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Sample records for dysphagia including gastrostomy-tube

  1. Factors Associated With Gastrostomy Tube Removal in Patients With Dysphagia After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmskoetter, Janina; Herbert, Teri Lynn; Bonilha, Heather S

    2017-04-01

    Gastrostomy feeding tubes are commonly placed in patients with dysphagia after stroke. The subsequent removal of the tube is a primary goal during rehabilitation. The purpose of our review was to identify predictors and factors associated with gastrostomy tube removal in patients with dysphagia after stroke. We conducted a literature review following the PRISMA statement and included the search databases PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and CINAHL. Articles were included in the final analysis per predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Our search retrieved a total of 853 results consisting of 416 articles (after eliminating duplicates). Six articles met our final eligibility criteria. The following factors were identified in at least 1 article as being significantly associated with gastrostomy tube removal: reduced age, decreased number of comorbidities, prolonged inpatient rehabilitation stay, absence of bilateral stroke, nonhemorrhagic stroke, reduced dysphagia severity, absence of aspiration, absence of premature bolus loss, and timely initiation of pharyngeal swallow. Aspiration was the only factor that was investigated by 2 studies-both using multiple regression and both showing stable results, with absence of aspiration increasing the chances for tube removal. In conclusion, little is known about factors associated with gastrostomy tube removal in patients with dysphagia after stroke. Most of the identified factors are associated with stroke or disease severity; however, the role of the individual factors remains unclear. The strongest predictor appears to be absence of aspiration on modified barium swallow studies emphasizing the importance of instrumental swallow studies in this patient population.

  2. A simple gastropexy for the loop-gastrostomy tube

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    Pang Ah-San

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy has been in clinical use for more than three decades. A recent innovation, the loop-gastrostomy, is more suitable for developing countries because the tube cannot be dislodged and is easy to change. Gastropexy and gastrostomy are separate but related moieties. We describe a novel technique to add a gastropexy to the loop-gastrostomy, using it successfully in a man with permanent dysphagia. It involved creating a secondary loop at the mid-portion of the LOOPPEG® 3G tube with absorbable ligatures.

  3. The role of gastrostomy tube placement in advanced dementia with dysphagia: a critical review

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    Goldberg LS

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Leanne S Goldberg,1 Kenneth W Altman2 1Department of Otolaryngology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USAPurpose: Over 4.5 million people in North America had a diagnosis of dementia in the year 2000, and more than half had advanced disease with potential aspiration risk. There is much controversy regarding the use and timing of enteral feeding support in these patients with dysphagia. The management of dysphagia is far more complex when considering quality of life, “comfort care” hand feeding, the use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube (PEG, and associated mortality rates. This study seeks to critically review the literature that evaluates PEG placement in this population. Methods: A systematic literature review of PubMed, from 1995–2012, was conducted to identify studies relating to PEG placement in dementia patients with dysphagia. The principal outcomes and related survival rates for this population were compared. Results: In total, 100 articles were identified in the search. Of these, ten met the search criteria and were analyzed. There was one study with a 2b level of evidence, one with 3b, and the remainder had level 4. All studies discussed long-term survival in the PEG versus non-PEG populations. No studies showed definitive evidence to suggest long-term survival rates improved in patients who underwent PEG placement as compared to those who did not. Two studies documented median survival worse in patients over age 80 with dementia and PEG placement.Conclusion: There is presently no evidence to suggest long-term survival rates improved in patients with advanced dementia who underwent PEG placement for dysphagia. Relevance to quality of life, need for nutrition and hydration, and ethical considerations in the decision process are discussed.Keywords: PEG, aspiration, elderly, feeding tube, swallow

  4. Gastrostomy feeding tube - bolus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - bolus; G-tube - bolus; Gastrostomy button - bolus; Bard Button - bolus; MIC-KEY - bolus ... KEY, 3 to 8 weeks after surgery. These feedings will help your child grow strong and healthy. ...

  5. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002937.htm Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A gastrostomy feeding tube insertion is the placement of a feeding ...

  6. Clinical-dosimetric analysis of measures of dysphagia including gastrostomy-tube dependence among head and neck cancer patients treated definitively by intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Baoqing; Chen, Allen M; Li, Dan; Lau, Derick H; Farwell, D Gregory; Luu, Quang; Rocke, David M; Newman, Kathleen; Courquin, Jean; Purdy, James A

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the association between dose to various anatomical structures and dysphagia among patients with head and neck cancer treated by definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-nine patients with squamous cancer of the head and neck were treated by definitive concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT to a median dose of 70 Gy (range, 68 to 72). In each patient, a gastrostomy tube (GT) was prophylacticly placed prior to starting treatment. Prolonged GT dependence was defined as exceeding the median GT duration of 192 days. Dysphagia was scored using standardized quality-of-life instruments. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data incorporating the superior/middle pharyngeal constrictors (SMPC), inferior pharyngeal constrictor (IPC), cricoid pharyngeal inlet (CPI), and cervical esophagus (CE) were analyzed in relation to prolonged GT dependence, dysphagia, and weight loss. At 3 months and 6 months after treatment, 87% and 44% of patients, respectively, were GT dependent. Spearman's ρ analysis identified statistical correlations (p < 0.05) between prolonged GT dependence or high grade dysphagia with IPC V65, IPC V60, IPC Dmean, and CPI Dmax. Logistic regression model showed that IPC V65 > 30%, IPC V60 > 60%, IPC Dmean > 60 Gy, and CPI Dmax > 62 Gy predicted for greater than 50% probability of prolonged GT dependence. Our analysis suggests that adhering to the following parameters may decrease the risk of prolonged GT dependence and dysphagia: IPC V65 < 15%, IPC V60 < 40%, IPC Dmean < 55 Gy, and CPI Dmax < 60 Gy

  7. Comparison between gastrostomy feeding and self-expandable metal stent insertion for patients with esophageal cancer and dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yang Won; Jang, Eun Young; Jung, Ji Hey; Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J

    2017-01-01

    Self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) insertion and percutaneous gastrostomy (PG) feeding are commonly used for patients with esophageal cancer and dysphagia. This study aimed to compare outcomes between SEMS insertion and PG feeding for them. We retrospectively analyzed 308 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent fully covered SEMS insertion (stent group) or PG (gastrostomy group) for dysphagia due to tumor. Patients with other causes of dysphagia, such as radiation-induced or postoperative stricture, were excluded from the study. Clinical outcomes were compared between the two groups, including overall survival and need for additional intervention and postprocedural nutritional status. At baseline, the stent group (n = 169) had more stage IV patients, less cervical cancers, and received radiotherapy and esophagectomy less often than the gastrostomy group (n = 64). The Kaplan-Meier curves showed higher overall survival in the gastrostomy group than in the stent group. Multivariate analysis revealed that PG was associated with better survival compared with SEMS insertion (hazard ratio 0.541, 95% confidence interval 0.346-0.848, p = 0.007). In addition, the gastrostomy group needed additional intervention less often (3.1% vs. 21.9%, p esophageal cancer and dysphagia. Stabilized nutritional status by PG may play a role in improving patient survival.

  8. Outcome of Rehabilitation and Swallowing Therapy after Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Dysphagia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong; Hirao, Jun; Minoda, Naoko

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the outcomes of rehabilitation (with swallowing therapy) after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in patients with neurogenic dysphagia. Forty-seven patients (29 males and 18 females) who were transferred to the rehabilitation ward of our hospital after receiving PEG tube placements during a 5-year period were enrolled in this study. Patients' demographic data, comorbidities, nutritional statuses, and laboratory biomarkers before the PEG procedure were collected. Rehabilitation (with swallowing therapy) outcomes such as changes in Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and dysphagia grade (using Fujishima's classification) were evaluated. Significant improvements in FIM scores and dysphagia grades after rehabilitation therapy were observed. Twenty-seven patients (57.4 %) were discharged with some oral intake and 10 patients (21.3%) were discharged PEG-free (defined as the PEG tube not being used or removed). Factors associated with being discharged with some oral intake were increase in FIM score (adjusted OR 1.10, 95 % CI 1.02-1.19) and higher baseline dysphagia grade (adjusted OR 1.88, 95 % CI 1.04-3.39). Factors associated with being discharged PEG-free were longer rehabilitation period (OR 1.03, 95 % CI 1.01-1.04), absence of respiratory disorders (OR 0.12, 95 % CI 0.03-0.35), and increase in FIM score (OR 1.17, 95 % CI 1.08-1.28). Changes in dysphagia grade were significantly correlated with changes in FIM score (r 2  = 0.46, p dysphagia.

  9. Comparison between gastrostomy feeding and self-expandable metal stent insertion for patients with esophageal cancer and dysphagia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Won Min

    Full Text Available Self-expandable metal stent (SEMS insertion and percutaneous gastrostomy (PG feeding are commonly used for patients with esophageal cancer and dysphagia. This study aimed to compare outcomes between SEMS insertion and PG feeding for them.We retrospectively analyzed 308 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent fully covered SEMS insertion (stent group or PG (gastrostomy group for dysphagia due to tumor. Patients with other causes of dysphagia, such as radiation-induced or postoperative stricture, were excluded from the study. Clinical outcomes were compared between the two groups, including overall survival and need for additional intervention and postprocedural nutritional status.At baseline, the stent group (n = 169 had more stage IV patients, less cervical cancers, and received radiotherapy and esophagectomy less often than the gastrostomy group (n = 64. The Kaplan-Meier curves showed higher overall survival in the gastrostomy group than in the stent group. Multivariate analysis revealed that PG was associated with better survival compared with SEMS insertion (hazard ratio 0.541, 95% confidence interval 0.346-0.848, p = 0.007. In addition, the gastrostomy group needed additional intervention less often (3.1% vs. 21.9%, p < 0.001 and experienced less decrease in serum albumin levels (-0.15 ± 0.56 g/dL vs. -0.39 ± 0.58 g/dL, p = 0.011 than the stent group after procedure.Our data suggested that, compared with SEMS insertion, PG is associated with better overall survival in patients with esophageal cancer and dysphagia. Stabilized nutritional status by PG may play a role in improving patient survival.

  10. Radiologic Percutaneous Gastrostomy in Nondistended Stomach: A Modified Approach

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    Petrocelli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.petrocelli@hsanmartino.it; Salsano, Giancarlo, E-mail: giancarlo.salsano@yahoo.it; Bovio, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.bovio@hsanmartino.it; Camerano, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.camerano@gmail.com; Utili, Alice, E-mail: aliceutili@gmail.com; Ferro, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.ferro@hsanmartino.it [IRCCS San Martino University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    IntroductionGastrostomy tube placement for patients requiring long-term nutritional support may be performed using different techniques including endoscopic, surgical, and percutaneous radiologically guided methods. Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG), typically performed when percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is not possible, requires proper gastric distension that is achieved by insufflating air through a nasogastric tube. We describe a simple technique to prevent air escape from the stomach during gastrostomy tube placement. To the best of our knowledge, this technique has not yet been described in the literature.Materials and MethodsFour patients with unsuccessful percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy were referred for fluoroscopic-guided gastrostomy. One patient had a pyriform sinus tumor and three had an ischemic stroke causing dysphagia. Gastric distention was not achieved in the patients due to air escaping into the bowel during the standard RIG procedure. A modified approach using a balloon catheter inflated in the pylorus to avoid air passing into the duodenum permitted successful RIG.ResultsThe modified RIG procedure was successfully carried out in all cases without complications.DiscussionInadequate air distension of the stomach is an unusual event that causes a failure of gastrostomy tube placement and an increased risk of both major and minor complications. The use of a balloon catheter inflated in the first part of the duodenum prevents the air passage into the bowel allowing the correct positioning of the gastrostomy.

  11. Comparative Study of Esophageal Self-expandable Metallic Stent Insertion and Gastrostomy Feeding for Dysphagia Caused by Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihye; Min, Yang Won; Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung Hoon; Lee, Joon Haeng; Rhee, Poong Lyul; Kim, Jae J

    2018-03-25

    Dysphagia is encountered in a large proportion of patients with lung cancer and is associated with malnutrition and a poor quality of life. This study compared the clinical outcomes of self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) insertion and percutaneous gastrostomy (PG) feeding for patients with lung cancer and dysphagia. A total of 261 patients with lung cancer, who underwent either SEMS insertion (stent group) or PG (gastrostomy group) as an initial treatment procedure for dysphagia between July 1997 and July 2015 at the Samsung Medical Center, were reviewed retrospectively, and 84 patients with esophageal obstruction were identified. The clinical outcomes, including the overall survival, additional intervention, complications, and post-procedural nutritional status in the two groups, were compared. Among the 84 patients finally analyzed, 68 patients received SEMS insertion and 16 had PG. The stent group had less cervical obstruction and more mid-esophageal obstruction than the gastrostomy group. The Kaplan-Meier curves revealed similar overall survival in the two groups. Multivariate analysis showed that the two modalities had similar survival rates (PG compared with SEMS insertion, hazard ratio 0.682, p=0.219). Fifteen patients (22.1%) in the stent group received additional intervention, whereas there was no case in the gastrostomy group (p=0.063). The decrease in the serum albumin level after the procedure was lower in the gastrostomy group than in the stent group (-0.20±0.54 g/dL vs. -0.65±0.57 g/dL, p=0.013). SEMS insertion and PG feeding for relieving dysphagia by lung cancer had a comparable survival outcome. On the other hand, PG was associated with a better nutritional status.

  12. Gastrostomy tube feeding of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlseng, Magnus O; Andersen, Guro L; DA Graca Andrada, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries.......To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries....

  13. Percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement in patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sane, S.S.; Towbin, A.; Bergey, E.A.; Kaye, R.D.; Fitz, C.R.; Albright, L.; Towbin, R.B. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital of Pittsburgh, 3705 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study is to determine the risk of CNS and/or peritoneal infection in children with ventriculoperitoneal shunts in whom a percutaneous gastrostomy tube is placed. Materials and methods. We placed 205 gastrostomy or gastrojejunostomy tubes from January of 1991 to December 1996. Twenty-three patients (10 boys, 13 girls) had ventriculoperitoneal shunts at the time of placement. All shunts were placed at least 1 month prior to placement of the gastrostomy tube. The patients ranged in age from 8 months to 16 years with a mean age of 6 years, 9 months. Patient weight ranged from 2 kg to 60 kg. All 23 children required long-term nutritional support due to severe neurologic impairment. No prophylactic antibiotics were given prior to the procedure. Of the patients, 21/23 had a 14-F Sacks-Vine gastrostomy tube with a fixed terminal retention device inserted, using percutaneous fluoroscopic antegrade technique. Two of the 23 patients had a Ross 14-F Flexi-flo gastrostomy tube which required a retrograde technique due to a small caliber esophagus in these children. Results. All 23 children had technically successful placements of percutaneous gastrostomy (7) or gastrojejunostomy (16) tubes. Of the children, 21/23 (91 %) had no complications from the procedure. Two of 23 (9 %) patients demonstrated signs of peritonitis after placement of their gastrostomy tubes and subsequently had shunt infections. In both, children CSF culture grew gram-positive cocci. The antegrade technique was used in both children who developed peritonitis. Conclusion. Our study indicates children with ventriculoperitoneal shunts who undergo percutaneous gastrostomy are at greater risk for infection and subsequent shunt malfunction. Therefore, we recommend prophylactic antibiotic therapy to cover for skin and oral flora. (orig.) With 1 fig., 7 refs.

  14. A very feasible alternative in patients with feeding difficulties from gastrostomy: Jejunal tube advanced through the gastrostomy

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    Ramazan Karabulut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our aim is to share our experiences regarding patients who cannot be fed effectively through the gastrostomy tube, but were inserted feeding jejunostomy through the gastrostomy orifice using scopic fluoroscopic techniques utilised by the interventional radiology. Patients and Methods: Between January 2010 and May 2013 the patients that were inserted jejunostomy tube through the gastrostomy orifice using fluoroscopic techniques were retrospectively analysed. Data including primary indication for gastrostomy, sex, concomitant disease and the requirement for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD were all recorded. Results: There were five patients with these criteria. They all received either medical or surgical GERD therapy; nevertheless enteral feeding failed to reach an effective level, they all had vomiting and did not gain any weight. Following conversion, all the patients gained minimum 2 kg in 2-5 months; all the patients tolerated enteral feeding and were discharged in the early period. There were neither procedure related complications such as perforation, bleeding nor sedation related complications. Procedure took no more than 30 min as a whole. There was no need for surgical intervention. However in one patient re-intervention was required due to accidental removal of the catheter. Conclusions: In case of feeding difficulties following the gastrostomy; instead of an invasive surgical intervention; physicians should consider jejunal feeding that is advanced through the gastrostomy, which does not require any anaesthesia.

  15. Acceptability and outcomes of the Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG tube placement- patients' and care givers' perspectives

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    Shah Hasnain A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube has now become a preferred option for the long-term nutritional support device for patients with dysphagia. There is a considerable debate about the health issues related to the quality of life of these patients. Our aim of the study was to assess the outcome and perspectives of patients/care givers, about the acceptability of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement. Methods This descriptive analytic study conducted in patients, who have undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement during January 1998 till December 2004. Medical records of these patients were evaluated for their demographic characteristics, underlying diagnosis, indications and complications. Telephonic interviews were conducted till March 2005, on a pre-tested questionnaire to address psychological, social and physical performance status, of the health related quality of life issues. Results A total of 191 patients' medical records were reviewed, 120 (63% were males, and mean age was 63 years. Early complication was infection at PEG tube site in 6 (3% patients. In follow up over 365 ± 149 days, late complications (occurring 72 hours later were infection at PEG tube site in 29 (15 % patient and dislodgment/blockage of the tube in 26 (13.6%. Interviews were possible with 126 patients/caretakers. Karnofsky Performance Score of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 was found in 13(10%, 18(14%, 21(17%, 29(23% and 45(36% with p-value Conclusion PEG-tube placement was found to be relatively free from serious immediate and long- term complications. Majority of caregivers and patient felt that PEG-tube helped in feeding and prolonging the survival. Studies are needed to assess the real benefit in terms of actual nutritional gain and quality of life in such patients.

  16. ''Push-pull'' gastrostomy: a new technique for percutaneous gastrostomy tube insertion in the neonate and young infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, A.M.; Kaye, R.D.; Fitz, C.R.; Towbin, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate a newly developed method combining antegrade and retrograde techniques for percutaneous gastrostomy tube (PGT) insertion in the neonate and young infant. Materials and methods. From January 1994 to December 2000, 85 children (47 male, 38 female), mean age 4.5 months (range 0.44-9.13 months) underwent PGT insertion using the ''push-pull'' technique. With the addition, 57 children had a jejunostomy tube placed as well at or within 24 h of the PGT procedure. The mean weight was 3.74 kg, range 1.5-7.0 kg. The indications for the procedure included failure to thrive in 40 patients (25 %), static encephalopathy in 21 (25 %), neurological/congenital abnormalities in 12 (14 %), aspiration in 7 (8 %), and cardiac problems in 5 (6 %). Results. Eighty-five PGTs were successfully inserted in 85 children. One procedure was initially unsuccessful due to failed conscious sedation and was completed under general anesthesia. Four of 85 patients initially had attempted antegrade placement that failed, and the procedure was successfully completed using the ''push-pull'' method. One major complication occurred: a gastrocolic fistula at day 5 post-procedure, which was surgically repaired without sequelae. Tube-related problems included; tube dislodgement (n = 1) and procedure-related stomal infection (n = 3). Conclusion. The ''push-pull'' gastrostomy technique is a safe, effective method of percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement in neonates. It facilitates successful placement of the PGT in patients in whom the classic antegrade method is not possible. It has become the procedure of choice in this group. (orig.)

  17. A New Tube Gastrostomy Model in Animal Experiments

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    Atakan Sezer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The orogastric route is the most preferred application method in the vast majority of the animal experiments in which application can be achieved by adding the material to the water of the experiment animal, through an orogastric tube or with a surgically managed ostomy. Material and Method: This experiment was constructed with twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats which were randomly assigned to one of two groups consist of control group ( group C, n: 6 and tube gastrostomy group ( group TG, n: 6.A novel and simple gastrostomy tube was derivated from a silicone foley catheter. Tube gastrostomy apparatus was constituted with a silicone foley catheter (6 French. In the group TG an incision was performed, and the stomach was visualized. A 1 cm incision was made in the midline and opening of the peritoneum. Anchoring sutures were placed and anterior gastric wall was lifted. The gastric wall is then opened. The apparatus was placed into the stomach and pulled through from a tunnel under the skin and fixed to the lateral abdominal wall with a 2/0 silk suture. Result: The procedure was ended in the 10th day of experiment. No mortality was observed in group C. The rats were monitored daily and no abnormal behavior consists of self harming incision site, resistance to oral intake or attending to displace. There was statistically significant difference in increasing alanine transaminase level (p<0.05 and decrease in the total protein and body weight (p<0.05 at the group TG at the end of experiment. There was significant increase in urea levels in Group C (p<0.05 at the end of experiment. The statistically significant decrease was observed in the same period in group C between aspartate transaminase, albumin, total protein, and body weight (p<0.05.  Glucose (p=0.047 and aspartate transaminase (p=0.050 level decrease changes and weight loose (p=0.034 from preoperative period to the end of the experiment between gastrostomy and laparotomy groups were

  18. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in the Enteral Feeding of the Elderly

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    Huan-Lin Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Today we are faced with an aging society that may develop malnutrition because of dysphagia related to dementia, stroke, and malignancy seen often in the elderly. The preferred form of nutritional supplementation for this group is enteral nutrition, and the most appropriate long-term method is by use of a gastrostomy. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG was first introduced in 1980 as an alternative to the traditional operative procedure and rapidly became the preferred procedure. In geriatric patients, the principal indications are neurological dysphagia and malnutrition, related to an underlying disease or anorexia-cachexia in very elderly. PEG is contraindicated in the presence of respiratory distress, previous gastric resection, total esophageal obstruction, coagulation disorders and sepsis in the elderly. Common complications include wound infection, leakage, hemorrhage, and fistula in the general population, but aspiration pneumonia is the major case of death in this group. Risks and complications of PEG must be discussed with patients and their families; and the decision for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion should only be made after careful consideration and discussion between managing physicians, allied health professionals, and the patient and/or family. Four ethical principles may help make feeding decisions: beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice. Attentive long-term care after tube replacement is mandatory. Acceptance of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement by patients and their families tends to increase once favorable outcomes are offered.

  19. Disc-retained tubes for radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG): Not up to the job?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibriya, N.; Wilbraham, L.; Mullan, D.; Puro, P.; Vasileuskaya, S.; Edwards, D.W.; Laasch, H.-U.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the insertion procedure and performance of disc-retained gastrostomy tubes, recording complications and accidental displacements by prospective audit, and to determine whether primary placement of the tube off-licence was feasible. Materials and methods: Disc-retained 12 F single-lumen Monarch gastrostomy tubes (Enteral UK, Selby, UK) were inserted by three gastrointestinal interventional radiologists in a supra-regional cancer centre. The 12 F tubes required a 20 F peel-away sheath with four-point gastropexy fixation and were placed under conscious sedation, using electrocardiogram (EEG) bispectral index monitoring. Follow-up was performed in an in-house gastrostomy drop-in clinic at 1 week and 1 month, supplemented with weekly telephone follow-up. Patients also had open access to the gastrostomy drop-in clinic for immediate advice and complication management. Results: Eighteen patients underwent primary insertion of a Monarch gastrostomy tube over 5 months. A total of 6/18 (33%) tubes displaced; 4/18 (22%) completely, 2/18 (11%) occult into the peritoneum. Four of 18 (22%) patients developed infection at the stoma site. Due to the unexpectedly poor performance of the tube, the study was terminated early. Conclusion: Initial experience with the Monarch disc-retained gastrostomy tube demonstrates it unsuitable for primary placement with current protocols. In view of the potentially serious complications, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has been informed. A request has been made to the distributer to reassess the tube design and/or review the procedure promoted for primary placement

  20. Recovery from severe dysphagia in systemic sclerosis - myositis overlap: a case report.

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    Chinniah, Keith J; Mody, Girish M

    2017-06-01

    Dysphagia is common in inflammatory myopathies and usually responds to corticosteroids. Severe dysphagia requiring feeding by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is associated with significant morbidity and high mortality. A 56-year old African Black woman initially presented with systemic sclerosis (SSC) - myositis overlap and interstitial lung disease. She responded to high dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide followed by azathioprine, with improvement in her lung function and regression of the skin changes. Six years later she had a myositis flare with severe dysphagia. Her myositis improved after high doses of corticosteroids, azathioprine and two doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). As her dysphagia persisted, she was fed via a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube and given a course of rituximab. Her dysphagia gradually resolved and the PEG tube was removed within two months. She received another dose of rituximab six months later and continued low dose prednisone and azathioprine. Her muscle power improved, weight returned to normal and she remained well 20 months after hospital discharge. Our patient with SSC-myositis overlap and severe dysphagia requiring PEG feeding, improved with high dose corticosteroids, azathioprine, two courses of IVIG and rituximab, and remained in remission 20 months after hospital discharge.

  1. Replacement of Mushroom Cage Gastrostomy Tube Using a Modified Technique to Allow Percutaneous Replacement with an Endoscopic Tube in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammar, Thoraya; Rio, Alan; Ampong, Mary Ann; Sidhu, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    Radiologic inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is the preferred method in our institution for enteral feeding in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Skin-level primary-placed mushroom cage gastrostomy tubes become tight with weight gain. We describe a minimally invasive radiologic technique for replacing mushroom gastrostomy tubes with endoscopic mushroom cage tubes in ALS. All patients with ALS who underwent replacement of a RIG tube were included. Patients were selected for a modified replacement when the tube length of the primary placed RIG tube was insufficient to allow like-for-like replacement. Replacement was performed under local anesthetic and fluoroscopic guidance according to a preset technique, with modification of an endoscopic mushroom cage gastrostomy tube to allow percutaneous placement. Assessment of the success, safety, and durability of the modified technique was undertaken. Over a 60-month period, 104 primary placement mushroom cage tubes in ALS were performed. A total of 20 (19.2%) of 104 patients had a replacement tube positioned, 10 (9.6%) of 104 with the modified technique (male n = 4, female n = 6, mean age 65.5 years, range 48-85 years). All tubes were successfully replaced using this modified technique, with two minor complications (superficial wound infection and minor hemorrhage). The mean length of time of tube durability was 158.5 days (range 6-471 days), with all but one patient dying with a functional tube in place. We have devised a modification to allow percutaneous replacement of mushroom cage gastrostomy feeding tubes with minimal compromise to ALS patients. This technique allows tube replacement under local anesthetic, without the need for sedation, an important consideration in ALS.

  2. Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by Foley Catheter: A Complication when Substituting for Commercial Gastrostomy Tubes

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    Amanda B. Lewis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of using percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG for long-term enteral feeding is well established and commonly used. While the technique is relatively safe and simple, the gastrostomy tube itself may deteriorate or malfunction, requiring a replacement tube. We present a case of a 58-year-old woman who was found to have gastric outlet obstruction from the inflated balloon of a Foley catheter being used as a replacement for her PEG tube. This case illustrates a potential complication of using a Foley catheter in place of commercially available gastrostomy tubes.

  3. Percutaneous transesophageal gastro-tubing (PTEG) as an alternative long-term tube feeding procedure when gastrostomy is not feasible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong; Nishihara, Kazuki

    2017-12-01

    Percutaneous transesophageal gastro-tubing (PTEG) is a minimally invasive technique to access the gut via an esophagostomy. However, this procedure is not well known and the literature available is still fairly limited. This observational study was conducted to evaluate our experience using this method as an alternative long-term tube feeding procedure when gastrostomy is not suitable. A total of 15 patients (10 males and 5 females) who underwent PTEG at our institution from 2012 to 2016 were observed and analyzed in this study. The average age was 80.1 (71-93) years. Underlying conditions that required PTEG were previous gastric resection in 11 patients, left diaphragm disorder in 2 patients, interposing transverse colon between the abdominal wall and anterior gastric wall in 1 patient, and severe gastrostomy site leakage in 1 patient. Tube placement was successful in all patients by approaching the left side of the neck, using a 15 Fr size tube. The mean postoperative length of stay was 22 (8-48) days. Postoperative adverse events included accidental tube dislodgement in three patients, tracheoesophageal fistula in one patient, inferior thyroid artery injury in one patient and thyroid gland mispuncture in one patient. There was no procedure-related mortality nor mortality at 30 days. Eight patients were discharged with some oral intake. PTEG is feasible in patients requiring long-term tube feeding for whom gastrostomy is unsuitable. It is an effective long-term tube feeding procedure and should be offered as a more comfortable alternative to nasogastric tubing.

  4. CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy: success rate, early and late complications; CT-gesteuerte perkutane Gastrostomie: Technischer Erfolg, Frueh- und Spaetkomplikationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A.; Voelk, M. [Radiologie, Bundeswehrkrankenhaus Ulm (Germany); Strotzer, M. [Radiologie, Klinikum Hohe Warte (Germany); Feuerbach, S.; Rogler, G. [Radiologie, Klinikum der Universitaet Regensburg (Germany); Seitz, J. [Radiologie, MVZ Dr. Neumaier und Kollegen (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Purpose: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) are the standard methods of ensuring long-term enteral food intake in patients with dysphagia caused by neoplasia or neurological disorders. High-grade obstructions of the upper digestive tract or inadequate transillumination can prevent PEG. CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (PG) represents a special technique for enabling gastrostomy in patients for whom the endoscopic method is impossible. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. Materials and Methods: CT-guided PG was performed in 83 patients, mostly with malignancy of the upper respiratory or digestive tract. Medical records for these patients were reviewed, and the results and complications of the CT-guided PG were analyzed retrospectively. Complications were grouped into four categories: Major and minor complications as well as early and late complications. Results: In 95.2 % of all cases (79/83), CT-guided PG was successful in the first attempt. Within the first 3 days, 5 major complications including 4 tube dislocations and one case of peritonitis were found in 4/79 patients (5.1 %). One of these patients experienced two early major complications. Early minor complications, mainly local skin irritations and temporary stomachache, were observed in 31 patients (39.2 %). Three days after CT-guided PG, 4 cases of major complications were documented, yielding a total rate of major complications was 8.7 % (7/79). Hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion or perforation after gastrostomy was not observed. 29.1 % of the patients (23/79) experienced late minor complications. (orig.)

  5. Fluoroscopy-Guided Removal of Pull-Type Gastrostomy Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlers, Christopher M.; Schneider, Jens; Lachmann, Ricarda; Herber, Sascha; Dueber, Christoph; Pitton, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    These case reports demonstrate a radiologic interventional technique for removal of pull-type gastrostomy tubes. This approach proved to be a safe and efficient procedure in two patients. The procedure may be applicable in situations where endoscopic attempts fail.

  6. Analysis of patients ≥65 with predominant cervical spine fractures: Issues of disposition and dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Poole

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical spine fractures occur in 2.6% to 4.7% of trauma patients aged 65 years or older. Mortality rates in this population ranges from 19% to 24%. A few studies have specifically looked at dysphagia in elderly patients with cervical spine injury. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate dysphagia, disposition, and mortality in elderly patients with cervical spine injury. Settings and Design: Retrospective review at an the American College of Surgeons-verified level 1 trauma center. Methods: Patients 65 years or older with cervical spine fracture, either isolated or in association with other minor injuries were included in the study. Data included demographics, injury details, neurologic deficits, dysphagia evaluation and treatment, hospitalization details, and outcomes. Statistical Analysis: Categorical and continuous data were analyzed using Chi-square analysis and one-way analysis of variance, respectively. Results: Of 136 patients in this study, 2 (1.5% had a sensory deficit alone, 4 (2.9% had a motor deficit alone, and 4 (2.9% had a combined sensory and motor deficit. Nearly one-third of patients (n = 43, 31.6% underwent formal swallow evaluation, and 4 (2.9% had a nasogastric tube or Dobhoff tube placed for enteral nutrition, whereas eight others (5.9% had a gastrostomy tube or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placed. Most patients were discharged to a skilled nursing unit (n = 50, 36.8%, or to home or home with home health (n = 48, 35.3%. Seven patients (5.1% died in the hospital, and eight more (5.9% were transferred to hospice. Conclusion: Cervical spine injury in the elderly patient can lead to significant consequences, including dysphagia and need for skilled nursing care at discharge.

  7. Peritonitis following percutaneous gastrostomy tube insertions in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dookhoo, Leema [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Mahant, Sanjay [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Pediatrics, Toronto, ON (Canada); Parra, Dimitri A.; John, Philip R.; Amaral, Joao G.; Connolly, Bairbre L. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-09-15

    Percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy has a high success rate, low morbidity, and can be performed under different levels of sedation or local anesthesia in children. Despite its favourable safety profile, major complications can occur. Few studies have examined peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy in children. To identify potential risk factors and variables influencing the development and early diagnosis of peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of children who developed peritonitis within 7 days of percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy between 2003 and 2012. From the 1,504 patients who underwent percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy, patients who developed peritonitis (group 1) were matched by closest date of procedure to those without peritonitis (group 2). Peritonitis was defined according to recognized clinical criteria. Demographic, clinical, procedural, management and outcomes data were collected. Thirty-eight of 1,504 children (2.5%; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) who underwent percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy developed peritonitis ≤7 days post procedure (group 1). Fever (89%), irritability (63%) and abdominal pain (55%) occurred on presentation of peritonitis. Group 1 patients were all treated with antibiotics; 41% underwent additional interventions: tube readjustments (8%), aspiration of pneumoperitoneum (23%), laparotomy (10%) and intensive care unit admission (10%). In group 1, enteral feeds started on average 3 days later and patients were discharged 5 days later than patients in group 2. There were two deaths not directly related to peritonitis. Neither age, gender, weight, underlying diagnoses nor operator was identified as a risk factor. Peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy in children occurs in approximately 2.5% of cases. No risk factors for its development were identified. Medical management is usually sufficient for a good outcome

  8. Peritonitis following percutaneous gastrostomy tube insertions in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dookhoo, Leema; Mahant, Sanjay; Parra, Dimitri A.; John, Philip R.; Amaral, Joao G.; Connolly, Bairbre L.

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy has a high success rate, low morbidity, and can be performed under different levels of sedation or local anesthesia in children. Despite its favourable safety profile, major complications can occur. Few studies have examined peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy in children. To identify potential risk factors and variables influencing the development and early diagnosis of peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of children who developed peritonitis within 7 days of percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy between 2003 and 2012. From the 1,504 patients who underwent percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy, patients who developed peritonitis (group 1) were matched by closest date of procedure to those without peritonitis (group 2). Peritonitis was defined according to recognized clinical criteria. Demographic, clinical, procedural, management and outcomes data were collected. Thirty-eight of 1,504 children (2.5%; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) who underwent percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy developed peritonitis ≤7 days post procedure (group 1). Fever (89%), irritability (63%) and abdominal pain (55%) occurred on presentation of peritonitis. Group 1 patients were all treated with antibiotics; 41% underwent additional interventions: tube readjustments (8%), aspiration of pneumoperitoneum (23%), laparotomy (10%) and intensive care unit admission (10%). In group 1, enteral feeds started on average 3 days later and patients were discharged 5 days later than patients in group 2. There were two deaths not directly related to peritonitis. Neither age, gender, weight, underlying diagnoses nor operator was identified as a risk factor. Peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy in children occurs in approximately 2.5% of cases. No risk factors for its development were identified. Medical management is usually sufficient for a good outcome

  9. Peritonitis following percutaneous gastrostomy tube insertions in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dookhoo, Leema; Mahant, Sanjay; Parra, Dimitri A; John, Philip R; Amaral, Joao G; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2016-09-01

    Percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy has a high success rate, low morbidity, and can be performed under different levels of sedation or local anesthesia in children. Despite its favourable safety profile, major complications can occur. Few studies have examined peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy in children. To identify potential risk factors and variables influencing the development and early diagnosis of peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of children who developed peritonitis within 7 days of percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy between 2003 and 2012. From the 1,504 patients who underwent percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy, patients who developed peritonitis (group 1) were matched by closest date of procedure to those without peritonitis (group 2). Peritonitis was defined according to recognized clinical criteria. Demographic, clinical, procedural, management and outcomes data were collected. Thirty-eight of 1,504 children (2.5%; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) who underwent percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy developed peritonitis ≤7 days post procedure (group 1). Fever (89%), irritability (63%) and abdominal pain (55%) occurred on presentation of peritonitis. Group 1 patients were all treated with antibiotics; 41% underwent additional interventions: tube readjustments (8%), aspiration of pneumoperitoneum (23%), laparotomy (10%) and intensive care unit admission (10%). In group 1, enteral feeds started on average 3 days later and patients were discharged 5 days later than patients in group 2. There were two deaths not directly related to peritonitis. Neither age, gender, weight, underlying diagnoses nor operator was identified as a risk factor. Peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy in children occurs in approximately 2.5% of cases. No risk factors for its development were identified. Medical management is usually sufficient for a good outcome

  10. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for nutritional palliation of upper esophageal cancer unsuitable for esophageal stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Grilo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Esophageal cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and has a poor prognosis. Most patients with advanced esophageal cancer have significant dysphagia that contributes to weight loss and malnutrition. Esophageal stenting is a widespread palliation approach, but unsuitable for cancers near the upper esophageal sphincter, were stents are poorly tolerated. Generally, guidelines do not support endoscopic gastrostomy in this clinical setting, but it may be the best option for nutritional support. OBJECTIVE: Retrospective evaluation of patients with dysphagia caused advanced esophageal cancer, no expectation of resuming oral intake and with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for comfort palliative nutrition. METHOD: We selected adult patients with unresecable esophageal cancer histological confirmed, in whom stenting was impossible due to proximal location, and chemotherapy or radiotherapy were palliative, using gastrostomy for enteral nutrition. Clinical and nutritional data were evaluated, including success of gastrostomy, procedure complications and survival after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, and evolution of body mass index, albumin, transferrin and cholesterol. RESULTS: Seventeen males with stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Mean age was 60.9 years. Most of the patients had toxic habits. All underwent palliative chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Gastrostomy was successfully performed in all, but nine required prior dilatation. Most had the gastrostomy within 2 months after diagnosis. There was a buried bumper syndrome treated with tube replacement and four minor complications. There were no cases of implantation metastases or procedure related mortality. Two patients were lost and 12 died. Mean survival of deceased patients was 5.9 months. Three patients are alive 6, 14 and 17 months after the gastrostomy procedure, still increasing the mean survival. Mean body mass index and laboratory

  11. Initial Experience with Computed Tomography and Fluoroscopically Guided Placement of Push-Type Gastrostomy Tubes Using a Rupture-Free Balloon Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Takeshi; Tanabe, Masahiro; Yamatogi, Shigenari; Shimizu, Kensaku; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement of push-type gastrostomy tubes using a rupture-free balloon (RFB) catheter under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic guidance. A total of 35 patients (23 men and 12 women; age range 57–93 years [mean 71.7]) underwent percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement of a push-type gastrostomy tube using an RFB catheter between April 2005 and July 2008. Technical success, procedure duration, and complications were analyzed. Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement was considered technically successful in all patients. The median procedure time was 39 ± 13 (SD) min (range 24–78). The average follow-up time interval was 103 days (range 7–812). No major complications related to the procedure were encountered. No tubes failed because of blockage, and neither tube dislodgement nor intraperitoneal leakage occurred during the follow-up period. The investigators conclude that percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement with push-type tubes using an RFB catheter is a safe and effective means of gastric feeding when performed by radiologists.

  12. Pain and Swelling after Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Removal: An Unexpected Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Queirós

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastrostomy site metastization is considered an uncommon complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG placement in patients with head and neck tumours, but it is important to consider this possibility when evaluating gastrostomy-related symptoms. The authors present the case of a 40-year-old male with excessive alcohol consumption and active smoking, diagnosed with a stage IV oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The patient developed a paraneoplastic demyelinating motor polyneuropathy that, associated with tumour mass effect, caused dysphagia with need for nasogastric tube feeding. Treatment with radiotherapy and then chemoradiotherapy was administered and a PEG was placed with the pull method. Cancer remission and resolution of polyneuropathy was achieved, so PEG was removed. Two weeks later, the patient presented with pain and swelling at the gastrostomy site suggesting a local abscess, with improvement after drainage and antibiotic therapy. After 1 month, there was a tumour mass at the gastrostomy site and an oropharyngeal cancer metastasis was diagnosed. The patient underwent surgical excision of abdominal wall metastasis and abdominal disease was controlled. Nevertheless, there was subsequent oropharyngeal neoplasia recurrence and the patient died 6 months later. This case raises the discussion about gastrostomy placement methods that could avoid gastrostomy site metastization, the possible differential diagnosis, and diagnostic workout. Surgical resection may allow metastatic disease control, but by primary disease evolution greatly affects prognosis.

  13. Gastroenteric tube feeding: Techniques, problems and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstein, Irina; Shastri, Yogesh M; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteric tube feeding plays a major role in the management of patients with poor voluntary intake, chronic neurological or mechanical dysphagia or gut dysfunction, and patients who are critically ill. However, despite the benefits and widespread use of enteral tube feeding, some patients experience complications. This review aims to discuss and compare current knowledge regarding the clinical application of enteral tube feeding, together with associated complications and special aspects. We conducted an extensive literature search on PubMed, Embase and Medline using index terms relating to enteral access, enteral feeding/nutrition, tube feeding, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy, endoscopic nasoenteric tube, nasogastric tube, and refeeding syndrome. The literature showed common routes of enteral access to include nasoenteral tube, gastrostomy and jejunostomy, while complications fall into four major categories: mechanical, e.g., tube blockage or removal; gastrointestinal, e.g., diarrhea; infectious e.g., aspiration pneumonia, tube site infection; and metabolic, e.g., refeeding syndrome, hyperglycemia. Although the type and frequency of complications arising from tube feeding vary considerably according to the chosen access route, gastrointestinal complications are without doubt the most common. Complications associated with enteral tube feeding can be reduced by careful observance of guidelines, including those related to food composition, administration rate, portion size, food temperature and patient supervision. PMID:25024606

  14. Management of acid-related disorders in patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, Colin W

    2004-09-06

    Dysphagia affects a large and growing number of individuals in the United States, particularly the elderly and those who are neurologically impaired. Swallowing difficulties may be due to age-related changes in oropharyngeal and esophageal functioning as well as central nervous system diseases such as stroke, Parkinson disease, and dementia. Among institutionalized individuals, dysphagia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. An appreciation of the physiology of swallowing and the pathophysiology of dysphagia is necessary for proper patient management. Careful history, physical examination, and evaluation of radiologic and endoscopic studies should differentiate oropharyngeal and esophageal etiologies of dysphagia and distinguish mechanical (anatomic) disorders from functional (motor) disorders. A significant percentage of patients with dysphagia have concomitant acid-related disorders that are managed best with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Three of the currently available PPIs are manufactured as capsules containing enteric-coated granules that may be mixed with soft foods or fruit juices before oral administration to those with swallowing difficulties. In addition, omeprazole and lansoprazole may be administered via gastrostomy or nasogastric feeding tubes as suspensions in sodium bicarbonate. Novel dosage formulations of lansoprazole that may be appropriate for patients with dysphagia include the commercially manufactured lansoprazole strawberry-flavored enteric-coated granules for suspension and lansoprazole orally disintegrating tablets.

  15. CIRSE Standards of Practice Guidelines on Gastrostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutcliffe, James, E-mail: jasutcliffe@gmail.com; Wigham, Andrew, E-mail: a.wigham@doctors.org.uk [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Mceniff, Niall, E-mail: nmceniff@stjames.ie [St. James’s Hospital, Radiology (DiagIm) (Ireland); Dvorak, Petr, E-mail: petr-dvorak@email.cz [Faculty Hospital Charles University, Radiology Department (Czech Republic); Crocetti, Laura, E-mail: laura.crocetti@med.unipi.it [University of Pisa, Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Hepatology and Liver Transplants (Italy); Uberoi, Raman, E-mail: Raman.Uberoi@ouh.nhs.uk [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Radiology Department (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    PurposeSurgical Gastrostomy has been around since the 19th century but in 1980 the first successful percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was reported. A year later the first successful percutaneous gastrostomy was performed using fluoroscopic guidance. The technique for percutaneous insertion and the equipment used has been refined since then and it is now considered the gold standard for gastrostomy insertion. Here we present guidelines for image-guided enteral feeding tubes in adults.Material and MethodWe performed a review and analysis of the scientific literature, other national and international guidelines and expert opinion.ResultsStudies have shown fluoroscopic techniques have consistently higher success rates with lower rates of major complications than endoscopic techniques. However, the Achilles' heel of many fluoroscopic techniques is the requirement for smaller gastrostomy tube sizes resulting in them being more prone to blockages and thus requiring further intervention.ConclusionRadiological feeding tube insertion is a safe and effective procedure. Success rates are higher, and complication rates lower than PEG or surgical gastrostomy tube placement and innovative techniques for gastric and jejunal access mean that there are very few cases in which RIG is not possible. The principal weakness of radiologically inserted gastrostomies is the limitiation on tube size which leads to a higher rate of tube blockage. Per-oral image-guided gastrostomies have to an extent addressed this but have not been popularised. Currently many centres still consider endoscopic gastrostomies as the first line unless patients are too unwell to undergo this procedure or previous attempts have failed, in which case radioloically inserted gastrostomies are the technique of choice.

  16. Percutaneous Gastrostomy in Patients Who Fail or Are Unsuitable for Endoscopic Gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, Frank J.; Varghese, Jose C.; Haslam, Philip J.; McGrath, Frank P.; Keeling, Frank; Lee, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is not possible or fails in some patients. We aimed to categorize the reasons for PEG failure, to study the success of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) in these patients, and to highlight the associated technical difficulties and complications.Methods: Forty-two patients (28 men, 14 women; mean age 60 years, range 18-93 years) in whom PEG failed or was not possible, underwent PRG. PEG failure or unsuitability was due to upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction or other pathology precluding PEG in 15 of the 42 patients, suboptimal transillumination in 22 of 42 patients, and advanced cardiorespiratory decompensation precluding endoscopy in five of 42 patients. T-fastener gastropexy was used in all patients and 14-18 Fr catheters were inserted.Results: PRG was successful in 41 of 42 patients (98%). CT guidance was required in four patients with altered upper gastrointestinal anatomy. PRG failed in one patient despite CT guidance. In the 16 patients with high subcostal stomachs who failed PEG because of inadequate transillumination, intercostal tube placement was required in three and cephalad angulation under the costal margin in six patients. Major complications included inadvertent placement of the tube in the peritoneal cavity. There was one case of hemorrhage at the gastrostomy site requiring transfusion and one case of superficial gastrostomy site infection requiring tube removal. Minor complications included superficial wound infection in six patients, successfully treated with routine wound toilette.Conclusion: We conclude that PRG is a safe, well-tolerated and successful method of gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy insertion in the technically difficult group of patients who have undergone an unsuccessful PEG. In many such cases optimal clinical evaluation will suggest primary referral for PRG as the preferred option

  17. Replacement of Dislodged Gastrostomy Tubes After Stoma Dilation in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiloni Bhambani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A dislodged gastrostomy tube (GT is a common complaint that requires evaluation in the pediatric emergency department (ED and, on occasion, will require stoma dilation to successfully replace the GT. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency that stoma dilation is required, the success rate of replacement, complications encountered, and the techniques used to confirm placement of the GT after dilation. Methods: We conducted a retrospective medical record review of children 0–18 years who presented to the pediatric ED from February 2013 through February 2015 with a dislodged GT that required stoma dilation by pediatric emergency physicians with serially increasing Foley catheter sizes prior to successful placement of the GT. Results: We reviewed a total of 302 encounters in 215 patients, with 97 (32% of the encounters requiring stoma dilation prior to replacing a GT. The median amount of dilation was 2 French between the initial Foley catheter size and the final GT size. There was a single complication of a mal-positioned balloon that was identified at the index visit. No delayed complications were encountered. We performed confirmation of placement in all patients. The two most common forms of confirmation were aspiration of gastric contents (56/97 [58%] followed by contrast radiograph in 39 (40%. Conclusion: The practice of serial dilation of a gastrostomy stoma site to allow successful replacement of a gastrostomy tube in pediatric patients who present to the ED with a dislodged gastrostomy tube is generally successful and without increased complication. All patients received at least one form of confirmation for appropriate GT placement with the most common being aspiration of gastric contents.

  18. Single port laparoscopic long-term tube gastrostomy in Göttingen minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birck, Malene Muusfeldt; Vegge, Andreas; Moesgaard, S G

    2015-01-01

    it was evident that the catheter had entered the stomach in the fundus region in 11/12 of the animals. In one animal the catheter had entered the antrum region. None of the animals developed leakage or clinically detectable reactions to the gastrostomy tube. Histopathologically, only discrete changes were...

  19. Ostomy metastasis after pull endoscopic gastrostomy: a unique favorable outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jorge; Adriana, Carla; Fróis-Borges, Miguel; Meira, Tânia; Oliveira, Gabriel; Santos, José Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients tend to develop dysphagia. In order to preserve the nutritional support, many undergo endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). In HNC patients, ostomy metastasis is considered a rare complication of PEG, but there are no reports of successful treatment of these metastatic cancers. We report the case of a 65 years old pharyngeal/laryngeal cancer patient who underwent a PEG before the neck surgery. He was considered to be cured, resumed oral intake and the PEG tube was removed. Ten months after, he returned with a metastasis at the ostomy site. A block resection of the stomach and abdominal wall was performed. Two years after the abdominal surgery, he is free of disease. Although usually considered a rare complication of the endoscopic gastrostomy, ostomy metastasis may be more frequent than usually considered and the present case report demonstrates that these patients may have a favourable outcome. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  20. Gastrostomy versus nasogastric tube feeding for chemoradiation patients with head and neck cancer: the TUBE pilot RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleri, Vinidh; Patterson, Joanne; Rousseau, Nikki; Moloney, Eoin; Craig, Dawn; Tzelis, Dimitrios; Wilkinson, Nina; Franks, Jeremy; Hynes, Ann Marie; Heaven, Ben; Hamilton, David; Guerrero-Urbano, Teresa; Donnelly, Rachael; Barclay, Stewart; Rapley, Tim; Stocken, Deborah

    2018-04-01

    Approximately 9000 new cases of head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs) are treated by the NHS each year. Chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is a commonly used treatment for advanced HNSCC. Approximately 90% of patients undergoing CRT require nutritional support via gastrostomy or nasogastric tube feeding. Long-term dysphagia following CRT is a primary concern for patients. The effect of enteral feeding routes on swallowing function is not well understood, and the two feeding methods have, to date (at the time of writing), not been compared. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) was to compare these two options. This was a mixed-methods multicentre study to establish the feasibility of a RCT comparing oral feeding plus pre-treatment gastrostomy with oral feeding plus as-required nasogastric tube feeding in patients with HNSCC. Patients were recruited from four tertiary centres treating cancer and randomised to the two arms of the study (using a 1 : 1 ratio). The eligibility criteria were patients with advanced-staged HNSCC who were suitable for primary CRT with curative intent and who presented with no swallowing problems. The primary outcome was the willingness to be randomised. A qualitative process evaluation was conducted alongside an economic modelling exercise. The criteria for progression to a Phase III trial were based on a hypothesised recruitment rate of at least 50%, collection of outcome measures in at least 80% of those recruited and an economic value-of-information analysis for cost-effectiveness. Of the 75 patients approached about the trial, only 17 consented to be randomised [0.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13 to 0.32]. Among those who were randomised, the compliance rate was high (0.94, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.05). Retention rates were high at completion of treatment (0.94, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.05), at the 3-month follow-up (0.88, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.04) and at the 6-month follow-up (0.88, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.04). No serious adverse

  1. Severe dysphagia as the presenting symptom of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in a non-alcoholic man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaiskos, Ilias; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2008-02-01

    We present the case of a non-alcoholic man, who, following severe malnutrition, presented with dysphagia that necessitated gastrostomy tube placement. The patient subsequently developed encephalopathy, at which point thiamine deficiency was suspected and thiamine supplementation initiated. The encephalopathy and the dysphagia resolved, but the patient was left with a dense amnestic deficit consistent with Korsakoff syndrome. MRI at the time of the encephalopathy revealed lesions consistent with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. This case represents a remarkable example of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome that for a prolonged time period had as its sole manifestation severe dysphagia. To our knowledge, there is only one similar case reported in the literature. This case serves to alert neurologists that isolated dysphagia may be the presenting symptom of this classic neurological syndrome even in the absence of alcoholism.

  2. Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... any of these problems: a dislodged tube a blocked or clogged tube any signs of infection (including redness, swelling, or warmth at the tube site; discharge that's yellow, green, or foul-smelling; fever) excessive bleeding or drainage from the tube site severe abdominal pain lasting ...

  3. Abdominal Plain Film Before Gastrostomy Tube Placement to Predict Success of Percutaneous Endoscopic Procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruijsen, J. M.; de Bruin, A.; Sekema, G.; Koetse, H. A.; van Rheenen, P. F.

