative ataxia (DA). CADN comprises two parts, an anamnesis (part one) and consumption (part two). Two-thirds of patients were assessed using reference tests, the SWAL-QOL symptoms subscale (part one) and videofluoroscopic assessment of swallowing (part two). CADN has 11 items and can be administered and scored in an average of 7 min. Test-retest reliability was established using correlation and Bland-Altman plots. 125 patients with a neurodegenerative disease were recruited; 60 PD and 65 DA. Validity was established using ROC graphs and correlations. CADN has sensitivity of 79 and 84% and specificity 71 and 69% for parts one and two, respectively. Significant correlations with disease severity were also observed (p dysphagia symptomatology and risk of aspiration. The CADN is a reliable, valid, brief, quantifiable, and easily deployed assessment of swallowing in neurodegenerative disease. It is thus ideally suited for both clinical bedside assessment and future multicentre clinical trials in neurodegenerative disease.

  3. A predictive model for dysphagia following IMRT for head and neck cancer: Introduction of the EMLasso technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, De Ruyck; Duprez, Fréderic; Werbrouck, Joke; Sabbe, Nick; Sofie, De Langhe; Boterberg, Tom; Madani, Indira; Thas, Olivier; Wilfried, De Neve; Thierens, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Design a model for prediction of acute dysphagia following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Illustrate the use of the EMLasso technique for model selection. Material and methods: Radiation-induced dysphagia was scored using CTCAE v.3.0 in 189 head and neck cancer patients. Clinical data (gender, age, nicotine and alcohol use, diabetes, tumor location), treatment parameters (chemotherapy, surgery involving the primary tumor, lymph node dissection, overall treatment time), dosimetric parameters (doses delivered to pharyngeal constrictor (PC) muscles and esophagus) and 19 genetic polymorphisms were used in model building. The predicting model was achieved by EMLasso, i.e. an EM algorithm to account for missing values, applied to penalized logistic regression, which allows for variable selection by tuning the penalization parameter through crossvalidation on AUC, thus avoiding overfitting. Results: Fifty-three patients (28%) developed acute ⩾ grade 3 dysphagia. The final model has an AUC of 0.71 and contains concurrent chemotherapy, D 2 to the superior PC and the rs3213245 (XRCC1) polymorphism. The model’s false negative rate and false positive rate in the optimal operation point on the ROC curve are 21% and 49%, respectively. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the utility of the EMLasso technique for model selection in predictive radiogenetics

  4. Acclimation of Emiliania huxleyi (1516) to nutrient limitation involves precise modification of the proteome to scavenge alternative sources of N and P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKew, Boyd A; Metodieva, Gergana; Raines, Christine A; Metodiev, Metodi V; Geider, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Limitation of marine primary production by the availability of nitrogen or phosphorus is common. Emiliania huxleyi, a ubiquitous phytoplankter that plays key roles in primary production, calcium carbonate precipitation and production of dimethyl sulfide, often blooms in mid-latitude at the beginning of summer when inorganic nutrient concentrations are low. To understand physiological mechanisms that allow such blooms, we examined how the proteome of E. huxleyi (strain 1516) responds to N and P limitation. We observed modest changes in much of the proteome despite large physiological changes (e.g. cellular biomass, C, N and P) associated with nutrient limitation of growth rate. Acclimation to nutrient limitation did however involve significant increases in the abundance of transporters for ammonium and nitrate under N limitation and for phosphate under P limitation. More notable were large increases in proteins involved in the acquisition of organic forms of N and P, including urea and amino acid/polyamine transporters and numerous C-N hydrolases under N limitation and a large upregulation of alkaline phosphatase under P limitation. This highly targeted reorganization of the proteome towards scavenging organic forms of macronutrients gives unique insight into the molecular mechanisms that underpin how E. huxleyi has found its niche to bloom in surface waters depleted of inorganic nutrients. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. DYSPHAGIA AND SIALORRHEA: the relationship to Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Hack NICARETTA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Dysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease. Objective The aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Method Two Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by the scintigraphic method, Results Videofluoroscopic examination of the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing showed that 94% of Parkinson's diseases patients present, structural causes, not related to Parkinson's diseases, able to produce or intensify the observed disphagia. The scintigraphic examination of Parkinson's diseases patients with sialorrhea showed that there is no increase of serous saliva production. Nevertheless, showed a significantly higher velocity of saliva excretion in the Parkinson's diseases patients. Conclusions Dysphagia can be due to the muscular rigidity often present in the Parkinson's diseases patient, or more usually by non Parkinson's disease associated causes. In Parkinson's diseases patients, sialorrhea is produced by saliva retention. Nevertheless, sialorrhea can produce discomfort in swallowing, although without a formal complaint of dysphagia. In this case, subclinical dysphagia must be considered. Sialorrhea is indicative of dysphagia or at least of subclinical dysphagia. As final conclusion, Parkinson's diseases can be an isolated cause of dysphagia and/or sialorrhea, but frequently, a factor unrelated to Parkinson's diseases is the main cause of or at least aggravates the dysphagia. Contexto Disfagia e sialorreia em pacientes com doença de Parkinson são automaticamente entendidos como decorrentes do comprometimento neurológico produzido pela doença de Parkinson. Objetivo Estabelecer se estas duas queixas s

  6. Spontaneous swallowing frequency has potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael F

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases, swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute [SPM]) were compared with stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with versus without clinically significant dysphagia. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM, which was compared with a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was used to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis yielded a threshold of SPM≤0.40 that identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5- to 10-minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel.

  7. Spontaneous Swallowing Frequency [Has Potential to] Identify Dysphagia in Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. Methods In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute: SPM) were compared to stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with vs. without clinically significant dysphagia. ROC analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM which was compared to a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was employed to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. Results SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. ROC analysis yielded a threshold of SPM ≤ 0.40 which identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5 to 10 minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Conclusions Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel. PMID:24149008

  8. Dysphagia in Acute Stroke: Incidence, Burden and Impact on Clinical Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeg-Morvay, Anne; Meisterernst, Julia; Schlager, Markus; Mono, Marie-Luise; El-Koussy, Marwan; Kägi, Georg; Jung, Simon; Sarikaya, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Reported frequency of post-stroke dysphagia in the literature is highly variable. In view of progress in stroke management, we aimed to assess the current burden of dysphagia in acute ischemic stroke. Methods We studied 570 consecutive patients treated in a tertiary stroke center. Dysphagia was evaluated by using the Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). We investigated the relationship of dysphagia with pneumonia, length of hospital stay and discharge destination and compared rates of favourable clinical outcome and mortality at 3 months between dysphagic patients and those without dysphagia. Results Dysphagia was diagnosed in 118 of 570 (20.7%) patients and persisted in 60 (50.9%) at hospital discharge. Thirty-six (30.5%) patients needed nasogastric tube because of severe dysphagia. Stroke severity rather than infarct location was associated with dysphagia. Dysphagic patients suffered more frequently from pneumonia (23.1% vs. 1.1%, pdysphagia. At 3 months, dysphagic patients less often had a favourable outcome (35.7% vs. 69.7%; pdysphagia to be an independent predictor of discharge destination and institutionalization at 3 months, while severe dysphagia requiring tube placement was strongly associated with mortality. Conclusion Dysphagia still affects a substantial portion of stroke patients and may have a large impact on clinical outcome, mortality and institutionalization. PMID:26863627

  9. Prevalence and clinical correlation of dysphagia in Parkinson disease: a study on Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, X; Gao, J; Xie, C; Xiong, B; Wu, S; Cen, Z; Lou, Y; Lou, D; Xie, F; Luo, W

    2018-01-01

    Dysphagia is relatively common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and can have a negative impact on their quality of life; therefore, it is imperative that its prevalence in PD patients is studied. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and clinical correlation of dysphagia in Chinese PD patients. We recruited 116 Chinese PD patients. A videofluoroscopic study of swallowing (VFSS) was used to identify dysphagia. Assessments, including water drinking test, relative motor symptoms, non-motor symptoms (NMS) and quality of life, were performed to analyze the risks of dysphagia. The prevalence of dysphagia was 87.1%. The comparison of demographic and clinical features between patients with and without dysphagia included sex, education level, disease course, Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), Question 6, 7 of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS Part II), Hoehn-Yahr stage (H&Y), water drinking test, 39-item Parkinson Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and Non-Motor Symptoms Quest (NMSQ). We found significant correlations between dysphagia and age. Using age, disease course, and H&Y stage as the independent variable in our regression analysis for assessing the risk factors of dysphagia in PD patients, age and H&Y stage displayed a strong correlation as the risk factors. The risk of dysphagia in elderly PD patients is 1.078 times greater than that of younger PD patients. Also, the risk of dysphagia in PD patients of a greater H&Y staging is 3.260 times greater than that of lower staging PD patients. Our results suggest that dysphagia is common in Chinese PD patients. Older patients or those in higher H&Y stages are more likely to experience dysphagia. There is no correlation between dysphagia and PD duration.

  10. Upfront Chemotherapy and Involved-Field Radiotherapy Results in More Relapses Than Extended Radiotherapy for Intracranial Germinomas: Modification in Radiotherapy Volume Might Be Needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Keun-Yong; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Jin Ho.; Kim, Kyubo; Kim, Seung Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Cho, Byung-Gyu; Jung, Hee-Won; Heo, Dae Seog; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the outcome of upfront chemotherapy plus radiotherapy (CRT) and the outcome of the use of extended radiotherapy (RT) only for intracranial germinoma. Methods and Materials: Of 81 patients with tissue-confirmed intracranial germinoma, 42 underwent CRT and 39 underwent RT only. For CRT, one to five cycles of upfront chemotherapy was followed by involved-field or extended-field RT, for which the dose was dependent on the M stage. For RT only, all 39 patients underwent craniospinal RT alone. The median follow-up was 68 months. Results: The 5- and 10-year overall survival rate was 100% and 92.5% for RT alone and 92.9% and 92.9% for CRT, respectively. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 100.0% for RT and 88.1% for CRT (p = 0.0279). No recurrences developed in patients given RT, but four relapses developed in patients who had received CRT-three in the brain and one in the spine. Only one patient achieved complete remission from salvage treatment. The proportion of patients requiring hormonal replacement was greater for patients who received RT than for those who had received CRT (p = 0.0106). Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that the better quality of life provided by CRT was compensated for by the greater rate of relapse. The possible benefit of including the ventricles in involved-field RT after upfront chemotherapy, specifically for patients with initial negative seeding, should be addressed in a prospective study

  11. The physiology of deglutition and the pathophysiology and complications of oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M

    2012-01-01

    The opening session of the 2nd International Conference on Oropharyngeal Dysphagia featured a series of invited talks reviewing the definition of dysphagia, its prevalence and its pathophysiology. The discussion arising from these talks focused heavily on the current underrecognition of dysphagia as a significant concern for older adults, particularly those over 75. The burdens associated with dysphagia in this sector of the population were recognized to be substantial, both in social/psychological terms and in terms of economic consequences for the healthcare system. The importance of developing swallow screening protocols as a routine method for the early identification of dysphagia and aspiration was explored. The idea of launching political initiatives aimed at increasing awareness and the utilization of appropriate dysphagia healthcare codes was also discussed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalf, J G; de Swart, B J M; Bloem, B R; Munneke, M

    2012-05-01

    Dysphagia is a potentially harmful feature, also in Parkinson's disease (PD). As published prevalence rates vary widely, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD in a meta-analysis. We conducted a systematic literature search in February 2011 and two independent reviewers selected the papers. We computed the estimates of the pooled prevalence weighted by sample size. Twelve studies were suitable for calculating prevalence rates. Ten studies provided an estimate based on subjective outcomes, which proved statistically heterogeneous (p dysphagia occurs in one third of community-dwelling PD patients. Objectively measured dysphagia rates were much higher, with 4 out of 5 patients being affected. This suggests that dysphagia is common in PD, but patients do not always report swallowing difficulties unless asked. This underreporting calls for a proactive clinical approach to dysphagia, particularly in light of the serious clinical consequences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dysphagia, hoarseness, and unilateral true vocal fold motion impairment following anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Eli M; Soliman, Ahmed M S; Gaughan, John P; Simpson, Lisa; Young, William F

    2003-11-01

    The charts of 100 patients who underwent anterior cervical diskectomy with fusion performed at our institution between January 1996 and February 1999 were reviewed. The incidences of hoarseness, dysphagia, and unilateral true vocal fold motion impairment were calculated. Univariate logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship of several patient and technical factors to the rates of occurrence of hoarseness and dysphagia. Patient age was found to be a significant predictor of postoperative dysphagia (p dysphagia, hoarseness, and unilateral true vocal fold motion impairment in the literature were calculated as 12.3%, 4.9%, and 1.4%, respectively. We conclude that dysphagia, hoarseness, and unilateral vocal fold motion impairment continue to remain significant complications of anterior cervical diskectomy with fusion. Older patients may be at higher risk for dysphagia.

  14. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with moderately severe dysphagia due to esophageal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Tu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA is a chronic, autoimmune condition involving the skin and mucous membranes. Symptomatic mucosal involvement is rare, but can impact on quality of life, due to esophageal strictures and dysphagia. We report a case involving a 60-year-old male presenting with bullous skin lesions on areas of friction on his hands, feet and mouth. Milia were visible on some healed areas. Biopsy showed a subepidermal vesicle. Direct immunofluorescence showed intense linear junctional IgG and C3 at the dermo-epidermal junction. Serological tests also supported the diagnosis of EBA. Screening tests for underlying malignancies were negative. Despite treatment with systemic steroids, the patient developed increasing dysphagia, requiring further investigation with esophagoscopy and a barium swallow. Confirmation of extensive esophageal stricturing prompted adjustment of medications including an increase in systemic steroids and addition of azathioprine. Currently, the patient′s disease remains under control, with improvement in all his symptoms and return of anti-basement membrane antibody levels to normal, whilst he remains on azathioprine 150 mg daily and prednisolone 5 mg daily. This case highlights the fact that the treatment of a given patient with EBA depends on severity of disease and co-morbid symptoms. Newer immunoglobulin and biological therapies have shown promise in treatment resistant disease. Considering that long-term immunosuppressants or biologicals will be required, potential side effects of the drugs should be considered. If further deterioration occurs in this patient, cyclosporin A or intravenous immunoglobulin (IV Ig will be considered. Vigilance for associated co-morbidities, especially malignancies, should always be maintained.

  15. Chest pain following oesophageal stenting for malignant dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golder, Mark; Tekkis, Paris P.; Kennedy, Colette; Lath, Sadaf; Toye, Rosemary; Steger, Adrian C.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The palliative use of self-expanding metallic stents has been widely reported to relieve dysphagia in cases of oesophageal carcinoma. Little has been documented on the severity of chest pain following oesophageal stenting. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of pain with oesophageal stenting for malignant dysphagia. METHODS: Fifty-two patients with inoperable oesophageal carcinoma underwent stent placement between 1995-1999. Daily opioid analgesic requirements (mg of morphine equivalent doses) were monitored for 3 days before and 7 days after stenting. The degree of palliation was expressed as a dysphagia score (0-3). Hospital stay, readmission days, stent complications and patient survival time were also recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients (50%) required opioid analgesia for chest pain (median dose: 80 mg morphine/day) within 48 h of the procedure compared to 11 (21.2%) patients before stenting (P = 0.0041). A significant increase was evident in the analgesic consumption following stent deployment (P < 0.001). The dysphagia score improved by a median value of 1 (CI 0.25)P < 0.001, with a re-intervention rate of 11.5%. The median survival time was 40 days post stenting (range 1-120). CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of patients developed chest pain after oesophageal stenting, requiring high dose opioid analgesia. As the origin of the pain is still unknown, pre-emptive analgesia may a play role in reducing stent-related morbidity and possibly in-hospital stay. Golder, M. et al. (2001)

  16. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-12-21

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE.

  17. Chest pain following oesophageal stenting for malignant dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golder, Mark; Tekkis, Paris P.; Kennedy, Colette; Lath, Sadaf; Toye, Rosemary; Steger, Adrian C

    2001-03-01

    AIM: The palliative use of self-expanding metallic stents has been widely reported to relieve dysphagia in cases of oesophageal carcinoma. Little has been documented on the severity of chest pain following oesophageal stenting. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of pain with oesophageal stenting for malignant dysphagia. METHODS: Fifty-two patients with inoperable oesophageal carcinoma underwent stent placement between 1995-1999. Daily opioid analgesic requirements (mg of morphine equivalent doses) were monitored for 3 days before and 7 days after stenting. The degree of palliation was expressed as a dysphagia score (0-3). Hospital stay, readmission days, stent complications and patient survival time were also recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients (50%) required opioid analgesia for chest pain (median dose: 80 mg morphine/day) within 48 h of the procedure compared to 11 (21.2%) patients before stenting (P = 0.0041). A significant increase was evident in the analgesic consumption following stent deployment (P < 0.001). The dysphagia score improved by a median value of 1 (CI 0.25)P < 0.001, with a re-intervention rate of 11.5%. The median survival time was 40 days post stenting (range 1-120). CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of patients developed chest pain after oesophageal stenting, requiring high dose opioid analgesia. As the origin of the pain is still unknown, pre-emptive analgesia may a play role in reducing stent-related morbidity and possibly in-hospital stay. Golder, M. et al. (2001)

  18. [Importance of the detection of dysphagia in geriatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora Mur, A; Palacín Ariño, C; Guardia Contreras, A I; Zamora Catevilla, A; Clemente Roldán, E; Santaliestra Grau, J

    2018-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is one of the lesser known geriatric syndromes, despite its enormous impact on functional capacity, quality of life, and health of those affected. A descriptive and prospective study was conducted by the Geriatric Department of Barbastro Hospital (Huesca), from March 2012 to October 2014, as biannual and annual reviews in October 2015. This study included all patients on whom a volume-viscosity clinical examination (MECV-V test) was performed to suspecting dysphagia. The study included 266 patients with a mean age of 82.35±12.3 years, and with a mean Barthel index score of 20.5±25.4, and mean Charlson index of 1.77±1.6. The test was performed in 105 cases after stroke (40%), 53 in dementia (20%), 24 in Parkinsonism (9%), and for other different reasons in 80 (31%). Dysphagia was diagnosed in 228 (86%) cases. Enteral nutrition was given in 25 (10.9%) cases. The test results were shown in the discharge report in 45% of the tests with positive result. The mean survival obtained after test in the patients who died was 230.8±256.5 days. Differences in survival at 12 months were found in patients with positive test, without finding a clear relationship with functional status and comorbidity. Dysphagia has a significant mortality, and the use of thickeners after its detection should be properly reported. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Infected bronchogenic cyst causing dysphagia and retrosternal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva Bjerre; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Kleive, Dyre Berg

    2013-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts are congenital. They are typically discovered in infancy or early childhood. Secondary infection of the cyst is uncommon. We present the case of a 17-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with intermediate onset of upper abdominal, and retrosternal chest pai......, Pedersen JH and Kleive D. Infected bronchogenic cyst causing dysphagia and retrosternal pain. Clin Respir J 2012; DOI:10.1111/j.1752-699X.2012.00296.x....

  20. Distribution of Esophageal Motor Disorders in Diabetic Patients With Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Nina S; Rangan, Vikram; Geng, Zhuo; Khan, Freeha; Kichler, Adam; Gabbard, Scott; Ganocy, Stephen; Fass, Ronnie

    Diabetes mellitus can cause various gastrointestinal symptoms. Assessment of esophageal dysmotility in diabetic patients has been scarcely studied. The aim of this study was to determine the esophageal motor characteristics of diabetic versus nondiabetic patients who present with dysphagia. High-resolution esophageal manometries (HREMs) of 83 diabetic patients and 83 age and gender-matched nondiabetic patients with dysphagia from 2 medical centers were included in this study. Demographic information, medical comorbidities, and medication usage were recorded for each patient in a single registry. HREM of each patient was evaluated and the different functional parameters were recorded. Overall, 46% of diabetic patients were found to have an esophageal motor disorder. Diabetic patients with dysphagia were more likely to have failed swallows on HREM (50.6% vs. 33.7%; P=0.03) as compared with nondiabetic patients. Among diabetic patients, those being treated with insulin were more likely to have failed (69.0% vs. 40.7%; P=0.01) and weak (65.5% vs. 33.3%; P=0.005) swallows as compared with diabetic patients not on insulin. Among diabetic patients, those with abnormal manometry were more likely to demonstrate diabetic retinopathy (27.0% vs. 8.7%; P=0.04). There was a trend toward increased incidence of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction in diabetic patients (10.8% vs. 2.4%; P=0.057) as compared with nondiabetic patients. Nearly half of diabetic patients with dysphagia have some type of an esophageal motility disorder. Diabetic retinopathy and the use of insulin are predictive of esophageal motor abnormalities among diabetic patients.

  1. Dysphagia as result of oesophageal dysfunction in dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolte, I.

    1987-01-01

    Disturbances of the oesophageal function in dogs and cats lead to the clinical symptoms of dysphagia. An oesophageal dilatation of various degree can result from this and can be categorized as primary, i.e. idiopathic form, or secondary form, if its cause is known. This present study of our own patient population gives a survey of the symptomatology, diagnostic measures, incidence, pathogenesis, and therapy of oesophageal dilatation

  2. Randomized trial of transcranial direct current stimulation for poststroke dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntrup-Krueger, Sonja; Ringmaier, Corinna; Muhle, Paul; Wollbrink, Andreas; Kemmling, Andre; Hanning, Uta; Claus, Inga; Warnecke, Tobias; Teismann, Inga; Pantev, Christo; Dziewas, Rainer

    2018-02-01

    We evaluated whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is able to enhance dysphagia rehabilitation following stroke. Besides relating clinical effects with neuroplastic changes in cortical swallowing processing, we aimed to identify factors influencing treatment success. In this double-blind, randomized study, 60 acute dysphagic stroke patients received contralesional anodal (1mA, 20 minutes) or sham tDCS on 4 consecutive days. Swallowing function was thoroughly assessed before and after the intervention using the validated Fiberoptic Endoscopic Dysphagia Severity Scale (FEDSS) and clinical assessment. In 10 patients, swallowing-related brain activation was recorded applying magnetoencephalography before and after the intervention. Voxel-based statistical lesion pattern analysis was also performed. Study groups did not differ according to demographic data, stroke characteristics, or baseline dysphagia severity. Patients treated with tDCS showed greater improvement in FEDSS than the sham group (1.3 vs 0.4 points, mean difference = 0.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.4-1.4, p < 0.0005). Functional recovery was accompanied by a significant increase of activation (p < 0.05) in the contralesional swallowing network after real but not sham tDCS. Regarding predictors of treatment success, for every hour earlier that treatment was initiated, there was greater improvement on the FEDSS (adjusted odds ratio = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.98-1.00, p < 0.05) in multivariate analysis. Stroke location in the right insula and operculum was indicative of worse response to tDCS (p < 0.05). Application of tDCS over the contralesional swallowing motor cortex supports swallowing network reorganization, thereby leading to faster rehabilitation of acute poststroke dysphagia. Early treatment initiation seems beneficial. tDCS may be less effective in right-hemispheric insulo-opercular stroke. Ann Neurol 2018;83:328-340. © 2018 American Neurological

  3. Dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy: Evaluation of risk factors and assessment of endoscopic intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Nath, Anand; Yewale, Sayali; Tran, Tung; Brebbia, John S; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the risks of medical conditions, evaluate gastric sleeve narrowing, and assess hydrostatic balloon dilatation to treat dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG). METHODS VSG is being performed more frequently worldwide as a treatment for medically-complicated obesity, and dysphagia is common post-operatively. We hypothesize that post-operative dysphagia is related to underlying medical conditions or narrowing of the gastric sleeve. This is a retrospective, single insti...

  4. Implementation of a standardized out-of-hospital management method for Parkinson dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Hongying; Sun, Dongxiu; Liu, Meiping

    2017-01-01

    Summary Objective: Our objective is to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of establishing a swallowing management clinic to implement out-of-hospital management for Parkinson disease (PD) patients with dysphagia. Method: Two-hundred seventeen (217) voluntary PD patients with dysphagia in a PD outpatient clinic were divided into a control group with 100 people, and an experimental group with 117 people. The control group was given dysphagia rehabilitation guidance. The experimental gr...

  5. Prevalence and risk factors for dysphagia: a U.S. community study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, So Yang; Choung, Rok Seon; Saito, Yuri A.; Schleck, Cathy D; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Locke, G. Richard; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysphagia is considered an alarm symptom but detailed population-based data on dysphagia are lacking. We aimed to estimate in a representative US Caucasian population the prevalence of dysphagia and potential risk factors. Methods A modified version of the previously validated Bowel Disease Questionnaire was mailed to a population based cohort (n=7640) of Olmsted County, MN. Dysphagia was measured by one validated question “In the last year, how often have you had difficulty swallowing (a feeling that food sticks in your throat or chest)?” The medical records were reviewed for organic causes of dysphagia. The associations of reported frequency of dysphagia with potential risk factors were assessed using logistic regression models. Results The sex-specific, age-adjusted (US White 2000) prevalence for dysphagia experienced at least weekly was 3.0 % (95% CI: 2.2, 3.7) in females and 3.0 % (95% CI: 2.0, 4.0) in males. Those with frequent heartburn [OR=5.9 (4.0, 8.6)] and acid regurgitation [OR=10.6 (6.8, 16.6)] were significantly more likely to report frequent dysphagia. PPI use was significantly associated with frequent (3.1, 95% CI 2.2, 4.4) and infrequent dysphagia (1.5, 955 CI 1.3, 1.8). GERD was the most common diagnosis in those reporting dysphagia on the medical record; other organic explanations were rare and only found in the frequent dysphagia group. Conclusions Frequent dysphagia is not rare in the community (3%), occurs in both women and men across all adult age groups, and is most likely to indicate underlying GERD. PMID:25376877

  6. Pretreatment Dysphagia in Esophageal Cancer Patients May Eliminate the Need for Staging by Endoscopic Ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, R Taylor; Sarkaria, Inderpal S; Grosser, Rachel; Sima, Camelia S; Bains, Manjit S; Jones, David R; Adusumilli, Prasad S; Huang, James; Finley, David J; Rusch, Valerie W; Rizk, Nabil P

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy is commonly administered to patients with localized disease who have T3-4 esophageal disease as staged by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Previously, we noted that patients who present with dysphagia have a higher EUS T stage. We hypothesized that the presence of dysphagia is predictive of EUS T3-4 disease and that staging EUS could be forgone for esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia. We performed a prospective, intent-to-treat, single-cohort study in which patients with potentially resectable esophageal cancer completed a standardized four-tier dysphagia score survey. EUS was performed as part of our standard evaluation. To determine whether the presence of dysphagia predicted EUS T3-4 disease, the dysphagia score was compared with EUS T stage. The study enrolled 114 consecutive patients between August 2012 and February 2014: 77% (88 of 114) received neoadjuvant therapy, 18% (20 of 114) did not, and 5% (6 of 114) pursued treatment elsewhere. In total, 70% (80 of 114) underwent esophagectomy; of these, 54% (61 of 114) had dysphagia and 46% (53 of 114) did not. Dysphagia scores were 66% (40 of 61) grade 1, 25% (15 of 61) grade 2, and 10% (6 of 61) grade 3 to 4. Among patients with dysphagia, 89% (54 of 61) had T3-4 disease by EUS; among those without dysphagia, only 53% (28 of 53) had T3-4 disease by EUS (p < 0.001). The presence of dysphagia in patients with esophageal cancer was highly predictive of T3-4 disease by EUS. On the basis of this finding, approximately 50% of patients currently undergoing staging EUS at our institution could potentially forgo EUS before neoadjuvant therapy. Patients without dysphagia, however, should still undergo EUS. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Does concomitant anterior fundoplication promote dysphagia after laparoscopic Heller myotomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, Donovan; Morton, Connor; Kraemer, Emily; Villadolid, Desiree; Ross, Sharona B; Cowgill, Sarah M; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2008-07-01

    Concerns for gastroesophageal reflux after laparoscopic Heller myotomy for achalasia justify considerations of concomitant anterior fundoplication. This study was undertaken to determine if concomitant anterior fundoplication reduces symptoms of reflux after myotomy without promoting dysphagia. From 1992 to 2004, 182 patients underwent laparoscopic Heller myotomy without fundoplication. After a prospective randomized trial justified its concomitant application, anterior fundoplication was undertaken with laparoscopic Heller myotomy in 171 patients from 2004 to 2007. All patients have been prospectively followed. Pre and postoperatively, patients scored the frequency and severity of symptoms of achalasia (including dysphagia, choking, vomiting, regurgitation, chest pain, and heartburn) using a Likert Scale (0 = never/not bothersome to 10 = always/very bothersome). Before myotomy, symptoms of achalasia were frequent and severe for all patients. After myotomy, the frequency and severity of all symptoms of achalasia significantly decreased for all patients (P Heller myotomy alone, concomitant anterior fundoplication led to significantly less frequent and severe heartburn after myotomy (P Heller myotomy reduces the frequency and severity of symptoms of achalasia. Concomitant anterior fundoplication decreases the frequency and severity of heartburn and dysphagia after laparoscopic Heller myotomy. Concomitant anterior fundoplication promotes salutary relief in the frequency and severity of symptoms after myotomy and is warranted.

  8. Solid bolus swallowing in the radiologic evaluation of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westen, D. van; Ekberg, O.

    1993-01-01

    Patients with dysphagia, heartburn and chest pain are regularly referred for radiologic evaluation of swallowing. The liquid barium swallow has been of great value for the biphasic evaluation of the pharynx and esophagus. Though many patients complain of dysphagia specifically for solids, solid bolus swallow is ususally not part of the evaluation. For the present study we therefore included the use of a solid bolus with a diameter of 13 mm and interviewed the patients carefully for any symptoms during this tablet swallow. Of 200 patients examined, the tablet passed through the esophagus without delay in 102. In the 98 patients with delayed passage, the solid bolus arrest occurred in the pharynx in 5 and in the esophagus in 93. Arrest in the esophagus was due to esophageal dysmotility in 48 patients. Twenty of these were symptomatic during the tablet swallow. A narrowing was the cause in 45, of whom 9 had symptoms. In 18 patients (9%) the solid bolus added key information to the radiologic evaluation. We therefore recommend that the solid bolus is included in the routine radiologic work-up of patients with dysphagia. Careful attention to symptoms during the tablet swallow is important. (orig.)

  9. Solid bolus swallowing in the radiologic evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westen, D. van (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Malmoe General Hospital, Univ. Lund (Sweden)); Ekberg, O. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Malmoe General Hospital, Univ. Lund (Sweden))

    1993-07-01

    Patients with dysphagia, heartburn and chest pain are regularly referred for radiologic evaluation of swallowing. The liquid barium swallow has been of great value for the biphasic evaluation of the pharynx and esophagus. Though many patients complain of dysphagia specifically for solids, solid bolus swallow is ususally not part of the evaluation. For the present study we therefore included the use of a solid bolus with a diameter of 13 mm and interviewed the patients carefully for any symptoms during this tablet swallow. Of 200 patients examined, the tablet passed through the esophagus without delay in 102. In the 98 patients with delayed passage, the solid bolus arrest occurred in the pharynx in 5 and in the esophagus in 93. Arrest in the esophagus was due to esophageal dysmotility in 48 patients. Twenty of these were symptomatic during the tablet swallow. A narrowing was the cause in 45, of whom 9 had symptoms. In 18 patients (9%) the solid bolus added key information to the radiologic evaluation. We therefore recommend that the solid bolus is included in the routine radiologic work-up of patients with dysphagia. Careful attention to symptoms during the tablet swallow is important. (orig.).