    Objectives: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube feeding is a convenient method for children requiring long-term enteral nutrition. Preoperative fitness of the majority of pediatric PEG candidates is graded as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status >= III, indicating

  4. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy versus nasogastric tube feeding for patients with head and neck cancer. A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinfeng; Liu Minjie; Ye Yun; Liu Chao; Huang Guanhong

    2014-01-01

    There are two main enteral feeding strategies—namely nasogastric (NG) tube feeding and percutaneous gastrostomy—used to improve the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). But up till now there has been no consistent evidence about which method of enteral feeding is the optimal method for this patient group. To compare the effectiveness of percutaneous gastrostomy and NGT feeding in patients with HNC, relevant literature was identified through Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane, Wiley and manual searches. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-experimental studies comparing percutaneous gastrostomy—including percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and percutaneous fluoroscopic gastrostomy (PFG)—with NG for HNC patients. Data extraction recorded characteristics of intervention, type of study and factors that contributed to the methodological quality of the individual studies. Data were then compared with respect to nutritional status, duration of feeding, complications, radiotherapy delays, disease-free survival and overall survival. Methodological quality of RCTs and non-experimental studies were assessed with separate standard grading scales. It became apparent from our studies that both feeding strategies have advantages and disadvantages. (author)

  5. Dysphagia after sequential chemoradiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Laura A; Posner, Marshall R; Norris, Charles M; Tishler, Roy B; Wirth, Lori J; Annino, Donald J; Gagne, Adele; Sullivan, Christopher A; Sammartino, Daniel E; Haddad, Robert I

    2006-06-01

    Assess impact of sequential chemoradiation therapy (SCRT) for advanced head and neck cancer (HNCA) on swallowing, nutrition, and quality of life. Prospective cohort study of 59 patients undergoing SCRT for advanced head and neck cancer. Follow-up median was 47.5 months. Regional Cancer Center. Median time to gastrostomy tube removal was 21 weeks. Eighteen of 23 patients who underwent modified barium swallow demonstrated aspiration; none developed pneumonia. Six of 7 with pharyngoesophageal stricture underwent successful dilatation. Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck Scale questionnaires at median 6 months after treatment revealed "somewhat" satisfaction with swallowing. At the time of analysis, 97% have the gastronomy tube removed and take soft/regular diet. Early after treatment dysphagia adversely affected weight, modified barium swallow results, and quality of life. Diligent swallow therapy, and dilation as needed, allowed nearly all patients to have their gastronomy tubes removed and return to a soft/regular diet. Dysphagia is significant after SCRT but generally slowly recovers 6 to 12 months after SCRT. C-4.

  6. Recovery from severe dysphagia in systemic sclerosis - myositis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dysphagia is common in inflammatory myopathies and usually responds to corticosteroids. Severe dysphagia requiring feeding by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is associated with significant morbidity and high mortality. Clinical case: A 56-year old African Black woman initially presented with systemic ...

  7. Clinical application of percutaneous gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy under fluoroscopic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianping; Wang Zhongmin; Liu Tao; Chen Kemin; Gong Ju; Zheng Yunfeng; Chen Zhijin; Shen Jieyun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous gastrostomy (PRG) and gastrojejunostomy (PRGJ) under fluoroscopic guidance, and to discuss its technical manipulation, the indications and contraindications as well as the complications. Methods: During the period from May 2002 to June 2010 in authors' hospital fluoroscopically-guided PRG or PRGJ was carried out in 40 patients. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. With Seldinger technique and under fluoroscopic guidance, a 14 F radiopaque gastrostomy or gastrojejunostomy feeding catheter was successfully placed. The indications, operation procedures, clinical success rate, procedure-related complications, and tube indwelling time, etc. were discussed and analyzed. Results: PRG was conducted in 30 patients. The reasons for performing PRG included neurologic disease (n=13), recurrent aspiration pneumonia (n=6), gastroesophageal reflux due to disfunction of gastrointestinal tract (n=3), subtotal gastrectomy (n=2), esophagomediastinal fistula (n=1) and esophageal carcinoma (n=5). PRGJ was carried out in 10 patients. The disorders included bulbar paralysis (n=3), malignant duodenal obstruction (n=4) and previous gastrostomy-related complications (n=3). Two anchors were used in all patients receiving PRG or PRGJ. Clinical success was achieved in all study patients. No procedure-related or severe complications occurred. Minor complications were observed in four patients (10%), which included local soft tissue infection (n=1), severe puncture site pain (n=1), gastrostomy tube dislodgement (n=1) and obstruction of gastrojejunostomy tube (n=1). During the follow-up period, no aggravation of gastroesophageal reflux or aspiration pneumonia was observed in all patients. The tube indwelling time was 115 to 585 days (mean of 150 days) after tube placement. Conclusion: Fluoroscopically-guided percutaneous gastrostomy or gastrojejunostomy is a safe, simple and minimally-invasive technique. This

  8. Factors Predicting Recovery of Oral Intake in Stroke Survivors with Dysphagia in a Convalescent Rehabilitation Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenaga, Yasunori; Nakayama, Sayaka; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Ohori, Isao; Komatsu, Nahoko; Nishimura, Hitoshi; Katsuki, Yasuo

    2017-05-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy may be performed in dysphagic stroke patients. However, some patients regain complete oral intake without gastrostomy. This study aimed to investigate the predictive factors of intake, thereby determining gastrostomy indications. Stroke survivors admitted to our convalescent rehabilitation ward who underwent gastrostomy or nasogastric tube placement from 2009 to 2015 were divided into 2 groups based on intake status at discharge. Demographic data and Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Dysphagia Severity Scale (DSS), National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores on admission were compared between groups. We evaluated the factors predicting intake using a stepwise logistic regression analysis. Thirty-four patients recovered intake, whereas 38 achieved incomplete intake. Mean age was lower, mean body mass index (BMI) was higher, and mean time from stroke onset to admission was shorter in the complete intake group. The complete intake group had less impairment in terms of GCS, FIM, and DSS scores. In the stepwise logistic regression analysis, BMI, FIM-cognitive score, and DSS score were significant independent factors predicting intake. The formula of BMI × .26 + FIM cognitive score × .19 + DSS score × 1.60 predicted recovery of complete intake with a sensitivity of 88.2% and a specificity of 84.2%. Stroke survivors with dysphagia with a high BMI and FIM-cognitive and DSS scores tended to recover oral intake. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Current microbiology of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube (PEG tube) insertion site infections in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolston, Kenneth V I; Mihu, Coralia; Tarrand, Jeffrey J

    2011-08-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is frequently used to provide enteral access in cancer patients who are unable to swallow. Infection is an important complication in this setting. Current microbiological data are needed to guide infection prevention and treatment strategies. The microbiological records of our institution (a 550-bed comprehensive cancer center) were retrospectively reviewed over an 8-month study period in order to identify patients who developed PEG tube insertion site infections, and review their microbiological details and susceptibility/resistance data. Fifty-eight episodes of PEG tube insertion site infections were identified. Of these, 31 (53%) were monomicrobial, and the rest were polymicrobial. The most common organisms isolated were Candida species, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All infections were local (cellulitis, complicated skin, and skin structure infections including abdominal wall abscess) with no cases of concomitant bacteremia being documented. Most of the organisms isolated were susceptible to commonly used antimicrobial agents, although some quinolone-resistant and some multidrug-resistant organisms were isolated. This retrospective study provides descriptive data regarding PEG tube insertion site infections. These data have helped us update institutional guidelines for infection prevention and treatment as part of our focus on antimicrobial stewardship.

  10. Percutaneous gastrostomy -a report of twenty-seven cases-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Lee, Ho Suk; Kim, Yong Joo; Kim, Tae Hun; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kang, Duk Sik

    1991-01-01

    Nutritional support by gastrostomy feeding is an important treatment adjunct when major swallowing difficulty or debilitating diseases is present. This technique for percutaneous placement of a gastric feeding tube now provides many patients with a simple, safe, and well-tolerated alternative to surgical feeding gastrostomy. We experienced 27 cases of percutaneous gastrostomy from January 1989 to February 1991 at Kyungpook National University Hospital. The underlying diseases of the patients were esophageal cancer (11), pyriform sinus cancer (4), laryngeal cancer (3), tongue cancer (2), lye stricture (1), lung cancer (1), chordoma (1), lethal midline granuloma (1), malignant lymphoma (1), maxillary cancer (1), and tonsil cancer (1). Selding method was used in all cases. In five patients it was difficult to insert the nasogastric tube for air insufflation, and one patient had subtotal gastrectomy with gastrojejunostomy, but gastrostomy was performed in all cases. The general condition improved in all patients. We experienced one case of mild peritonitis, but no other significant complications were observed. Gastrostomy tubes were patient in all patients during their survival period, except two patients who experienced obstruction 2 and 6 months after the procedure. Percutaneous gastrostomy can be used safely and effectively in such patients who have pharyngoesophageal or CNS lesions precluding oral intake

  11. Push versus pull gastrostomy in cancer patients: A single center retrospective analysis of complications and technical success rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, B M; Getrajdman, G I; Covey, A M; Alago, W; Erinjeri, J P; Maybody, M; Boas, F E

    2018-04-28

    To compare the technical success and complication rates of push versus pull gastrostomy tubes in cancer patients, and to examine their dependence on operator experience. A retrospective review was performed of 304 cancer patients (170 men, 134 women; mean age 60.3±12.6 [SD], range: 19-102 years) referred for primary gastrostomy tube placement, 88 (29%) of whom had a previously unsuccessful attempt at percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement. Analyzed variables included method of insertion (push versus pull), indication for gastrostomy, technical success, operator experience, and procedure-related complications within 30 days of placement. Gastrostomy tubes were placed for feeding in 189 patients and palliative decompression in 115 patients. Technical success was 91%: 78% after endoscopy had previously been unsuccessful and 97% when excluding failures associated with prior endoscopy. In the first 30 days, there were 29 minor complications (17.2%) associated with push gastrostomies, and only 8 minor complications (7.5%) with pull gastrostomies (Ptechnical success rates for more versus less experienced operators. Pull gastrostomy tube placement had a lower rate of complications than push gastrostomy tube placement, especially when the indication was decompression. The technical success rate was high, even after a failed attempt at endoscopic placement. Both the rates of success and complications were independent of operator experience. Copyright © 2018 Société française de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Percutaneous gastrostomy and jejunostomy: Technique, results, and complications in 55 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.R.; Brown, A.; Saini, S.; Hahn, P.F.; Steiner, E.; Ferrucci, J.T.; Forman, B.H.; Silverman, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy is a well-described method that has not been widely adopted by radiologists. The authors reviewed their experience to highlight technical points and clinical results. Direct percutaneous gastrostomy was performed in 51 patients and percutaneous jejunostomy in four. Indications for gastrostomy procedures were the need for general nutrition (n = 31), complications of use of a nasogastric feeding tube (n = 7), gastric or small bowel decompression (n = 4) and endoscopic failure (n = 5). The major indication for percutaneous jejunostomy was decompression of small bowel obstruction. Key technical aspects include the use of a novel needle device that tacks the abdominal wall to the stomach, thus assuring a seal between the two structures. In the percutaneous gastrostomies, 18-F Foley catheters were introduced through the tacked portion of the stomach with a Seldinger technique and dilators. For percutaneous jejunostomy, 18-F feeding tubes were placed. All procedures were performed under local anesthesia. The authors conclude that a radiologic percutaneous gastrostomy is a safe and effective procedure and should be pursued aggressively by interventional radiologists

  13. Ramsay Hunt syndrome with severe dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Crystal; Fozo, Michael; Rubin, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome, first described by J. Ramsay Hunt in 1907, encompassed the symptoms of otalgia, erythematous vesicular rash on the auricle, and facial paralysis. Although rare, in some cases, the varicella zoster virus responsible for the illness can also be associated with involvement of cranial nerves III-XII, cervical nerves, aseptic meningitis, and the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. We present a case of a patient with clinical evidence of Ramsay Hunt syndrome involving the cranial nerves V, VII, VIII, X, and, possibly, XII. Pharyngeal wall and vocal fold paralysis, and severely reduced laryngeal elevation, resulted in such significant dysphagia that percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement was required. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Perioperative management of gastrostomy tube placement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy adolescent and young adult patients: A role for a perioperative surgical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Ariane; Antonelli, Richard; Sethna, Navil F

    2018-02-01

    In past decades, Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have been living longer and as the disease advances, patients experience multisystemic deterioration. Older patients often require gastrostomy tube placement for nutritional support. For optimizing the perioperative care, a practice of multidisciplinary team can better anticipate, prevent, and manage possible complications and reduce the overall perioperative morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to review our experience with perioperative care of adolescent and young adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy undergoing gastrostomy by various surgical approaches in order to identify challenges and improve future perioperative care coordination to reduce morbidity. We retrospectively examined cases of gastrostomy tube placement in patients of ages 15 years and older between 2005 and 2016. We reviewed preoperative evaluation, anesthetic and surgical management, and postoperative complications. Twelve patients were identified; 1 had open gastrostomy, 3 laparoscopic gastrostomies, 5 percutaneous endoscopic guided, and 3 radiologically inserted gastrostomy tubes. All patients had preoperative cardiac evaluation with 6 patients demonstrating cardiomyopathy. Nine patients had preoperative pulmonary consultations and the pulmonary function tests reported forced vital capacity of ≤36% of predicted. Eight patients were noninvasive positive pressure ventilation dependent. General anesthesia with tracheal intubation was administered in 8 patients, and intravenous sedation in 4 patients; 1 received sedation supplemented with regional anesthesia and 3 received deep sedation. One patient had a difficult intubation that resulted in trauma and prolonged tracheal intubation. Three patients developed postoperative respiratory complications. Two patients' procedures were postponed due to inadequate preoperative evaluation and 1 because of disagreement between anesthesia and procedural services as to the optimal

  15. Nasogastric tube versus gastrostomy tube for gastric decompression in abdominal surgery: a prospective, randomized trial comparing patients' tube-related inconvenience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, S; Koller, M; Plaul, U; Stinner, B; Gerdes, B; Lorenz, W; Rothmund, M

    2001-11-01

    Perioperative decompression of the stomach is still a common procedure and can be achieved using either nasogastric tubes (NTs) or gastrostomy tubes (GTs). While both procedures appear to be equally effective, some authors believe that NTs are less convenient for patients than GTs. However, to date, no reliable prospective data are available on this issue. We conducted a prospective, randomized trial comparing NTs versus GTs with a total of 110 patients undergoing elective colon surgery. The primary outcome measure was the patient's tube-related inconvenience and pain, assessed in a standardized interview on day 2 after surgery and quantified by means of a visual-analog scale (VAS). A questionnaire including the EORTC QLQ-C30 and additional items regarding retrospective tube-related judgements was administered on the day of discharge and 4 weeks after discharge. Secondary endpoints were the therapy-related morbidity and general complications. When patients were asked which of their drainage tubes (all patients had three or four drainage tubes, such as decompression drains, urinary drains, central venous line) was most inconvenient, 43% (CI 33-53%) in the NT group reported that the NT was most inconvenient, while only 4% (CI 1-10%) of the GT patients judged the GT most inconvenient ( Ptube system (day 2 p.o.: 71%, CI 61-80%; 4 weeks p.o.: 66%, CI 56-75%) than did GT patients (day 2 p.o.: 94%, CI 88-98%; 4 weeks p.o.: 91% CI 84-96%); again, these differences were statistically significant ( Ptube system have to weigh up the possibilities of different averse clinical as well as subjective outcomes. It is then preferable to include patients' preferences in the individual decision making process (shared-decision making).

  16. Factors Associated with the Risk of Persistent Gastrostomy Site Infection Following Laparoscopic or Open Nissen Fundoplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisayuki Miyagi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastrostomy for feeding disorders or swallowing dysfunctions can be complicated by persistent gastrostomy site infection (PGSI. PGSI causes nutrient leakage, with dilated PGSI requiring gastrostomy reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the causes, patient characteristics, and perioperative management of PGSI after Nissen fundoplication and gastrostomy for patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux. Patients and Methods: The records of all patients who underwent Nissen fundoplication and gastrostomy for gastro-oesophageal reflux over the past 12 years were retrieved. Risk factors were analysed, including age at surgery, gender, operative procedure, use of postoperative ventilator management, gastrostomy tube migration towards the pylorus, bacterial culture results, and length of hospital stay. PGSI as a cause of inflammation was analysed statistically. Results: Forty patients were identified, ranging in age from 1 to 49 years (median, 11 years surgically. Twenty each underwent laparoscopic and open surgery, with all undergoing gastrostomy using the Stamm technique. Four patients developed PGSI. Gastrostomy tubes had migrated postoperatively to the pyloric side in three of these four patients (P < 0.005, increasing intragastric pressure. Three of these four patients also required positive pressure ventilation during the perioperative period (P < 0.001. Conclusion: PGSI correlates with the perioperative management of positive pressure and with increased intragastric pressure resulting from pyloric obstruction, which is caused by aberrant distribution of the gastrostomy tube to the pyloric side. Statistical Analysis Used: Factors in the two groups were compared statistically by Mann–Whitney U-test to determine whether PGSI caused inflammation. Statistical significance was defined as P < 0.05.

  17. [Severe diarrhea after the original well-functioning percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube was replaced by a Mic-Key button].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Susanne Wigh; Eriksen, Jan; Kristensen, Kurt

    2006-03-06

    We report two cases of colocutaneous fistula as a complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in small children. Both children developed severe osmotic diarrhoea immediately after the original PEG tube was replaced by a Mic-Key button which subsequently migrated to the colon.

  18. A simple technique for laparoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C; Rosemurgy, A S; Albrink, M H; Carey, L C

    1992-05-01

    While endoscopically placed gastrostomy tubes are routinely simple, they are not always feasible. Endoscopic technique also does not uniformly secure the tube to the abdominal wall, which presents possible complications, including leakage, accidental early tube removal, intraperitoneal catheter migration and necrosis of the stomach or abdominal wall because of excessive traction. Presented herein is a technique that is rapid, simple and eliminates some of these potential complications. The technique is easily combined with other operative procedures, such as tracheostomy, is done under direct vision, can be performed quickly with intravenous sedation and local anesthetic and is a safe method of tube placement for enteral feeding or gastric decompression.

  19. Insertion of Balloon Retained Gastrostomy Buttons: A 5-Year Retrospective Review of 260 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, Sarah; Kavanagh, Liam N.; Shields, Mary C.; Given, Mark F.; Keeling, Aoife N.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is an established way of maintaining enteral nutrition in patients who cannot maintain nutrition orally. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of primary placement of a wide bore button gastrostomy in a large, varied patient population through retrospective review. All patients who underwent gastrostomy placement from January 1, 2004 to January 1, 2009 were identified. 18-Fr gastrostomy buttons (MIC-Key G) were inserted in the majority. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 4.5 years. A total of 260 patients (M:F 140:120, average age 59.2 years) underwent gastrostomy during the study period. Overall success rate for RIG placement was 99.6 %, with success rate of 95.3 % for primary button insertion. Indications included neurological disorders (70 %), esophageal/head and neck malignancy (21 %), and other indications (9 %). Major and minor complication rates were 1.2 and 12.8 %, respectively. Thirty-day mortality rate was 6.8 %. One third of patients underwent gastrostomy reinsertion during the study period, the main indication for which was inadvertent catheter removal. Patency rate was high at 99.5 %. The maximum number of procedures in any patient was 8 (n = 2), and the average tube dwell time was 125 days. Primary radiological insertion of a wide bore button gastrostomy is a safe technique, with high success rate, high patency rate, and low major complication rate. We believe that it is feasible to attempt button gastrostomy placement in all patients, once tract length is within limits of tube length. If difficulty is encountered, then a standard tube may simply be placed instead.

  20. Insertion of Balloon Retained Gastrostomy Buttons: A 5-Year Retrospective Review of 260 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, Sarah, E-mail: sarahpower28@yahoo.co.uk; Kavanagh, Liam N.; Shields, Mary C.; Given, Mark F.; Keeling, Aoife N.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J., E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2013-04-15

    Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is an established way of maintaining enteral nutrition in patients who cannot maintain nutrition orally. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of primary placement of a wide bore button gastrostomy in a large, varied patient population through retrospective review. All patients who underwent gastrostomy placement from January 1, 2004 to January 1, 2009 were identified. 18-Fr gastrostomy buttons (MIC-Key G) were inserted in the majority. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 4.5 years. A total of 260 patients (M:F 140:120, average age 59.2 years) underwent gastrostomy during the study period. Overall success rate for RIG placement was 99.6 %, with success rate of 95.3 % for primary button insertion. Indications included neurological disorders (70 %), esophageal/head and neck malignancy (21 %), and other indications (9 %). Major and minor complication rates were 1.2 and 12.8 %, respectively. Thirty-day mortality rate was 6.8 %. One third of patients underwent gastrostomy reinsertion during the study period, the main indication for which was inadvertent catheter removal. Patency rate was high at 99.5 %. The maximum number of procedures in any patient was 8 (n = 2), and the average tube dwell time was 125 days. Primary radiological insertion of a wide bore button gastrostomy is a safe technique, with high success rate, high patency rate, and low major complication rate. We believe that it is feasible to attempt button gastrostomy placement in all patients, once tract length is within limits of tube length. If difficulty is encountered, then a standard tube may simply be placed instead.

  1. Comprehensive approach to the child with gastrostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Šmid

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement is the method of choice for enteral feeding of adults and children. It is most commonly needed in children with neurological impairment, and in those with swallowing difficulties. Complications are relatively common but in most cases not severe. Among the most common complications are bacterial and fungal infections of the skin around the tube.In adults, it is usually performed with local anesthesia, whereas in children general anesthesia is recommended.During the child’s hospitalization, parents are usually present in order to learn how to take care of the child at home. We offer them theoretical and practical knowledge about the life of a child with gastrostomy. We provide them information on feeding, skin care, possible complications, and actively include them in all steps of the process of gastrostomy nursing care as soon as possible.Likewise adults, children also have to be treated as equals, andfor this reason we have to know how to communicate with them, with special attention on child’s non-verbal communication. Nursing care to the child often presents an unfamiliar and even undesirable situation. It is therefore the role of the nurse to mitigate it by appropriate communication.It takes four to five days for parents to obtain sufficient information to be able to take care of their child at home. Upon discharge, they receive written information on percutaneous gastrostomy care.

  2. Persistent post-stroke dysphagia treated with cricopharyngeal myotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruthi S Nair

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-stroke dysphagia is a common problem after stroke. About 8-13% patients have persistent dysphagia and are unable to return to pre-stroke diet even after 6 months of stroke. Use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG may be required in these patients, which may be psychologically unacceptable and impair the quality of life. In those with cricopharyngeal dysfunction leading on to refractory post-stroke dysphagia, cricopharyngeal myotomy and injection of botulinum toxin are the treatment options. We present a case of vertebrobasilar stroke who had persistent dysphagia due to cricopharyngeal dysfunction with good recovery of swallowing function following cricopharyngeal myotomy 1.5 years after the stroke.

  3. Clinical Experience of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Taiwanese Patients—310 Cases in 8 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzong-Hsi Lee

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Although percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG has become a popular method for long-term tube feeding worldwide, there are only a few reports about its application in Taiwan. From May 1997 to May 2005, we performed 302 PEG insertions successfully in 310 attempts (97.4% success rate using modified Ponsky's pull method with 24-Fr feeding tubes. All the patients received PEG for tube feeding except for two patients with cancerous peritonitis for decompression. The underlying diseases in these 308 patients who received PEG for tube feeding were 161 cerebrovascular accidents (52.3%, 62 head and neck cancers (20.1%, 21 cases of Parkinsonism (6.8%, and others. There were 11 major complications (3.6% and 57 minor complications (18.9%. Ten patients (3.3% died within 30 days after PEG insertion. However, no procedure-related mortality occurred. In conclusion, PEG is an effective method for tube feeding and drainage with a high success rate. PEG insertion was often indicated for patients with dysphagia caused by cerebrovascular accident, head and neck cancer, and Parkinsonism in Taiwan. It is a relatively safe procedure, with a 3.6% rate of major complications and 18.9% rate of minor complications.

  4. MAPLE Fabricated Fe3O4@Cinnamomum verum Antimicrobial Surfaces for Improved Gastrostomy Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Georgiana Anghel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamomum verum-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles of 9.4 nm in size were laser transferred by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE technique onto gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes for antibacterial activity evaluation toward Gram positive and Gram negative microbial colonization. X-ray diffraction analysis of the nanoparticle powder showed a polycrystalline magnetite structure, whereas infrared mapping confirmed the integrity of C. verum (CV functional groups after the laser transfer. The specific topography of the deposited films involved a uniform thin coating together with several aggregates of bio-functionalized magnetite particles covering the G-tubes. Cytotoxicity assays showed an increase of the G-tube surface biocompatibility after Fe3O4@CV treatment, allowing a normal development of endothelial cells up to five days of incubation. Microbiological assays on nanoparticle-modified G-tube surfaces have proved an improvement of anti-adherent properties, significantly reducing both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria colonization.

  5. Growth outcomes and complications after radiologic gastrostomy in 120 children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Evan Cole [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Ottawa (Canada); Connolly, Bairbre; Temple, Michael; John, Philip; Chait, Peter G.; Vaughan, Jennifer; Amaral, Joao G. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Image Guided Therapy, Toronto (Canada)

    2008-09-15

    Enteral feeding is ideal for children with low caloric intake. It can be provided through different methods, including nasogastric, nasojejunal, gastrostomy, or gastrojejunostomy tubes. To assess growth outcomes of pediatric patients following retrograde percutaneous gastrostomy (RPG) and compare complications with those following other gastrostomy methods. We retrospectively reviewed 120 random RPG patients from 2002 to 2003 (mean follow-up, 2.7 years). Patient weights and growth percentiles were recorded at insertion, and at 0-5 months, 6-12 months, and 18-24 months after insertion, and then compared using a Student's t-test. Complications and tube maintenance issues (TMIs) were recorded. Gastrostomy tube insertion was successful in all 120 patients (59 boys, 61 girls; mean age 4.3 years). The most common underlying diagnosis was neurologic disease (29%, 35/120) and the main indication was inadequate caloric intake (24%, 29/120). Significant increases in growth percentile for the entire population were demonstrated between insertion and 0-5 months (18.7-25.3; P<0.001) and between insertion and 18-24 months (18.7-25.8; P<0.001). In boys and girls significant growth increases occurred between insertion and 0-5 months (boys P=0.004; girls P=0.01). There were 11 major postprocedural complications, 100 minor complications and 169 TMIs. RPG provides long-term enteral nutrition in the pediatric population and increases growth significantly 6 and 24 months after insertion. Minor complications and TMIs are frequent. (orig.)

  6. Growth outcomes and complications after radiologic gastrostomy in 120 children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Evan Cole; Connolly, Bairbre; Temple, Michael; John, Philip; Chait, Peter G.; Vaughan, Jennifer; Amaral, Joao G.

    2008-01-01

    Enteral feeding is ideal for children with low caloric intake. It can be provided through different methods, including nasogastric, nasojejunal, gastrostomy, or gastrojejunostomy tubes. To assess growth outcomes of pediatric patients following retrograde percutaneous gastrostomy (RPG) and compare complications with those following other gastrostomy methods. We retrospectively reviewed 120 random RPG patients from 2002 to 2003 (mean follow-up, 2.7 years). Patient weights and growth percentiles were recorded at insertion, and at 0-5 months, 6-12 months, and 18-24 months after insertion, and then compared using a Student's t-test. Complications and tube maintenance issues (TMIs) were recorded. Gastrostomy tube insertion was successful in all 120 patients (59 boys, 61 girls; mean age 4.3 years). The most common underlying diagnosis was neurologic disease (29%, 35/120) and the main indication was inadequate caloric intake (24%, 29/120). Significant increases in growth percentile for the entire population were demonstrated between insertion and 0-5 months (18.7-25.3; P<0.001) and between insertion and 18-24 months (18.7-25.8; P<0.001). In boys and girls significant growth increases occurred between insertion and 0-5 months (boys P=0.004; girls P=0.01). There were 11 major postprocedural complications, 100 minor complications and 169 TMIs. RPG provides long-term enteral nutrition in the pediatric population and increases growth significantly 6 and 24 months after insertion. Minor complications and TMIs are frequent. (orig.)

  7. Dosimetric Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Desmond, Renee A.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Intensification of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer may lead to increased rates of dysphagia. Dosimetric predictors of objective findings of long-term dysphagia were sought. Methods and Materials: From an institutional database, 83 patients were identified who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, after exclusion of those who were treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary lesion, had locoregional recurrence at any time, had less than 12 months of follow-up, or had postoperative radiotherapy. Dosimetric parameters were analyzed relative to three objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube dependence at 12 months, aspiration on modified barium swallow, or pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Results: Mean dose greater than 41 Gy and volume receiving 60 Gy (V 60 ) greater than 24% to the larynx were significantly associated with PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V 60 greater than 12% to the inferior pharyngeal constrictor was also significantly associated with increased PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V 65 greater than 33% to the superior pharyngeal constrictor or greater than 75% to the middle pharyngeal constrictor was associated with pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Conclusions: Doses to the larynx and pharyngeal constrictors predicted long-term swallowing complications, even when controlled for other clinical factors. The addition of these structures to intensity-modulated radiotherapy optimization may reduce the incidence of dysphagia, although cautious clinical validation is necessary.

  8. Malnutrition in healthcare settings and the role of gastrostomy feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Matthew; Williams, Jake; Sanders, David S

    2017-08-01

    Malnutrition can adversely affect physical and psychological function, influencing both morbidity and mortality. Despite the prevalence of malnutrition and its associated health and economic costs, malnutrition remains under-detected and under-treated in differing healthcare settings. For a subgroup of malnourished individuals, a gastrostomy (a feeding tube placed directly into the stomach) may be required to provide long-term nutritional support. In this review we explore the spectrum and consequences of malnutrition in differing healthcare settings. We then specifically review gastrostomies as a method of providing nutritional support. The review highlights the origins of gastrostomies, and discusses how endoscopic and radiological advances have culminated in an increased demand and placement of gastrostomy feeding tubes. Several studies have raised concerns about the benefits derived following this intervention and also about the patients selected to undergo this procedure. These studies are discussed in detail in this review, alongside suggestions for future research to help better delineate those who will benefit most from this intervention, and improve understanding about how gastrostomies influence nutritional outcomes.

  9. A Nationwide Study of the Impact of Dysphagia on Hospital Outcomes Among Patients With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranji, Suchitra; Paranji, Neethi; Wright, Scott; Chandra, Shalini

    2017-02-01

    To assess the impact of dysphagia on clinical and operational outcomes in hospitalized patients with dementia. Retrospective cohort study. 2012 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. All patients discharged with a diagnosis of dementia (N = 234,006) from US hospitals in 2012. Univariate and multivariate regression models, adjusting for stroke and patient characteristics, to assess the impact of dysphagia on the prevalence of comorbidities, including pneumonia, sepsis, and malnutrition; complications, including mechanical ventilation and death; and operational outcomes, including length of stay (LOS) and total charges for patients with dementia. Patients having dementia with dysphagia (DWD) had significantly higher odds of having percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement during the admission (odds ratio [OR]: 13.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.53-14.95, P dysphagia. Dysphagia is a significant predictor of worse clinical and operational outcomes including a 38% longer LOS and a 30% increase in charge per case among hospitalized patients with dementia. Although these findings may not be surprising, this new evidence might bring heightened awareness for the need to more thoughtfully support patients with dementia and dysphagia who are hospitalized.

  10. Long-term outcomes of children undergoing video-assisted gastrostomy

    OpenAIRE

    Sal?, Martin; Santimano, Ana; Helmroth, Sofia; Stenstr?m, Pernilla; Arnbjornsson, Einar ?lafur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to assess the short- and long-term complication rates after video-assisted gastrostomy (VAG), the effects of age and gender on long-term complications and the effect of duration of gastrostomy tube retention on the need for gastroraphy when the gastrostomy device was removed. Methods This was a retrospective study of children undergoing VAG at a single institution. Children who died or moved from the area were excluded. The rates of short- and long-term com...

  11. [Nursing Experience With a Patient With Gastrostomy Leakage Resulting in Moisture-Associated Skin Damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Mei-Yu; Hsu, Hsiao-Hui; Lyu, Ji-Yan

    2016-10-01

    Leakage is a common complication of gastrostomy. Exposure of the skin surrounding the gastrostomy tube to moisture or chemical irritants may cause moisture-associated skin damage (MASD) and seriously affect the patient's quality of life. This case study describes a nursing experience with gastrostomy leakage that resulted in MASD. An assessment conducted from July 29, 2015 to August 20, 2015 revealed that heavy gastronomy leakage had caused extensive skin erosion, ulceration, hyperplasia, and superficial infection. Simultaneously, the patient was required to conduct complex stoma care, which resulted in physical and psychological exhaustion. Changes in traditional tube and wound care were discussed on multiple occasions with an interdisciplinary healthcare team. Based on the evidence-based literature, we provide gastrostomy and MASD management strategies. Through team collaboration, we prevented gastric contents from contacting the patient's skin directly, improved patient comfort, controlled effluent and skin infections, maintained fluid and electrolyte balances, and acce-lerated the healing of the damaged skin. We recommend that healthcare professionals caring for patients with gastrostomy leakage be provided with early skin protection programs to learn the standard methods for identifying and correcting leakage factors, containing effluent, and adequately stabilizing the gastrostomy tube in order to reduce the impact on the patient's quality of life. In addition, patient education on tube and skin care should be provided to prevent the reoccurrence of complications.

  12. Use of Noninvasive Ventilation During Feeding Tube Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfi, Paolo; Volpato, Eleonora; Valota, Chiara; D'Ascenzo, Salvatore; Alunno, Chiara Bani; Lax, Agata; Nicolini, Antonello; Ticozzi, Nicola; Silani, Vincenzo; Bach, John R

    2017-11-01

    Parenteral nutrition is indicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) when dysphagia, loss of appetite, and difficulty protecting the airways cause malnutrition, severe weight loss, dehydration, and increased risk of aspiration pneumonia. The aim of this review is to compare percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), radiologically inserted G-tube (RIG), and percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) in patients with ALS, performed with or without noninvasive ventilation (NIV). We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the EBSCO Online Research Database, and Scopus up to December 2015. A priori selection included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomized trials, and prospective and retrospective studies. The primary outcome was 30-d survival. We found no RCTs or quasi-RCTs. Seven studies about the implementation of the PEG/RIG procedure during the use of NIV and 5 studies without NIV were included. In another study of 59 subjects undergoing open gastrostomy, all with vital capacity NIV at full ventilatory support settings, there were no respiratory complications. Thus, the use of NIV during the implementation of these procedures, especially when used at full ventilatory support settings of pressure preset 18-25 cm H 2 O, can support alveolar ventilation before, during, and after the procedures and prevent respiratory complications. The procedures investigated appear equivalent, but the methodological quality of the studies could be improved. Possible benefits with regard to nutrition parameters, quality of life, and psychological features need to be further investigated. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  13. An evaluation of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with the pull technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, Chang Wook; Won, Jong Yun; Yu, Jeong Sik; Ko, Heung Kyu; Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Jong Tae

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and usefulness of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (FPG) using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied with the pull technique, and without the use of an endoscopy or a gastropexy. From March 2005 to February 2007, 25 patients underwent an FPG using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied by the pull technique, in which a 24F pull-type tube was inserted into a patient's mouth and was pulled to the upper abdominal puncture site using a snare, under fluoroscopy. The 18 patients with difficulty swallowing due to muscular atrophic lateral sclerosis or transitional myodystrophy included 5 cases of quadriplegia, 1 case of Parkinson's disease, and 1 metastatic mediastinal tumor. The technical success rate, occurrence of complications, and clinical outcomes were examined. The technical success rate was found to be 100%. In addition, the retention periods for the indwelling tube ranged from 1 to 24 months (mean: 6.5 months), with all tubes retained at a normal position with normal function. No procedure-related mortality occurred. One patient (4%) did however develop a complication in the form of ascites and ascitic fluid leakage around the tube, which was of hepatic origin and was ultimately resolved after the drainage of ascites. As a result of this study the FPG, accompanied with the pull technique using a 24F tube, should be considered as a safe and effective method for examining patients. It was found to have a high success rate and a low complication rate

  14. An evaluation of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with the pull technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhm, Chang Wook; Won, Jong Yun; Yu, Jeong Sik; Ko, Heung Kyu; Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Jong Tae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    To evaluate the safety and usefulness of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (FPG) using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied with the pull technique, and without the use of an endoscopy or a gastropexy. From March 2005 to February 2007, 25 patients underwent an FPG using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied by the pull technique, in which a 24F pull-type tube was inserted into a patient's mouth and was pulled to the upper abdominal puncture site using a snare, under fluoroscopy. The 18 patients with difficulty swallowing due to muscular atrophic lateral sclerosis or transitional myodystrophy included 5 cases of quadriplegia, 1 case of Parkinson's disease, and 1 metastatic mediastinal tumor. The technical success rate, occurrence of complications, and clinical outcomes were examined. The technical success rate was found to be 100%. In addition, the retention periods for the indwelling tube ranged from 1 to 24 months (mean: 6.5 months), with all tubes retained at a normal position with normal function. No procedure-related mortality occurred. One patient (4%) did however develop a complication in the form of ascites and ascitic fluid leakage around the tube, which was of hepatic origin and was ultimately resolved after the drainage of ascites. As a result of this study the FPG, accompanied with the pull technique using a 24F tube, should be considered as a safe and effective method for examining patients. It was found to have a high success rate and a low complication rate.

  15. Carers' experiences of dysphagia in people treated for head and neck cancer: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-08-01

    The implication of dysphagia for people treated nonsurgically for head and neck cancer (HNC) and its detrimental effects on functioning and quality of life has been well documented. To date, however, there has been a paucity of research on the effects of dysphagia following HNC on carers, independent of the consequences of a gastrostomy. The objective of this qualitative study was to report on the experiences of carers of people with dysphagia (non-gastrostomy dependent) following nonsurgical treatment for HNC and to identify the support needs of this group. A purposive, maximum-variation sampling technique was adopted to recruit 12 carers of people treated curatively for HNC since 2007. Each participated in an in-depth interview, detailing their experience of caring for someone with dysphagia and the associated impact on their life. Thematic analysis was adopted to search the transcripts for key phases and themes that emerged from the discussions. Analysis of the transcripts revealed four themes: (1) dysphagia disrupts daily life, (2) carers make adjustments to adapt to their partner's dysphagia, (3) the disconnect between carers' expectations and the reality of dysphagia, and (4) experiences of dysphagia-related services and informal supports. Carers generally felt ill-prepared for their role in dysphagia management. The qualitative methodology successfully described the impact of dysphagia on the everyday lives of carers, particularly in regard to meal preparation, social events, and family lifestyle. Clinicians should provide adequate and timely training and support to carers and view carers as copartners in dysphagia management.

  16. Outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion in respiratory impaired amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients under noninvasive ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czell, David; Bauer, Matthias; Binek, Janek; Schoch, Otto D; Weber, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with impaired respiratory function is associated with an increased risk of peri-procedural and post-interventional complications. It was the aim of the study to analyze peri- and post-interventional complications and survival after PEG tube placement under noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in ALS patients with various degrees of respiratory impairment. Twenty-six subjects were included in this retrospective case study. Prior to PEG tube placement, training with ventilatory support via an oronasal mask was performed with ALS subjects on the pneumology ward. PEG placement was then performed under continuous NIV. FVC, sniff nasal inspiratory pressure, and demographic data were assessed. Complication rates and 1-month and overall survival rates were analyzed. There were no deaths within 24 hours after PEG placement. One subject died within the first month. The mean survival rate after PEG was 12 ± 10 months (range 0.6-42 months). There was no difference in post-PEG survival between subjects with moderately (> 50%) and severely (NIV in ALS subjects.

  17. SERUM ELECTROLYTES AND OUTCOME IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ENDOSCOPIC GASTROSTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana VIEIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is a gold standard for long term enteral feeding. Neurologic dysphagia and head/neck cancer are the most common indications for PEG as they can lead to protein-energy malnutrition and serum electrolyte abnormalities, with potential negative impact on metabolic balance. Refeeding syndrome may also be related with severe electrolyte changes in PEG-fed patients and contribute to poor prognosis. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the changes in serum concentrations of the main electrolytes and its possible association with the outcome. METHODS: Retrospective study of patients followed in our Artificial Nutrition Clinic, submitted to PEG from 2010 to 2016, having head/neck cancer or neurologic dysphagia, who died under PEG feeding. Serum electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chlorine, magnesium, calcium and phosphorus were evaluated immediately before the gastrostomy procedure. Survival after PEG until death was recorded in months. RESULTS: We evaluated 101 patients, 59 with electrolyte alterations at the moment of the gastrostomy. Sodium was altered in 32 (31.7%, magnesium in 21 (20.8%, chlorine in 21 (20.8%, potassium in 14 (13.8%, calcium in 11 (10.9 % and phosphorus in 11 (10.9%. The survival of patients with low sodium (<135 mmol/L was significantly lower when compared to patients with normal/high values, 2.76 months vs 7.80 months, respectively (P=0.007. CONCLUSION: Changes in serum electrolytes of patients undergoing PEG were very common. More than half showed at least one abnormality, at the time of the procedure. The most frequent was hyponatremia, which was associated with significantly shorter survival, probably reflecting severe systemic metabolic distress.

  18. [Digestive disorders in Parkinson's disease: dysphagia and sialorrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, J; Prieto-Albin, R; Velasco-Palacios, L; Jorge-Roldán, S; Cubo-Delgado, E

    2010-02-08

    The non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease are a frequent and often under-diagnosed disorder. Two of the most significant non-motor symptoms are perhaps dysphagia and sialorrhea (which are relatively common in advanced stages of the disease) owing to their important functional repercussions and to the associated comorbidity. In recent years, different evaluation scales have been developed for clinical use and in screening the aforementioned symptoms. Of the different therapeutic options available, botulinum toxin represents the preferred treatment for sialorrhea. In contrast, speech therapy and an optimisation of the antiparkinsonian therapy are generally useful measures to treat dysphagia, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy being reserved for patients suffering from Parkinson who have severe dysphagia.

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-07-14

    Jul 14, 2003 ... Surgery, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital and School of Child and. Adolescent ... gastrostomy (viz. no need for a laparotomy, short anaesthetic time or ... long-term nasogastric tube feeding with all its inherent ...

  20. Multicentre survey of radiologically inserted gastrostomy feeding tube (RIG) in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, A.S.; Laasch, H.U.; Stephenson, S.; Butterfield, C.; Goodwin, M.; Kay, C.L.; Glancy, S.; Jackson, S.; Brown, D.; McLean, P.; Keanie, J.; Thrower, A.; Briggs, R.; Punekar, S.; Krishnan, S.; Thomas, B.; Yap, K.; Mullan, D.; Maskell, G.; Hancock, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the variance in current UK clinical practice and clinical outcomes for direct percutaneous radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG). Materials and methods: A prospective UK multicentre survey of RIG performed between October 2008 and August 2010 was performed through the British Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (BSGAR). Results: Data from 684 patients were provided by 45 radiologists working at 17 UK centres. Two hundred and sixty-three cases (40%) were performed with loop-retained catheters, and 346 (53%) with balloon-retained devices. Sixty percent of all patients experienced pain in the first 24 h, but settled in the majority thereafter. Early complications, defined as occurring in the first 24 h, included minor bleeding (1%), wound infection (3%), peritonism (2%), and tube misplacement (1%). Late complications, defined as occurring between day 2 and day 30 post-procedure, included mild pain (30%), persisting peritonism (2%), and 30 day mortality of 1% (5/665). Pre-procedural antibiotics or anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prophylaxis did not affect the rate of wound infection, peritonitis, post-procedural pain, or mortality. Ninety-three percent of cases were performed using gastropexy. Gastropexy decreased post-procedural pain (p < 0.001), but gastropexy-related complications occurred in 5% of patients. However, post-procedure pain increased with the number of gastropexy sutures used (p < 0.001). The use of gastropexy did not affect the overall complication rate or mortality. Post-procedure pain increased significantly as tube size increased (p < 0.001). The use of balloon-retention feeding tubes was associated with more pain than the deployment of loop-retention devices (p < 0.001). Conclusion: RIG is a relatively safe procedure with a mortality of 1%, with or without gastropexy. Pain is the commonest complication. The use of gastropexy, fixation dressing or skin sutures, smaller tube sizes, and

  1. CT-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Evaluation in 177 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Akio, E-mail: a.akahane@gmail.com; Kato, Kenichi, E-mail: kkato@iwate-med.ac.jp; Suzuki, Michiko, E-mail: mamimichiko@me.com [Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sone, Miyuki, E-mail: msone@me.com [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Tanaka, Ryoichi, E-mail: rtanaka@iwate-med.ac.jp; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko, E-mail: nakasato@iwate-med.ac.jp; Ehara, Shigeru, E-mail: ehara@iwate-med.ac.jp [Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).Materials and MethodsThis retrospective study included patients with HNC who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy between February 2007 and December 2013. Information regarding the patients’ backgrounds, CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy techniques, technical success rate, and AEs were obtained from the medical records. In all patients, the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy with a Funada gastropexy device.ResultsDuring the study period, 177 patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. The most common tumor location was the oral cavity, followed by the pharynx and maxilla. The indication for CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy were tumor obstruction in 78 patients, postoperative dysphagia in 55 patients, radiation edema in 43 patients, and cerebral infarction in 1 patient. The technical success rate was 97.7 %. The overall mean procedure time was 25.3 min. Major AEs occurred in seven patients (4.0 %), including bleeding (n = 4), colonic injury (n = 1), gastric tear (n = 1), and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Minor AEs occurred in 15 patients (8.5 %), which included peristomal leakage (n = 6), irritation (n = 4), inadvertent removal (n = 2), peristomal hemorrhage (n = 1), peristomal infection (n = 1), and wound granulation (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 111 days (range 1–1106 days).ConclusionOur study suggests that CT-guided gastrostomy may be suitable in patients with HNC.

  2. CT-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Evaluation in 177 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Akio; Kato, Kenichi; Suzuki, Michiko; Sone, Miyuki; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).Materials and MethodsThis retrospective study included patients with HNC who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy between February 2007 and December 2013. Information regarding the patients’ backgrounds, CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy techniques, technical success rate, and AEs were obtained from the medical records. In all patients, the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy with a Funada gastropexy device.ResultsDuring the study period, 177 patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. The most common tumor location was the oral cavity, followed by the pharynx and maxilla. The indication for CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy were tumor obstruction in 78 patients, postoperative dysphagia in 55 patients, radiation edema in 43 patients, and cerebral infarction in 1 patient. The technical success rate was 97.7 %. The overall mean procedure time was 25.3 min. Major AEs occurred in seven patients (4.0 %), including bleeding (n = 4), colonic injury (n = 1), gastric tear (n = 1), and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Minor AEs occurred in 15 patients (8.5 %), which included peristomal leakage (n = 6), irritation (n = 4), inadvertent removal (n = 2), peristomal hemorrhage (n = 1), peristomal infection (n = 1), and wound granulation (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 111 days (range 1–1106 days).ConclusionOur study suggests that CT-guided gastrostomy may be suitable in patients with HNC

  3. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehlenbruch, Markus; Nelles, Michael; Thomas, Daniel; Willinek, Winfried; Gerstner, Andreas; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a flat-detector C-arm-guided radiographic technique (cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) insertion. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 62 years) in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) had failed underwent CBCT-guided PRG insertion. PEG failure or unsuitability was caused by upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction in all cases. Indications for gastrostomy were esophageal and head and neck malignancies, respectively. Before the PRG procedure, initial C-arm CBCT scans were acquired. Three- and 2-dimensional soft-tissue reconstructions of the epigastrium region were generated on a dedicated workstation. Subsequently, gastropexy was performed with T-fasteners after CBCT-guided puncture of the stomach bubble, followed by insertion of an 14F balloon-retained catheter through a peel-away introducer. Puncture of the stomach bubble and PRG insertion was technically successful in all patients without alteration of the epigastric region. There was no malpositioning of the tube or other major periprocedural complications. In 2 patients, minor complications occurred during the first 30 days of follow-up (PRG malfunction: n = 1; slight infection: n = 1). Late complications, which were mainly tube disturbances, were observed in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 212 days. CBCT-guided PRG is a safe, well-tolerated, and successful method of gastrostomy insertion in patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible. CBCT provides detailed imaging of the soft tissue and surrounding structures of the epigastric region in one diagnostic tour and thus significantly improves the planning of PRG procedures.

  4. A Retrospective Study of G-Tube Use in Japanese Patients Treated with Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Hypopharyngeal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Homma

    Full Text Available Late toxicity after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT, such as dysphagia, in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck has received a good deal of attention recently. The gastrostomy tube (G-tube dependence rate 1 year after CCRT was reported to be 16.7-42.9% in Western countries. We evaluated swallowing outcomes after CCRT in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC treated in our hospital and compared them with previous reports.We reviewed 96 consecutive patients with a HPC treated by radiotherapy with intravenous or intra-arterial chemotherapy between 2006 and 2013 at Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Japan.At 1 month after CCRT, 13 patients (13.7% used a G-tube, whereas 5/91 (5.5% and 4/81 (4.9% used a G-tube at 3 and 6 months, respectively. Two patients used a G-tube at 12 and 24 months after CCRT (G-tube use rate: 2.8% at 12 months, and 3.2% at 24 months. The variables female, posterior wall primary, stage IV, ECOG performance status of 2, and smoking status were significantly associated with G-tube use at 12 months after CCRT, whereas the route of cisplatin administration was not related to G-tube use (p = 0.303.The G-tube use rate up to 1year could be lower in Japanese patients than in Western patients according to previous reports. In particular, Japanese patients resume oral intake sooner than Western patients. Further study of the incidence of dysphagia after CCRT by ethnicity is required to clarify the differences in dysphagia after CCRT.

  5. Effectiveness of prophylactic percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for oropharyngeal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Masanori; Tanimoto, Hitoshi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Kiyota, Naomi; Okuno, Shinya; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Patients with head and neck carcinoma are often provided concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), but they experience severe mucositis and dysphagia. These side effects can lead to decreased oral intake, resulting in interruption of treatment. In our hospital, from September 2007, all patients with oropharyngeal cancer who were to receive CCRT, were principally offered percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) before the start of treatment, and tube feeding was started when swallowing became impaired, to accomplish the treatment as planned. To evaluate the effect of prophylactic PEG, outcome measures in this study included the frequency of unplanned break from CCRT, nutritional deterioration and required analgesic during CCRT, complication of PEG, and patient satisfaction between 15 patients with PEG and 11 patients without PEG as a control group. Although no significant weight loss occurred in either group, there were fewer patients with a Body Mass Index <18.5 in the PEG group after CCRT than in the control group. Regarding the treatment, most patients were satisfied with their PEG and considered that prophylactic PEG was necessary and helpful in completing the CCRT. This study suggests that prophylactic PEG helps patients to complete CCRT both mentally and nutritionally. (author)

  6. Incidence and Management of Bleeding Complications Following Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Nieun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu Bo

    2012-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a serious complication that sometimes occurs after percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG). We evaluated the incidence of bleeding complications after a PRG and its management including transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). We retrospectively reviewed 574 patients who underwent PRG in our institution between 2000 and 2010. Eight patients (1.4%) had symptoms or signs of upper GI bleeding after PRG. The initial presentation was hematemesis (n = 3), melena (n = 2), hematochezia (n = 2) and bloody drainage through the gastrostomy tube (n = 1). The time interval between PRG placement and detection of bleeding ranged from immediately after to 3 days later (mean: 28 hours). The mean decrease in hemoglobin concentration was 3.69 g/dL (range, 0.9 to 6.8 g/dL). In three patients, bleeding was controlled by transfusion (n = 2) or compression of the gastrostomy site (n = 1). The remaining five patients underwent an angiography because bleeding could not be controlled by transfusion only. In one patient, the bleeding focus was not evident on angiography or endoscopy, and wedge resection including the tube insertion site was performed for hemostasis. The other four patients underwent prophylactic (n = 1) or therapeutic (n = 3) TAEs. In three patients, successful hemostasis was achieved by TAE, whereas the remaining one patient underwent exploration due to persistent bleeding despite TAE. We observed an incidence of upper GI bleeding complicating the PRG of 1.4%. TAE following conservative management appears to be safe and effective for hemostasis.

  7. Incidence and Management of Bleeding Complications Following Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Nieun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a serious complication that sometimes occurs after percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG). We evaluated the incidence of bleeding complications after a PRG and its management including transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). We retrospectively reviewed 574 patients who underwent PRG in our institution between 2000 and 2010. Eight patients (1.4%) had symptoms or signs of upper GI bleeding after PRG. The initial presentation was hematemesis (n = 3), melena (n = 2), hematochezia (n = 2) and bloody drainage through the gastrostomy tube (n = 1). The time interval between PRG placement and detection of bleeding ranged from immediately after to 3 days later (mean: 28 hours). The mean decrease in hemoglobin concentration was 3.69 g/dL (range, 0.9 to 6.8 g/dL). In three patients, bleeding was controlled by transfusion (n = 2) or compression of the gastrostomy site (n = 1). The remaining five patients underwent an angiography because bleeding could not be controlled by transfusion only. In one patient, the bleeding focus was not evident on angiography or endoscopy, and wedge resection including the tube insertion site was performed for hemostasis. The other four patients underwent prophylactic (n = 1) or therapeutic (n = 3) TAEs. In three patients, successful hemostasis was achieved by TAE, whereas the remaining one patient underwent exploration due to persistent bleeding despite TAE. We observed an incidence of upper GI bleeding complicating the PRG of 1.4%. TAE following conservative management appears to be safe and effective for hemostasis.

  8. Enteral Feeding Tubes in Patients Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Critical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyfman, Shlomo A., E-mail: koyfmas@ccf.org [Departments of Radiation and Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Adelstein, David J. [Departments of Radiation and Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Definitive chemoradiation therapy has evolved as the preferred organ preservation strategy in the treatment of locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LA-HNC). Dry mouth and dysphagia are among the most common and most debilitating treatment-related toxicities that frequently necessitate the placement of enteral feeding tubes (FT) in these patients to help them meet their nutritional requirements. The use of either a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube or a nasogastric tube, the choice of using a prophylactic vs a reactive approach, and the effects of FTs on weight loss, hospitalization, quality of life, and long-term functional outcomes are areas of continued controversy. Considerable variations in practice patterns exist in the United States and abroad. This critical review synthesizes the current data for the use of enteral FTs in this patient population and clarifies the relative advantages of different types of FTs and the timing of their use. Recent developments in the biologic understanding and treatment approaches for LA-HNC appear to be favorably impacting the frequency and severity of treatment-related dysphagia and may reduce the need for enteral tube feeding in the future.

  9. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Dermatomyositis: Associations with Clinical and Laboratory Features Including Autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Oohata, Sacihe; Okita, Hirokazu; Yahata, Tetsutarou; Someya, Fujiko; Inoue, Katsumi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia develops with low frequency in patients with dermatomyositis. Our objective was to determine the clinical and laboratory features that can estimate the development of dysphagia in dermatomyositis. This study included 92 Japanese patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis. The associations between dysphagia and clinical and laboratory features including disease-specific autoantibodies determined by immunoprecipitation assays were analyzed. Videofluoroscopy swallow study (VFSS) was performed for all patients with clinical dysphagia (n = 13, 14.1%) but not for patients without clinical dysphagia. Typical findings of dysphagia (pharyngeal pooling, n = 11 and/or nasal regurgitation, n = 4) was detected by VFSS in all patients with clinical dysphagia. Eleven patients with dysphagia (84.6%) had anti-transcription intermediary factor 1γ (TIF-1γ) antibody. By univariate analysis, the average age and the male to female ratio, internal malignancy, and anti-TIF-1γ antibody were significantly higher and the frequency of interstitial lung diseases and manual muscle testing (MMT) scores of sternomastoid and dertoid muscles were significantly lower in patients with dysphagia than in patients without dysphagia. Among patients with anti-TIF-1γ antibody, the mean age, the ratios of male to female and internal malignancy were significantly higher and mean MMT scores of sternomastoid muscle were significantly lower in patients with dysphagia compared with patients without dysphagia. By multivariable analysis, the risk of dysphagia was strongly associated with the existence of internal malignancy and ant-TIF-1γ antibody and was also associated with reduced scores of manual muscle test of sternomastoid muscle. Dysphagia was markedly improved after the treatment against myositis in all 13 patients. These findings indicate that dysphagia can develop frequently in patients with internal malignancy, anti-TIF-1γ antibody, or severe muscle weakness of sternomastoid muscle.

  10. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Dermatomyositis: Associations with Clinical and Laboratory Features Including Autoantibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Mugii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Oohata, Sacihe; Okita, Hirokazu; Yahata, Tetsutarou; Someya, Fujiko; Inoue, Katsumi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dysphagia develops with low frequency in patients with dermatomyositis. Our objective was to determine the clinical and laboratory features that can estimate the development of dysphagia in dermatomyositis. Methods This study included 92 Japanese patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis. The associations between dysphagia and clinical and laboratory features including disease-specific autoantibodies determined by immunoprecipitation assays were analyzed. Results Videofluoroscopy sw...

  11. Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Locher, Julie L.; Nabell, Lisle M.; Carroll, William R.; Magnuson, J. Scott; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The use of altered fractionation radiotherapy (RT) regimens, as well as concomitant chemotherapy and RT, to intensify therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer can lead to increased rates of long-term dysphagia. Methods and Materials: We identified 122 patients who had undergone definitive RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, after excluding those who had been treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary, had Stage I-II disease, developed locoregional recurrence, had <12 months of follow-up, or had undergone postoperative RT. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were correlated with a composite of 3 objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence at the last follow-up visit; aspiration on a modified barium swallow study or a clinical diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia; or the presence of a pharyngoesophageal stricture. Results: A composite dysphagia outcome occurred in 38.5% of patients. On univariate analysis, the primary site (p = 0.01), use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), RT schedule (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of composite long-term dysphagia. The use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), primary site (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.02) remained significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent chemotherapy to RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer resulted in increased long-term dysphagia. Early intervention using swallowing exercises, avoidance of nothing-by-mouth periods, and the use of intensity-modulated RT to reduce the dose to the uninvolved swallowing structures should be explored further in populations at greater risk of long-term dysphagia

  12. CT findings in gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Suki; McHugh, Kieran; Ledermann, Sarah; Pierro, Agostino

    2007-01-01

    We describe the CT findings in an initially asymptomatic boy aged 2 years 9 months with a gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement. The findings consisted of an unusual configuration of the gastrostomy tubing on an abdominal radiograph and upper gastrointestinal study indicating the possibility of transcolic PEG placement, which was confirmed with limited section CT. This well-known and major complication following a common procedure may be recognized on plain abdominal radiography, but it has not to our knowledge been documented previously on CT in a child. (orig.)

  13. CT findings in gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Suki [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); St. George' s Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Ledermann, Sarah [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Pierro, Agostino [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15

    We describe the CT findings in an initially asymptomatic boy aged 2 years 9 months with a gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement. The findings consisted of an unusual configuration of the gastrostomy tubing on an abdominal radiograph and upper gastrointestinal study indicating the possibility of transcolic PEG placement, which was confirmed with limited section CT. This well-known and major complication following a common procedure may be recognized on plain abdominal radiography, but it has not to our knowledge been documented previously on CT in a child. (orig.)

  14. Unsuccessful Practice of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in an Infant with Gastric Volvulus: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Duman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is an easy and safe procedure for long-term enteral feeding in children with inadequate oral intake. Although PEG has been used for treatment of gastric volvulus in adults, there is a little relevant data for its use in children. Here, we report a 17-month-old male infant who was admitted to our hospital with a 1-month history of vomiting. Upper gastrointestinal contrast study revealed an organoaxial gastric volvulus. Then PEG was inserted for the purpose of nutritional support. Because the patient continued to vomit after feeding via gastrostomy, surgery was planned. Laparotomy revealed that the entry of the PEG tube was at the posterior wall of the stomach. The gastrostomy tube was removed, and the opening was repaired. Then the stomach was repositioned, and Nissen fundoplication and a Stamm gastrostomy at the anterior wall of the stomach were performed. The patient had no further episodes of vomiting after surgery and was discharged following an uneventful recovery period.

  15. The sky blue method as a screening test to detect misplacement of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube at exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yutaka; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshida, Hideki; Iwase, Tsuyoshi; Kura, Toshiroh; Imazato, Shin; Kudo, Michiaki; Ohta, Tomoyuki; Mizuhara, Akihiro; Tamamori, Yutaka; Muramatsu, Hirohito; Nishiguchi, Yukio; Nishiyama, Yorihiro; Takahashi, Mikako; Nishiwaki, Shinji; Matsumoto, Masami; Goshi, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Shigeo; Uchida, Nobuyuki; Ijima, Masashi; Ogawa, Tetsushi; Shimazaki, Makoto; Takei, Shinichi; Kimura, Chikou; Yamashita, Satoyoshi; Endo, Takao; Nakahori, Masato; Itoh, Akihiko; Kusakabe, Toshiro; Ishizuka, Izumi; Iiri, Takao; Fukasawa, Shingo; Arimoto, Yukitsugu; Kajitani, Nobuaki; Ishida, Kazuhiko; Onishi, Koji; Taira, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Makoto; Itano, Yasuto; Kobuke, Toshiya

    2009-01-01

    During tube exchange for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), a misplaced tube can cause peritonitis and death. Thus, endoscopic or radiologic observation is required at tube exchange to make sure the tube is placed correctly. However, these procedures cost extensive time and money to perform in all patients at the time of tube exchange. Therefore, we developed the "sky blue method" as a screening test to detect misplacement of the PEG tube during tube exchange. First, sky blue solution consisting of indigocarmine diluted with saline was injected into the gastric space via the old PEG tube just before the tube exchange. Next, the tube was exchanged using a standard method. Then, we checked whether the sky blue solution could be collected through the new tube or not. Finally, we confirmed correct placement of the tube by endoscopic or radiologic observation for all patients. A total of 961 patients were enrolled. Each tube exchange took 1 to 3 minutes, and there were no adverse effects. Four patients experienced a misplaced tube, all of which were detectable with the sky blue method. Diagnostic parameters of the sky blue method were as follows: sensitivity, 94% (95%CI: 92-95%); specificity, 100% (95%CI: 40-100%); positive predictive value, 100% (95%CI: 100-100%); negative predictive value, 6% (95%CI: 2-16%). These results suggest that the number of endoscopic or radiologic observations to confirm correct replacement of the PEG tube may be reduced to one fifteenth using the sky blue method.

  16. Characteristics of dysphagia in older patients evaluated at a tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocdor, Pelin; Siegel, Eric R; Giese, Rachel; Tulunay-Ugur, Ozlem E

    2015-02-01

    To determine laryngoscopic and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) findings in geriatric patients with dysphagia; to evaluate management. Retrospective chart review. Patients over 65 years old complaining of dysphagia, seen at a tertiary laryngology clinic, were included. Head and neck cancer and stroke patients were excluded. Demographics, laryngoscopic findings, swallowing studies, and treatment modalities were reviewed. Sixty-five patients were included. Mean age was 75 years old (range = 66-97) with female predominance of 67.6%. Weight loss was seen in 9.2% of the patients. Whereas 52.3% of the patients complained of solid food dysphagia, 53.8% were choking on food. On laryngoscopy, 15.3% of the patients had pooling in the pyriform sinuses, 30.7% had glottic gap, 18.4% had vocal fold immobility, and 3% had hypomobility. VFSS showed that 38.4% of the patients had pharyngoesophageal dysphagia, 20% had oropharyngeal dysphagia, 20% had pharyngeal dysphagia, and 20% had a normal study. In addition, 41.5% of the patients showed laryngeal penetration and 18.4% showed aspiration. Surgical intervention was employed in 29.2% of the patients in the form of botulinum toxin injection, esophageal dilatation, cricopharyngeal myotomy, vocal fold injection, diverticulectomy, and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. Whereas 21.5% of the patients received swallowing therapy, 61.5% underwent diet modification. As a result, 80% of the patients needed some type of treatment. Swallowing problems in older patients are not uncommon. The clinician needs to be diligent to inquire about dysphagia because a large number of these patients will require treatment. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Indications for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and survival in old adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Faxén-Irving

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background : Many diseases striking old adults result in eating difficulties. Indications for selecting individuals for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG are unclear and everybody may not benefit from the procedure. Objective : The aim of this study was to evaluate indications for and survival after PEG insertion in patients older than 65 years. Design and Methods : A retrospective analysis including age, gender, diagnosis, indication, and date of death was made in 201 consecutive individuals, 94 male, mean age 79±7 years, who received a nutritional gastrostomy. Results: Dysphagia was present in 86% of the patients and stroke was the most common diagnosis (49%. Overall median survival was 123 days and 30-day mortality was 22%. Patients with dementia and Mb Parkinson had the longest survival (i.e. 244 and 233 days, while those with other neurological diseases, and head and neck malignancy had the shortest (i.e. 75 and 106 days. There was no difference in mortality in patients older or younger than 80 years, except in patients with dementia. Conclusions: Old age should not be a contraindication for PEG. A high 30-day mortality indicates that there is a need of better criteria for selection and timing of PEG insertion in the elderly.

  18. CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with loop gastropexy and peel-away sheath trocar technique in 31 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bucourt, Maximilian; Collettini, Federico; Althoff, Christian; Streitparth, Florian; Greupner, Johannes; Hamm, Bernd (Dept. of Radiology, Charite - Univ. Medicine, Berlin (Germany)), Email: mdb@charite.de; Teichgraeber, U.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Jena Univ. (Germany))

    2012-04-15

    Background: In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with respiratory impairment and/or advanced disease, performing even mild sedation - as is usually necessary for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placements - is fraught with risk. These patients are often referred to Interventional Radiology for alternative percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement options. Purpose: To report our experience with CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with a novel loop gastropexy and peel-away sheath trocar technique in ALS patients as an alternative to endoscopic techniques. Material and Methods: A consecutive series of 31 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy was considered too dangerous or impossible to perform underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastropexy and gastrostomy and prospective follow-up. All procedures were performed with a 15 FR Freka Pexact gastrostomy kit, a 16-row CT scanner (Aquilion 16) and single shot CT fluoroscopy mode. Results: The procedure was performed successfully in 30 of 31 patients (20 men, 11 women; median age 60 years, range 38-80 years). In the remaining case the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy and CO2 insufflation was initiated thereafter, leading to successful gastrostomy without prior gastropexy and without further adverse events during follow-up. Two patients reported unproblematic exchange of a balloon tube due to skin irritations with no further adverse events. One patient reported accidental displacement of an exchanged new balloon tube in domestic environment due to balloon leakage: A new balloon tube was easily re-inserted in a hospital the same day. No serious adverse events such as peritonitis, persistent local bleeding, systemic blood loss, or any local infection requiring surgical intervention were observed. Until August 11, 2011 follow-up resulted in 7473 cumulative gastrostomy-days from the date of first placement. Conclusion: Initial results suggest that the described

  19. CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with loop gastropexy and peel-away sheath trocar technique in 31 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bucourt, Maximilian; Collettini, Federico; Althoff, Christian; Streitparth, Florian; Greupner, Johannes; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, U.K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with respiratory impairment and/or advanced disease, performing even mild sedation - as is usually necessary for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placements - is fraught with risk. These patients are often referred to Interventional Radiology for alternative percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement options. Purpose: To report our experience with CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with a novel loop gastropexy and peel-away sheath trocar technique in ALS patients as an alternative to endoscopic techniques. Material and Methods: A consecutive series of 31 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy was considered too dangerous or impossible to perform underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastropexy and gastrostomy and prospective follow-up. All procedures were performed with a 15 FR Freka Pexact gastrostomy kit, a 16-row CT scanner (Aquilion 16) and single shot CT fluoroscopy mode. Results: The procedure was performed successfully in 30 of 31 patients (20 men, 11 women; median age 60 years, range 38-80 years). In the remaining case the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy and CO2 insufflation was initiated thereafter, leading to successful gastrostomy without prior gastropexy and without further adverse events during follow-up. Two patients reported unproblematic exchange of a balloon tube due to skin irritations with no further adverse events. One patient reported accidental displacement of an exchanged new balloon tube in domestic environment due to balloon leakage: A new balloon tube was easily re-inserted in a hospital the same day. No serious adverse events such as peritonitis, persistent local bleeding, systemic blood loss, or any local infection requiring surgical intervention were observed. Until August 11, 2011 follow-up resulted in 7473 cumulative gastrostomy-days from the date of first placement. Conclusion: Initial results suggest that the described

  20. Randomized study of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy versus nasogastric tubes for enteral feeding in head and neck cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corry, J.; Poon, W.; McPhee, N.; Milner, A. D.; Cruickshank, D.; Rischin, D.; Peters, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes have largely replaced nasogastric tubes (NGT) for nutritional support of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing curative (chemo)radiotherapy without any good scientific basis. A randomized trial was conducted to compare PEG tubes and NGT in terms of nutritional outcomes, complications, patient satisfaction and cost. The study was closed early because of poor accrual, predominantly due to patients' reluctance to be randomized. There were 33 patients eligible for analysis. Nutritional support with both tubes was good. There were no significant differences in overall complication rates, chest infection rates or in patients' assessment of their overall quality of life. The cost of a PEG tube was 10 times that of an NGT. The duration of use of PEG tubes was significantly longer, a median 139 days compared with a median 66 days for NGT. We found no evidence to support the routine use of PEG tubes over NGT in this patient group

  1. Safety of pull-type and introducer percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes in oncology patients: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelckmans Paul A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG allows long-term tube feeding. Safety of pull-type and introducer PEG placement in oncology patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancies is unknown. Methods Retrospective analysis of 299 patients undergoing PEG tube placement between January 2006 and December 2008 revealed 57 oncology patients. All patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancy were treated with chemo- and radiotherapy. In case of high-grade stenosis introducer Freka® Pexact PEG tube was placed (n = 24 and in all other patients (n = 33 conventional pull-type PEG tube. Short-term complications and mortality rates were compared. Results Patients' characteristics and clinical status were comparable in both groups. Short-term complications were encountered in 11/24 (48% introducer PEG patients as compared to only 4/33 (12% pull-type PEG patients (P vs. 0/33 (0%, P vs. 3/33 (9%, NS. Finally, 3/24 gastrointestinal perforations (12% resulted from a difficult placement procedure vs. 1/33 (3%, leading to urgent surgical intervention and admission to ICU. Two introducer PEG patients died at ICU, resulting in an overall mortality rate of 8% vs. 0% (P = 0.091. Conclusion The introducer Freka® Pexact PEG procedure for long-term tube feeding may lead to significantly higher complication and mortality rates in patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancies treated with chemo- and radiotherapy. It is suggested to use the conventional pull-type PEG tube placement in this group of patients, if possible.

  2. Initial experience with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with T-fastener fixation in pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvello, Morten; Knatten, Charlotte Kristensen; Perminow, Gøri; Skari, Hans; Engebretsen, Anders; Schistad, Ole; Emblem, Ragnhild; Bjørnland, Kristin

    2018-01-01

    Background and study aims  Insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) with push-through technique and T-fastener fixation (PEG-T) has recently been introduced in pediatric patients. The T-fasteners allow a primary insertion of a balloon gastrostomy. Due to limited data on the results of this technique in children, we have investigated peri- and postoperative outcomes after implementation of PEG-T in our department. Patients and methods  This retrospective chart review included all patients below 18 years who underwent PEG-T placement from 2010 to 2014. Main outcomes were 30-day postoperative complications and late gastrostomy-related complications. Results  In total, 87 patients were included, and median follow-up time was 2.4 years (1 month – 4.9 years). Median age and weight at PEG-T insertion were 1.9 years (9.4 months – 16.4 years) and 10.4 kg (5.4 – 33.0 kg), respectively. Median operation time was 28 minutes (10 – 65 minutes), and 6 surgeons and 3 endoscopists performed the procedures. During the first 30 days, 54 complications occurred in 41 patients (47 %). Most common were peristomal infections treated with either local antibiotics in 11 patients (13 %) or systemic antibiotics in 11 other patients (13 %). 9 patients (10 %) experienced tube dislodgment. Late gastrostomy-related complications occurred in 33 patients (38 %). The T-fasteners caused early and late complications in 9 (10 %) and 11 patients (13 %), respectively. Of these, 4 patients (5 %) had subcutaneously migrated T-fasteners which were removed under general anesthesia. Conclusion  We found a high rate of complications after PEG-T. In particular, problems with the T-fasteners and tube dislodgment occurred frequently after PEG-T insertion. PMID:29399615

  3. [Button gastrostomy in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Iu A; Novozhilov, V A; Rasputin, A A; Us, G P; Kuznetsova, N N

    2015-01-01

    For the period January 2002 to December 2013 it was performed 84 interventions for introduction of gastrostomy tube. The first group included 24 open operations and the second group had 60 laparoscopic operations by using of button devices MIC-KEY (Kimberly-Clark, Roswell, USA) in neonates and infants. Statistically significant difference was not observed during comparison of demographic data of patients. Differences in groups were found in statistical analysis of intra- and postoperative parameters (p<0.05). Mean duration of surgery in the first group was 37.29 min, in the second group - 23.97 min. Time to start of feeding and transition to complete enteral nutrition was less in patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery than after open intervention (10.5 and 19.13 hours, 23.79 and 35.88 hours respectively; p<0.05). It was revealed augmentation of hospital stay in the 1st group in comparison with the 2(nd) group (11.71 and 7.09 days respectively; p<0.05). Frequency of postoperative complications was 18.33% in the 2(nd) group and 24% - in the 1st group (p<0.05). The authors consider that button devices are simply and effective technique of gastrostomy establishment in children. It is associated with minimal surgery duration and allows to start early enteral nutrition in comparison with open techniques.

  4. Fluoroscopic-guided primary single-step percutaneous gastrostomy. Initial results using the Freka {sup registered} GastroTube; Primaere einzeitige durchleuchtungsgesteuerte perkutane Gastrostomie (PG). Erste Ergebnisse mit dem Freka {sup registered} GastroTube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahne, J.D.; Schoennagel, B.P.; Arndt, C.; Bannas, P.; Koops, A.; Adam, G.; Habermann, C.R. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Zentrum fuer Radiologie; Herrmann, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Zentrum fuer Radiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Abt. Paediatrische Radiologie

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the practicability and outcome of fluoroscopic-guided primary one-step treatment of percutaneous gastrostomy (PG) with the system Freka {sup registered} Gastro Tube (Fresenius Kabi, Germany). Materials and Methods: In 39 patients (mean age 62.7 {+-} 12.0 years), primary PG was performed based on clinical indication from August 2009 to April 2010. The intervention was performed by an experienced radiologist under aseptic conditions by direct puncture with Freka {sup registered} Gastro Tube under fluoroscopic guidance. The clinical data and outcome as well as any complications originated from the electronic archive of the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf. Results: The intervention was technically successful in all 39 patients. Within the mean follow-up time of 155.3 {+-} 73.6 days, 29 patients (74.4 %) did not experience complications. 10 patients (25.6 %) had to be revised. Complications manifested after a mean of 135.6 {+-} 61.2 days and mainly corresponded to accidental dislocation (50 %). One patient had to be surgically revised under suspicion of a malpositioned tube and suspected intestinal perforation. Clinically relevant wound infections were not detected. The total costs per patient were 553.17 Euro for our single-step treatment (OPS 5 - 431.x) vs. 963.69 Euro (OPS 5 - 431.x and OPS 8 - 123.0) for the recommended two-step treatment. Conclusion: Fluoroscopic-guided primary single-step treatment with Freka {sup registered} Gastro Tube system is feasible and not associated with an increased complication rate when compared to published literature applying a two-step treatment approach. Material costs as well as human and time resources could be significantly reduced using the single-step treatment. (orig.)

  5. Gastrostomy and gastroesophageal reflux in neurologically impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Cappellano

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastrostomy has been increasingly indicated for daily feeding ofneurologically impaired children with swallowing abnormalitiesthat hinder the use of the mouth. Therefore, the enteral route hasstill been used by means of oral, nasogastric or nasojejunal tube.However it is no longer the preferential method, mainly in cases ofprolonged use. Today gastrostomy is the most often utilizedprocedure, particularly Stamm gastrostomy. Many of thesepatients present pulmonary abnormalities due to a possiblegastroesophageal reflux (GER. After the study by Jolley et al.(1, in1985, fundoplication has become a systematic and routinecomplement to gastrostomy. The neurologically impaired patientshave been submitted to two surgeries, leading to possible andpredictable increase in morbidity and mortality rates. Althougheffective when properly indicated, this simple management hasrecently been very much debated and rejected. Thus, an updatingbased on recent studies is necessary to make pediatric surgeonsand pediatricians aware of other manners to solve this problem,which aim at correctly feeding these children with impairedswallowing and GER and helping them have a better quality of life.The literature reviewed was searched in PubMed/Medline, fromJanuary 1994 to May 2003. Other articles read and mentioned inthis review and published before 1994 were collected based onarticles cited in the references. Thus, we could assess thechronological progression in management of neurologicallyimpaired children who need gastrostomy for their feeding, andcarry out an analysis of current fundoplication and the questionwhether the use of a prophylactic antireflux valve is compulsoryor not.

  6. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: an update on its indications, management, complications, and care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo J. Lucendo

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous disorders impairing or diminishing a patient's ability to swallow may benefit from a PEG tube placement. This is considered the elective feeding technique if a functional digestive system is present. Methods: A PubMed-based search restricted to the English literature from the last 20 years was conducted. References in the results were also reviewed to identify potential sources of information. Results: PEG feeding has consistently demonstrated to be more effective and safe than nasogastric tube feeding, having also replaced surgical and radiological gastrostomy techniques for long term feeding. PEG is considered a minimally invasive procedure to ensure an adequate source for enteral nutrition in institutionalized and at home patients. Acute and chronic conditions associated with risk of malnutrition and dysphagia benefit from PEG placement: Beyond degenerative neuro-muscular disorders, an increasing body of evidence supports the advantages of PEG tubes in patients with head and neck cancer and in a wide range of situations in pediatric settings. The safety of PEG placement under antithrombotic medication is discussed. While antibiotic prophylaxis reduces peristomal wound infection rates, co-trimoxazole solutions administered through a newly inserted catheter constitutes an alternative to intravenous antibiotics. Early feeding (3-6 hours after PEG placement firmly supports on safety evidences, additionally resulting in reduced costs and hospital stays. Complications of PEG are rare and the majority prevented with appropriated nursing cares. Conclusions: PEG feeding provides the most valuable access for nutrition in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system. Its high effectiveness, safety and reduced cost underlie increasing worldwide popularity.

  7. Stability of Balloon-Retention Gastrostomy Tubes with Different Concentrations of Contrast Material: In Vitro Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopera, Jorge E.; Alvarez, Alex; Trimmer, Clayton; Josephs, Shellie; Anderson, Matthew; Dolmatch, Bart

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of two balloon-retention-type gastrostomy tubes when the balloons are inflated with two types of contrast materials at different concentrations. Two commonly used balloon-retention-type tubes (MIC and Tri-Funnel) were inflated to the manufacturer's recommended volumes (4 and 20 cm 3 , respectively) with normal saline or normal saline plus different concentrations of contrast material. Five tubes of each brand were inflated with normal saline and 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% contrast material dilutions, using either nonionic hyperosmolar contrast, or nonionic iso-osmolar contrast. The tubes were submerged in a glass basin containing a solution with a pH of 4. Every week the tubes were visually inspected to determine the integrity of the balloons, and the diameter of the balloons was measured with a caliper. The tests were repeated every week for a total of 12 weeks. The MIC balloons deflated slightly faster over time than the Tri-Funnel balloons. The Tri-Funnel balloons remained relatively stable over the study period for the different concentrations of contrast materials. The deflation rates of the MIC balloons were proportionally related to the concentration of saline and inversely related to the concentration of the contrast material. At high contrast material concentrations, solidification of the balloons was observed. In conclusion, this in vitro study confirms that the use of diluted amounts of nonionic contrast materials is safe for inflating the balloons of two types of balloon-retention feeding tubes. High concentrations of contrast could result in solidification of the balloons and should be avoided.

  8. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, F; el Nawar, A; Van Gossum, A

    1992-01-01

    From March 87 to March 92, fifty eight patients were referred to our department for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). The modality of the feeding tube insertion is described. The most common indications for placement were neurologic disorders in 62% of the cases (n = 36) and malignant diseases in 32% (n = 19). The success rate of the technique was 98.3% (n = 57). No procedure-related mortality was observed. A low rate of major complication (1.7%) and minor complication (10.5%) was noted. Feeding tubes were removed in 21% of patients (n = 12); none of them with malignant disease. Survival curve analysis demonstrated that 50% of patients died within 3 months of PEG placement. Such results raise questions about the selection of patients undergoing PEG. Our experience of patients undergoing PEG. Our experience suggests that PEG is easy and safe, even in debilitated patients, having an acceptable life expectancy.

  9. The use of radiologically placed gastroctomy tubes in head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyldesley, Scott; Sheehan, Finbarr; Munk, Peter; Tsang, Victor; Skarsgard, David; Bowman, Carol A.; Hobenshield, Shirley E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Patients undergoing radiotherapy to the head and neck area frequently experience radiation reactions that can markedly restrict oral intake, require hospitalization, and occasionally cause treatment interruptions. The Vancouver Cancer Center (VCC) has recently employed radiologically placed gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes) in the management of this problem. A review of the patients on whom this procedure had been performed is the subject of this review. Methods and Materials: Thirty-four patients had gastrostomy tubes inserted under radiologic guidance. This group is compared to a control group matched for age, sex, irradiated volume, and radiation dose, who did not have gastrostomy tubes. Patients with gastrostomy tubes were divided into two categories: (a) patients who had tubes inserted in anticipation of severe reactions, and (b) patients who developed severe radiation reactions necessitating nutritional support. Results: The gastrostomy group consisted of 65% males with an average age of 59 years and stage range of II (12%), III (24%), and IV (65%). In both the elective group and the nonelective group, patients maintained their weight at 95 to 97% of the pretreatment weight, at follow-up of 6 weeks and 3 months. This compared with an average weight loss in the control group of 9% at 6 weeks and 12% at 3 months. The length of hospitalization was a mean of 4.9 days in the elective group and 19 days in the nonelective group. Complication were low compared to those documented in the literature, but included two tube migrations, two aspirations, and one gastrointestinal bleed. Conclusions: We believe that gastrostomy tubes contribute significantly to the management of patients with head and neck cancer, particularly in maintenance of nutrition, and they may decrease the need for hospitalization

  10. Practice and problems with gastrostomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHattie, Gill

    2005-08-01

    The development of gastrostomy placement has been an important technological advance in the enteral-access field. However, its rapid growth in popularity could be viewed as problematic. The endoscopist or intervention radiologist can no longer act as a technician but requires to follow-up this group of patients in order to determine outcomes that will inform future practice. There has been emphasis on the importance of the multidisciplinary team in informing and assessing patients referred for gastrostomy insertion. Communication between all the professionals caring for a patient and between the carers and the patient allows information to be collated that will determine the benefits and burdens of long-term gastrostomy feeding. At present much of the published experience is limited to the acute care setting. The incidence of complications varies, depending on the investigator's definition of complication and the diagnosis of the patient group. Many reported studies are retrospective, which puts limitations on documentation. Increasing numbers of patients with diverse needs are now being discharged into the community with gastrostomy tubes in place. Whilst the hospital should ensure that written protocols are provided and that all carers involved should have adequate training, it is not unusual for patients to receive mixed messages from the different care teams responsible for their care. In South Glasgow NHS Hospital Division key members of all teams caring for these patients (acute care, community district nurses, learning disabilities team, physical disabilities team and commercial homecare companies) meet regularly to discuss equipment and protocols. The members of this group feel that this approach has improved communication, standardised practice and reduced complications by providing a service that delivers artificial nutrition support but is primarily suited to the patient's disease process.

  11. Endoscopically placed guide wire assisted nasogastric tube insertion for palliation of absolute dysphagia in patients with incurable esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purkayastha Joydeep

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of the esophagus is a dreadful disease because it causes a lot of distress to the patient due to its adverse effects on swallowing. Many patients present with large incurable disease or undergo disease progression and become incurable. Such patients are advised palliative and symptomatic care. The most distressing symptom that requires palliation in such patients is dysphagia. Many procedures are available for relief of dysphagia, but these are not readily available or are costly. We describe a simple, safe, cost effective and easy to do procedure for palliation of malignant dysphagia by insertion of Ryle′s tube over a endoscopically placed guide wire especially suitable for patients of the poor socio-economic strata.

  12. [Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in a myotrophic lateral sclerosis. Experience in a district general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Herrera-Martínez, Aura Dulcinea; Tenorio Jiménez, Carmen; Molina Puerta, María José; Calañas Continente, Alfonso Jesús; Manzano García, Gregorio; Gálvez Moreno, María Ángeles

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative disorder that affects the pyramidal tract, producing progressive motor dysfunctions leading to paralysis. These patients can present with dysphagia, requiring nutritional support with a nasogastric tube or Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG). PEG is associated with increased survival rates. However, the timing of PEG placement remains a significant issue for clinicians. To analyse the characteristics of ALS patients at the moment of PEG placement and their progression. Descriptive retrospective study including patients diagnosed with ALS and PEG who were assessed during the 2005-2014 period in our hospital. Nutritional parameters and respiratory function were assessed for all patients, as well as their progression. The data was analysed using SPSS15. 37 patients were included (56.8% men, 43.2% women) with an average age of 60 at diagnosis, and an average age of 63.1 at PEG placement. 48.6% started with spinal affection and 51.4%, with bulbar affection. 43.2% of the patients received oral nutritional supplements prior to PEG placement for a mean period of 11.3 months. The mean forced vital capacity at diagnosis was 65.45±13.67%, with a negative progression up to 39.47±14.69% at the moment of PEG placement. 86.5% of patients required non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation. 86.5% presented with dysphagia, 64.9% with weight loss > 5-10% from their usual weight, 8.1% with low Body Mass Index, 27% with malnutrition and 73% with aworsened breathing function; therefore, 100% met the criteria for PEG placement according to our protocol. The period on enteral feeding was extended for 10.1 months with a mortality of 50% during the first 6 months from PEG placement. There is evidence of a 3-year delay between diagnosis and PEG placement, with a survival rate of 50% at 6 months from PEG insertion. Further studies are required to establish whether an earlier placement might increase survival rates. Copyright AULA

  13. Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy versus percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: A comparison of indications, complications and outcomes in 370 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silas, Anne M.; Pearce, Lindsay F.; Lestina, Lisa S.; Grove, Margaret R.; Tosteson, Anna; Manganiello, Wendy D.; Bettmann, Michael A.; Gordon, Stuart R.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Percutaneous access to the stomach can be achieved by endoscopic or fluoroscopic methods. Our objective was to compare indications, complications, efficacy and outcomes of these two techniques. Methods: Records of 370 patients with feeding tubes placed either endoscopically by gastroenterology, or fluoroscopically by radiology, at our university-based tertiary care center over a 54-month period were reviewed. Results: 177 gastrostomies were placed endoscopically and 193 fluoroscopically. Nutrition was the most common indication in each group (94 and 92%), but the most common underlying diagnosis was neurologic impairment in the endoscopic group (n = 89, 50%) and malignancy in the fluoroscopic group (n = 134, 69%) (p < 0.001). Complications in the first 30 days were more common with fluoroscopic placement (23% versus 11%, p = 0.002), with infection most frequent. Correlates of late complications were inpatient status (OR 0.26, 95%CI: 0.13-0.51) and a diagnosis of malignancy (OR 2.2, 95%CI: 1.03-4.84). Average follow-up time was 108 days in the fluoroscopic group and 174 days in the endoscopic group. Conclusions: Both endoscopic and fluoroscopic gastrostomy tube placement are safe and effective. Outpatient status was associated with greater early and late complication rates; minor complications such as infection were greater in the fluoroscopic group, while malignancy was associated with late complications

  14. Screening Adult Patients with a Tracheostomy Tube for Dysphagia: A Mixed-Methods Study of Practice in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginnelly, Aeron; Greenwood, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with tracheostomy tubes are at risk of aspiration and swallowing problems (dysphagia), and because of their medical acuity, complications in this patient population can be severe. It is well recognized that swallow screening in stroke significantly reduces potential complications by allowing early identification and…

  15. Use of a novel laparoscopic gastrostomy technique in children with severe epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kamlesh; Wells, Jonathan; Jones, Rosie; Browne, Fiona; Moss, Celia; Parikh, Dakshesh

    2014-05-01

    Supplementing nutrition in children with severe epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is challenging because of skin and mucosal fragility. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is contraindicated in EB, whereas more invasive open surgical gastrostomy placement can be complicated by chronic leakage. The aim of the study was to review the efficacy and acceptability, in children with severe EB, of our modified 2-port laparoscopic approach using the Seldinger technique with serial dilatation and tube insertion through a peel-away sheath. Retrospective review of children with EB who underwent laparoscopic feeding gastrostomy at our centre since 2009. Seven children (6 severe generalised recessive dystrophic EB, 1 non-Herlitz junctional EB; 2 girls, 5 boys) underwent modified laparoscopic gastrostomy placement at median age 4.85 years (range 1.0-8.8), with fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux in 1 case, with follow-up for 0.3 to 3.9 years. The procedure was well tolerated with oral feeds usually given after 4 hours and whole protein gastrostomy feeds within 24 hours in 6 patients. Improved growth was reflected in mean weight and height z scores: -1.36 (range -2.6 to 0.5) to -0.61 (range -2.34 to 2.0) and -1.09 (range -2.42 to 1.0) to 0.71 (range -1.86 to 1.0), respectively. Postoperatively, 5 patients experienced minor local complications: minimal leakage without skin damage in 3 and transient peristomal granulation rapidly responsive to topical treatment in 2; this followed acute gastrostomy site infection in 1. There was no leakage after the immediate postoperative period. We conclude that our less-invasive laparoscopic gastrostomy technique is effective and better tolerated in children with severe EB, at least in the medium term, than open gastrostomy placement. Longer follow-up is required.

  16. Minority race and male sex as risk factors for non-beneficial gastrostomy tube placements after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigle, Roland; Carrese, Joseph A; Cooper, Lisa A; Urrutia, Victor C; Gottesman, Rebecca F

    2018-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes are widely used for enteral feeding after stroke; however, PEG tubes placed in patients in whom death is imminent are considered non-beneficial. We sought to determine whether placement of non-beneficial PEG tubes differs by race and sex. In this retrospective cohort study, inpatient admissions for stroke patients who underwent palliative/withdrawal of care, were discharged to hospice, or died during the hospitalization, were identified from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 2007 and 2011. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between race and sex with PEG placement. Of 36,109 stroke admissions who underwent palliative/withdrawal of care, were discharge to hospice, or experienced in-hospital death, a PEG was placed in 2,258 (6.3%). Among PEG recipients 41.1% were of a race other than white, while only 22.0% of patients without PEG were of a minority race (prace was associated with PEG placement compared to whites (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.57-1.96), and men had 1.27 times higher odds of PEG compared to women (95% CI 1.16-1.40). Racial differences were most pronounced among women: ethnic/racial minority women had over 2-fold higher odds of a PEG compared to their white counterparts (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.81-2.41), while male ethnic/racial minority patients had 1.44 increased odds of a PEG when compared to white men (95% CI 1.24-1.67, p-value for interaction race and male sex are risk factors for non-beneficial PEG tube placements after stroke.

  17. PEG Tube Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saptarshi Biswas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG has been used for providing enteral access to patients who require long-term enteral nutrition for years. Although generally considered safe, PEG tube placement can be associated with many immediate and delayed complications. Buried bumper syndrome (BBS is one of the uncommon and late complications of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG placement. It occurs when the internal bumper of the PEG tube erodes into the gastric wall and lodges itself between the gastric wall and skin. This can lead to a variety of additional complications such as wound infection, peritonitis, and necrotizing fasciitis. We present here a case of buried bumper syndrome which caused extensive necrosis of the anterior abdominal wall.

  18. Modified tube gastropexy using a mushroom-tipped silicone catheter for management of gastric dilatation-volvulus in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belch, A; Rubinos, C; Barnes, D C; Nelissen, P

    2017-02-01

    To report the short- and long-term complications and clinical outcomes of a cohort of dogs managed for gastric dilatation-volvulus using a modified right-sided tube gastropexy technique. Retrospective case series. Of 31 dogs treated, 29 (93·5%) had an excellent short-term outcome, and gastric dilatation-volvulus did not recur in any dog. Twenty-six dogs (84%) were initially fed via the gastrostomy tube postoperatively; three (9·7%) suffered a major complication including septic peritonitis (n=1), and premature tube removal (n=2). Fourteen dogs (45·1%) had minor complications including mild, self-limiting discharge from the stoma site in 13. Modified tube gastropexy using a mushroom-tipped silicone catheter is an effective and safe surgical method for the management of gastric dilatation-volvulus. The gastrostomy tube allowed early enteral feeding and easy administration of medications, including gastroprotectants. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  19. [Evaluation of dysphagia. Results after one year of incorporating videofluoroscopy into its study introduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Romero, Ruth; Ros Arnal, Ignacio; Romea Montañés, María José; López Calahorra, José Antonio; Gutiérrez Alonso, Cristina; Izquierdo Hernández, Beatriz; Martín de Vicente, Carlos

    2017-11-09

    Dysphagia is very common in children with neurological disabilities. These patients usually suffer from respiratory and nutritional problems. The videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) is the most recommended test to evaluate dysphagia, as it shows the real situation during swallowing. To analyse the results obtained in our centre after one year of the implementation of VFSS, the clinical improvement after confirmation, and the prescription of an individualised treatment for the patients affected. VFSS performed in the previous were collected. The following variables were analysed: age, pathology, degree of neurological damage, oral and pharyngeal and/or oesophageal dysphagia and its severity, aspirations, prescribed treatment, and nutritional and respiratory improvement after diagnosis. A statistical analysis was performed using SPSS v21. A total of 61 VFSS were performed. Dysphagia was detected in more than 70%, being moderate-severe in 58%. Aspirations and/or penetrations were recorded in 59%, of which 50% were silent. Adapted diet was prescribed to 56%, and gastrostomy was performed on 13 (21%) patients. A statistical association was found between neurological disease and severity of dysphagia. The degree of motor impairment is related to the presence of aspirations. After VFSS evaluation and treatment adjustment, nutritional improvement was found in Z-score of weight (+0.3SD) and BMI (+0.4SD). There was respiratory improvement in 71% of patients with dysphagia being controlled in the Chest Diseases Department. After implementation of VFSS, a high percentage of patients were diagnosed and benefited from a correct diagnosis and treatment. VFSS is a fundamental diagnostic test that should be included in paediatric centres as a diagnostic method for children with suspected dysphagia. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  20. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF COMPLICATIONS RELATED TO PERCUTANEOUS ENDOSCOPIC GASTROSTOMY IN ICU PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokanath S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The first percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy performed on a child was on June 12, 1979, at the Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Dr. Michael W.L. Gauderer, paediatric surgeon; Dr. Jeffrey Ponsky, endoscopist; and Dr. James Bekeny, surgical resident, performed the procedure on a 4 1 ⁄2-month-old child with inadequate oral intake. The authors of the technique, Dr. Michael W.L. Gauderer and Dr. Jeffrey Ponsky, first published the technique in 1980. In 2001, the details of the development of the procedure were published. Gastrostomy maybe indicated in numerous situations usually those in which normal or nutrition (or nasogastric feeding is impossible. The causes for these situations maybe neurological (e.g. stroke, anatomical (e.g. cleft lip and palate during the process of correction or other (e.g. radiation therapy for tumours in head and neck region. In certain situations where normal or nasogastric feeding is not possible, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy maybe of clinical benefit. This provides enteral nutrition (making use of the natural digestion process of the gastrointestinal tract despite bypassing the mouth; enteral nutrition is generally preferable to parenteral nutrition (which is only used when the GI tract must be avoided. The PEG procedure is an alternative to open surgical gastrostomy insertion and does not require a general anaesthetic; mild sedation is typically used. PEG tubes may also be extended into the small intestine by passing a jejunal extension tube (PEG-J tube through the PEG tube and into the jejunum via the pylorus. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was carried out in the Department of General Medicine on 32 patients who underwent PEG placement by gastroenterologist at Gayatri Vidya Parishad Hospital, Visakhapatnam, from January 2016 to December 2016. Patients were aged 18 years and above. All patients had placement of Ponsky pull PEs either in the

  1. Duration and extent of dysphagia following pediatric airway reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Claire Kane; Linck, Jessica; Willging, Jay Paul

    2009-04-01

    Patients who undergo open airway reconstruction procedures are likely to experience some degree of post-operative dysphagia. This retrospective review describes the duration of post-operative dysphagia and the use of compensatory strategies in a group of 30 pediatric patients. A retrospective chart review of pediatric patients referred for post-operative swallowing assessment following airway reconstruction during a six-month period was completed. Age, sex, surgical procedure, stent type, co-morbid factors, duration of dysphagia, and use of compensatory dietary modifications and swallowing strategies was summarized and compared. Dysphagia was generally of short duration (1-5 days) in patients undergoing single stage procedures with anterior or anterior/posterior grafts. Duration of swallowing difficulty was increased in patients undergoing posterior grafts in combination with T tubes (10-14 days). The longest duration of difficulty (>2 weeks) occurred in patients who had anterior and posterior grafting with T tubes, combined with additional procedures such as vocal fold lateralization, epiglottic petiole repositioning, and/or arytenoidectomy. There was a greater likelihood of oral feeding difficulty post-operatively in patients presenting with pre-operative feeding issues such as oral aversion or specific texture refusal, and the pre-morbid need for supplemental tube feeding to supplement oral intake. Compensatory swallowing strategies were effective in decreasing aspiration associated with swallowing in oral feeders post-operatively, and in facilitating return to baseline swallowing skills. The duration of dysphagia overall was increased in patients undergoing anterior/posterior grafts in conjunction with in-dwelling T tubes, especially when combined with additional procedures. Compensatory strategies to assist with swallowing were found to be effective in the post-operative phase and included the use of a modified supraglottic swallowing sequence to assist with

  2. Paediatric gastrostomy stoma complications and treatments: A rapid scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Ashleigh; Wincentak, Joanne; Krog, Kim; Schippke, Julia; Kingsnorth, Shauna

    2018-04-01

    To provide a scoping review of the types of treatments used to address paediatric skin-related stoma complications specific to infection, hypergranulation and gastric leakage, and explore their effectiveness and indications for use. Stoma-related complications can be a common occurrence for children with gastrostomy (G) and gastrojejunostomy (GJ) tubes. Nurses require guidance to inform decision-making of the broad spectrum of treatments used in clinical practice. A scoping review using a rapid review approach. Working with a multidisciplinary health professional team, search terms were generated. A systematic search of CINAHL, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was completed, coupled with an Internet search to identify relevant clinical practice guidelines and hand searching of citation lists. Eligible articles were peer-reviewed English publications, focused on paediatric populations aged 18 years and under, dating from 2002-2016 and described complications and treatment approaches related to G- and GJ-tube stomas. Pertinent information was extracted using a standardised template, and a narrative synthesis approach was used to analyse the data. Twenty-five articles were included in this review. Study designs varied, and complication management was often a secondary focus. A broad spectrum of treatments was used to manage each complication type. There was a lack of consensus on lines of therapy; however, a stepwise approach was often used for complication management, particularly for infections. The evidence on the comparative effectiveness of different treatment strategies of skin-related gastrostomy stoma complications in paediatric practice is sparse. Current evidence is generally limited to expert opinions. Future studies examining efficacy of treatments and their indications for use with children are warranted. Effective management of skin-related stoma complications is important to maintain health and wellness among children who rely on G- and GJ-tubes for

  3. Video assisted gastrostomy in children

    OpenAIRE

    Backman, Torbjörn

    2014-01-01

    Children with severe diseases can be provided nutritional support through a gastrostomy if needed. At the Department of Paediatric Surgery in Lund we have used the Video Assisted Gastrostomy (VAG) procedure since 1994 when establishing gastrostomies. In this thesis, children with different diseases, who all had undergone the VAG procedure, were studied in five different clinical studies. Postoperative complications were collected and validated. We have not seen any major complications associa...

  4. Radiation-induced acute dysphagia. Prospective observational study on 42 head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alterio, D.; Gerardi, M.A.; Fodor, C.; Ciardo, D.; Ferrari, A.; Colangione, S.; Cella, L.; D'Avino, V.; Conson, M.; Palma, G.; Spoto, R.; Dicuonzo, S.; Jereczek-Fossa, B.A.; Zurlo, V.; Bruschini, R.; Sabbatini, A.; Valoriani, F.; Pacelli, R.; Maisonneuve, P.; Preda, L.; Cossu Rocca, M.; Rondi, E.; Orecchia, R.; Sanguineti, G.

    2017-01-01

    Acute toxicity in head and neck (H and N) cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT) has a crucial role in compliance to treatments. The aim of this study was to correlate doses to swallowing-associated structures and acute dysphagia. We prospectively analyzed 42 H and N cancer patients treated with RT. Dysphagia (grade ≥ 3) and indication for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) insertion were classified as acute toxicity. Ten swallowing-related structures were considered for the dosimetric analysis. The correlation between clinical information and the dose absorbed by the contoured structures was analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression method using resampling methods (bootstrapping) was applied to select model order and parameters for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modelling. A strong multiple correlation between dosimetric parameters was found. A two-variable model was suggested as the optimal order by bootstrap method. The optimal model (Rs = 0.452, p < 0.001) includes V 45 of the cervical esophagus (odds ratio [OR] = 1.016) and D mean of the cricopharyngeal muscle (OR = 1.057). The model area under the curve was 0.82 (95% confidence interval 0.69-0.95). Our results suggested that the absorbed dose to the cricopharyngeal muscle and cervical esophagus might play a relevant role in the development of acute RT-related dysphagia. (orig.) [de

  5. Dysphagia in Acute Stroke: Incidence, Burden and Impact on Clinical Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeg-Morvay, Anne; Meisterernst, Julia; Schlager, Markus; Mono, Marie-Luise; El-Koussy, Marwan; Kägi, Georg; Jung, Simon; Sarikaya, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Reported frequency of post-stroke dysphagia in the literature is highly variable. In view of progress in stroke management, we aimed to assess the current burden of dysphagia in acute ischemic stroke. Methods We studied 570 consecutive patients treated in a tertiary stroke center. Dysphagia was evaluated by using the Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). We investigated the relationship of dysphagia with pneumonia, length of hospital stay and discharge destination and compared rates of favourable clinical outcome and mortality at 3 months between dysphagic patients and those without dysphagia. Results Dysphagia was diagnosed in 118 of 570 (20.7%) patients and persisted in 60 (50.9%) at hospital discharge. Thirty-six (30.5%) patients needed nasogastric tube because of severe dysphagia. Stroke severity rather than infarct location was associated with dysphagia. Dysphagic patients suffered more frequently from pneumonia (23.1% vs. 1.1%, pdysphagia. At 3 months, dysphagic patients less often had a favourable outcome (35.7% vs. 69.7%; pdysphagia to be an independent predictor of discharge destination and institutionalization at 3 months, while severe dysphagia requiring tube placement was strongly associated with mortality. Conclusion Dysphagia still affects a substantial portion of stroke patients and may have a large impact on clinical outcome, mortality and institutionalization. PMID:26863627

  6. Relation between functional dysphagia and vocal cord palsy after transhiatal oesophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierie, J P; Goedegebuure, S; Schuerman, F A; Leguit, P

    2000-03-01

    To assess the incidence, natural course, and possible pathogenesis of dysphagia that is not caused by anastomotic stricture, after transhiatal oesophagectomy and gastric tube reconstruction. Prospective study. District teaching hospital, The Netherlands. 22 patients who had transhiatal oesophagectomy and gastric tube reconstruction for cancer. Incidence of dysphagia that is not caused by anastomotic stricture one week after operation, and presence of this functional dysphagia and correlation with vocal cord palsy at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postoperatively. The incidence of functional dysphagia was 7 out of 22 (32%); it was self-limiting in 5 out of 7 (71%) of the cases and associated with the incidence of vocal cord palsy (p = 0.0006). Functional dysphagia after transhiatal oesophagectomy occurs frequently, but is self-limiting in most patients. Injury to branches of the recurrent laryngeal nerve is a likely cause.

  7. Risks of PEG tube placement in patients with cirrhosis-associated ascites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Abboodi Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Yasir Al-Abboodi,1 Ali Ridha,2 Matthew Fasullo,3 Tarek H Naguib4 1Internal Medicine Department, Saint Davis Round Rock Medical Centre, Round Rock, TX, USA, 2Internal Medicine Department, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, Little Rock, AR, USA, 3Internal Medicine Department, Umass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, MA, USA, 4Internal Medicine Department, Texas Tech University Health and Sciences Center, Amarillo, TX, USA Abstract: This study examined the safety of placing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG tube in people with liver cirrhosis. The target population was further subdivided into people with ascites (case group and people without ascites (control. We compare the morbidity and the mortality difference of PEG placement in cirrhotic patients with ascites vs cirrhotic patients without ascites. We then examined multiple factors including sex, race, chronic illness including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and others and their influence on the inpatient mortality of all cirrhotic patients who had PEG placement. A total of 38,175 inpatient PEG tube placements were identified. Only 583 patients out of 38,175 had a history of cirrhosis. One hundred seven had ascites and the rest did not. Mean age of the patients was 61.14 years. Patient demography included (65.2% male and the rest were female, 359 were white (64.4%, 90 black (14.8%, 84 Hispanic (13.7%, 23 Asians (3.3%, 7 Native Americans (0.4%, and 20 others (3.5%. Complications from PEG procedure in cirrhosis with ascites vs non-ascites included bleeding of 4 (0.8% vs 2 (1.9% (P=0.35, surgical site infection 2 (0.4% vs 1 (0.9% (P=0.51, and urinary tract infection 105 (22.1% vs 34 (23.8% (P=0.34, respectively. There was no colonic injury in either group. The total inpatient mortality was 75 out of the 583. Fifty-six (11.8% were in the ascites group and 19 (17.8% in the non-ascites group (P=0.097. Factors including ascites, postsurgical bleeding, and surgical site

  8. Structural airway abnormalities contribute to dysphagia in children with esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Katherine J; Baxter, Lauren M; Landry, April M; Wulkan, Mark L; Bhatia, Amina M

    2018-01-31

    Long-term dysphagia occurs in up to 50% of repaired esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) patients. The underlying factors are unclear and may include stricture, esophageal dysmotility, or associated anomalies. Our purpose was to determine whether structural airway abnormalities (SAA) are associated with dysphagia in EA/TEF. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children who underwent EA/TEF repair in our hospital system from 2007 to 2016. Children with identified SAA (oropharyngeal abnormalities, laryngeal clefts, laryngomalacia, vocal cord paralysis, and tracheomalacia) were compared to those without airway abnormalities. Dysphagia outcomes were determined by the need for tube feeding and the modified pediatric Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) at 1 year. SAA was diagnosed in 55/145 (37.9%) patients with EA/TEF. Oropharyngeal aspiration was more common in children with SAA (58.3% vs. 36.4%, p=0.028). Children with SAA were more likely to require tube feeding both at discharge (79.6% vs. 48.3%, pesophageal stricture, the presence of SAA remained a significant risk factor for dysphagia (OR 4.17 (95% CI 1.58-11.03)). SAA are common in children with EA/TEF and are associated with dysphagia, even after accounting for gestational age, esophageal gap and stricture. This study highlights the need for a multidisciplinary approach, including early laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy, in the evaluation of the EA/TEF child with dysphagia. Level II retrospective prognostic study. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Mothers' process of decision making for gastrostomy placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Ailsa; Abbott, Janice

    2012-05-01

    In this article we present the findings of an exploration of mothers' discourses on decision making for gastrostomy placement for their child. Exploring in-depth interviews of a purposive sample, we analyzed the mothers' discourses of the decision-making process to understand how their experiences of the process influenced their subsequent constructions of decision making. Mothers negotiated decision making by reflecting on their personal experiences of feeding their child, either orally or via a tube, and interwove their background experiences with the communications from members of the health care team until a decision was reached. Decision making was often fraught with difficulty, resulting in anxiety and guilt. Experiences of decision making ranged from perceived coercion to true choice, which encompasses a truly child-centered decision. The resulting impact of the decision-making process on the mothers was profound. We conclude with an exploration of the implications for clinical practice and describe how health care professionals can support mothers to ensure that decision-making processes for gastrostomy placement in children are significantly improved.