  10. Diagnosis of dysphagia in the practice of a family doctor (clinical cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. A. Rosytska

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is an important risk factor for such a serious life-threatening or health-patient complication as aspiration (aspiration pneumonia, dehydration, malnutrition. Prevention of dysphagia in the damage to the nervous system is not possible. However, with the proper evaluation and treatment of disorders that result from dysphagia, it is possible to prevent complications, to take into account this symptom when feeding the patient, carrying out rehabilitation measures and medical treatment. The article presents diagnostic algorithms for the actions of the ge­neral practitioner-family doctor in the detection of dysphagia and clinical cases of this syndrome of different etiology.

  11. Ultrasonography to Measure Swallowing Muscle Mass and Quality in Older Patients With Sarcopenic Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Nami; Mori, Takashi; Fujishima, Ichiro; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Itoda, Masataka; Kunieda, Kenjiro; Shigematsu, Takashi; Nishioka, Shinta; Tohara, Haruka; Yamada, Minoru; Ogawa, Sumito

    2018-06-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is characterized by difficulty swallowing due to a loss of whole-body skeletal and swallowing muscle mass and function. However, no study has reported on swallowing muscle mass and quality in patients with sarcopenic dysphagia. To compare the differences in swallowing muscle mass and quality between sarcopenic and nonsarcopenic dysphagia. A cross-sectional study was performed in 55 older patients, who had been recommended to undergo dysphagia assessment and/or rehabilitation. Sarcopenic dysphagia was diagnosed using a diagnostic algorithm for sarcopenic dysphagia. The thickness and area of tongue muscle and geniohyoid muscle (coronal plane and sagittal plane), and the echo-intensity of the tongue and geniohyoid muscles were examined by ultrasound. The study participants included 31 males and 24 females (mean age of 82 ± 7 years), with 14 having possible sarcopenic dysphagia, 22 probable sarcopenic dysphagia, and 19 without sarcopenic dysphagia. The group with sarcopenic dysphagia had a significantly lower cross-sectional area and area of brightness of the tongue muscle than that observed in the group without sarcopenic dysphagia. The most specific factor for identifying the presence of sarcopenic dysphagia was tongue muscle area (sensitivity, 0.389; specificity, 0.947; cut-off value, 1536.0), while the factor with the highest sensitivity was geniohyoid muscle area brightness in sagittal sections (sensitivity, 0.806; specificity, 0.632; cut-off value, 20.1). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the area of the tongue muscle and its area of brightness were independent risk factors for sarcopenic dysphagia. However, geniohyoid sagittal muscle area and area of brightness showed no significant independent association with sarcopenic dysphagia. Tongue muscle mass in patients with sarcopenic dysphagia was smaller than that in patients without the condition. Sarcopenic dysphagia was also associated with increased intensity of the

  12. Comparison of dysphagia outcomes between rostral and caudal lateral medullary infarct patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Min Ho; Kim, Daeha; Chang, Min Cheol

    2017-11-01

    A detailed knowledge of dysphagia outcomes in lateral medullary infarct (LMI) patients would enable proper establishment of swallowing therapy goals and strategies. However, little is known about the impact of infarct location on dysphagia outcomes in patients with LMI. Twenty patients with rostral LMI (rostral group) and 20 patients with caudal LMI (caudal group) participated in the study. All patients underwent swallowing therapy, which included compensatory treatments and strengthening exercises, for >3 months. Dysphagia evaluation was performed twice (during the subacute stage and six months after stroke onset) using videofluoroscopic swallowing studies. Dysphagia degree was assessed using the functional dysphagia scale (FDS), the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Outcome Measurement System (NOMS) swallowing scale. In the subacute stage, the rostral group had significantly higher FDS and PAS scores and a significantly lower ASHA NOMS score than the caudal group. Patients from both groups showed significant improvement from the initial evaluation to the six-month evaluation. There were no significant differences in these scale scores between the two groups at the six-month evaluation. In the subacute stage, patients in the rostral group had more severe dysphagia than those in the caudal group. Dysphagia improved in both groups after 3-6 months of swallowing therapy. At six months after onset, there were no significant differences in dysphagia severity between the two groups. Recovery from dysphagia after LMI was observed regardless of the infarct location.

  13. Higher risk of complications in odynophagia-associated dysphagia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Fontes Luchesi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective This investigation aimed to identify associated factors with dysphagia severity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Method We performed a cross-sectional study of 49 patients with ALS. All patients underwent fiberoptic endoscopy evaluation of swallowing and answered a verbal questionnaire about swallowing complaints. The patients were divided into groups according to dysphagia severity. Results Among the factors analyzed, only odynophagia was associated with moderate or severe dysphagia. Conclusion Odynophagia was associated with moderate and severe dysphagia in ALS and suggests a high risk of pulmonary and nutritional complications.

  14. The Burden of Dysphagia on Family Caregivers of the Elderly: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini M. Namasivayam-MacDonald

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid increase in the elderly population, there is a simultaneous increased need for care provided by family caregivers. Research in the field of head and neck cancer has indicated that caring for patients with dysphagia can impact a caregiver’s quality of life. Given that many older adults present with dysphagia, one can assume that their caregivers are equally, if not more greatly, affected. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine all relevant literature regarding the caregiver burden in caregivers of community-dwelling older adults with dysphagia. A review of relevant studies published through April 2018 was conducted using search terms related to dysphagia, caregiver burden, and older adults. The search yielded 2331 unique abstracts. Of the 176 abstracts that underwent full review, four were accepted. All reported an increase in caregiver burden due to presence of dysphagia in care recipients. Worsening feeding-related behaviors were associated with burden, and the use of feeding tubes was more frequently associated with “heavy burden”. The presence of dysphagia in community-dwelling older adults is a factor leading to an increased burden among caregivers. Although aspects of dysphagia play a role in the caregiver burden, the specific reasons for the increased burden are unknown. Clinicians should be aware of dysphagia as a source of the burden, and future studies should further define the relationship between dysphagia and the caregiver burden in order to develop comprehensive approaches to care.

  15. Diagnostic yield in the evaluation of dysphagia: experience at a single tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, J; Rajagopal, S; Kushnir, V; Gyawali, C P

    2018-05-24

    Evaluation of dysphagia typically starts with esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD); further testing is pursued if this is negative. When no mucosal, structural, or motor esophageal disorders are identified with persisting symptoms, functional dysphagia is considered. We evaluated outcomes in patients undergoing EGD for dysphagia, and estimated prevalence of functional dysphagia. The endoscopy database at single tertiary care center was interrogated to identify EGDs performed for an indication of 'dysphagia' over a 12-month period (2008-09). Electronic medical records were reviewed over the next 8 years to assess if an etiology was identified. Data were analyzed to assess the diagnostic yield of endoscopy and subsequent tests in the evaluation of dysphagia. Of 5486 EGDs, 822 (15.0%) were performed for dysphagia in 694 patients (58.4 ± 0.6 year, range: 18-95 year, 55.8% female). Of these, 529 (76.2%) had EGD findings that explained dysphagia; another 22 (3.2%) had findings on histopathology. Of the remainder 143 patients (20.6%) with normal index EGD, 38 (26.6%) patients underwent barium esophagram with 15 (39.5%) having abnormal studies. 19 patients (13.3%) underwent esophageal high resolution manometry with 12 (63.2%) being abnormal, and 7 had a mechanism for dysphagia on alternate testing. A repeat EGD was abnormal in 6 patients, while 45 patients were lost to follow-up. 42 patients had complete resolution of symptoms despite normal endoscopy, of which 30 were treated empirically with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Only 16 patients had no findings on evaluation, and had continued dysphagia symptoms, representing true functional dysphagia in 2.3% of all dysphagia patients and 11.2% of patients with normal EGD. Endoscopy remains the test with the highest yield (over 75%) for a diagnosis in patients presenting with dysphagia; secondary tests are useful when endoscopy does not provide a diagnosis. Benign strictures and GERD-related etiologies are leading causes; PPI

  16. Diagnostic evaluation of dysphagia in multiple sclerosis patients using a Persian version of DYMUS questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajouh, Sahar Danesh; Moradi, Negin; Shaterzadeh Yazdi, Mohammad Jafar; Latifi, Seyed Mahmoud; Mehravar, Mohammad; Majdinasab, Nastaran; Olapour, Ali Reza; Soltani, Majid; Khanchezar, Fatemeh

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurological disease that may cause swallowing disorders. Dysphagia is a common problem, which patients with different levels of disability may encounter, but it is usually underestimated; therefore, effective assessments need to be performed before any serious complications. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency and characteristics of dysphagia in multiple sclerosis patients of Khuzestan MS society, using a Persian version of Dysphagia in Multiple Sclerosis (DYMUS) questionnaire. 105 consecutive MS patients (84 F and 21 M, mean age 33.8 ± 8.5 years, mean disease duration 3.5 ± 3.1 years, mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) 1.8 ± 1.3) participated in the study and the DYMUS questionnaire was administered by a trained speech therapist. The results have shown that 55 MS patients (52.4%) had dysphagia and the dysphagia was significantly associated with the disease course of MS (p = 0.02). However, significant associations between DYMUS values and EDSS, disease duration, age, and gender were not observed. (Respectively, p = 0.4, p = 0.09, p = 0.1, p = 1.0). In the dysphagia group, based on dysphagia severity, 17.1% and 35.2% of patients had mild and alarming dysphagia, respectively. Although, the patients with alarming dysphagia had longer disease duration, higher EDSS score and more with SP, PP and PR disease course than the patients with mild dysphagia, these differences were not significant. The oropharyngeal dysphagia in MS patients is very common even in early stages of the disease; therefore, it is important to assess these patients carefully and to initiate a treatment program if needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dysphagia and trismus after concomitant chemo-Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (chemo-IMRT) in advanced head and neck cancer; dose-effect relationships for swallowing and mastication structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, Lisette; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; de Jong, Rianne; van Rossum, Maya A.; Smeele, Ludi E.; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Hilgers, Frans J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Prospective assessment of dysphagia and trismus in chemo-IMRT head and neck cancer patients in relation to dose-parameters of structures involved in swallowing and mastication. Assessment of 55 patients before, 10-weeks (N=49) and 1-year post-treatment (N=37). Calculation of dose-volume parameters

  18. Dysphagia and trismus after concomitant chemo-Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (chemo-IMRT) in advanced head and neck cancer; dose-effect relationships for swallowing and mastication structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, L.; Heemsbergen, W.D.; de Jong, R.; van Rossum, M.A.; Smeele, L.E.; Rasch, C.R.N.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Prospective assessment of dysphagia and trismus in chemo-IMRT head and neck cancer patients in relation to dose-parameters of structures involved in swallowing and mastication. Material and methods: Assessment of 55 patients before, 10-weeks (N=49) and 1-year post-treatment

  19. Dysphagia Therapy in Stroke: A Survey of Speech and Language Ttherapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, S. K.; Wellwood, I.; Smith, C. H.; Newham, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is common after stroke, leading to adverse outcome. There is a paucity of high-quality evidence for dysphagia therapy, thus making it difficult to determine the best approaches to treatment. Clinical decisions are often based on usual practice, however no formal method of monitoring practice patterns exists. Aims: To…

  20. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  1. Dysphagia Management: A Survey of School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists in Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Tiffany L.; Gerety, Katherine W.; Mulligan, Moira

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study (a) gathered information about the kinds of dysphagia management services school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) provide, (b) examined the attitudes of SLPs related to dysphagia management, (c) compared the responses of SLPs on the basis of their experience working in a medical setting, and (d) investigated the…

  2. Prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalf, J.G.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Bloem, B.R.; Munneke, M.

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is a potentially harmful feature, also in Parkinson's disease (PD). As published prevalence rates vary widely, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD in a meta-analysis. We conducted a systematic literature search in February 2011 and two independent reviewers

  3. Prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson’s disease : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaan Bloem; Johanna Kalf; Marten Munneke; Bert de Swart

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is a potentially harmful feature, also in Parkinson's disease (PD). As published prevalence rates vary widely, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD in a meta-analysis. We conducted a systematic literature search in February 2011 and two independent reviewers

  4. Adherence to Eating and Drinking Guidelines for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, Jane; Goldbart, Juliet

    2003-01-01

    The extent to which 40 individuals with intellectual disorders and dysphagia and their caregivers adhered to speech and language pathology dysphagia guidelines was evaluated across four settings. Although adherence was generally high, there were significant differences across settings, type of guidelines, and between people who were fed by…

  5. Poststroke dysphagia rehabilitation by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: a noncontrolled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verin, E; Leroi, A M

    2009-06-01

    Poststroke dysphagia is frequent and significantly increases patient mortality. In two thirds of cases there is a spontaneous improvement in a few weeks, but in the other third, oropharyngeal dysphagia persists. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is known to excite or inhibit cortical neurons, depending on stimulation frequency. The aim of this noncontrolled pilot study was to assess the feasibility and the effects of 1-Hz rTMS, known to have an inhibitory effect, on poststroke dysphagia. Seven patients (3 females, age = 65 +/- 10 years), with poststroke dysphagia due to hemispheric or subhemispheric stroke more than 6 months earlier (56 +/- 50 months) diagnosed by videofluoroscopy, participated in the study. rTMS at 1 Hz was applied for 20 min per day every day for 5 days to the healthy hemisphere to decrease transcallosal inhibition. The evaluation was performed using the dysphagia handicap index and videofluoroscopy. The dysphagia handicap index demonstrated that the patients had mild oropharyngeal dysphagia. Initially, the score was 43 +/- 9 of a possible 120 which decreased to 30 +/- 7 (p study demonstrated that rTMS is feasible in poststroke dysphagia and improves swallowing coordination. Our results now need to be confirmed by a randomized controlled study with a larger patient population.

  6. Dysphagia in the Elderly Following Anterior Cervical Surgery: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Osuafor, C N.

    2017-11-01

    Dysphagia is a risk factor for adverse health outcomes like aspiration, recurrent chest infections and malnutrition. Here, we describe a case of an 82-year-old lady who presented with a two-month history of dysphagia after an anterior odontoid screw fixation for a type II odontoid process fracture. This case highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to patient care.

  7. Consensus-Building on Developing Dysphagia Competence: A North West of England Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Susan; Lancaster, John; Stansfield, Jois

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia has been an increasing area of practice for speech and language therapists (SLTs) for over 20 years, and throughout that period there has been debate about how practical skills in dysphagia can best be developed. The implementation of the new Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) framework was considered…

  8. Prevalence of Dysphagia in People with Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Janet; Chadwick, Darren; Baines, Susannah; Emerson, Eric; Hatton, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia (feeding and swallowing disorder) is associated with serious health complications and psychosocial sequelae. This review summarizes international research relating to the prevalence of dysphagia in people with intellectual disability. Studies published from 1990 to July 2016 were identified using Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO, Web of…

  9. Late dysphagia after IMRT for head and neck cancer and correlation with dose–volume parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortensen, Hanna R.; Jensen, Kenneth; Aksglæde, Karin; Behrens, Marie; Grau, Cai

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Many head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors experience diminished quality of life due to radiation-induced dysphagia. The aim of this study was to investigate frequency, intensity and dose–volume dependency for late dysphagia in HNC patients treated with curative IMRT. Materials and methods: Candidates for the study were 294 patients treated with primary IMRT from 2006 to 2010; a total of 259 patients accepted to participate by answering the EORTC QLQ-C30 and H and N35 questionnaires. A total of 65 patients were further examined with modified barium swallow (MBS) and saliva collection. Data on patient, tumor and treatment characteristics were prospectively recorded in the DAHANCA database. Dose–volume histograms (DVH) of swallowing-related structures were retrospectively analyzed. Results: QoL data showed low degree of dysphagia (QoL subscales scores of 17 and below) compared to objective measures. The most frequent swallowing dysfunction was retention; penetration and aspiration was less common. In general, objective measurements and observer-assessed late dysphagia correlated with dose to pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM), whereas QoL endpoints correlated with DVH parameters in the glottis/supraglottic larynx. Both xerostomia and dysphagia has been reduced after introduction of IMRT. Conclusions: Radiation-induced dysphagia is still important, with a high degree of retention and penetration. Introduction of parotid-sparing IMRT has reduced the severity of dysphagia, primarily through a major reduction in xerostomia. Dose–response relationships were found for specific dysphagia endpoints

  10. Evaluation of dysphagia risk, nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly patients with Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, Vanessa Fernanda; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela Billig; de Oliveira, Lilian Oliveira; Hack, Jaqueline; Magro, Marcela; Bonini, Juliana Sartori

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the risk of dysphagia and its relationship with the stage of Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the relationship between the risk of dysphagia and nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly people with Alzheimer's disease. Methods the sample consisted of 30 subjects of both genders with probable Alzheimer's disease. The stage of the disease, nutritional status, energy intake, and risk of dysphagia were assessed. Results it was found that increased risk of dysphagia is associated with the advance in the stages of Alzheimer's disease and that even patients in the early stages of disease have a slight risk of developing dysphagia. No association was found between nutritional status and the risk of dysphagia. High levels of inadequate intake of micronutrients were also verified in the patients. Conclusion an association between dysphagia and the development of Alzheimer's disease was found. The results indicate the need to monitor the presence of dysphagia and the micronutrient intake in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26107841

  11. The reliability and validity of cervical auscultation in the diagnosis of dysphagia : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagarde, Marloes L J; Kamalski, DMA; Van Den Engel-Hoek, Lenie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the available evidence for the reliability and validity of cervical auscultation in diagnosing the several aspects of dysphagia in adults and children suffering from dysphagia. Data sources: Medline (PubMed), Embase and the Cochrane Library databases. Review

  12. Dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy: Evaluation of risk factors and assessment of endoscopic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Anand; Yewale, Sayali; Tran, Tung; Brebbia, John S; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2016-12-21

    To evaluate the risks of medical conditions, evaluate gastric sleeve narrowing, and assess hydrostatic balloon dilatation to treat dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG). VSG is being performed more frequently worldwide as a treatment for medically-complicated obesity, and dysphagia is common post-operatively. We hypothesize that post-operative dysphagia is related to underlying medical conditions or narrowing of the gastric sleeve. This is a retrospective, single institution study of consecutive patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy from 2013 to 2015. Patients with previous bariatric procedures were excluded. Narrowing of a gastric sleeve includes: inability to pass a 9.6 mm gastroscope due to stenosis or sharp angulation or spiral hindering its passage. Of 400 consecutive patients, 352 are included; the prevalence of dysphagia is 22.7%; 33 patients (9.3%) have narrowing of the sleeve with 25 (7.1%) having sharp angulation or a spiral while 8 (2.3%) have a stenosis. All 33 patients underwent balloon dilatation of the gastric sleeve and dysphagia resolved in 13 patients (39%); 10 patients (30%) noted resolution of dysphagia after two additional dilatations. In a multivariate model, medical conditions associated with post-operative dysphagia include diabetes mellitus, symptoms of esophageal reflux, a low whole blood thiamine level, hypothyroidism, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and use of opioids. Narrowing of the gastric sleeve and gastric sleeve stenosis are common after VSG. Endoscopic balloon dilatations of the gastric sleeve resolves dysphagia in 69% of patients.

  13. Subtle lower esophageal sphincter relaxation abnormalities in patients with unexplained esophageal dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herregods, T. V. K.; van Hoeij, F. B.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2018-01-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is a relatively common symptom. We aimed to evaluate whether subtle, presently not acknowledged forms of dysfunction of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could explain dysphagia in a subset of patients with normal findings at high-resolution manometry (HRM) according to the

  14. Evaluation of dysphagia risk, nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly patients with Alzheimer's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Fernanda Goes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the risk of dysphagia and its relationship with the stage of Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the relationship between the risk of dysphagia and nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly people with Alzheimer's disease.METHODS: the sample consisted of 30 subjects of both genders with probable Alzheimer's disease. The stage of the disease, nutritional status, energy intake, and risk of dysphagia were assessed.RESULTS: it was found that increased risk of dysphagia is associated with the advance in the stages of Alzheimer's disease and that even patients in the early stages of disease have a slight risk of developing dysphagia. No association was found between nutritional status and the risk of dysphagia. High levels of inadequate intake of micronutrients were also verified in the patients.CONCLUSION: an association between dysphagia and the development of Alzheimer's disease was found. The results indicate the need to monitor the presence of dysphagia and the micronutrient intake in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Altered Cortical Swallowing Processing in Patients with Functional Dysphagia: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollbrink, Andreas; Warnecke, Tobias; Winkels, Martin; Pantev, Christo; Dziewas, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Objective Current neuroimaging research on functional disturbances provides growing evidence for objective neuronal correlates of allegedly psychogenic symptoms, thereby shifting the disease concept from a psychological towards a neurobiological model. Functional dysphagia is such a rare condition, whose pathogenetic mechanism is largely unknown. In the absence of any organic reason for a patient's persistent swallowing complaints, sensorimotor processing abnormalities involving central neural pathways constitute a potential etiology. Methods In this pilot study we measured cortical swallow-related activation in 5 patients diagnosed with functional dysphagia and a matched group of healthy subjects applying magnetoencephalography. Source localization of cortical activation was done with synthetic aperture magnetometry. To test for significant differences in cortical swallowing processing between groups, a non-parametric permutation test was afterwards performed on individual source localization maps. Results Swallowing task performance was comparable between groups. In relation to control subjects, in whom activation was symmetrically distributed in rostro-medial parts of the sensorimotor cortices of both hemispheres, patients showed prominent activation of the right insula, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and lateral premotor, motor as well as inferolateral parietal cortex. Furthermore, activation was markedly reduced in the left medial primary sensory cortex as well as right medial sensorimotor cortex and adjacent supplementary motor area (pdysphagia - a condition with assumed normal brain function - seems to be associated with distinctive changes of the swallow-related cortical activation pattern. Alterations may reflect exaggerated activation of a widely distributed vigilance, self-monitoring and salience rating network that interferes with down-stream deglutition sensorimotor control. PMID:24586948

  16. Endoscopic palliation of malignant dysphagia: a challenging task in inoperable oesophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mylvaganam S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main goal when managing patients with inoperable oesophageal cancer is to restore and maintain their oral nutrition. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of endoscopic palliation of dysphagia in patients with oesophageal cancer, who either due to advanced stage of the disease or co-morbidity are not suitable for surgery. Patients and methods All the endoscopic palliative procedures performed over a 5-year period in our unit were retrospectively reviewed. Dilatation and insertion of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS were mainly used for tight circumferential strictures whilst ablation with Nd-YAG laser was used for exophytic lesions. All procedures were performed under sedation. Results Overall 249 palliative procedures were performed in 59 men and 40 women, with a median age of 73 years (range 35 – 93. The median number of sessions per patient was 2 (range 1 – 13 sessions. Palliation involved laser ablation alone in 24%, stent insertion alone in 22% and dilatation alone in 13% of the patients. In 41% of the patients, a combination of the above palliative techniques was applied. A total of 45 SEMS were inserted. One third of the patients did not receive any other palliative treatment, whilst the rest received chemotherapy, radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Swallowing was maintained in all patients up to death. Four oesophageal perforations were encountered; two were fatal whilst the other two were successfully treated with covered stent insertion and conservative treatment. The median survival from diagnosis was 10.5 months (range 0.5–83 months and the median survival from 1st palliation was 5 months (range 0.5–68.5 months. Conclusion Endoscopic interventions are effective and relatively safe palliative modalities for patients with oesophageal cancer. It is possible to adequately palliate almost all cases of malignant dysphagia. This is achieved by expertise in combination treatment.

  17. Dysphagia screening after acute stroke: a quality improvement project using criteria-based clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivertsen, Jorun; Graverholt, Birgitte; Espehaug, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is common after stroke and represents a major risk factor for developing aspiration pneumonia. Early detection can reduce the risk of pulmonary complications and death. Despite the fact that evidence-based guidelines recommend screening for swallowing deficit using a standardized screening tool, national audits has identified a gap between practice and this recommendation. The aim was to determine the level of adherence to an evidence-based recommendation on swallow assessment and to take actions to improve practice if necessary. We carried out a criteria-based clinical audit (CBCA) in a small stroke unit at a Norwegian hospital. Patients with hemorrhagic stroke, ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack were included. A power calculation informed the number of included patients at baseline ( n  = 80) and at re-audit ( n  = 35). We compared the baseline result with the evidence-based criteria and gave feedback to management and staff. A brainstorming session, a root-cause analysis and implementation science were used to inform the quality improvement actions which consisted of workshops, use of local opinion leaders, manual paper reminders and feedback. We completed a re-audit after implementation. Percentages and median are reported with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Among 88 cases at baseline, documentation of swallow screening was complete for 6% (95% CI 2-11). In the re-audit ( n  = 51) 61% (95% CI 45-74) had a complete screening. A CBCA involving management and staff, and using multiple tailored intervention targeting barriers, led to greater adherence with the recommendation for screening stroke patients for dysphagia.

  18. A novel animal model of dysphagia following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Naoto; Nishiyama, Eiji; Nishikawa, Yukitoshi; Sasamura, Takashi; Nakade, Shinji; Okawa, Katsumasa; Nagasawa, Tadashi; Yuki, Akane

    2014-02-01

    Patients who have an ischemic stroke are at high risk of swallowing disorders. Aspiration due to swallowing disorders, specifically delayed trigger of the pharyngeal stage of swallowing, predisposes such patients to pneumonia. In the present study, we evaluated swallowing reflex in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), which is one of the most common experimental animal models of cerebral ischemia, in order to develop a novel animal model of dysphagia following ischemic stroke. A swallowing reflex was elicited by a 10-s infusion of distilled water (DW) to the pharyngolaryngeal region in the tMCAO rat model. Swallowing reflex was estimated using the electromyographic activity of the mylohyoid muscle from 1 to 3 weeks after surgery. Two weeks after tMCAO, the number of swallows significantly decreased and the onset latency of the first swallow was prolonged compared with that of the sham group. The number of swallows in rats significantly increased by infusions of 10 mM citric acid and 0.6 μM capsaicin to the pharyngolaryngeal region compared with the number from infusion of DW. It has been reported that sensory stimulation of the pharyngolaryngeal region with citric acid, capsaicin, and L-menthol ameliorates hypofunction of pharyngeal-stage swallowing in dysphagia patients. Therefore, the tMCAO rat model may show some of the symptoms of pharyngeal-stage swallowing disorders, similar to those in patients with ischemic stroke. This rat tMCAO model has the potential to become a novel animal model of dysphagia following stroke that is useful for development of therapeutic methods and drugs.

  19. Incidence of vocal fold immobility in patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Steven B; Ross, Douglas A

    2005-01-01

    This study prospectively investigated the incidence of vocal fold immobility, unilateral and bilateral, and its influence on aspiration status in a referred population of 1452 patients for a dysphagia evaluation from a large, urban, tertiary-care, teaching hospital. Main outcome measures included overall incidence of vocal fold immobility and aspiration status, with specific emphasis on age, etiology, and side of vocal fold immobility, i.e., right, left, or bilateral. Overall incidence of vocal fold immobility was 5.6% (81 of 1452 patients), including 47 males (mean age 55.7 yr) and 34 females (mean age 59.7 yr). In the subgroup of patients with vocal fold immobility, 31% (25 of 81) exhibited unilateral right, 60% (49 of 81) unilateral left, and 9% (7 of 81) bilateral impairment. Overall incidence of aspiration was found to be 29% (426 of 1452) of all patients referred for a swallow evaluation. Aspiration was observed in 44% (36 of 81) of patients presenting with vocal fold immobility, i.e., 44% (11 of 25) unilateral right, 43% (21 of 49) unilateral left, and 57% (4 of 7) bilateral vocal fold immobility. Left vocal fold immobility occurred most frequently due to surgical trauma. A liquid bolus was aspirated more often than a puree bolus. Side of vocal fold immobility and age were not factors that increased incidence of aspiration. In conclusion, vocal fold immobility, with an incidence of 5.6%, is not an uncommon finding in patients referred for a dysphagia evaluation in the acute-care setting, and vocal fold immobility, when present, was associated with a 15% increased incidence of aspiration when compared with a population already being evaluated for dysphagia.

  20. VIDEOFLUOROSCOPIC SWALLOWING STUDY: esophageal alterations in patients with dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina SCHEEREN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Videofluoroscopic swallowing study is a dynamic exam and allows the evaluation of the complete swallowing process. However, most published studies have only reported alterations in the oropharynx and pharyngoesophageal transition, leaving the analysis of the esophagus as a secondary goal. Objectives The goal of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alterations in the esophageal phase thorough videofluoroscopic swallowing study in patients with dysphagia. Methods Consecutive patients with dysphagia who underwent videofluoroscopic swallowing study including esophageal analysis between May 2010 and May 2012 had their exams retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified into two groups: Group I - without a pre-established etiological diagnosis and Group II - with neurological disease. During the exam, the patients ingested three different consistencies of food (liquid, pasty and solid contrasted with barium sulfate and 19 items were analyzed according to a protocol. The esophageal phase was considered abnormal when one of the evaluated items was compromised. Results Three hundred and thirty-three (n = 333 consecutive patients were studied - 213 (64% in Group I and 120 (36% in Group II. Esophageal alterations were found in 104 (31% patients, with a higher prevalence in Group I (36.2%, especially on the items esophageal clearance (16.9% and tertiary contractions (16.4%. It was observed that 12% of individuals in Group I only presented alterations on the esophageal phase. Conclusion Evaluation of the esophageal phase of swallowing during videofluoroscopic swallowing study detects abnormalities in patients with cervical dysphagia, especially in the group without pre-established etiological diagnosis.

  1. Relation between functional dysphagia and vocal cord palsy after transhiatal oesophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierie, J P; Goedegebuure, S; Schuerman, F A; Leguit, P

    2000-03-01

    To assess the incidence, natural course, and possible pathogenesis of dysphagia that is not caused by anastomotic stricture, after transhiatal oesophagectomy and gastric tube reconstruction. Prospective study. District teaching hospital, The Netherlands. 22 patients who had transhiatal oesophagectomy and gastric tube reconstruction for cancer. Incidence of dysphagia that is not caused by anastomotic stricture one week after operation, and presence of this functional dysphagia and correlation with vocal cord palsy at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postoperatively. The incidence of functional dysphagia was 7 out of 22 (32%); it was self-limiting in 5 out of 7 (71%) of the cases and associated with the incidence of vocal cord palsy (p = 0.0006). Functional dysphagia after transhiatal oesophagectomy occurs frequently, but is self-limiting in most patients. Injury to branches of the recurrent laryngeal nerve is a likely cause.

  2. Implementation of a standardized out-of-hospital management method for Parkinson dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongying; Sun, Dongxiu; Liu, Meiping

    2017-12-01

    Our objective is to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of establishing a swallowing management clinic to implement out-of-hospital management for Parkinson disease (PD) patients with dysphagia. Two-hundred seventeen (217) voluntary PD patients with dysphagia in a PD outpatient clinic were divided into a control group with 100 people, and an experimental group with 117 people. The control group was given dysphagia rehabilitation guidance. The experimental group was presented with the standardized out-of-hospital management method as overall management and information and education materials. Rehabilitation efficiency and incidence rate of dysphagia, as well as relevant complications of both groups were compared after a 6-month intervention. Rehabilitation efficiency and the incidence rate of dysphagia including relevant complications of patients treated with the standardized out-of-hospital management were compared with those seen in the control group. The differences have distinct statistics meaning (pdysphagia complications and improve the quality of life in patients with PD.