  10. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube Insertion in Neurodegenerative Disease: A Retrospective Study and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Sarkar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims With the notable exceptions of dementia, stroke, and motor neuron disease, relatively little is known about the safety and utility of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG tube insertion in patients with neurodegenerative disease. We aimed to determine the safety and utility of PEG feeding in the context of neurodegenerative disease and to complete a literature review in order to identify whether particular factors need to be considered to improve safety and outcome. Methods A retrospective case note review of patients referred for PEG insertion by neurologists in a single neuroscience center was conducted according to a pre-determined set of standards. For the literature review, we identified references from searches of PubMed, mainly with the search items “percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy” and “neurology” or “neurodegenerative disease.” Results Short-term mortality and morbidity associated with PEG in patients with neurological disease were significant. Age greater than 75 years was associated with poor outcome, and a trend toward adverse outcome was observed in patients with low serum albumin. Conclusions This study highlights the relatively high risk of PEG in patients with neurodegenerative disease. We present points for consideration to improve outcome in this particularly vulnerable group of patients.

  11. Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH—A Rare Etiology of Dysphagia

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    Balakumar Krishnarasa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old gentleman presented to the hospital with progressively worsening dysphagia to soft foods and liquids. He was diagnosed with severe pharyngeal dysphagia by modified barium swallow. A CT scan of the neck with IV contrast showed anterior flowing of bridging osteophytes from C3-C6, indicative of DISH, resulting in esophageal impingement. He underwent resection of the DISH segments. Following the surgery, a PEG tube for nutrition supplementation was placed. However, the PEG tube was removed after five months when the speech and swallow evaluation showed no residual dysphagia. DISH is a rare non-inflammatory condition that results in pathological ossification and calcification of the anterolateral spinal ligaments.

  12. Assessment of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Risako; Matsuura, Kazuto; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Katagiri, Katsunori; Imai, Takayuki; Ishida, Eichi; Saijyo, Shigeru; Kato, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    As nutrition support for head and neck cancer patients who receive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and whose oral cavity or pharynx is exposed to radiation, we perform percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement. We examined 235 patients who underwent PEG in our division between January 2003 and December 2009. For 64% of them, the purpose of performing PEG was nutrition support for CRT, of whom 74% actually used the tube. However, the situation varied according to the primary sites of patients. Forty-four percent of laryngeal cancer patients who underwent PEG actually used the tube, which was a significantly lower rate than others. Also, 81% of them removed the PEG tube within one year. These findings suggest that PEG-tube placement for nutrition support is not indispensable for all CRT cases. Therefore, we recommend performing PEG for oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal cancer patients. (author)

  13. Improving post-stroke dysphagia outcomes through a standardized and multidisciplinary protocol: an exploratory cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Smania, Nicola; Bisoffi, Giulia; Squaquara, Teresa; Zuccher, Paola; Mazzucco, Sara

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is a major cause of dysphagia. Few studies to date have reported on standardized multidisciplinary protocolized approaches to the management of post-stroke dysphagia. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the impact of a standardized multidisciplinary protocol on clinical outcomes in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. We performed retrospective chart reviews of patients with post-stroke dysphagia admitted to the neurological ward of Verona University Hospital from 2004 to 2008. Outcomes after usual treatment for dysphagia (T- group) were compared versus outcomes after treatment under a standardized diagnostic and rehabilitative multidisciplinary protocol (T+ group). Outcome measures were death, pneumonia on X-ray, need for respiratory support, and proportion of patients on tube feeding at discharge. Of the 378 patients admitted with stroke, 84 had dysphagia and were enrolled in the study. A significantly lower risk of in-hospital death (odds ratio [OR] 0.20 [0.53-0.78]), pneumonia (OR 0.33 [0.10-1.03]), need for respiratory support (OR 0.48 [0.14-1.66]), and tube feeding at discharge (OR 0.30 [0.09-0.91]) was recorded for the T+ group (N = 39) as compared to the T- group (N = 45). The adjusted OR showed no difference between the two groups for in-hospital death and tube feeding at discharge. Use of a standardized multidisciplinary protocolized approach to the management of post-stroke dysphagia may significantly reduce rates of aspiration pneumonia, in-hospital mortality, and tube feeding in dysphagic stroke survivors. Consistent with the study's exploratory purposes, our findings suggest that the multidisciplinary protocol applied in this study offers an effective model of management of post-stroke dysphagia.

  14. Removal of T-fasteners 2 days after gastrostomy is feasible.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Foster, A

    2009-03-01

    T-fastener gastropexy is widely performed as part of gastrostomy insertion. The current literature recommends removal of T-fasteners at 2 weeks. We present a series of patients in whom T-fasteners were removed at 2 days with no major complications. We removed T-fasteners in 109 patients (male-to-female ratio 59:50, age range 18 to 88 years, mean age 62 years) at 2 days after gastrostomy insertion. Indications for gastrostomy included amytrophic lateral sclerosis, cerebrovascular accidents, head and neck carcinoma, multiple sclerosis, and others, including brain tumours and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. No peritubal leaks or other major complications were seen in the study population. In the study group, 15 minor complications were recorded (14%), including localised infection and pain, both of which resolved on removal of T-fasteners. We conclude that it is feasible and safe to remove T-fasteners at 2 days.

  15. Prediction of outcome in neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia within 72 hours of acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickenstein, Guntram W; Höhlig, Carolin; Prosiegel, Mario; Koch, Horst; Dziewas, Rainer; Bodechtel, Ulf; Müller, Rainer; Reichmann, Heinz; Riecker, Axel

    2012-10-01

    Stroke is the most frequent cause of neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia (NOD). In the acute phase of stroke, the frequency of NOD is greater than 50% and, half of this patient population return to good swallowing within 14 days while the other half develop chronic dysphagia. Because dysphagia leads to aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, and in-hospital mortality, it is important to pay attention to swallowing problems. The question arises if a prediction of severe chronic dysphagia is possible within the first 72 hours of acute stroke. On admission to the stroke unit, all stroke patients were screened for swallowing problems by the nursing staff within 2 hours. Patients showing signs of aspiration were included in the study (n = 114) and were given a clinical swallowing examination (CSE) by the swallowing/speech therapist within 24 hours and a swallowing endoscopy within 72 hours by the physician. The primary outcome of the study was the functional communication measure (FCM) of swallowing (score 1-3, tube feeding dependency) on day 90. The grading system with the FCM swallowing and the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) in the first 72 hours was tested in a multivariate analysis for its predictive value for tube feeding-dependency on day 90. For the FCM level 1 to 3 (P dysphagia scales to prevent aspiration pneumonia and malnutrition. A dysphagia program can lead to better communication within the stroke unit team to initiate the appropriate diagnostics and swallowing therapy as soon as possible. Copyright © 2012 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Feeding Problems and Their Underlying Mechanisms in the Esophageal Atresia–Tracheoesophageal Fistula Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Lisa; Rosen, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Feeding difficulties such as dysphagia, coughing, choking, or vomiting during meals, slow eating, oral aversion, food refusal, and stressful mealtimes are common in children with repaired esophageal atresia (EA) and the reasons for this are often multifactorial. The aim of this review is to describe the possible underlying mechanisms contributing to feeding difficulties in patients with EA and approaches to management. Underlying mechanisms for these feeding difficulties include esophageal dysphagia, oropharyngeal dysphagia and aspiration, and aversions related to prolonged gastrostomy tube feeding. The initial diagnostic evaluation for feeding difficulties in a patient with EA may involve an esophagram, videofluoroscopic imaging or fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation during swallowing, upper endoscopy with biopsies, pH-impedance testing, and/or esophageal motility studies. The main goal of management is to reduce the factors contributing to feeding difficulties and may include reducing esophageal stasis, maximizing reflux therapies, treating underlying lung disease, dilating strictures, and altering feeding methods, routes, or schedules. PMID:28620597

  17. Clinical Variables Associated with Hydration Status in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Shabbir, Yasmeen; Miller, Leslie; Silliman, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Acute stroke patients with dysphagia are at increased risk for poor hydration. Dysphagia management practices may directly impact hydration status. This study examined clinical factors that might impact hydration status in acute ischemic stroke patients with dysphagia. A retrospective chart review was completed on 67 ischemic stroke patients who participated in a prior study of nutrition and hydration status during acute care. Prior results indicated that patients with dysphagia demonstrated elevated BUN/Cr compared to non-dysphagia cases during acute care and that BUN/Cr increased selectively in dysphagic patients. This chart review evaluated clinical variables potentially impacting hydration status: diuretics, parenteral fluids, tube feeding, oral diet, and nonoral (NPO) status. Exposure to any variable and number of days of exposure to each variable were examined. Dysphagia cases demonstrated significantly more NPO days, tube fed days, and parenteral fluid days, but not oral fed days, or days on diuretics. BUN/Cr values at discharge were not associated with NPO days, parenteral fluid days, oral fed days, or days on diuretics. Patients on modified solid diets had significantly higher mean BUN/Cr values at discharge (27.12 vs. 17.23) as did tube fed patients (28.94 vs. 18.66). No difference was noted between these subgroups at baseline (regular diet vs. modified solids diets). Any modification of solid diets (31.11 vs. 17.23) or thickened liquids (28.50 vs. 17.81) resulted in significantly elevated BUN/Cr values at discharge. Liquid or diet modifications prescribed for acute stroke patients with dysphagia may impair hydration status in these patients.

  18. Transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation (VitalStim) curative therapy for severe dysphagia: myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Gary Y; Sechtem, Phillip R; Searl, Jeff; Keller, Kristina; Rawi, Taib A; Dowdy, Emily

    2007-01-01

    VitalStim therapy was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2001 for the treatment of dysphagia through the application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation to cervical swallowing muscles. This approval was based upon submission of data on more than 800 patients who received this therapy collected by the principal developer and patent-holder of the device. The therapy is marketed as successful in restoring long-term swallowing function in 97.5% of dysphagic patients past the point of requiring a feeding tube and as significantly better than existing therapies. More than 2,500 speech-language pathologists have taken the certification course, and thousands of devices have been sold. To date, however, aside from the developer's own studies, there are no peer-reviewed publications supporting these claims. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of VitalStim therapy in a heterogeneous group of dysphagic patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of 18 patients who received this therapy at an urban tertiary referral center. All patients underwent pretherapy evaluation by speech-language pathologists, including modified barium swallow and/or functional endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and clinical evaluation of swallowing that included assessment of laryngeal elevation, diet tolerance, and swallowing delay, and were then assigned an overall dysphagia severity score. After therapy, all patients underwent the same assessments. Twelve of the 18 also underwent a functional swallowing telephone survey months (range, 1 to 21 months) after their therapy to assess whether the improvement was worthwhile and sustained. Eleven of the 18 patients (61%) demonstrated some improvement in their swallowing. Six of the 18 patients (33%) were improved enough to no longer require a feeding tube. However, of the 5 patients categorized as having "severe dysphagia" before therapy, only 2 showed any improvement, and these patients still required a feeding tube for

  19. Tips and Tricks of Percutaneous Gastrostomy Under Image Guidance in Patients with Limited Access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Figl, Andrea; Thariat, Juliette [Sophia Antipolis University, Nice cedex (France); Lacout, Alexis [Centre Me' dico-Chirurgical, Aurillac (France)

    2011-10-15

    We read with great interest the article by Chan et al. (1) in the March issue of Korean Journal of Radiology on their experience of modified radiology-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (MRPG). The authors proposed a technique to access the stomach in patients with upper digestive tract obstruction (UDTO). Following marking a patient's left liver inferior margin and room air-colonography, the authors punctured the gastric area using a 21G fine needle under X-ray guidance and withdrew their syringe gradually while injecting contrast medium. We noted that the gastrostomy may be performed using a 0.0035-inch hydrophilic guide wire and a 6.5-Fr angled catheter in almost 100% of patients contraindicated for endoscopy gastrostomy, including those with tortuous or tight cervical stenosis (2). In patients with a collapsed stomach, orally administered effervescent sodium bicarbonate powder can produce sufficient gas in the stomach to allow for a percutaneous needle puncture. In UDTO patients, diatrizoate meglumine can be directly injected into the gastric lumen under ultrasound (US) guidance, as reported by Pugash et al. (3) in 1995. Since the stomach appears collapsed with apposed multi-layer walls and virtual lumen on US, the needle tip is hardly seen. In such circumstances, after having transfixed the stomach with a 21G Chiba needle, further gradual needle withdrawing is performed under fluoroscopic guidance while injecting small amounts of diatrizoate meglumine until a ruga pattern is seen. Moreover, a cancer patient's subcutaneous fat is often absent and the anterior gastric wall is close to the abdominal wall. High frequency US monitoring does improve needle visualization in such a circumstance. Conversely, in obese patients, back- and forth motions of the needle stylet under Doppler color US guidance clearly improves needle visualization. We noted that by using this technique we successfully performed percutaneous fluoroscopy gastrostomy (PFG) in two partially

  20. Tips and Tricks of Percutaneous Gastrostomy Under Image Guidance in Patients with Limited Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Figl, Andrea; Thariat, Juliette; Lacout, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    We read with great interest the article by Chan et al. (1) in the March issue of Korean Journal of Radiology on their experience of modified radiology-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (MRPG). The authors proposed a technique to access the stomach in patients with upper digestive tract obstruction (UDTO). Following marking a patient's left liver inferior margin and room air-colonography, the authors punctured the gastric area using a 21G fine needle under X-ray guidance and withdrew their syringe gradually while injecting contrast medium. We noted that the gastrostomy may be performed using a 0.0035-inch hydrophilic guide wire and a 6.5-Fr angled catheter in almost 100% of patients contraindicated for endoscopy gastrostomy, including those with tortuous or tight cervical stenosis (2). In patients with a collapsed stomach, orally administered effervescent sodium bicarbonate powder can produce sufficient gas in the stomach to allow for a percutaneous needle puncture. In UDTO patients, diatrizoate meglumine can be directly injected into the gastric lumen under ultrasound (US) guidance, as reported by Pugash et al. (3) in 1995. Since the stomach appears collapsed with apposed multi-layer walls and virtual lumen on US, the needle tip is hardly seen. In such circumstances, after having transfixed the stomach with a 21G Chiba needle, further gradual needle withdrawing is performed under fluoroscopic guidance while injecting small amounts of diatrizoate meglumine until a ruga pattern is seen. Moreover, a cancer patient's subcutaneous fat is often absent and the anterior gastric wall is close to the abdominal wall. High frequency US monitoring does improve needle visualization in such a circumstance. Conversely, in obese patients, back- and forth motions of the needle stylet under Doppler color US guidance clearly improves needle visualization. We noted that by using this technique we successfully performed percutaneous fluoroscopy gastrostomy (PFG) in two partially

  1. Peristomal infection after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: a 7-year surveillance of 297 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Duarte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Healthcare-associated infection represents the most frequent adverse event during care delivery. Medical advances like percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy have brought improvement on quality of life to patients but an increased risk of healthcare-associated infection. Predictive risk factors for peristomal wound infection are largely unknown but evidence suggests that antibiotic prophylaxis and preventive strategies related to infection control may reduce infection rates. OBJECTIVES: The primary aim was to evaluate the global prevalence rate of peristomal infection. Secondary objectives were to characterise the positive culture results, to evaluate the prophylactic antibiotic protocol and to identify potential risk factors for peristomal infection. METHODS: Retrospective study of 297 patients with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy performed at a general hospital between January 2004 and September 2010. Patients received prophylactic cefazolin before the endoscopic gastrostomy procedure. Medical records were reviewed for demographic data, underling disease conditions to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and patient potential intrinsic risk factors. Statistical analysis was made with the statistical program SPSS 17.0. RESULTS: A total of 297 percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes were inserted. Wound infection occurred in 36 patients (12.1%. Staphylococcus aureus methicillin resistant was the most frequently isolated microorganism (33.3% followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.6%. The incidence rate had been rising each year and differ from 4.65% in 2004/2007 to 17.9% in 2008/2010. This finding was consistent with the increasing of prevalence global infection rates of the hospital. Most of the infections (55.6% were detected in the first 10 days post procedure. There was no significant difference in age, body mass index values, mean survival time and duration of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding between patients with and

  2. Characterizing Dysphagia and Swallowing Intervention in the Traumatic Spinal Injury Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Teresa J.; Waito, Ashley A.; Steele, Catriona M.

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is reported to be a common secondary complication for individuals with traumatic spinal injuries. Different etiologies of traumatic spinal injuries may lead to different profiles of swallowing impairment. We conducted a systematic review to determine the characteristics of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and to describe interventions currently used to improve swallowing function in this population. A comprehensive multi-engine literature search identified 137 articles of which 5 were judged to be relevant. These underwent review for study quality, rating for level of evidence, and data extraction. The literature describing dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury was comprised predominantly of low level evidence and single case reports. Aspiration, pharyngeal residue, and decreased/absent hyolaryngeal elevation were found to be common characteristics of dysphagia in this population. The most commonly used swallowing interventions included tube feeding, compensatory swallowing strategies, and steroids/antibiotics. Improvement in swallowing function following swallowing intervention was reported in all studies, however there was no control for spontaneous recovery. The results demonstrate a need for high-quality research to profile the pathophysiology of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and controlled studies to demonstrate the efficacy of swallowing interventions in this population. PMID:27412004

  3. Evaluation and Management of Neonatal Dysphagia: Impact of Pharyngoesophageal Motility Studies and Multidisciplinary Feeding Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan R.; Stoner, Erin; Gupta, Alankar; Bates, D. Gregory; Fernandez, Soledad; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Linscheid, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Abnormal swallowing (dysphagia) among neonates is commonly evaluated using the videofluoroscopic swallow study (VSS). Radiological findings considered high risk for administration of oral feeding include nasopharyngeal reflux, laryngeal penetration, aspiration, or pooling. Our aims were to determine pharyngoesophageal motility correlates in neonates with dysphagia and the impact of multidisciplinary feeding strategy. Methods Twenty dysphagic neonates (mean gestation ± standard deviation [SD] = 30.9 ± 4.9 weeks; median 31.1 weeks; range = 23.7–38.6 weeks) with abnormal VSS results were evaluated at 49.9 ± 16.5 weeks (median 41.36 weeks) postmenstrual age. The subjects underwent a swallow-integrated pharyngoesophageal motility assessment of basal and adaptive swallowing reflexes using a micromanometry catheter and pneumohydraulic water perfusion system. Based on observations during the motility study, multidisciplinary feeding strategies were applied and included postural adaptation, sensory modification, hunger manipulation, and operant conditioning methods. To discriminate pharyngoesophageal manometry correlates between oral feeders and tube feeders, data were stratified based on the primary feeding method at discharge, oral feeding versus tube feeding. Results At discharge, 15 of 20 dysphagic neonates achieved oral feeding success, and the rest required chronic tube feeding. Pharyngoesophageal manometry correlates were significantly different (P dysphagia or its consequences. Manometry may be a better predictor than VSS in identifying patients who are likely to succeed in vigorous intervention programs. PMID:19179881

  4. Gastrostomy Tube Feeding in Children With Developmental or Acquired Disorders: A Longitudinal Comparison on Healthcare Provision and Eating Outcomes 4 Years After Gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Ellen; Karlsson, Ann-Kristin; Sjögreen, Lotta

    2018-03-30

    Studies on long-term feeding and eating outcomes in children requiring gastrostomy tube feeding (GT) are scarce. The aim of this study was to describe children with developmental or acquired disorders receiving GT and to compare longitudinal eating and feeding outcomes. A secondary aim was to explore healthcare provision related to eating and feeding. This retrospective cohort study reviewed medical records of children in 1 administrative region of Sweden with GT placement between 2005 and 2012. Patient demographics, primary diagnoses, age at GT placement, and professional healthcare contacts prior to and after GT placement were recorded and compared. Feeding and eating outcomes were assessed 4 years after GT placement. The medical records of 51 children, 28 boys and 23 girls, were analyzed and grouped according to "acquired" (n = 13) or "developmental" (n = 38) primary diagnoses. At 4 years after GT placement, 67% were still using GT. Only 6 of 37 (16%) children with developmental disorders transferred to eating all orally, as opposed to 10 of 11 (91%) children with acquired disorders. Children with developmental disorders were younger at the time of GT placement and displayed a longer duration of GT activity when compared with children with acquired disorders. This study demonstrates a clear difference between children with developmental or acquired disorders in duration of GT activity and age at GT placement. The study further shows that healthcare provided to children with GT is in some cases multidisciplinary, but primarily focuses on feeding rather than eating. © 2018 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  5. Feeding tube-related complications and problems in patients receiving long-term home enteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Alivizatos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term complications and problems related to gastrostomy and jejunostomy feeding tubes used for home enteral nutrition support and the effect these have on health care use. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 31 patients having gastrostomy (27 patients and jejunostomy (4 feeding tubes inserted in our Department were retrospectively studied. All were discharged on long-term (>3 months enteral nutrition and followed up at regular intervals by a dedicated nurse. Any problem or complication associated with tube feeding as well as the intervention, if any, that occurred, was recorded. Data were collected and analyzed. Results: All the patients were followed up for a mean of 17.5 months (4-78. The most frequent tube-related complications included inadvertent removal of the tube (broken tube, plugged tube; 45.1%, tube leakage (6.4%, dermatitis of the stoma (6.4%, and diarrhea (6.4%. There were 92 unscheduled health care contacts, with an average rate of such 2.9 contacts over the mean follow-up time of 17.5 months. Conclusion: In patients receiving long-term home enteral nutrition, feeding tube-related complications and problems are frequent and result in significant health care use. Further studies are needed to address their optimal prevention modalities and management.

  6. Pre- and Postoperative Vomiting in Children Undergoing Video-Assisted Gastrostomy Tube Placement

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    Torbjörn Backman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of pre- and postoperative vomiting in children undergoing a Video-Assisted Gastrostomy (VAG operation. Patients and Methods. 180 children underwent a VAG operation and were subdivided into groups based on their underlying diagnosis. An anamnesis with respect to vomiting was taken from each of the children’s parents before the operation. After the VAG operation, all patients were followed prospectively at one and six months after surgery. All complications including vomiting were documented according to a standardized protocol. Results. Vomiting occurred preoperatively in 51 children (28%. One month after surgery the incidence was 43 (24% in the same group of children and six months after it was found in 40 (22%. There was a difference in vomiting frequency both pre- and postoperatively between the children in the groups with different diagnoses included in the study. No difference was noted in pre- and postoperative vomiting frequency within each specific diagnosis group. Conclusion. The preoperative vomiting symptoms persisted after the VAG operation. Neurologically impaired children had a higher incidence of vomiting than patients with other diagnoses, a well-known fact, probably due to their underlying diagnosis and not the VAG operation. This information is useful in preoperative counselling.

  7. Laparoscopic versus percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement in children: Results of a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Nutnicha Suksamanapun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG and laparoscopic-assisted gastrostomy (LAG are widely used in the paediatric population. The aim of this study was to determine which one of the two procedures is the most effective and safe method. Methods: This systematic review was conducted according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement. Primary outcomes were success rate, efficacy of feeding, quality of life, gastroesophageal reflux and post-operative complications. Results: Five retrospective studies, comparing 550 PEG to 483 LAG placements in children, were identified after screening 2347 articles. The completion rate was similar for both procedures. PEG was associated with significantly more adjacent bowel injuries (P = 0.047, early tube dislodgements (P = 0.02 and complications that require reintervention under general anaesthesia (P < 0.001. Minor complications were equally frequent after both procedures. Conclusions: Because of the lack of well-designed studies, we have to be cautious in making definitive conclusions comparing PEG to LAG. To decide which type of gastrostomy placement is best practice in paediatric patients, randomised controlled trials comparing PEG to LAG are highly warranted.

  8. Cytokines levels, Severity of acute mucositis and the need of PEG tube installation during chemo-radiation for head and neck cancer - a prospective pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meirovitz, Amichay; Kuten, Michal; Billan, Salem; Abdah-Bortnyak, Roxolyana; Sharon, Anat; Peretz, Tamar; Sela, Mordechai; Schaffer, Moshe; Barak, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to detect a correlation between serum cytokine levels and severity of mucositis, necessitating installation of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube (PEG) in head and neck (H&N) cancer patients receiving combined chemo-radiation therapy. Fifteen patients with H&N epithelial cancer were recruited to this study. All patients received radiotherapy to the H&N region, with doses ranging from 50-70 Gy. Chemotherapy with cisplatin, carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil and taxanes was given to high-risk patients, using standard chemotherapy protocols. Patients were evaluated for mucositis according to WHO common toxicity criteria, and blood samples were drawn for inflammatory (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine levels before and during treatment. A positive correlation was found between IL-6 serum levels and severity of mucositis and dysphagia; specifically, high IL-6 levels at week 2 were correlated with a need for PEG tube installation. A seemingly contradictory correlation was found between low IL-8 serum levels and a need for a PEG tube. These preliminary results, indicating a correlation between IL-6 and IL-8 serum levels and severity of mucositis and a need for a PEG tube installation, justify a large scale study

  9. [Transdisciplinary approach for sarcopenia. Sarcopenic Dysphagia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka

    2014-10-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is difficulty swallowing due to sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles. Presbyphagia refers to age-related changes in the swallowing mechanism in the elderly associated with a frailty in swallowing. Presbyphagia is different from dysphagia. The most common cause of dysphagia is stroke. However, sarcopenic dysphagia may be common in the elderly with sarcopenia and dysphagia. Frail elderly with aspiration pneumonia can simultaneously experience activity-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles, resulting in the development of sarcopenic dysphagia. Consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenic dysphagia were proposed at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Dysphagia Rehabilitation. The concept of rehabilitation nutrition as a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management is useful for treatment of sarcopenic dysphagia. Therapy for sarcopenic dysphagia includes dysphagia rehabilitation, nutrition improvement and sarcopenia treatment. The core components of dysphagia rehabilitation are oral health care, rehabilitative techniques, and food modification. Nutrition improvement is important, because malnutrition contributes to the etiology of secondary sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia. Assessment of the multi-factorial causes of primary and secondary sarcopenia is important because rehabilitation nutrition for sarcopenia differs depending on its etiology. Treatment of age-related sarcopenia should include resistance training and dietary supplements of amino acids. Therapy for activity-related sarcopenia includes reduced bed rest time and early mobilization and physical activity. Treatment for disease-related sarcopenia requires therapies for advanced organ failure, inflammatory disease, or malignancy, while therapy for nutrition-related sarcopenia involves appropriate nutrition management to increase muscle mass.

  10. Oropharyngeal dysphagia, an underestimated disorder in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Vaquero-Sosa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a rather frequent clinical entity in patients with neurological problems that can lead to serious complications such as aspiration pneumonia and other disorders like dehydration or malnutrition due to feeding difficulties. It should be suspected in children with splitting of food intake or prolonged feeding, coughing or choking during feeding, continuous drooling or repeated respiratory symptoms. For the diagnosis, apart from the examination of swallowing, additional tests can be run like the water-swallowing test, the viscosity-volume test (which determines what kind of texture and how much volume the patient is able to tolerate, a fiberoptic endoscopy of swallowing or a videofluoroscopic swallow study, which is the gold standard for the study of swallowing disorders. It requires a multidisciplinary approach to guarantee an adequate intake of fluids and nutrients with minimal risk of aspiration. If these two conditions cannot be met, a gastrostomy feeding may be necessary.

  11. Stents in patients with esophageal cancer before chemoradiotherapy: high risk of complications and no impact on the nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mão-de-Ferro, S; Serrano, M; Ferreira, S; Rosa, I; Lage, P; Alexandre, D P; Freire, J; Mirones, L; Casaca, R; Bettencourt, A; Pereira, A D

    2016-03-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for locally advanced esophageal cancer, causing persistent deterioration in the nutritional status. We performed a prospective study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of esophageal double-covered self-expandable metal stents in patients with esophageal cancer before chemoradiotherapy. The nutritional status and dysphagia were prospectively recorded. Eleven patients were included: eight were moderate and three were severely malnourished. After stent placement, dysphagia improved in all patients. With regard to complications, one patient developed an esophageal perforation that required urgent esophagectomy. Four patients presented stent migration. Three of these patients required enteral nutrition and none was submitted to surgery because of poor nutritional status. Of the other six patients, only four were operated upon. Stent placement presented a high complication rate and did not prevent weight loss or malnutrition. Other alternatives, including naso-gastric tube placement or endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy or jejunostomy, should be considered.

  12. A Review of Dysphagia Presentation and Intervention Following Traumatic Spinal Injury: An Understudied Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Teresa J; Waito, Ashley A; Steele, Catriona M

    2016-10-01

    Dysphagia is reported to be a common secondary complication for individuals with traumatic spinal injuries. Different etiologies of traumatic spinal injuries may lead to different profiles of swallowing impairment. We conducted a systematic review to determine the characteristics of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and to describe interventions currently used to improve swallowing function in this population. A comprehensive multiengine literature search identified 137 articles of which five were judged to be relevant. These underwent review for study quality, rating for level of evidence, and data extraction. The literature describing dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury was comprised predominantly of low-level evidence and single case reports. Aspiration, pharyngeal residue, and decreased/absent hyolaryngeal elevation were found to be common characteristics of dysphagia in this population. The most commonly used swallowing interventions included tube feeding, compensatory swallowing strategies, and steroids/antibiotics. Improvement in swallowing function following swallowing intervention was reported in all studies; however, there was no control for spontaneous recovery. The results demonstrate a need for high-quality research to profile the pathophysiology of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and controlled studies to demonstrate the efficacy of swallowing interventions in this population.

  13. Analysis of dysphagia risk using the modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The elderly are susceptible to dysphagia, and complications can be minimized if high-risk groups are screened in early stages and properly rehabilitated. This study provides basic material for the early detection and prevention of dysphagia by investigating the risks of dysphagia and related factors in community-dwelling elders. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 325 community-dwelling elderly people aged 65 or older. The modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly was used to assess dysphagia risk. [Results] Approximately 52.6% (n=171) of participants belonged to the high-risk group for dysphagia. After adjusting for confounding variables, people aged 75+, who used dentures, and who needed partial help in daily living had a significantly higher risk of dysphagia. [Conclusion] It is necessary to develop guidelines for dysphagia for early detection and rehabilitation.

  14. Indications, medical conditions and services related to gastrostomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gastrostomy, is used in paediatric patients when long-term enteral feeding is required.1 This form of ... Gastrostomy feeding may also be indicated in paediatric patients with structural abnormalities, or those who ... with cardiac defects may have difficulty with feeding endurance, resulting in poor weight gain and the need for.

  15. Oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian J

    2009-09-01

    Although the aging process per se can produce measurable changes in the normal oropharyngeal swallow, these changes alone are rarely sufficient to cause clinically apparent dysphagia. The causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia in the elderly are predominantly neuromyogenic, with the most common cause being stroke. The evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in the elderly involves early exclusion of structural abnormalities, detection of aspiration by videofluoroscopy which might dictate early introduction of nonoral feeding, and exclusion of underlying systemic and neuromyogenic causes that have specific therapies in their own right. Such conditions include Parkinson disease, myositis, myasthenia, and thyrotoxicosis. Management is best delivered by a multidisciplinary team involving physician, speech pathologist, nutritionist and, at times, a surgeon.

  16. Analysis of dysphagia risk using the modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The elderly are susceptible to dysphagia, and complications can be minimized if high-risk groups are screened in early stages and properly rehabilitated. This study provides basic material for the early detection and prevention of dysphagia by investigating the risks of dysphagia and related factors in community-dwelling elders. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 325 community-dwelling elderly people aged 65 or older. The modified dysphagia risk assessment for the communit...

  17. Maternal psychological distress and parenting stress after gastrostomy placement in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitsland, Tone Lise; Faugli, Anne; Pripp, Are Hugo; Malt, Ulrik Fredrik; Bjørnland, Kristin; Emblem, Ragnhild

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate stress in mothers of children with feeding problems before and after gastrostomy placement, and to identify changes in child health and variables affecting maternal stress. Psychological distress and parenting stress in 34 mothers of children referred for gastrostomy were assessed using general health questionnaire (GHQ) (overall psychological distress), impact of event scale (IES) (intrusive stress related to child's feeding problems), and parenting stress index (PSI) (stress related to parenting) before, 6, and 18 months after placement of a gastrostomy. Information of child health and long-term gastrostomy complications were recorded. A semistructured interview constructed for the present study explored maternal preoperative expectations and child's quality of life. Insertion of a gastrostomy did not significantly influence vomiting or the number of children with a low weight-for-height percentile. All of the children experienced peristomal complications. Despite this, mothers' overall psychological distress was significantly reduced after 6 and 18 months, and the majority of mothers (85%) reported that their preoperative expectations were fulfilled and that the child's quality of life was improved after gastrostomy placement. Maternal concerns for the child's feeding problems, measured as intrusive stress, had effect on maternal overall psychological distress. Despite frequent stomal complications the gastrostomy significantly reduced the mothers' psychological distress and improved the child's quality of life as reported by the mother.

  18. Radiologic percutaneous gastrostomy and gastroenterostomy: Indications, results, and difficulties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casola, G.; Van Sonnenberg, E.; Sukthankar, R.; Varney, R.A.; Stavas, J.; Cohen, M.; Christensen, R.A.; Wittich, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes the authors' experience with 130 radiologic percutaneous gastrostomies (PG) and percutaneous gastroenterostomies (PGE). Procedures were accomplished successfully in 127 of 130 candidates. One case was unsuccessful and two were unfeasible. Indications were for feeding, decompression, or both. Underlying diseases included neurologic disorders, head and neck and esophageal tumors, pelvic and abdominal malignancies, trauma, and a variety of other diseases. Various guidance systems, techniques, and catheters were used. Complications occurred in 8%, most being minor. Three patients were operated on after PG/PGE-two had peritonitis, one due to tube dislodgment. Difficulties were encountered at different portions of the procedure. During catheter insertion the following problems were most common: (1) the access route was difficult because of overlying colon, (2) inability to insert a nasogastric tube in patients with esophageal carcinoma or large head and neck tumors, (3) inability to keep the stomach distended in patients with increased motility and those with surgical gastroenterostomies (Billroth I or II), (4) high position of the residual stomach in patients with hemigastrectomy, (5) the presence of ascites or peritoneal tumor anterior to the stomach in patients with ovarian carcinoma, and (6) tenting or herniation of the anterior wall of the stomach during dilatation. Difficulties that were encountered following catheter insertion included (1) chemical peritonitis from leakage of gastric juices, (2) peritonities from leakage of gastric feedings, (3) leakage around the skin entry site in patients with ascites, (4) catheters backing out and forming an intraperitorial loop, (5) catheters kinking and becoming occluded, and (6) catheters being pulled out

  19. The Feasibility and Outcome of Oro-esophageal Tube Feeding in Patients with Various Etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juyong; Seo, Han Gil; Lee, Goo Joo; Han, Tai Ryoon; Oh, Byung-Mo

    2015-12-01

    The oro-esophageal tube (OE tube) is widely used in dysphagia patients although its success rate for transition to oral feeding is reported only in stroke patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of OE tube feeding for patients with dysphagia resulting from various etiologies. The authors reviewed the medical records of 1995 dysphagic patients that had undergone videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) in a tertiary hospital from April 2002 through December 2009. Of these, 97 patients were recommended to use OE tube feeding based on the VFSS findings. Follow-up VFSS were performed on 54 patients. The mean duration of tube use at the time of follow-up VFSS was 274 days. We evaluated clinical information including age, sex, diet, etiology of dysphagia, location of lesions, duration of intervention, and complications of OE tube feeding. Initially, all 54 patients were fed using the OE tube. After their last follow-up evaluation, 19 patients (35.2 %) resumed full oral feeding without the OE tube, 12 patients (22.2 %) used partial OE tube feeding, and 23 patients (42.6 %) continued OE tube feeding only. Full oral feeding was achieved again most often in brain tumor, stroke, and head and neck cancer patients (54.5, 27.3, and 20.0 %, respectively). Mild adverse events, such as blood-tinged sputum, nausea, dyspepsia, and regurgitation of food, were reported in 4 patients. OE tube feeding is a feasible feeding method also in conditions other than stroke such as brain tumors, and head and neck cancers.

  20. Cervical osteophyte induced dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.P.; Sage, M.R.; Brophy, B.P.

    1989-01-01

    Although cervical spondylosis is a common disorder, dysphagia induced by osteophyte formation is uncommon. Fewer than one hundred cases of cervical osteophyte induced dysphagia have been reported, with little attention to the diagnosis by barium swallow. The radiological features of two cases treated surgically with good results are described. Both cases complained of dysphagia while one had associated respiratory obstruction on forward flexion of his neck. The features on barium study of cervical osteophytes causing dysphagia include deformity at the level of osteophyte formation, in both AP and lateral projections. Tracheal aspirations due to deformity at the laryngeal inlet and interference with epiglottic retroversion may be present. 8 refs., 3 figs

  1. Comparison of fluoroscopy-guided pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) with conventional percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG): clinical results in 253 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yang; Schneider, J.; Dueber, C.; Pitton, M.B. [University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    To analyze the clinical results and complications of fluoroscopy guided internal-external pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) and conventional external-internal percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG). A total of 253 patients underwent radiological gastrostomy between January 2002 and January 2010. Data were collected retrospectively from radiology reports, Chart review of clinical notes, procedure reports, discharge summaries and subsequent hospital visits. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the two methods for gastrostomy with respect to peri-interventional aspects and clinical results. 128 patients received the Pull-type-PRG whereas the other 125 patients were served with the Push-type-PRG. Indications for gastrostomy were similar in these two groups. The most frequent indications for the both methods were stenotic oesophageal tumors or head/neck tumors (54.7% in pull-type-PRG, 68% in push-type-PRG). Gastrostomy procedures were successful in 98.3% in pull-type-PRG compared to 92% in push-type-PRG. There was no procedure-related mortality. Compared to Push-type-PRG, the peri-interventional complication rate was significantly reduced in pull-type-PRG (14.8% versus 34.4%, P = 0.002). Compared to the external-internal push-type-PRG, the internal-external Pull-type-PRG showed a high primary success rate and a decreased incidence of peri-interventional complications. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of fluoroscopy-guided pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) with conventional percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG): clinical results in 253 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yang; Schneider, J.; Dueber, C.; Pitton, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the clinical results and complications of fluoroscopy guided internal-external pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) and conventional external-internal percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG). A total of 253 patients underwent radiological gastrostomy between January 2002 and January 2010. Data were collected retrospectively from radiology reports, Chart review of clinical notes, procedure reports, discharge summaries and subsequent hospital visits. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the two methods for gastrostomy with respect to peri-interventional aspects and clinical results. 128 patients received the Pull-type-PRG whereas the other 125 patients were served with the Push-type-PRG. Indications for gastrostomy were similar in these two groups. The most frequent indications for the both methods were stenotic oesophageal tumors or head/neck tumors (54.7% in pull-type-PRG, 68% in push-type-PRG). Gastrostomy procedures were successful in 98.3% in pull-type-PRG compared to 92% in push-type-PRG. There was no procedure-related mortality. Compared to Push-type-PRG, the peri-interventional complication rate was significantly reduced in pull-type-PRG (14.8% versus 34.4%, P = 0.002). Compared to the external-internal push-type-PRG, the internal-external Pull-type-PRG showed a high primary success rate and a decreased incidence of peri-interventional complications. (orig.)

  3. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous gastrostomy: initial experience at a cancer center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Santos, Erich Frank Vater; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Chojniak, Rubens; Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo

    2017-01-01

    Gastrostomy is indicated for patients with conditions that do not allow adequate oral nutrition. To reduce the morbidity and costs associated with the procedure, there is a trend toward the use of percutaneous gastrostomy, guided by endoscopy, fluoroscopy, or, most recently, computed tomography. The purpose of this paper was to review the computed tomography-guided gastrostomy procedure, as well as the indications for its use and the potential complications. (author)

  4. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous gastrostomy: initial experience at a cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Santos, Erich Frank Vater; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Chojniak, Rubens [A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (HUCAM/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Cassiano Antonio de Morais. Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2017-03-15

    Gastrostomy is indicated for patients with conditions that do not allow adequate oral nutrition. To reduce the morbidity and costs associated with the procedure, there is a trend toward the use of percutaneous gastrostomy, guided by endoscopy, fluoroscopy, or, most recently, computed tomography. The purpose of this paper was to review the computed tomography-guided gastrostomy procedure, as well as the indications for its use and the potential complications. (author)

  5. Percutaneous sonographically assisted endoscopic gastrostomy for difficult cases with interposed organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Otani, Jun; Okuda, Junzo; Zotani, Hitomi; Kasuga, So

    2018-03-27

    The aim of this retrospective observational study was to clarify the usefulness and safety of percutaneous sonographically assisted endoscopic gastrostomy or duodenostomy (PSEGD) using the introduction method. The information for the sequential 22 patients who could not undergo standard percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and underwent PSEGD for 3 y was extracted and was reviewed. In standard PEG, we performed pushing out of the stomach from the mediastinum and full distention to adhere the gastric wall to the peritoneal wall without interposing of the intraperitoneal tissues by air inflation and a turning-over procedure of the endoscope, four-point square fixation of the stomach to the peritoneal wall by using a Funada-style gastric wall fixation kit under diaphanoscopy, extracorporeal thumb pushing, and in difficult cases extracorporeal ultrasound guidance, and if necessary confirmation of fixation of the gastric wall to the peritoneal wall and placement of the PEG tube without any interposed tissues by using ultrasound. Twenty-one patients (95.5%) successfully underwent PSEGD. Early complications (more than grade 2 in Clavien-Dindo classification) just after the procedure occurred in one case (active oozing). We did not encounter a case with mispuncture of the intraperitoneal organs and tissues. Delayed complications occurring within 1 mo were pneumonia in five patients, including death in three cases; bleeding from puncture site in two patients; and atrial fibrilation in one patient. PSEGD using the introduction method is a useful procedure for difficult patients in whom intraperitoneal organ or tissue is suspected to be interposed between the abdominal wall and stomach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Buried bumper syndrome revisited: a rare but potentially fatal complication of PEG tube placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Saptarshi; Dontukurthy, Sujana; Rosenzweig, Mathew G; Kothuru, Ravi; Abrol, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) has been used for providing enteral access to patients who require long-term enteral nutrition for years. Although generally considered safe, PEG tube placement can be associated with many immediate and delayed complications. Buried bumper syndrome (BBS) is one of the uncommon and late complications of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement. It occurs when the internal bumper of the PEG tube erodes into the gastric wall and lodges itself between the gastric wall and skin. This can lead to a variety of additional complications such as wound infection, peritonitis, and necrotizing fasciitis. We present here a case of buried bumper syndrome which caused extensive necrosis of the anterior abdominal wall.

  7. Nutritional Aspects of Dysphagia Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, C; Brito-de la Fuente, E; Clavé, P; Costa, A; Assegehegn, G

    This chapter describes the nutritional aspects of dysphagia management by starting with the definition of these two conditions (dysphagia and malnutrition) that share three main clinical characteristics: (a) their prevalence is very high, (b) they can lead to severe complications, and (c) they are frequently underrecognized and neglected conditions. From an anatomical standpoint, dysphagia can result from oropharyngeal and/or esophageal causes; from a pathophysiological perspective, dysphagia can be caused by organic or structural diseases (either benign or malignant) or diseases causing impaired physiology (mainly motility and/or perception disorders). This chapter gathers up-to-date information on the screening and diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia, the consequences of dysphagia (aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, and dehydration), and on the nutritional management of dysphagic patients. Concerning this last topic, this chapter reviews the rheological aspects of swallowing and dysphagia (including shear and elongational flows) and its influence on the characteristics of the enteral nutrition for dysphagia management (solid/semisolid foods and thickened liquids; ready-to-use oral nutritional supplements and thickening powders), with special focus on the real characteristics of the bolus after mixing with human saliva. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tongue pressure profile training for dysphagia post stroke (TPPT): study protocol for an exploratory randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M; Bayley, Mark A; Péladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Stokely, Shauna L

    2013-05-07

    It is estimated that approximately 50% of stroke survivors will experience swallowing difficulty, or dysphagia. The associated sequelae of dysphagia include dehydration, malnutrition, and aspiration pneumonia, all of which have can have serious medical consequences. To improve swallowing safety and efficiency, alternative nutritional intake methods (for example, a feeding tube) or a modified diet texture (such as pureed foods or thickened liquids) may be recommended but these modifications may negatively affect quality of life. An alternative approach to treating dysphagia has emerged over the past few years, targeting stronger lingual muscles through maximal isometric pressure tasks. Although these studies have shown promising results, thin-liquid bolus control continues to be challenging for patients with dysphagia. Previous work investigating lingual pressures when healthy participants swallow has suggested that greater task specificity in lingual exercises may yield improved results with thin liquids. This is a small, exploratory randomized clinical trial being conducted with post-stroke patients 4 to 20 weeks after onset of dysphagia secondary to impaired lingual control. At enrollment, participants are randomly assigned to one of two treatment protocols, either tongue pressure profile training (TPPT) or the control treatment, tongue pressure strength-and-accuracy training (TPSAT). Each treatment protocol consists of 24 sessions of treatment over 8 to 12 weeks with monitoring of tongue pressure as well as a baseline and outcome videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Tongue pressure measures, videofluoroscopic measures, and functional outcome measures will be obtained following training of 60 participants (30 in each condition), to determine whether TPPT yields better outcomes. This study will continue to explore options beyond tube feeding and modified diets for people with neurogenic dysphagia following stroke. Should the novel protocol, TPPT, prove to be more

  9. Colojejunal Fistula Resulting from a D-PEJ Feeding Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin D. Zielinski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous procedures have been developed to provide adequate enteral nutrition to patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Previously, operative placement of a feeding gastrostomy or jejunostomy tube was the accepted means of gaining chronic enteral access. However, improved technology and experience with endoscopic techniques have quickly replaced primary operative placement of enteral access. Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (D-PEJ is a procedure that was designed to deliver enteral feeding solutions for patients with proximal disease after unsatisfactory results from percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes with jejunal extensions (PEG-J. As with any procedure, it is associated with complications. We present the first reported case of a colojejunal fistula resulting from a D-PEJ placement. While D-PEJ has been shown to be relatively safe, complications related to the inherent limitations of the procedure need to be considered when the patient experiences unusual post-procedure symptoms and worked up appropriately.

  10. Dysphagia in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients are inherently predisposed to dysphagia predominately because of comorbid health conditions. With the aging of the population in the United States, along with the increased prevalence of obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease, healthcare providers will increasingly encounter older patients with either oropharyngeal or esophageal disease and complaints of dysphagia. Useful tests to evaluate dysphagia include the videofluoroscopic swallowing study and the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Swallow rehabilitation is useful to help patients compensate for swallowing difficulty and ultimately help strengthen the neuromusculature involved in swallowing. PMID:24772045

  11. Radiation-induced acute dysphagia. Prospective observational study on 42 head and neck cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alterio, D.; Gerardi, M.A.; Fodor, C.; Ciardo, D.; Ferrari, A.; Colangione, S. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiotherapy, Milan (Italy); Cella, L.; D' Avino, V.; Conson, M.; Palma, G. [National Research Council (CNR), Institute of Biostructures and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Spoto, R.; Dicuonzo, S.; Jereczek-Fossa, B.A. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiotherapy, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Oncology and Hemato-oncology, Milan (Italy); Zurlo, V.; Bruschini, R. [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Milan (Italy); Sabbatini, A.; Valoriani, F. [European Institute of Oncology, Dietetic and Clinical Nutrition Unit, Milan (Italy); Pacelli, R. [National Research Council (CNR), Institute of Biostructures and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Federico II University School of Medicine, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Maisonneuve, P. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, Milan (Italy); Preda, L. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Cossu Rocca, M. [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Urogenital and Head and Neck Tumors, Department of Medical Oncology, Milan (Italy); Rondi, E. [European Institute of Oncology, Unit of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Orecchia, R. [European Institute of Oncology, Scientific Directorate, Milan (Italy); Sanguineti, G. [Istituto Tumori Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    Acute toxicity in head and neck (H and N) cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT) has a crucial role in compliance to treatments. The aim of this study was to correlate doses to swallowing-associated structures and acute dysphagia. We prospectively analyzed 42 H and N cancer patients treated with RT. Dysphagia (grade ≥ 3) and indication for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) insertion were classified as acute toxicity. Ten swallowing-related structures were considered for the dosimetric analysis. The correlation between clinical information and the dose absorbed by the contoured structures was analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression method using resampling methods (bootstrapping) was applied to select model order and parameters for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modelling. A strong multiple correlation between dosimetric parameters was found. A two-variable model was suggested as the optimal order by bootstrap method. The optimal model (Rs = 0.452, p < 0.001) includes V{sub 45} of the cervical esophagus (odds ratio [OR] = 1.016) and D{sub mean} of the cricopharyngeal muscle (OR = 1.057). The model area under the curve was 0.82 (95% confidence interval 0.69-0.95). Our results suggested that the absorbed dose to the cricopharyngeal muscle and cervical esophagus might play a relevant role in the development of acute RT-related dysphagia. (orig.) [German] Bei Kopf-Hals-Tumorpatienten, die mit einer kurativen Strahlentherapie (''radiation therapy'', RT) behandelt werden, spielt die Akuttoxizitaet eine entscheidende Rolle fuer die Patientencompliance bei der Behandlung. Ziel dieser Studie war es, die Dosen im Bereich des Schluckapparates mit der akuten Dysphagie zu korrelieren. Prospektiv analysiert wurden 42 mit einer RT behandelten Patienten. Eine Dysphagie III und/oder die Indikation fuer eine PEG(perkutane endoskopische Gastrostomie)-Anlage wurden als Akuttoxizitaet klassifiziert. Fuer die dosimetrische

  12. Functional Outcomes After De-escalated Chemoradiation Therapy for Human Papillomavirus-Positive Oropharyngeal Cancer: Secondary Analysis of a Phase 2 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, John V; Shaverdian, Narek; Felix, Carol; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Veruttipong, Darlene; Hsu, Sophia; Riess, Jonathan W; Rao, Shyam D; Daly, Megan E; Chen, Allen M

    2018-03-01

    To analyze functional outcomes for patients treated on a phase 2 trial of de-escalated chemoradiation therapy for human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal cancer. Patient eligibility included p16-positive, stage III or IV oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and a Zubrod performance status of 0 to 1. Treatment was induction chemotherapy with paclitaxel, 175 mg/m 2 , and carboplatin, area under the curve (AUC) of 6 mg/ml/min, for 2 cycles every 21 days, followed by concurrent paclitaxel, 30 mg/m 2 , every 7 days with dose-reduced radiation therapy of 54 or 60 Gy. Trends in body weight and body mass index (BMI) were analyzed with gastrostomy tube and narcotic use rates. Functional outcomes were assessed using the University of Washington Quality of Life Scale and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck Scale. Forty-five patients were registered, of whom 40 were evaluable. Only 1 patient had a BMI deemed unhealthy at the completion of treatment. For the 15 patients (38%) with a normal BMI (18-25 kg/m 2 ) before treatment, recovery back to baseline occurred at approximately 18 months (average BMI, 23.2 kg/m 2 vs 22.3 kg/m 2 ; P=.09). In 2 patients (5%), gastrostomy tubes were placed during treatment. No patient was enteral feeding tube-dependent at 6 months after treatment. Ninety-five percent of patients tolerated a normal regular diet at last follow-up. De-escalated chemoradiation therapy may improve functional outcomes as indicated by the relatively low incidence of gastrostomy tube placement and long-term dysphagia. In patients with a normal BMI prior to chemoradiation therapy, BMI recovered to baseline levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dysphagia is prevalent in patients with CPEO and single, large-scale deletions in mtDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gitte Hedermann; Løkken, Nicoline; Dahlqvist, Julia R.

    2017-01-01

    Background  The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of subjective and objective dysphagia in patients with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) due to single, large-scale deletions (LSDs) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Methods  Sixteen patients with CPEO and single LSDs...... and single LSDs of mtDNA had a prolonged cold-water test, including one with a PEG-tube, who was unable to perform the test, and nine patients reported subjective swallowing problems (56.3%). All mitochondrial myopathy patients in the control group had a normal duration of the cold-water test.  Conclusions......  The study shows that dysphagia is a common problem in patients with CPEO and LSDs of mtDNA. Dysphagia seems to be progressive with age as abnormal swallowing occurred preferentially in persons ≥ 45 years. The study shows that increased awareness of this symptom should be given to address appropriate...

  14. Multidisciplinary approach to the management of a case of classical respiratory diphtheria requiring percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Matthew James; Vijendren, Ananth; Acharya, Vikas; Mulla, Rohinton; Panesar, Miss Jaan

    2017-03-06

    We present a case of a Caucasian woman aged 67 years referred with a 4-day history of sore throat, dysphagia, fever and nasal blockage. Examination revealed a swollen neck and pharyngeal pseudomembrane. A throat swab was positive on culture for Corynebacterium ulcerans , with toxin expression confirmed on PCR and Elek testing. A diagnosis of classical respiratory diphtheria was made, with subsequent confirmation of the patient's domesticated dog as the source of infection. The dog had recently been attacked by a wild badger and was being treated for an ear infection. The patient made a good recovery with intravenous antimicrobial and supportive therapy; however, she subsequently developed a diphtheritic polyneuropathy in the form of a severe bulbar palsy with frank aspiration necessitating percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding. A mild sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy was also diagnosed. The patient eventually made an almost complete recovery. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. The Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation Approach Applied to Patients With Neurogenic Dysphagia: A Case Series Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandraki, Georgia A; Rajappa, Akila; Kantarcigil, Cagla; Wagner, Elise; Ivey, Chandra; Youse, Kathleen

    2016-04-01

    To examine the effects of the Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation approach on physiological and functional swallowing outcomes in adults with neurogenic dysphagia. Intervention study; before-after trial with 4-week follow-up through an online survey. Outpatient university clinics. A consecutive sample of subjects (N=10) recruited from outpatient university clinics. All subjects were diagnosed with adult-onset neurologic injury or disease. Dysphagia diagnosis was confirmed through clinical and endoscopic swallowing evaluations. No subjects withdrew from the study. Participants completed the 4-week Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation protocol, including 2 oropharyngeal exercise regimens, a targeted swallowing routine using salient stimuli, and caregiver participation. Treatment included hourly sessions twice per week and home practice for approximately 45 min/d. Outcome measures assessed pre- and posttreatment included airway safety using an 8-point Penetration Aspiration Scale, lingual isometric pressures, self-reported swallowing-related quality of life (QOL), and level of oral intake. Also, patients were monitored for adverse dysphagia-related effects. QOL and adverse effects were also assessed at the 4-week follow-up (online survey). The Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation approach was effective in improving maximum and mean Penetration Aspiration Scale scores (PDysphagia Rehabilitation approach was safe and improved physiological and some functional swallowing outcomes in our sample; however, further investigation is needed before it can be widely applied. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jye Hae Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG can improve nutritional status and reduce the amount of time needed to feed neurologically impaired children. We evaluated the characteristics, complications, and outcomes of neurologically impaired children treated with PEG. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 32 neurologically impaired children who underwent PEG between March 2002 and August 2008 at our medical center. Forty-two PEG procedures comprising 32 PEG insertions and 10 PEG exchanges, were performed. The mean follow-up time was 12.2 (6.6 months. Results: Mean patient age was 9.4 (4.5 years. The main indications for PEG insertion were swallowing difficulty with GI bleeding due to nasogastric tube placement and/or the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The overall rate of complications was 47%, with early complications evident in 25% of patients and late complications in 22%. The late complications included one gastro-colic fistula, two cases of aggravated GERD, and four instances of wound infection. Among the 15 patients with histological evidence of GERD before PEG, 13 (87% had less severe GERD, experienced no new aspiration events, and showed increased body weight after PEG treatment. Conclusion: PEG is a safe, effective, and relatively simple technique affording long-term enteral nutritional support in neurologically impaired children. Following PEG treatment, the body weight of most patients increased and the levels of vomiting, GI bleeding, and aspiration fell. We suggest that PEG with post-procedural observation be considered for enteral nutritional support of neurologically impaired children.

  17. Can patients determine the level of their dysphagia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Hafiz Hamad; Palmer, Joanne; Dalton, Harry Richard; Waters, Carolyn; Luff, Thomas; Strugnell, Madeline; Murray, Iain Alexander

    2017-02-14

    To determine if patients can localise dysphagia level determined endoscopically or radiologically and association of gender, age, level and pathology. Retrospective review of consecutive patients presenting to dysphagia hotline between March 2004 and March 2015 was carried out. Demographics, clinical history and investigation findings were recorded including patient perception of obstruction level (pharyngeal, mid sternal or low sternal) was documented and the actual level of obstruction found on endoscopic or radiological examination (if any) was noted. All patients with evidence of obstruction including oesophageal carcinoma, peptic stricture, Schatzki ring, oesophageal pouch and cricopharyngeal hypertrophy were included in the study who had given a perceived level of dysphagia. The upper GI endoscopy reports (barium study where upper GI endoscopy was not performed) were reviewed to confirm the distance of obstructing lesion from central incisors. A previously described anatomical classification of oesophagus was used to define the level of obstruction to be upper, middle or lower oesophagus and this was compared with patient perceived level. Three thousand six hundred and sixty-eight patients were included, 42.0% of who were female, mean age 70.7 ± 12.8 years old. Of those with obstructing lesions, 726 gave a perceived level of dysphagia: 37.2% had oesophageal cancer, 36.0% peptic stricture, 13.1% pharyngeal pouches, 10.3% Schatzki rings and 3.3% achalasia. Twenty-seven point five percent of patients reported pharyngeal level (upper) dysphagia, 36.9% mid sternal dysphagia and 25.9% lower sternal dysphagia (9.5% reported multiple levels). The level of obstructing lesion seen on diagnostic testing was upper (17.2%), mid (19.4%) or lower (62.9%) or combined (0.3%). When patients localised their level of dysphagia to a single level, the kappa statistic was 0.245 ( P dysphagia were accurate in localising the obstructing pathology. With respect to pathology, patients

  18. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Mortality and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbó Perseguer, J; Madejón Seiz, A; Romero Portales, M; Martínez Hernández, J; Mora Pardina, J S; García-Samaniego, J

    2018-03-26

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes severe dysphagia and weight loss. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is currently the technique of choice for the enteral nutrition of these patients. To analyse mortality and complications in a series of patients diagnosed with ALS who underwent PEG, and to evaluate factors related to patient survival after the procedure. We performed a prospective, observational study including all patients diagnosed with ALS and treated by our hospital's Gastroenterology Department in the period 1997-2013. We studied mortality, complications, and clinical and biochemical parameters, and correlated these with the survival rate. The study included a total of 57 patients, of whom 49 were ultimately treated with PEG. ALS onset was bulbar in 30 patients and spinal in 19. Mortality during the procedure and at 30 days was 2% (n = 1). Six patients (12.2%) experienced major complications; 17 (34.7%) experienced less serious complications which were easily resolved with conservative treatment. No significant differences were observed in forced vital capacity, albumin level, or age between patients with (n = 6) and without (n = 43) major complications. PEG is an effective, relatively safe procedure for the enteral nutrition of patients with ALS, although not without morbidity and mortality. Neither forced vital capacity nor the form of presentation of ALS were associated with morbidity in PEG. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluating the Role of Prophylactic Gastrostomy Tube Placement Prior to Definitive Chemoradiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Lau, Derick H.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Stuart, Kerri; Newman, Kathleen; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan M.D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of prophylactic gastrostomy tube (GT) placement on acute and long-term outcome for patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty consecutive patients were treated with chemoradiotherapy for Stage III/IV head and neck cancer to a median dose of 70 Gy (range, 64-74 Gy). The most common primary site was the oropharynx (66 patients). Sixty-seven patients (56%) were treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Seventy patients (58%) received prophylactic GT placement at the discretion of the physician before initiation of chemoradiotherapy. Results: Prophylactic GT placement significantly reduced weight loss during radiation therapy from 43 pounds (range, 0 to 76 pounds) to 19 pounds (range, 0 to 51 pounds), which corresponded to a net change of -14% (range, 0% to -30%) and -8% (range, +1% to -22%) from baseline, respectively (p < 0.001). However, the proportion of patients who were GT-dependent at 6- and 12-months after treatment was 41% and 21%, respectively, compared with 8% and 0%, respectively, for those with and without prophylactic GT (p < 0.001). Additionally, prophylactic GT was associated with a significantly higher incidence of late esophageal stricture compared with those who did not have prophylactic GT (30% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Although prophylactic GT placement was effective at preventing acute weight loss and the need for intravenous hydration, it was also associated with significantly higher rates of late esophageal toxicity. The benefits of this strategy must be balanced with the risks.

  20. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: Dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ⩾12months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), masseter (MM), buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving⩾69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. Materials/Methods T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ≥ 12 months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), ), masseter (MM), Buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Results Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving ≥69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). Conclusion In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. PMID:26897515

  2. Presbyphagia and Sarcopenic Dysphagia: Association between Aging, Sarcopenia, and Deglutition Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, H

    2014-01-01

    Presbyphagia refers to age-related changes in the swallowing mechanism in the elderly associated with a frailty in swallowing. Presbyphagia is different from dysphagia. Sarcopenic dysphagia is difficulty swallowing due to sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles. Age-related loss of swallowing muscle mass becomes evident in the geniohyoid muscle and tongue. Elderly subjects with both sarcopenia and dysphagia may have not only disease-related dysphagia but also sarcopenic dysphagia. In cases of aspiration pneumonia, deterioration in activity-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles may develop into sarcopenic dysphagia. Assessment of sarcopenic dysphagia includes evaluation of both dysphagia and sarcopenia. The 10-item Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and a water test combined with pulse oximetry are useful for dysphagia screening. Assessment of the multi-factorial causes of sarcopenia including nutritional review is important, because rehabilitation of sarcopenic dysphagia differs depending on its etiology. Consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenic dysphagia were proposed at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Dysphagia Rehabilitation. Rehabilitation for sarcopenic dysphagia includes treatment of both dysphagia and sarcopenia. The core components of dysphagia rehabilitation are oral health care, rehabilitative techniques, and food modification. The causes of adult malnutrition may also contribute to the etiology of secondary sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia. Therefore, nutrition management is indispensable for sarcopenic dysphagia rehabilitation. In cases of sarcopenia with numerous complicating causes, treatment should include pharmaceutical therapies for age-related sarcopenia and comorbid chronic diseases, resistance training, early ambulation, nutrition management, protein and amino acid supplementation, and non-smoking.

  3. The Burden of Dysphagia on Family Caregivers of the Elderly: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini M. Namasivayam-MacDonald

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid increase in the elderly population, there is a simultaneous increased need for care provided by family caregivers. Research in the field of head and neck cancer has indicated that caring for patients with dysphagia can impact a caregiver’s quality of life. Given that many older adults present with dysphagia, one can assume that their caregivers are equally, if not more greatly, affected. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine all relevant literature regarding the caregiver burden in caregivers of community-dwelling older adults with dysphagia. A review of relevant studies published through April 2018 was conducted using search terms related to dysphagia, caregiver burden, and older adults. The search yielded 2331 unique abstracts. Of the 176 abstracts that underwent full review, four were accepted. All reported an increase in caregiver burden due to presence of dysphagia in care recipients. Worsening feeding-related behaviors were associated with burden, and the use of feeding tubes was more frequently associated with “heavy burden”. The presence of dysphagia in community-dwelling older adults is a factor leading to an increased burden among caregivers. Although aspects of dysphagia play a role in the caregiver burden, the specific reasons for the increased burden are unknown. Clinicians should be aware of dysphagia as a source of the burden, and future studies should further define the relationship between dysphagia and the caregiver burden in order to develop comprehensive approaches to care.

  4. Frailty measurements and dysphagia in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Bridget; Vaezi, Alec; Egloff, Ann Marie; Smith, Libby; Wasserman-Wincko, Tamara; Johnson, Jonas T

    2014-09-01

    Deconditioning and frailty may contribute to dysphagia and aspiration. Early identification of patients at risk of aspiration is important. Aspiration prevention would lead to reduced morbidity and health care costs. We therefore wondered whether objective measurements of frailty could help identify patients at risk for dysphagia and aspiration. Consecutive patients (n = 183) were enrolled. Patient characteristics and objective measures of frailty were recorded prospectively. Variables tested included age, body mass index, grip strength, and 5 meter walk pace. Statistical analysis tested for association between these parameters and dysphagia or aspiration, diagnosed by instrumental swallowing examination. Of variables tested for association with grip strength, only age category (P = .003) and ambulatory status (P dysphagia or aspiration, ambulatory status was significantly associated with dysphagia and aspiration in multivariable model building. Nonambulatory status is a predictor of aspiration and should be included in risk assessments for dysphagia. The relationship between frailty and dysphagia deserves further investigation. Frailty assessments may help identify those at risk for complications of dysphagia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Inspiratory stridor and dysphagia because of prolonged oesophageal foreign body

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, G. D.; Heymans, H. S.; Urbanus, N. A.

    1987-01-01

    A 2-year-old boy with severe inspiratory stridor and dysphagia is described. The delay in the diagnosis of an impacted foreign body resulted in severe deformation of the oesophagus. After surgical extraction of the foreign body the oesophagus was splinted for 4 months by a nasogastric tube because

  6. Gastric Emptying of Elemental Liquid Diets Versus Semisolid Diets in Bedridden Gastrostomy-fed Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Akira; Sakai, Ryosei; Tamaki, Michio; Kajiyama, Masashi; Tanaka, Naoki; Morikawa, Akio

    2018-03-21

    Aspiration is a common problem in bedridden gastrostomy-fed patients. We compared gastric emptying of an elemental liquid diet and a commercial semisolid diet in bedridden gastrostomy-fed patients. Study 1: from January 2013 to December 2016, consecutive bedridden patients receiving percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) semisolid feeding hospitalized due to aspiration pneumonia were switched to elemental liquid diet feedings. The frequency of defecation, tube feed contents aspirated from the trachea, and aspiration pneumonia during hospitalization were retrospectively reviewed. Study 2 was a randomized, crossover trial comparing C sodium acetate gastric emptying of a commercial elemental liquid or a commercial semisolid diet in bedridden PEG patients and controls. Study 1: 18 patients were enrolled. Elemental liquid diet was aspirated from the trachea in 1 (5.6%) (once in 24 observations); neither aspiration pneumonia nor diarrhea developed during elemental liquid diet feeding over 2 weeks observation. Study 2: 8 PEG patients and 8 healthy subjects were separately randomized to assess gastric emptying of the commercial elemental and semisolid diets. The elemental liquid diet was associated with a significant decrease of the 10%, 30%, or 50% emptying (excretion) time (Pbedridden PEG patients. They may prevent or reduce aspiration pneumonia compared with semisolid diets.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  7. Accepting or declining non-invasive ventilation or gastrostomy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenaway, L P; Martin, N H; Lawrence, V; Janssen, A; Al-Chalabi, A; Leigh, P N; Goldstein, L H

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to identify factors associated with decisions made by patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to accept or decline non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and/or gastrostomy in a prospective population-based study. Twenty-one people with ALS, recruited from the South-East ALS Register who made an intervention decision during the study timeframe underwent a face-to-face in-depth interview, with or without their informal caregiver present. Sixteen had accepted an intervention (11 accepted gastrostomy, four accepted NIV and one accepted both interventions). Five patients had declined gastrostomy. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes: (1) patient-centric factors (including perceptions of control, acceptance and need, and aspects of fear); (2) external factors (including roles played by healthcare professionals, family, and information provision); and (3) the concept of time (including living in the moment and the notion of 'right thing, right time'). Many aspects of these factors were inter-related. Decision-making processes for the patients were found to be complex and multifaceted and reinforce arguments for individualised (rather than 'algorithm-based') approaches to facilitating decision-making by people with ALS who require palliative interventions.

  8. A retrospective matched cohort study evaluating the effects of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tubes on nutritional status and survival in patients with advanced gastroesophageal malignancies undergoing systemic anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Scott; Williams, John P; Bhatti, Harsimrandeep; Kachaamy, Toufic; Weber, Jeffrey; Weiss, Glen J

    2017-01-01

    Many patients with cancer or other systemic illnesses can experience malnutrition. One way to mitigate malnutrition is by insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tube (PEG tube). The goal of this retrospective matched cohort study is to evaluate if PEG tube placement improved nutritional status and overall survival (OS) in advanced gastroesophageal (GE) cancer patients who are undergoing anti-neoplastic therapy. GE cancer patients who were treated and evaluated by a nutritionist and had at least 2 nutritionist follow-up visits were identified. Patients with PEG tube were matched to patients that did not undergo PEG placement (non-PEG). Clinical characteristics, GE symptoms reported at nutrition follow-up visits, and OS were recorded. 20 PEG and 18 non-PEG cases met criteria for further analyses. After correction for multiple testing, there were no OS differences between PEG and non-PEG, treatment naive and previously treated. However, PEG esophageal carcinoma has statistically significant inferior OS compared with non-PEG esophageal carcinoma. PEG placement did not significantly reduce the proportion of patients with weight loss between the initial nutrition assessment and 12-week follow-up. In this small study, PEG placement had inferior OS outcome for GE esophageal carcinoma, no improvement in OS for other evaluated groups, and did not reduce weight loss between baseline and 12-week follow-up. Unless there is prospective randomized trial that can show superiority of PEG placement in this population, PEG placement in this group cannot be endorsed.

  9. Can patients determine the level of their dysphagia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Hafiz Hamad; Palmer, Joanne; Dalton, Harry Richard; Waters, Carolyn; Luff, Thomas; Strugnell, Madeline; Murray, Iain Alexander

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine if patients can localise dysphagia level determined endoscopically or radiologically and association of gender, age, level and pathology. METHODS Retrospective review of consecutive patients presenting to dysphagia hotline between March 2004 and March 2015 was carried out. Demographics, clinical history and investigation findings were recorded including patient perception of obstruction level (pharyngeal, mid sternal or low sternal) was documented and the actual level of obstruction found on endoscopic or radiological examination (if any) was noted. All patients with evidence of obstruction including oesophageal carcinoma, peptic stricture, Schatzki ring, oesophageal pouch and cricopharyngeal hypertrophy were included in the study who had given a perceived level of dysphagia. The upper GI endoscopy reports (barium study where upper GI endoscopy was not performed) were reviewed to confirm the distance of obstructing lesion from central incisors. A previously described anatomical classification of oesophagus was used to define the level of obstruction to be upper, middle or lower oesophagus and this was compared with patient perceived level. RESULTS Three thousand six hundred and sixty-eight patients were included, 42.0% of who were female, mean age 70.7 ± 12.8 years old. Of those with obstructing lesions, 726 gave a perceived level of dysphagia: 37.2% had oesophageal cancer, 36.0% peptic stricture, 13.1% pharyngeal pouches, 10.3% Schatzki rings and 3.3% achalasia. Twenty-seven point five percent of patients reported pharyngeal level (upper) dysphagia, 36.9% mid sternal dysphagia and 25.9% lower sternal dysphagia (9.5% reported multiple levels). The level of obstructing lesion seen on diagnostic testing was upper (17.2%), mid (19.4%) or lower (62.9%) or combined (0.3%). When patients localised their level of dysphagia to a single level, the kappa statistic was 0.245 (P dysphagia were accurate in localising the obstructing pathology. With respect to

  10. Observation the swallowing mechanism in elderly patients with pharyngeal dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ximena Campo-Cañar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Observation of the swallowing dynamics is an issue that demands close attention by the health professionals involved in the diagnosis and management of patients with dysphagia. This article is a review of the literature aimed to enhance the knowledge regarding the speech therapy assessment of pharyngeal dysphagia in elder adults. The disorder of the swallowing is called dysphagia and it is defined as difficulty swallowing. The dysphagia is often caused by affectation of mechanical or neuromuscular components of the swallowing mechanism. This type of disorder is likely to impact the the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of the swallowing. The speech therapist should take into account assessing aspects such as level of consciousness, vital signs, whether or not the patient is ventilator dependent, means of feeding, if intubated what type of cannula, whether or not the patient uses a speaking valve (if a trach tube is present, nutritional status, the patient’s expressive and receptive language, the anatomical and physiological state of the oral motor structures. When assessing swallowing clinicians should also make sure to develop an adequate beside clinical, voice assessment and videofluoroscopy.

  11. Giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp misdiagnosed as achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoş, I; Istrate, A; Codreşi, M; Bolca, C

    2012-01-01

    A 59 years old woman was admitted in our unit accusing longtime dysphagia and regurgitation. On admission, the patient was wearing a 3 month old definitive feeding gastrostomy tube. The contrast swallow, endoscopy and esophageal manometry established the diagnostic--achalasia. We removed the gastrostomy tube and we performed an open Heller myotomy. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged one week later with affirmatively unimpaired deglutition. One month later, the patient was admitted via emergency with a giant fibrous tumor arising from her mouth after an episode of strong coughing and vomiting. The repeated endoscopy showed a giant esophageal polyp that was missed by the previous investigations, originating from pharingoesophageal junction. The esophageal polyp was resected by cervical approach with good postoperative outcome. The polyp's particular extreme dimensions (27 cm) prevented the acute asphyxia by blockage at the laryngeal level, possibly provoked by smaller tumors. As postoperative one month barium swallow showed a normal esophageal aspect, a final question remains--was achalasia real or an erroneous diagnosis was established the second time too?

  12. Family Involvement in School-Based Dysphagia Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Maureen E.; Bailey, Rita L.; Nicholson, Joanna K.; Stoner, Julia B.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a practitioner-friendly synthesis of existing literature on family involvement in the management of dysphagia for school-age. Research reviewed includes family perspectives on programs, therapists, and characteristics that comprise effective family involvement in school-based dysphagia management programs. Also included are…

  13. Dysphagia and laryngeal pathology in post-surgical cardiothoracic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Anna; McLellan, Naomi; Machan, Rochelle; Vokes, David; Hunting, Alexandra; McFarlane, Mary; Holmes, Jennifer; Lynn, Kelly

    2018-02-09

    Cardiothoracic surgery is known to result in dysphagia and laryngeal injury. While prevalence has been explored, extent, trajectory and longevity of symptoms are poorly understood. This retrospective, observational study explored dysphagia and laryngeal injury in patients following cardiothoracic surgery referred for instrumental swallowing assessment. Clinical notes and endoscopic recordings of 106 patients (age range 18-87yrs; mean 63yrs; SD 15yrs) (including 190 endoscopes) at one large tertiary centre were reviewed by two speech-language pathologists and a laryngologist. Standardized measures of laryngeal anatomy and physiology, New Zealand Secretion Scale, Penetration-Aspiration scale and Yale Residue Scale were rated. Prevalence of abnormality included 39% silent aspiration, 65% laryngeal edema and 61% vocal paralysis. The incidence of pneumonia was 36% with a post-operative stroke rate of 14%. Forty percent of patients were receiving a standard diet by discharge from acute care; while, 24% continued to require enteral feeding and 8% received laryngeal surgery within twelve months of discharge. Vocal fold motion impairment was significantly associated with ventilation time and tracheostomy tube duration (pdysphagia and laryngeal injury in patients following cardiothoracic surgery may allow early management and prevention of secondary complications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. DYSPHAGIA AND SIALORRHEA:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Hack NICARETTA

    Full Text Available ContextDysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease.ObjectiveThe aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease.MethodTwo Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by the scintigraphic method,ResultsVideofluoroscopic examination of the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing showed that 94% of Parkinson's diseases patients present, structural causes, not related to Parkinson's diseases, able to produce or intensify the observed disphagia. The scintigraphic examination of Parkinson's diseases patients with sialorrhea showed that there is no increase of serous saliva production. Nevertheless, showed a significantly higher velocity of saliva excretion in the Parkinson's diseases patients.ConclusionsDysphagia can be due to the muscular rigidity often present in the Parkinson's diseases patient, or more usually by non Parkinson's disease associated causes. In Parkinson's diseases patients, sialorrhea is produced by saliva retention. Nevertheless, sialorrhea can produce discomfort in swallowing, although without a formal complaint of dysphagia. In this case, subclinical dysphagia must be considered. Sialorrhea is indicative of dysphagia or at least of subclinical dysphagia. As final conclusion, Parkinson's diseases can be an isolated cause of dysphagia and/or sialorrhea, but frequently, a factor unrelated to Parkinson's diseases is the main cause of or at least aggravates the dysphagia.

  15. Effectiveness of prophylactic percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy on nutritional status and mucositis in oropharyngeal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Miki; Takemoto, Naoko; Sano, Ayaka

    2012-01-01

    Recently, concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is frequently used for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. However, CCRT induces mucositis and dysphagia and causes inadequate oral nutrition intake. Thus, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in advance is recently recommended. To evaluate the effectiveness of PEG on nutritional intake, nutritional status, blood test, and grade of mucositis of 29 patients who had CCRT with PEG were investigated retrospectively. The results were statistically compared with those of 13 patients who had CCRT without PEG as a control group. Regarding the total energy, no significant change was observed in the PEG group, while the total energy intake significantly decreased in the control group (P=0.026). A significant correlation was observed between the rate of body weight loss during CCRT and total energy intake (R=0.78). The total energy intake of patients who could maintain body weight was 34.1 kcal/kg/day. Taken together, these results suggested that early nutritional administration using PEG can reduce the weight loss during CCRT. (author)

  16. Outcomes of nutritional interventions to treat dysphagia in esophageal cancer: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, R M; Mikhail, S; Ciombor, K; Perry, K A; Hinton, A; Stanich, P P; Zhang, C; Conwell, D L; Krishna, S G

    2017-11-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is increasing in prevalence due to rising incidence and improved treatment strategies. Dysphagia is a significant morbidity in patients with EC requiring nutritional intervention. We sought to evaluate outcomes of nutritional interventions for EC patients hospitalized with dysphagia at a population level. The National Inpatient Sample (2002-2012) was utilized to include all adult inpatients (≥18 years of age) with EC and presence of dysphagia and stricture that underwent nutritional interventions including feeding tube (FT) placement, esophageal stenting, or parenteral nutrition (PN). Temporal trends were examined with multivariate analysis performed for mortality, length of stay (LOS), and cost of hospitalization. A total of 509,593 EC patients had 12,205 hospitalizations related to dysphagia. The hospitalization rates doubled over the study period (1.52% vs. 3.28%, p esophageal stenting (13%), and PN (11%). PN was more frequently associated with a diagnosis of sepsis (6.1%, p = 0.023) compared to FT (2.5%) or esophageal stenting (1.8%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated FT and esophageal stenting had comparable mortality (OR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.49, 2.32); however, PN was associated with higher mortality (OR 2.37, 95% CI: 1.22, 4.63), cost of hospitalization ($5,510, 95% CI: 2,262, 8,759), and LOS (2.13 days, 95% CI: 0.72, 3.54). This study shows that hospitalizations for EC with dysphagia and related nutritional interventions are increasing. As a single modality, parenteral nutrition should be avoided. Among our esophageal stent and FT population, further studies are necessary to determine adequate interventions based on disease stage. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Update on clinical trials in Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logemann, Jeri A

    2006-04-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are often known as the gold standard in treatment efficacy studies. This article defines the characteristics of RCTs and the factors that investigators must consider in designing clinical trials in dysphagia. Design issues unique to behavioral treatments often used in dysphagia are discussed. Ongoing RCTs in dysphagia are described including studies of (1) the effectiveness of the Shaker exercise versus standardized treatment in patients with severe dysphagia resulting from stroke or treatment for head and neck cancer who have been nonoral for at least three months; (2) the comparative effects of nectar- and honey-thickened liquids versus chin tuck posture and in patients with dementia or Parkinson's disease with or without dementia who aspirate on thin liquids; and (3) the comparative effects of muscle exercise versus sensory postural therapy for dysphagia resulting from treatment for head and neck cancer. Issues in generalizing from the results of clinical trials are also described.

  18. [Indication and effectiveness of endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation for the home care patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, T; Hida, S; Higasa, K; Shinomiya, S; Matsumoto, T; Fukuoka, K; Yamanaka, E; Ozaki, S; Takayama, E

    2000-12-01

    We are managing 8 home care patients who have a gastrostomy made using an endoscopic percutaneous technique as a route of parenteral alimentation. Based on our experience, the preconditions for an endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation are 1. normal gastrointestinal function, 2. difficulty in swallowing, 3. possibility that the caregiver can manage the gastrostomy. When we performed an endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation for 8 home care patients, we obtained the several advantages mentioned below. 1. Swallowing pneumonia was prevented. 2. Adequate amount of alimental liquid could be infused. 3. Patient could take a bath or shower with the gastrostomy, and good QOL was realized. 4. The home care patient with the gastrostomy could have a satisfactorily long life.

  19. Effects of therapy for dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baijens, Laura W J; Speyer, Renée

    2009-03-01

    This systematic review explores the effects of dysphagia treatment for Parkinson's disease. The review includes rehabilitative, surgical, pharmacologic, and other treatments. Only oropharyngeal dysphagia is selected for this literature search, excluding dysphagia due to esophageal or gastric disorders. The effects of deep brain stimulation on dysphagia are not included. In general, the literature concerning dysphagia treatment in Parkinson's disease is rather limited. Most effect studies show diverse methodologic problems. Multiple case studies and trials are identified by searching biomedical literature databases PubMed and Embase, and by hand-searching reference lists. The conclusions of most studies cannot be compared with one another because of heterogeneous therapy methods and outcome measures. Further research based on randomized controlled trials to determine the effectiveness of different therapies for dysphagia in Parkinson's disease is required.

  20. Effects of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy on survival of patients in a persistent vegetative state after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kunpeng; Chen, Ying; Yan, Caihong; Huang, Zhijia; Wang, Deming; Gui, Peigen; Bao, Juan

    2017-10-01

    To assess the effect of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy on short- and long-term survival of patients in a persistent vegetative state after stroke and determine the relevant prognostic factors. Stroke may lead to a persistent vegetative state, and the effect of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy on survival of stroke patients in a persistent vegetative state remains unclear. Prospective study. A total of 97 stroke patients in a persistent vegetative state hospitalised from January 2009 to December 2011 at the Second Hospital, University of South China, were assessed in this study. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was performed in 55 patients, and mean follow-up time was 18 months. Survival rate and risk factors were analysed. Median survival in the 55 percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy-treated patients was 17·6 months, higher compared with 8·2 months obtained for the remaining 42 patients without percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy treatment. Univariate analyses revealed that age, hospitalisation time, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy treatment status, family financial situation, family care, pulmonary infection and nutrition were significantly associated with survival. Multivariate analysis indicated that older age, no gastrostomy, poor family care, pulmonary infection and poor nutritional status were independent risk factors affecting survival. Indeed, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy significantly improved the nutritional status and decreased pulmonary infection rate in patients with persistent vegetative state after stroke. Interestingly, median survival time was 20·3 months in patients with no or one independent risk factors of poor prognosis (n = 38), longer compared with 8·7 months found for patients with two or more independent risk factors (n = 59). Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy significantly improves long-term survival of stroke patients in a persistent vegetative state and is associated with improved nutritional status

  1. The cost of dysphagia in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westmark S

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Signe Westmark,1 Dorte Melgaard,1,2 Line O Rethmeier,3 Lars Holger Ehlers3 1Center for Clinical Research, North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring, Denmark; 2Department of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring, Denmark; 3Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Objectives: To estimate the annual cost at the hospital and in the municipality (social care due to dysphagia in geriatric patients.Design: Retrospective cost analysis of geriatric patients with dysphagia versus geriatric patients without dysphagia 1 year before hospitalization.Setting: North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring Municipality, Frederikshavn Municipality, and Brønderslev Municipality.Subjects: A total of 258 hospitalized patients, 60 years or older, acute hospitalized in the geriatric department.Materials and methods: Volume-viscosity swallow test and the Minimal Eating Observation Form-II were conducted for data collection. A Charlson Comorbidity Index score measured comorbidity, and functional status was measured by Barthel-100. To investigate the cost of dysphagia, patient-specific data on health care consumption at the hospital and in the municipality (nursing, home care, and training were collected from medical registers and records 1 year before hospitalization including the hospitalization for screening for dysphagia. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between dysphagia and hospital and municipality costs, respectively, adjusting for age, gender, and comorbidity.Results: Patients with dysphagia were significantly costlier than patients without dysphagia in both hospital (p=0.013 and municipality costs (p=0.028 compared to patients without dysphagia. Adjusted annual hospital costs in patients with dysphagia were 27,347 DKK (3,677 EUR, 4,282 USD higher than patients without dysphagia at the hospital, and annual health care costs in the

  2. Chemo-IMRT of Oropharyngeal Cancer Aiming to Reduce Dysphagia: Swallowing Organs Late Complication Probabilities and Dosimetric Correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Feng, Mary; Worden, Frank P.; Bradford, Carol R.; Prince, Mark E.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Assess dosimetric correlates of long-term dysphagia after chemo-intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) sparing parts of the swallowing organs. Patients and Methods: Prospective longitudinal study: weekly chemotherapy concurrent with IMRT for Stages III/IV OPC, aiming to reduce dysphagia by sparing noninvolved parts of swallowing-related organs: pharyngeal constrictors (PC), glottic and supraglottic larynx (GSL), and esophagus, as well as oral cavity and major salivary glands. Dysphagia outcomes included patient-reported Swallowing and Eating Domain scores, Observer-based (CTCAEv.2) dysphagia, and videofluoroscopy (VF), before and periodically after therapy through 2 years. Relationships between dosimetric factors and worsening (from baseline) of dysphagia through 2 years were assessed by linear mixed-effects model. Results: Seventy-three patients participated. Observer-based dysphagia was not modeled because at >6 months there were only four Grade ≥2 cases (one of whom was feeding-tube dependent). PC, GSL, and esophagus mean doses, as well as their partial volume doses (V D s), were each significantly correlated with all dysphagia outcomes. However, the V D s for each organ intercorrelated and also highly correlated with the mean doses, leaving only mean doses significant. Mean doses to each of the parts of the PCs (superior, middle, and inferior) were also significantly correlated with all dysphagia measures, with superior PCs demonstrating highest correlations. For VF-based strictures, most significant predictor was esophageal mean doses (48±17 Gy in patients with, vs 27±12 in patients without strictures, p = 0.004). Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) increased moderately with mean doses without any threshold. For increased VF-based aspirations or worsened VF summary scores, toxic doses (TDs) 50 and TD 25 were 63 Gy and 56 Gy for PC, and 56 Gy and 39 Gy for GSL, respectively. For both PC and GSL, patient

  3. Survival times with and without tube feeding in patients with dementia or psychiatric diseases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Keiko; Hirayama, Keisuke; Hirao, Akihiko; Kondo, Keiko; Hayashi, Hideki; Kadota, Koichi; Asaba, Hiroyuki; Ishizu, Hideki; Nakata, Kenji; Kurisu, Kairi; Oshima, Etsuko; Yokota, Osamu; Yamada, Norihito; Terada, Seishi

    2017-11-01

    It is widely supposed that there has been no evidence of increased survival in patients with advanced dementia receiving enteral tube feeding. However, more than a few studies have reported no harmful outcome from tube feeding in dementia patients compared to in patients without dementia. This was a retrospective study. Nine psychiatric hospitals in Okayama Prefecture participated in this survey. All inpatients fulfilling the entry criteria were evaluated. All subjects suffered from difficulty with oral intake. Attending physicians thought that the patients could not live without long-term artificial nutrition. The physicians decided whether to make use of long-term artificial nutrition between January 2012 and December 2014. We evaluated 185 patients. Their mean age was 76.6 ± 11.4 years. Of all subjects, patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (n = 78) formed the biggest group, schizophrenia patients (n = 44) the second, and those with vascular dementia (n = 30) the third. The median survival times were 711 days for patients with tube feeding and 61 days for patients without tube feeding. In a comparison different types of tube feeding, median survival times were 611 days for patients with a nasogastric tube and more than 1000 days for those with a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube. Patients with tube feeding survived longer than those without tube feeding, even among dementia patients. This study suggests that enteral nutrition for patients with dementia prolongs survival. Additionally, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube feeding may be safer than nasogastric tube feeding among patients in psychiatric hospitals. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  4. The Anxiety Level of Caregivers of Neurological Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serel Arslan, Selen; Demir, Numan; Karaduman, A Ayşe

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to investigate anxiety level of caregivers of neurological patients with dysphagia, and the relationship of patient-related factors to anxiety level of dysphagia caregivers. A total of 103 adult neurological patients with dysphagia (study group), 30 without dysphagia (control group), and their primary caregivers were included. Types of feeding, condition of dependency in eating and drinking, dysphagia duration, and history of previous dysphagia treatment were recorded for study group. In study group, the Turkish version of the Eating Assessment Tool-10 (T-EAT-10) was used to determine dysphagia symptom severity. Penetration and aspiration severity was determined with the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS). The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) that has two subscales including state anxiety (S-STAI) and trait anxiety (T-STAI) was used to determine anxiety level of caregivers. There was no difference between groups in terms of age, gender, weight, and height. The mean S-STAI was 42.56 ± 10.10 for the study group and 29.20 ± 6.64 for the control group (p dysphagia treatment (p = 0.01, r = 0.25). No correlation was found between STAI (in terms of both S-STAI and T-STAI) and T-EAT-10, PAS, types of feeding, condition of dependency in eating and drinking, dysphagia duration (p > 0.05). Caregivers of neurological patients with dysphagia have greater anxiety level than caregivers of neurological patients without dysphagia.

  5. Serum Zn levels in dysphagic patients who underwent endoscopic gastrostomy for long term enteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Santos, Carla; Fonseca, Jorge; Brito, José; Fernandes, Tânia; Gonçalves, Luísa; Sousa Guerreiro, António

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Dysphagic patients who underwent endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) usually present protein-energy malnutrition, but little is known about micronutrient malnutrition. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of serum zinc in patients who underwent endoscopic gastrostomy and its relationship with serum proteins, whole blood zinc, and the nature of underlying disorder. Methods: From patients that underwent gastrostomy a blood sample was obtained minutes before the procedur...

  6. Dysphagia (Difficulty Swallowing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some of the causes of esophageal dysphagia include: Achalasia. When your lower esophageal muscle (sphincter) doesn't ... into your esophagus and cause frequent heartburn. Radiation therapy. This cancer treatment can lead to inflammation and ...

  7. Dysphagia associated with cervical spine and postural disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Soultana; Exarchakos, Georgios; Beris, Alexander; Ploumis, Avraam

    2013-12-01

    Difficulties with swallowing may be both persistent and life threatening for the majority of those who experience it irrespective of age, gender, and race. The purpose of this review is to define oropharyngeal dysphagia and describe its relationship to cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances due to either congenital or acquired disorders. The etiology and diagnosis of dysphagia are analyzed, focusing on cervical spine pathology associated with dysphagia as severe cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances largely have been held accountable for deglutition disorders. Scoliosis, kyphosis–lordosis, and osteophytes are the primary focus of this review in an attempt to elucidate the link between cervical spine disorders and dysphagia. It is important for physicians to be knowledgeable about what triggers oropharyngeal dysphagia in cases of cervical spine and postural disorders. Moreover, the optimum treatment for dysphagia, including the use of therapeutic maneuvers during deglutition, neck exercises, and surgical treatment, is discussed.

  8. Bilateral vocal fold paralysis and dysphagia secondary to diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allensworth, Jordan J; O'Dell, Karla D; Schindler, Joshua S

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is an idiopathic spinal disease common in the elderly and characterized by flowing ossification and osteophyte formation along the spinal column. Cervical hyperostosis is capable of producing dysphagia, stridor, and airway obstruction; however, there are no extant reports of true paralysis of bilateral vocal folds in patients fulfilling the criteria for DISH. We report a case of a 61-year-old man presenting with dysphagia and dyspnea. Flexible laryngoscopy revealed bilateral true vocal fold paralysis. Cervical radiograph showed flowing ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament with preservation of intervertebral disc height. Tracheotomy and cervical osteophytectomy were performed, after which the patient showed improved swallowing and speaking ability and was decannulated without complication. In the case presented, cervical osteophytectomy dramatically reversed bilateral vocal fold paralysis and dysphagia secondary to hyperostosis, thus negating the need for prolonged tracheostomy and feeding tube dependence. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: E1-E3, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Feasibility and Safety of Overtubes for PEG-Tube Placement in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crispin O. Musumba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG placement using the “pull” technique is commonly utilized for providing nutritional support in head and neck cancer (HNC patients, but it may be complicated by peristomal metastasis in up to 3% of patients. Overtube-assisted PEG placement might reduce this risk. However, this technique has not been systemically studied for this purpose to date. Methods. Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with HNC who underwent overtube-assisted PEG placement at Westmead Hospital, Australia, between June 2011 and December 2013. Data were extracted from patients’ endoscopy reports and case notes. We present our technique for PEG insertion and discuss the feasibility and safety of this method. Results. In all 53 patients studied, the PEG tubes were successfully placed using 25 cm long flexible overtubes, in 89% prophylactically (before commencing curative chemoradiotherapy, and in 11% reactively (for treatment of tumor related dysphagia or weight loss. During a median follow-up period of 16 months, 3 (5.7% patients developed peristomal infection and 3 others developed self-limiting peristomal pain. There were no cases of overtube-related adverse events or overt cutaneous metastases observed. Conclusions. Overtube-assisted PEG placement in patients with HNC is a feasible, simple, and safe technique and might be effective for preventing cutaneous metastasis.

  10. Factors predicting dysphagia after anterior cervical surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Ma, Lei; Yang, Da-Long; Wang, Hui; Bai, Zhi-Long; Zhang, Li-Jun; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A multicenter retrospective study. The purpose of this study was to explore risk factors of dysphagia after anterior cervical surgery and factors affecting rehabilitation of dysphagia 2 years after surgery. Patients who underwent anterior cervical surgery at 3 centers from January 2010 to January 2013 were included. The possible factors included 3 aspects: demographic variables—age, sex, body mass index (BMI): hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, smoking, alcohol use, diagnose (cervical spondylotic myelopathy or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament), preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA), surgical-related variables—surgical option (ACDF, ACCF, ACCDF, or Zero profile), operation time, blood loss, operative level, superior fusion segment, incision length, angle of C2 to C7, height of C2 to C7, cervical circumference, cervical circumference/height of C2 to C7. The results of our study indicated that the rate of dysphagia at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery was 20%, 5.4%, 2.4%, 1.1%, and 0.4%, respectively. Our results showed that age (58.8 years old), BMI (27.3 kg/m2), course of disease (11.6 months), operation time (103.2 min), blood loss (151.6 mL), incision length (9.1 cm), cervical circumference (46.8 cm), angle of C2 to C7 (15.3°), cervical circumference/height of C2 to C7 (4.8), preoperative VAS (7.5), and ODI (0.6) in dysphagia group were significantly higher than those (52.0, 24.6, 8.6, 88.2, 121.6, 8.6, 42.3, 12.6, 3.7, 5.6, and 0.4, respectively) in nondysphagia group; however, height of C2 to C7 (9.9 vs 11.7 cm) and preoperative JOA (8.3 vs 10.7) had opposite trend between 2 groups. We could also infer that female, smoking, diabetes, ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, ACCDF, multilevel surgery, and superior fusion segment including C2 to C3 or C6 to C7 were the risk factors for dysphagia after surgery immediately. However

  11. Dysphagia due to Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Ohki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH is usually asymptomatic. However, rarely, it causes dysphagia, hoarseness, dyspnea, snoring, stridor, and laryngeal edema. Herein, we present a patient with DISH causing dysphagia. A 70-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of sore throat, dysphagia, and foreign body sensation. Flexible laryngoscopy revealed a leftward-protruding posterior wall in the hypopharynx. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a bony mass pushing, anteriorly, on the posterior hypopharyngeal wall. Ossification included an osseous bridge involving 5 contiguous vertebral bodies. Dysphagia due to DISH was diagnosed. His symptoms were relieved by conservative therapy using anti-inflammatory drugs. However, if conservative therapy fails and symptoms are severe, surgical treatments must be considered.

  12. Antroduodenal motility in neurologically handicapped children with feeding intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werlin Steven L

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia and feeding intolerance are common in neurologically handicapped children. The aim is to determine the etiologies of feeding intolerance in neurologically handicapped children who are intolerant of tube feedings. Methods Eighteen neurologically handicapped children, followed in the Tube Feeding Clinic at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin who were intolerant of gastrostomy feedings. The charts of these 18 patients were reviewed. Past medical history, diagnoses, history of fundoplication and results of various tests of gastrointestinal function including barium contrast radiography, endoscopy and antroduodenal manometry were documented. Results Five of 11 children had abnormal barium upper gastrointestinal series. Seven of 14 had abnormal liquid phase gastric emptying tests. Two of 16 had esophagitis on endoscopy. All 18 children had abnormal antroduodenal motility. Conclusions In neurologically handicapped children foregut dysmotility may be more common than is generally recognized and can explain many of the upper gastrointestinal symptoms in neurologically handicapped children.

  13. A case of dysphagia induced by irradiation to the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Akira; Moriyama, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    This report deals with a case of dysphagia induced by the irradiation of a malignant lymphoma of the neck. The patient was a 55-year-old male with dysphagia who had undergone irradiation to the neck for a malignant lymphoma ten years previously. The dysphagia that had gradually worsened in ten years made him enable to eat and drink orally. He often contracted by pneumonia. On first examination, atrophic changes were observed in the soft palates, and the epiglottis, and the improvement of the tongue was bilaterally impaired. These findings were diagnosed as the causes of the dysphagia. A barium study showed that the movement of the tongue and the pharynx were impaired. The barium was aspirated. A plain X-ray film of the mandible showed ostitis. The impairment of the tongue movement was due to bilateral hypopharyngeal nerve palsies induced by the irradiation. Laryngeal suspension and cricopharyngeal myotomy were not suitable because they could have aggravated the radiation necrosis of the thyroid cartilage which will be expected in the future. A total laryngectomy, which sacrifies the phonation, was out of the question, because the patient's dysarthria was not so hard to understand. He was instructed in the self-insertion of a feeding tube to get enough nutrition, the physical therapy of the lung with the aid of his wife to prevent aspiration pneumonia. The loss of phonation lowers the QOL of such patients. In the cases with dysphagia which do not recover with surgical treatments, rehabilitation should mainly stress the conservation of phonation and the prevention of pneumonia to maintain the higher QOL of patients. (author)

  14. Risk factors for severe Dysphagia after concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koiwai, Keiichiro; Shikama, Naoto; Sasaki, Shigeru; Shinoda, Atsunori; Kadoya, Masumi

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for dysphagia induced by chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Forty-seven patients with head and neck cancers who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy from December 1998 to March 2006 were reviewed retrospectively. Median age was 63 years (range, 16-81). The locations of the primary lesion were as follows: larynx in 18 patients, oropharynx in 11, nasopharynx in 7, hypopharynx in 7 and others in 4. Clinical stages were as follows: Stage II in 20 and Stages III-IV in 27. Almost all patients underwent platinum-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy. The median cumulative dose of cisplatin was 100 mg/m 2 (range, 80-300) and median radiation dose was 70 Gy (range, 50-70). Severe dysphagia (Grade 3-4) was observed in 22 patients (47%) as an acute toxic event. One patient required tube feeding even at 12-month follow-up. In univariate analysis, clinical stage (III-IV) (P=0.017), primary site (oro-hypopharynx) (P=0.041) and radiation portal size (>11 cm) (P<0.001) were found to be associated with severe dysphagia. In multivariate analysis, only radiation portal size was found to have a significant relationship with severe dysphagia (P=0.048). Larger radiation portal field was associated with severe dysphagia induced by chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  15. Radiology of oesophageal dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A.J.; Nolan, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Dysphagia is defined as the sensation of difficulty in swallowing. The causes of dysphagia can be oropharyngeal or oesophageal. Oesophageal dysphagia develops as a result of mechanical obstruction or motility disorders and frequently causes distressing symptoms. Patients who develop oesophageal dysphagia can be easily and rapidly examined by routine barium techniques. The barium swallow remains a safe, accurate and widely available method for showing structural and functional oesophageal lesions, and for identifying those patients who require urgent endoscopic assessment and treatment. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) and endoscopic ultrasonography are available for the preoperative staging of oesophageal neoplasms. This article discusses the radiological appearances of the main oesophageal disorders that cause dysphagia in adults. (author). 15 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab

  16. Dysphagia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: prevalence and clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoppolo, G; Schettino, I; Frasca, V; Giacomelli, E; Prosperini, L; Cambieri, C; Roma, R; Greco, A; Mancini, P; De Vincentiis, M; Silani, V; Inghilleri, M

    2013-12-01

    To characterize swallowing deficits in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); investigate the delay in dysphagia onset; estimate correlations between dysphagia severity and patients' functional status; identify the symptom(s) most likely to predict dysphagia. A group of 49 consecutive patients with ALS, 14 with bulbar onset and 35 with spinal onset, underwent swallowing evaluation including bedside and fiberoptic endoscopic examination to detect dysphagia. Patients with dysphagia were more likely than those without to have bulbar onset ALS (P = 0.02); more severely impaired chewing (P = 0.01); and tongue muscle deficits (P = 0.001). The only variable measured at first examination significantly associated with dysphagia was a more than mild tongue muscle deficit. The only variable useful in predicting dysphagia was a chewing deficit. In 10 of the 49 patients studied, swallowing evaluation disclosed an impaired cough reflex. Dysphagia in patients with ALS correlates significantly with bulbar onset and with oral swallowing impairment. Fiberoptic swallowing evaluation is a useful tool for detecting swallowing deficits and laryngeal sensitivity in patients with ALS. An impaired cough reflex is an unexpected finding in many patients with ALS. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Insertion of balloon retained gastrostomy buttons: a 5-year retrospective review of 260 patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Sarah

    2013-04-01

    Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is an established way of maintaining enteral nutrition in patients who cannot maintain nutrition orally. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of primary placement of a wide bore button gastrostomy in a large, varied patient population through retrospective review.

  18. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in neurological rehabilitation: a report of six cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annoni, J M; Vuagnat, H; Frischknecht, R; Uebelhart, D

    1998-08-01

    This study reports the cases of six patients with severe chronic neurological disability and swallowing difficulties due to traumatic brain injury (TBI), anoxia and multiple sclerosis (MS). The patients required nutritional supplement through percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Their clinical follow-up showed a decrease of intercurrent medical complications, especially pressure sores. In addition, an improvement of oropharyngeal function was observed in some patients, also accompanied by slightly better basic psychomotor functions such as vigilance, sustained attention and tone or motor control. However, not every patient did improve with this procedure. The two MS patients benefited most, while the improvement was less homogenous in the three TBI patients. The advantages of PEG over nasogastric tube on oropharyngeal function can be related to the absence of pharyngeal irritation and its role in overall recovery could be due to an increase in social activities, a control of infections, a better rehabilitation schedule and a long-term effect on brain function due to better nutritional support.

  19. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cumhur Ertekin

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic, neurodegenerative movement disorder that typically affects elderly patients. Swallowing disorders are highly prevalent in PD and can have grave consequences, including pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration and mortality. Neurogenic dysphagia in PD can manifest with both overt clinical symptoms or silent dysphagia. Regardless, early diagnosis and objective follow-up of dysphagia in PD is crucial for timely and appropriate care for these patients. In this r...

  20. Dysphagia after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, Peter; Jacobsen, Bo

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency and severity of dysphagia during the first 8 weeks after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. So far, there have been no studies reporting data on day-to-day occurrence of dysphagia after laparoscopic fundoplication...... in a consecutive series of patients. This may explain why the frequency of dysphagia varies greatly in the literature (4-100%). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients, undergoing elective laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication, completed a standard dysphagia registration diary each day during the first 8...... weeks after surgery. Patients who preoperatively had suffered from dysphagia were excluded. Thus, none of the patients had dysphagia in the 2-month period before surgery. Ten patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy served as controls. Data were quantified, and a score value of 4 or more...

  1. Does Dysphagia Indicate Recurrence of Benign Esophageal Strictures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle Ekberg

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal dilatation in dysphagic patients with benign strictures is usually considered successful if the patients' dysphagia is alleviated. However, the relation between dysphagia and the diameter of a stricture is not well understood. Moreover, the dysphagia may also be caused by an underlying esophageal motor disorder. In order to compare symptoms and objective measurements of esophageal stricture, 28 patients were studied with interview and a radiologic esophagram. The latter included swallowing of a solid bolus. All patients underwent successful balloon dilatation at least one month prior to this study. Recurrence of a stricture with a diameter of less than 13 mm was diagnosed by the barium swallow in 21 patients. Recurrence of dysphagia was seen in 15 patients. Thirteen patients denied any swallowing symptoms. Chest pain was present in 9 patients. Of 15 patients with dysphagia 2 (13% had no narrowing but severe esophageal dysmotility. Of 13 patients without dysphagia 9 (69% had a stricture with a diameter of 13 mm or less. Of 21 patients with a stricture of 13 mm or less 14 (67% were symptomatic while 7 (33% were asymptomatic. Four of 11 patients with retrosternal pain had a stricture of less than 10 mm. Three patients with retrosternal pain and obstruction had severe esophageal dysmotility. Whether or not the patients have dysphagia may be more related to diet and eating habits than to the true diameter of their esophageal narrowing. We conclude that the clinical history is non-reliable for evaluating the results of esophageal stricture dilatation. In order to get an objective measurement of therapeutic outcome, barium swallow including a solid bolus is recommended.

  2. The benefits of a 5-day dysphagia intensive placement

    OpenAIRE

    Cocks, N.; Harding, C.; Pritchard, M.

    2014-01-01

    Finding practical dysphagia opportunities for students pre-qualification is challenging. Discussions with clinicians led to the development of a new placement model. The placement was just five days and had an accompanying workbook. The current study aimed to evaluate the benefits of the placement. Data were analysed from 40 students who attended an adult dysphagia placement and 13 who attended a paediatric dysphagia placement. Measures included a pre and post self-rating questionnaire, quali...

  3. Optimising medication for Parkinson's disease patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krupa

    2015-07-01

    In addition to movement disorders, Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with several nonmotor symptoms, including dysphagia (swallowing difficulties). Dysphagia can make the consumption of solid medicines difficult, which potentially contributes to the poor adherence that is common among people with PD. However, patients may be reluctant to admit that they experience dysphagia. Community nurses should actively enquire into swallowing difficulties among all patients, not only those with PD, and should work with pharmacists and other members of the multidisciplinary team to help optimise medication management to help improve adherence.