  3. Comparison of endoscopy and barium swallow with marshmallow in dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, S; Stevenson, G W; Thompson, G

    1986-06-01

    Forty-four patients with dysphagia were examined both by endoscopy and by barium swallow with a marshmallow bolus. In these patients 36 stenoses were found: 34 by radiology and 30 by endoscopy. The radiologic criteria for stenosis included arrest of the marshmallow in a manner to support a column of barium and reproduction of the patient's symptoms at the time this occurred. Radiologic false negative findings were partly due to an inability by patients to swallow an adequate marshmallow bolus; endoscopic failures were associated with small endoscopes and mild stenoses.

  4. Phagophobia: a form of psychogenic dysphagia. A new entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, J; Franko, D L; Gagne, A

    1997-04-01

    There is a group of patients presenting with either acute or chronic dysphagia secondary to fear of swallowing. We have termed this entity phagophobia. It is characterized by various significant swallowing complaints in the face of normal findings on head and neck examination, oropharyngeal swallowing videofluoroscopy, and standard barium swallow study. Ten patients who received diagnoses of phagophobia after a full evaluation at our swallowing disorders center are presented. Each patient was then evaluated by a psychologist, and an attempt at therapy was undertaken. We discuss the specific clinical features, assessment, and treatment of this frequently misdiagnosed disorder.

  5. The One-Year Attributable Cost of Post-Stroke Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilha, Heather Shaw; Simpson, Annie N.; Ellis, Charles; Mauldin, Patrick; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Simpson, Kit

    2014-01-01

    With the recent emphasis on evidence-based practice and healthcare reform, understanding the cost of dysphagia management has never been more important. It is helpful for clinicians to understand and objectively report the costs associated with dysphagia when they advocate for their services in this economy. Having carefully estimated cost of illness, inputs are needed for cost-effectiveness analyses that help support the value of treatments. This study sought to address this issue by examining the 1-year cost associated with a diagnosis of dysphagia post-stroke in South Carolina. Furthermore, this study investigated whether ethnicity and residence differences exist in the cost of dysphagia post-stroke. Data on 3,200 patients in the South Carolina Medicare database from 2004 who had ICD-9 codes for ischemic stroke, 434 and 436, were retrospectively included in this study. Differences between persons with and without dysphagia post-stroke were compared with respect to age, gender, ethnicity, mortality, length of stay, comorbidity, rurality, discharge disposition, and cost to Medicare. Univariate analyses and a gamma-distributed generalized linear multivariable model with a log link function were completed. We found that the 1-year cost to Medicare for persons with dysphagia post ischemic stroke was $4,510 higher than that for persons without dysphagia post ischemic stroke when controlling for age, comorbidities, ethnicity, and proportion of time alive. Univariate analysis revealed that rurality, ethnicity, and gender were not statistically significantly different in comparisons of individuals with or without dysphagia post-stroke. Post-stroke dysphagia significantly increases post-stroke medical expenses. Understanding the expenditures associated with post-stroke dysphagia is helpful for optimal allocation and use of resources. Such information is needed to conduct cost-effectiveness studies. PMID:24948438

  6. The one-year attributable cost of post-stroke dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilha, Heather Shaw; Simpson, Annie N; Ellis, Charles; Mauldin, Patrick; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Simpson, Kit

    2014-10-01

    With the recent emphasis on evidence-based practice and healthcare reform, understanding the cost of dysphagia management has never been more important. It is helpful for clinicians to understand and objectively report the costs associated with dysphagia when they advocate for their services in this economy. Having carefully estimated cost of illness, inputs are needed for cost-effectiveness analyses that help support the value of treatments. This study sought to address this issue by examining the 1-year cost associated with a diagnosis of dysphagia post-stroke in South Carolina. Furthermore, this study investigated whether ethnicity and residence differences exist in the cost of dysphagia post-stroke. Data on 3,200 patients in the South Carolina Medicare database from 2004 who had ICD-9 codes for ischemic stroke, 434 and 436, were retrospectively included in this study. Differences between persons with and without dysphagia post-stroke were compared with respect to age, gender, ethnicity, mortality, length of stay, comorbidity, rurality, discharge disposition, and cost to Medicare. Univariate analyses and a gamma-distributed generalized linear multivariable model with a log link function were completed. We found that the 1-year cost to Medicare for persons with dysphagia post ischemic stroke was $4,510 higher than that for persons without dysphagia post ischemic stroke when controlling for age, comorbidities, ethnicity, and proportion of time alive. Univariate analysis revealed that rurality, ethnicity, and gender were not statistically significantly different in comparisons of individuals with or without dysphagia post-stroke. Post-stroke dysphagia significantly increases post-stroke medical expenses. Understanding the expenditures associated with post-stroke dysphagia is helpful for optimal allocation and use of resources. Such information is needed to conduct cost-effectiveness studies.

  7. Dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Nam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, VA North Texas Health Care System, Radiation Oncology Service (140), 4500 S, Lancaster Road, Dallas, TX 72516 (United States)]. E-mail: NamPhong.Nguyen@med.va.gov; Moltz, Candace C. [Audiology and Speech Pathology Service (126), VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Frank, Cheryl [Audiology and Speech Pathology Service (126), VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Karlsson, Ulf [Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Nguyen, Phuc D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, VA North Texas Health Care System, Radiation Oncology Service (140), 4500 S, Lancaster Road, Dallas, TX 72516 (United States); Vos, Paul [Department of Biostatistics, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Smith, Herbert J. [Radiology Service, VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Dutta, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Nguyen, Ly M. [Public Health School, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Lemanski, Claire [Department of Radiation Oncology, Val D' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Chan, Wayne [Radiation Oncology Service, VAMC, Jackson, MS 39216 (United States); Sallah, Sabah [Division of Hematology/Oncology Research, Novo Nordisk, Athens (Greece)

    2006-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to evaluate dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer, and particularly the aspiration risk because of its potential life-threatening consequence. Materials and methods: We reviewed retrospectively the modified barium swallow (MBS) results in 110 patients who complained of dysphagia following chemoradiation (57) and postoperative radiation (53) of their head and neck cancer. Patients were selected if they were cancer free at the time of the swallowing study. Dysphagia severity was graded on a scale of 1-7. Patients were grouped according to the dysphagia severity: mild (grades 2-3), moderate (grades 4-5), and severe (grades 6-7). Results: Mean and median dysphagia grades were 4.84/5 and 4.12/4 for chemoradiation and postoperative radiation respectively. The mean difference between the two groups is statistically significant (p = 0.02). Mild dysphagia occurred in 13 patients (22%) of the chemoradiation group and 17 (32%) of the postoperative group. Corresponding number for the moderate group was 25 (43%) and 25 (48%), respectively. Severe dysphagia was significant in the chemoradiation group (34%) compared to the postoperative group (19%). However, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.29). There was a higher proportion of patients with large tumor (T3-T4) in the chemoradiation group who developed severe dysphagia. Conclusion: Dysphagia remained a significant morbidity of chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer. Dysphagia may be more severe in the chemoradiation group because of the higher proportion of patients with large tumor, the high radiation dose, and a high number of oropharyngeal tumors. Aspiration occurred in both groups. Diagnostic studies such as MBS should be part of future head and neck cancer prospective studies to assess the prevalence of aspiration, as it may be silent.

  8. Dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Moltz, Candace C.; Frank, Cheryl; Karlsson, Ulf; Nguyen, Phuc D.; Vos, Paul; Smith, Herbert J.; Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Ly M.; Lemanski, Claire; Chan, Wayne; Sallah, Sabah

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to evaluate dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer, and particularly the aspiration risk because of its potential life-threatening consequence. Materials and methods: We reviewed retrospectively the modified barium swallow (MBS) results in 110 patients who complained of dysphagia following chemoradiation (57) and postoperative radiation (53) of their head and neck cancer. Patients were selected if they were cancer free at the time of the swallowing study. Dysphagia severity was graded on a scale of 1-7. Patients were grouped according to the dysphagia severity: mild (grades 2-3), moderate (grades 4-5), and severe (grades 6-7). Results: Mean and median dysphagia grades were 4.84/5 and 4.12/4 for chemoradiation and postoperative radiation respectively. The mean difference between the two groups is statistically significant (p = 0.02). Mild dysphagia occurred in 13 patients (22%) of the chemoradiation group and 17 (32%) of the postoperative group. Corresponding number for the moderate group was 25 (43%) and 25 (48%), respectively. Severe dysphagia was significant in the chemoradiation group (34%) compared to the postoperative group (19%). However, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.29). There was a higher proportion of patients with large tumor (T3-T4) in the chemoradiation group who developed severe dysphagia. Conclusion: Dysphagia remained a significant morbidity of chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer. Dysphagia may be more severe in the chemoradiation group because of the higher proportion of patients with large tumor, the high radiation dose, and a high number of oropharyngeal tumors. Aspiration occurred in both groups. Diagnostic studies such as MBS should be part of future head and neck cancer prospective studies to assess the prevalence of aspiration, as it may be silent

  9. Interventions for dysphagia and nutritional support in acute and subacute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeganage, Chamila; Beavan, Jessica; Ellender, Sharon; Bath, Philip M W

    2012-10-17

    Dysphagia (swallowing problems) are common after stroke and can cause chest infection and malnutrition. Dysphagic, and malnourished, stroke patients have a poorer outcome. To assess the effectiveness of interventions for the treatment of dysphagia (swallowing therapy), and nutritional and fluid supplementation, in patients with acute and subacute (within six months from onset) stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (February 2012), MEDLINE (1966 to July 2011), EMBASE (1980 to July 2011), CINAHL (1982 to July 2011) and Conference Proceedings Citation Index- Science (CPCI-S) (1990 to July 2011). We also searched the reference lists of relevant trials and review articles, searched Current Controlled Trials and contacted researchers (July 2011). For the previous version of this review we contacted the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists and equipment manufacturers. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in dysphagic stroke patients, and nutritional supplementation in all stroke patients, where the stroke occurred within six months of enrolment. Two review authors independently applied the inclusion criteria, assessed trial quality, and extracted data, and resolved any disagreements through discussion with a third review author. We used random-effects models to calculate odds ratios (OR), 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), and mean differences (MD). The primary outcome was functional outcome (death or dependency, or death or disability) at the end of the trial. We included 33 studies involving 6779 participants.Swallowing therapy: acupuncture, drug therapy, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, pharyngeal electrical stimulation, physical stimulation (thermal, tactile), transcranial direct current stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation each had no significant effect on case fatality or combined death or dependency. Dysphagia at end-of-trial was reduced by acupuncture (number of studies (t) = 4, numbers of participants (n) = 256

  10. Effect of palatal augmentation prosthesis on pharyngeal manometric pressure in a patient with functional dysphagia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Tomohisa; Ohno, Ryo; Fujishima, Ichiro

    2017-10-01

    A 53-year-old institutionalized male patient with a history of postoperative bilateral hypoglossal nerve injury was admitted for treatment of dysphagia. He experienced dysphagia involving oral cavity-to-pharynx bolus transportation because of restricted tongue movement and was treated with a palatal augmentation prosthesis (PAP), which resulted in improved bolus transportation, pharyngeal swallowing pressure, and clearance of oral and pharyngeal residue. The mean pharyngeal swallowing pressure at tongue base with the PAP (145.5±7.5mmHg) was significantly greater than that observed immediately after removal of the PAP (118.3±10.1mmHg; pDysphagia rehabilitation with the PAP was continued. Approximately 1 month after PAP application, the patient could orally consume three meals, with the exception of foods particularly difficult to swallow. The supporting contact between the tongue and palate enabled by the PAP resulted in improvement of bolus transportation, which is the most important effect of a PAP. The increase in pharyngeal swallowing pressure at the tongue base because of PAP-enabled tongue-palate contact might play an important role in this improvement. Since a PAP augments the volume of the palate, it enables easy contact between the tongue and palate, resulting in the formation of an anchor point for tongue movement during swallowing. Thus, application of a PAP increases the tongue force, especially that of the basal tongue. A palatal augmentation prosthesis helps improve pharyngeal swallowing pressure at the basal tongue region and might contribute to the decrease of oral as well as pharyngeal residue. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of risk factors for postoperative dysphagia after primary anti-reflux surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Lee, Tommy H; Legner, András; Yano, Fumiaki; Dworak, Thomas; Mittal, Sumeet K

    2011-03-01

    Transient postoperative dysphagia is not uncommon after antireflux surgery and usually runs a self-limiting course. However, a subset of patients report long-term dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors for persistent postoperative dysphagia at 1 year after surgery. All patients who underwent antireflux surgery were entered into a prospectively maintained database. After obtaining institutional review board approval, the database was queried to identify patients who underwent primary antireflux surgery and were at least 1 year from surgery. Postoperative severity of dysphagia was evaluated using a standardized questionnaire (scale 0-3). Patients with scores of 2 or 3 were defined as having significant dysphagia. A total of 316 consecutive patients underwent primary antireflux surgery by a single surgeon. Of these, 219 patients had 1 year postoperative symptom data. Significant postoperative dysphagia at 1 year was reported by 19 (9.1%) patients. Thirty-eight patients (18.3%) required postoperative dilation for dysphagia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified preoperative dysphagia (odds ratio (OR), 4.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2-15.5; p = 0.023) and preoperative delayed esophageal transit by barium swallow (OR, 8.2; 95% CI, 1.6-42.2; p = 0.012) as risk factors for postoperative dysphagia. Female gender was a risk factor for requiring dilation during the early postoperative period (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.3-10.2; p = 0.016). No correlations were found with preoperative manometry. There also was no correlation between a need for early dilation and persistent dysphagia at 1 year of follow-up (p = 0.109). Patients with preoperative dysphagia and delayed esophageal transit on preoperative contrast study were significantly more likely to report moderate to severe postoperative dysphagia 1 year after antireflux surgery. This study confirms that the manometric criteria used to define esophageal dysmotility are not reliable

  12. Cognitive and Motor Aspects of Parkinson's Disease Associated with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Sun; Youn, Jinyoung; Suh, Mee Kyung; Kim, Tae-Eun; Chin, Juhee; Park, Suyeon; Cho, Jin Whan

    2015-11-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom and an important prognostic factor in Parkinson's disease (PD). Although cognitive and motor dysfunctions may contribute to dysphagia in patients with PD, any specific association between such problems and swallowing functions is unclear. Here, we examined the potential relationship between cognitive/motor components and swallowing functions in PD. We evaluated the contributions of cognition and motor function to the components of swallowing via video fluoroscopic swallowing (VFS) experiments. We prospectively enrolled 56 patients without dementia having PD. Parkinson's disease severity was assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). All participants received neuropsychological tests covering general mental status, visuospatial function, attention, language, learning and memory, and frontal executive function. The well-validated "modified barium swallow impairment profile" scoring system was applied during VFS studies to quantify swallowing impairments. Finally, correlations between neuropsychological or motor functions and impairment in swallowing components were calculated. The most significant correlations were found between the frontal/executive or learning/memory domains and the oral phase of swallowing, though a minor component of the pharyngeal phase correlated with frontal function as well. Bradykinesia and the UPDRS total score were associated with both the pharyngeal and oral phases. Our findings suggest that cognitive dysfunctions are associated with the oral phase of swallowing in patients with early stage PD while the severity of motor symptoms may be associated with overall swallowing function.

  13. Dysphagia and laryngeal pathology in post-surgical cardiothoracic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Anna; McLellan, Naomi; Machan, Rochelle; Vokes, David; Hunting, Alexandra; McFarlane, Mary; Holmes, Jennifer; Lynn, Kelly

    2018-02-09

    Cardiothoracic surgery is known to result in dysphagia and laryngeal injury. While prevalence has been explored, extent, trajectory and longevity of symptoms are poorly understood. This retrospective, observational study explored dysphagia and laryngeal injury in patients following cardiothoracic surgery referred for instrumental swallowing assessment. Clinical notes and endoscopic recordings of 106 patients (age range 18-87yrs; mean 63yrs; SD 15yrs) (including 190 endoscopes) at one large tertiary centre were reviewed by two speech-language pathologists and a laryngologist. Standardized measures of laryngeal anatomy and physiology, New Zealand Secretion Scale, Penetration-Aspiration scale and Yale Residue Scale were rated. Prevalence of abnormality included 39% silent aspiration, 65% laryngeal edema and 61% vocal paralysis. The incidence of pneumonia was 36% with a post-operative stroke rate of 14%. Forty percent of patients were receiving a standard diet by discharge from acute care; while, 24% continued to require enteral feeding and 8% received laryngeal surgery within twelve months of discharge. Vocal fold motion impairment was significantly associated with ventilation time and tracheostomy tube duration (pdysphagia and laryngeal injury in patients following cardiothoracic surgery may allow early management and prevention of secondary complications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Subclinical dysphagia in persons with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Roxann Diez; Gisser, Ronit; Cherpes, Gregory; Hartman, Katie; Maheshwary, Rishi

    2017-02-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is caused by a genetic imprinting abnormality resulting from the lack of expression of the paternal genes at 15q11-q13. Intellectual disability, low muscle tone, and life-threatening hyperphagia are hallmarks of the phenotype. The need for the Heimlich maneuver, death from choking, and pulmonary infection occur in a disproportionally high number of persons with PWS. The widely held belief is that eating behaviors are responsible for choking and aspiration; yet, no investigation had sought to determine if swallowing impairments were present in persons with PWS. To address this research and clinical gap, simultaneous videofluoroscopy and nasal respiratory signals were used to record swallowing function and breathing/swallowing coordination in 30 participants with PWS. Subjects consumed thin liquid and barium cookies under two randomized conditions as follows: (i) controlled (cues to swallow and standardized bolus sizes); (ii) spontaneous (no cues or bolus size control). Under videofluoroscopy, the cohort showed disordered pharyngeal and esophageal swallowing in both conditions with disturbances in timing, clearance, and coordination of swallowing with the respiratory cycle. No participant showed a sensory response such as attempting to clear residue or coughing; thereby supporting the lack of overt symptoms. We conclude that the high death rate from choking and pulmonary infection in children and adults with PWS may be related, in part, to underlying, asymptomatic dysphagia. The combination of rapid eating and dysphagia would increase the risk of aspiration-related morbidity and mortality. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Emerging modalities in dysphagia rehabilitation: neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckabee, Maggie-Lee; Doeltgen, Sebastian

    2007-10-12

    The aim of this review article is to advise the New Zealand medical community about the application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) as a treatment for pharyngeal swallowing impairment (dysphagia). NMES in this field of rehabilitation medicine has quickly emerged as a widely used method overseas but has been accompanied by significant controversy. Basic information is provided about the physiologic background of electrical stimulation. The literature reviewed in this manuscript was derived through a computer-assisted search using the biomedical database Medline to identify all relevant articles published until from the initiation of the databases up to January 2007. The reviewers used the following search strategy: [(deglutition disorders OR dysphagia) AND (neuromuscular electrical stimulation OR NMES)]. In addition, the technique of reference tracing was used and very recently published studies known to the authors but not yet included in the database systems were included. This review elucidates not only the substantive potential benefit of this treatment, but also potential key concerns for patient safety and long term outcome. The discussion within the clinical and research communities, especially around the commercially available VitalStim stimulator, is objectively explained.

  16. Ocular, bulbar, limb, and cardiopulmonary involvement in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, N; Mensah, A; Køber, L

    2014-01-01

    ; 64 years (41-80) from 8 families. Ptosis was the first symptom in 8/13 patients followed by limb weakness in the remaining 5 patients Dysphagia was never the presenting symptom. At the time of examination, all affected patients had ptosis or had previously been operated for ptosis, while...... dysfunction, but no cardiac involvement, was detected....

  17. Assessment of early and late dysphagia using videofluoroscopy and quality of life questionnaires in patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yirmibeşoğlu Erkal, Eda; Canoğlu, Doğu; Kaya, Ahmet; Aksu, Görkem; Sarper, Binnaz; Akansel, Gür; Meydancı, Tülay; Erkal, Haldun Şükrü

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dysphagia in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy using objective and subjective tools simultaneously and to associate the clinical correlates of dysphagia with dosimetric parameters. Twenty patients were included in the study. The primary tumor and the involved lymph nodes (LN) were treated with 66-70 Gy, the uninvolved LN were treated with 46-50 Gy. Six swallowing structures were identified: the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (SPCM), the middle pharyngeal constrictor muscle (MPCM), the inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (IPCM), the base of tongue (BOT), the larynx and the proximal esophageal sphincter (PES). Dysphagia was evaluated using videofluoroscopy and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QoL questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and supplemental EORTC QoL module for HNC (QLQ-H&N35). The evaluations were performed before treatment, at 3 months and at 6 months following treatment. On objective evaluation, the D max for the larynx and the sub-structures of the PCM were correlated with impaired lingual movement, BOT weakness and proximal esophageal stricture at 3 months, whereas the V 65 , the V 70 and the D max for the larynx was correlated with BOT weakness and the V 65 , the V 70 , the D max or the D mean for the sub-structures of the PCM were correlated with impaired lingual movement, BOT weakness, reduced laryngeal elevation, reduced epiglottic inversion and aspiration at 6 months following treatment. On subjective evaluation, the V 60 , the D max and the D mean for SPCM were correlated with QoL scores for HNSO at 3 months, whereas the V 70 for SPCM were correlated with QoL scores for HNPA and the V 60 , the V 65 , the V 70 , the D max and the D mean for SPCM were correlated with QoL scores for HNSO at 6 months following treatment. The use of multiple dysphagia-related endpoints to complement eachother rather than to overlap with

  18. Spontaneous swallow frequency compared with clinical screening in the identification of dysphagia in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare spontaneous swallow frequency analysis (SFA) with clinical screening protocols for identification of dysphagia in acute stroke. In all, 62 patients with acute stroke were evaluated for spontaneous swallow frequency rates using a validated acoustic analysis technique. Independent of SFA, these same patients received a routine nurse-administered clinical dysphagia screening as part of standard stroke care. Both screening tools were compared against a validated clinical assessment of dysphagia for acute stroke. In addition, psychometric properties of SFA were compared against published, validated clinical screening protocols. Spontaneous SFA differentiates patients with versus without dysphagia after acute stroke. Using a previously identified cut point based on swallows per minute, spontaneous SFA demonstrated superior ability to identify dysphagia cases compared with a nurse-administered clinical screening tool. In addition, spontaneous SFA demonstrated equal or superior psychometric properties to 4 validated, published clinical dysphagia screening tools. Spontaneous SFA has high potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke with psychometric properties equal or superior to clinical screening protocols. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dysphagia in Lewy body dementia - a clinical observational study of swallowing function by videofluoroscopic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londos, Elisabet; Hanxsson, Oskar; Alm Hirsch, Ingrid; Janneskog, Anna; Bülow, Margareta; Palmqvist, Sebastian

    2013-10-07

    Dysphagia, which can result in aspiration pneumonia and death, is a well-known problem in patients with dementia and Parkinson's disease. There are few studies on dysphagia in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), especially studies objectively documenting the type of swallowing dysfunction. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the prevalence, and define the actual swallowing dysfunction according to a videofluoroscopic swallowing examination (VFSE) in patients with DLB and PDD. Eighty-two consecutive patients with DLB or PDD in a clinical follow-up program were asked about symptoms of dysphagia. Those experiencing dysphagia were examined with VFSE. Prevalence and type of swallowing dysfunction was recorded. Twenty-six patients (32%) reported symptoms of dysphagia such as swallowing difficulties or coughing. Twenty-four (92%) of these had a documented swallowing dysfunction on VFSE. Eighty-eight percent suffered from pharyngeal dysfunction. Almost all DLB or PDD patients with subjective signs of dysphagia had pathologic results on VFSE, the majority of pharyngeal type. This type of dysphagia has not been reported in DLB before. The results have clinical implications and highlight the importance of asking for and examining swallowing function to prevent complications such as aspiration.

  20. [Evaluation and treatment of dysphagia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-11-01

    As both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson's disease (PD) exhibit a variety of patterns of dysphagia, appropriate symptomatic treatment is provided after evaluation of swallowing function through videofluoroscopic examination of swallowing. In ALS, disease progression is rapid, therefore, respiratory function, swallowing function and nutritional status should be evaluated regularly. When the oral or pharyngeal stage of swallowing are affected early in dysphagia, adjusting swallowing volume and varying consistency can be beneficial in ALS. When all stages of swallowing are impaired in ALS, such complications as pneumonia, dehydration and malnutrition, are observed. In such patients, it is necessary to consider an alternative to oral dietary intake. In PD, dysphagia is not necessarily associated with severity of parkinsonism and can appear at any time during the course of the disease. Dysphagia in PD can occur at any stage of swallowing and frequently accompanies multiple abnormalities. In particular, aspiration is an important risk factor for pneumonia in PD. The effect of L-dopa treatment for dysphagia is often insufficient; however, this treatment remains the first choice because dysphagia is exacerbated during off state. Rehabilitation for dysphagia in PD has also some effect.

  1. Self-reported dysphagia and its correlates within a prevalent population of people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Richard W; Dunn, Janet R; Gray, William K

    2011-03-01

    Many people with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience dysphagia; however, the prevalence of dysphagia in people with PD is unknown. We studied a prevalent population of PD cases. All of those who consented to participate were assessed for anxiety, depression, cognitive function, and quality of life using standard rating scales. Anyone who answered "yes" to either one of the two questions: Do you have difficulty swallowing food/liquid or tablets? and Do you cough after eating/drinking? was considered to have dysphagia. Question 7 of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was also used to identify dysphagia. Of 106 prevalent PD cases, 75 (38 males) patients consented to examination and assessment. The prevalence of dysphagia was 32.0% (n=24; 11 males). Using the response to UPDRS Question 7 as an indicator of the impact of swallowing problems on the patient, there were significant correlations with cognitive function, anxiety, depression, quality of life, and UPDRS-reported gait disturbance, postural instability and problems with falling. There was no correlation with disease duration, age, or gender. Almost one third of the participants reported dysphagia. There was a strong correlation between dysphagia and gross motor skills; patients reporting such problems should be screened for swallowing problems. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

  2. Dysphagia is a common and serious problem for adults with mental illness: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Kristy J; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2012-03-01

    Adults with mental illness may experience a higher incidence of dysphagia and choking due to factors such as medication side effects and behavioural abnormalities. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of dysphagia and the most effective interventions for this population. Studies published up to August 2010 were sought via a comprehensive electronic database search (CINAHL, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase). Studies reporting dysphagia frequency or dysphagia intervention outcomes in adults with mental illness were included. Two reviewers independently assessed study eligibility and quality, and the results were synthesised descriptively. Ten studies were identified, each describing dysphagia frequency or death due to choking asphyxiation. No studies evaluating intervention effectiveness were identified. Study quality was limited by subjective assessment of outcomes. Six studies presented dysphagia frequencies ranging from 9 to 42% in varying subgroups. Four studies presented the frequency of choking asphyxiation death, including a large survey that concluded that adults with organic mental illness were 43 times more likely to die of this cause than the general population. Dysphagia is a common and significant cause of morbidity and mortality in adults with mental illness and our review found that there is a lack of studies evaluating the effectiveness of intervention techniques.

  3. The lived experience of dysphagia following non-surgical treatment for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence and severity of dysphagia in people treated non-surgically for primary head and neck cancer (HNC) is well documented. However, few studies have looked beyond the physiological impairment to explore the lived experience of dysphagia in the post-treatment period of HNC. The current study adopted a person-centred, qualitative approach to describe the experiences of people living with dysphagia in the months and years following non-surgical treatment for HNC. Using maximum variation sampling, 24 participants who had undergone radiotherapy treatment for HNC were recruited. Individual interviews were conducted to explore the impact of dysphagia on participants' everyday lives. The themes identified included: (1) physical changes related to swallowing; (2) emotions evoked by living with dysphagia; (3) altered perceptions and changes in appreciation of food; and (4) personal and lifestyle impacts. The data revealed the breadth and significance of the impact of dysphagia on the lives of people treated curatively for HNC. Assessment and management in the post-treatment period must be sufficiently holistic to address both the changing physical states and the psychosocial needs of people with dysphagia following HNC. Rehabilitation services which focus only on impairment-based management will fail to fully meet the support needs of this clinical population.

  4. Chemoradiation therapy of esophageal cancer. Relationship between improvement of dysphagia and treatment outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Yoshihide; Kitahara Tadashi

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine retrospectively whether the extent of dysphagia influenced the survival rate after chemoradiation therapy in patients with advanced esophageal cancer. 46 patients had dysphagia before treatment, in which 39 patients were treated with a combination of chemotherapy and irradiation. The remaining 7 patients were treated with irradiation alone. Forty six patients were divided into 5 groups according to the dysphagia score standard to obtain a relationship between the extent of dysphagia and the survival rate of the patients after treatment. Thirty out of 46 patients (65.2%) became able to swallow solid food after treatment. In these patients, the median survival period was 12 months and the one-year survival rate was 53.2%. However, dysphagia was not improved in 16 patients and their median survival period was 4 months, the one-year survival rate was 17.9%. The survival rate after treatment was definitely higher in the patients with improvement of dysphagia. Regarding esophageal cancer, the patients with cancer in the upper esophagus had the worse survival rate. Improvement of dysphagia was an important factor to control the survival rate after chemoradiation therapy in patients with advanced esophageal cancer. (author)

  5. A case report of life-threatening acute dysphagia in dermatomyositis: Challenges in diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyoung Min; Lee, Jung Soo; Kim, Yeo Hyung

    2018-04-01

    Although dysphagia is a known complication of dermatomyositis, sudden onset of dysphagia without the notable aggravation of other symptoms can make the diagnosis and treatment challenging. A 53-year-old male diagnosed as dermatomyositis 1 month ago came to our emergency department complaining of a sudden inability to swallow solid foods and liquids. The patient showed generalized edema, but the muscle power was not different compared with 1 month ago. Serum creatine kinase level was lower than that measured 2 weeks ago. Computed tomography scan of the larynx, chest, abdomen, and pelvis, an esophagogastroduodenoscopy, and brain magnetic resonance imaging were unremarkable. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study revealed inadequate pharyngeal contraction and slightly decreased upper esophageal sphincter opening with silent aspiration. Treatment with oral prednisolone, intravenous methylprednisolone, azathioprine, and intravenous immunoglobulins was applied. During the course of medical treatment for life-threatening dysphagia, he continued with rehabilitative therapy. He could swallow saliva at 2 months and showed normal swallowing function at 3 months from the onset of dysphagia. Dysphagia has not recurred for 3 years after recovery. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary to diagnose severe acute dysphagia due to exacerbation of underlying dermatomyositis rather than other structural or neurological causes. Appropriate supportive care is important because dysphagia can be life-threatening and last for a long time.

  6. Implementing oral care to reduce aspiration pneumonia amongst patients with dysphagia in a South African setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaishika Seedat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Oral care is a crucial routine for patients with dysphagia that, when completed routinely, can prevent the development of aspiration pneumonia. There is no standardised protocol for oral care within government hospitals in South Africa. This study aimed to investigate the outcome of an oral care protocol. Participants were patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia, with either stroke or traumatic brain injury as the underlying medical pathology, and nurses. All participants were recruited from one tertiary level government hospital in Gauteng, South Africa. 139 nurses participated in the study and received training on the oral care protocol. There were two groups of participants with oropharyngeal dysphagia. Group one (study group, n = 23 was recruited by consecutive sampling, received regular oral care and were not restricted from drinking water; however, all other liquids were restricted. Group two (comparison group, n = 23 was recruited via a retrospective record review, received inconsistent oral care and were placed on thickened liquids or liquid restricted diets. Results showed that a regimen of regular oral care and free water provision when combined with dysphagia intervention did prevent aspiration pneumonia in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. The article highlights two key findings: that regular and routine oral care is manageable within an acute government hospital context and a strict routine of oral care can reduce aspiration pneumonia in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. An implication from these findings is confirmation that teamwork in acute care settings in developing contexts must be prioritised to improve dysphagia management and patient prognosis.

  7. Early Dysphagia Screening by Trained Nurses Reduces Pneumonia Rate in Stroke Patients: A Clinical Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palli, Christoph; Fandler, Simon; Doppelhofer, Kathrin; Niederkorn, Kurt; Enzinger, Christian; Vetta, Christian; Trampusch, Esther; Schmidt, Reinhold; Fazekas, Franz; Gattringer, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Dysphagia is a common stroke symptom and leads to serious complications such as aspiration and pneumonia. Early dysphagia screening can reduce these complications. In many hospitals, dysphagia screening is performed by speech-language therapists who are often not available on weekends/holidays, which results in delayed dysphagia assessment. We trained the nurses of our neurological department to perform formal dysphagia screening in every acute stroke patient by using the Gugging Swallowing Screen. The impact of a 24/7 dysphagia screening (intervention) over swallowing assessment by speech-language therapists during regular working hours only was compared in two 5-month periods with time to dysphagia screening, pneumonia rate, and length of hospitalization as outcome variables. Overall, 384 patients (mean age, 72.3±13.7 years; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 3) were included in the study. Both groups (pre-intervention, n=198 versus post-intervention, n=186) were comparable regarding age, sex, and stroke severity. Time to dysphagia screening was significantly reduced in the intervention group (median, 7 hours; range, 1-69 hours) compared with the control group (median, 20 hours; range, 1-183; P =0.001). Patients in the intervention group had a lower rate of pneumonia (3.8% versus 11.6%; P =0.004) and also a reduced length of hospital stay (median, 8 days; range, 2-40 versus median, 9 days; range, 1-61 days; P =0.033). 24/7 dysphagia screening can be effectively performed by nurses and leads to reduced pneumonia rates. Therefore, empowering nurses to do a formal bedside screening for swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients timely after admission is warranted whenever speech-language therapists are not available. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Randomized controlled trial comparing esophageal dilation to no dilation among adults with esophageal eosinophilia and dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitt, R T; Ates, F; Slaughter, J C; Higginbotham, T; Shepherd, B D; Sumner, E L; Vaezi, M F

    2016-11-01

    The role of esophageal dilation in patients with esophageal eosinophilia with dysphagia remains unknown. The practice of dilation is currently based on center preferences and expert opinion. The aim of this study is to determine if, and to what extent, dysphagia improves in response to initial esophageal dilation followed by standard medical therapies. We conducted a randomized, blinded, controlled trial evaluating adult patients with dysphagia and newly diagnosed esophageal eosinophilia from 2008 to 2013. Patients were randomized to dilation or no dilation at time of endoscopy and blinded to dilation status. Endoscopic features were graded as major and minor. Subsequent to randomization and endoscopy, all patients received fluticasone and dexlansoprazole for 2 months. The primary study outcome was reduction in overall dysphagia score, assessed at 30 and 60 days post-intervention. Patients with severe strictures (less than 7-mm esophageal diameter) were excluded from the study. Thirty-one patients were randomized and completed the protocol: 17 randomized to dilation and 14 to no dilation. Both groups were similar with regard to gender, age, eosinophil density, endoscopic score, and baseline dysphagia score. The population exhibited moderate to severe dysphagia and moderate esophageal stricturing at baseline. Overall, there was a significant (P dysphagia score at 30 and 60 days post-randomization compared with baseline in both groups. No significant difference in dysphagia scores between treatment groups after 30 (P = 0.93) or 60 (P = 0.21) days post-intervention was observed. Esophageal dilation did not result in additional improvement in dysphagia score compared with treatment with proton pump inhibitor and fluticasone alone. In patients with symptomatic esophageal eosinophilia without severe stricture, dilation does not appear to be a necessary initial treatment strategy. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  9. Interventions for oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with neurological impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Angela T; Dodrill, Pamela; Ward, Elizabeth C

    2012-10-17

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia encompasses problems with the oral preparatory phase of swallowing (chewing and preparing the food), oral phase (moving the food or fluid posteriorly through the oral cavity with the tongue into the back of the throat) and pharyngeal phase (swallowing the food or fluid and moving it through the pharynx to the oesophagus). Populations of children with neurological impairment who commonly experience dysphagia include, but are not limited to, those with acquired brain impairment (for example, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, stroke), genetic syndromes (for example, Down syndrome, Rett syndrome) and degenerative conditions (for example, myotonic dystrophy). To examine the effectiveness of interventions for oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with neurological impairment. We searched the following electronic databases in October 2011: CENTRAL 2011(3), MEDLINE (1948 to September Week 4 2011), EMBASE (1980 to 2011 Week 40)
, CINAHL (1937 to current)
, ERIC (1966 to current), PsycINFO (1806 to October Week 1 2011), Science Citation Index (1970 to 7 October 2011), Social Science Citation Index (1970 to 7 October 2011), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2011(3), DARE 2011(3), Current Controlled Trials (ISRCTN Register) (15 October 2011), ClinicalTrials.gov (15 October 2011) and WHO ICTRP (15 October 2011). We searched for dissertations and theses using Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations, Australasian Digital Theses Program and DART-Europe E-theses Portal (11 October 2011). Finally, additional references were also obtained from reference lists from articles. The review included randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials for children with oropharyngeal dysphagia and neurological impairment. All three review authors (AM, PD and EW) independently screened titles and abstracts for inclusion and discussed results. In cases of uncertainty over whether an abstract met inclusion criterion, review

  10. A Rare Cause of Dysphagia to Remember: Calcific Tendinitis of the Longus Colli Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic M. Colella

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Longus colli tendinitis (LCT is an acute inflammatory condition with symptoms typically consisting of acute neck pain and stiffness with or without dysphagia. Once more severe etiologies for these symptoms are ruled out, this self-limiting condition usually resolves spontaneously with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids. We present a case of LCT that presented as acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia that rapidly resolved once diagnosed and treated with anti-inflammatory agents. Though exceedingly rare, LCT must be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia when more common etiologies do not correlate with the clinical presentation.

  11. Progressive dysphagia in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Richard

    2012-02-01

    Dysphagia has not been reported in genetically confirmed limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B). A 40-year-old woman reported exercise-induced calf pain at age 34, followed by progressive lower and upper limb weakness. At age 38, progressive dysphagia for solids, and subsequently liquids, ensued. Endoscopic and videofluoroscopic-radiological findings indicated a myopathic swallowing disorder. Molecular genetic analysis confirmed two dysferlin gene mutations consistent with a compound heterozygote state. Progressive dysphagia should be considered as part of the expanding dysferlinopathy phenotype.

  12. Pathophysiology of Radiation-Induced Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Suzanne N; Dunlap, Neal E; Tennant, Paul A; Pitts, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Oncologic treatments, such as curative radiotherapy and chemoradiation, for head and neck cancer can cause long-term swallowing impairments (dysphagia) that negatively impact quality of life. Radiation-induced dysphagia comprised a broad spectrum of structural, mechanical, and neurologic deficits. An understanding of the biomolecular effects of radiation on the time course of wound healing and underlying morphological tissue responses that precede radiation damage will improve options available for dysphagia treatment. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of radiation-induced injury and elucidate areas that need further exploration.

  13. A study of dysphagia symptoms and esophageal body function in children undergoing anti-reflux surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Omari, T.; Connor, F.; McCall, L.; Ferris, L.; Ellison, S.; Hanson, B.; Abu-Assi, R.; Khurana, S.; Moore, D.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The role of high-resolution esophageal impedance manometry (HRIM) for establishing risk for dysphagia after anti-reflux surgery is unclear. We conducted a prospective study of children with primary gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease, for whom symptoms of dysphagia were determined pre-operatively and then post-operatively and we examined for features that may predict post-operative dysphagia. Methods: Thirteen children (aged 6.8–15.5 years) undergoing work-up prior to 360 o Niss...

  14. Can a giant cervical osteophyte cause dysphagia and airway obstruction? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Vasileiadis, Ioannis; Papanas, Nikolaos; Goulimari, Reggina; Maltezos, Eustratios

    2011-05-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder mainly affecting elderly people. It frequently presents with excessive bone formation (osteophytes). These may lead to pain and neurological deficits due to root compression. Dysphagia and airway obstruction due to a giant anterior osteophyte of the cervical spine are extremely rare. We present the case of an 81-year-old patient suffering from dysphagia and slight dyspnoea due to a giant cervical osteophyte. Osteophyte resection was performed and the patient was relieved from symptoms. This case highlights that a large cervical osteophyte may, albeit rarely, be the cause of simultaneously presenting dysphagia and dyspnoea, and should, therefore, be included in the diagnostic workup in such cases.

  15. Pill in the blister pack: a rare cause of dysphagia in an elderly adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeeq, Syed Mudassir; Rai, Ayesha Aslam; Tasneem, Abbas Ali; Luck, Nasir Hassan; Majid, Zain

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body impaction in the esophagus amongst adults is not a common cause of dysphagia. Fish bone, food bolus, dentures may cause symptoms of dysphagia, odynophagia, chest pain or respiratory distress. It needs prompt evaluation along with removal of the substance either surgically or endoscopically to avoid the development of life threatening complications. Here we are reporting a case of an elderly male, who presented to us with a history of absolute dysphagia for one week, as a consequence of ingestion of a pill in blister pack. PMID:26918072

  16. Clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Lisiane De Rosa; Gomes, Erissandra; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the occurrence of clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis, to compare the respiratory parameters during deglutition, and to ensure the intra- and inter- examiners agreement, as well as to accomplish intra and interexaminators concordance of the clinical evaluation of the deglutition. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 42 infants aged 0-12 months. The clinical evaluation was accompanied by measurements of respiratory rate and pulse oximetry. A score of swallowing disorders was designed to establish associations with other studied variables and to ensure the intra- and interrater agreement of clinical feeding assessments. Caregivers also completed a questionnaire about feeding difficulties. Significance was set at pdysphagia. PMID:25479843

  17. Dyspnea and dysphagia associated to hypopharyngeal fibrolipoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Mendez Saenz, MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fibrolipomas are benign lesions conformed by fat and connective tissue, classified as histologic variants of lipomas. They are rarely located in the head and neck and represent less than 0.6% of the benign tumors of the larynx and hypopharynx. Their clinical presentation depends on its location and size. We present the case of a 51-year-old male patient who reported progressive dyspnea, dysphagia and obstructive sleep symptoms with a duration of 3 months, without apparent cause. A pharyngolaryngeal fiberoptic endoscopy showed a smooth, rounded mass in the posterior wall of the hypopharynx, partially obstructing the laryngeal vestibule, creating a valve effect. Complete trans-cervical resection of the lesion was performed after the airway was secured by means of a tracheotomy. The final histopathology report was fibrolipoma. He is currently asymptomatic and without evidence of relapse one year after the procedure.

  18. Lymphocytic Esophagitis: An Emerging Clinicopathologic Disease Associated with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasricha, Sarina; Gupta, Amit; Reed, Craig C; Speck, Olga; Woosley, John T; Dellon, Evan S

    2016-10-01

    Lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is a recently described clinicopathological condition, but little is known about its features and clinical associations. The aim of this study was to characterize patients with LyE, compare them to non-LyE controls, and identify risk factors. We conducted a retrospective study of all patients ≥18 years old who underwent upper endoscopy with esophageal biopsy between January 1, 2000, and June 1, 2012. Archived pathology slides were re-reviewed, and LyE was diagnosed if there was lymphocyte-predominant esophageal inflammation with no eosinophils or granulocytes. Three non-LyE controls groups were also defined: reflux, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), and normal. Clinical data were extracted from electronic medical records, and LyE cases were compared to non-LyE controls. Twenty-seven adults were diagnosed with LyE, and the majority were female (63 %). The most common symptom was dysphagia (70 %). Fifty-two percentage had a prior or current diagnosis of reflux. Endoscopic findings included strictures (37 %), erosive esophagitis (33 %), rings (26 %), and hiatal hernia (26 %); 33 % of patients required dilation. After histology re-review, 78 % of LyE patients were found to have more than 20 lymphs/hpf. In comparison with the normal, reflux and EoE controls, patients with LyE tended to be nonwhite (p dysphagia due to esophageal strictures which require dilation. Smoking was associated with LyE, whereas atopy was not. LyE should be considered as a diagnostic possibility in patients with these characteristics undergoing upper endoscopy.

  19. [Clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Lisiane De Rosa; Gomes, Erissandra; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno

    2014-09-01

    To determine the occurrence of clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis, to compare the respiratory parameters during deglutition, and to ensure the intra- and inter- examiners agreement, as well as to accomplish intra and interexaminators concordance of the clinical evaluation of the deglutition. This was a cross-sectional study of 42 infants aged 0-12 months. The clinical evaluation was accompanied by measurements of respiratory rate and pulse oximetry. A score of swallowing disorders was designed to establish associations with other studied variables and to ensure the intra- and interrater agreement of clinical feeding assessments. Caregivers also completed a questionnaire about feeding difficulties. Significance was set at p<0.05. Changes in the oral phase (prolonged pauses) and pharyngeal phase (wheezing, coughing and gagging) of swallowing were found. A significant increase in respiratory rate between pre- and post-feeding times was found, and it was determined that almost half of the infants had tachypnea. An association was observed between the swallowing disorder scores and a decrease in oxygen saturation. Infants whose caregivers reported feeding difficulties during hospitalization stated a significantly greater number of changes in the swallowing evaluation. The intra-rater agreement was considered to be very good. Infants with acute viral bronchiolitis displayed swallowing disorders in addition to changes in respiratory rate and measures of oxygen saturation. It is suggested, therefore, that infants displaying these risk factors have a higher probability of dysphagia. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. A Systematic Review of the Prevalence of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Stroke, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, and Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Claire; Gemmell, Elizabeth; Kenworthy, James; Speyer, Renée

    2016-06-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a common condition after stroke, Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and can cause serious complications including malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia, and premature mortality. Despite its high prevalence among the elderly and associated serious complications, dysphagia is often overlooked and under-diagnosed in vulnerable patient populations. This systematic review aimed to improve understanding and awareness of the prevalence of dysphagia in susceptible patient populations. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, PROSPERO, and disease-specific websites were systematically searched for studies reporting oropharyngeal dysphagia prevalence or incidence in people with stroke, PD, AD, traumatic brain injury, and community-acquired pneumonia, from the USA, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, Japan, China, and regional studies. The quality of study descriptions were assessed based on STROBE guidelines. A total of 1207 publications were identified and 33 met inclusion criteria: 24 in stroke, six in PD, two in traumatic brain injury, and one in patients with traumatic brain injury. Dysphagia was reported in 8.1-80 % of stroke patients, 11-81 % of PD, 27-30 % of traumatic brain injury patients, and 91.7 % of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. No relevant studies of dysphagia in AD were identified. This review demonstrates that dysphagia is highly prevalent in these populations, and highlights discrepancies between studies, gaps in dysphagia research, and the need for better dysphagia management starting with a reliable, standardized, and validated method for oropharyngeal dysphagia identification.

  1. The incidences and risk factors related to early dysphagia after anterior cervical spine surgery: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Tong, Wei-Lai; Chen, Xuan-Yin; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Wen-Zhao; Huang, Shan-Hu; Liu, Zhi-Li

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common complication following anterior cervical spine surgery (ACSS). The incidences of dysphagia were variable and controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of early dysphagia after ACSS with a new scoring system, and to identify the risk factors of it. A prospective study was carried out and patients who underwent ACSS from March 2014 to August 2014 in our hospital were included in this study. A self-designed dysphagia questionnaire was delivered to all of the patients from the first day to the fifth day after ACSS. Perioperative characteristics of patients were recorded, and incidences and risk factors of dysphagia were analyzed. A total of 104 patients who underwent ACSS were included and incidences of dysphagia from the first to the fifth day after ACSS was 87.5%, 79.81%, 62.14%, 50% and 44.23%, respectively. There was a good correlation between the new dysphagia scoring system and Bazaz scoring system (P dysphagia during the first to the second day postoperatively. However, the dC2-C7angle was the main risk factor for dysphagia from the third to the fifth day after surgery. There were comparatively high incidences of early dysphagia after ACSS, which may be ascribed to operative time, BMI and the dC2-C7 angle.

  2. Dysphagia and disrupted cranial nerve development in a mouse model of DiGeorge (22q11 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly A. Karpinski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We assessed feeding-related developmental anomalies in the LgDel mouse model of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, a common developmental disorder that frequently includes perinatal dysphagia – debilitating feeding, swallowing and nutrition difficulties from birth onward – within its phenotypic spectrum. LgDel pups gain significantly less weight during the first postnatal weeks, and have several signs of respiratory infections due to food aspiration. Most 22q11 genes are expressed in anlagen of craniofacial and brainstem regions critical for feeding and swallowing, and diminished expression in LgDel embryos apparently compromises development of these regions. Palate and jaw anomalies indicate divergent oro-facial morphogenesis. Altered expression and patterning of hindbrain transcriptional regulators, especially those related to retinoic acid (RA signaling, prefigures these disruptions. Subsequently, gene expression, axon growth and sensory ganglion formation in the trigeminal (V, glossopharyngeal (IX or vagus (X cranial nerves (CNs that innervate targets essential for feeding, swallowing and digestion are disrupted. Posterior CN IX and X ganglia anomalies primarily reflect diminished dosage of the 22q11DS candidate gene Tbx1. Genetic modification of RA signaling in LgDel embryos rescues the anterior CN V phenotype and returns expression levels or pattern of RA-sensitive genes to those in wild-type embryos. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage, including but not limited to Tbx1, disrupts oro-facial and CN development by modifying RA-modulated anterior-posterior hindbrain differentiation. These disruptions likely contribute to dysphagia in infants and young children with 22q11DS.

  3. Prevalence and association of oral candidiasis with dysphagia in individuals with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Kothari, Mohit

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of oral candidiasis (OC) in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) and to evaluate the association of OC with improvement in dysphagia. Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: Individuals with ABI admitted to rehabilitation were recruited over...... a one-year period (n=206 (59% with dysphagia). OC-data were collected by clinical examinations and verified by cultivation/microscopy in every 3 weeks during first 10 weeks of admission. . Dysphagia improvement was defined by: 1) first positive change in food consistency, 2) initiation of at least soft....... The OC prevalence was 24.8% at one week after admission and reduced to 10.1% ten weeks after admission. Adjusted hazard ratios for improvement in dysphagia were 0.64-0.77 in OC compared to without OC, though not statistically significant. Conclusion: Prevalence of OC was high at admission but reduced...

  4. Prevalence and association of oral candidiasis with dysphagia in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk; Kothari, Mohit

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of oral candidiasis (OC) in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) and to evaluate the association of OC with improvement in dysphagia. Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: Individuals with ABI admitted to a rehabilitation centre were...... recruited over a one-year period. OC-data were collected by clinical examinations and verified by cultivation/microscopy in every 3 weeks during first 10 weeks of admission. Data on dysphagia were collected through medical record reviews. Dysphagia improvement was defined by: 1) First positive change.......7%, respectively. The OC prevalence was 24.8% after one week of admission and reduced to 10.1% after ten weeks of admission. Adjusted hazard ratios for improvement in dysphagia were 0.64-0.77 in OC compared to without OC, though not statistically significant. Conclusion: Prevalence of OC was high at admission...

  5. Animal Models for Dysphagia Studies: What have we learnt so far

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Rebecca Z.; Crompton, A.W.; Gould, Francois D. H.; Thexton, Allan J.

    2017-01-01

    Research using animal models has contributed significantly to realizing the goal of understanding dysfunction and improving the care of patients who suffer from dysphagia. But why should other researchers and the clinicians who see patients day in and day out care about this work? Results from studies of animal models have the potential to change and grow how we think about dysphagia research and practice in general, well beyond applying specific results to human studies. Animal research provides two key contributions to our understanding of dysphagia. The first is a more complete characterization of the physiology of both normal and pathological swallow than is possible in human subjects. The second is suggesting of specific, physiological, targets for development and testing of treatment interventions to improve dysphagia outcomes. PMID:28132098

  6. Animal Models for Dysphagia Studies: What Have We Learnt So Far.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Rebecca Z; Crompton, A W; Gould, Francois D H; Thexton, Allan J

    2017-02-01

    Research using animal models has contributed significantly to realizing the goal of understanding dysfunction and improving the care of patients who suffer from dysphagia. But why should other researchers and the clinicians who see patients day in and day out care about this work? Results from studies of animal models have the potential to change and grow how we think about dysphagia research and practice in general, well beyond applying specific results to human studies. Animal research provides two key contributions to our understanding of dysphagia. The first is a more complete characterization of the physiology of both normal and pathological swallow than is possible in human subjects. The second is suggesting of specific, physiological, targets for development and testing of treatment interventions to improve dysphagia outcomes.

  7. Diagnostic Assessment and Management of Dysphagia in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardi, Virginia; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Patriti, Alberto; Marano, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    A growing concern in patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) is dysphagia, or swallowing impairment, which leads to malnutrition, dehydration, weight loss, functional decline and fear of eating and drinking, as well as a decrease in the quality of life. Thus the diagnostic assessment of dysphagia in patients with AD is imperative to ensure that they receive effective management, avoiding complications, and reducing comorbidity and mortality in such a growing population. Dysphagia management requires a multidisciplinary approach considering that no single strategy is appropriate for all patients. However, evidence for clinical diagnostic assessment, interventions, and medical management of dysphagia in these patients are still limited: few studies are reporting the evaluation and the management among this group of patients. Here we analyzed the most recent findings in diagnostic assessment and management of swallowing impairment in patients affected by AD.

  8. A Rare Cause of Dysphagia to Remember: Calcific Tendinitis of the Longus Colli Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Colella, Dominic M.; Calder?n Sandoval, Fiorela; Powers, David W.; Patel, Nimal; Sobrado, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Longus colli tendinitis (LCT) is an acute inflammatory condition with symptoms typically consisting of acute neck pain and stiffness with or without dysphagia. Once more severe etiologies for these symptoms are ruled out, this self-limiting condition usually resolves spontaneously with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids. We present a case of LCT that presented as acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia that rapidly resolved once diagnosed and treated with anti-inflam...

  9. Dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy: Evaluation of risk factors and assessment of endoscopic intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Anand; Yewale, Sayali; Tran, Tung; Brebbia, John S; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the risks of medical conditions, evaluate gastric sleeve narrowing, and assess hydrostatic balloon dilatation to treat dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG). METHODS VSG is being performed more frequently worldwide as a treatment for medically-complicated obesity, and dysphagia is common post-operatively. We hypothesize that post-operative dysphagia is related to underlying medical conditions or narrowing of the gastric sleeve. This is a retrospective, single institution study of consecutive patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy from 2013 to 2015. Patients with previous bariatric procedures were excluded. Narrowing of a gastric sleeve includes: inability to pass a 9.6 mm gastroscope due to stenosis or sharp angulation or spiral hindering its passage. RESULTS Of 400 consecutive patients, 352 are included; the prevalence of dysphagia is 22.7%; 33 patients (9.3%) have narrowing of the sleeve with 25 (7.1%) having sharp angulation or a spiral while 8 (2.3%) have a stenosis. All 33 patients underwent balloon dilatation of the gastric sleeve and dysphagia resolved in 13 patients (39%); 10 patients (30%) noted resolution of dysphagia after two additional dilatations. In a multivariate model, medical conditions associated with post-operative dysphagia include diabetes mellitus, symptoms of esophageal reflux, a low whole blood thiamine level, hypothyroidism, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and use of opioids. CONCLUSION Narrowing of the gastric sleeve and gastric sleeve stenosis are common after VSG. Endoscopic balloon dilatations of the gastric sleeve resolves dysphagia in 69% of patients. PMID:28058017

  10. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: a Novel Approach for Treating Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Michou, Emilia; Raginis-Zborowska, Alicja; Watanabe, Masahiro; Lodhi, Taha; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, a technique used to produce human central neurostimulation, has attracted increased interest and been applied experimentally in the treatment of dysphagia. This review presents a synopsis of the current research for the application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on dysphagia. Here, we review the mechanisms underlying the effects of rTMS and the results from studies on both healthy volunteers and dysphagic p...

  11. Development and validation of a new screening questionnaire for dysphagia in early stages of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Janine A; Fietzek, Urban M; Waldmann, Annika; Warnecke, Tobias; Schuster, Tibor; Ceballos-Baumann, Andrés O

    2014-09-01

    Dysphagia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) significantly reduces quality of life and predicted lifetime. Current screening procedures are insufficiently evaluated. We aimed to develop and validate a patient-reported outcome questionnaire for early diagnosis of dysphagia in patients with PD. The two-phased project comprised the questionnaire, diagnostic scales construction (N = 105), and a validation study (N = 82). Data for the project were gathered from PD patients at a German Movement Disorder Center. For validation purposes, a clinical evaluation focusing on swallowing tests, tests of sensory reflexes, and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) was performed that yielded a criteria sum score against which the results of the questionnaire were compared. Specificity and sensitivity were evaluated for the detection of noticeable dysphagia and for the risk of aspiration. The Munich Dysphagia Test - Parkinson's disease (MDT-PD) consists of 26 items that show high internal consistency (α = 0.91). For the validation study, 82 patients, aged 70.9 ± 8.7 (mean ± SD), with a median Hoehn & Yahr stage of 3, were assessed. 73% of patients had dysphagia with noticeable oropharyngeal symptoms (44%) or with penetration/aspiration (29%). The criteria sum score correlated positively with the screening result (r = 0.70, p dysphagia vs. risk of aspiration (noticeable dysphagia) with a sensitivity of 90% (82%) and a specificity of 86% (71%), and yielded similar results in cross-validation, respectively. MDT-PD is a valid screening tool for early diagnosis of swallowing problems and aspiration risk, as well as initial graduation of dysphagia severity in PD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sarcopenia is an independent risk factor of dysphagia in hospitalized older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keisuke; Akagi, Junji

    2016-04-01

    Sarcopenia can cause varying physical function disorders, including dysphagia. Malnutrition, a potential result of dysphagia, can also cause sarcopenia. However, the association between sarcopenia and dysphagia is not fully understood, despite evidence suggesting correlations between deglutition disorders and degenerative loss of muscle mass. The present study investigated the prevalence of dysphagia among patients with sarcopenia, and the association between the two conditions. We included 224 older adults (mean age 82.5 ± 8.4 years; 37.9% men). Individuals who had a stroke or other diseases that could directly cause dysphagia were excluded. Logistic regression analyses were carried out after adjusting for potential causes of sarcopenia, including malnutrition, a low activity of daily living levels and aging, to investigate the relationship between the skeletal muscle index (SMI), prevalence of sarcopenia diagnosed based on a low SMI and grip strength, and swallowing functions. The Mini-Nutritional Assessment short form was used to assess their nutritional status, and the Barthel Index was used to evaluate their activities of daily living. The prevalences of sarcopenia and dysphagia were 76.8% and 30.0%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that Barthel Index, SMI and presence of sarcopenia were significant independent factors for the prevalence of dysphagia, after adjusting for sex, age and nutritional status. Furthermore, subgroup analysis showed that SMI in males, and both hand-grip strength and SMI in females were lower in dysphagic subjects than in non-dysphagic subjects (P ≤ 0.01). Sarcopenia was an independent risk factor for dysphagia among older individuals. However, further studies are required to define causality. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Self-expanding oesophageal metal stents for the palliation of dysphagia due to extrinsic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, N.K.; Boylan, C.E.; Razzaq, R.; England, R.E.; Mirra, L.; Martin, D.F. [Dept. of Radiology, South Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Withington Hospital (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    The role of self-expanding metallic stents is well established in the palliation of oesophageal stenosis and dysphagia due to primary oesophageal malignancy. However, their role in palliation of dysphagia due to external compressive mediastinal malignancies is not well established. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of self-expanding metallic stents in the palliation of dysphagia due to extrinsic oesophageal compression by mediastinal malignancy. Between January 1995 and January 1998, 21 patients with oesophageal compression due to malignant mediastinal tumours underwent oesophageal stent placement for palliation of dysphagia. Complete data were available in 17 patients (10 men and 7 women). The mean age was 63.5 years (range 46-89 years). A total of 19 stents were placed successfully. The dysphagia grade prior to and after oesophageal stent placement was assessed and the complications documented. Of the 17 patients, 16 reported an improvement in dysphagia. The mean dysphagia score improved from 3.1 prior to treatment to 1.3 after treatment. In 1 patient the stent slipped during placement and another stent was placed satisfactorily. Early complications (within 48 h) in the form of mild to moderate retrosternal chest pain occurred in 5 patients. This was treated symptomatically. Late complications (after 48 h) in the form of bolus impaction occurred in 2 patients. This was successfully treated with oesophagoscopy and removal of bolus. In 2 patients the stent was overgrown by tumour and in one of these an additional stent was placed. In 1 patient incomplete closure of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula was observed. There was no procedure- or stent-related mortality. The mean survival time of this group was 2.1 months. Self-expanding metallic stents can be safely and effectively used in the palliation of dysphagia due to external mediastinal malignancies. (orig.)

  14. Improving post-stroke dysphagia outcomes through a standardized and multidisciplinary protocol: an exploratory cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Smania, Nicola; Bisoffi, Giulia; Squaquara, Teresa; Zuccher, Paola; Mazzucco, Sara

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is a major cause of dysphagia. Few studies to date have reported on standardized multidisciplinary protocolized approaches to the management of post-stroke dysphagia. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the impact of a standardized multidisciplinary protocol on clinical outcomes in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. We performed retrospective chart reviews of patients with post-stroke dysphagia admitted to the neurological ward of Verona University Hospital from 2004 to 2008. Outcomes after usual treatment for dysphagia (T- group) were compared versus outcomes after treatment under a standardized diagnostic and rehabilitative multidisciplinary protocol (T+ group). Outcome measures were death, pneumonia on X-ray, need for respiratory support, and proportion of patients on tube feeding at discharge. Of the 378 patients admitted with stroke, 84 had dysphagia and were enrolled in the study. A significantly lower risk of in-hospital death (odds ratio [OR] 0.20 [0.53-0.78]), pneumonia (OR 0.33 [0.10-1.03]), need for respiratory support (OR 0.48 [0.14-1.66]), and tube feeding at discharge (OR 0.30 [0.09-0.91]) was recorded for the T+ group (N = 39) as compared to the T- group (N = 45). The adjusted OR showed no difference between the two groups for in-hospital death and tube feeding at discharge. Use of a standardized multidisciplinary protocolized approach to the management of post-stroke dysphagia may significantly reduce rates of aspiration pneumonia, in-hospital mortality, and tube feeding in dysphagic stroke survivors. Consistent with the study's exploratory purposes, our findings suggest that the multidisciplinary protocol applied in this study offers an effective model of management of post-stroke dysphagia.

  15. Dysphagia among Adult Patients who Underwent Surgery for Esophageal Atresia at Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Huynh-Trudeau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and/or anatomical anomalies.