  4. Radiologically assisted percutaneous gastrostomy or enterostomy. A retrospective analysis of 90 procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mildenberger, P.; Oberholzer, K.; Kauczor, H.U.; Dueber, C.; Kurz, S.; Schild, H.; Thelen, M.

    1996-01-01

    To analyse retrospectively the indications, technique and results of radiologically induced gastrostomies or enterostomies. Radiologically assisted gastrostomies or enterostomies were induced in 90 patients, mostly with high grade obstructions due to head and neck tumours or oesophageal tumours. 19/90 patients had had previous resection of the oesophagus or gastric operations. A catheter was successfully introduced in all patients. In 11/90 patients this was followed by a two-stage procedure. In 16/90 patients puncture was performed under CT control because of some anatomical peculiarity. Serious complication occurred in 9/90 patients but in only one was surgery necessary. There were no deaths resulting from the procedure but mortality after 30 days was 6.7%. Radiologically assisted gastrostomies or enterostomies are a reliable and effective form of treatment even amongst difficult patients. The results and complications are comparable to those from endoscopic procedures. (orig.) [de

  5. [Awareness of dysphagia in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés-Rusiñol, Àngels; Forjaz, Maria J; Ayala, Alba; Crespo, M de la Cruz; Prats, Anna; Valles, Esther; Petit, Cristina; Casanovas, Mercè; Garolera-Freixa, Maite

    2011-12-01

    In order to be able to assess the level of awareness of swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD), a specific questionnaire was designed and validated: the Dysphapark questionnaire. A total of 470 persons with PD were asked whether they believe they have problems swallowing or not, and then they filled in a self-administered questionnaire that evaluates the effectiveness and safety of swallowing. The Dysphapark questionnaire was validated by means of Rasch analysis and classical psychometric methods. The safety and effectiveness dimensions of the Dysphapark fit the Rasch model well. The efficacy dimension showed significant differences for gender, length of the illness, awareness of dysphagia and length of meals. Significant differences were also found in the safety dimension for length and severity of illness, awareness of dysphagia, speech therapy and knowledge of thickening agents. Despite the fact that 90% of patients had problems concerning effectiveness and safety in swallowing, 79.45% were not aware that they suffered from dysphagia. The Dysphapark questionnaire is a suitable measure of dysphagia in PD, according to the Rasch analysis. A high proportion of patients with PD have dysphagia, although it has been observed that they have a low level of awareness of the condition, of the consequences it may have and of the possibility of using thickening agents. Given that some of the swallowing disorders in PD are asymptomatic and that the level of awareness of the disorder is low, we recommend including specific questionnaires as well as clinical and instrumental evaluation of dysphagia in clinical practice.

  6. Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrup, Inga; Warnecke, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    More than 80 % of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop dysphagia during the course of their disease. Swallowing impairment reduces quality of life, complicates medication intake and leads to malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. Although the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood, it has been shown that dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the development of dysphagia in PD. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in PD patients is challenging and often delivers unreliable results. A modified water test assessing maximum swallowing volume is recommended to uncover oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD. PD-specific questionnaires may also be useful to identify patients at risk for swallowing impairment. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and videofluoroscopic swallowing study are both considered to be the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. In addition, high-resolution manometry may be a helpful tool. These instrumental methods allow a reliable detection of aspiration events. Furthermore, typical patterns of impairment during the oral, pharyngeal and/or esophageal swallowing phase of PD patients can be identified. Therapy of dysphagia in PD consists of pharmacological interventions and swallowing treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs). Fluctuating dysphagia with deterioration during the off-state should be treated by optimizing dopaminergic medication. The methods used during swallowing treatment by SLTs shall be selected according to the individual dysphagia pattern of each PD patient. A promising novel method is an intensive training of expiratory muscle strength. Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinical relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. The goal of this review is giving an overview on current stages of epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of PD-associated dysphagia, which might be helpful for neurologists

  7. Predictors and Outcomes of Dysphagia Screening After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joundi, Raed A; Martino, Rosemary; Saposnik, Gustavo; Giannakeas, Vasily; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K

    2017-04-01

    Guidelines advocate screening all acute stroke patients for dysphagia. However, limited data are available regarding how many and which patients are screened and how failing a swallowing screen affects patient outcomes. We sought to evaluate predictors of receiving dysphagia screening after acute ischemic stroke and outcomes after failing a screening test. We used the Ontario Stroke Registry from April 1, 2010, to March 31, 2013, to identify patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke and determine predictors of documented dysphagia screening and outcomes after failing the screening test, including pneumonia, disability, and death. Among 7171 patients, 6677 patients were eligible to receive dysphagia screening within 72 hours, yet 1280 (19.2%) patients did not undergo documented screening. Patients with mild strokes were significantly less likely than those with more severe strokes to have documented screening (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-0.64). Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio, 4.71; 95% CI, 3.43-6.47), severe disability (adjusted odds ratio, 5.19; 95% CI, 4.48-6.02), discharge to long-term care (adjusted odds ratio, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.11-3.79), and 1-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 2.09-2.80). Associations were maintained in patients with mild strokes. One in 5 patients with acute ischemic stroke did not have documented dysphagia screening, and patients with mild strokes were substantially less likely to have documented screening. Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including in patients with mild strokes, highlighting the importance of dysphagia screening for all patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Dysphagia lusoria: a late onset presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Alice Louise; Cock, Charles; Heddle, Richard; Morcom, Russell Kym

    2013-04-21

    Dysphagia lusoria is a term used to describe dysphagia secondary to vascular compression of the oesophagus. The various embryologic anomalies of the arterial brachial arch system often remain unrecognised and asymptomatic, but in 30%-40% of cases can result in tracheo-oesophageal symptoms, which in the majority of cases manifest as dysphagia. Diagnosis of dysphagia lusoria is via barium swallow and chest Computed tomography scan. Manometric abnormalities are variable, but age-related manometric changes may contribute to clinically relevant dysphagia lusoria in patients who present later in life. Our report describes a case of late-onset dysphagia secondary to a right aortic arch with an aberrant left subclavian artery, which represents a rare variant of dysphagia lusoria. The patient had proven additional oesophageal dysmotility with solid bolus only and a clinical response to dietary modification.

  9. Dysphagia in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlgemuth, M.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Kalf, J.G.; Joosten, F.B.M.; Vliet, A.M. van der; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Dysphagia is not considered a symptom of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In this study, the authors found that dysphagia does occur in patients with advanced FSHD showing mild involvement of the jaw and lingual muscles. Dysphagia is seldom life threatening in these patients. The

  10. [Efficacy observation of dysphagia after acute stroke treated with acupuncture and functional electric stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ling; He, Peng-Lan; Zhou, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Yan-Hua

    2014-08-01

    To observe the impacts on the recovery of swallowing function in patients of dysphagia after acute stroke treated with acupuncture and functional electric stimulation. Seventy-four patients were randomized into an acupuncture plus electric stimulation group (38 cases) and an electric stimulation group (36 cases). The functional electric stimulator was used in the two groups. The electric pads were placed on the hyoid bone, the upper part of thyroid cartilage, the masseter muscle and the mandibular joint. The treatment lasted for 30 mm each time. In the acupuncture plus electric stimulation group, acupuncture was supplemented at motor area of Jiao's scalp acupuncture, lower 2/5 of sensory area, Baihui (CV 20), Lianquan (CV 23), Jinjin (EX-HN 12) and Yuye (EX-HN 13), 30 mm each time. The treatment was given once a day, 6 treatments for one session and there was 1 day at interval between the sessions, 4 sessions were required totally in the two groups. The dysphagia scale was adopted for efficacy evaluation before treatment and after 4 sessions of treatment in the two groups. The removal rate of nasal feeding tube was observed after treatment. The dysphagia score was increased apparently after treatment compared with that before treatment in the two groups (both P vs 6.73 +/- 1.36, P stroke and promotes the early removal of nasal feeding tube. The efficacy is better than that of the simple electric stimulation therapy.

  11. 3D integrated HYDRA simulations of hohlraums including fill tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J.; Hammel, B. A.; Macphee, A. G.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Kerbel, G. D.; Sepke, S.; Patel, M. V.

    2017-10-01

    Measurements of fill tube perturbations from hydro growth radiography (HGR) experiments on the National Ignition Facility show spoke perturbations in the ablator radiating from the base of the tube. These correspond to the shadow of the 10 μm diameter glass fill tube cast by hot spots at early time. We present 3D integrated HYDRA simulations of these experiments which include the fill tube. Meshing techniques are described which were employed to resolve the fill tube structure and associated perturbations in the simulations. We examine the extent to which the specific illumination geometry necessary to accommodate a backlighter in the HGR experiment contributes to the spoke pattern. Simulations presented include high resolution calculations run on the Trinity machine operated by the Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES) partnership. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Cumhur

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic, neurodegenerative movement disorder that typically affects elderly patients. Swallowing disorders are highly prevalent in PD and can have grave consequences, including pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration and mortality. Neurogenic dysphagia in PD can manifest with both overt clinical symptoms or silent dysphagia. Regardless, early diagnosis and objective follow-up of dysphagia in PD is crucial for timely and appropriate care for these patients. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the electrophysiological methods that can be used to objectively evaluate dysphagia in PD. We discuss the electrophysiological abnormalities that can be observed in PD, their clinical correlates and the pathophysiology underlying these findings. PMID:25360228

  13. Dysphagia associated with presumed pharyngeal dysfunction in 16 neonatal foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, S J; Hurcombe, S D; Barr, B S; Schott, H C

    2012-02-01

    Dysphagia due to pharyngeal dysfunction occurs in human neonates and is associated with prematurity and hypoxic episodes. This syndrome probably occurs in neonatal foals but has not been reported. The objectives of this study were to describe 1) a series of neonatal foals with dysphagia due to pharyngeal dysfunction; 2) the progression, treatment and resolution of the dysphagia; 3) the comorbidities; and 4) the prognosis for life and athleticism for affected foals. Records from 3 referral equine hospitals were reviewed from neonatal foals with dysphagia of pharyngeal origin. Inclusion criteria were a normal to strong suckle, dysphagia evidenced by milk at the nostrils after nursing the dam, and endoscopic examination of the airway. Foals with mechanical reasons for dysphagia, botulism or hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis were not included. Sixteen neonatal foals qualified for the study. Eight (50%) were premature and/or diagnosed with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. Twelve (75%) had aspiration pneumonia. Fifteen foals were discharged alive from the hospital, nursing the mare with no evidence of dysphagia (n = 14), or mild dysphagia (n = 1), a mean +/- s.d. of 7 +/- 6 days (median = 6.3 days, range 0-22 days) after hospital admission. One foal was subjectedto euthanasia in hospital. Follow-up nformation was available for 14 animals. Thirteen of 16 (81%) were alive and included one yearling and 12 horses >2 years old. Seven of the 14 (50%) were racing, training or in work, and 6 horses were pets, breeding animals or had unknown athletic status. Two had laryngeal deficits. One foal was subjected to euthanasia within weeks of discharge from the hospital due to aspiration pneumonia. Dysphagia related to pharyngeal dysfunction occurs in equine neonates and can resolve, but may require days to weeks of supportive care. Prognosis for life is favourable and for athleticism fair.

  14. Feasibility study of EUS-NOTES as a novel approach for peroral cholecysto-gastrostomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, P; Bhutani, M S

    2013-01-01

    EUS-guided cholecysto-gastrostomy might be a useful minimally invasive procedure used for salvage drainage in advanced pancreaticobiliary cancers, but also for drainage of the gallbladder in acute cholecystitis in patients deemed unfit for laparoscopic surgery.......EUS-guided cholecysto-gastrostomy might be a useful minimally invasive procedure used for salvage drainage in advanced pancreaticobiliary cancers, but also for drainage of the gallbladder in acute cholecystitis in patients deemed unfit for laparoscopic surgery....

  15. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function.

  16. Recovery of Dysphagia in lateral medullary stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function.

  17. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function. PMID:25045555

  18. Eighty-year-old man with 10 years dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Showkat A Kadla; Nisar Ahmad Shah; Shaheena Parveen; Bilal A Khan; Asif I Shah; Shaheen Nazir Lone; Sandeep Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is a sensation of food being "stuck" up in its passage from the mouth to stomach. It is of two main types, oropharyngeal dysphagia, and esophageal dysphagia. In oropharyngeal dysphagia, there is difficulty in transferring the food from the mouth to upper esophagus. Thus, this dysphagia is also called as transfer dysphagia. It occurs within 1 st 1-2 s of the swallow. We also call this dysphagia as instant dysphagia. It is almost always associated with sinobronchial symptoms. The seco...

  19. Impact of the prophylactic gastrostomy for unresectable squamous cell head and neck carcinomas treated with radio-chemotherapy on quality of life: Prospective randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, Sebastien; Baumstarck-Barrau, Karine; Alfonsi, Marc; Digue, Laurence; Bagarry, Danielle; Feham, Nasreddine; Bensadoun, Rene Jean; Pignon, Thierry; Loundon, Anderson; Deville, Jean-Laurent; Zanaret, Michel; Favre, Roger; Duffaud, Florence; Auquier, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Concomitant radio-chemotherapy is the gold standard treatment for unresectable head and neck carcinomas. Placement of prophylactic gastrostomy has been proposed to provide adequate nutrition during the therapeutic sequence. The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of prophylactic gastrostomy on the 6-month quality of life, and to determine the factors related to this quality of life. Materials and methods: Design. randomized, controlled, open study ('systematic percutaneous gastrostomy' versus 'no systematic gastrostomy'). Patients. squamous cell head and neck carcinoma (stages III and IV, UICC 1997). Setting. oncological departments of French university teaching hospitals. Treatment. optimal concomitant radio-chemotherapy. Evaluations. T0 baseline evaluation, T1 during the treatment, T2 end of the treatment, and T3 6-month post-inclusion. Primary endpoint. 6-month quality of life (Qol) assessed using SF36, EORTC QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ H and N35 questionnaires. Results: The Qol changes from baseline included a decline (T1 and T2) followed by an improvement (T3). Qol at 6 months was significantly higher in the group receiving systematic prophylactic gastrostomy (p = 10 -3 ). Higher initial BMI and lower initial Karnofsky index were significant factors related to a higher 6-month Qol. Conclusions: The study results suggest that prophylactic gastrostomy improves post-treatment quality of life for unresectable head and neck cancer patients, after adjusting for other potential predictive quality of life factors.

  20. Patient and Family Caregivers’ Experiences of Living With a Jejunostomy Feeding Tube After Surgery for Esophagogastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Halliday, V.; Baker, M.; Thomas, A.L.; Bowrey, D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Jejunostomy feeding tubes (JFTs) can be used to provide nutrition support to patients who have had surgery for esophagogastric cancer. Although previous research reports how patients cope with a gastrostomy tube, little is known about the impact of having a JFT. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore how patients and their informal caregivers experience living with a JFT in the first months following surgery. METHODS: Participants were purposively sampled from a cohort o...

  1. High dose rate brachytherapy for the palliation of malignant dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homs, Marjolein Y.V.; Eijkenboom, Wilhelmina M.H.; Coen, Veronique L.M.A.; Haringsma, Jelle; Blankenstein, Mark van; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a commonly used palliative treatment for esophageal carcinoma. We evaluated the outcome of HDR brachytherapy in patients with malignant dysphagia. Material and methods: A retrospective analysis over a 10-year period was performed of 149 patients treated with HDR brachytherapy, administered in one or two sessions, at a median dose of 15 Gy. Patients were evaluated for functional outcome, complications, recurrent dysphagia, and survival. Results: At 6 weeks after HDR brachytherapy, dysphagia scores had improved from a median of 3 to 2 (n=104; P<0.001), however, dysphagia had not improved in 51 (49%) patients. Procedure-related complications occurred in seven (5%) patients. Late complications, including fistula formation or bleeding, occurred in 11 (7%) patients. Twelve (8%) patients experienced minor retrosternal pain. Median survival of the patients was 160 days with a 1-year survival rate of 15%. Procedure-related mortality was 2%. At follow-up, 55 (37%) patients experienced recurrent dysphagia. In 34 (23%) patients a metal stent was placed to relieve persistent or recurrent dysphagia. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy is a moderately effective treatment for the palliation of malignant dysphagia. The incidence of early major complications is low, however, persistent and recurrent dysphagia occur frequently, and require often additional treatment

  2. The one-year attributable cost of post-stroke dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilha, Heather Shaw; Simpson, Annie N; Ellis, Charles; Mauldin, Patrick; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Simpson, Kit

    2014-10-01

    With the recent emphasis on evidence-based practice and healthcare reform, understanding the cost of dysphagia management has never been more important. It is helpful for clinicians to understand and objectively report the costs associated with dysphagia when they advocate for their services in this economy. Having carefully estimated cost of illness, inputs are needed for cost-effectiveness analyses that help support the value of treatments. This study sought to address this issue by examining the 1-year cost associated with a diagnosis of dysphagia post-stroke in South Carolina. Furthermore, this study investigated whether ethnicity and residence differences exist in the cost of dysphagia post-stroke. Data on 3,200 patients in the South Carolina Medicare database from 2004 who had ICD-9 codes for ischemic stroke, 434 and 436, were retrospectively included in this study. Differences between persons with and without dysphagia post-stroke were compared with respect to age, gender, ethnicity, mortality, length of stay, comorbidity, rurality, discharge disposition, and cost to Medicare. Univariate analyses and a gamma-distributed generalized linear multivariable model with a log link function were completed. We found that the 1-year cost to Medicare for persons with dysphagia post ischemic stroke was $4,510 higher than that for persons without dysphagia post ischemic stroke when controlling for age, comorbidities, ethnicity, and proportion of time alive. Univariate analysis revealed that rurality, ethnicity, and gender were not statistically significantly different in comparisons of individuals with or without dysphagia post-stroke. Post-stroke dysphagia significantly increases post-stroke medical expenses. Understanding the expenditures associated with post-stroke dysphagia is helpful for optimal allocation and use of resources. Such information is needed to conduct cost-effectiveness studies.

  3. The One-Year Attributable Cost of Post-Stroke Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilha, Heather Shaw; Simpson, Annie N.; Ellis, Charles; Mauldin, Patrick; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Simpson, Kit

    2014-01-01

    With the recent emphasis on evidence-based practice and healthcare reform, understanding the cost of dysphagia management has never been more important. It is helpful for clinicians to understand and objectively report the costs associated with dysphagia when they advocate for their services in this economy. Having carefully estimated cost of illness, inputs are needed for cost-effectiveness analyses that help support the value of treatments. This study sought to address this issue by examining the 1-year cost associated with a diagnosis of dysphagia post-stroke in South Carolina. Furthermore, this study investigated whether ethnicity and residence differences exist in the cost of dysphagia post-stroke. Data on 3,200 patients in the South Carolina Medicare database from 2004 who had ICD-9 codes for ischemic stroke, 434 and 436, were retrospectively included in this study. Differences between persons with and without dysphagia post-stroke were compared with respect to age, gender, ethnicity, mortality, length of stay, comorbidity, rurality, discharge disposition, and cost to Medicare. Univariate analyses and a gamma-distributed generalized linear multivariable model with a log link function were completed. We found that the 1-year cost to Medicare for persons with dysphagia post ischemic stroke was $4,510 higher than that for persons without dysphagia post ischemic stroke when controlling for age, comorbidities, ethnicity, and proportion of time alive. Univariate analysis revealed that rurality, ethnicity, and gender were not statistically significantly different in comparisons of individuals with or without dysphagia post-stroke. Post-stroke dysphagia significantly increases post-stroke medical expenses. Understanding the expenditures associated with post-stroke dysphagia is helpful for optimal allocation and use of resources. Such information is needed to conduct cost-effectiveness studies. PMID:24948438

  4. Rehabilitation Nutrition for Possible Sarcopenic Dysphagia After Lung Cancer Surgery: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Uwano, Rimiko

    2016-06-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is characterized by the loss of swallowing muscle mass and function associated with generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. In this report, the authors describe a patient with possible sarcopenic dysphagia after lung cancer surgery and was treated subsequently by rehabilitation nutrition. A 71-year-old man with lung cancer experienced complications of an acute myocardial infarction and pneumonia after surgery. He was ventilated artificially, and a tracheotomy was performed. The patient received diagnoses of malnutrition, severe sarcopenia, and possible sarcopenic dysphagia. His dysphagia was improved by a combination of dysphagia rehabilitation including physical and speech therapy and an improvement in nutrition initiated by a nutrition support team. Finally, he no longer had dysphagia and malnutrition. Sarcopenic dysphagia should be considered in patients with sarcopenia and dysphagia. Rehabilitation nutrition using a combination of both rehabilitation and nutritional care management is presumptively useful for treating sarcopenic dysphagia.

  5. Oesophageal dysphagia: manifestations and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Frank; Omari, Taher

    2015-06-01

    Oesophageal dysphagia is a common symptom, which might be related to severe oesophageal diseases such as carcinomas. Therefore, an organic process must be ruled out in the first instance by endoscopy in all patients presenting with dysphagia symptoms. The most prevalent obstructive aetiologies are oesophageal cancer, peptic strictures and eosinophilic oesophagitis. Eosinophilic oesophagitis is one of the most common causes of dysphagia in adults and children, thus justifying the need to obtain oesophageal biopsy samples from all patients presenting with unexplained dysphagia. With the advent of standardized high-resolution manometry and specific metrics to characterize oesophageal motility, the Chicago classification has become a gold-standard algorithm for manometric diagnosis of oesophageal motor disorders. In addition, sophisticated investigations and analysis methods that combine pressure and impedance measurement are currently in development. In the future, these techniques might be able to detect subtle pressure abnormalities during bolus transport, which could further explain pathophysiology and symptoms. The degree to which novel approaches will help distinguish dysphagia caused by motor abnormalities from functional dysphagia still needs to be determined.

  6. Dysphagia: Thinking outside the box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Hamish; Garg, Mayur; Tomic, Dunya; Balasubramanian, Smrithya; Sweis, Rami

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom that is important to recognise and appropriately manage, given that causes include life threatening oesophageal neoplasia, oropharyngeal dysfunction, the risk of aspiration, as well as chronic disabling gastroesophageal reflux (GORD). The predominant causes of dysphagia varies between cohorts depending on the interplay between genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors, and is changing with time. Currently in white Caucasian societies adopting a western lifestyle, obesity is common and thus associated gastroesophageal reflux disease is increasingly diagnosed. Similarly, food allergies are increasing in the west, and eosinophilic oesophagitis is increasingly found as a cause. Other regions where cigarette smoking is still prevalent, or where access to medical care and antisecretory agents such as proton pump inhibitors are less available, benign oesophageal peptic strictures, Barrett’s oesophagus, adeno- as well as squamous cell carcinoma are endemic. The evaluation should consider the severity of symptoms, as well as the pre-test probability of a given condition. In young white Caucasian males who are atopic or describe heartburn, eosinophilic esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease will predominate and a proton pump inhibitor could be commenced prior to further investigation. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy remains a valid first line investigation for patients with suspected oesophageal dysphagia. Barium swallow is particularly useful for oropharyngeal dysphagia, and oesophageal manometry mandatory to diagnose motility disorders. PMID:29097867

  7. Healthcare professionals' views on the provision of gastrostomy and noninvasive ventilation to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffell, Tamatha O; Martin, Naomi H; Janssen, Anna; Wijesekera, Lokesh; Knights, Catherine; Burman, Rachel; Oliver, David J; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Goldstein, Laura H

    2013-01-01

    Gastrostomy and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) are recommended interventions for the management of symptoms associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This study aimed to quantify the views of a range of healthcare professionals (HCPs) on the provision of these interventions in the United Kingdom. A total of 177 HCPs participated in an online survey. Significant differences were found between medical and allied HCPs' views on: whether HCPs adhere to policy and accept legal constraints when it comes to making gastrostomy available to people with ALS; the impressions that HCPs receive of the way patients and caregivers understand the effects of gastrostomy and NIV on symptoms and quality of life; and the challenges HCPs face when caring for patients who have refused gastrostomy. More widely available guidelines for the provision of gastrostomy and advice on the best way to impart information to patients and caregivers about gastrostomy and NIV appear to be needed.

  8. [Dysphagia and swallowing rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Fujishima, Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Dysphagia is a life-threatening disorder caused by many medical conditions such as stroke, neurological disorders, tumors, etc. The symptoms of dysphagia are quite variable and diagnosed by observation or through screening involving instrumental swallowing examinations such as video-fluoroscopy and video-endoscopy, to determine functional severity and treatment-prognosis. Direct- and indirect-therapy is used with and without food, respectively. Swallowing rehabilitation is very effective, and could be used in conjunction with compensatory techniques. Here we present an overview of dysphagia and swallowing rehabilitation.

  9. Dysphagia in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke: Early Dysphagia Screening May Reduce Stroke-Related Pneumonia and Improve Stroke Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaled, Mohamed; Matthis, Christine; Binder, Andreas; Mudter, Jonas; Schattschneider, Joern; Pulkowski, Ulrich; Strohmaier, Tim; Niehoff, Torsten; Zybur, Roland; Eggers, Juergen; Valdueza, Jose M; Royl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is associated with poor outcome in stroke patients. Studies investigating the association of dysphagia and early dysphagia screening (EDS) with outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) are rare. The aims of our study are to investigate the association of dysphagia and EDS within 24 h with stroke-related pneumonia and outcomes. Over a 4.5-year period (starting November 2007), all consecutive AIS patients from 15 hospitals in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, were prospectively evaluated. The primary outcomes were stroke-related pneumonia during hospitalization, mortality, and disability measured on the modified Rankin Scale ≥2-5, in which 2 indicates an independence/slight disability to 5 severe disability. Of 12,276 patients (mean age 73 ± 13; 49% women), 9,164 patients (74%) underwent dysphagia screening; of these patients, 55, 39, 4.7, and 1.5% of patients had been screened for dysphagia within 3, 3 to 72 h following admission. Patients who underwent dysphagia screening were likely to be older, more affected on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and to have higher rates of neurological symptoms and risk factors than patients who were not screened. A total of 3,083 patients (25.1%; 95% CI 24.4-25.8) had dysphagia. The frequency of dysphagia was higher in patients who had undergone dysphagia screening than in those who had not (30 vs. 11.1%; p dysphagia had a higher rate of pneumonia than those without dysphagia (29.7 vs. 3.7%; p dysphagia was associated with increased risk of stroke-related pneumonia (OR 3.4; 95% CI 2.8-4.2; p dysphagia was independently correlated with an increase in mortality (OR 3.2; 95% CI 2.4-4.2; p Dysphagia exposes stroke patients to a higher risk of pneumonia, disability, and death, whereas an EDS seems to be associated with reduced risk of stroke-related pneumonia and disability. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Three cases of dysphagia as a late complication after radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesuda, Yasushi; Dohsaka, Yoshihiro; Honma, Akihiro; Nishizawa, Noriko; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Furuta, Yasushi; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Our experience of 3 cases with dysphagia due to cranial nerve palsy as a late complication after radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is herein reported. The cases consisted of two males and one female, ranging in age from 20 to 41 years old at the time of radiation therapy. Two cases received conventional radiation therapy alone while one case was given a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. All patients began to suffer from dysphagia from eight to fifteen weeks after the therapy. All cases had bilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy with several sensory and motor disturbances of the pharynx and larynx. The method of intermittent oral-esophageal tube feeding was performed in one case, however, the other one case had to undergo a total laryngectomy in order to prevent aspiration pneumonia. Recently, the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is frequently performed in order to improve prognosis of NPC. As a result, the occurrence of dysphagia associated with this therapeutic regimen and caused by a late disturbance of the cranial nerve may therefore increase in future. (author)

  11. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia...

  12. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  13. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint

  14. Sarcopenia is an independent risk factor of dysphagia in hospitalized older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keisuke; Akagi, Junji

    2016-04-01

    Sarcopenia can cause varying physical function disorders, including dysphagia. Malnutrition, a potential result of dysphagia, can also cause sarcopenia. However, the association between sarcopenia and dysphagia is not fully understood, despite evidence suggesting correlations between deglutition disorders and degenerative loss of muscle mass. The present study investigated the prevalence of dysphagia among patients with sarcopenia, and the association between the two conditions. We included 224 older adults (mean age 82.5 ± 8.4 years; 37.9% men). Individuals who had a stroke or other diseases that could directly cause dysphagia were excluded. Logistic regression analyses were carried out after adjusting for potential causes of sarcopenia, including malnutrition, a low activity of daily living levels and aging, to investigate the relationship between the skeletal muscle index (SMI), prevalence of sarcopenia diagnosed based on a low SMI and grip strength, and swallowing functions. The Mini-Nutritional Assessment short form was used to assess their nutritional status, and the Barthel Index was used to evaluate their activities of daily living. The prevalences of sarcopenia and dysphagia were 76.8% and 30.0%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that Barthel Index, SMI and presence of sarcopenia were significant independent factors for the prevalence of dysphagia, after adjusting for sex, age and nutritional status. Furthermore, subgroup analysis showed that SMI in males, and both hand-grip strength and SMI in females were lower in dysphagic subjects than in non-dysphagic subjects (P ≤ 0.01). Sarcopenia was an independent risk factor for dysphagia among older individuals. However, further studies are required to define causality. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Diagnostic value of "dysphagia limit" for neurogenic dysphagia: 17 years of experience in 1278 adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Kiylioglu, Nefati; Tarlaci, Sultan; Tanriverdi, Zeynep; Alpaydin, Sezin; Acarer, Ahmet; Baysal, Leyla; Arpaci, Esra; Yuceyar, Nur; Secil, Yaprak; Ozdemirkiran, Tolga; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2015-03-01

    Neurogenic dysphagia (ND) is a prevalent condition that accounts for significant mortality and morbidity worldwide. Screening and follow-up are critical for early diagnosis and management which can mitigate its complications and be cost-saving. The aims of this study are to provide a comprehensive investigation of the dysphagia limit (DL) in a large diverse cohort and to provide a longitudinal assessment of dysphagia in a subset of subjects. We developed a quantitative and noninvasive method for objective assessment of dysphagia by using laryngeal sensor and submental electromyography. DL is the volume at which second or more swallows become necessary to swallow the whole amount of bolus. This study represents 17 years experience with the DL approach in assessing ND in a cohort of 1278 adult subjects consisting of 292 healthy controls, 784 patients with dysphagia, and 202 patients without dysphagia. A total of 192 of all patients were also reevaluated longitudinally over a period of 1-19 months. DL has 92% sensitivity, 91% specificity, 94% positive predictive value, and 88% negative predictive value with an accuracy of 0.92. Patients with ALS, stroke, and movement disorders have the highest sensitivity (85-97%) and positive predictive value (90-99%). The clinical severity of dysphagia has significant negative correlation with DL (r=-0.67, pdysphagia and it can be performed in an EMG laboratory. Our study provides specific quantitative features of DL test that can be readily utilized by the neurologic community and nominates DL as an objective and robust method to evaluate dysphagia in a wide range of neurologic conditions. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An overview of pediatric dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasse, Jane E; Kikano, George E

    2009-04-01

    Difficulty swallowing or dysphagia can be present in children and adults alike. Pediatric dysphagias have long been recognized in the literature. Certain groups of infants with specific developmental and/or medical conditions have been identified as being at high risk for developing dysphagia. Still others may present with a swallowing or feeding problem as their primary symptom. Left untreated, these problems in infants and children can lead to failure to thrive, aspiration pneumonias, gastroesophageal reflux, and/or the inability to establish and maintain proper nutrition and hydration. Awareness of the prevalence of pediatric dysphagia in today's population and the signs and symptoms of this condition aids in its treatment. Early detection of dysphagia in infants and children is important to prevent or minimize complications. This article provides a review of symptoms, etiologies, and resources available regarding management of this condition to help the primary care physician and the families of young children and infants in its management.

  17. Can patients determine the level of their dysphagia?

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf, Hafiz Hamad; Palmer, Joanne; Dalton, Harry Richard; Waters, Carolyn; Luff, Thomas; Strugnell, Madeline; Murray, Iain Alexander

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine if patients can localise dysphagia level determined endoscopically or radiologically and association of gender, age, level and pathology. METHODS Retrospective review of consecutive patients presenting to dysphagia hotline between March 2004 and March 2015 was carried out. Demographics, clinical history and investigation findings were recorded including patient perception of obstruction level (pharyngeal, mid sternal or low sternal) was documented and the actual level of obst...

  18. Prevalence and clinical correlation of dysphagia in Parkinson disease: a study on Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, X; Gao, J; Xie, C; Xiong, B; Wu, S; Cen, Z; Lou, Y; Lou, D; Xie, F; Luo, W

    2018-01-01

    Dysphagia is relatively common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and can have a negative impact on their quality of life; therefore, it is imperative that its prevalence in PD patients is studied. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and clinical correlation of dysphagia in Chinese PD patients. We recruited 116 Chinese PD patients. A videofluoroscopic study of swallowing (VFSS) was used to identify dysphagia. Assessments, including water drinking test, relative motor symptoms, non-motor symptoms (NMS) and quality of life, were performed to analyze the risks of dysphagia. The prevalence of dysphagia was 87.1%. The comparison of demographic and clinical features between patients with and without dysphagia included sex, education level, disease course, Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), Question 6, 7 of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS Part II), Hoehn-Yahr stage (H&Y), water drinking test, 39-item Parkinson Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and Non-Motor Symptoms Quest (NMSQ). We found significant correlations between dysphagia and age. Using age, disease course, and H&Y stage as the independent variable in our regression analysis for assessing the risk factors of dysphagia in PD patients, age and H&Y stage displayed a strong correlation as the risk factors. The risk of dysphagia in elderly PD patients is 1.078 times greater than that of younger PD patients. Also, the risk of dysphagia in PD patients of a greater H&Y staging is 3.260 times greater than that of lower staging PD patients. Our results suggest that dysphagia is common in Chinese PD patients. Older patients or those in higher H&Y stages are more likely to experience dysphagia. There is no correlation between dysphagia and PD duration.

  19. Dysphagia after Nissen fundoplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breumelhof, R.; Fellinger, H. W.; Vlasblom, V.; Jansen, A.; Smout, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Nissen fundoplication is a commonly used antireflux operation. After this operation symptoms such as dysphagia, inability to belch and vomit, and gas bloating are frequently reported in the literature. In 32 patients who underwent Nissen fundoplication 3.5-18 years ago, postprocedure dysphagia was

  20. Dysphagia in infants after open heart procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sook-Hee; Kim, Sang-Jun; Huh, June; Jun, Tae-Gook; Cheon, Hee Jung; Kwon, Jeong-Yi

    2013-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and the clinical predictors of dysphagia and to determine the characteristics of videofluoroscopic swallowing study findings in infants after open heart procedures. This study is a retrospective review of 146 infants who underwent open heart surgery. The infants with dysphagia were compared with those without dysphagia. The videofluoroscopic swallowing study findings of the infants with dysphagia were also evaluated. Of the 146 infants who underwent open heart surgery, 35 (24.0%) had dysphagia symptoms. The infants with dysphagia had lower body weight at operation, more malformation syndromes, longer operation times, and more complex operations than did the infants without dysphagia. In addition, the infants with dysphagia required more time to achieve full oral feeding and had longer hospital stays. Thirty-three infants underwent videofluoroscopic swallowing study: 32 (97.0%) exhibited at least one abnormal finding among the videofluoroscopic swallowing study parameters and 21 (63.6%) exhibited tracheal aspiration. Given the high rate of aspiration in the infants who underwent open heart procedures, monitoring and prompt recognition of the signs and the risk factors of dysphagia may substantially improve infant care with oral feeding and reduce the duration of hospital stays.

  1. Exploratory Research on Latent Esophageal Motility Disorders in Dysphagia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Shinpei; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Inoue, Yousuke; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Ozaki, Haruhiko; Ota, Kazuhiro; Harada, Satoshi; Edogawa, Shoko; Kojima, Yuichi; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Fukuchi, Takumi; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) has been applied to assess esophageal motility disorders. However, the frequency and types of motility disorders in patients with dysphagia, which are frequently seen in clinical practice, are not clear. We evaluated latent esophageal motility disorders associated with dysphagia. The study included patients without erosive esophageal mucosal damage and with dysphagia symptoms refractory to at least 8 weeks of standard-dose proton pump inhibitors. After enrolment, HRM was used to evaluate for esophageal motility disorder based on the Chicago classification. Esophageal motility disorder was found in 58 of 100 patients and was classified based on the causes: achalasia (13%), esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (16%), distal esophageal spasms (3%), weak peristalsis (14%), frequently failed peristalsis (5%), and hypertensive peristalsis (7%). Primary esophageal motility disorder was found in approximately 50% of cases in dysphagia patients. Therefore, esophageal motility disorder is not an uncommon condition and should be sought for in order to elucidate precisely the cause of dysphagia. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Practice Guidelines: Evaluation of Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Cockeram, Alan W

    1998-01-01

    Dysphagia may be defined as difficulty in swallowing. Dysphagia may be classified as oropharyngeal or esophageal; oropharyngeal dysphagia arises from a structural or functional abnormality in the oropharynx, and esophageal dysphagia occurs as a result of structural or functional abnormalities in the esophagus. Esophageal dysphagia may be further subclassified symptomatically as dysphagia for solids alone, which usually suggests a mechanical problem, versus dysphagia for liquids and solids, wh...

  3. Grading Dysphagia as a Toxicity of Head and Neck Cancer: Differences in Severity Classification Based on MBS DIGEST and Clinical CTCAE Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goepfert, Ryan P; Lewin, Jan S; Barrow, Martha P; Warneke, Carla L; Fuller, Clifton D; Lai, Stephen Y; Weber, Randal S; Hutcheson, Katherine A

    2018-04-01

    Clinician-reported toxicity grading through common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) stages dysphagia based on symptoms, diet, and tube dependence. The new dynamic imaging grade of swallowing toxicity (DIGEST) tool offers a similarly scaled five-point ordinal summary grade of pharyngeal swallowing as determined through results of a modified barium swallow (MBS) study. This study aims to inform clinicians on the similarities and differences between dysphagia severity according to clinical CTCAE and MBS-derived DIGEST grading. A cross-sectional sample of 95 MBS studies was randomly selected from a prospectively-acquired MBS database among patients treated with organ preservation strategies for head and neck cancer. MBS DIGEST and clinical CTCAE dysphagia grades were compared. DIGEST and CTCAE dysphagia grades had "fair" agreement per weighted κ of 0.358 (95% CI .231-.485). Using a threshold of DIGEST ≥ 3 as reference, CTCAE had an overall sensitivity of 0.50, specificity of 0.84, and area under the curve (AUC) of 0.67 to identify severe MBS-detected dysphagia. At less than 6 months, sensitivity was 0.72, specificity was 0.76, and AUC was 0.75 while at greater than 6 months, sensitivity was 0.22, specificity was 0.90, and AUC was 0.56 for CTCAE to detect dysphagia as determined by DIGEST. Classification of pharyngeal dysphagia on MBS using DIGEST augments our understanding of dysphagia severity according to the clinically-derived CTCAE while maintaining the simplicity of an ordinal scale. DIGEST likely complements CTCAE toxicity grading through improved specificity for physiologic dysphagia in the acute phase and improved sensitivity for dysphagia in the late-phase.

  4. Symptom burden and dysphagia associated with osteoradionecrosis in long-term oropharynx cancer survivors: A cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Angela T T; Lai, Stephen Y; Gunn, G Brandon; Beadle, Beth M; Fuller, Clifton D; Barrow, Martha P; Hofstede, Theresa M; Chambers, Mark S; Sturgis, Erich M; Mohamed, Abdallah Sherif Radwan; Lewin, Jan S; Hutcheson, Katherine A

    2017-03-01

    The purpose is to examine the relationship between mandibular osteoradionecrosis (ORN) and chronic dysphagia in long-term oropharynx cancer (OPC) survivors, and to determine the perceived symptom burden associated with ORN. Medical records of 349 OPC patients treated with bilateral IMRT and systemic therapy were reviewed. ORN was graded using a published 4-point classification schema. Patients were considered to have chronic dysphagia if they had aspiration pneumonia, stricture or aspiration detected by fluoroscopy or endoscopy, and/or feeding tube dependence in long-term follow-up ⩾1year following radiotherapy. MD Anderson Symptom Inventory - Head and Neck Module (MDASI-HN) scores were analyzed in a nested cross-sectional survey sample of 118 patients. 34 (9.7%, 95% CI: 6.8-13.3%) patients developed ORN and 45 (12.9%, 95% CI: 9.6-16.9%) patients developed chronic dysphagia. Prevalence of chronic dysphagia was significantly higher in ORN cases (12/34, 35%) compared to those who did not develop ORN (33/315, 11%, pdysphagia (pdysphagia. Summary MDASI-HN symptom scores did not significantly differ by ORN grade. Significantly higher symptom burden was reported, however, among ORN cases compared to those without ORN for MDASI-HN swallowing (p=0.033), problems with teeth and/or gums (p=0.016) and change in activity (p=0.015) item scores. ORN is associated with excess burden of chronic dysphagia and higher symptom severity related to swallowing, dentition and activity limitations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Survival period after tube feeding in bedridden older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Yoichi; Nakagawa-Satoh, Takuma; Ohrui, Takashi; Fujii, Masahiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Hidetada

    2012-04-01

    We prospectively studied survival periods after tube feeding. Participants were 163 bedridden older patients suffering from dysphagia. A wide range of survival periods after tube feeding were observed within half a year without tube feeding after being bedridden. After this initial period, survival periods after tube feeding were limited to approximately half a year. Survival periods after tube feeding were positively proportional to the length of time patients were free from pneumonia after tube feeding. After tube feeding, patients died from pneumonia within half a year, and the frequency of pneumonia was 3.1 ± 2.7 times (mean ± SD) before death. Survival periods after tube feeding for less than 1 year were primarily determined by being bedridden for more than half a year without tube feeding and once pneumonia occurred; patients who were tube fed did not survive for more than half a year. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  6. Dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy: Evaluation of risk factors and assessment of endoscopic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Anand; Yewale, Sayali; Tran, Tung; Brebbia, John S; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2016-12-21

    To evaluate the risks of medical conditions, evaluate gastric sleeve narrowing, and assess hydrostatic balloon dilatation to treat dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG). VSG is being performed more frequently worldwide as a treatment for medically-complicated obesity, and dysphagia is common post-operatively. We hypothesize that post-operative dysphagia is related to underlying medical conditions or narrowing of the gastric sleeve. This is a retrospective, single institution study of consecutive patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy from 2013 to 2015. Patients with previous bariatric procedures were excluded. Narrowing of a gastric sleeve includes: inability to pass a 9.6 mm gastroscope due to stenosis or sharp angulation or spiral hindering its passage. Of 400 consecutive patients, 352 are included; the prevalence of dysphagia is 22.7%; 33 patients (9.3%) have narrowing of the sleeve with 25 (7.1%) having sharp angulation or a spiral while 8 (2.3%) have a stenosis. All 33 patients underwent balloon dilatation of the gastric sleeve and dysphagia resolved in 13 patients (39%); 10 patients (30%) noted resolution of dysphagia after two additional dilatations. In a multivariate model, medical conditions associated with post-operative dysphagia include diabetes mellitus, symptoms of esophageal reflux, a low whole blood thiamine level, hypothyroidism, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and use of opioids. Narrowing of the gastric sleeve and gastric sleeve stenosis are common after VSG. Endoscopic balloon dilatations of the gastric sleeve resolves dysphagia in 69% of patients.

  7. Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscles and nerves used for swallowing may cause dysphagia. For example, people with diseases of the nervous system, such as cerebral palsy or Parkinson’s disease, often have problems swallowing. Additionally, stroke or ...

  8. Endoscopic findings in patients presenting with oesophageal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Adil Naseer; Said, Khalid; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Ali, Kishwar; Hidayat, Rania; Latif, Humera

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia is the difficulty in swallowing and is often described by the patients as a 'perception' that there is an impediment to the normal passage of the swallowed material. It is frequently observed that there is an association of dysphagia with serious underlying disorders and warrants early evaluation. The current study aimed to determine the frequency of common endoscopic findings in patients presenting with oesophageal dysphagia. This cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out in the department of Gastroenterology, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad, from October 2012 to April 2013. Consecutive patients with dysphagia were included in the study and were subjected to endoscopy. A total of 139 patients presenting with dysphagia were studied, 81 (58.3%) were males and 58 (41.7%) were females. The mean age was 52.41 ± 16.42. Malignant oesophageal stricture was the most common finding noted in 38 (27.3%) patients with 28 (73.7%) males and 23 (60.5%) patients among them were above the age of 50 years. It was followed by normal upper Gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy in 29 (20.9%) patients and reflux esophagitis in 25 (18.0%) patients. Schatzki's ring was present in 14 (10.1%) patients; benign oesophageal strictures in 12 (8.6%) patients while achalasia was noted in 7 (5.0%) patients. 14(10.1%) patients had findings other than the ones mentioned above. Malignancies are a more common cause of dysphagia in our population and early diagnosis can result in proper treatment of many of these cases.

  9. Esophageal peristaltic defects in adults with functional dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratuapli, Shiva K; Hansel, Stephanie L; Umar, Sarah B; Burdick, George E; Ramirez, Francisco C; Fleischer, David E; Harris, Lucinda A; Lacy, Brian E; DiBaise, John K; Crowell, Michael D

    2014-08-01

    Functional dysphagia (FD) is characterized by the presence of dysphagia without evidence of mechanical esophageal obstruction, GERD, and histopathology-based esophageal motor disorders. Dysphagia is common in older patients; however, there is a paucity of information regarding the type and frequency of peristaltic abnormalities compared to younger patients. Based on recently validated criteria for classification of weak peristalsis using high-resolution manometry (HRM), we hypothesized that older patients with FD would have more peristaltic defects detected by HRM compared to younger FD patients. A retrospective review of our motility database yielded 65 patients that met inclusion criteria. Patients were divided into two groups based on age (younger: dysphagia, or quality of life. Dyspeptic symptoms, including nausea (p 5 cm) (p < 0.001). The mean contraction amplitude was also lower in the older group (p < 0.05). These data support the hypothesis that older patients with FD have a higher frequency of peristaltic abnormalities on HRM compared to younger patients. Older age was associated with increased frequency of weak peristalsis with small and large peristaltic defects.

  10. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutt, Polly; Love, Jo; Clavé, Pere; Cohen, David; Dziewas, Rainer; Iversen, Helle K.; Ledl, Christian; Ragab, Suzanne; Soda, Hassan; Warusevitane, Anushka; Woisard, Virginie; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials. Methods— We randomly assigned 162 patients with a recent ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and dysphagia, defined as a penetration aspiration score (PAS) of ≥3 on video fluoroscopy, to PES or sham treatment given on 3 consecutive days. The primary outcome was swallowing safety, assessed using the PAS, at 2 weeks. Secondary outcomes included dysphagia severity, function, quality of life, and serious adverse events at 6 and 12 weeks. Results— In randomized patients, the mean age was 74 years, male 58%, ischemic stroke 89%, and PAS 4.8. The mean treatment current was 14.8 (7.9) mA and duration 9.9 (1.2) minutes per session. On the basis of previous data, 45 patients (58.4%) randomized to PES seemed to receive suboptimal stimulation. The PAS at 2 weeks, adjusted for baseline, did not differ between the randomized groups: PES 3.7 (2.0) versus sham 3.6 (1.9), P=0.60. Similarly, the secondary outcomes did not differ, including clinical swallowing and functional outcome. No serious adverse device-related events occurred. Conclusions— In patients with subacute stroke and dysphagia, PES was safe but did not improve dysphagia. Undertreatment of patients receiving PES may have contributed to the neutral result. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN25681641. PMID:27165955

  11. Electrical stimulation therapy for dysphagia: a follow-up survey of USA dysphagia practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barikroo, Ali; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare current application, practice patterns, clinical outcomes, and professional attitudes of dysphagia practitioners regarding electrical stimulation (e-stim) therapy with similar data obtained in 2005. A web-based survey was posted on the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Special Interest Group 13 webpage for 1 month. A total of 271 survey responses were analyzed and descriptively compared with the archived responses from the 2005 survey. Results suggested that e-stim application increased by 47% among dysphagia practitioners over the last 10 years. The frequency of weekly e-stim therapy sessions decreased while the reported total number of treatment sessions increased between the two surveys. Advancement in oral diet was the most commonly reported improvement in both surveys. Overall, reported satisfaction levels of clinicians and patients regarding e-stim therapy decreased. Still, the majority of e-stim practitioners continue to recommend this treatment modality to other dysphagia practitioners. Results from the novel items in the current survey suggested that motor level e-stim (e.g. higher amplitude) is most commonly used during dysphagia therapy with no preferred electrode placement. Furthermore, the majority of clinicians reported high levels of self-confidence regarding their ability to perform e-stim. The results of this survey highlight ongoing changes in application, practice patterns, clinical outcomes, and professional attitudes associated with e-stim therapy among dysphagia practitioners.

  12. Dysphagia due to tardive dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pookala S Bhat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dyskinesia (TD, neuroleptic-induced delayed onset movement disorder, remains an enigmatic phenomenon and a therapeutic challenge. Only a few cases of dysphagia also have been reported in world literature and to the best knowledge of the authors no case of TD manifesting as isolated dysphagia has been reported so far from India. We report a case of TD consequent to prolonged exposure to typical neuroleptics, manifesting as isolated dysphagia who responded well to a combination of Quetiapine, Donepezil and Vit E.

  13. Pneumoperitoneum with Subcutaneous Emphysema after Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin Iscan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is a safe way for enteral nutrition in selected patients. Generally, complications of this procedure are very rare but due to patients general health condition, delayed diagnosis and treatment of complications can be life threatening. In this study, we present a PEG-related massive pneumoperitoneum and subcutaneous emphysema in a patient with neuro-Behçet.

  14. Dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy: Evaluation of risk factors and assessment of endoscopic intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Anand; Yewale, Sayali; Tran, Tung; Brebbia, John S; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the risks of medical conditions, evaluate gastric sleeve narrowing, and assess hydrostatic balloon dilatation to treat dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG). METHODS VSG is being performed more frequently worldwide as a treatment for medically-complicated obesity, and dysphagia is common post-operatively. We hypothesize that post-operative dysphagia is related to underlying medical conditions or narrowing of the gastric sleeve. This is a retrospective, single institution study of consecutive patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy from 2013 to 2015. Patients with previous bariatric procedures were excluded. Narrowing of a gastric sleeve includes: inability to pass a 9.6 mm gastroscope due to stenosis or sharp angulation or spiral hindering its passage. RESULTS Of 400 consecutive patients, 352 are included; the prevalence of dysphagia is 22.7%; 33 patients (9.3%) have narrowing of the sleeve with 25 (7.1%) having sharp angulation or a spiral while 8 (2.3%) have a stenosis. All 33 patients underwent balloon dilatation of the gastric sleeve and dysphagia resolved in 13 patients (39%); 10 patients (30%) noted resolution of dysphagia after two additional dilatations. In a multivariate model, medical conditions associated with post-operative dysphagia include diabetes mellitus, symptoms of esophageal reflux, a low whole blood thiamine level, hypothyroidism, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and use of opioids. CONCLUSION Narrowing of the gastric sleeve and gastric sleeve stenosis are common after VSG. Endoscopic balloon dilatations of the gastric sleeve resolves dysphagia in 69% of patients. PMID:28058017

  15. Evaluation of the benefits of gastric tube feeding in an elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J P; Odell, P; Nelson, C

    1993-09-01

    To assess the benefits of gastric tube feeding in an elderly community hospital population. One hundred consecutive patients who required feeding gastrostomies from July 1984 through June 1987. Durham (NC) Regional Hospital, a 380-bed community hospital. Patients were evaluated using a quality of life scale (QL scale) adapted from Spitzer's QL Index. The evaluation was based on hospital records at the time of tube placement and interviews with patients or family members at follow-up between June 1991 and March 1992. Subjective evaluation of the benefits of gastric tube feeding were obtained in interviews with patients or their families at follow-up. Overall there was no significant change in the objective evaluation of quality of life at follow-up. Men, patients over 76 years of age, and patients with chronic illnesses such as multiple strokes or dementia showed the poorest response on the QL scale. Subjective evaluation by patients or their family members was positively correlated with objective evaluation on the QL scale. Family members of patients who showed the poorest response on the QL scale were more likely than other family members to respond no to the question, "Would you want this done to you if you were in his/her situation?" Our QL scale provides a good indication of patients' and family members' subjective evaluation of the benefits of gastrostomy tube feeding after 4 to 8 years. Thus, the scale should be helpful to physicians who must consult with patients and their families and make decisions about the use of this procedure. The significant discrepancy between family members' evaluations of the benefit of the procedure to the patient and their refusal of the procedure for themselves if they were in the patient's situation confirms the need for advance directives and the importance of conscientious implementation of the Patient Self Determination Act of 1990.