  16. Stroke-induced immunodepression and dysphagia independently predict stroke-associated pneumonia - The PREDICT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sarah; Harms, Hendrik; Ulm, Lena; Nabavi, Darius G; Mackert, Bruno-Marcel; Schmehl, Ingo; Jungehulsing, Gerhard J; Montaner, Joan; Bustamante, Alejandro; Hermans, Marcella; Hamilton, Frank; Göhler, Jos; Malzahn, Uwe; Malsch, Carolin; Heuschmann, Peter U; Meisel, Christian; Meisel, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Stroke-associated pneumonia is a frequent complication after stroke associated with poor outcome. Dysphagia is a known risk factor for stroke-associated pneumonia but accumulating evidence suggests that stroke induces an immunodepressive state increasing susceptibility for stroke-associated pneumonia. We aimed to confirm that stroke-induced immunodepression syndrome is associated with stroke-associated pneumonia independently from dysphagia by investigating the predictive properties of monocytic HLA-DR expression as a marker of immunodepression as well as biomarkers for inflammation (interleukin-6) and infection (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein). This was a prospective, multicenter study with 11 study sites in Germany and Spain, including 486 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Daily screening for stroke-associated pneumonia, dysphagia and biomarkers was performed. Frequency of stroke-associated pneumonia was 5.2%. Dysphagia and decreased monocytic HLA-DR were independent predictors for stroke-associated pneumonia in multivariable regression analysis. Proportion of pneumonia ranged between 0.9% in the higher monocytic HLA-DR quartile (≥21,876 mAb/cell) and 8.5% in the lower quartile (≤12,369 mAb/cell). In the presence of dysphagia, proportion of pneumonia increased to 5.9% and 18.8%, respectively. Patients without dysphagia and normal monocytic HLA-DR expression had no stroke-associated pneumonia risk. We demonstrate that dysphagia and stroke-induced immunodepression syndrome are independent risk factors for stroke-associated pneumonia. Screening for immunodepression and dysphagia might be useful for identifying patients at high risk for stroke-associated pneumonia.

  17. Self-expanding oesophageal metal stents for the palliation of dysphagia due to extrinsic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.; Boylan, C.E.; Razzaq, R.; England, R.E.; Mirra, L.; Martin, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    The role of self-expanding metallic stents is well established in the palliation of oesophageal stenosis and dysphagia due to primary oesophageal malignancy. However, their role in palliation of dysphagia due to external compressive mediastinal malignancies is not well established. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of self-expanding metallic stents in the palliation of dysphagia due to extrinsic oesophageal compression by mediastinal malignancy. Between January 1995 and January 1998, 21 patients with oesophageal compression due to malignant mediastinal tumours underwent oesophageal stent placement for palliation of dysphagia. Complete data were available in 17 patients (10 men and 7 women). The mean age was 63.5 years (range 46-89 years). A total of 19 stents were placed successfully. The dysphagia grade prior to and after oesophageal stent placement was assessed and the complications documented. Of the 17 patients, 16 reported an improvement in dysphagia. The mean dysphagia score improved from 3.1 prior to treatment to 1.3 after treatment. In 1 patient the stent slipped during placement and another stent was placed satisfactorily. Early complications (within 48 h) in the form of mild to moderate retrosternal chest pain occurred in 5 patients. This was treated symptomatically. Late complications (after 48 h) in the form of bolus impaction occurred in 2 patients. This was successfully treated with oesophagoscopy and removal of bolus. In 2 patients the stent was overgrown by tumour and in one of these an additional stent was placed. In 1 patient incomplete closure of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula was observed. There was no procedure- or stent-related mortality. The mean survival time of this group was 2.1 months. Self-expanding metallic stents can be safely and effectively used in the palliation of dysphagia due to external mediastinal malignancies. (orig.)

  18. Quality of life in oncological patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia: validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory and the Deglutition Handicap Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speyer, Renée; Heijnen, Bas J; Baijens, Laura W; Vrijenhoef, Femke H; Otters, Elsemieke F; Roodenburg, Nel; Bogaardt, Hans C

    2011-12-01

    Quality of life is an important outcome measurement in objectifying the current health status or therapy effects in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. In this study, the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the Deglutition Handicap Index (DHI) and the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) have been determined for oncological patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. At Maastricht University Medical Center, 76 consecutive patients were selected and asked to fill in three questionnaires on quality of life related to oropharyngeal dysphagia (the SWAL-QOL, the MDADI, and the DHI) as well as a simple one-item visual analog Dysphagia Severity Scale. None of the quality-of-life questionnaires showed any floor or ceiling effect. The test-retest reliability of the MDADI and the Dysphagia Severity Scale proved to be good. The test-retest reliability of the DHI could not be determined because of insufficient data, but the intraclass correlation coefficients were rather high. The internal consistency proved to be good. However, confirmatory factor analysis could not distinguish the underlying constructs as defined by the subscales per questionnaire. When assessing criterion validity, both the MDADI and the DHI showed satisfactory associations with the SWAL-QOL (reference or gold standard) after having removed the less relevant subscales of the SWAL-QOL. In conclusion, when assessing the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the DHI or the MDADI, not all psychometric properties have been adequately met. In general, because of difficulties in the interpretation of study results when using questionnaires lacking sufficient psychometric quality, it is recommended that researchers strive to use questionnaires with the most optimal psychometric properties.

  19. Implementation of a standardized out-of-hospital management method for Parkinson dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongying Wei

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: Our objective is to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of establishing a swallowing management clinic to implement out-of-hospital management for Parkinson disease (PD patients with dysphagia. Method: Two-hundred seventeen (217 voluntary PD patients with dysphagia in a PD outpatient clinic were divided into a control group with 100 people, and an experimental group with 117 people. The control group was given dysphagia rehabilitation guidance. The experimental group was presented with the standardized out-of-hospital management method as overall management and information and education materials. Rehabilitation efficiency and incidence rate of dysphagia, as well as relevant complications of both groups were compared after a 6-month intervention. Results: Rehabilitation efficiency and the incidence rate of dysphagia including relevant complications of patients treated with the standardized out-of-hospital management were compared with those seen in the control group. The differences have distinct statistics meaning (p<0.01. Conclusion: Establishing a swallowing management protocol for outpatient setting can effectively help the recovery of the function of swallowing, reduce the incidence rate of dysphagia complications and improve the quality of life in patients with PD.

  20. Use of endoscopy in diagnosis and management of patients with dysphagia in an African setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudawi, H M Y; Mahmoud, A O A; El Tahir, M A; Suliman, S H; Ibrahim, S Z

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to define the utility of esophagogastroduodenoscopy in the diagnosis and management of patients presenting with dysphagia and to determine the relative incidence of the various causes of dysphagia in Sudan. This is a prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive, hospital-based study carried out at the endoscopy unit of Soba University Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan. All patients complaining of dysphagia underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with therapeutic intervention when necessary. A total of 114 patients were enrolled in the study, with a mean age of 47 years SD +/- 19 and a male to female ratio of 1 : 1.04. A benign condition was diagnosed in 56% of the cases; this included esophageal strictures in 21% of the cases and achalasia in 14%. Malignant causes were mainly due to esophageal cancer (40.4%) and cancer of the stomach cardia (3.5%). Therapeutic intervention was attempted in 83% of the cases. Risk factors predictive of a malignant etiology were age over 40 years (P dysphagia lasting between 1 month and 1 year (P endoscopy in our African setting is an accurate and useful investigation in the diagnosis and management of patients presenting with dysphagia. Patients over the age of 40 years presenting with dysphagia and weight loss are more likely to have a neoplastic disease and should be referred for urgent endoscopy.

  1. A Nationwide Study of the Impact of Dysphagia on Hospital Outcomes Among Patients With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranji, Suchitra; Paranji, Neethi; Wright, Scott; Chandra, Shalini

    2017-02-01

    To assess the impact of dysphagia on clinical and operational outcomes in hospitalized patients with dementia. Retrospective cohort study. 2012 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. All patients discharged with a diagnosis of dementia (N = 234,006) from US hospitals in 2012. Univariate and multivariate regression models, adjusting for stroke and patient characteristics, to assess the impact of dysphagia on the prevalence of comorbidities, including pneumonia, sepsis, and malnutrition; complications, including mechanical ventilation and death; and operational outcomes, including length of stay (LOS) and total charges for patients with dementia. Patients having dementia with dysphagia (DWD) had significantly higher odds of having percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement during the admission (odds ratio [OR]: 13.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.53-14.95, P dysphagia. Dysphagia is a significant predictor of worse clinical and operational outcomes including a 38% longer LOS and a 30% increase in charge per case among hospitalized patients with dementia. Although these findings may not be surprising, this new evidence might bring heightened awareness for the need to more thoughtfully support patients with dementia and dysphagia who are hospitalized.

  2. Radiation enhancement of laser palliation for malignant dysphagia: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargeant, I.R.; Loizou, L.A.; Tobias, J.S.; Blackman, G.; Thorpe, S.; Bown, S.G. (University Coll. Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1992-12-01

    Laser therapy offers rapid relief of dysphagia for patients with cancers of the oesophagus and gastric cardia but repeat treatments are required approximately every five weeks to maintain good swallowing. To try to prolong the treatment interval, 22 elderly patients were given additional external beam radiotherapy. Nine had squamous cell carcinoma and 13 adenocarcinoma: five had documented metastases. Six received 40 Gy and 16, 30 Gy in 10-20 fractions. A check endoscopy was performed three weeks after external beam radiotherapy. Dysphagia was graded from 0-4 (0=normal; 4=dysphagia for liquids). The median dysphagia grade improved from 3 to 1 after laser treatment. This improvement was maintained in the 30 Gy group but there was a noticeable deterioration in three of those who had received the higher radiation dose. A lifelong dysphagia grade of 2 or better was enjoyed by 14 of 16 patients in the 30 Gy group but only two of six in the 40 Gy group. The dysphagia controlled interval was 9 weeks (median) after check endoscopy and subsequent endoscopic procedures were required every 13 weeks to maintain good swallowing. There were no endoscopy related complications. Combined treatment is a promising approach for reducing the frequency of endoscopic treatments. The 30 Gy dose seems more appropriate and may prolong survival. A randomised study to test these conclusions is in progress. (Author).

  3. Effect of anterior cervical osteophyte in poststroke dysphagia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngkook; Park, Geun-Young; Seo, Yu Jung; Im, Sun

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether the concomitant presence of anterior cervical osteophytes can influence the severity and outcome of patients with poststroke dysphagia. Retrospective case-control study. Hospital. A total of 40 participants were identified (N=40). Patients with poststroke dysphagia with anterior cervical osteophytes (n=20) were identified and matched by age, sex, location, and laterality of the stroke lesion to a poststroke dysphagia control group with no anterior cervical osteophytes (n=20). Not applicable. Videofluoroscopic swallowing study, Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS), and Penetration-Aspiration Scale results assessed within the first month of stroke were analyzed. The FOIS at 6 months was recorded, and severity of dysphagia was compared between the 2 groups. The case group had larger degrees of postswallow residues in the valleculae and pyriform sinuses (P=.020 and Pdysphagia (OR=15.375; 95% CI, 3.195-infinity). The presence of anterior cervical osteophytes, which may cause mechanical obstruction and interfere with residue clearance at the valleculae and pyriform sinuses and result in more postswallow aspiration, may influence initial severity and outcome of poststroke dysphagia. The presence of anterior cervical osteophytes may be considered an important clinical condition that may affect poststroke dysphagia rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recovery from severe dysphagia in systemic sclerosis - myositis overlap: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinniah, Keith J; Mody, Girish M

    2017-06-01

    Dysphagia is common in inflammatory myopathies and usually responds to corticosteroids. Severe dysphagia requiring feeding by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is associated with significant morbidity and high mortality. A 56-year old African Black woman initially presented with systemic sclerosis (SSC) - myositis overlap and interstitial lung disease. She responded to high dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide followed by azathioprine, with improvement in her lung function and regression of the skin changes. Six years later she had a myositis flare with severe dysphagia. Her myositis improved after high doses of corticosteroids, azathioprine and two doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). As her dysphagia persisted, she was fed via a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube and given a course of rituximab. Her dysphagia gradually resolved and the PEG tube was removed within two months. She received another dose of rituximab six months later and continued low dose prednisone and azathioprine. Her muscle power improved, weight returned to normal and she remained well 20 months after hospital discharge. Our patient with SSC-myositis overlap and severe dysphagia requiring PEG feeding, improved with high dose corticosteroids, azathioprine, two courses of IVIG and rituximab, and remained in remission 20 months after hospital discharge.

  5. Dysphagia and mucositis after concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuneyuki, Miki; Maeda, Tatsuyoshi; Yonezawa, Koichiro; Morimoto, Koichi; Tanimoto, Hitoshi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2010-01-01

    A speech therapist performs swallowing rehabilitation in this hospital because concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for head and neck cancer is commonly associated with, dysphagia. An evaluation of oral mucositis and dysphagia after CCRT was conducted to determine the relationship between swallowing rehabilitation and swallowing disability. A total of 51 patients (44 males and 7 females) with a mean age of 63 years (range, 39 to 80), underwent CCRT with or without neck dissection between April 2008 and November 2009. Oral mucositis and dysphagia were graded at the end of CCRT according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 4.0. Seventeen of 51 patients underwent swallowing rehabilitation, exercise and education on muscle strengthening programs before and during CCRT. The average grades of oral mucositis of patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer patients were 1.8, 2.1, 1.8, and 0.8, respectively. There was a lower incidence of oral mucositis in patients with laryngeal cancer than in those with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer. The average grades of dysphagia of patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer were 2.4, 2.7, 2.2, and 1.2. Dysphagia was most severe in the patients with oropharyngeal cancer, while it was minimal in those with laryngeal cancer. Seventeen diligent patients that underwent swallowing rehabilitation every day rarely developed severe dysphagia. (author)

  6. Radiation enhancement of laser palliation for malignant dysphagia: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargeant, I.R.; Loizou, L.A.; Tobias, J.S.; Blackman, G.; Thorpe, S.; Bown, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    Laser therapy offers rapid relief of dysphagia for patients with cancers of the oesophagus and gastric cardia but repeat treatments are required approximately every five weeks to maintain good swallowing. To try to prolong the treatment interval, 22 elderly patients were given additional external beam radiotherapy. Nine had squamous cell carcinoma and 13 adenocarcinoma: five had documented metastases. Six received 40 Gy and 16, 30 Gy in 10-20 fractions. A check endoscopy was performed three weeks after external beam radiotherapy. Dysphagia was graded from 0-4 (0=normal; 4=dysphagia for liquids). The median dysphagia grade improved from 3 to 1 after laser treatment. This improvement was maintained in the 30 Gy group but there was a noticeable deterioration in three of those who had received the higher radiation dose. A lifelong dysphagia grade of 2 or better was enjoyed by 14 of 16 patients in the 30 Gy group but only two of six in the 40 Gy group. The dysphagia controlled interval was 9 weeks (median) after check endoscopy and subsequent endoscopic procedures were required every 13 weeks to maintain good swallowing. There were no endoscopy related complications. Combined treatment is a promising approach for reducing the frequency of endoscopic treatments. The 30 Gy dose seems more appropriate and may prolong survival. A randomised study to test these conclusions is in progress. (Author)

  7. Videofluoroscopy versus upper G.I. endoscopy: A comparative study as a diagnostic tool in patients presenting with dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Sharwak Ramlan; Sai Manohar; Gangadhara Somayaji

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Dysphagia is a major symptom in many of the patients coming to the hospital. There can be various causes of dysphagia and its accurate diagnosis shows the way for the necessary treatment. Videofluoroscopy and upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy are the two most commonly employed primary investigating modalities in assessing dysphagia. The objective of the study was to compare videofluoroscopy and upper GI endoscopy and establish a primary diagnostic tool for assess...

  8. Neurorehabilitation strategies for poststroke oropharyngeal dysphagia: from compensation to the recovery of swallowing function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabib, Christopher; Ortega, Omar; Kumru, Hatice; Palomeras, Ernest; Vilardell, Natalia; Alvarez-Berdugo, Daniel; Muriana, Desirée; Rofes, Laia; Terré, Rosa; Mearin, Fermín; Clavé, Pere

    2016-09-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is very prevalent among poststroke patients, causing severe complications but lacking specific neurorehabilitation treatment. This review covers advances in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and physiologically based neurorehabilitation strategies for poststroke OD. The pathophysiology of oropharyngeal biomechanics can be assessed by videofluoroscopy, as delayed laryngeal vestibule closure is closely associated with aspiration. Stroke may affect afferent or efferent neuronal circuits participating in deglutition. The integrity of oropharyngeal-cortical afferent pathways can be assessed by electroencephalography through sensory-evoked potentials by pharyngeal electrical stimulation, while corticopharyngeal efferent pathways can be characterized by electromyography through motor-evoked potentials by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Dysfunction in both cortico-mediated evoked responses is associated with delayed swallow response and aspiration. Studies have reported hemispherical asymmetry on motor control of swallowing and the relevance of impaired oropharyngeal sensitivity on aspiration. Advances in treatment include improvements in compensatory strategies but are mainly focused on (1) peripheral stimulation strategies and (2) central, noninvasive stimulation strategies with evidence of their clinical benefits. Characterization of poststroke OD is evolving from the assessment of impaired biomechanics to the sensorimotor integration processes involved in deglutition. Treatment is also changing from compensatory strategies to promoting brain plasticity, both to recover swallow function and to improve brain-related swallowing dysfunction. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Hybrid treatment of dysphagia lusoria: right carotid to subclavian bypass and endovascular insertion of an Amplatzer II Vascular Plug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Cobos-González

    Full Text Available Compression of the esophagus by a retroesophageal aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA is a rare cause of dysphagia. We present the case of a 47-year-old female with symptoms of progressive dysphagia diagnosed with dysphagia lusoria using barium swallow and contrast computed tomography and successfully treated with a hybrid procedure: right carotid to subclavian bypass and endovascular insertion of an Amplatzer II Vascular Plug through the right superficial femoral artery. We consider this approach safer, less invasive and more complete to avoid recurrent dysphagia.

  10. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation versus traditional therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease and oropharyngeal dysphagia: effects on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijnen, B J; Speyer, R; Baijens, L W J; Bogaardt, H C A

    2012-09-01

    This study compares the effects of traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment with those of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) as adjunct to therapy on the quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease and oropharyngeal dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients were randomized over three treatment groups. Traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment and traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment combined with NMES at sensor or motor level stimulation were compared. At three times (pretreatment, post-treatment, and 3 months following treatment), two quality-of-life questionnaires (SWAL-QOL and MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory) and a single-item Dysphagia Severity Scale were scored. The Functional Oral Intake Scale was used to assess the dietary intake. After therapy, all groups showed significant improvement on the Dysphagia Severity Scale and restricted positive effects on quality of life. Minimal group differences were found. These effects remained unchanged 3 months following treatment. No significant correlations were found between dietary intake and quality of life. Logopedic dysphagia treatment results in a restricted increased quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease. In this randomized controlled trial, all groups showed significant therapy effects on the Dysphagia Severity Scale and restricted improvements on the SWAL-QOL and the MDADI. However, only slight nonsignificant differences between groups were found.

  11. Palliation of dysphagia in patients with malignant esophageal strictures. Comparison of results of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and esophageal stent treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cwikiel, M. [Dept. of Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Cwikiel, W. [Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Albertsson, M. [Dept. of Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden)

    1996-06-01

    Dysphagia is the earliest and the most common symptom of malignant disease in the esophagus. The palliative effects on dysphagia of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) were evaluated retrospectively and compared with the effect of the self-expanding stent, evaluated in the prospective study. After completion of treatment, 78 (56%) of 140 patients treated with RT; 31 (49%) of 63 patients treated with CT; and 53 (81%) of 66 patients treated with stent insertion were free from dysphagia. Stent treatment has a good and prompt effect on dysphagia and can be recommended for palliation of patients with malignant esophageal strictures. (orig.).

  12. Injection of Botulinum Toxin a to Upper Esophageal Sphincter for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Two Patients with Inclusion Body Myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis WC Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion body myositis (IBM is a progressive degenerative skeletal muscle disease leading to weakening and atrophy of both proximal and distal muscles. Dysphagia is reported in up to 86% of IBM patients. Surgical cricopharyngeal myotomy may be effective for cricopharyngeal dysphagia and there is one published report that botulinum toxin A, injected into the cricopharyngeus muscle using a hypopharyngoscope under general anesthesia, relieved IBM-associated dysphagia. This report presents the first documentation of botulinum toxin A injection into the upper esophageal sphincter using a flexible esophagogastroduodenoscope under conscious sedation, to reduce upper esophageal sphincter pressure and successfully alleviate oropharyngeal dysphagia in two IBM patients.

  13. The incidence of dysphagia in patients receiving cerebral reperfusion therapy poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Priscila W; Cola, Paula C; Gatto, Ana R; da Silva, Roberta G; Luvizutto, Gustavo J; Braga, Gabriel P; Schelp, Arthur O; de Arruda Henry, Maria A C; Bazan, Rodrigo

    2014-07-01

    The high prevalence of dysphagia after stroke leads to increased mortality, and cerebral reperfusion therapy has been effective in reducing neurologic deficits. The aim of this study was to investigate the severity and evolution of dysphagia and the occurrence of pneumonia in patients submitted to cerebral reperfusion therapy. Seventy ischemic stroke patients were evaluated. Of these, 35 patients (group 1) were submitted to cerebral reperfusion therapy and 35 (group 2) did not receive thrombolytic treatment. The following were evaluated: severity of dysphagia by means of videofluoroscopy, evolution of oral intake rate by means of the Functional Oral Intake Scale, and the occurrence of pneumonia by international protocol. The relation between the severity of dysphagia and the occurrence of pneumonia with the treatment was evaluated through the chi-square test; the daily oral intake rate and its relation to the treatment were assessed by the Mann-Whitney test and considered significant if P is less than .05. The moderate and severe degrees of dysphagia were more frequent (P=.013) among the patients who were not submitted to cerebral reperfusion therapy. The daily oral intake evolved independently of the treatment type, without statistical significance when compared between the groups, whereas pneumonia occurred more frequently in group 2 (28%) in relation to group 1 (11%) and was associated with the worst degrees of dysphagia (P=.045). We can conclude that there is improvement in the oral intake rate in both groups, with lower severity of dysphagia and occurrence of pneumonia in ischemic stroke patients submitted to cerebral reperfusion therapy. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychometric characteristics of health-related quality-of-life questionnaires in oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Angelique A; Speyer, Renée; Heijnen, Bas J; Klijn-Zwijnenberg, Iris R

    2014-04-01

    Dysphagia can have severe consequences for the patient's health, influencing health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Sound psychometric properties of HRQoL questionnaires are a precondition for assessing the impact of dysphagia, the focus of this study, resulting in recommendations for the appropriate use of these questionnaires in both clinical practice and research contexts. We performed a systematic review starting with a search for and retrieval of all full-text articles on the development of HRQoL questionnaires related to oropharyngeal dysphagia and/or their psychometric validation from the electronic databases PubMed and Embase published up to June 2011. Psychometric properties were judged according to quality criteria proposed for health status questionnaires. Eight questionnaires were included in this study. Four are aimed solely at HRQoL in oropharyngeal dysphagia: the deglutition handicap index (DHI), dysphagia handicap index (DHI'), M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI), and SWAL-QOL, while the EDGQ, EORTC QLQ-STO 22, EORTC QLQ-OG 25 and EORTC QLQ-H&N35 focus on other primary diseases resulting in dysphagia. The psychometric properties of the DHI, DHI', MDADI, and SWAL-QOL were evaluated. For appropriate applicability of HRQoL questionnaires, strong scores on the psychometric criteria face validity, criterion validity, and interpretability are prerequisites. The SWAL-QOL has the strongest ratings for these criteria, while the DHI' is the most easy to apply given its 25 items and the use of a uniform scoring format. For optimal use of HRQoL questionnaires in diverse settings, it is necessary to combine psychometric and utility approaches.

  15. [Relationship between dysphagia and malnutritition in patients over 65 years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán Sánchez-Heredero, María José; Santander Vaquero, Cecilio; Cortázar Sáez, Milagros; de la Morena López, Felipe; Susi García, Rosario; Martínez Rincón, María Del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to understand the relationship between oropharyngeal dysphagia, nutritional risk factors and functional impairment in the elderly (>65y) admitted to a medical-surgical hospital unit. Secondary objectives were to determine the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia, the nutritional status and their functional capacity. A cross-sectional observational study was performed. It included patients over 65 years of age admitted to the Gastroenterology-Urology Department in La Princesa University Hospital (Madrid, Spain) during the months of February and March. The following variables were recorded: age, sex, body mass index, family support, diagnosis, comorbidity, oropharyngeal dysphagia (EAT-10 and volume-viscosity evaluation method), malnutrition (Mininutritional Assessment) and functional capacity (Barthel index). A total of 167 patients were recruited, with 30.8% and 15.4% prevalence of dysphagia and malnutrition, respectively. Prevalence of malnutrition increased to 75% in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. The logistic regression analysis showed how conditions as low score on the Barthel index (OR 0.97 [95% CI, 0.95-0.99]), comorbidity (OR 7.98 [CI 95%, 3.09-20.61]) and dysphagia (OR 4.07 [CI 95%, 1.57-10.52]) were associated with a greater likelihood of suffering malnutrition. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is one of the most underdiagnosed and underestimated conditions among elderly patients and one that has a greater effect on their nutritional status. Accordingly, we suggest using established diagnostic methods with a multidisciplinary team collaboration for its early detection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. [Evaluation of dysphagia. Results after one year of incorporating videofluoroscopy into its study introduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Romero, Ruth; Ros Arnal, Ignacio; Romea Montañés, María José; López Calahorra, José Antonio; Gutiérrez Alonso, Cristina; Izquierdo Hernández, Beatriz; Martín de Vicente, Carlos

    2017-11-09

    Dysphagia is very common in children with neurological disabilities. These patients usually suffer from respiratory and nutritional problems. The videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) is the most recommended test to evaluate dysphagia, as it shows the real situation during swallowing. To analyse the results obtained in our centre after one year of the implementation of VFSS, the clinical improvement after confirmation, and the prescription of an individualised treatment for the patients affected. VFSS performed in the previous were collected. The following variables were analysed: age, pathology, degree of neurological damage, oral and pharyngeal and/or oesophageal dysphagia and its severity, aspirations, prescribed treatment, and nutritional and respiratory improvement after diagnosis. A statistical analysis was performed using SPSS v21. A total of 61 VFSS were performed. Dysphagia was detected in more than 70%, being moderate-severe in 58%. Aspirations and/or penetrations were recorded in 59%, of which 50% were silent. Adapted diet was prescribed to 56%, and gastrostomy was performed on 13 (21%) patients. A statistical association was found between neurological disease and severity of dysphagia. The degree of motor impairment is related to the presence of aspirations. After VFSS evaluation and treatment adjustment, nutritional improvement was found in Z-score of weight (+0.3SD) and BMI (+0.4SD). There was respiratory improvement in 71% of patients with dysphagia being controlled in the Chest Diseases Department. After implementation of VFSS, a high percentage of patients were diagnosed and benefited from a correct diagnosis and treatment. VFSS is a fundamental diagnostic test that should be included in paediatric centres as a diagnostic method for children with suspected dysphagia. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  17. Evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia: which diagnostic tool is superior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmore, Susan E

    2003-12-01

    As flexible endoscopic examinations of swallowing become more widely used to evaluate patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia, it is important to be aware of research regarding the efficacy of this procedure as compared with the videofluoroscopy procedure. A recent evidence-based review of the field threw some long-held findings into question and has stimulated a surge of new research studying the sensitivity of the two instrumental examinations, health outcomes of patients who receive each procedure, and a look at different patient outcomes. Since 1999, one quasi-randomized clinical trial has directly compared outcomes of patients given a fluoroscopy versus a fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) examination. This study showed no significant difference in pneumonia rates between the two groups of patients. A multitude of studies have shown a high level of agreement between the two instrumental examinations, and the use of the term gold standard as applied to fluoroscopy is no longer appropriate. The attempt to standardize each examination has been slow, and inter-judge reliability of results has come under fire. Several new scales for quality of life and functional status are now ready to be applied to research that can measure outcomes other than pneumonia. Research to date has suggested that both instrumental examinations are valuable. It is likely that both will continue to be used and will be seen as complementary rather than competitors.

  18. The Dysphagia in Stroke Protocol Reduces Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients with Dysphagia Following Acute Stroke: a Clinical Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Sarah E; Miles, Anna; Fink, John N; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2018-03-30

    Cough reflex testing has been evaluated as a component of the clinical swallowing assessment as a means of identifying patients at risk of aspiration during swallowing. A previous study by our research group found good sensitivity and specificity of the cough reflex test for identifying patients at risk of aspiration post-stroke, yet its use did not decrease pneumonia rates, contrary to previous reports. The aim of this study was to expand on our earlier work by implementing a clinical management protocol incorporating cough reflex testing within the same healthcare setting and compare patient outcomes to those from the original study and to evaluate clinical outcomes in patients with acute stroke who were managed using the Dysphagia in Stroke Protocol (DiSP). Secondarily, to compare those outcomes to historical data prior to implementation of the DiSP. This clinical audit measured outcomes from 284 patients with acute stroke managed per the DiSP, which guides use of videofluoroscopic swallowing study and patient management based on clinical exam with cough reflex testing. Data from our previous trial were included for comparison of pre- and post-DiSP patient outcomes. Data collection took place between November 2012 and April 2016 at four urban hospitals within New Zealand. Following implementation of the DiSP, the rate of aspiration pneumonia (10%) was substantially lower than the pre-DiSP rate (28%), with no pneumonia readmissions within 3 months. Pneumonia-related mortality was unchanged. By 3 months, 81% of the patients were on a normal diet and 67% had returned home, compared to pre-DiSP outcomes of 55% and 55% respectively. Previous work has suggested that simply implementing cough reflex testing in dysphagia management may not be sufficient to improve patient outcomes. The present study adds to this picture by suggesting that the true variable of influence may be the way in which the results of the test are applied to patient care. There is a strong case

  19. TWO MODIFICATIONS OF SCALERS FOR RATE STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, T. S.; Gordon, B. E.

    1964-04-15

    Two simple modifications to nuclear scalers have been developed. The first involves an automatic stepping switch which permits a single scaler to be actuated by up to four Geiger counters in sequence and to record the time to reach a preset count for each. The second modification is designed to pick a pulse off a conventional scaler when a preset count has been reached and to use the pulse to actuate a recorder. Both modifications considerably extend the utility of conventional scalers.

  20. Cognitive Dysfunction and Malnutrition Are Independent Predictor of Dysphagia in Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Congestive Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Junichi; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Yoshimi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Nobuhiro; Onoue, Noriko; Ishizuka, Takeshi; Shinozaki, Tsuyoshi; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Early detection and intervention for dysphagia is important in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). However, previous studies have focused on how many patients with dysphagia develop CHF. Studies focusing on the comorbidity of dysphagia in patients with CHF are rare. Additionally, risk factors for dysphagia in patients with CHF are unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to clarify risk factors for dysphagia in patients with acute exacerbation of CHF. A total of 105 patients, who were admitted with acute exacerbation of CHF, were enrolled. Clinical interviews, blood chemistry analysis, electrocardiography, echocardiography, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), exercise tolerance tests, phonatory function tests, and evaluation of activities of daily living (ADL) and nutrition were conducted on admission. After attending physicians permitted the drinking of water, swallowing screening tests were performed. Patients were divided into a dysphagia group (DG) or a non-dysphagia group (non-DG) based on Functional Oral Intake Scale level. Among the 105 patients, 38 had dysphagia. A greater number of patients had history of aspiration pneumonia and dementia, and there was a higher age, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level in the DG compared with the non-DG. MMSE scores, exercise tolerance, phonatory function, status of ADL, nutrition, albumin, and transthyretin were lower in the DG compared with the non-DG. In multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age and sex, MMSE, BI score, and transthyretin was independently associated with dysphagia. Comorbidity of dysphagia was 36.1% in patients with acute exacerbation of CHF, and cognitive dysfunction and malnutrition may be an independent predictor of dysphagia.

  1. [Causes, diagnosis and treatment of neurogenic dysphagia as an interdisciplinary clinical problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Jurek

    2006-01-01

    The intricate mechanism of swallowing can be divided into three phases: oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal. Dysphagia is a disruption in the swallowing process, which include difficulty in transporting (or a lack of transporting) a food or liquid bolus from the mouth through the pharynx and esophagus into the stomach. Causes of disruptions in the swallowing process can be divided into superior (oropharyngeal) and inferior (esophageal) according to Paradowski et al. Neurlologic dysphagia may be caused by a disruption in different parts of the central nervous system (supranuclear level, level of motor and sensory nuclei taking part in swallowing process, peripherial nerves level and a pathology of muscle cells and spindles) or neuromuscular and muscular disorders. Neuromuscular disorders causes according to Waśko-Czopnik et al. are: stroke, brain tumors, brain injury, bulbar and pseudobulbar paralysis, neurodegenerative diseases (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis), tabes dorsalis, multisystem degenerations, Parkinson's disease, delayed dyskineses, Huntington's disease, myasthenia and myasthenic syndromes, myopathies and peripherial neuropathies. The correct diagnosis evaluation include history taking, physical examination with palpation and consultations (laryngological, gastrological and neurological). According to Halama radiological esophagogram, videofluoroscopy, flexible endoscopic examination, ultrasound examination, manometry, electromyography, scintigraphy and 24 hour pH monitoring are main diagnostic procedures of dysphagia. Some of the reasons for the neurologic dysphagia may be treated by surgical and pharmacological methods. Neurologic dysphagia rehabilitation is difficult, long-lasting and often falling far short of expected results. Primary it should include neurologic cause treatment if it is possible. According to WHO International Classification of Functioning and Health in 2001 non-invasive methods of dysphagia treatment may be

  2. Effect of dysphasia and dysphagia on inpatient mortality and hospital length of stay: a database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyomard, Veronique; Fulcher, Robert A; Redmayne, Oliver; Metcalf, Anthony K; Potter, John F; Myint, Phyo K

    2009-11-01

    To examine the effect of dysphasia and dysphagia on stroke outcome. Retrospective database study. Norfolk, United Kingdom. Two thousand nine hundred eighty-three men and women with stroke admitted to the hospital between 1997 and 2001. Inpatient mortality and likelihood of longer length of hospital stay, defined as longer than median length of stay (LOS). Dysphagia was defined as difficulty swallowing any liquid (including saliva) or solid material. Dysphasia was defined as speech disorders in which there was impairment of the power of expression by speech, writing, or signs or impairment of the power of comprehension of spoken or written language. An experienced team assessed dysphagia and dysphasia using explicit criteria. Two thousand nine hundred eighty-three patients (1,330 (44.6%) male), median age 78 (range 17-105), were included, of whom 77.7% had ischemic, 10.5% had hemorrhagic, and 11.8% had undetermined stroke types. Dysphasia was present in 41.2% (1,230) and dysphagia in 50.5% (1,506), and 27.7% (827) had both conditions. Having either or both conditions was associated with greater mortality and longer LOS (P<.001 for all). Using multiple logistic regression models controlling for age, sex, premorbid Rankin score, previous disabling stroke, and stroke type, corresponding odds ratios for death and longer LOS were 2.2 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.8-2.7) and 1.4 (95% CI=1.2-1.6) for dysphasia; 12.5 (95% CI=8.9-17.3) and 3.9 (95% CI=3.3-4.6) for dysphagia, 5.5 (95% CI=3.7-8.2), 1.9 (95% CI=1.6-2.3) for either, and 13.8 (95% CI=9.4-20.4) and 3.7 (95% CI=3.1-4.6) if they had both, versus having no dysphasia, no dysphagia, or none of these conditions, respectively. Patients with dysphagia have worse outcome in terms of inpatient mortality and length of hospital stay than those with dysphasia. When both conditions are present, the presence of dysphagia appears to determine the likelihood of poor outcome. Whether this effect is related just to stroke severity

  3. Relief of dysphagia during neoadjuvant treatment for cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, B; Ericson, J; Kumagai, K; Lundell, L; Tsai, J A; Lindblad, M; Rouvelas, I; Friesland, S; Wang, N; Nilsson, M

    2016-07-01

    Dysphagia is the main symptom of cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction and causing nutritional problems and weight loss, often counteracted by insertion of self-expandable metal stents or nutrition via an enteral route. Clinical observations indicate that neoadjuvant therapy may effectively and promptly alleviate dysphagia, making such nutrition supportive interventions redundant before surgical resection. The objective of the current study was to carefully study the effects of induction neoadjuvant therapy on dysphagia and its subsequent course and thereby investigate the actual need for alimentary gateways for nutritional support. Thirty-five consecutive patients scheduled for neoadjuvant therapy were recruited and assessed regarding dysphagia and appetite at baseline, after the first cycle of preoperative treatment with either chemotherapy alone or with chemoradiotherapy and before surgery. Platinum-based therapy in combination with 5-fluorouracil was administered intravenously days 1-5 every 3 weeks and consisted of three treatments. Patients receiving combined chemoradiotherapy started radiotherapy on day one of second chemotherapy cycle. They received fractions of 2 Gy/day each up to a total dose of 40 Gy. Watson and Ogilvie dysphagia scores were used to assess dysphagia, while appetite was assessed by the Edmonton Assessment System Visual analogue scale-appetite questionnaire. Patients were evaluated at regular outpatient clinic visits or by telephone. The histological tumor response in the surgical specimen was assessed using the Chirieac scale. Ten patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 25 patients scheduled for chemoradiotherapy were included in the analysis. There was a significant improvement in dysphagia in both treatment groups, according to both scales, already from baseline to the completion of the first chemotherapy cycle which remained to the end of the neoadjuvant treatment (P dysphagia and the degree of

  4. Transmitted cardiovascular pulsations on high resolution esophageal impedance manometry, and their significance in dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Naueen A; Zahid, Kamran; Keihanian, Sara; Dai, Yunfeng; Zhang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the behavior of pulsatile pressure zones (PPZ’s) as noted on high resolution esophageal impedance manometry (HREIM), and determine their association with dysphagia. METHODS Retrospective, single center case control design screening HREIM studies for cases (dysphagia) and controls (no dysphagia). Thoracic radiology studies were reviewed further in cases for (thoracic cardiovascular) thoracic cardiovascular (TCV) structures in esophageal proximity to compare with HREIM findings. Manometric data was collected for number, location, axial length, PPZ pressure and esophageal clearance function (impedance). RESULTS Among 317 screened patients, 56% cases and 64% controls had PPZ’s. Fifty cases had an available thoracic radiology comparison. The distribution of PPZ’s in these 50 cases and 59 controls was similar (average 1.4 PPZ/patient). Controls (mean 31.2 ± SD 12 years) were a significantly younger population than cases (mean 67.3 ± SD 14.9 years) with P dysphagia patients had partial compression from external TCV on radiology (1 aberrant subclavian artery, 2 dilated left atrium). The posture (supine vs upright) with more prominent PPZ’s impaired bolus clearance in 9 additional cases by > 20%. CONCLUSION Transmitted TCV pulsations observed in HREIM bear no significant impact on swallowing. However, in older adults with dysphagia, evidence of impaired bolus clearance on impedance should be evaluated for external TCV compression. These associations have never been explored previously in literature, and are novel. PMID:29209125

  5. Rehabilitation and nutritional support for sarcopenic dysphagia and tongue atrophy after glossectomy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashida, Nao; Shamoto, Hiroshi; Maeda, Keisuke; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Motoyuki; Fujii, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    Swallowing dysfunction is related to long-term weight loss and reduced body mass index in patients with head and neck cancer. We describe a 76-y-old woman who had severe sarcopenic dysphagia and atrophy of the reconstructed tongue for 17 mo after subtotal glossectomy due to tongue cancer and lost 14 kg during that period. Upon admission, the patient received diagnoses of malnutrition in the context of social or environmental circumstances with insufficient energy intake, loss of muscle mass, localized fluid accumulation, weight loss, and sarcopenia due to reduced skeletal muscle mass (skeletal muscle index protein intake to 70.3 g/d by supplying sufficient excess energy, and provided physical therapy and dysphagia rehabilitation to improve sarcopenia, atrophy of the reconstructed tongue, and dysphagia. After 20 mo of treatment, she was considered to be no longer malnourished (11 kg weight gain) and without sarcopenia (skeletal muscle index 4.01 cm 2 /m 2 ), and the volume of the reconstructed tongue was increased. Sarcopenia and atrophy of the reconstructed tongue may cause dysphagia after glossectomy due to tongue cancer. Additionally, nutritional support and rehabilitation could improve such dysphagia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Objective Measures of Swallowing Function Applied to the Dysphagia Population: A One Year Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Katherine A; Ellerston, Julia; Heller, Amanda; Houtz, Daniel R; Zhang, Chong; Presson, Angela P

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative, reliable measures of swallowing physiology can be made from an modified barium swallowing study. These quantitative measures have not been previously employed to study large dysphagic patient populations. The present retrospective study of 139 consecutive patients with dysphagia seen in a university tertiary voice and swallowing clinic sought to use objective measures of swallowing physiology to (1) quantify the most prevalent deficits seen in the patient population, (2) identify commonly associated diagnoses and describe the most prevalent swallowing deficits, and (3) determine any correlation between objective deficits and Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) scores and body mass index. Poor pharyngeal constriction (34.5 %) and airway protection deficits (65.5 %) were the most common swallowing abnormalities. Reflux-related dysphagia (36 %), nonspecific pharyngeal dysphagia (24 %), Parkinson disease (16 %), esophageal abnormality (13 %), and brain insult (10 %) were the most common diagnoses. Poor pharyngeal constriction was significantly associated with an esophageal motility abnormality (p dysphagia symptoms as determined by the EAT-10 did not correlate with swallowing function abnormalities. This preliminary study indicates that reflux disease is common in patients with dysphagia and that associated esophageal abnormalities are common in dysphagic populations and may be associated with specific pharyngeal swallowing abnormalities. However, symptom scores from the EAT-10 did not correspond to swallowing pathophysiology.

  7. The relationship between limit of Dysphagia and average volume per swallow in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Luciana Rodrigues; Gomes, Nathália Angelina Costa; Coriolano, Maria das Graças Wanderley de Sales; de Souza, Elizabete Santos; Moura, Danielle Albuquerque Alves; Asano, Amdore Guescel; Lins, Otávio Gomes

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to obtain the limit of dysphagia and the average volume per swallow in patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease (PD) but without swallowing complaints and in normal subjects, and to investigate the relationship between them. We hypothesize there is a direct relationship between these two measurements. The study included 10 patients with idiopathic PD and 10 age-matched normal controls. Surface electromyography was recorded over the suprahyoid muscle group. The limit of dysphagia was obtained by offering increasing volumes of water until piecemeal deglutition occurred. The average volume per swallow was calculated by dividing the time taken by the number of swallows used to drink 100 ml of water. The PD group showed a significantly lower dysphagia limit and lower average volume per swallow. There was a significantly moderate direct correlation and association between the two measurements. About half of the PD patients had an abnormally low dysphagia limit and average volume per swallow, although none had spontaneously related swallowing problems. Both measurements may be used as a quick objective screening test for the early identification of swallowing alterations that may lead to dysphagia in PD patients, but the determination of the average volume per swallow is much quicker and simpler.

  8. Correlation between brain injury and dysphagia in adult patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes, Maria Cristina de Alencar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the literature, the incidence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with cerebrovascular accident (AVE ranges 20-90%. Some studies correlate the location of a stroke with dysphagia, while others do not. Objective: To correlate brain injury with dysphagia in patients with stroke in relation to the type and location of stroke. Method: A prospective study conducted at the Hospital de Clinicas with 30 stroke patients: 18 women and 12 men. All patients underwent clinical evaluation and swallowing nasolaryngofibroscopy (FEES®, and were divided based on the location of the injury: cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex, subcortical areas, and type: hemorrhagic or transient ischemic. Results: Of the 30 patients, 18 had ischemic stroke, 10 had hemorrhagic stroke, and 2 had transient stroke. Regarding the location, 10 lesions were in the cerebral cortex, 3 were in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices, 3 were in the cerebral cortex and subcortical areas, and 3 were in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices and subcortical areas. Cerebral cortex and subcortical area ischemic strokes predominated in the clinical evaluation of dysphagia. In FEES®, decreased laryngeal sensitivity persisted following cerebral cortex and ischemic strokes. Waste in the pharyngeal recesses associated with epiglottic valleculae predominated in the piriform cortex in all lesion areas and in ischemic stroke. A patient with damage to the cerebral and cerebellar cortices from an ischemic stroke exhibited laryngeal penetration and tracheal aspiration of liquid and honey. Conclusion: Dysphagia was prevalent when a lesion was located in the cerebral cortex and was of the ischemic type.

  9. Esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms before and after oral IQoro(R) training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita; Franzén, Thomas

    2015-06-28

    To examine whether muscle training with an oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) improves esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms. A total of 43 adult patients (21 women and 22 men) were consecutively referred to a swallowing center for the treatment and investigation of long-lasting nonstenotic esophageal dysphagia. Hiatal hernia was confirmed by radiologic examination in 21 patients before enrollment in the study (group A; median age 52 years, range: 19-85 years). No hiatal hernia was detected by radiologic examination in the remaining 22 patients (group B; median age 57 years, range: 22-85 years). Before and after training with an oral IQS for 6-8 mo, the patients were evaluated using a symptom questionnaire (esophageal dysphagia and acid chest symptoms; score 0-3), visual analogue scale (ability to swallow food: score 0-100), lip force test (≥ 15 N), velopharyngeal closure test (≥ 10 s), orofacial motor tests, and an oral sensory test. Another twelve patients (median age 53 years, range: 22-68 years) with hiatal hernia were evaluated using oral IQS traction maneuvers with pressure recordings of the upper esophageal sphincter and hiatus canal as assessed by high-resolution manometry. Esophageal dysphagia was present in all 43 patients at entry, and 98% of patients showed improvement after IQS training [mean score (range): 2.5 (1-3) vs 0.9 (0-2), P dysphagia and reflux symptoms in adults, likely due to improved hiatal competence.

  10. Orotracheal intubation and dysphagia: comparison of patients with and without brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rodrigues Padovani

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the swallowing and feeding abilities in extubated patients with and without brain injury. Methods: A retrospective study including 44 patients aged 20 to 50 years submitted to prolonged orotracheal intubation (> 48 hours. Two groups were analyzed: Group 1 composed of nontraumatic brain injury patients, and Group 2 composed of patients with traumatic brain injury. Two scales for characterization of functional swallowing and feeding abilities were used to compare both groups; the levels of alertness, awareness and patient collaboration were also assessed. Rresults: The groups were equal in age, number and time of orotracheal intubation and extubation on the date of the assessment. Regarding the speech and language diagnosis, Group 1 presented higher percentage of functional swallowing and mild dysphagia, while Group 2 showed higher rates of moderate to severe dysphagia and severe dysphagia. The Functional Oral Intake Scale average was higher in Group 1. In addition, the injured brain group was sleepier, less collaborative and had less contact in the first evaluation. Cconclusions: In this study, patients who underwent prolonged orotracheal intubation had dysphagia in different degrees, but the patients with brain injury presented more frequent and severe disorder. Thus, this study suggested that orotracheal intubation cannot be considered as the single factor causing dysphagia, especially in neurological patients. Moreover, some cognitive factors may influence the possibility of providing oral feeding.

  11. Dysphagia and cerebrovascular accident: relationship between severity degree and level of neurological impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itaquy, Roberta Baldino; Favero, Samara Regina; Ribeiro, Marlise de Castro; Barea, Liselotte Menke; Almeida, Sheila Tamanini de; Mancopes, Renata

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this case study was to verify the occurrence of dysphagia in acute ischemic stroke within 48 hours after the onset of the first symptoms, in order to establish a possible relationship between the level of neurologic impairment and the severity degree of dysphagia. After emergency hospital admission, three patients underwent neurological clinical evaluation (general physical examination, neurological examination, and application of the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale - NIHSS), and clinical assessment of swallowing using the Protocolo Fonoaudiológico de Avaliação do Risco para Disfagia (PARD--Speech-Language Pathology Protocol for Risk Evaluation for Dysphagia). One of the patients presented functional swallowing (NIHSS score 11), while the other two had mild and moderate oropharyngeal dysphagia (NIHSS scores 15 and 19, respectively). The service flow and the delay on the patients' search for medical care determined the small sample. The findings corroborate literature data regarding the severity of the neurological condition and the manifestation of dysphagia.

  12. A Review of Dysphagia Presentation and Intervention Following Traumatic Spinal Injury: An Understudied Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Teresa J; Waito, Ashley A; Steele, Catriona M

    2016-10-01

    Dysphagia is reported to be a common secondary complication for individuals with traumatic spinal injuries. Different etiologies of traumatic spinal injuries may lead to different profiles of swallowing impairment. We conducted a systematic review to determine the characteristics of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and to describe interventions currently used to improve swallowing function in this population. A comprehensive multiengine literature search identified 137 articles of which five were judged to be relevant. These underwent review for study quality, rating for level of evidence, and data extraction. The literature describing dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury was comprised predominantly of low-level evidence and single case reports. Aspiration, pharyngeal residue, and decreased/absent hyolaryngeal elevation were found to be common characteristics of dysphagia in this population. The most commonly used swallowing interventions included tube feeding, compensatory swallowing strategies, and steroids/antibiotics. Improvement in swallowing function following swallowing intervention was reported in all studies; however, there was no control for spontaneous recovery. The results demonstrate a need for high-quality research to profile the pathophysiology of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and controlled studies to demonstrate the efficacy of swallowing interventions in this population.

  13. Characterizing Dysphagia and Swallowing Intervention in the Traumatic Spinal Injury Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Teresa J.; Waito, Ashley A.; Steele, Catriona M.

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is reported to be a common secondary complication for individuals with traumatic spinal injuries. Different etiologies of traumatic spinal injuries may lead to different profiles of swallowing impairment. We conducted a systematic review to determine the characteristics of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and to describe interventions currently used to improve swallowing function in this population. A comprehensive multi-engine literature search identified 137 articles of which 5 were judged to be relevant. These underwent review for study quality, rating for level of evidence, and data extraction. The literature describing dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury was comprised predominantly of low level evidence and single case reports. Aspiration, pharyngeal residue, and decreased/absent hyolaryngeal elevation were found to be common characteristics of dysphagia in this population. The most commonly used swallowing interventions included tube feeding, compensatory swallowing strategies, and steroids/antibiotics. Improvement in swallowing function following swallowing intervention was reported in all studies, however there was no control for spontaneous recovery. The results demonstrate a need for high-quality research to profile the pathophysiology of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and controlled studies to demonstrate the efficacy of swallowing interventions in this population. PMID:27412004

  14. Transmitted cardiovascular pulsations on high resolution esophageal impedance manometry, and their significance in dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Naueen A; Zahid, Kamran; Keihanian, Sara; Dai, Yunfeng; Zhang, Qing

    2017-11-28

    To investigate the behavior of pulsatile pressure zones (PPZ's) as noted on high resolution esophageal impedance manometry (HREIM), and determine their association with dysphagia. Retrospective, single center case control design screening HREIM studies for cases (dysphagia) and controls (no dysphagia). Thoracic radiology studies were reviewed further in cases for (thoracic cardiovascular) thoracic cardiovascular (TCV) structures in esophageal proximity to compare with HREIM findings. Manometric data was collected for number, location, axial length, PPZ pressure and esophageal clearance function (impedance). Among 317 screened patients, 56% cases and 64% controls had PPZ's. Fifty cases had an available thoracic radiology comparison. The distribution of PPZ's in these 50 cases and 59 controls was similar (average 1.4 PPZ/patient). Controls (mean 31.2 ± SD 12 years) were a significantly younger population than cases (mean 67.3 ± SD 14.9 years) with P dysphagia patients had partial compression from external TCV on radiology (1 aberrant subclavian artery, 2 dilated left atrium). The posture (supine vs upright) with more prominent PPZ's impaired bolus clearance in 9 additional cases by > 20%. Transmitted TCV pulsations observed in HREIM bear no significant impact on swallowing. However, in older adults with dysphagia, evidence of impaired bolus clearance on impedance should be evaluated for external TCV compression. These associations have never been explored previously in literature, and are novel.

  15. The Challenges of Dysphagia Management and Rehabilitation in Two Complex Cases Post Chemical Ingestion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbach, Anna F; Cremer, Rebecca; Chatwood, Astra; Fink, Sari; Haider, Sadaf; Yee, Michelle

    2016-11-01

    Dysphagia is common sequelae of chemical ingestion injury, resulting from damage to critical swallowing structures. From a speech-language pathology perspective, this study outlines the physiological deficits in 2 individuals with severe injury (1 woman, acid; 1 man, alkali) and the pattern of dysphagia rehabilitation and recovery. A retrospective chart review of clinical and instrumental assessments was conducted to examine swallow characteristics and speech-language pathology management (compensatory and rehabilitation strategies) at multiple time points. Chemical ingestion injury resulted in severe pharyngeal dysphagia for both participants, warranting speech-language pathology management. Dysphagia was characterized by poor base of tongue mobility and reduced laryngeal excursion. Decreased airway patency and protection, secondary to mucosal sloughing, widespread edema, and structural deficits necessitated tracheostomy. Recovery was complicated by physical alterations of pharyngeal and laryngeal structures (e.g., interarytenoid adhesions) and esophageal strictures. Participant 1 was discharged (Day 135) consuming a texture-modified diet; Participant 2 remained nil by mouth (Day 329). Dysphagia recovery subsequent to chemical ingestion is protracted and complex. Clinical outcomes may be improved through individualized and intensive rehabilitation by speech-language pathologists.

  16. Number of Gastrointestinal Symptoms is a Useful Means of Identifying Patients with Cancer for Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Machi; Manabe, Noriaki; Kamada, Tomoari; Hirai, Toshihiro; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken; Inoue, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia is a symptom suggestive of severe underlying pathology, although its causes include organic and non-organic disorders. The epidemiology of dysphagia is, however, poorly understood. We evaluated the prevalence of dysphagia in outpatients in Japan, measured the proportion ultimately found to have an organic cause, and recorded the nature of their symptoms and the underlying disorder. Of 5362 consecutive outpatients attending the Digestive Center at our hospital between June 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012, 186 patients (3.5 %) had dysphagia with a frequency score of ≥5 out of 6. The most common diagnosis was cancer (34 patients, 18.3 %), followed by gastroesophageal reflux disease (24 patients, 12.9 %). An esophageal motility disorder was diagnosed in 21 patients (11.3 %); the causes in the remaining 107 patients (57.5 %) were miscellaneous. Multivariable analysis identified the following predictors of cancer: age ≥ 54 years, weight loss, being a drinker of alcohol, and ≤2 gastrointestinal symptoms. Our findings can be used to inform the prioritization of referrals from primary care for investigation and treatment for patients with cancer for dysphagia.

  17. Risk factors for severe Dysphagia after concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koiwai, Keiichiro; Shikama, Naoto; Sasaki, Shigeru; Shinoda, Atsunori; Kadoya, Masumi

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for dysphagia induced by chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Forty-seven patients with head and neck cancers who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy from December 1998 to March 2006 were reviewed retrospectively. Median age was 63 years (range, 16-81). The locations of the primary lesion were as follows: larynx in 18 patients, oropharynx in 11, nasopharynx in 7, hypopharynx in 7 and others in 4. Clinical stages were as follows: Stage II in 20 and Stages III-IV in 27. Almost all patients underwent platinum-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy. The median cumulative dose of cisplatin was 100 mg/m 2 (range, 80-300) and median radiation dose was 70 Gy (range, 50-70). Severe dysphagia (Grade 3-4) was observed in 22 patients (47%) as an acute toxic event. One patient required tube feeding even at 12-month follow-up. In univariate analysis, clinical stage (III-IV) (P=0.017), primary site (oro-hypopharynx) (P=0.041) and radiation portal size (>11 cm) (P<0.001) were found to be associated with severe dysphagia. In multivariate analysis, only radiation portal size was found to have a significant relationship with severe dysphagia (P=0.048). Larger radiation portal field was associated with severe dysphagia induced by chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  18. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Versus Traditional Therapy in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease and Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Effects on Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Heijnen, B. J.; Speyer, R.; Baijens, L. W. J.; Bogaardt, H. C. A.

    2011-01-01

    This study compares the effects of traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment with those of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) as adjunct to therapy on the quality of life in patients with Parkinson’s disease and oropharyngeal dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients were randomized over three treatment groups. Traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment and traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment combined with NMES at sensor or motor level stimulation were compared. At three times (pretreatm...

  19. Survivors' Experiences of Dysphagia-Related Services Following Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nund, Rebecca L.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Scarinci, Nerina A.; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that people with dysphagia experience a number of negative consequences as a result of their swallowing difficulties following head and neck cancer management (HNC). However their perceptions and experiences of adjusting to dysphagia in the post-treatment phase, and the services received to assist this process, has not been…

  20. A new fully covered metal stent with anti-migration features for the treatment of malignant dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, Daisy; van den Berg, Maarten W.; van Hooft, Jeanin E.; Boot, Henk; Scheffer, Robert C. H.; Vleggaar, Frank P.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    A new esophageal stent with two anti-migration features was developed to minimize migration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of this stent in patients with malignant dysphagia. A total of 40 patients with dysphagia due to a malignant obstruction of the

  1. Rehabilitation or Compensation: Time for a Fresh Perspective on Speech and Language Therapy for Dysphagia and Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah K.; Roddam, Hazel; Sheldrick, Heulwen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is a common symptom of Parkinson's disease and can have negative consequences for physical health and quality of life. A variety of treatment options are available to clinicians working with people who have dysphagia and Parkinson's disease. These options can be broadly categorized as being compensatory or rehabilitative in…

  2. Automated impedance-manometry analysis detects esophageal motor dysfunction in patients who have non-obstructive dysphagia with normal manometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, N. Q.; Holloway, R. H.; Smout, A. J.; Omari, T. I.

    2013-01-01

    Background  Automated integrated analysis of impedance and pressure signals has been reported to identify patients at risk of developing dysphagia post fundoplication. This study aimed to investigate this analysis in the evaluation of patients with non-obstructive dysphagia (NOD) and normal

  3. Subjective dysphagia in older care home residents: a cross-sectional, multi-centre point prevalence measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarel-Wierink, C.D. van der; Meijers, J.M.M.; Visschere, L.M. De; Baat, C. de; Halfens, R.J.; Schols, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dysphagia has been found to be strongly associated with aspiration pneumonia in frail older people. Aspiration pneumonia is causing high hospitalization rates, morbidity, and often death. Better insight in the prevalence of (subjective) dysphagia in frail older people may improve its

  4. Relationship between esophageal contraction patterns and clearance of swallowed liquid and solid boluses in healthy controls and patients with dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogte, A.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Oors, J.; Siersema, P. D.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-obstructive dysphagia patients prove to be a difficult category for clinical management. Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is a novel method, used to analyze dysphagia. However, it is not yet clear how findings on HRM relate to bolus transport through the esophagus. Methods

  5. Bedside screening to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with neurological disorders: an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertscher, Berit; Speyer, Renée; Palmieri, Maria; Plant, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent comorbidity in neurological patients and presents a serious health threat, which may le to outcomes of aspiration pneumonia ranging from hospitalization to death. Therefore, an early identification of risk followed by an accurate diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia is fundamental. This systematic review provides an update of currently available bedside screenings to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia in neurological patients. An electronic search was carried out in the databases PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychInfo (formerly PsychLit), and all hits from 2008 up to December 2012 were included in the review. Only studies with sufficient methodological quality were considered, after which the psychometric characteristics of the screening tools were determined. Two relevant bedside screenings were identified, with a minimum sensitivity and specificity of ≥70 and ≥60 %, respectively.

  6. The role of transnasal oesophagoscopy in the management of globus pharyngeus and non-progressive dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyaolu, L N; Jemah, A; Stew, B; Ingrams, D R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transnasal oesophagoscopy is a relatively new method of examining the upper aerodigestive tract via the nasal passage as an outpatient procedure without the need for sedation. It has been shown to be a well tolerated, safe and accurate technique, that can therefore be used in the investigation of patients thought to have globus pharyngeus and other non sinister causes of dysphagia. Methods A total of 150 consecutive patients undergoing transnasal oesophagoscopy were analysed retrospectively. Results The main indications for this procedure were non-progressive dysphagia (n=68, 45%) and globus pharyngeus (n=60, 40%). Transnasal oesophagoscopy was normal in 65% of patients and 42% of patients were discharged from clinic at the same appointment with no further investigation. The most common positive findings were laryngeal erythema (13%) and oesophagitis (10%). Conclusions Transnasal oesophagoscopy is a useful adjunct to the management of patients with the symptoms of globus pharyngeus and non-progressive dysphagia.

  7. Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH—A Rare Etiology of Dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakumar Krishnarasa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old gentleman presented to the hospital with progressively worsening dysphagia to soft foods and liquids. He was diagnosed with severe pharyngeal dysphagia by modified barium swallow. A CT scan of the neck with IV contrast showed anterior flowing of bridging osteophytes from C3-C6, indicative of DISH, resulting in esophageal impingement. He underwent resection of the DISH segments. Following the surgery, a PEG tube for nutrition supplementation was placed. However, the PEG tube was removed after five months when the speech and swallow evaluation showed no residual dysphagia. DISH is a rare non-inflammatory condition that results in pathological ossification and calcification of the anterolateral spinal ligaments.

  8. Dysphagia training after head and neck cancer fails to follow legislation and national recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund, Sara Vinther; Høgdal, Nina; Christensen, Malene Bæk

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dysphagia is a known sequela after head and neck cancer (HNC) and causes malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia and a reduced quality of life. Due to improved survival rates, the number of patients with sequelae is increasing. Evidence on the ideal HNC-specific rehabilitation of dysphagia...... is lacking, but several studies indicate that early initiation is crucial. The aim of this study was to map the existing dysphagia rehabilitation programmes for HNC patients in Denmark. METHODS: Occupational therapists (OTs), oncologists and surgeons from five hospitals participated in a nationwide...... questionnaire-based survey, along with OTs from 39 municipal health centres. RESULTS: HNC patients rarely receive preventive occupational therapy before treatment, and hospital-based OTs mainly attend to HNC patients undergoing surgery. Far from all oncology and surgical departments complete the required...