  16. Clinical Characteristics of Dysphagia in Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Arwen; Maybee, Jennifer; Moran, Maura K; Wolter-Warmerdam, Kristine; Hickey, Francis

    2016-10-01

    Aspiration is an often unrecognized comorbidity in children with Down syndrome with serious medical consequences. This retrospective chart review of swallow study reports characterizes oral and pharyngeal phase dysphagia and diet modifications on videofluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) in a large cohort of children with Down syndrome. A total of 158 pediatric patients (male = 95; female = 63; mean age 2.10 years, SD 3.17 years) received an initial VFSS at a pediatric teaching hospital as part of their medical care. A total of 56.3 % (n = 89) children had pharyngeal phase dysphagia with aspiration and deep laryngeal penetration occurring most frequently. Of the 61 patients who aspirated, 90.2 % (n = 55) did so silently with no cough or overt clinical symptoms. In 76.7 % of cases of pharyngeal phase dysphagia, a functional feeding plan, with use of thickened liquids or change in feeding system to control flow rate and/or bolus size, was able to be established, which allowed children to continue eating by mouth. Thickened liquids (76.7 %, n = 46) were the most effective adaptation, with change in feeding system alone effective in only 8.3 % (n = 5) cases. Oral phase dysphagia was reported in the majority of patients (63.8 %, n = 88/138); however, this was not predictive of pharyngeal phase dysphagia. Age, sex, and reason for referral, including prior clinical symptoms, did not have a statistically significant impact on the presence of dysphagia. This comprehensive review has application to clinical understanding and management of dysphagia in children with Down syndrome.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Swallowing Function Between Dysphagia Patients and Healthy Subjects Using High-Resolution Manometry

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Taek; Yi, Youbin; Lee, Jung-Sang; Kim, Kunwoo; Park, Jung Ho; Yoon, Kyung Jae

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare swallowing function between healthy subjects and patients with pharyngeal dysphagia using high resolution manometry (HRM) and to evaluate the usefulness of HRM for detecting pharyngeal dysphagia. Methods Seventy-five patients with dysphagia and 28 healthy subjects were included in this study. Diagnosis of dysphagia was confirmed by a videofluoroscopy. HRM was performed to measure pressure and timing information at the velopharynx (VP), tongue base (TB), and upper esophage...

  18. Acute and long-term dysphagia in critically ill patients with severe sepsis: results of a prospective controlled observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielske, Joerg; Bohne, Silvia; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Axer, Hubertus; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-11-01

    Dysphagia is a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs). Structured otorhinolaryngological data on dysphagia in ICU survivors with severe sepsis are missing. In a prospective study, 30 ICU patients with severe sepsis and thirty without sepsis as control group were examined using bedside fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing after 14 days in the ICU (T1) and 4 months after onset of critical illness (T2). Swallowing dysfunction was assessed using the Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS). The Functional Oral Intake Scale was applied to evaluate the diet needed. Primary endpoint was the burden of dysphagia defined as PAS score >5. At T1, 19 of 30 severe sepsis patients showed aspiration with a PAS score >5, compared to 7 of 30 in critically ill patients without severe sepsis (p = 0.002). Severe sepsis and tracheostomy were independent risk factors for severe dysphagia with aspiration (PAS > 5) at T1 (p = 0.042 and 0.006, respectively). 4-month mortality (T2) was 57 % in severe sepsis patients compared to 20 % in patients without severe sepsis (p = 0.006). At T2, more severe sepsis survivors were tracheostomy-dependent and needed more often tube or parenteral feeding (p = 0.014 and p = 0.040, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed tracheostomy at T1 as independent risk factor for severe dysphagia at T2 (p = 0.030). Severe sepsis appears to be a relevant risk factor for long-term dysphagia. An otorhinolaryngological evaluation of dysphagia at ICU discharge is mandatory for survivors of severe critical illness to plan specific swallowing rehabilitation programs.

  19. Comparison of dysphagia outcomes between rostral and caudal lateral medullary infarct patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Min Ho; Kim, Daeha; Chang, Min Cheol

    2017-11-01

    A detailed knowledge of dysphagia outcomes in lateral medullary infarct (LMI) patients would enable proper establishment of swallowing therapy goals and strategies. However, little is known about the impact of infarct location on dysphagia outcomes in patients with LMI. Twenty patients with rostral LMI (rostral group) and 20 patients with caudal LMI (caudal group) participated in the study. All patients underwent swallowing therapy, which included compensatory treatments and strengthening exercises, for >3 months. Dysphagia evaluation was performed twice (during the subacute stage and six months after stroke onset) using videofluoroscopic swallowing studies. Dysphagia degree was assessed using the functional dysphagia scale (FDS), the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Outcome Measurement System (NOMS) swallowing scale. In the subacute stage, the rostral group had significantly higher FDS and PAS scores and a significantly lower ASHA NOMS score than the caudal group. Patients from both groups showed significant improvement from the initial evaluation to the six-month evaluation. There were no significant differences in these scale scores between the two groups at the six-month evaluation. In the subacute stage, patients in the rostral group had more severe dysphagia than those in the caudal group. Dysphagia improved in both groups after 3-6 months of swallowing therapy. At six months after onset, there were no significant differences in dysphagia severity between the two groups. Recovery from dysphagia after LMI was observed regardless of the infarct location.

  20. [Causes, diagnosis and treatment of neurogenic dysphagia as an interdisciplinary clinical problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Jurek

    2006-01-01

    The intricate mechanism of swallowing can be divided into three phases: oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal. Dysphagia is a disruption in the swallowing process, which include difficulty in transporting (or a lack of transporting) a food or liquid bolus from the mouth through the pharynx and esophagus into the stomach. Causes of disruptions in the swallowing process can be divided into superior (oropharyngeal) and inferior (esophageal) according to Paradowski et al. Neurlologic dysphagia may be caused by a disruption in different parts of the central nervous system (supranuclear level, level of motor and sensory nuclei taking part in swallowing process, peripherial nerves level and a pathology of muscle cells and spindles) or neuromuscular and muscular disorders. Neuromuscular disorders causes according to Waśko-Czopnik et al. are: stroke, brain tumors, brain injury, bulbar and pseudobulbar paralysis, neurodegenerative diseases (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis), tabes dorsalis, multisystem degenerations, Parkinson's disease, delayed dyskineses, Huntington's disease, myasthenia and myasthenic syndromes, myopathies and peripherial neuropathies. The correct diagnosis evaluation include history taking, physical examination with palpation and consultations (laryngological, gastrological and neurological). According to Halama radiological esophagogram, videofluoroscopy, flexible endoscopic examination, ultrasound examination, manometry, electromyography, scintigraphy and 24 hour pH monitoring are main diagnostic procedures of dysphagia. Some of the reasons for the neurologic dysphagia may be treated by surgical and pharmacological methods. Neurologic dysphagia rehabilitation is difficult, long-lasting and often falling far short of expected results. Primary it should include neurologic cause treatment if it is possible. According to WHO International Classification of Functioning and Health in 2001 non-invasive methods of dysphagia treatment may be

  1. Treatment effects for dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooren, M R A; Baijens, L W J; Voskuilen, S; Oosterloo, M; Kremer, B

    2014-08-01

    Dysphagia remains a common problem in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous systematic reviews on therapy effects for oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD have shown a lack of evidence. In the past 5 years several placebo or sham-controlled trials with varying results have been published. The aim of this systematic literature review is to summarize and qualitatively analyze the published studies on this matter. Studies published up to December 2013 were found via a systematic comprehensive electronic database search using PubMed, Embase, and The Cochrane Library. Two reviewers independently assessed the studies using strict inclusion criteria. Twelve studies were included and qualitatively analyzed using critical appraisal items. The review includes rehabilitative (exercises, electrical stimulation, bolus modification etc.) and pharmacologic treatment. Some well-designed controlled trials were included. However, none of the included studies fulfilled all criteria for external and internal validity. A meta-analysis was not carried out as most of the studies were not of sufficient quality to warrant doing so. Expiratory Muscle Strength Training (EMST) and Video-Assisted Swallowing Therapy (VAST) may be effective dysphagia treatments solely or in addition to dopaminergic therapy for PD. However, these preliminary results warrant further investigation concerning their clinical applicability, and further research should be based on randomized sham-controlled trials to determine the effectiveness and long-term effects of different therapies for dysphagia in PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dysphagia as initial presentation of primary amyloidosis

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    Piyush Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis involves all parts of the gastrointestinal tract including the esophagus. The esophageal involvement in amyloidosis has been reported to vary from 13% in a radiology study to 22% in an autopsy series; however, such patients have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. Dysphagia is an uncommon presentation of amyloidosis. We report a 64-year-old patient who presented with progressive dysphagia of 4 months duration which was confirmed to be due to primary amyloidosis with multiple myeloma. The esophageal involvement by amyloidosis was confirmed by esophageal mucosal biopsies, and 22-channel high-resolution manometry.

  3. [Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrup, I; Warnecke, T

    2016-07-01

    Oropharyngeal and esophageal dysphagia are a frequent, but seldom diagnosed symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). More than 80 % of patients with PD develop dysphagia during the course of their disease leading to a reduced quality of life, complicated medication intake, malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. The underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. Impaired dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms of the cortical swallowing network as well as peripheral neuromuscular involvement have been suggested to contribute to its multifactorial genesis. Diagnostic screening methods include PD-specific questionnaires and a modified water test. Fiber optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS), which complement each other, are the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. For evaluation of esophageal dysphagia, the high-resolution manometry (HRM) may be a helpful tool. In addition to dysphagia-specific treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs), optimized dopaminergic medication is a meaningful therapeutic option. A promising novel method is intensive training of expiratory muscle strength (EMST). Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinically relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. [Dysphagia rehabilitation in visiting home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohara, Haruka; Iida, Takatoshi; Inoue, Motoharu; Sato, Mitsuyasu; Wada, Satoko; Sanpei, Ryuichi; Okada, Takeshi; Shimano, Takaya; Ebihara, Katsuko; Ueda, Koichiro

    2010-12-01

    Dysphagia can cause aspiration pneumonia. The condition of dysphagia is difficult to evaluate from outside. Therefore, a careful examination is necessary to grasp the state of swallowing of a patient accurately. However, it has been a difficult situation for a patient who cannot come to hospital for some reason to be examined by video fluoroscopy or video endoscopy. In recent years, a usefulness of video endoscopy in visiting home examination for dysphagia has been reported several times. And this video endoscopy examination is a valuable tool to detect a discrepancy between swallowing function and nutritional intake of the patient. Cooperative rehabilitation with such a careful examination is an important issue to be successful in dysphagia rehabilitation.

  5. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Acute Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Faezeh Asadollahpour; Kowsar Baghban; Mojgan Asadi; Ehsan Naderifar; Maryam Dehghani

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of different kinds of swallowing disorder and it’s severity in patients after stroke. Patients and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 91 consecutive stroke patients were screened by the Northwestern Dysphagia Patient Check Sheet (NDPCS) and the Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). Results: Forty seven percent of those assessed demonstrated signs of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Mild dysphagia was seen in (10.98%) pat...

  6. Omission of Dysphagia Therapies in Hospital Discharge Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Amy; Anderson, Paul; Hind, Jacqueline; Robbins, JoAnne; Smith, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the wide implementation of dysphagia therapies, it is unclear whether these therapies are successfully communicated beyond the inpatient setting. Objective To examine the rate of dysphagia recommendation omissions in hospital discharge summaries for high-risk sub-acute care (i.e., skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation, long-term care) populations. Design Retrospective cohort study Subjects All stroke and hip fracture patients billed for inpatient dysphagia evaluations by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and discharged to sub-acute care in 2003-2005 from a single large academic medical center (N=187). Measurements Dysphagia recommendations from final SLP hospital notes and from hospital (physician) discharge summaries were abstracted, coded, and compared for each patient. Recommendation categories included: dietary (food and liquid), postural/compensatory techniques (e.g., chin-tuck), rehabilitation (e.g., exercise), meal pacing (e.g., small bites), medication delivery (e.g., crush pills), and provider/supervision (e.g., 1-to-1 assist). Results 45% of discharge summaries omitted all SLP dysphagia recommendations. 47%(88/186) of patients with SLP dietary recommendations, 82%(93/114) with postural, 100%(16/16) with rehabilitation, 90%(69/77) with meal pacing, 95%(21/22) with medication, and 79%(96/122) with provider/supervision recommendations had these recommendations completely omitted from their discharge summaries. Conclusions Discharge summaries omitted all categories of SLP recommendations at notably high rates. Improved post-hospital communication strategies are needed for discharges to sub-acute care. PMID:20098999

  7. Progression of Dysphagia in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isono, Chiharu; Hirano, Makito; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Ueno, Shuichi; Kusunoki, Susumu; Nakamura, Yusaku

    2017-06-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant triplet repeat disease, predominantly affects the cerebellum with a late onset and generally good prognosis. Dysphagia is commonly associated with the outcomes of neurodegenerative diseases such as SCA6. Although the characteristics of dysphagia have been rarely reported in SCA6, our previous study indicated that dysphagia is generally milder in SCA6 than in SCA3, another inherited ataxia with multisystem involvement. However, abnormalities in the pharyngeal phase in SCA6 were indistinguishable from those in SCA3, with no explainable reason. To determine the reason, we repeatedly performed videofluoroscopic examinations (VF) in 14 patients with SCA6. The results showed that the gross progression of dysphagia was apparently slow, but four patients had progressive dysphagia at an early disease stage; dysphagia began within 10 years from the onset of ataxia and rapidly progressed. A common clinical feature of the four patients was a significantly older age at the onset of ataxia (74.0 vs. 60.3 years), associated with significantly shorter triplet repeats. This finding surprisingly indicated that patients who had shorter repeats and thereby later onset and potentially better prognoses were at risk for dysphagia-associated problems. Ischemic changes, homozygous mutation, and diabetes mellitus as well as aging might have contributed to the observed progressive dysphagia. We found that conventionally monitored somatosensory evoked potentials at least partly reflected progressive dysphagia. Despite the small study group, our findings suggest that clinicians should carefully monitor dysphagia in patients with SCA6 who are older at disease onset (>60 years).

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Swallowing Function Between Dysphagia Patients and Healthy Subjects Using High-Resolution Manometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare swallowing function between healthy subjects and patients with pharyngeal dysphagia using high resolution manometry (HRM) and to evaluate the usefulness of HRM for detecting pharyngeal dysphagia. Methods Seventy-five patients with dysphagia and 28 healthy subjects were included in this study. Diagnosis of dysphagia was confirmed by a videofluoroscopy. HRM was performed to measure pressure and timing information at the velopharynx (VP), tongue base (TB), and upper esophageal sphincter (UES). HRM parameters were compared between dysphagia and healthy groups. Optimal threshold values of significant HRM parameters for dysphagia were determined. Results VP maximal pressure, TB maximal pressure, UES relaxation duration, and UES resting pressure were lower in the dysphagia group than those in healthy group. UES minimal pressure was higher in dysphagia group than in the healthy group. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were conducted to validate optimal threshold values for significant HRM parameters to identify patients with pharyngeal dysphagia. With maximal VP pressure at a threshold value of 144.0 mmHg, dysphagia was identified with 96.4% sensitivity and 74.7% specificity. With maximal TB pressure at a threshold value of 158.0 mmHg, dysphagia was identified with 96.4% sensitivity and 77.3% specificity. At a threshold value of 2.0 mmHg for UES minimal pressure, dysphagia was diagnosed at 74.7% sensitivity and 60.7% specificity. Lastly, UES relaxation duration of dysphagia. Conclusion We present evidence that HRM could be a useful evaluation tool for detecting pharyngeal dysphagia. PMID:29201816

  9. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Practice Guidelines: Evaluation of Dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W Cockeram

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia may be defined as difficulty in swallowing. Dysphagia may be classified as oropharyngeal or esophageal; oropharyngeal dysphagia arises from a structural or functional abnormality in the oropharynx, and esophageal dysphagia occurs as a result of structural or functional abnormalities in the esophagus. Esophageal dysphagia may be further subclassified symptomatically as dysphagia for solids alone, which usually suggests a mechanical problem, versus dysphagia for liquids and solids, which is more suggestive of a neuromuscular problem. Dysphagia may be described by the patient as a sensation of food 'sticking' or as a sensation of food passing slowly through the esophagus. True dysphagia always indicates organic disease and always warrants investigation and consultation if no cause is found in initial studies. These symptoms should be distinguished from those of a persistent foreign body-type sensation or a sensation of a lump, which is more typical of globus sensation. Odynophagia, defined as pain with swallowing, may occur in association with esophageal dysmotility or as a result of mucosal disease in the esophagus.

  10. Ultrasonography to Measure Swallowing Muscle Mass and Quality in Older Patients With Sarcopenic Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Nami; Mori, Takashi; Fujishima, Ichiro; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Itoda, Masataka; Kunieda, Kenjiro; Shigematsu, Takashi; Nishioka, Shinta; Tohara, Haruka; Yamada, Minoru; Ogawa, Sumito

    2018-06-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is characterized by difficulty swallowing due to a loss of whole-body skeletal and swallowing muscle mass and function. However, no study has reported on swallowing muscle mass and quality in patients with sarcopenic dysphagia. To compare the differences in swallowing muscle mass and quality between sarcopenic and nonsarcopenic dysphagia. A cross-sectional study was performed in 55 older patients, who had been recommended to undergo dysphagia assessment and/or rehabilitation. Sarcopenic dysphagia was diagnosed using a diagnostic algorithm for sarcopenic dysphagia. The thickness and area of tongue muscle and geniohyoid muscle (coronal plane and sagittal plane), and the echo-intensity of the tongue and geniohyoid muscles were examined by ultrasound. The study participants included 31 males and 24 females (mean age of 82 ± 7 years), with 14 having possible sarcopenic dysphagia, 22 probable sarcopenic dysphagia, and 19 without sarcopenic dysphagia. The group with sarcopenic dysphagia had a significantly lower cross-sectional area and area of brightness of the tongue muscle than that observed in the group without sarcopenic dysphagia. The most specific factor for identifying the presence of sarcopenic dysphagia was tongue muscle area (sensitivity, 0.389; specificity, 0.947; cut-off value, 1536.0), while the factor with the highest sensitivity was geniohyoid muscle area brightness in sagittal sections (sensitivity, 0.806; specificity, 0.632; cut-off value, 20.1). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the area of the tongue muscle and its area of brightness were independent risk factors for sarcopenic dysphagia. However, geniohyoid sagittal muscle area and area of brightness showed no significant independent association with sarcopenic dysphagia. Tongue muscle mass in patients with sarcopenic dysphagia was smaller than that in patients without the condition. Sarcopenic dysphagia was also associated with increased intensity of the

  11. Buried bumber syndrome (internal button buried of the gastrostomy): Unearthing the solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Nelson; Otero, William; Gomez, Martin; Bula, Rodrigo; Otero, Elder

    2006-01-01

    The Buried bumper syndrome is a major complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and the literature of in of having described of rarely. The physiopathology is the gastric isquemy of the mucous one for an excessive pressure for the ends that fix the gastrostomy. Their clinical manifestations that depend on the depth of migration of the end go from the absence of symptoms, spill of the nutrition enteral being the most frequent, until peritonitis. The diverse described treatment modalities are based on the depth of migration of the end valued endoscopically. The successful use of the ecoendosonography is described for the estimate of the depth of the migration, when you cannot visualize the end internal endoscopically and we propose a handling .algorithm based on this technique

  12. Thyrotoxic Dysphagia in an 82-Year-Old Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Parperis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is a common problem in elderly patients and a rare manifestation of Graves' disease. We report a case of an 82-year-old male who presented with a 4-week history of dysphagia and weight loss. Workup for his dysphagia with upper endoscopy, MRI brain, electromyography, acetyl-cholinesterase receptor antibodies, and voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. Modified Barium swallow test showed oropharyngeal dysphagia. Thyroid function tests that revealed hyperthyroidism and antibodies to TSH-receptor were positive. Based on the above findings, we considered Graves' disease as the most likely diagnosis. Patient was treated with methimazole and beta-blockers and subsequently his dysphagia resolved. This paper highlights the importance to clinicians of considering thyrotoxicosis as possible diagnosis in an elderly patient presenting with unexplained dysphagia.

  13. Clinical evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Machado-Joseph disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Mello Alves Corrêa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: In Machado-Joseph disease, poor posture, dystonia and peripheral neuropathy are extremely predisposing to oropharyngeal dysphagia, which is more commonly associated with muscular dystrophy. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical characteristics of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Machado-Joseph disease patients. METHOD: Forty individuals participated in this study, including 20 with no clinical complaints and 20 dysphagic patients with Machado-Joseph disease of clinical type 1, who were all similar in terms of gender distribution, average age, and cognitive function. The medical history of each patient was reviewed and each subject underwent a clinical evaluation of deglutition. At the end, the profile of dysphagia in patients with Machado-Joseph disease was classified according to the Severity Scale of Dysphagia, as described by O'Neil and collaborators. RESULTS: Comparison between dysphagic patients and controls did not reveal many significant differences with respect to the clinical evaluation of the oral phase of deglutition, since afflicted patients only demonstrated deficits related to the protrusion, retraction and tonus of the tongue. However, several significant differences were observed with respect to the pharyngeal phase. Dysphagic patients presented pharyngeal stasis during deglutition of liquids and solids, accompanied by coughing and/or choking as well as penetration and/or aspiration; these signs were absent in the controls. CONCLUSIONS: Oropharyngeal dysphagia is part of the Machado-Joseph disease since the first neurological manifestations. There is greater involvement of the pharyngeal phase, in relation to oral phase of the deglutition. The dysphagia of these patients is classified between mild and moderate.

  14. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Dysphagia: A Systematic Review of Instrument Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dhyanesh A.; Sharda, Rohit; Hovis, Kristen L.; Nichols, Erin E.; Sathe, Nila; Penson, David F.; Feurer, Irene D.; McPheeters, Melissa L.; Vaezi, Michael F.; Francis, David O.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are commonly used to capture patient experience with dysphagia and to evaluate treatment effectiveness. Inappropriate application can lead to distorted results in clinical studies. A systematic review of the literature on dysphagia-related PRO measures was performed to 1) identify all currently available measures and 2) to evaluate each for the presence of important measurement properties that would affect their applicability. Design MEDLINE via the PubMed interface, the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and the Health and Psychosocial Instrument database were searched using relevant vocabulary terms and key terms related to PRO measures and dysphagia. Three independent investigators performed abstract and full text reviews. Each study meeting criteria was evaluated using an 18-item checklist developed a priori that assessed multiple domains: 1) conceptual model, 2) content validity, 3) reliability, 4) construct validity, 6) scoring and interpretation, and 7) burden and presentation. Results Of 4950 abstracts reviewed, a total of 34 dysphagia-related PRO measures (publication year 1987 – 2014) met criteria for extraction and analysis. Several PRO measures were of high quality (MADS for achalasia, SWAL-QOL and SSQ for oropharyngeal dysphagia, PROMIS-GI for general dysphagia, EORTC-QLQ-OG25 for esophageal cancer, ROMP-swallowing for Parkinson’s disease, DSQ-EoE for eosinophilic esophagitis, and SOAL for total laryngectomy-related dysphagia). In all, 17 met at least one criterion per domain. Thematic deficiencies in current measures were evident including: 1) direct patient involvement in content development, 2) empirically justified dimensionality, 3) demonstrable responsiveness to change, 4) plan for interpreting missing responses, and 5) literacy level assessment. Conclusion This is the first comprehensive systematic review assessing developmental properties of all available dysphagia

  15. The incidences and risk factors related to early dysphagia after anterior cervical spine surgery: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Tong, Wei-Lai; Chen, Xuan-Yin; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Wen-Zhao; Huang, Shan-Hu; Liu, Zhi-Li

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common complication following anterior cervical spine surgery (ACSS). The incidences of dysphagia were variable and controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of early dysphagia after ACSS with a new scoring system, and to identify the risk factors of it. A prospective study was carried out and patients who underwent ACSS from March 2014 to August 2014 in our hospital were included in this study. A self-designed dysphagia questionnaire was delivered to all of the patients from the first day to the fifth day after ACSS. Perioperative characteristics of patients were recorded, and incidences and risk factors of dysphagia were analyzed. A total of 104 patients who underwent ACSS were included and incidences of dysphagia from the first to the fifth day after ACSS was 87.5%, 79.81%, 62.14%, 50% and 44.23%, respectively. There was a good correlation between the new dysphagia scoring system and Bazaz scoring system (P dysphagia during the first to the second day postoperatively. However, the dC2-C7angle was the main risk factor for dysphagia from the third to the fifth day after surgery. There were comparatively high incidences of early dysphagia after ACSS, which may be ascribed to operative time, BMI and the dC2-C7 angle.

  16. Efficacy of radiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yuri; Niibe, Yuzuru; Terahara, Atsuro; Shimada, Hideaki; Yajima, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively assess the efficacy of radiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia due to the primary lesion at our institute, by evaluating change of Mellow-Pinkas-dysphagia score and subjective symptom. We confarmed radiotherapy for esophageal cancer help improve dysphagia. Change of Mel-low-Pinkas-dysphagia score throughout radiotherapy did not match with change of subjective dysphagia, which have relevancy to patients' quality of life. New evaluation criterion is required. (author)

  17. Transgastrostomy jejunal intubation for enteric alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, G K; Rombeau, J L; Caldwell, M D; Ring, E J; Freiman, D B

    1982-12-01

    Malnourished patients who cannot maintain an adequate oral intake but have normal intestinal absorption and motility are candidates for enteric alimentation. When impaired gastric peristalsis or an increased risk for aspiration makes gastrostomy feeding unsafe, direct jejunal infusion is the preferred route of alimentation. Angiographic techniques were used to convert previously placed, simple gastrostomies to combined gastrostomy-jejunostomies in 14 patients. In 17 additional patients, a combined gastrostomy-jejunal tube was placed under local anesthesia; angiographic techniques assisted in the placement of 11 of these tubes.

  18. Dysphagia and sialorrhea: the relationship to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaretta, Denise Hack; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Mattos, James Pitágoras de; Maliska, Carmelindo; Costa, Milton M B

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease. The aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Two Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by the scintigraphic method, Videofluoroscopic examination of the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing showed that 94% of Parkinson's diseases patients present, structural causes, not related to Parkinson's diseases, able to produce or intensify the observed disphagia. The scintigraphic examination of Parkinson's diseases patients with sialorrhea showed that there is no increase of serous saliva production. Nevertheless, showed a significantly higher velocity of saliva excretion in the Parkinson's diseases patients. Dysphagia can be due to the muscular rigidity often present in the Parkinson's diseases patient, or more usually by non Parkinson's disease associated causes. In Parkinson's diseases patients, sialorrhea is produced by saliva retention. Nevertheless, sialorrhea can produce discomfort in swallowing, although without a formal complaint of dysphagia. In this case, subclinical dysphagia must be considered. Sialorrhea is indicative of dysphagia or at least of subclinical dysphagia. As final conclusion, Parkinson's diseases can be an isolated cause of dysphagia and/or sialorrhea, but frequently, a factor unrelated to Parkinson's diseases is the main cause of or at least aggravates the dysphagia.

  19. Dysphagia following stroke: evaluation with digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Sung Nam; Kang, Heoung Keun; Joo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Chang Il; Park, Soo Min; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Seo, Jeong Jin; Chung, Tae Woong [Chonnam Univ., Kwanju (Korea, Republic of). Medical School

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of digital radiography in the assessment of dysphagia following stroke. Eighteen stroke patients (8 men, 10 women) referred for dysphagia and ten controls without known pharyngeal swallowing difficulty underwent digital radiography using a 1:1 mixture of barium and water. We evaluated oropharyngeal transit time and the location and severity of dysphagia; transit time was defined as the time from the first movement of the bolus to the return of the epiglottis to its original position. We sought to observe specific patterns of oropharyngeal dysfunction; dysphagia was classified as mild, moderate, or severe. The dynamic image of the pharynx, as seen on a digital radiograph, may be diagnostically useful for defining the location and severity of dysphagia; in order to make feeding recommendations, this information is essential. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Dysphagia following stroke: evaluation with digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Sung Nam; Kang, Heoung Keun; Joo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Chang Il; Park, Soo Min; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Seo, Jeong Jin; Chung, Tae Woong

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of digital radiography in the assessment of dysphagia following stroke. Eighteen stroke patients (8 men, 10 women) referred for dysphagia and ten controls without known pharyngeal swallowing difficulty underwent digital radiography using a 1:1 mixture of barium and water. We evaluated oropharyngeal transit time and the location and severity of dysphagia; transit time was defined as the time from the first movement of the bolus to the return of the epiglottis to its original position. We sought to observe specific patterns of oropharyngeal dysfunction; dysphagia was classified as mild, moderate, or severe. The dynamic image of the pharynx, as seen on a digital radiograph, may be diagnostically useful for defining the location and severity of dysphagia; in order to make feeding recommendations, this information is essential. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs

  1. Thyrotoxic Dysphagia in an 82-Year-Old Male

    OpenAIRE

    Parperis, Konstantinos; Dadu, Ramona; Hoq, Sheikh; Argento, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in elderly patients and a rare manifestation of Graves' disease. We report a case of an 82-year-old male who presented with a 4-week history of dysphagia and weight loss. Workup for his dysphagia with upper endoscopy, MRI brain, electromyography, acetyl-cholinesterase receptor antibodies, and voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. Modified Barium swallow test showed oropharyngeal dysphagia. Thyroid function tests that revealed hyperthyroidism and...

  2. Implementation of a standardized out-of-hospital management method for Parkinson dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongying; Sun, Dongxiu; Liu, Meiping

    2017-12-01

    Our objective is to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of establishing a swallowing management clinic to implement out-of-hospital management for Parkinson disease (PD) patients with dysphagia. Two-hundred seventeen (217) voluntary PD patients with dysphagia in a PD outpatient clinic were divided into a control group with 100 people, and an experimental group with 117 people. The control group was given dysphagia rehabilitation guidance. The experimental group was presented with the standardized out-of-hospital management method as overall management and information and education materials. Rehabilitation efficiency and incidence rate of dysphagia, as well as relevant complications of both groups were compared after a 6-month intervention. Rehabilitation efficiency and the incidence rate of dysphagia including relevant complications of patients treated with the standardized out-of-hospital management were compared with those seen in the control group. The differences have distinct statistics meaning (pdysphagia complications and improve the quality of life in patients with PD.

  3. The correlation between dysphagia and involvement of the ambiguous nucleus on MRI in acute-phase lateral medullary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurono, Hiroko; Uesaka, Yoshikazu; Kunimoto, Masanari; Imafuku, Ichirou

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the clinical features and MRI findings of 21 patients admitted for acute lateral medullary syndrome, including 10 patients with dysphagia, were examined. According to Cytoarchitecture of the Human Brain Stem (Olszewski, J and Baxter, D), MRI-identified lesions were classified into four groups based on their location (upper, middle-upper, middle-lower, and lower parts of the medulla oblongata). We also examined whether each lesion involved the ambiguous nucleus (AN). We then studied the correlation between dysphagia and involvement of the AN. Ten patients had dysphagia, which improved very quickly in all but one. In the horizontal plane, lesions of all patients with dysphagia exhibited AN involvement, suggesting that dysphagia is strongly correlated with AN involvement. Among the 8 patients with lesions in the upper part of the medulla oblongata, the lesions of 7 patients included the AN, and 6 of those 7 patients had dysphagia. Among the 5 patients with lesions in the middle-upper part of the medulla oblongata, the lesions of two contained the AN, and one of those two patients had dysphagia. Among the 6 patients with lesions in the middle-lower part of the medulla oblongata, all lesions contained the AN, but only 3 of the patients exhibited dysphagia. In both patients who had lesions in the lower part of the medulla oblongata, the lesions did not include the AN and neither patient had dysphagia. Patients who had lesions involving the AN in the rostral part of the medulla oblongata were more likely to have dysphagia than the other patients. On the other hand, half of the patients with lesions involving the AN in the middle-lower part of the medulla oblongata did not have dysphagia. This might suggest that the caudal part of the AN has little involvement in the mechanisms of dysphagia. (author)

  4. Dysphagia is a common and serious problem for adults with mental illness: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Kristy J; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2012-03-01

    Adults with mental illness may experience a higher incidence of dysphagia and choking due to factors such as medication side effects and behavioural abnormalities. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of dysphagia and the most effective interventions for this population. Studies published up to August 2010 were sought via a comprehensive electronic database search (CINAHL, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase). Studies reporting dysphagia frequency or dysphagia intervention outcomes in adults with mental illness were included. Two reviewers independently assessed study eligibility and quality, and the results were synthesised descriptively. Ten studies were identified, each describing dysphagia frequency or death due to choking asphyxiation. No studies evaluating intervention effectiveness were identified. Study quality was limited by subjective assessment of outcomes. Six studies presented dysphagia frequencies ranging from 9 to 42% in varying subgroups. Four studies presented the frequency of choking asphyxiation death, including a large survey that concluded that adults with organic mental illness were 43 times more likely to die of this cause than the general population. Dysphagia is a common and significant cause of morbidity and mortality in adults with mental illness and our review found that there is a lack of studies evaluating the effectiveness of intervention techniques.

  5. Effect of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy on gastro-esophageal reflux in mechanically-ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douzinas, Emmanuel E; Tsapalos, Andreas; Dimitrakopoulos, Antonios; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Rapidis, Alexandros D; Roussos, Charis

    2006-01-07

    To investigate the effect of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) on gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in mechanically-ventilated patients. In a prospective, randomized, controlled study 36 patients with recurrent or persistent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and GER > 6% were divided into PEG group (n = 16) or non-PEG group (n = 20). Another 11 ventilated patients without reflux (GER Patients were strictly followed up for semi-recumbent position and control of gastric nutrient residue. A significant decrease of median (range) reflux was observed in PEG group from 7.8 (6.2 - 15.6) at baseline to 2.7 (0 - 10.4) on d 7 post-gastrostomy (P position and absence of nutrient gastric residue reduces the gastroesophageal reflux in ventilated patients.

  6. Dysphagia Aortica: Diagnostic Dilemma and Therapeutic Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivanesan Pitchai

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Dysphagia due to vascular diseases in the thoracic domain is an uncommon clinical entity. Patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm presenting with severe dysphagia deserve open surgical repair to provide optimal symptomatic relief in addition to saving life. The state-of-the-art endovascular stent grafting may be considered in very elderly patient having severe comorbidities presenting with mild dysphagia.

  7. Implementation of a standardized out-of-hospital management method for Parkinson dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongying Wei

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: Our objective is to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of establishing a swallowing management clinic to implement out-of-hospital management for Parkinson disease (PD patients with dysphagia. Method: Two-hundred seventeen (217 voluntary PD patients with dysphagia in a PD outpatient clinic were divided into a control group with 100 people, and an experimental group with 117 people. The control group was given dysphagia rehabilitation guidance. The experimental group was presented with the standardized out-of-hospital management method as overall management and information and education materials. Rehabilitation efficiency and incidence rate of dysphagia, as well as relevant complications of both groups were compared after a 6-month intervention. Results: Rehabilitation efficiency and the incidence rate of dysphagia including relevant complications of patients treated with the standardized out-of-hospital management were compared with those seen in the control group. The differences have distinct statistics meaning (p<0.01. Conclusion: Establishing a swallowing management protocol for outpatient setting can effectively help the recovery of the function of swallowing, reduce the incidence rate of dysphagia complications and improve the quality of life in patients with PD.

  8. Therapeutic effects of mosapride citrate and lansoprazole for prevention of aspiration pneumonia in patients receiving gastrostomy feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, Kento; Yoshida, Rihito; Horai, Aya; Satake, Shinya; Ose, Takayuki; Kitajima, Naoto; Yoneda, Shushi; Adachi, Kyoichi; Amano, Yuji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2013-10-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is an emerging problem in patients receiving gastrostomy feeding. This study is designed to clarify the therapeutic effects of mosapride citrate and lansoprazole for prevention of aspiration pneumonia in patients receiving gastrostomy feeding. The study subjects were 119 patients with dysphasia who required gastrostomy feeding. They were randomly assigned to the control (without medication), lansoprazole (15 mg, 1/day), and mosapride (5 mg, 3/day) groups. The number of days with fever (≥37.8 °C), vomiting, and antibiotics administration, as well as the occurrence of pneumonia were investigated during the 6-month observation period. The incidence of pneumonia during the observation period was significantly lower in the mosapride group as compared to the control (7/38 vs. 16/40, p = 0.038) and lansoprazole (vs. 20/41, p = 0.005) groups. The mosapride group also showed a significant decrease in days with fever and antibiotics administration as compared to the other groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of hiatal hernia was a significant risk factor and administration of mosapride was a significant preventive factor for pneumonia. Mosapride has a preventive effect on occurrence of pneumonia in patients receiving gastrostomy feeding.

  9. Treatment Effects for Dysphagia in Adults with Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Dalal; Ballard, Kirrie; Bogaardt, Hans

    2016-10-01

    Dysphagia or swallowing difficulties have been reported to be a concern in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). This problem can result in several complications including aspiration pneumonia, reduced quality of life and an increase in mortality rate. No previous systematic reviews on treatment effects for dysphagia in MS have been published. The main objective of this study is to summarise and qualitatively analyse published studies on treatment effects for dysphagia in MS. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were applied to conduct a systematic search of seven databases, using relevant key words, and subsequent analysis of the identified studies. The studies were required to meet all three inclusion criteria of including a statement on intention to treat, or measure the effects of treatment for dysphagia in adults with MS and data on treatment outcomes for at least one adult diagnosed with MS. Retained studies were evaluated by two independent reviewers using a critical appraisal tool. This study has not been registered. A total of 563 studies were identified from the database searches. After screening and assessment of full articles for eligibility, five studies were included in the review. Three examined electrical stimulation and two examined the use of botulinum toxin. One study testing electrical stimulation was a randomised controlled trial, two were well-designed case series and two were case series lacking experimental control. All studies reported some positive effects on dysphagia; however, treatments that involved the use of electrical stimulation showed larger effect sizes. There is a paucity of evidence to guide treatment of dysphagia in MS, with only electrical stimulation and botulinum toxin treatment represented in the literature search conducted here. While both treatments show initial promise for reducing the swallowing impairment, they require further research using well-controlled experimental

  10. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Antonio; Mozzanica, Francesco; Sonzini, Giulia; Plebani, Daniela; Urbani, Emanuele; Pecis, Marica; Montano, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated that patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may present subclinical manifestations of dysphagia, in not one were different textures and volumes systematically studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) with boluses of different textures and volumes in a large cohort of patients with OSAS. A total of 72 OSAS patients without symptoms of dysphagia were enrolled. The cohort was divided in two groups: 30 patients with moderate OSAS and 42 patients with severe OSAS. Each patient underwent a FEES examination using 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquids and semisolids, and solids. Spillage, penetration, aspiration, retention, and piecemeal deglutition were considered. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), pooling score (PS), and dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) were used for quantitative analysis. Each patient completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire. Forty-six patients (64 %) presented spillage, 20 (28 %) piecemeal deglutition, 26 (36 %) penetration, and 30 (44 %) retention. No differences were found in the PAS, PS, and DOSS scores between patients with moderate and severe OSAS. Patients with severe OSAS scored higher General Burden and Food selection subscales of the SWAL-QOL. Depending on the DOSS score, the cohort of patients was divided into those with and those without signs of dysphagia. Patients with signs of dysphagia scored lower in the General Burden and Symptoms subscales of the SWAL-QOL. OSAS patients show signs of swallowing impairment in about half of the population; clinicians involved in the management of these patients should include questions on swallowing when taking the medical history.

  11. Laparoscopy-assisted percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy using a "Funada-kit II" device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Miyano, Go; Shiyanagi, Satoko; Lane, Geoffrey J; Yamataka, Atsuyuki

    2012-09-01

    We aimed at assessing the effect of using a "Funada-kit II" device during laparoscopy-assisted percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (Lap-PEG), by reviewing 29 cases of Lap-PEG we performed from 2001 to 2011. We started using the "Funada-kit II" (CREATE MEDIC CO., Kanagawa, Japan) device with two parallel needles to puncture the stomach and assist suturing the anterior gastric wall to the anterior abdominal wall during Lap-PEG in 2011 (F-PEG). By introducing a loop through the lumen of one needle which allows placement of a suture introduced through the lumen of the other needle. Once repeated, the stomach can be pexied at two points, approximately 2 cm apart. We compared Lap-PEG (n = 23) with F-PEG (n = 6) where the mean ages and weights at surgery and sex ratios were similar. All cases were uneventful without intraoperative complications, although one postoperative wound infection occurred in a Lap-PEG case. There were no differences in the duration of analgesia, time taken to commence tube feeding, and return to full feeding. However, mean operating time was significantly shorter in F-PEG (28.1 min) versus Lap-PEG (46.1 min) p < 0.05. As per results F-PEG would appear to be as safe as Lap-PEG, but much quicker.

  12. Patient-reported outcome measures in dysphagia: a systematic review of instrument development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, D A; Sharda, R; Hovis, K L; Nichols, E E; Sathe, N; Penson, D F; Feurer, I D; McPheeters, M L; Vaezi, M F; Francis, David O

    2017-05-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are commonly used to capture patient experience with dysphagia and to evaluate treatment effectiveness. Inappropriate application can lead to distorted results in clinical studies. A systematic review of the literature on dysphagia-related PRO measures was performed to (1) identify all currently available measures and (2) to evaluate each for the presence of important measurement properties that would affect their applicability. MEDLINE via the PubMed interface, the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and the Health and Psychosocial Instrument database were searched using relevant vocabulary terms and key terms related to PRO measures and dysphagia. Three independent investigators performed abstract and full text reviews. Each study meeting criteria was evaluated using an 18-item checklist developed a priori that assessed multiple domains: (1) conceptual model, (2) content validity, (3) reliability, (4) construct validity, (6) scoring and interpretation, and (7) burden and presentation. Of 4950 abstracts reviewed, a total of 34 dysphagia-related PRO measures (publication year 1987-2014) met criteria for extraction and analysis. Several PRO measures were of high quality (MADS for achalasia, SWAL-QOL and SSQ for oropharyngeal dysphagia, PROMIS-GI for general dysphagia, EORTC-QLQ-OG25 for esophageal cancer, ROMP-swallowing for Parkinson's Disease, DSQ-EoE for eosinophilic esophagitis, and SOAL for total laryngectomy-related dysphagia). In all, 17 met at least one criterion per domain. Thematic deficiencies in current measures were evident including: (1) direct patient involvement in content development, (2) empirically justified dimensionality, (3) demonstrable responsiveness to change, (4) plan for interpreting missing responses, and (5) literacy level assessment. This is the first comprehensive systematic review assessing developmental properties of all available dysphagia-related PRO measures. We

  13. Challenges in oral drug delivery in patients with esophageal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappelle, Wouter F W; Siersema, Peter D; Bogte, Auke; Vleggaar, Frank P

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is a commonly reported symptom with various benign and malignant causes. Esophageal dysphagia can impede intake of oral medication, which often poses a major challenge for both patients and physicians. The best way to address this challenge depends of the cause of dysphagia. The pathophysiology of esophageal dysphagia is discussed, diagnostic tools to determine its cause are reviewed and recent developments in the treatment of esophageal dysphagia are discussed. Alternative options to administer medication in dysphagia are discussed and the appropriateness of them reviewed. Two ways can be followed to allow medication intake in patients with esophageal dysphagia, i.e. altering medication or resolving dysphagia. The latter is generally preferred, since esophageal dysphagia rarely only impedes medication intake. Esophageal resection is possible in more advanced esophageal cancer stages due to advances in neo-adjuvant therapy. Due to recent improvements in intraluminal radiotherapy, it can be expected that this will be the primary treatment in a palliative setting. Temporary self-expandable metal stent placement is a promising new alternative for bougienage in difficult-to-treat benign strictures.

  14. Development and validation of the brief esophageal dysphagia questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, T H; Riehl, M; Sodikoff, J B; Kahrilas, P J; Keefer, L; Doerfler, B; Pandolfino, J E

    2016-12-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is common in gastroenterology practice and has multiple etiologies. A complication for some patients with dysphagia is food impaction. A valid and reliable questionnaire to rapidly evaluate esophageal dysphagia and impaction symptoms can aid the gastroenterologist in gathering information to inform treatment approach and further evaluation, including endoscopy. 1638 patients participated over two study phases. 744 participants completed the Brief Esophageal Dysphagia Questionnaire (BEDQ) for phase 1; 869 completed the BEDQ, Visceral Sensitivity Index, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for phase 2. Demographic and clinical data were obtained via the electronic medical record. The BEDQ was evaluated for internal consistency, split-half reliability, ceiling and floor effects, and construct validity. The BEDQ demonstrated excellent internal consistency, reliability, and construct validity. The symptom frequency and severity scales scored above the standard acceptable cutoffs for reliability while the impaction subscale yielded poor internal consistency and split-half reliability; thus the impaction items were deemed qualifiers only and removed from the total score. No significant ceiling or floor effects were found with the exception of 1 item, and inter-item correlations fell within accepted ranges. Construct validity was supported by moderate yet significant correlations with other measures. The predictive ability of the BEDQ was small but significant. The BEDQ represents a rapid, reliable, and valid assessment tool for esophageal dysphagia with food impaction for clinical practice that differentiates between patients with major motor dysfunction and mechanical obstruction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Stroke-induced immunodepression and dysphagia independently predict stroke-associated pneumonia - The PREDICT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sarah; Harms, Hendrik; Ulm, Lena; Nabavi, Darius G; Mackert, Bruno-Marcel; Schmehl, Ingo; Jungehulsing, Gerhard J; Montaner, Joan; Bustamante, Alejandro; Hermans, Marcella; Hamilton, Frank; Göhler, Jos; Malzahn, Uwe; Malsch, Carolin; Heuschmann, Peter U; Meisel, Christian; Meisel, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Stroke-associated pneumonia is a frequent complication after stroke associated with poor outcome. Dysphagia is a known risk factor for stroke-associated pneumonia but accumulating evidence suggests that stroke induces an immunodepressive state increasing susceptibility for stroke-associated pneumonia. We aimed to confirm that stroke-induced immunodepression syndrome is associated with stroke-associated pneumonia independently from dysphagia by investigating the predictive properties of monocytic HLA-DR expression as a marker of immunodepression as well as biomarkers for inflammation (interleukin-6) and infection (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein). This was a prospective, multicenter study with 11 study sites in Germany and Spain, including 486 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Daily screening for stroke-associated pneumonia, dysphagia and biomarkers was performed. Frequency of stroke-associated pneumonia was 5.2%. Dysphagia and decreased monocytic HLA-DR were independent predictors for stroke-associated pneumonia in multivariable regression analysis. Proportion of pneumonia ranged between 0.9% in the higher monocytic HLA-DR quartile (≥21,876 mAb/cell) and 8.5% in the lower quartile (≤12,369 mAb/cell). In the presence of dysphagia, proportion of pneumonia increased to 5.9% and 18.8%, respectively. Patients without dysphagia and normal monocytic HLA-DR expression had no stroke-associated pneumonia risk. We demonstrate that dysphagia and stroke-induced immunodepression syndrome are independent risk factors for stroke-associated pneumonia. Screening for immunodepression and dysphagia might be useful for identifying patients at high risk for stroke-associated pneumonia.

  16. Decision Making About Gastrostomy and Noninvasive Ventilation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Naomi H; Lawrence, Vanessa; Murray, Joanna; Janssen, Anna; Higginson, Irene; Lyall, Rebecca; Burman, Rachel; Leigh, P Nigel; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Goldstein, Laura H

    2016-08-01

    We used thematic analysis to investigate factors affecting decision making about gastrostomy and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) by people with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) from the viewpoint of the health care professionals (HCPs) supporting them. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews with 19 HCPs nominated by people with ALS who had made a decision to accept or decline NIV or gastrostomy. We found the main themes influencing decision making were patient-centric, caregiver-related or related to HCPs' own beliefs, perspectives, and actions. HCPs felt patients should be, and were, in control of decision making, although caregivers and HCPs played a role. The patient's evaluation of quality of life, the desirability of prolonging life, and acceptance of the disease and its progression by both patient and caregiver were the most important factors identified by HCPs. HCPs should be aware of the importance of multiprofessional discussions, and the potential influences (identified above) that might require discussion with patients and caregivers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: a therapeutic challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michou, Emilia; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2010-06-01

    This article focuses on the current status and research directions on swallowing disorders (dysphagia) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Although epidemiological data are scarce, increased incidence of dysphagia in patients with PD leads to increased risk of mortality, secondary to aspiration pneumonia. Although studies show that aspiration pneumonia is a common cause of death in this group of patients, clinical practice lacks an evidence base and there is an increased need for randomized clinical trials. Importantly, the underlying mechanisms accounting for the progression of dysphagia in PD are still unclear. Furthermore, evidence shows that dopaminergic medication does not affect swallowing performance. Future research in the field is urgently needed and may result in improved management of dysphagia in patients with PD.

  18. Defining and Measuring Dysphagia Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Stephanie K.; Schroeder, Mae Fern; DeGeorge, Pamela C.; Corey, David M.; Foundas, Anne L.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To continue the development of a quantified, standard method to differentiate individuals with stroke and dysphagia from individuals without dysphagia. Method: Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) were completed on a group of participants with acute stroke (n = 42) and healthy age-matched individuals (n = 25). Calibrated liquid…

  19. Dysphagia in children with repaired oesophageal atresia

    OpenAIRE

    Coppens, C.H.; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Scharbatke, H.E.; Groot, S.A. de; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in children with repaired oesophageal atresia (OA). Abnormalities in the oropharyngeal and oesophageal phase have hardly been studied. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of dysphagia in children with repaired OA and to identify and differentiate oral and pharyngeal dysphagia based on videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) findings in a limited number of children in this cohort. Medical records of 111 patients, born between January 1996 and July ...

  20. Comparison of different ligature materials used for T-tube esophageal exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y C; Luh, S P; Tsai, C C; Hsu, H C; Chu, S H

    1992-03-01

    Four different ligature materials--plain catgut, chromic catgut, dexon and silk--were used for ligature of the distal arm during T-tube exclusion of the cervical esophagus in 12 dogs. Ligature by plain catgut was maintained for only a short period, but the duration of esophageal occlusion with the other three ligature materials was around 10 days. Ligated esophageal segments were examined grossly and histologically two months after the procedure. The diameter of the esophageal lumen in the ligated segments had become smaller compared with the neighboring normal esophageal lumen. The most prominent histologic changes were atrophy and fibrosis of the muscle coat, vessel congestion and inflammatory cell infiltration in the ligated segments. These tissue reactions were more severe in the chromic catgut and silk ligatures. Among the 11 evaluable dogs, four had symptoms of dysphagia after removal of the T-tube. All four dogs had a sinus discharge and granuloma formation at the T-tube esophagostoma. The diameter of the esophageal lumen was more constricted in dogs with dysphagia. Among the four ligature materials, dexon had the advantages of a long duration of occlusion, less tissue fibrosis and little sequel of esophageal stenosis, making it the most suitable for ligature during esophageal exclusion.

  1. Nutritional status, food intake, and dysphagia in long-term survivors with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Manon G A; Rütten, Heidi; Rasmussen-Conrad, Ellen L; Knuijt, Simone; Takes, Robert P; van Herpen, Carla M L; Wanten, Geert J A; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Merkx, Matthias A W

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate nutritional status, food intake, and dysphagia in long-term head and neck cancer survivors. Thirty-two patients with stage III-IV head and neck cancer treated by chemoradiotherapy were invited to evaluate nutritional status (malnutrition, relative weight loss), food intake (food modification; quality), and dysphagia. At a median follow up of 44 months, 6 of 32 patients were at risk for malnutrition. Women (p = .049) and patients with high body mass index before treatment (p = .024) showed more weight loss. None of the 32 patients could eat a "full diet." Six patients used nutritional supplements/tube feeding. Low dysphagia-related quality of life scores were significantly correlated to increased food modification (r = 0.405; p = .024). Nutritional advice in patients with head and neck cancer is still necessary years after chemoradiation and should focus on nutritional status, food modification, and quality, in accord with recommended food groups. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Dysphagia in the Mild or Moderate Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Concept of Subclinical Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Yesim; Gürgör, Nevin; Çakır, Ahmet; Arıcı, Şehnaz; İncesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2015-06-01

    Swallowing mechanism and neurogenic dysphagia in MS have been rarely studied by electromyographical (EMG) methods. This study aims to evaluate the presence of subclinical dysphagia in patients with mild multiple sclerosis (MS) using electrophysiological methods. A prospective study of 51 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis and 18 age-matched healthy adults was investigated. We used electromyography to measure the activity of the submental muscles during swallowing. Electrophysiological recordings of patients were obtained during relapse, after relapse, and at any time in remission period. Clinical dysphagia was found in 12% of MS patients, while electrophysiological swallowing abnormalities were encountered in 33% of patients. Subclinical dysphagia was determined in 35% of patients during an MS relapse, in 20% of patients after a relapse, and in 25% of all 51 patients in the remission period based on EMG findings. Duration of swallowing signal of submental muscles in all MS patients was found to be longer than in normal subjects (p = 0.001). During swallowing of 50 ml of sequential water, the compensatory respiratory cycles occurred more often in MS patients than normal subjects, especially during a relapse (p = 0.005). This is the first study investigating swallowing abnormalities and subclinical dysphagia from the electrophysiological aspect in MS patients with mild disability. The electrophysiological tests described in this study are useful to uncover subclinical dysphagia since they have the advantage of being rapid, easy to apply, non-invasive, and without risk for the patients.