  9. Lymphocytic Esophagitis: An emerging clinicopathologic disease associated with dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasricha, Sarina; Gupta, Amit; Reed, Craig C.; Speck, Olga; Woosley, John T.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lymphocytic Esophagitis (LyE) is a recently described clinicopathological condition, but little is known about its features and clinical associations. Aim To characterize patients with LyE, compare them to non-LyE controls, and identify risk factors. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of all patients ≥18 years old who underwent upper endoscopy with esophageal biopsy between January 1, 2000 and June 1, 2012. Archived pathology slides were re-reviewed and LyE was diagnosed if there was lymphocyte-predominant esophageal inflammation with no eosinophils or granulocytes. Three non-LyE controls groups were also defined: reflux, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), and normal. Clinical data were extracted from electronic medical records, and LyE cases were compared to non-LyE controls. Results 27 adults were diagnosed with LyE, and the majority were female (63%). The most common symptom was dysphagia (70%). 52% had a prior or current diagnosis of reflux. Endoscopic findings included strictures (37%), erosive esophagitis (33%), rings (26%), and hiatal hernia (26%); 33% of patients required dilation. After histology re-review, 78% of LyE patients were found to have more than 20 lymphs/hpf. In comparison to the normal, reflux and EoE controls, patients with LyE tended to be non-white (pdysphagia due to esophageal strictures which require dilation. Smoking was associated with LyE whereas atopy was not. LyE should be considered as a diagnostic possibility in patients with these characteristics undergoing upper endoscopy. PMID:27343035

  10. Management of dysphagia in Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchesi, Karen Fontes; Kitamura, Satoshi; Mourão, Lucia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    To describe swallowing management in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson' disease (PD), to investigate whether physiopathology determines the choice of therapeutic approaches, and to investigate whether the disease duration modifies the therapeutic approaches. This is a long-term study comprising 24 patients with idiopathic PD and 27 patients with ALS. The patients were followed-up in a dysphagia outpatient clinic between 2006 and 2011. The patients underwent clinic evaluation and Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing, Functional Oral Intake Scale, and therapeutic intervention every 3 months. The swallowing management was based on orientation about the adequate food consistency and volume, besides the necessary maneuvers or exercises to improve swallowing functionality. An exploratory analysis of data was used to investigate associations between the groups of disease (PD or ALS) and clinic aspects and to know about the association between the groups of diseases and the application of maneuver or exercises over the follow-up. The most frequent recommended maneuvers in PD were bolus effect (83.3%), bolus consistency (79.2%), and swallowing frequency (79%). To patients with ALS, the bolus consistency (92%) and the bolus effect (74.1%) were more recommended. Strengthening-tongue (p=0.01), tongue control (p=0.05), and vocal exercises (p<0.001) were significantly more recommended in PD than in ALS. Compensatory and sensorial maneuvers are more recommended to rehabilitee program in both diseases. The physiopathology of the diseases determined the choice of therapeutic approaches. The disease duration of the patients did not interfere directly in the therapeutic approaches.

  11. Drugs Related to Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miarons, Marta; Campins, Lluís; Palomera, Elisabet; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Cabré, Mateu; Rofes, Laia

    2016-10-01

    Scientific evidence on the impact of medication on the physiology of swallowing is scarce and mainly based on clinical case reports. To evaluate the association between oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) and chronic exposure to medication in older patients admitted to the acute geriatric unit (AGU) of a secondary hospital, we performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of 966 patients admitted to an AGU from 2008 to 2011. We reviewed (a) diagnosis of OD (assessed with the volume-viscosity swallow test, V- VST); (b) chronic patient medication classified by anatomical, therapeutic, chemical codes; and (c) demographic and clinical data. A univariate analysis was performed to determine which medications were associated with OD. A multivariate analysis adjusting for confounding clinical factors was performed to identify which of those medications were independently associated with OD. The age of patients included was 85.3 ± 6.37 years and 59.4 % were women. A total of 41.9 % presented OD. We found a possible protective effect of beta blocking agents on OD after the multivariate analysis (OR 0.54, 95 % CI 0.35-0.85). None of the categories of drugs was associated with an altered swallowing function after adjusting for confounding variables. The present study is the first one to widely investigate the association between drugs and OD, increasing understanding of their association. The role of beta blockers in OD needs to be further studied as their potentially beneficial effects on the swallowing function in older patients could help to prevent complications.

  12. Understanding the Viscosity of Liquids used in Infant Dysphagia Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Jackie; Chestnut, Amanda; Jackson, Arwen; Barbon, Carly E. A.; Steele, Catriona M.; Pickler, Laura

    2016-01-01

    When assessing swallowing in infants, it is critical to have confidence that the liquids presented during the swallow study closely replicate the viscosity of liquids in the infant's typical diet. However, we lack research on rheological properties of frequently used infant formulas or breastmilk, and various forms of barium contrast media used in swallow studies. The aim of the current study was to provide objective viscosity measurements for typical infant liquid diet options and barium contrast media. A TA-Instruments AR2000 Advanced Rheometer was used to measure the viscosity, five standard infant formulas, three barium products and two breastmilk samples. Additionally, this study measured the viscosity of infant formulas and breastmilk when mixed with powdered barium contrast in a 20% weight-to-volume (w/v) concentration. Study findings determined that standard infant formulas and the two breastmilk samples had low viscosities, at the lower end of the National Dysphagia Diet (NDD) thin liquid range. Two specialty formulas tested had much thicker viscosities, close to the NDD nectar-thick liquid range lower boundary. The study showed differences in viscosity between two 60% w/v barium products (Liquid E-Z-Paque® and E-Z-Paque® powder); the powdered product had a much lower viscosity, despite identical barium concentration. When E-Z-Paque® powdered barium was mixed in a 20% w/v concentration using water, standard infant formulas or breastmilk, the resulting viscosities were at the lower end of the NDD thin range, and only slightly thicker than the non-barium comparator liquids. When E-Z-Paque® powdered barium was mixed in a 20% w/v concentration with the two thicker specialty formulas (Enfamil AR 20kcal and 24 kcal), unexpected alterations in their original viscosity occurred. These findings highlight the clinical importance of objective measures of viscosity as well as objective data on how infant formulas or breastmilk may change in consistency when mixed

  13. Chemical modification and characterization of quaternized polysulfones.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nonjola, P

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and characterization of anion-exchange membranes (AEMs) using polysulfones is described. The modification process of polysulfones involves two steps: Firstly, by introducing chloromethyl groups followed by quaternization reaction...

  14. Decreased tongue pressure is associated with sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keisuke; Akagi, Junji

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the association between tongue pressure and factors related to sarcopenia such as aging, activities of daily living, nutritional state, and dysphagia. One-hundred-and-four patients without a history of treatment of stroke and without a diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease (36 men and 68 women), with a mean age of 84.1 ± 5.6 years, hospitalized from May 2013 to June 2013 were included in this study. Maximum voluntary tongue pressure against the palate (MTP) was measured by a device consisting of a disposable oral balloon probe. Nutritional and anthropometric parameters such as serum albumin concentration, Mini-Nutritional Assessment short form (MNA-SF), body mass index, arm muscle area (AMA), and others and presence of sarcopenia and dysphagia were analyzed to evaluate their relationships. Correlation analysis and univariate or multivariate analysis were performed. Simple correlation analysis showed that MTP correlated with Barthel index (BI), MNA-SF, serum albumin concentration, body mass index, and AMA. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that sarcopenia, BI, MNA-SF, and age were the independent explanatory factors for decreased MTP, and the propensity score for dysphagia, including causes of primary or secondary sarcopenia, and the presence of sarcopenia were significantly associated with the presence of dysphagia. Decreased MTP and dysphagia were related to sarcopenia or the causes of sarcopenia in the studied population. Furthermore, the clinical condition of sarcopenic dysphagia may be partially interpreted as the presence of sarcopenia and causal factors for sarcopenia.

  15. Effects of Bilateral Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Post-Stroke Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunhee; Kim, Min Su; Chang, Won Hyuk; Oh, Su Mi; Kim, Yun Kwan; Lee, Ahee; Kim, Yun-Hee

    Optimal protocol of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on post-stroke dysphagia remains uncertain with regard to its clinical efficacy. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of high-frequency rTMS at the bilateral motor cortices over the cortical representation of the mylohyoid muscles in the patients with post-stroke dysphagia. This study was a single-blind, randomized controlled study with a blinded observer. Thirty-five stroke patients were randomly divided into three intervention groups: the bilateral stimulation group, the unilateral stimulation group, and the sham stimulation group. For the bilateral stimulation group, 500 pulses of 10 Hz rTMS over the ipsilesional and 500 pulses of 10 Hz rTMS over the contralesional motor cortices over the cortical areas that project to the mylohyoid muscles were administered daily for 2 consecutive weeks. For the unilateral stimulation group, 500 pulses of 10 Hz rTMS over the ipsilesional motor cortex over the cortical representation of the mylohyoid muscle and the same amount of sham rTMS over the contralesional hemisphere were applied. For the sham stimulation group, sham rTMS was applied at the bilateral motor cortices. Clinical swallowing function and videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were assessed before the intervention (T0), immediately after the intervention (T1) and 3 weeks after the intervention (T2) using Clinical Dysphagia Scale (CDS), Dysphagia Outcome and Severity Scale (DOSS), Penetration Aspiration Scale (PAS), and Videofluoroscopic Dysphagia Scale (VDS). There were significant time and intervention interaction effects in the CDS, DOSS, PAS, and VDS scores (p dysphagia therapies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Prediction of outcome in neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia within 72 hours of acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickenstein, Guntram W; Höhlig, Carolin; Prosiegel, Mario; Koch, Horst; Dziewas, Rainer; Bodechtel, Ulf; Müller, Rainer; Reichmann, Heinz; Riecker, Axel

    2012-10-01

    Stroke is the most frequent cause of neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia (NOD). In the acute phase of stroke, the frequency of NOD is greater than 50% and, half of this patient population return to good swallowing within 14 days while the other half develop chronic dysphagia. Because dysphagia leads to aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, and in-hospital mortality, it is important to pay attention to swallowing problems. The question arises if a prediction of severe chronic dysphagia is possible within the first 72 hours of acute stroke. On admission to the stroke unit, all stroke patients were screened for swallowing problems by the nursing staff within 2 hours. Patients showing signs of aspiration were included in the study (n = 114) and were given a clinical swallowing examination (CSE) by the swallowing/speech therapist within 24 hours and a swallowing endoscopy within 72 hours by the physician. The primary outcome of the study was the functional communication measure (FCM) of swallowing (score 1-3, tube feeding dependency) on day 90. The grading system with the FCM swallowing and the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) in the first 72 hours was tested in a multivariate analysis for its predictive value for tube feeding-dependency on day 90. For the FCM level 1 to 3 (P dysphagia scales to prevent aspiration pneumonia and malnutrition. A dysphagia program can lead to better communication within the stroke unit team to initiate the appropriate diagnostics and swallowing therapy as soon as possible. Copyright © 2012 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluating a novel approach to enhancing dysphagia management: workplace-based, blended e-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilott, Irene; Bennett, Bev; Gerrish, Kate; Pownall, Sue; Jones, Amanda; Garth, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the learning effect and resource use cost of workplace-based, blended e-learning about dysphagia for stroke rehabilitation nurses. Dysphagia is a potentially life-threatening problem that compromises quality of life. In many countries, nurses play a crucial role in supporting the management of patients with swallowing problems, yet the literature reports a need for training. A single-group, pre- and post-study with mixed methods. Each blended e-learning session comprised a needs analysis, e-learning programmes, practical skills about modifying fluids and action planning to transfer learning into practice. Participants were the population of registered nurses (n = 22) and healthcare assistants (n = 10) on a stroke rehabilitation ward in a large, teaching hospital in England between August 2010-March 2011. Data collection comprised observation (34 hours), questionnaires administered at four time points to examine change in attitude, knowledge and practice, and estimating the resource use cost for the service. Nonparametric tests and content analysis were used to analyse the data. All participants achieved a nationally recognised level of competence. The learning effect was evident on the post- and follow-up measures, with some items of dysphagia knowledge and attitude achieving significance at the p ≤ 0·05 level. The most common self-reported changes in practice related to medicines management, thickening fluids and oral hygiene. The resource use cost was estimated at £2688 for 108 hours training. Workplace-based, blended e-learning was an acceptable, cost effective way of delivering essential clinical knowledge and skills about dysphagia. Dysphagia should be viewed as a patient safety issue because of the risks of malnutrition, dehydration and aspiration pneumonia. As such, it is pertinent to many members of the interdisciplinary team. Consideration should be given to including dysphagia management in initial education and continuing professional

  18. Dysphagia and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Acute, First-Ever, Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losurdo, Anna; Brunetti, Valerio; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Caliandro, Pietro; Frisullo, Giovanni; Morosetti, Roberta; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Sacchetti, Maria Luisa; Testani, Elisa; Vollono, Catello; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2018-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and dysphagia are common in acute stroke and are both associated with increased risk of complications and worse prognosis. The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate the prevalence of OSA and dysphagia in patients with acute, first-ever, ischemic stroke; (2) to investigate their clinical correlates; and (3) to verify if these conditions are associated in acute ischemic stroke. We enrolled a cohort of 140 consecutive patients with acute-onset (<48 hours), first-ever ischemic stroke. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging scans confirmed the diagnosis. Neurological deficit was measured using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) by examiners trained and certified in the use of this scale. Patients underwent a clinical evaluation of dysphagia (Gugging Swallowing Screen) and a cardiorespiratory sleep study to evaluate the presence of OSA. There are 72 patients (51.4%) with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA+), and there are 81 patients (57.8%) with dysphagia (Dys+). OSA+ patients were significantly older (P = .046) and had greater body mass index (BMI) (P = .002), neck circumference (P = .001), presence of diabetes (P = .013), and hypertension (P < .001). Dys+ patients had greater NIHSS (P < .001), lower Alberta Stroke Programme Early CT Score (P < .001), with greater BMI (P = .030). The association of OSA and dysphagia was greater than that expected based on the prevalence of each condition in acute stroke (P < .001). OSA and dysphagia are associated in first-ever, acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Longitudinal Study of Symptoms of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in an Elderly Community-Dwelling Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmons, Danielle; Michou, Emilia; Jones, Maureen; Pendleton, Neil; Horan, Michael; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia has been estimated to affect around 8-16 % of healthy elderly individuals living in the community. The present study investigated the stability of perceived dysphagia symptoms over a 3-year period and whether such symptoms predicted death outcomes. A population of 800 and 550 elderly community-dwelling individuals were sent the Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ) in 2009 and 2012, respectively, where an arbitrary score of 180 or more was chosen to indicate symptomatic dysphagia. The telephone interview cognitive screen measured cognitive performance and the Geriatric Depression Scale measured depression. Regression models were used to investigate associations with dysphagia symptom scores, cognition, depression, age, gender and a history of stroke; a paired t test was used to examine if individual mean scores had changed. A total of 528 participants were included in the analysis. In 2009, dysphagia was associated with age (P = 0.028, OR 1.07, CI 1.01, 1.13) and stroke (P = 0.046, OR 2.04, CI 1.01, 4.11) but these associations were no longer present in 2012. Those who had symptomatic dysphagia in 2009 (n = 75) showed a shift towards improvement in swallowing (P < 0.001, mean = -174.4, CI -243.6, -105.3), and for those who died from pneumonia, there was no association between the SSQ derived swallowing score and death (P = 0.509, OR 0.10, CI -0.41, -0.20). We conclude that swallowing symptoms are a temporally dynamic process, which increases our knowledge on swallowing in the elderly.

  20. [A retrospective study on the assessment of dysphagia after partial laryngectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, T T; Sun, Z F

    2017-11-07

    Objective: To retrospectively investigate the long-term swallowing function of patients with laryngeal carcinoma, who underwent partial laryngectomy, discuss the effectiveness and reliability of Kubota drinking test in the assessment of patients with dysphagia, who underwent partial laryngectomy, and analyze the influence of different ways of operation on swallowing function. Methods: Clinical data were retrospectively analyzed on 83 patients with laryngeal carcinoma, who underwent partial laryngectomy between September 2012 and August 2015. Questionnaire survey, Kubota drinking test and video fluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were conducted for patients during a scheduled interview. Patients were grouped by two ways: the one was whether epiglottis was retained, and the other was whether either arytenoids or both were reserved. The influence of different surgical techniques on swallowing function was analyzed according to the results of Kubota drinking test. The agreement and reliability of Kubota drinking test were statistically analyzed with respect to VFSS treated as the gold standard. SPSS23.0 software was used to analyze the data. Results: Questionnaire results revealed that among 83 patients underwent partial laryngectomy 32.53% suffered from eating disorder, and 43.37% experienced painful swallowing. The incidence of dysphagia was 40.96% according to the results of Kubota drinking test. There was statistical difference between the group with epiglottis remained and that having epiglottis removed in terms of the absence of dysphagia and severity. The statistical values of normal, moderate and severe dysphagia were in the order of 18.160, 7.229, 12.344( P dysphagia as well as that of intermediate severity, and their statistical values were 4.790 and 9.110( P dysphagia post partial laryngectomy.

  1. Outcome of Rehabilitation and Swallowing Therapy after Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Dysphagia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong; Hirao, Jun; Minoda, Naoko

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the outcomes of rehabilitation (with swallowing therapy) after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in patients with neurogenic dysphagia. Forty-seven patients (29 males and 18 females) who were transferred to the rehabilitation ward of our hospital after receiving PEG tube placements during a 5-year period were enrolled in this study. Patients' demographic data, comorbidities, nutritional statuses, and laboratory biomarkers before the PEG procedure were collected. Rehabilitation (with swallowing therapy) outcomes such as changes in Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and dysphagia grade (using Fujishima's classification) were evaluated. Significant improvements in FIM scores and dysphagia grades after rehabilitation therapy were observed. Twenty-seven patients (57.4 %) were discharged with some oral intake and 10 patients (21.3%) were discharged PEG-free (defined as the PEG tube not being used or removed). Factors associated with being discharged with some oral intake were increase in FIM score (adjusted OR 1.10, 95 % CI 1.02-1.19) and higher baseline dysphagia grade (adjusted OR 1.88, 95 % CI 1.04-3.39). Factors associated with being discharged PEG-free were longer rehabilitation period (OR 1.03, 95 % CI 1.01-1.04), absence of respiratory disorders (OR 0.12, 95 % CI 0.03-0.35), and increase in FIM score (OR 1.17, 95 % CI 1.08-1.28). Changes in dysphagia grade were significantly correlated with changes in FIM score (r 2  = 0.46, p dysphagia.

  2. Age-Related Differences in Clinical Characteristics and Esophageal Motility in Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakato, Rui; Manabe, Noriaki; Kamada, Tomoari; Matsumoto, Hideo; Shiotani, Akiko; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2017-06-01

    Dysphagia in elderly patients has a major effect on nutrition and quality of life (QOL). Although several studies have shown that aging itself is associated with changes in esophageal motility, the impact of these changes on dysphagia symptoms and QOL is unknown. This study assessed the manometric diagnoses of elderly patients with dysphagia compared with diagnoses in younger counterparts. Participants included 116 consecutive patients examined for dysphagia from 2007 to 2014. We divided patients into three groups by age: Group A, 66 years and older (24 men, 23 women); Group B, 45-65 years (18 men, 24 women); and Group C, 44 years and younger (15 men, 12 women). The three groups were compared in regard to symptoms, esophageal motility, and health-related QOL (HRQOL). All patients underwent esophageal manometry examination and completed a self-administered questionnaire concerning their symptoms; HRQOL assessment was based on results of the Short Form-8 General Health Survey. Symptoms rated ≥4 points on the Likert scale were defined as significant. Although all patients had dysphagia as a major symptom, more elderly patients reported globus sensation, whereas more young patients reported heartburn as the primary symptom. Manometric diagnoses were generally similar across the three groups. Ineffective esophageal motility was more prevalent in Groups A and C than in Group B, although the difference was not statistically significant. No significant differences in manometric parameters or HRQOL were detected among the three groups. Despite differences in symptom patterns, broad manometric diagnoses and impairment of HRQOL in elderly patients with dysphagia are similar to those in younger counterparts.

  3. Structural airway abnormalities contribute to dysphagia in children with esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Katherine J; Baxter, Lauren M; Landry, April M; Wulkan, Mark L; Bhatia, Amina M

    2018-01-31

    Long-term dysphagia occurs in up to 50% of repaired esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) patients. The underlying factors are unclear and may include stricture, esophageal dysmotility, or associated anomalies. Our purpose was to determine whether structural airway abnormalities (SAA) are associated with dysphagia in EA/TEF. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children who underwent EA/TEF repair in our hospital system from 2007 to 2016. Children with identified SAA (oropharyngeal abnormalities, laryngeal clefts, laryngomalacia, vocal cord paralysis, and tracheomalacia) were compared to those without airway abnormalities. Dysphagia outcomes were determined by the need for tube feeding and the modified pediatric Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) at 1 year. SAA was diagnosed in 55/145 (37.9%) patients with EA/TEF. Oropharyngeal aspiration was more common in children with SAA (58.3% vs. 36.4%, p=0.028). Children with SAA were more likely to require tube feeding both at discharge (79.6% vs. 48.3%, pesophageal stricture, the presence of SAA remained a significant risk factor for dysphagia (OR 4.17 (95% CI 1.58-11.03)). SAA are common in children with EA/TEF and are associated with dysphagia, even after accounting for gestational age, esophageal gap and stricture. This study highlights the need for a multidisciplinary approach, including early laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy, in the evaluation of the EA/TEF child with dysphagia. Level II retrospective prognostic study. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Validity and Reliability of the Persian Version of the Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahpour, Faezeh; Baghban, Kowsar; Asadi, Mozhgan

    2015-05-01

    The Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI) is one of the instruments used for measuring a dysphagic patient's self-assessment. In some ways, it reflects the patient's quality of life. Although it has been recognized and widely applied in English speaking populations, it has not been used in its present forms in Persian speaking countries. The purpose of this study was to adapt a Persian version of the DHI and to evaluate its validity, consistency, and reliability in the Persian population with oropharyngeal dysphagia. Some stages for cross-cultural adaptation were performed, which consisted in translation, synthesis, back translation, review by an expert committee, and final proof reading. The generated Persian DHI was administered to 85 patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia and 89 control subjects at Zahedan city between May 2013 and August 2013. The patients and control subjects answered the same questionnaire 2 weeks later to verify the test-retest reliability. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were evaluated. The results of the patients and the control group were compared. The Persian DHI showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficients range from 0.82 to 0.94). Also, good test-retest reliability was found for the total scores of the Persian DHI (r=0.89). There was a significant difference between the DHI scores of the control group and those of the oropharyngeal dysphagia group (P‹0.001). The Persian version of the DHI achieved Face and translation validity. This study demonstrated that the Persian DHI is a valid tool for self-assessment of the handicapping effects of dysphagia on the physical, functional, and emotional aspects of patient life and can be a useful tool for screening and treatment planning for the Persian-speaking dysphagic patients, regardless of the cause or the severity of the dysphagia.

  5. Reoperative fundoplications are effective treatment for dysphagia and recurrent gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemurgy, Alexander S; Arnaoutakis, Dean J; Thometz, Donald P; Binitie, Odion; Giarelli, Natalie B; Bloomston, Mark; Goldin, Steve G; Albrink, Michael H

    2004-12-01

    With wide application of antireflux surgery, reoperations for failed fundoplications are increasingly seen. This study was undertaken to document outcomes after reoperative fundoplications. Sixty-four patients, 26 men and 38 women, of average age 55 years+/-15.6 (SD), underwent reoperative antireflux surgery between 1992 and 2003. Fundoplication prior to reoperation had been undertaken via celiotomy in 27 and laparoscopically in 37. Both before and after reoperative antireflux surgery, patients scored their reflux and dysphagia on a Likert Scale (0 = none, 10 = continuous). Reoperation was undertaken because of dysphagia in 16 per cent, recurrent reflux in 52 per cent (median DeMeester Score 52), or both in 27 per cent. Failure leading to reoperation was due to hiatal failure in 28 per cent, wrap failure in 19 per cent, both in 33 per cent, and slipped Nissen fundoplication in 20 per cent. Laparoscopic reoperations were completed in 49 of 54 patients (91%); 15 had reoperations undertaken via celiotomy. Eighty-eight per cent of reoperations were Nissen fundoplications. With reoperation, Dysphagia Scores improved from 9.5+/-0.7 to 2.6+/-2.8, and Reflux Scores improved from 9.1+/-1.4 to 1.8+/-2.7. Seventy-nine per cent of patients with reflux prior to reoperation, 100 per cent with dysphagia, and 74 per cent with both noted excellent or good outcomes after reoperation. We conclude that failure after fundoplication occurs. Reoperations reduce the severity of dysphagia and reflux, thus salvaging excellent and good outcomes in most. Laparoscopic reoperations are generally possible. Reoperative fundoplications are effective treatment for dysphagia and recurrent gastroesophageal reflux, and their application is encouraged.

  6. Evaluating and Reporting Dysphagia in Trials of Chemoirradiation for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluck, Iris; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Reporting long-term toxicities in trials of chemoirradiation (CRT) of head-and-neck cancer (HNC) has mostly been limited to observer-rated maximal Grades ≥3. We evaluated this reporting approach for dysphagia by assessing patient-reported dysphagia (PRD) and objective swallowing dysfunction through videofluoroscopy (VF) in patients with various grades of maximal observer-reported dysphagia (ORD). Methods and Materials: A total of 62 HNC patients completed quality-of-life questionnaires periodically through 12 months post-CRT. Five PRD items were selected: three dysphagia-specific questions, an Eating-Domain, and 'Overall Bother.' They underwent VF at 3 and 12 months, and ORD (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) scoring every 2 months. We classified patients into four groups (0-3) according to maximal ORD scores documented 3-12 months post-CRT, and assessed PRD and VF summary scores in each group. Results: Differences in ORD scores among the groups were considerable throughout the observation period. In contrast, PRD scores were similar between Groups 2 and 3, and variable in Group 1. VF scores were worse in Group 3 compared with 2 at 3 months but similar at 12 months. In Group 1, PRD and VF scores from 3 through 12 months were close to Groups 2 and 3 if ORD score 1 persisted, but were similar to Group 0 in patients whose ORD scores improved by 12 months. Conclusions: Patients with lower maximal ORD grades, especially if persistent, had similar rates of PRD and objective dysphagia as patients with highest grades. Lower ORD grades should therefore be reported. These findings may have implications for reporting additional toxicities besides dysphagia.

  7. Correlation of Radiological and Endoscopic Findings in Patients Presenting with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Kavita; Kaul, Vineet

    2017-03-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom with diverse etiology in otolaryngology. In the present study clinicopathological, radiological and endoscopic evaluation of patients was done in a tertiary care hospital in patients presenting with dysphagia. A prospective nonrandomized observational study was carried out on total of 80 cases having dysphagia during March 2015 to August 2016. In the present study, out of 80 patients, youngest case was a three years old child while oldest case was an 85 years old female. The mean age was 48.3 ± 20.3 years. The majority of cases were in age group 41-59 years (35%). Male to female ratio was 2.33:1. The mean duration of illness was 15.44 weeks. 15% of patients had absolute dysphagia. For detecting the lesion, Barium swallow study (BSS) showed a total sensitivity of 49.05% (n = 53), Computerised Tomography (CT) showed a total sensitivity of 85.70% (n = 49), plain skiagram neck & chest showed a total sensitivity of 88.88% (n = 9) and endoscopy was the most sensitive test overall as it showed a total sensitivity of 98.75% (n = 80). No complications were reported with either rigid or flexible endoscopy. Dysphagia is a common presenting complaint in otolaryngology with cases coming directly or being referred from other specialities. Males are more commonly affected than females and incidence of malignancy increases with age. Endoscopy can become the first screening test in dysphagia due to its high sensitivity and low risk of complications, with radiological tests being done in an adjunct manner.

  8. Validity and Reliability of the Persian Version of the Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    faezeh asadollahpour

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI is one of the instruments used for measuring a dysphagic patient’s self-assessment. In some ways, it reflects the patient’s quality of life. Although it has been recognized and widely applied in English speaking populations, it has not been used in its present forms in Persian speaking countries. The purpose of this study was to adapt a Persian version of the DHI and to evaluate its validity, consistency, and reliability in the Persian population with oropharyngeal dysphagia.   Materials and Methods: Some stages for cross-cultural adaptation were performed, which consisted in translation, synthesis, back translation, review by an expert committee, and final proof reading. The generated Persian DHI was administered to 85 patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia and 89 control subjects at Zahedan city between May 2013 and August 2013. The patients and control subjects answered the same questionnaire 2 weeks later to verify the test-retest reliability. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were evaluated. The results of the patients and the control group were compared.   Results: The Persian DHI showed good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficients range from 0.82 to 0.94. Also, good test-retest reliability was found for the total scores of the Persian DHI (r=0.89. There was a significant difference between the DHI scores of the control group and those of the oropharyngeal dysphagia group (P‹0.001.   Conclusion:  The Persian version of the DHI achieved Face and translation validity. This study demonstrated that the Persian DHI is a valid tool for self-assessment of the handicapping effects of dysphagia on the physical, functional, and emotional aspects of patient life and can be a useful tool for screening and treatment planning for the Persian-speaking dysphagic patients, regardless of the cause or the severity of the dysphagia.

  9. Demonstration of vascular abnormalities compressing esophagus by MDCT: Special focus on dysphagia lusoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alper, Fatih; Akgun, Metin; Kantarci, Mecit; Eroglu, Atilla; Ceyhan, Elvan; Onbas, Omer; Duran, Cihan; Okur, Adnan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia lusoria (DL) is described in the literature as difficulty in swallowing caused by vascular abnormalities. The most common cause is an aberrant right subclavian artery (SCA) which passes behind the esophagus and is also called arteria lusoria (AL). Our aim was to demonstrate the use of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the diagnosis of AL, as there is no comprehensive study investigating the role of MDCT in such cases. Material and methods: A total of 38 consecutive patients, comprising of 23 females (61%) and 15 males (39%), who had extrinsic compression were included in the study. These patients are selected from the cases who were admitted due to their gastrointestinal symptoms, such as dysphagia, epigastric pain, chronic nausea, vomiting, etc. The mean age of patients was 40 ± 25 years (range 15-65). Following barium esophagogram and then endoscopy performed, MDCT angiography was carried out on the same or the following few days. MDCT sections were examined to determine the following: presence of vascular abnormality; the diameter and angle of that vascular structure; and the compressed area of esophagus. Radiological findings and dysphagia scores were also compared. Results: In each of 15 cases, there was a compression due to vascular abnormality which were all located between the esophagus and the spine. There was an esophageal compression in each of 12 cases, due to right aberrant SCA, in one case due to right superior aortic arch and in two cases due to both right aortic arch and left SCA with Kommerell's diverticulum. The mean diameter and the angle of AL were 16.4 mm and 48.8 o , respectively, and the mean area of pressured esophagus was 194.7 mm 2 . Dysphagia scores of the cases was 1 in thirteen cases and 2 in two cases. However, dysphagia scores were not correlated with these parameters. Conclusions: MDCT angiography is a useful diagnostic tool for evaluation of patients with dysphagia, especially caused by a vascular

  10. Levodopa responsiveness of dysphagia in advanced Parkinson's disease and reliability testing of the FEES-Levodopa-test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnecke, Tobias; Suttrup, Inga; Schröder, Jens B; Osada, Nani; Oelenberg, Stephan; Hamacher, Christina; Suntrup, Sonja; Dziewas, Rainer

    2016-07-01

    It is still controversially discussed whether central dopaminergic stimulation improves swallowing ability in Parkinson's disease (PD). We evaluated the effect of oral levodopa application on dysphagia in advanced PD patients with motor fluctuations. In 15 PD patients (mean age 71.93 ± 8.29 years, mean disease duration 14.33 ± 5.94 years) with oropharyngeal dysphagia and motor fluctuations endoscopic swallowing evaluation was performed in the off state and on state condition following a specifically developed protocol (FEES-levodopa-test). The respective dysphagia score covered three salient parameters, i. e. premature spillage, penetration/aspiration events and residues, each tested with liquid as well as semisolid and solid food consistencies. An improvement of >30% in this score indicated levodopa responsiveness of dysphagia. Measures were compared between the off- and on-state condition by using the Wilcoxon Test and marginal homogeneity test. Inter- and intrarater reliability was also investigated. Severity of swallowing dysfunction in the off state varied widely. The lowest dysphagia score was 15 points (dysphagia without any aspiration risk). The highest dysphagia score was 84 points (dysphagia with aspiration of all consistencies). Seven patients showed a marked improvement of dysphagia in the on state condition. Eight PD patients did not respond. Inter- and intrarater reliability was excellent for all three subscales in the off state and on state conditions. A significant proportion of advanced PD patients with motor fluctuations and mild to moderate oropharyngeal dysphagia may demonstrate a clinically relevant improvement of swallowing after levodopa challenge. The FEES-levodopa-test is a reliable and sensitive tool to differentiate these responders from non-responders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Prediction and Prevention of Dysphagia After Occipitospinal Fusion by Use of the S-line (Swallowing Line).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneyama, Shuichi; Sumi, Masatoshi; Takabatake, Masato; Kasahara, Koichi; Kanemura, Aritetsu; Hirata, Hiroaki; Darden, Bruce V

    2017-05-15

    Clinical case series and risk factor analysis of dysphagia after occipitospinal fusion (OSF). The aim of this study was to develop new criteria to avoid postoperative dysphagia by analyzing the relationship among the craniocervical alignment, the oropharyngeal space, and the incidence of dysphagia after OSF. Craniocervical malalignment after OSF is considered to be one of the primary triggers of postoperative dysphagia. However, ideal craniocervical alignment has not been confirmed. Thirty-eight patients were included. We measured the O-C2 angle (O-C2A) and the pharyngeal inlet angle (PIA) on the lateral cervical radiogram at follow-up. PIA is defined as the angle between McGregor's line and the line that links the center of the C1 anterior arch and the apex of cervical sagittal curvature. The impact of these two parameters on the diameter of pharyngeal airway space (PAS) and the incidence of the dysphagia were analyzed. Six of 38 cases (15.8%) exhibited the dysphagia. A multiple regression analysis showed that PIA was significantly correlated with PAS (β = 0.714, P = 0.005). Receiver-operating characteristic curves showed that PIA had a high accuracy as a predictor of the dysphagia with an AUC (area under the curve) of 0.90. Cases with a PIA less than 90 degrees showed significantly higher incidence of dysphagia (31.6%) than those with a 90 or more degrees of PIA (0.0%) (P = 0.008). Our results indicated that PIA had the high possibility to predict postoperative dysphagia by OSF with the condition of PIA dysphagia. 4.

  12. Utility of dysphagia grade in predicting endoscopic ultrasound T-stage of non-metastatic esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, T C; Oh, Y S; Szabo, A; Khan, A; Dua, K S

    2016-08-01

    Patients with non-metastatic esophageal cancer routinely undergo endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for loco-regional staging. Neoadjuvant therapy is recommended for ≥T3 tumors while upfront surgery can be considered for ≤T2 lesions. The aim of this study was to determine if the degree of dysphagia can predict the EUS T-stage of esophageal cancer. One hundred eleven consecutive patients with non-metastatic esophageal cancer were retrospectively reviewed from a database. Prior to EUS, patients' dysphagia grade was recorded. Correlation between dysphagia grade and EUS T-stage, especially in reference to predicting ≥T3 stage, was determined. The correlation of dysphagia grade with EUS T-stage (Kendall's tau coefficient) was 0.49 (P dysphagia grade ≥2 (can only swallow semi-solids/liquids) for T3 cancer were 56% (95% confidence interval [CI] 43-67%) and 93% (95% CI 79-98%), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of dysphagia grade ≥3 (can only swallow liquids or total dysphagia) for T3 lesions were 36% (95% CI 25-48%), 100% (95% CI 89-100%), and 100% (95% CI 83-100%), respectively. Overall, there was a significant positive correlation between dysphagia grade and the EUS T-stage of esophageal cancer. All patients with dysphagia grade ≥3 had T3 lesions. This may have clinical implications for patients who can only swallow liquids or have complete dysphagia by allowing for prompt initiation of neoadjuvant therapy, especially in countries/centers where EUS service is difficult to access in a timely manner or not available. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  13. Developmental anomaly of the hyoid bone: an unusual cause of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayadjian, A.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Schmitt, E.; Chouard, Ch.; Tubiana, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    We report the case of a hyoid syndrome caused by a developmental anomaly of the second branchial cleft, presenting at adult age by dysphagia without any abnormality detected at the barium swallow and at naso-pharyngeal endoscopy, first examinations to perform in case of dysphagia. The MRI findings of this anomaly showed a hyperintense well-limited vallecular mass syndrome. The diagnosis of hyoid bone anomaly was established at spiral CT with 3-D reconstructions showing an incurvated and elongated lesser cornua causing persistent impingement on the lateral wall of the oropharynx. CT scan performed during Valsalva maneuver showed the persistence of the compression during pharyngeal insufflation. (author)

  14. Role of dysphagia in evaluating Parkinson patients for subthalamic nucleus stimulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allert, Niels; Kelm, Daniela; Spottke, Annika; Coenen, Volker A

    2011-09-01

    In the selection of Parkinson patients for deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) a risk-benefit-analysis is performed regarding symptoms that commonly improve and symptoms that may deteriorate. Speech is among the symptoms that may deteriorate. In contrast, the differential effects of STN-DBS on swallowing are less clear. Here, we present a Parkinson patient with dysphagia from concomitant oculo-pharyngeal muscle dystrophy successfully treated by STN-DBS. The role of dysphagia in evaluating Parkinson patients for STN-DBS is discussed.

  15. The Prevalence of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Danish Patients Hospitalised with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Dorte Melgaard; Baandrup, Ulrik; Bøgsted, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) are prevalent conditions in the elderly. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between CAP, OD, and frailty in patients admitted to a department of respiratory medicine at a regional hospital. The outcome was mort......Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) are prevalent conditions in the elderly. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between CAP, OD, and frailty in patients admitted to a department of respiratory medicine at a regional hospital. The outcome...

  16. Interferential current sensory stimulation, through the neck skin, improves airway defense and oral nutrition intake in patients with dysphagia: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keisuke; Koga, Takayuki; Akagi, Junji

    2017-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation with muscle contraction, administered through the skin of the neck, improves a patient's swallowing ability. However, the beneficial effects of transcutaneous electrical sensory stimulation (TESS), without muscle contraction, are controversial. We investigated the effect of TESS, using interferential current, in patients undergoing dysphagia rehabilitation. This double-blind, randomized controlled trial involved 43 patients who were prescribed in-hospital dysphagia rehabilitation for ≥3 weeks. Patients were randomly assigned to the sensory stimulation (SS) or sham groups; all received usual rehabilitative care plus 2 weeks of SS or sham intervention. Outcome measures included cough latency times against a 1% citric acid mist, functional oral intake scale (FOIS) scores, and oral nutritional intake - each determined after the second and third week following treatment initiation. Mean patient age was 84.3±7.5 years; 58% were women. The SS and sham groups had similar baseline characteristics. Changes in cough latency time at 2 weeks (-14.1±14.0 vs -5.2±14.2 s, p =0.047) and oral nutrition intake at 3 weeks (437±575 vs 138±315 kcal/day, p =0.042) improved more in the SS group than in the sham group. Changes in cough frequency and FOIS scores indicated better outcomes in the SS group, based on substantial effect sizes. TESS, using interferential current through the neck, improved airway defense and nutrition in patients suffering from dysphagia. Further large-scale studies are needed to confirm the technique's effect on swallowing ability.

  17. Understanding the Viscosity of Liquids used in Infant Dysphagia Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Jacqueline; Chestnut, Amanda H; Jackson, Arwen; Barbon, Carly E A; Steele, Catriona M; Pickler, Laura

    2016-10-01

    When assessing swallowing in infants, it is critical to have confidence that the liquids presented during the swallow study closely replicate the viscosity of liquids in the infant's typical diet. However, we lack research on rheological properties of frequently used infant formulas or breastmilk, and various forms of barium contrast media used in swallow studies. The aim of the current study was to provide objective viscosity measurements for typical infant liquid diet options and barium contrast media. A TA-Instruments AR2000 Advanced Rheometer was used to measure the viscosity of five standard infant formulas, three barium products, and two breastmilk samples. Additionally, this study measured the viscosity of infant formulas and breastmilk when mixed with powdered barium contrast in a 20 % weight-to-volume (w/v) concentration. The study findings determined that standard infant formulas and the two breastmilk samples had low viscosities, at the lower end of the National Dysphagia Diet (NDD) thin liquid range. Two specialty formulas tested had much thicker viscosities, close to the lower boundary of the NDD nectar-thick liquid range. The study showed differences in viscosity between 60 % w/v barium products (Liquid E-Z-Paque(®) and E-Z-Paque(®) powder); the powdered product had a much lower viscosity, despite identical barium concentration. When E-Z-Paque(®) powdered barium was mixed in a 20 % w/v concentration using water, standard infant formulas, or breastmilk, the resulting viscosities were at the lower end of the NDD thin range and only slightly thicker than the non-barium comparator liquids. When E-Z-Paque(®) powdered barium was mixed in a 20 % w/v concentration with the two thicker specialty formulas (Enfamil AR 20 and 24 kcal), unexpected alterations in their original viscosity occurred. These findings highlight the clinical importance of objective measures of viscosity as well as objective data on how infant formulas or breastmilk may change in

  18. A new fully covered metal stent with anti-migration features for the treatment of malignant dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Daisy; van den Berg, Maarten W; van Hooft, Jeanin E; Boot, Henk; Scheffer, Robert C H; Vleggaar, Frank P; Siersema, Peter D

    2014-12-01

    A new esophageal stent with two anti-migration features was developed to minimize migration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of this stent in patients with malignant dysphagia. A total of 40 patients with dysphagia due to a malignant obstruction of the esophagus were prospectively enrolled in this cohort study. Stent placement was technically successful in 39 patients (98 %). The median dysphagia-free time after stent placement was 220 days (95 % confidence interval 94 - 345 days). Nine patients (23 %) experienced recurrent dysphagia due to tissue overgrowth (n = 2), stent fracture (n = 1), and partial (n = 5) or complete (n = 1) stent migration. A total of 16 serious adverse events occurred in 14 patients (36 %), with hemorrhage (n = 3) and severe nausea or vomiting (n = 3) being the most common causes. This new stent design was effective for the palliation of malignant dysphagia and had a low rate of recurrent dysphagia. However, despite the anti-migration features, stent migration was still a major cause of recurrent dysphagia. Furthermore, treatment was associated with a high adverse event rate. Dutch Trial Registration (NTR 3313). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Acute symptoms during the course of head and neck radiotherapy or chemoradiation are strong predictors of late dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Schaaf, Arjen van der; Chouvalova, Olga; Vemer-van den Hoek, Johanna G.M.; Gawryszuk, Agata; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Roodenburg, Jan L.N.; Wopken, Kim; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if acute symptoms during definitive radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiation (CHRT) are prognostic factors for late dysphagia in head and neck cancer (HNC). Material and methods: This prospective cohort study consisted of 260 HNC patients who received definitive RT or CHRT. The primary endpoint was grade 2–4 swallowing dysfunction at 6 months after completing RT (SWALM6). During treatment, acute symptoms, including oral mucositis, xerostomia and dysphagia, were scored, and the scores were accumulated weekly and entered into an existing reference model for SWALM6 that consisted of dose–volume variables only. Results: Both acute xerostomia and dysphagia were strong prognostic factors for SWALM6. When acute scores were added as variables to the reference model, model performance increased as the course of treatment progressed: the AUC rose from 0.78 at the baseline to 0.85 in week 6. New models built for weeks 3–6 were significantly better able to identify patients with and without late dysphagia. Conclusion: Acute xerostomia and dysphagia during the course of RT are strong prognostic factors for late dysphagia. Including accumulated acute symptom scores on a weekly basis in prediction models for late dysphagia significantly improves the identification of high-risk and low-risk patients at an early stage during treatment and might facilitate individualized treatment adaptation

  20. Effect of Human Saliva on the Consistency of Thickened Drinks for Individuals with Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallons, Katleen J. R.; Helmens, Harold J.; Oudhuis, A. A. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thickening of foods and fluids is commonly used in the management of dysphagia to reduce the risk of aspiration. The use of starch-based thickeners is established. However, the use of gums in thickeners is gaining interest as they are resistant to salivary amylase, which may promote safer swallowing. Aims: To compare the effect of…

  1. The Utility of Pitch Elevation in the Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; Hind, Jacqueline A.; Gangnon, Ronald; Logemann, Jeri A.; Robbins, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a pitch elevation task in the assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Method: This study was a pilot prospective cohort study including 40 consecutive patients (16 male and 24 female) who were referred by their physician for a swallowing evaluation. Patients were evaluated with a noninstrumental clinical…

  2. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia Is Strongly Correlated With Apparent Life-Threatening Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Daniel R; Amirault, Janine; Mitchell, Paul D; Larson, Kara; Rosen, Rachel L

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysfunction with resultant aspiration in patients admitted after apparent life-threatening events (ALTE) and to determine whether historical characteristics could predict this oropharyngeal dysphagia and aspiration risk. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients admitted to Boston Children's Hospital between 2012 and 2015 with a diagnosis of ALTE to determine the frequency of evaluation for oropharyngeal dysphagia using video fluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) and clinical feeding evaluations, to determine the prevalence of swallowing dysfunction in subjects admitted after ALTE and to compare presenting historical characteristics to swallow study results. A total of 188 children were admitted with a diagnosis of ALTE of which 29% (n = 55) had an assessment of swallowing by VFSS. Of those who had a VFSS, 73% (n = 40) had evidence of aspiration or penetration on VFSS. Of all of the diagnostic tests ordered on patients with ALTEs, the VFSS had the highest rate of abnormalities of any test ordered. None of the historical characteristics of ALTE predicted which patients were at risk for aspiration. In patients who had both clinical feeding evaluations and VFSS, observed clinical feedings incorrectly identified 26% of patients as having no oropharyngeal dysphagia when in fact aspiration was present on VFSS. Oropharyngeal dysphagia with aspiration is the most common diagnosis identified in infants presenting with ALTEs. The algorithm for ALTE should be revised to include an assessment of VFSS as clinical feeding evaluations are inadequate to assess for aspiration.

  3. Multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring in the evaluation of patients with non-obstructive Dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conchillo, José M.; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Samsom, Melvin; Holloway, Richard H.; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-obstructive dysphagia (NOD) often poses diagnostic problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of the addition of multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) recording to esophageal manometry in the work-up of patients with NOD. METHODS: A total of 40 consecutive patients

  4. Multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring in the evaluation of patients with non-obstructive dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conchillo, JM; Nguyen, NQ; Samsom, M; Holloway, RH; Smout, AJPM

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-obstructive dysphagia (NOD) often poses diagnostic problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of the addition of multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) recording to esophageal manometry in the work-up of patients with NOD. METHODS: A total of 40 consecutive patients

  5. Prevalence and association of oral candidiasis with dysphagia in individuals with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Kothari, Mohit

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of oral candidiasis (OC) in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) and to evaluate the association of OC with improvement in dysphagia. Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: Individuals with ABI admitted to rehabilitation were recruited over...

  6. Assessment of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Patients With Parkinson Disease: Use of Ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun Hyun; Seo, Jin Seok; Kang, Hyo Jung

    2016-04-01

    To compare tongue thickness, the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation (distance between the hyoid bone and thyroid cartilage), and the time interval between the initiation of tongue movement and the time of the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation, by using ultrasonography in healthy controls and patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Healthy controls and PD patients with dysphagia were compared. Ultrasonography was performed 3 times for the evaluation of tongue thickness, the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation, and the time between the initiation of tongue movement and the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation. A total of 24 healthy controls and 24 PD patients with dysphagia were enrolled. No significant differences were demonstrated between the two groups for the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation (controls, 1.19±0.34 cm; PD patients, 1.37±0.5 cm; p=0.15) and tongue thickness (controls, 4.42±0.46 cm; PD patients, 4.27±0.51 cm; p=0.3). In contrast, the time to the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation was significantly different between the two groups (controls, 1.53±0.87 ms; PD patients, 2.4±1.4 ms, p=0.048). Ultrasonography can be useful in evaluating dysphagia in patients with PD by direct visualization and measurement of the hyoid bone. Moreover, ultrasonography might contribute to a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of dysphagia in PD.

  7. Relationship between dysphagia and depressive states in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Meng; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Nonaka, Michio; Yamauchi, Rika; Hozuki, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Takashi; Saitoh, Masaki; Hisahara, Shin; Imai, Tomihiro; Shimohama, Shun; Mori, Mitsuru

    2011-07-01

    Aspiration pneumonia related to dysphagia is known to be the leading cause of death in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the relationship between depressive states and dysphagia in patients with PD. A hundred and twenty-seven PD patients gave their informed consent and were enrolled in this study. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) questionnaire to determine the participants' depressive states, and also used a questionnaire to assess participants' state of dysphagia. Participants were divided into four groups according to their BDI score. We compared the PD patients with Swallowing Disturbances Questionnaire (SDQ) scores of more than or equal to 11 with the SDQ scores of less than 11 regarding depressive categories. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) adjusting for age, sex, disease duration, wearing-off phenomenon and severity of movement disorder. OR (95%CI) of depressive categories, in which the trivial class was set as a reference group, were 3.28 (0.93-11.55), 13.44 (3.10-58.16), 30.35 (5.65-162.97) in the mild class, the moderate class and the severe class, respectively. This study suggests that there may be a strong relationship between depressive states and dysphagia in patients with PD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Acoustic analysis of swallowing sounds: a new technique for assessing dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamato, Andrea; Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Russo, Anna; Frisardi, Vincenza; Megna, Marisa; Ranieri, Maurizio; Fiore, Pietro

    2009-07-01

    To perform acoustic analysis of swallowing sounds, using a microphone and a notebook computer system, in healthy subjects and patients with dysphagia affected by neurological diseases, testing the positive/negative predictive value of a pathological pattern of swallowing sounds for penetration/aspiration. Diagnostic test study, prospective, not blinded, with the penetration/aspiration evaluated by fibreoptic endoscopy of swallowing as criterion standard. Data from a previously recorded database of normal swallowing sounds for 60 healthy subjects according to gender, age, and bolus consistency was compared with those of 15 patients with dysphagia from a university hospital referral centre who were affected by various neurological diseases. Mean duration of the swallowing sounds and post-swallowing apnoea were recorded. Penetration/aspiration was verified by fibreoptic endoscopy of swallowing in all patients with dysphagia. The mean duration of swallowing sounds for a liquid bolus of 10 ml water was significantly different between patients with dysphagia and healthy patients. We also described patterns of swallowing sounds and tested the negative/positive predictive values of post-swallowing apnoea for penetration/aspiration verified by fibreoptic endoscopy of swallowing (sensitivity 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.24-0.94); specificity 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.56-1.00)). The proposed technique for recording and measuring swallowing sounds could be incorporated into the bedside evaluation, but it should not replace the use of more diagnostic and valuable measures.

  9. The impact of oropharynegeal dysphagia on quality of life in individuals with age over 50 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, S.; Iqblal, A.; Ayaz, S.B.; Khan, A.A.; Matee, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the demographics of individuals presented with oropharyngeal dysphagia, correlation of different demographic factors with the quality of life (QOL) after validation of the Urdu translation of Swallowing Quality of Life (SWAL-QOL) questionnaire. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey, carried out at the speech and language therapy department of Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rawalpindi from July 2013 to January 2014 enrolling patients > 50 years of age with oropharyngeal dysphagia and scoring them on Urdu translation of SWAL-QOL questionnaire. The reliability of the tool was measured through Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Results: Of 40 patients, majority (60%) were males, married (62.5 %), illiterate (80%) and settling in age group of 51- 61 years. Most of them were from Punjab (30%) and Sindh (30%). The most common primary pathology was stroke (47.5%).The mean SWAL-QOL score was 147±13 (Range: 124 - 176). Most domains of questionnaire had Cronbach's alpha coefficient = 0.7. No variable was found to be significantly affecting SWAL-QOL score. Conclusion: The Urdu-translated version of SWAL-QOL is a valid tool. QOL in Pakistani patients of age > 50 years with oropharyngeal dysphagia is adversely affected, however, it does not depend on age, gender, marital status, education, ethnicity based on provinces or primary pathology for dysphagia. (author)

  10. Clinical and videofluoroscopic diagnosis of dysphagia in chronic encephalopathy of childhood*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Brenda Carla Lima; Motta, Maria Eugênia Almeida; de Castro, Adriana Guerra; de Araújo, Claudia Marina Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the contribution of deglutition videofluoroscopy in the clinical diagnosis of dysphagia in chronic encephalopathy of childhood. Materials and Methods The study sample consisted of 93 children diagnosed with chronic encephalopathy, in the age range between two and five years, selected by convenience among patients referred to the authors' institution by speech therapists, neurologists and gastroenterologists in the period from March 2010 to September 2011. The data collection was made at two different moments, by different investigators who were blind to each other. Results The method presented low sensitivity for detecting aspiration with puree consistency (p = 0.04). Specificity and negative predictive value were high for clinical diagnosis of dysphagia with puree consistency. Conclusion In the present study, the value for sensitivity in the clinical diagnosis of dysphagia demonstrates that this diagnostic procedure may not detect any change in the swallowing process regardless of the food consistency used during the investigation. Thus, the addition of the videofluoroscopic method can significantly contribute to the diagnosis of dysphagia. PMID:25741054

  11. Frequency and Predictors of Dysphagia in Patients With Recent Small Subcortical Infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandler, Simon; Gattringer, Thomas; Eppinger, Sebastian; Doppelhofer, Kathrin; Pinter, Daniela; Niederkorn, Kurt; Enzinger, Christian; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Fazekas, Franz

    2017-01-01

    Detailed data on the occurrence of swallowing dysfunction in patients with recent small subcortical infarcts (RSSI) in the context of cerebral small vessel disease are lacking. This prompted us to assess the frequency of and risk factors for dysphagia in RSSI patients. We identified all inpatients with magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed RSSI between January 2008 and February 2013. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from our stroke database, and magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed for morphological changes. Dysphagia was determined according to the Gugging Swallowing Screen. We identified 332 patients with RSSI (mean age, 67.7±11.9 years; 64.5% male). Overall, 83 patients (25%) had dysphagia, which was mild in 46 (55.4%), moderate in 26 (31.3%), and severe in 11 patients (13.3%). The rate of dysphagia in patients with supratentorial RSSI was 20%. Multivariate analysis identified a higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (PDysphagia is present in a quarter of patients with RSSI and has to be expected especially in those with higher stroke severity, pontine infarction, and severe white matter hyperintensities. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Dysphagia referrals to a district general hospital gastroenterology unit: hard to swallow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melleney, Elizabeth Mary-Ann; Subhani, Javaid Mohammed; Willoughby, Charles Peter

    2004-01-01

    The aim of our study was to audit dysphagia referrals received by a specialist gastroenterology unit during an entire year. We used a prospective audit carried out over a 12-month period at the District General Hospital gastroenterology unit. The audit included 396 consecutive patients who were referred with swallowing difficulties. We found that 60 referrals (15.2%) were inaccurate and the patients had no swallowing problem. Of the 336 patients with genuine dysphagia, only 29 (8.6%) were new cancer cases. The large majority of subjects had benign disease mostly related to acid reflux. Weight loss was significantly associated with malignancy but also occurred in one third of patients with reflux alone. The temporal pattern of dysphagia was not significantly predictive of cancer. All the cancer patients were above the age of 50 years. Although patients were in general assessed rapidly after hospital referral, the productivity, in terms of early tumor diagnosis, was extremely low. We conclude that there is a substantial rate of inaccurate referrals of dysphagia patients. Most true cases of swallowing difficulty relate to benign disease. Even the devotion of considerable resources to the early diagnosis of esophago gastric malignancy in an attempt to conform with best practice guidelines results in a very low success rate in terms of the detection of potentially curable tumors.

  13. Meta-analysis of Dysphagia and Aspiration Pneumonia in Frail Elders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarel-Wierink, C.D. van der; Vanobbergen, J.N.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Schols, J.M.; Baat, C. de

    2011-01-01

    As part of a systematic literature review, a comprehensive literature search was carried out to identify risk factors for aspiration pneumonia in frail older people. A prominent risk factor found was dysphagia with evidence level 2a, according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels

  14. Factors Associated With Gastrostomy Tube Removal in Patients With Dysphagia After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmskoetter, Janina; Herbert, Teri Lynn; Bonilha, Heather S

    2017-04-01

    Gastrostomy feeding tubes are commonly placed in patients with dysphagia after stroke. The subsequent removal of the tube is a primary goal during rehabilitation. The purpose of our review was to identify predictors and factors associated with gastrostomy tube removal in patients with dysphagia after stroke. We conducted a literature review following the PRISMA statement and included the search databases PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and CINAHL. Articles were included in the final analysis per predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Our search retrieved a total of 853 results consisting of 416 articles (after eliminating duplicates). Six articles met our final eligibility criteria. The following factors were identified in at least 1 article as being significantly associated with gastrostomy tube removal: reduced age, decreased number of comorbidities, prolonged inpatient rehabilitation stay, absence of bilateral stroke, nonhemorrhagic stroke, reduced dysphagia severity, absence of aspiration, absence of premature bolus loss, and timely initiation of pharyngeal swallow. Aspiration was the only factor that was investigated by 2 studies-both using multiple regression and both showing stable results, with absence of aspiration increasing the chances for tube removal. In conclusion, little is known about factors associated with gastrostomy tube removal in patients with dysphagia after stroke. Most of the identified factors are associated with stroke or disease severity; however, the role of the individual factors remains unclear. The strongest predictor appears to be absence of aspiration on modified barium swallow studies emphasizing the importance of instrumental swallow studies in this patient population.

  15. Swallowing Kinematics and Factors Associated with Laryngeal Penetration and Aspiration in Stroke Survivors with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate swallowing kinematics and explore kinematic factors related with penetration-aspiration in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Videofluoroscopic images of 68 patients with post-stroke dysphagia and 34 sex- and age-matched healthy controls swallowing a thin liquid were quantitatively analyzed using two-dimensional motion digitization. The measurements included the movement distances and velocities of the hyoid and larynx, and the maximal tilt angles and angular velocities of the epiglottis. All velocity variables were significantly decreased in the stroke patients compared to the controls. There was a significant difference in the maximal horizontal displacement of the larynx, but there were no significant differences in other displacements of the larynx, the maximal displacements of the hyoid bone, and the maximum tilt angle of the epiglottis between the two groups. The maximal tilt angle of the epiglottis was lower in the aspiration subgroup than in the no penetration/aspiration and penetration subgroups as well as the controls. The maximal tilt angle from the y axis showed a dichotomous pattern at 90° of the angle, and all 11 patients with an angle dysphagia. The association of reduced epiglottic movement with the risk of aspiration in patients with post-stroke dysphagia was supported by the quantitative analysis.

  16. The reliability and validity of cervical auscultation in the diagnosis of dysphagia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, Marloes L J; Kamalski, Digna M A; van den Engel-Hoek, Lenie

    2016-02-01

    To systematically review the available evidence for the reliability and validity of cervical auscultation in diagnosing the several aspects of dysphagia in adults and children suffering from dysphagia. Medline (PubMed), Embase and the Cochrane Library databases. The systematic review was carried out applying the steps of the PRISMA-statement. The methodological quality of the included studies were evaluated using the Dutch 'Cochrane checklist for diagnostic accuracy studies'. A total of 90 articles were identified through the search strategy, and after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, six articles were included in this review. In the six studies, 197 patients were assessed with cervical auscultation. Two of the six articles were considered to be of 'good' quality and three studies were of 'moderate' quality. One article was excluded because of a 'poor' methodological quality. Sensitivity ranges from 23%-94% and specificity ranges from 50%-74%. Inter-rater reliability was 'poor' or 'fair' in all studies. The intra-rater reliability shows a wide variance among speech language therapists. In this systematic review, conflicting evidence is found for the validity of cervical auscultation. The reliability of cervical auscultation is insufficient when used as a stand-alone tool in the diagnosis of dysphagia in adults. There is no available evidence for the validity and reliability of cervical auscultation in children. Cervical auscultation should not be used as a stand-alone instrument to diagnose dysphagia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Low-amplitude distal esophageal spasm as a cause of severe dysphagia for solid food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breumelhof, R.; Timmer, R.; van Hees, P. A.; Obertop, H.; Smout, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    This case report presents a patient with progressive dysphagia, accompanied by weight loss, in the absence of organic disease. Esophageal motility studies initially failed to reveal a diagnosis. At simultaneous manometry and fluoroscopy, with bread/barium boluses, the diagnosis of esophageal spasm

  18. Repeated Surgical or Endoscopic Myotomy for Recurrent Dysphagia in Patients After Previous Myotomy for Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Uberto; Rosati, Riccardo; De Pascale, Stefano; Porta, Matteo; Carlani, Elisa; Pestalozza, Alessandra; Repici, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Surgical myotomy of the lower esophageal sphincter has a 5-year success rate of approximately 91 %. Peroral endoscopic myotomy can provide similar results for controlling dysphagia. Some patients experience either persistent or recurrent dysphagia after myotomy. We present here a retrospective analysis of our experience with redo myotomy for recurrent dysphagia in patients with achalasia. From March 1996 to February 2015, 234 myotomies for primary or recurrent achalasia were performed in our center. Fifteen patients (6.4 %) had had a previous myotomy and were undergoing surgical redo myotomy (n = 9) or endoscopic redo myotomy (n = 6) for recurrent symptoms. Patients presented at a median of 10.4 months after previous myotomy. Median preoperative Eckardt score was 6. Among the nine patients undergoing surgical myotomy, three esophageal perforations occurred intraoperatively (all repaired immediately). Surgery lasted 111 and 62 min on average (median) in the surgical and peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) groups, respectively. No postoperative complications occurred in either group. Median postoperative stay was 3 and 2.5 days in the surgical and POEM groups, respectively. In the surgical group, Eckardt score was dysphagia. Preliminary results using POEM indicate that the technique can be safely used in patients who have undergone previous surgical myotomy.

  19. Esophageal lichen planus: An unusual cause of dysphagia in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonari, Augusto Pinke Cruz; Imada, Regina Rie; Nakamura, Romeu; Araki, Osvaldo; Cristina, Kelly; Balancin, Marcelo Luiz; Ibrahim, Roberto El

    2018-03-01

    An 82-year-old man sought our service with dysphagia and was referred for upper endoscopy with biopsies, which evidenced multiple ulcers of the esophagus and oropharinx. Histopathology confirmed the unusual diagnosis of esophageal lichen planus. The correct clinical suspicion of this disease can facilitate the diagnosis and guide specific treatment, which can drastically change the natural course of the disease.

  20. Underuse of brachytherapy for the treatment of dysphagia owing to esophageal cancer. An Italian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Guido, Alessandra; Hassan, Cesare; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Arcelli, Alessandra; Farioli, Andrea; Giaccherini, Lucia; Galuppi, Andrea; Mandolesi, Daniele; Cellini, Francesco; Mantello, Giovanna; Macchia, Gabriella; de Bortoli, Nicola; Repici, Alessandro; Valentini, Vincenzo; Bazzoli, Franco; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    International guidelines strongly recommend brachytherapy as valid alternative or in addition to stenting in patients with dysphagia owing to esophageal cancer. However, for not well understood reasons, brachytherapy is definitively underused for the palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia. Aim of the current survey was to investigate the use of brachytherapy for the treatment of malignant dysphagia in Italy. A structured questionnaire was submitted to the 1510 members of the Italian Association of Radiation Oncologists (AIRO). These members refer to 177 centres of radiotherapy across Italy and in 68 (38.4%) of them brachytherapy is routinely performed. Of the 1510 invited members, 178 completed the survey (11.7%). The answers provided by the 178 participants allowed to get information on 40 out of 68 brachytherapy centres (58.8%). Seven out of 40 (17.5%) centres perform brachytherapy of the oesophagus, in 3 out of 40 (7.5%) centres brachytherapy represents the first line of treatment. The main reason why brachytherapy is not routinely performed is the lack of experience. Despite the strong recommendations of the international guidelines and the wide diffusion of brachytherapy centres across Italy, only very few of them routinely considered brachytherapy for the treatment of dysphagia due to esophageal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.