  3. Managing eating and drinking difficulties (dysphagia) with children who have learning disabilities: What is effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Celia; Cockerill, Helen

    2015-07-01

    People who work with children who have neurological and learning disabilities frequently need to manage the health and emotional risks associated with eating, drinking and swallowing (dysphagia). Some approaches can support children to develop oral feeding competence or to maximise their ability to maintain some oral intake supplemented with tube feeding. However, some clinicians feel that oral-motor exercises can support eating and drinking skills as well as speech and language development, whereas there is little evidence to support this.The implied "beneficial" association between oral-motor exercises, speech and swallowing skills gives a false impression in terms of future outcomes for parents and carers of children with learning disabilities. This paper considers oral-motor approaches in the remediation of dysphagia and the need for a cultural shift away from this view. Realistic and useful outcomes for people with learning disabilities need to be an essential part of therapeutic intervention. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: practical recommendations to guide management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Michel; Davidson, Zoe; Bouvoie, Veronique; Evenepoel, Nathalie; Haan, Jurn; Soudon, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disorder causing weakness of the skeletal, respiratory, cardiac and oropharyngeal muscles with up to one third of young men reporting difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). Recent studies on dysphagia in DMD clarify the pathophysiology of swallowing disorders and offer new tools for its assessment but little guidance is available for its management. This paper aims to provide a step-by-step algorithm to facilitate clinical decisions regarding dysphagia management in this patient population. This algorithm is based on 30 years of clinical experience with DMD in a specialised Centre for Neuromuscular Disorders (Inkendaal Rehabilitation Hospital, Belgium) and is supported by literature where available. Dysphagia can worsen the condition of ageing patients with DMD. Apart from the difficulties of chewing and oral fragmentation of the food bolus, dysphagia is rather a consequence of an impairment in the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. By contrast with central neurologic disorders, dysphagia in DMD accompanies solid rather than liquid intake. Symptoms of dysphagia may not be clinically evident; however laryngeal food penetration, accumulation of food residue in the pharynx and/or true laryngeal food aspiration may occur. The prevalence of these issues in DMD is likely underestimated. There is little guidance available for clinicians to manage dysphagia and improve feeding for young men with DMD. This report aims to provide a clinical algorithm to facilitate the diagnosis of dysphagia, to identify the symptoms and to propose practical recommendations to treat dysphagia in the adult DMD population. Implications for Rehabilitation Little guidance is available for the management of dysphagia in Duchenne dystrophy. Food can penetrate the vestibule, accumulate as residue or cause aspiration. We propose recommendations and an algorithm to guide management of dysphagia. Penetration/residue accumulation

  5. Frequency of changing enteral alimentation bags and tubing, and adverse clinical outcomes in patients in a long term care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, S; McIntyre, M; Chicoine, J; Gerard, B; Laughren, R; Cowley, G; Morrison, J; Aoki, F Y; Nicolle, L E

    1993-01-01

    Enteral alimentation, given via nasogastric or gastrostomy tubes, is a well established practice to provide nutrition for patients with significant neurological injury. The frequency with which enteral feeding bags and tubes require change and potential adverse effects associated with bacterial contamination of tube feeds remain controversial. The authors studied different times between enteral feeding bag and tube changes, and the effect on adverse clinical outcomes in residents of a long term care facility. In the first study, residents were randomized to 24 h (n = 2), 48 h (n = 3) or 72 h (n = 6) tube feeding and bag changes with clinical status monitored in a standardized fashion for six months. In the second study, patients were randomized to 24 h (n = 6) or 72 h (n = 6) changes. Patient-days of follow-up were 382, 574 and 1000 for the three arms of the first study period and 556 and 496 for the two arms of the second study. No differences in potential clinical adverse events--including fever, gastrointestinal symptoms or pneumonia--were observed with different durations of tubing change. This study suggests it is appropriate to change alimentation tube and feeding bags every 72 h (rather than every 24 h). The less frequent changes will decrease supply costs and free nursing time for other activities.

  6. The lived experience of dysphagia following non-surgical treatment for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence and severity of dysphagia in people treated non-surgically for primary head and neck cancer (HNC) is well documented. However, few studies have looked beyond the physiological impairment to explore the lived experience of dysphagia in the post-treatment period of HNC. The current study adopted a person-centred, qualitative approach to describe the experiences of people living with dysphagia in the months and years following non-surgical treatment for HNC. Using maximum variation sampling, 24 participants who had undergone radiotherapy treatment for HNC were recruited. Individual interviews were conducted to explore the impact of dysphagia on participants' everyday lives. The themes identified included: (1) physical changes related to swallowing; (2) emotions evoked by living with dysphagia; (3) altered perceptions and changes in appreciation of food; and (4) personal and lifestyle impacts. The data revealed the breadth and significance of the impact of dysphagia on the lives of people treated curatively for HNC. Assessment and management in the post-treatment period must be sufficiently holistic to address both the changing physical states and the psychosocial needs of people with dysphagia following HNC. Rehabilitation services which focus only on impairment-based management will fail to fully meet the support needs of this clinical population.

  7. Dysphagia lusorium in elderly: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarceken, Bulent; Bulbuloglu, Ertan; Yuksel, Murvet; Cetinkaya, Ali

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Late unset of dysphagia due to vascular abnormalities is a rare condition. We aimed to present a case of right subclavian artery abnormalities caused dysphagia in the elderly. METHODS: A 68-year-old female was admitted with dysphagia seven months ago. Upper endoscopic procedures and routine examinations could not demonstrate any etiology. Multislice computed thorax tomography was performed for probable extra- esophagial lesions. RESULTS: Multislice computed thorax tomography showed right subclavian artery abnormality and esophagial compression with this aberrant artery. CONCLUSION: Causes of dysphagia in the elderly are commonly malignancies, strictures and/or motility disorders. If routine examinations and endoscopic procedures fail to show any etiology, rare vascular abnormalities can be considered in such patients. Multislice computed tomography is a usefull choice in such conditions. PMID:15285045

  8. Subcooled Pool Boiling from Two Tubes of 6 Degree Included Angle in Vertical Alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Myeong-Gie [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    One of the major issues in the design of a heat exchanger is the heat transfer in a tube bundle. The passive condensation heat exchanger (PCHX) adopted in APR+ has U-type tube. The PCHX is submerged in the passive condensation cooling tank (PCCT). The heat exchanging tubes are in vertical alignment and inclined at 3 degrees to prevent water hammer as shown in Fig. 1. For the cases, the upper tube is affected by the lower tube. Therefore, the results for a single tube are not applicable to the design of the PCHX. However, the passive heat exchangers are submerged in the subcooled water under atmospheric pressure. The water temperature in the PCCT rises according to the PAFS actuation and reaches the saturation temperature after more than 2.5 hours. Since this period is very important to maintain reactor integrity, the exact evaluation of heat transfer on the tube bundle is indispensable. Although an experimental study on both subcooled and saturated pool boiling of water was performed to obtain local heat transfer coefficients on a 3 degree inclined tube at atmospheric pressure by Kang, no previous results were treating the bundle effect in the subcooled liquid. The heat transfer on the upper tube is enhanced compared with the single tube. The enhancement of the heat transfer on the upper tube is estimated by the bundle effect ( h{sub r} ). It is defined as the ratio of the heat transfer coefficient ( h{sub b} ) for an upper tube in a bundle with lower tubes activated to that for the same tube activated alone in the bundle. The upper tube within a tube bundle can significantly increase nucleated boiling heat transfer compared to the lower tubes at moderate heat fluxes. Summarizing the published results, it is still necessary to identify effects of liquid subcooling on inclined tubes for application to the PCHX design. Therefore, the present study is aimed to study the variations of pool boiling heat transfer on a tube bundle having a 6 degree included angle in

  9. Solid bolus swallowing in the radiologic evaluation of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westen, D. van; Ekberg, O.

    1993-01-01

    Patients with dysphagia, heartburn and chest pain are regularly referred for radiologic evaluation of swallowing. The liquid barium swallow has been of great value for the biphasic evaluation of the pharynx and esophagus. Though many patients complain of dysphagia specifically for solids, solid bolus swallow is ususally not part of the evaluation. For the present study we therefore included the use of a solid bolus with a diameter of 13 mm and interviewed the patients carefully for any symptoms during this tablet swallow. Of 200 patients examined, the tablet passed through the esophagus without delay in 102. In the 98 patients with delayed passage, the solid bolus arrest occurred in the pharynx in 5 and in the esophagus in 93. Arrest in the esophagus was due to esophageal dysmotility in 48 patients. Twenty of these were symptomatic during the tablet swallow. A narrowing was the cause in 45, of whom 9 had symptoms. In 18 patients (9%) the solid bolus added key information to the radiologic evaluation. We therefore recommend that the solid bolus is included in the routine radiologic work-up of patients with dysphagia. Careful attention to symptoms during the tablet swallow is important. (orig.)

  10. Solid bolus swallowing in the radiologic evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westen, D. van (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Malmoe General Hospital, Univ. Lund (Sweden)); Ekberg, O. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Malmoe General Hospital, Univ. Lund (Sweden))

    1993-07-01

    Patients with dysphagia, heartburn and chest pain are regularly referred for radiologic evaluation of swallowing. The liquid barium swallow has been of great value for the biphasic evaluation of the pharynx and esophagus. Though many patients complain of dysphagia specifically for solids, solid bolus swallow is ususally not part of the evaluation. For the present study we therefore included the use of a solid bolus with a diameter of 13 mm and interviewed the patients carefully for any symptoms during this tablet swallow. Of 200 patients examined, the tablet passed through the esophagus without delay in 102. In the 98 patients with delayed passage, the solid bolus arrest occurred in the pharynx in 5 and in the esophagus in 93. Arrest in the esophagus was due to esophageal dysmotility in 48 patients. Twenty of these were symptomatic during the tablet swallow. A narrowing was the cause in 45, of whom 9 had symptoms. In 18 patients (9%) the solid bolus added key information to the radiologic evaluation. We therefore recommend that the solid bolus is included in the routine radiologic work-up of patients with dysphagia. Careful attention to symptoms during the tablet swallow is important. (orig.).

  11. [Relationship between dysphagia and malnutritition in patients over 65 years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán Sánchez-Heredero, María José; Santander Vaquero, Cecilio; Cortázar Sáez, Milagros; de la Morena López, Felipe; Susi García, Rosario; Martínez Rincón, María Del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to understand the relationship between oropharyngeal dysphagia, nutritional risk factors and functional impairment in the elderly (>65y) admitted to a medical-surgical hospital unit. Secondary objectives were to determine the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia, the nutritional status and their functional capacity. A cross-sectional observational study was performed. It included patients over 65 years of age admitted to the Gastroenterology-Urology Department in La Princesa University Hospital (Madrid, Spain) during the months of February and March. The following variables were recorded: age, sex, body mass index, family support, diagnosis, comorbidity, oropharyngeal dysphagia (EAT-10 and volume-viscosity evaluation method), malnutrition (Mininutritional Assessment) and functional capacity (Barthel index). A total of 167 patients were recruited, with 30.8% and 15.4% prevalence of dysphagia and malnutrition, respectively. Prevalence of malnutrition increased to 75% in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. The logistic regression analysis showed how conditions as low score on the Barthel index (OR 0.97 [95% CI, 0.95-0.99]), comorbidity (OR 7.98 [CI 95%, 3.09-20.61]) and dysphagia (OR 4.07 [CI 95%, 1.57-10.52]) were associated with a greater likelihood of suffering malnutrition. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is one of the most underdiagnosed and underestimated conditions among elderly patients and one that has a greater effect on their nutritional status. Accordingly, we suggest using established diagnostic methods with a multidisciplinary team collaboration for its early detection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychometric characteristics of health-related quality-of-life questionnaires in oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Angelique A; Speyer, Renée; Heijnen, Bas J; Klijn-Zwijnenberg, Iris R

    2014-04-01

    Dysphagia can have severe consequences for the patient's health, influencing health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Sound psychometric properties of HRQoL questionnaires are a precondition for assessing the impact of dysphagia, the focus of this study, resulting in recommendations for the appropriate use of these questionnaires in both clinical practice and research contexts. We performed a systematic review starting with a search for and retrieval of all full-text articles on the development of HRQoL questionnaires related to oropharyngeal dysphagia and/or their psychometric validation from the electronic databases PubMed and Embase published up to June 2011. Psychometric properties were judged according to quality criteria proposed for health status questionnaires. Eight questionnaires were included in this study. Four are aimed solely at HRQoL in oropharyngeal dysphagia: the deglutition handicap index (DHI), dysphagia handicap index (DHI'), M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI), and SWAL-QOL, while the EDGQ, EORTC QLQ-STO 22, EORTC QLQ-OG 25 and EORTC QLQ-H&N35 focus on other primary diseases resulting in dysphagia. The psychometric properties of the DHI, DHI', MDADI, and SWAL-QOL were evaluated. For appropriate applicability of HRQoL questionnaires, strong scores on the psychometric criteria face validity, criterion validity, and interpretability are prerequisites. The SWAL-QOL has the strongest ratings for these criteria, while the DHI' is the most easy to apply given its 25 items and the use of a uniform scoring format. For optimal use of HRQoL questionnaires in diverse settings, it is necessary to combine psychometric and utility approaches.

  13. Structural cause of dysphagia detected during videofluoroscopic swallow study

    OpenAIRE

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong; Kabuto, Syu

    2017-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Dysphagia can be caused by many different underlying conditions. The assessment and management of dysphagia depend on each individual patient, often requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Structural cause of dysphagia can be dealt with using endoscopic interventions before the patient's general status deteriorates.

  14. Decreased tongue pressure is associated with sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keisuke; Akagi, Junji

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the association between tongue pressure and factors related to sarcopenia such as aging, activities of daily living, nutritional state, and dysphagia. One-hundred-and-four patients without a history of treatment of stroke and without a diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease (36 men and 68 women), with a mean age of 84.1 ± 5.6 years, hospitalized from May 2013 to June 2013 were included in this study. Maximum voluntary tongue pressure against the palate (MTP) was measured by a device consisting of a disposable oral balloon probe. Nutritional and anthropometric parameters such as serum albumin concentration, Mini-Nutritional Assessment short form (MNA-SF), body mass index, arm muscle area (AMA), and others and presence of sarcopenia and dysphagia were analyzed to evaluate their relationships. Correlation analysis and univariate or multivariate analysis were performed. Simple correlation analysis showed that MTP correlated with Barthel index (BI), MNA-SF, serum albumin concentration, body mass index, and AMA. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that sarcopenia, BI, MNA-SF, and age were the independent explanatory factors for decreased MTP, and the propensity score for dysphagia, including causes of primary or secondary sarcopenia, and the presence of sarcopenia were significantly associated with the presence of dysphagia. Decreased MTP and dysphagia were related to sarcopenia or the causes of sarcopenia in the studied population. Furthermore, the clinical condition of sarcopenic dysphagia may be partially interpreted as the presence of sarcopenia and causal factors for sarcopenia.

  15. [Importance of the detection of dysphagia in geriatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora Mur, A; Palacín Ariño, C; Guardia Contreras, A I; Zamora Catevilla, A; Clemente Roldán, E; Santaliestra Grau, J

    2018-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is one of the lesser known geriatric syndromes, despite its enormous impact on functional capacity, quality of life, and health of those affected. A descriptive and prospective study was conducted by the Geriatric Department of Barbastro Hospital (Huesca), from March 2012 to October 2014, as biannual and annual reviews in October 2015. This study included all patients on whom a volume-viscosity clinical examination (MECV-V test) was performed to suspecting dysphagia. The study included 266 patients with a mean age of 82.35±12.3 years, and with a mean Barthel index score of 20.5±25.4, and mean Charlson index of 1.77±1.6. The test was performed in 105 cases after stroke (40%), 53 in dementia (20%), 24 in Parkinsonism (9%), and for other different reasons in 80 (31%). Dysphagia was diagnosed in 228 (86%) cases. Enteral nutrition was given in 25 (10.9%) cases. The test results were shown in the discharge report in 45% of the tests with positive result. The mean survival obtained after test in the patients who died was 230.8±256.5 days. Differences in survival at 12 months were found in patients with positive test, without finding a clear relationship with functional status and comorbidity. Dysphagia has a significant mortality, and the use of thickeners after its detection should be properly reported. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Dysphagia Post Subcortical and Supratentorial Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ping; Chen, Xuhui; Zhu, Lequn; Xu, Shuangjin; Huang, Li; Li, Xiangcui; Ye, Qing; Ding, Ruiying

    2016-01-01

    Studies have recognized that the damage in the subcortical and supratentorial regions may affect voluntary and involuntary aspects of the swallowing function. The current study attempted to explore the dysphagia characteristics in patients with subcortical and supratentorial stroke. Twelve post first or second subcortical and supratentorial stroke patients were included in the study. The location of the stroke was ascertained by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The characteristics of swallowing disorder were assessed by video fluoroscopic swallowing assessment/fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. The following main parameters were analyzed: oral transit time, pharyngeal delay time, presence of cricopharyngeal muscle achalasia (CMA), distance of laryngeal elevation, the amounts of vallecular residue and pyriform sinus residue (PSR), and the extent of pharyngeal contraction. Eighty-three percent of the 12 patients were found suffering from pharyngeal dysphagia, with 50% having 50%-100% PSRs, 50% having pharyngeal delay, and 41.6% cases demonstrating CMA. Simple regression analysis showed PSRs were most strongly associated with CMA. Pharyngeal delay in the study can be caused by infarcts of basal ganglia/thalamus, infarcts of sensory tract, infarcts of swallowing motor pathways in the centrum semiovale, or a combination of the three. Subcortical and supratentorial stroke may result in pharyngeal dysphagia such as PSR and pharyngeal delay. PSR was mainly caused by CMA. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The incidence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in infants with GERD-like symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Mark; Branham, Christina; Fraker, Cheryl; Walbert, Laura; Cox, Sibyl; Scarborough, Donna

    2013-09-01

    Symptoms of infantile gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may overlap with oropharyngeal dysphagia, but the evaluation and treatment of these conditions vary greatly. In this investigation, the incidence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in infants with GERD-like symptoms is determined. A retrospective chart review was performed on infants referred to a pediatric gastroenterology clinic for GERD-like symptoms. A feeding screen was performed in all infants. Standardized bedside swallow evaluation and modified barium swallow (MBS) studies were then performed when clinically indicated. A similarly aged cohort of normal participants also underwent a standard bedside swallow evaluation for group comparison. Study population included 67 infants. A swallow evaluation was recommended in 39 of 67 infants with abnormalities noted in all. Swallowing abnormalities were more frequent and clustered in infants with GERD-like symptoms vs controls. MBS was abnormal in 16 of 17 qualifying infants. Characteristics of at-risk infants included extreme prematurity, developmental delay, or symptoms refractory to antireflux medications. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is prominent in infants with GERD-like symptoms.

  18. High negative pressure subcutaneous suction drain for managing debilitating subcutaneous emphysema secondary to tube thoracostomy for an iatrogenic post computed tomography guided transthoracic needle biopsy pneumothorax: Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Patel, Pinakin; Singh, Suresh; Sharma, Raj Govind; Somani, Pankaj; Gouri, Abdul Rauf; Singh, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    Subcutaneous emphysema is a common complication of tube thoracostomy. Though self-limiting, it should be treated when it causes palpebral closure, dyspnea, dysphagia or undue disfigurement resulting in anxiety and distress to the patient. A 72year old man who was a known case of COPD on bronchodilators developed a large pneumothorax and respiratory distress after a CT guided transthoracic lung biopsy done for a lung opacity (approx. 3×3cm) at the right hilar region on Chest X-ray. Within 24h of an urgent tube thoracostomy, patient developed intractable subcutaneous emphysema with closure of palpebral fissure and dyspnea unresponsive to increasing suction on chest tube. A subcutaneous fenestrated drain was placed mid-way between the nipple and clavicle in the mid-clavicular line bilaterally. Continuous negative suction (-150mmHg) resulted in immediate, sustained relief and complete resolution within 5days. Extensive and debilitating SE (subcutaneous emphysema) has to be treated promptly to relieve patient discomfort, dysphagia or imminent respiratory compromise. A variety of treatment have been tried including infraclavicular blow-hole incisions, subcutaneous drains +/- negative pressure suction, fenestrated angiocatheters, Vacuum assisted dressings and increasing suction on a pre-existing chest tube. We describe a high negative pressure subcutaneous suction drain which provides immediate and sustained relief in debilitating SE. Debilitating subcutaneous emphysema which causes distress, anxiety, palpebral closure, dyspnoea or dysphagia requires intervention. High negative pressure subcutaneous suction drain provides immediate and sustained relief in extensive and debilitating SE. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The Use of Brain Stimulation in Dysphagia Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Andre; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2017-04-01

    Dysphagia is common sequela of brain injury with as many as 50% of patients suffering from dysphagia following stroke. Currently, the majority of guidelines for clinical practice in the management of dysphagia focus on the prevention of complications while any natural recovery takes place. Recently, however, non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques like transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have started to attract attention and are applied to investigate both the physiology of swallowing and influences on dysphagia. TMS allows for painless stimulation of the brain through an intact skull-an effect which would normally be impossible with electrical currents due to the high resistance of the skull. By comparison, tDCS involves passing a small electric current (usually under 2 mA) produced by a current generator over the scalp and cranium external to the brain. Initial studies used these techniques to better understand the physiological mechanisms of swallowing in healthy subjects. More recently, a number of studies have investigated the efficacy of these techniques in the management of neurogenic dysphagia with mixed results. Controversy still exists as to which site, strength and duration of stimulation yields the greatest improvement in dysphagia. And while multiple studies have suggested promising effects of NIBS, more randomised control trials with larger sample sizes are needed to investigate the short- and long-term effects of NIBS in neurogenic dysphagia.

  20. Nonaneurysmatic Dysphagia Aortica in the Elderly: Three Case Reports and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsueh Chan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is a remarkably prevalent disorder in the elderly. Both age-related changes in swallowing physiology and age-related diseases are predisposing factors for dysphagia in the elderly. Dysphagia aortica is a rare etiology of dysphagia resulting from extrinsic compression of the esophagus by an aneurysm or by a tortuous and elongated thoracic aorta. Clinical findings of dysphagia aortica resemble those of esophageal malignancy or esophageal motility disorders. Dysphagia aortica not related to an aneurysm is usually observed in the elderly, especially in female patients with hypertensive cardiomyopathy or kyphosis. However, dysphagia aortica may occur in the aging population without underlying aneurysm or kyphosis. Here, we report three cases of nonaneurysmatic dysphagia aortica and review the literature to report the diagnostic approach and treatments used for this condition. Dysphagia aortica should be considered in the differential diagnosis of dysphagia, especially in the growing elderly population with cardiovascular disease or hypertension.

  1. Compensatory recombination phenomena of neurological functions in central dysphagia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-dong Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We speculate that cortical reactions evoked by swallowing activity may be abnormal in patients with central infarction with dysphagia. The present study aimed to detect functional imaging features of cerebral cortex in central dysphagia patients by using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The results showed that when normal controls swallowed, primary motor cortex (BA4, insula (BA13, premotor cortex (BA6/8, supramarginal gyrus (BA40, and anterior cingulate cortex (BA24/32 were activated, and that the size of the activated areas were larger in the left hemisphere compared with the right. In recurrent cerebral infarction patients with central dysphagia, BA4, BA13, BA40 and BA6/8 areas were activated, while the degree of activation in BA24/32 was decreased. Additionally, more areas were activated, including posterior cingulate cortex (BA23/31, visual association cortex (BA18/19, primary auditory cortex (BA41 and parahippocampal cortex (BA36. Somatosensory association cortex (BA7 and left cerebellum in patients with recurrent cerebral infarction with central dysphagia were also activated. Experimental findings suggest that the cerebral cortex has obvious hemisphere lateralization in response to swallowing, and patients with recurrent cerebral infarction with central dysphagia show compensatory recombination phenomena of neurological functions. In rehabilitative treatment, using the favorite food of patients can stimulate swallowing through visual, auditory, and other nerve conduction pathways, thus promoting compensatory recombination of the central cortex functions.

  2. Prefrontal cortex activity during swallowing in dysphagia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun; Yamate, Chisato; Taira, Masato; Shinoda, Masamichi; Urata, Kentaro; Maruno, Mitsuru; Ito, Reio; Saito, Hiroto; Gionhaku, Nobuhito; Iinuma, Toshimitsu; Iwata, Koichi

    2018-05-24

    Prefrontal cortex activity is modulated by flavor and taste stimuli and changes during swallowing. We hypothesized that changes in the modulation of prefrontal cortex activity by flavor and taste were associated with swallowing movement and evaluated brain activity during swallowing in patients with dysphagia. To evaluate prefrontal cortex activity in dysphagia patients during swallowing, change in oxidized hemoglobin (z-score) was measured with near-infrared spectroscopy while dysphagia patients and healthy controls swallowed sweetened/unsweetened and flavored/unflavored jelly. Total z-scores were positive during swallowing of flavored/unsweetened jelly and negative during swallowing of unflavored/sweetened jelly in controls but negative during swallowing of sweetened/unsweetened and flavored/unflavored jelly in dysphagia patients. These findings suggest that taste and flavor during food swallowing are associated with positive and negative z-scores, respectively. Change in negative and positive z-scores may be useful in evaluating brain activity of dysphagia patients during swallowing of sweetened and unsweetened food.

  3. Nonaneurysmatic Dysphagia Aortica in the Elderly: Three Case Reports and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Hsueh Chan; Chien-Yuan Hung; Tze-Yu Shieh; Horng-Yuan Wang; Ching-Wei Chang; Shou-Chuan Shih; Ming-Jen Chen

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is a remarkably prevalent disorder in the elderly. Both age-related changes in swallowing physiology and age-related diseases are predisposing factors for dysphagia in the elderly. Dysphagia aortica is a rare etiology of dysphagia resulting from extrinsic compression of the esophagus by an aneurysm or by a tortuous and elongated thoracic aorta. Clinical findings of dysphagia aortica resemble those of esophageal malignancy or esophageal motility disorders. Dysphagia aortica not relat...

  4. Laryngopharyngeal abnormalities in hospitalized patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Gregory N; McGuirt, W Frederick; Butler, Susan G; Rees, Catherine J; Crandall, Heather L; Tansavatdi, Kristina

    2007-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of laryngopharyngeal (LP) abnormalities in hospitalized patients with dysphagia referred for flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). Retrospective, blinded review by two otolaryngologists of 100 consecutive FEES studies performed and video-recorded by a speech-language pathologist (SLP). Two otolaryngologists reviewed videos of 100 consecutive FEES studies on hospitalized patients with dysphagia for the presence of abnormal LP findings. Sixty-one male and 38 female patients comprised the hospital dysphagia cohort. The mean age was 62. One subject could not be evaluated because of the severity of the retained secretions, leaving 99 subjects in the cohort. Seventy-six percent had been previously intubated, with a mean intubation duration of 13 days. The overall prevalence of abnormal LP findings was 79%. Forty-five percent of the patients presented with two or more findings, which included arytenoid edema (33%), granuloma (31%), vocal fold paresis (24%), mucosal lesions (17%), vocal fold bowing (14%), diffuse edema (11%), airway stenosis (3%), and ulcer (6%). There was a significant difference in LP findings between those individuals who had or had not been intubated. Hospitalized patients with dysphagia are at high risk for LP abnormalities, particularly if they have been intubated, and may benefit from either 1) an initial joint examination by the SLP and otolaryngologist or 2) an otolaryngologist's review of the recorded examination conducted by the SLP. Such otolaryngology involvement could identify airway stenosis patients at an earlier stage, initiate granuloma treatment sooner, enable earlier biopsy of unexpected lesions, and allow follow-up of mucosal and neuromuscular findings that do not respond to medical management.

  5. Usage of prophylactic radiologically inserted gastrostomy in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinson, P.I.; Tun, J. Kyaw; Byass, O.R.; Cast, J.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess outcomes and usage rate of prophylactic radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Materials and methods: Outcome data of all HNC patients who underwent prophylactic RIG over a 22-month period (November 2007 to September 2009) in a tertiary referral centre were collected retrospectively. Thirty-day mortality, major and minor complication rates, and subsequent usage of the RIG were analysed. Results: Fifty-one HNC patients underwent prophylactic RIG. Three minor and no major immediate complications were identified. Sixteen minor and three major complications at 30-days were identified. Three (5.9%) major complications were identified. There was one death due to disease progression and not RIG insertion. The RIG was not used in 17.7% of patients post-procedure. Conclusion: Prophylactic RIG in HNC patients has a comparable mortality rate to RIG insertion in HNC patients with mixed indications. However, the number of cases where the gastrostomy is not used raises important concerns and warrants further investigation.

  6. Prevalence and risk factors for dysphagia: a U.S. community study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, So Yang; Choung, Rok Seon; Saito, Yuri A.; Schleck, Cathy D; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Locke, G. Richard; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysphagia is considered an alarm symptom but detailed population-based data on dysphagia are lacking. We aimed to estimate in a representative US Caucasian population the prevalence of dysphagia and potential risk factors. Methods A modified version of the previously validated Bowel Disease Questionnaire was mailed to a population based cohort (n=7640) of Olmsted County, MN. Dysphagia was measured by one validated question “In the last year, how often have you had difficulty swallowing (a feeling that food sticks in your throat or chest)?” The medical records were reviewed for organic causes of dysphagia. The associations of reported frequency of dysphagia with potential risk factors were assessed using logistic regression models. Results The sex-specific, age-adjusted (US White 2000) prevalence for dysphagia experienced at least weekly was 3.0 % (95% CI: 2.2, 3.7) in females and 3.0 % (95% CI: 2.0, 4.0) in males. Those with frequent heartburn [OR=5.9 (4.0, 8.6)] and acid regurgitation [OR=10.6 (6.8, 16.6)] were significantly more likely to report frequent dysphagia. PPI use was significantly associated with frequent (3.1, 95% CI 2.2, 4.4) and infrequent dysphagia (1.5, 955 CI 1.3, 1.8). GERD was the most common diagnosis in those reporting dysphagia on the medical record; other organic explanations were rare and only found in the frequent dysphagia group. Conclusions Frequent dysphagia is not rare in the community (3%), occurs in both women and men across all adult age groups, and is most likely to indicate underlying GERD. PMID:25376877

  7. The Effects of Glucose Therapy Agents-Apple Juice, Orange Juice, and Cola-on Enteral Tube Flow and Patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Daphna J; Montreuil, Jasmine; Santoro, Andrea L; Zettas, Antonia; Lowe, Julia

    2016-06-01

    To develop evidence-based hypoglycemia treatment protocols in patients receiving total enteral nutrition, this study determined the effect on enteral tube flow of glucose therapy agents: apple juice, orange juice, and cola, and it also examined the effects of tube type and feed type with these glucose therapy agents. For this study, 12 gastrostomy tubes (6 polyethylene and 6 silicone) were set at 50 mL/h. Each feeding set was filled with Isosource HN with fibre or Novasource Renal. Each tube was irrigated with 1 glucose therapy agent, providing approximately 20 g of carbohydrate every 4 h. Flow-rate measurements were collected at 2 h intervals. The results showed that the glucose therapy agent choice affected flow rates: apple juice and cola had higher average flow rates than orange juice (P = 0.01). A significant difference was found between tube type and enteral formula: polyethylene tubes had higher average flow rates than silicone tubes (P orange juice, and thus may be considered as primary treatment options for hypoglycemia in enterally fed patients. Polyethylene tubes and Isosource HN with fibre were less likely to clog than silicone tubes and Novasource Renal.

  8. Vitamin D status of gastrostomy-fed children with special needs: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuter, Hayley; Das, Geeta; Mughal, M Zulf

    2017-12-01

    To assess the vitamin D status of gastrostomy-fed children. Vitamin D status was measured in 32 children aged five to 16 years recruited from special schools in Manchester, UK (53° 48 ' N). All children were receiving a nutritionally complete, commercially prepared enteral feed via gastrostomy, and had been established on this regimen for over 12 months. Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) were measured at the end of winter. Children with serum concentrations of 25OHD >50 nmol/L were considered to be sufficient, and those with concentrations 50 nmol/L). One subject was vitamin D deficient (serum 25OHD vitamin D insufficient (serum 25OHD >25 nmol/L - vitamin D derived from enteral feeds was 9.45 μg/day; range 3.5-30; 13 children (41%) received less than 10 μg of vitamin D per day from their enteral feed. Nutritionally complete gastrostomy feeds may be protective against vitamin D deficiency in the majority of children with special needs. We recommend that all children over 1 year of age receive 10 μg (400 IU) of vitamin D, as recommended by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN). ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Botulinum toxin alleviates dysphagia of patients with inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Aleksi; Airas, Laura; Jokela, Manu; Pulkkinen, Jaakko

    2017-09-15

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a disabling and undertreated symptom that often occurs in patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). In this study, we examined the effect of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) injections to the cricopharyngeus muscle (CPM) of patients with s-IBM and dysphagia. A single-center retrospective study involving 40 biopsy-proven s-IBM-patients treated in the District of Southwest Finland from 2000 to 2013. The incidence of dysphagia, rate of aspirations, rate of aspiration pneumonias and treatment results of dysphagia were analyzed. Patients treated for dysphagia were evaluated before and after surgery by video-fluoroscopy and/or using a questionnaire. Twenty-five of the 40 s-IBM patients (62.5%) experienced dysphagia. BoNT-A was injected a median of 2 times (range 1-7) in 12 patients with dysphagia. Before the injections 7 patients reported aspiration, none afterwards. The corresponding figures for aspiration pneumonia were 3 and 0. All of these patients had normal swallowing function 12months (median, range 2-60) after the last injection. BoNT-A injections to the CPM alleviate the dysphagia of s-IBM patients reversibly and appear to reduce the rate of aspiration effectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dilemmas for guardians of advanced dementia patients regarding tube feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Efrat; Agmon, Maayan; Hirsch, Ayal; Ziv, Miriam; Zisberg, Anna

    2018-01-01

    advanced dementia is an incurable illness, its last stage marked by inability to eat. Tube feeding was deemed a helpful solution at this stage, but in recent years its inefficiency has been proved, and it is no longer practiced in many countries around the world. In Israel, however, the procedure is still accepted. In the gastroenterology department at the Bnai Zion Medical Center, a serious interaction is ongoing with patients' legal guardians, where detailed information is given about the inefficiency of the tube procedure. Nevertheless, the great majority of guardians choose to have it performed. to probe the considerations underlying the decision for gastrostomy, despite the data and the recommendations. qualitative research, including participant observation at the clinic and in-depth interviews with guardians. the families of most patients did not discuss end-of-life issues with them. The overwhelming preference for using the technology was interpreted as life-saving, in contrast to comfort feeding, which was deemed euthanasia. The reasons given for the decision to tube feed were drawn from a range of outlooks: religion, the patient's earlier survival capacity, and pragmatic considerations involving relations with nursing home staff. study of the decision-making process of advanced dementia patients' guardians sheds light on the layers of meaning of the Israeli discourse regarding end-of-life issues. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Functional changes of neural circuits in stroke patients with dysphagia: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Xiao, Yuan; Zhang, Wenjing; Yao, Li; Gao, Xin; Chandan, Shah; Lui, Su

    2017-08-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in stroke patients with unclear pathogenesis. Several recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies had been carried out to explore the cerebral functional changes in dysphagic stroke patients. The aim of this study was to analysis these imaging findings using a meta-analysis. We used seed-based d mapping (SDM) to conduct a meta-analysis for dysphagic stroke patients prior to any kind of special treatment for dysphagia. A systematic search was conducted for the relevant studies. SDM meta-analysis method was used to examine regions of increased and decreased functional activation between dysphagic stroke patients and healthy controls. Finally, six studies including 81 stroke patients with dysphagia and 78 healthy controls met the inclusion standards. When compared with healthy controls, stroke patients with dysphagia showed hyperactivation in left cingulate gyrus, left precentral gyrus and right posterior cingulate gyrus, and hypoactivation in right cuneus and left middle frontal gyrus. The hyperactivity of precentral gyrus is crucial in stroke patients with dysphagia and may be associated with the severity of stroke. Besides the motor areas, the default-mode network regions (DMN) and affective network regions (AN) circuits are also involved in dysphagia after stroke. © 2017 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Dysphagia: current reality and scope of the problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavé, Pere; Shaker, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dysphagia is a symptom of swallowing dysfunction that occurs between the mouth and the stomach. Although oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent condition (occurring in up to 50% of elderly people and 50% of patients with neurological conditions) and is associated with aspiration, severe nutritional and respiratory complications and even death, most patients are not diagnosed and do not receive any treatment. By contrast, oesophageal dysphagia is less prevalent and less severe, but with better recognized symptoms caused by diseases affecting the enteric nervous system and/or oesophageal muscular layers. Recognition of the clinical relevance and complications of oesophageal and oropharyngeal dysphagia is growing among health-care professionals in many fields. In addition, the emergence of new methods to screen and assess swallow function at both the oropharynx and oesophagus, and marked advances in understanding the pathophysiology of these conditions, is paving the way for a new era of intensive research and active therapeutic strategies for affected patients. Indeed, a unified field of deglutology is developing, with new professional profiles to cover the needs of all patients with dysphagia in a nonfragmented way.

  13. Food Culture, Preferences and Ethics in Dysphagia Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Belinda

    2015-11-01

    Adults with dysphagia experience difficulties swallowing food and fluids with potentially harmful health and psychosocial consequences. Speech pathologists who manage patients with dysphagia are frequently required to address ethical issues when patients' food culture and/ or preferences are inconsistent with recommended diets. These issues incorporate complex links between food, identity and social participation. A composite case has been developed to reflect ethical issues identified by practising speech pathologists for the purposes of illustrating ethical concerns in dysphagia management. The case examines a speech pathologist's role in supporting patient autonomy when patients and carers express different goals and values. The case presents a 68-year-old man of Australian/Italian heritage with severe swallowing impairment and strong values attached to food preferences. The case is examined through application of the dysphagia algorithm, a tool for shared decision-making when patients refuse dietary modifications. Case analysis revealed the benefits and challenges of shared decision-making processes in dysphagia management. Four health professional skills and attributes were identified as synonymous with shared decision making: communication, imagination, courage and reflection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Dysphagia in children with repaired oesophageal atresia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppens, C.H.; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Scharbatke, H.E.; Groot, S.A. de; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in children with repaired oesophageal atresia (OA). Abnormalities in the oropharyngeal and oesophageal phase have hardly been studied. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of dysphagia in children with repaired OA and to identify and differentiate oral

  15. Prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalf, J G; de Swart, B J M; Bloem, B R; Munneke, M

    2012-05-01

    Dysphagia is a potentially harmful feature, also in Parkinson's disease (PD). As published prevalence rates vary widely, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD in a meta-analysis. We conducted a systematic literature search in February 2011 and two independent reviewers selected the papers. We computed the estimates of the pooled prevalence weighted by sample size. Twelve studies were suitable for calculating prevalence rates. Ten studies provided an estimate based on subjective outcomes, which proved statistically heterogeneous (p dysphagia occurs in one third of community-dwelling PD patients. Objectively measured dysphagia rates were much higher, with 4 out of 5 patients being affected. This suggests that dysphagia is common in PD, but patients do not always report swallowing difficulties unless asked. This underreporting calls for a proactive clinical approach to dysphagia, particularly in light of the serious clinical consequences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Oral conditions and dysphagia in Japanese, community-dwelling middle- and older- aged adults, independent in daily living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Akinari; Takahashi, Ippei; Kurauchi, Sizuka; Soma, Yuki; Oyama, Toshiaki; Tamura, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Takao; Murashita, Kouichi; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Prevention, early detection and effective rehabilitation of dysphagia are important issues to be considered in an aging society. Previous studies have shown conflicting findings regarding the association between dysphagia and its potential risk factors, including age, malnutrition, oral conditions, lifestyle and medical history. Herein, we assessed the prevalence and association of dysphagia with potential risk factors in 50- to 79-year-old adults dwelling in a community in Japan. Patients and methods In this study, there were 532 participants (185 males and 347 females). Participants who responded positively to the question “Do you sometimes choke on drinks/food such as tea and soup?” or those who presented with abnormal repetitive saliva swallowing test findings were diagnosed with dysphagia. The data collected from these participants included the following: number of teeth, occurrence of oral dryness, age, body mass index, serum albumin concentration, smoking, drinking and exercise habits, presence of diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and questions from the Mini–Mental State Examination. Results Dysphagia was observed in 33 males (17.8%) and 76 females (21.9%). To explore the effect of the potential risk factors on the prevalence of dysphagia, a model was built by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Using the forced entry method, oral dryness (odds ratio [OR] =3.683 and P=0.003 in males; OR =1.797 and P=0.032 in females) and the number of teeth (OR =0.946 and P=0.038 in males) were found to be significantly related to dysphagia. Conclusion This cross-sectional study demonstrated associations between oral conditions and dysphagia. Factors such as oral dryness and number of teeth may contribute to dysphagia more so than aging, lifestyle and comorbidity in community-dwelling adults over the age of 50. PMID:28352164

  17. Difficulties with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG): a practical guide for the endoscopist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, S

    2013-03-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a widely used and effective means of providing long-term nutrition in patients with inadequate oral intake. The demand for this intervention has risen steadily since the early 1990s. Endoscopists who perform PEG insertion have become increasingly concerned about inappropriate use of this intervention.

  18. Spontaneous swallowing frequency has potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael F

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases, swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute [SPM]) were compared with stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with versus without clinically significant dysphagia. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM, which was compared with a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was used to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis yielded a threshold of SPM≤0.40 that identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5- to 10-minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel.

  19. Spontaneous Swallowing Frequency [Has Potential to] Identify Dysphagia in Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. Methods In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute: SPM) were compared to stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with vs. without clinically significant dysphagia. ROC analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM which was compared to a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was employed to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. Results SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. ROC analysis yielded a threshold of SPM ≤ 0.40 which identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5 to 10 minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Conclusions Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel. PMID:24149008

  20. Family Experiences With Feeding Tubes in Neurologic Impairment: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Katherine E; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Cohen, Eyal; Nicholas, David B; Rosella, Laura C; Guttmann, Astrid; Mahant, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    Gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes) are frequently used to provide enteral nutrition for children who have neurologic impairment. Understanding the impact of G-tubes from the family's perspective will inform decision-making and improve support from health care providers. This study explored the experiences of families after G-tube placement in children with neurologic impairment. We conducted a systematic review of English-language qualitative primary research studies describing family experiences after G-tube placement. Six electronic databases were searched from inception to June 2014. Two authors independently screened and identified relevant studies, evaluated quality of reporting by using the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research tool, and extracted data. Overarching concepts were developed by using thematic analysis. From 2674 screened abstracts, 84 texts were reviewed, and 13 studies met the inclusion criteria. G-tubes affect the lives of children, parents, and the family unit in many ways, both positive and negative. Improvements and challenges were described for children's health and happiness, for parental caregiving and stress, and for logistics and bonding within the family. G-tube feeding also changed relationships within the family, between the family and the medical system, and between the family and the outside world. Furthermore, experiences varied, with different families framing similar concepts as positive and negative. G-tube placement has diverse effects on daily life for children with neurologic impairment and their families. Clinicians may use the themes identified in this study to guide conversations with families about their values, experiences, and expectations before and after G-tube placement. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Dysphagia: A Short Review of the Current State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koidou, Irene; Kollias, Nikolaos; Sdravou, Katerina; Grouios, George

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia is the clinical expression of disruption of the synchronized activity surrounding the normal swallowing mechanism. It results from a large number of causes including neurologic, myopathic, metabolic, inflammatory/autoimmune, infectious, structural, iatrogenic, and psychiatric diseases. It can have a significant impact on social and…

  2. Central cholinergic dysfunction could be associated with oropharyngeal dysphagia in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Duck; Koo, Jung Hoi; Song, Sun Hong; Jo, Kwang Deog; Lee, Moon Kyu; Jang, Wooyoung

    2015-11-01

    Dysphagia is an important issue in the prognosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although several studies have reported that oropharyngeal dysphagia may be associated with cognitive dysfunction, the exact relationship between cortical function and swallowing function in PD patients is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between an electrophysiological marker of central cholinergic function, which reflected cognitive function, and swallowing function, as measured by videofluoroscopic studies (VFSS). We enrolled 29 early PD patients. Using the Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire (SDQ), we divided the enrolled patients into two groups: PD with dysphagia and PD without dysphagia. The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) was applied to explore the nature of the dysphagia. To assess central cholinergic dysfunction, short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was evaluated. We analyzed the relationship between central cholinergic dysfunction and oropharyngeal dysphagia and investigated the characteristics of the dysphagia. The SAI values were significantly different between the two groups. The comparison of each VFSS component between the PD with dysphagia group and the PD without dysphagia group showed statistical significance for most of the oral phase components and for a single pharyngeal phase component. The total score on the VDS was higher in the PD with dysphagia group than in the PD without dysphagia group. The Mini-Mental State Examination and SAI values showed significant correlations with the total score of the oral phase components. According to binary logistic regression analysis, SAI value independently contributed to the presence of dysphagia in PD patients. Our findings suggest that cholinergic dysfunction is associated with dysphagia in early PD and that an abnormal SAI value is a good biomarker for predicting the risk of dysphagia in PD patients.

  3. Tube introducer and modified Celestin tube for use in palliative intubation of oesophagogastric neoplasms at fibreoptic endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, M; Ferguson, R; Parker, G C

    1978-01-01

    A new method for palliative intubation of inoperable neoplasms at or near the cardia is described. A guidewire is passed through the stricture, which is dilated using Eder Puestow metal olive dilators. The tube to be inserted is mounted on an introducer, which grips its distal end from inside, and is slid into position along the wire under radiological control. Twenty-five patients have been intubated with one death directly resulting from the procedure. The method provides a simple and relatively safe means of relieving dysphagia and improving nutrition. Images Fig. 2 PMID:79517

  4. Acute symptoms during the course of head and neck radiotherapy or chemoradiation are strong predictors of late dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Schaaf, Arjen van der; Chouvalova, Olga; Vemer-van den Hoek, Johanna G.M.; Gawryszuk, Agata; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Roodenburg, Jan L.N.; Wopken, Kim; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if acute symptoms during definitive radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiation (CHRT) are prognostic factors for late dysphagia in head and neck cancer (HNC). Material and methods: This prospective cohort study consisted of 260 HNC patients who received definitive RT or CHRT. The primary endpoint was grade 2–4 swallowing dysfunction at 6 months after completing RT (SWALM6). During treatment, acute symptoms, including oral mucositis, xerostomia and dysphagia, were scored, and the scores were accumulated weekly and entered into an existing reference model for SWALM6 that consisted of dose–volume variables only. Results: Both acute xerostomia and dysphagia were strong prognostic factors for SWALM6. When acute scores were added as variables to the reference model, model performance increased as the course of treatment progressed: the AUC rose from 0.78 at the baseline to 0.85 in week 6. New models built for weeks 3–6 were significantly better able to identify patients with and without late dysphagia. Conclusion: Acute xerostomia and dysphagia during the course of RT are strong prognostic factors for late dysphagia. Including accumulated acute symptom scores on a weekly basis in prediction models for late dysphagia significantly improves the identification of high-risk and low-risk patients at an early stage during treatment and might facilitate individualized treatment adaptation

  5. Can a giant cervical osteophyte cause dysphagia and airway obstruction? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Vasileiadis, Ioannis; Papanas, Nikolaos; Goulimari, Reggina; Maltezos, Eustratios

    2011-05-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder mainly affecting elderly people. It frequently presents with excessive bone formation (osteophytes). These may lead to pain and neurological deficits due to root compression. Dysphagia and airway obstruction due to a giant anterior osteophyte of the cervical spine are extremely rare. We present the case of an 81-year-old patient suffering from dysphagia and slight dyspnoea due to a giant cervical osteophyte. Osteophyte resection was performed and the patient was relieved from symptoms. This case highlights that a large cervical osteophyte may, albeit rarely, be the cause of simultaneously presenting dysphagia and dyspnoea, and should, therefore, be included in the diagnostic workup in such cases.

  6. [Oropharyngeal dysphagia associated with Chiari I malformation and syringomyelia J].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Medina, Julio César; Cárdenas-Lara, Armando; Guerrero-Rascón, Carlos Alberto; Rodríguez-Bautista, Heber

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia associated with neurological disease is an important clinical manifestation in the diagnosis of injury that justifies the compression of the brainstem and lower cranial nerves. To emphasize the study of dysphagia in a patient with Chiari I malformation associated with syringomyelia in the absence of primary gastroenterological symptoms. We describe the case of a 62 year-old woman with oropharyngeal dysphagia of six years of evolution, cervicobrachialgia, ptosis and facial diplexia. Magnetic resonance imaging is an essential element for establishing the etiologic diagnosis of neurogenic dysphagia.

  7. The Prediction and Prevention of Dysphagia After Occipitospinal Fusion by Use of the S-line (Swallowing Line).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneyama, Shuichi; Sumi, Masatoshi; Takabatake, Masato; Kasahara, Koichi; Kanemura, Aritetsu; Hirata, Hiroaki; Darden, Bruce V

    2017-05-15

    Clinical case series and risk factor analysis of dysphagia after occipitospinal fusion (OSF). The aim of this study was to develop new criteria to avoid postoperative dysphagia by analyzing the relationship among the craniocervical alignment, the oropharyngeal space, and the incidence of dysphagia after OSF. Craniocervical malalignment after OSF is considered to be one of the primary triggers of postoperative dysphagia. However, ideal craniocervical alignment has not been confirmed. Thirty-eight patients were included. We measured the O-C2 angle (O-C2A) and the pharyngeal inlet angle (PIA) on the lateral cervical radiogram at follow-up. PIA is defined as the angle between McGregor's line and the line that links the center of the C1 anterior arch and the apex of cervical sagittal curvature. The impact of these two parameters on the diameter of pharyngeal airway space (PAS) and the incidence of the dysphagia were analyzed. Six of 38 cases (15.8%) exhibited the dysphagia. A multiple regression analysis showed that PIA was significantly correlated with PAS (β = 0.714, P = 0.005). Receiver-operating characteristic curves showed that PIA had a high accuracy as a predictor of the dysphagia with an AUC (area under the curve) of 0.90. Cases with a PIA less than 90 degrees showed significantly higher incidence of dysphagia (31.6%) than those with a 90 or more degrees of PIA (0.0%) (P = 0.008). Our results indicated that PIA had the high possibility to predict postoperative dysphagia by OSF with the condition of PIA dysphagia. 4.

  8. Is Nasobiliary Tube Really Safe A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girolamo Geraci

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A case of esophageal ulcer caused by nasobiliary tube is described. This tool is not routinely considered to be a cause of major complications in the literature and to our knowledge, this is the first report of this kind of complication in nasobiliary tube placement. A 72-year-old patient presented with Charcot’s triad and was demonstrated to have cholangitis with multiple biliary stones in the common bile duct. Biliary drainage was achieved through endoscopic retrograde cholangiography, endoscopic sphincterotomy, biliary tree drainage and nasobiliary tube with double pigtail. The patient presented odynophagia, dysphagia and retrosternal pain 12 h after the procedure and upper endoscopy revealed a long esophageal ulcer, which was treated conservatively. This report provides corroboration of evidence that nasobiliary tubeplacement has potential complications related to pressure sores. In our opinion this is a possibility to consider in informed consent forms.

  9. The establishment of enteral nutrition with minimally-invasive interventional procedure under endoscopic or imaging guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Feng; Cheng Yingsheng

    2010-01-01

    For patients unable to get the necessary nutrition orally, a variety of techniques,including surgical way, to make gastrostomy with tube placement have been employed. For recent years, gastrostomy and tube placement with the help of endoscopic guidance or percutaneous interventional management has been developed, which is superior to surgical procedure in minimizing injuries, decreasing cost and reducing complications. In certain clinical situations, both endoscopic method and interventional method can be employed. This paper aims to make a comprehensive review of the indications, techniques and skills, advantages and disadvantages of both the endoscopy-guided and the imaging-guided percutaneous gastrojejunostomy for the establishment of enteral nutrition. (authors)

  10. Orotracheal intubation and dysphagia: comparison of patients with and without brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rodrigues Padovani

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the swallowing and feeding abilities in extubated patients with and without brain injury. Methods: A retrospective study including 44 patients aged 20 to 50 years submitted to prolonged orotracheal intubation (> 48 hours. Two groups were analyzed: Group 1 composed of nontraumatic brain injury patients, and Group 2 composed of patients with traumatic brain injury. Two scales for characterization of functional swallowing and feeding abilities were used to compare both groups; the levels of alertness, awareness and patient collaboration were also assessed. Rresults: The groups were equal in age, number and time of orotracheal intubation and extubation on the date of the assessment. Regarding the speech and language diagnosis, Group 1 presented higher percentage of functional swallowing and mild dysphagia, while Group 2 showed higher rates of moderate to severe dysphagia and severe dysphagia. The Functional Oral Intake Scale average was higher in Group 1. In addition, the injured brain group was sleepier, less collaborative and had less contact in the first evaluation. Cconclusions: In this study, patients who underwent prolonged orotracheal intubation had dysphagia in different degrees, but the patients with brain injury presented more frequent and severe disorder. Thus, this study suggested that orotracheal intubation cannot be considered as the single factor causing dysphagia, especially in neurological patients. Moreover, some cognitive factors may influence the possibility of providing oral feeding.

  11. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding of locally advanced oro-pharygo-laryngeal cancer patients: Blenderized or commercial food?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakostas, Pyrros; Tsaousi, Georgia; Stavrou, George; Rachovitsas, Dimitrios; Tsiropoulos, Gavriil; Rova, Constantina; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Michalopoulos, Antonios; Grosomanidis, Vasilios; Kotzampassi, Katerina

    2017-11-01

    Head and neck cancer patients commonly suffer from severe malnutrition at the time of tentative diagnosis. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy [PEG] feeding is now considered as an efficient tool to reduce nutritional deterioration alongside concurrent treatment. We undertook the challenge to retrospectively evaluate the impact of a commercial, disease-specific, feeding formula [Supportan, Fresenius Kabi, Hellas] versus blenderized family food on nutritional outcome. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected nutritional and anthropometric data at the time of PEG placement, at the 8th week [after treatment termination] and at 8 months [6mo of recovery from treatment]. All patients were prescribed a commercial feeding formula. The final dataset included 212 patients: 112 received the commercial formula, 69 voluntarily decided to switch into blenderized-tube-feeding, and 31 were prescribed to receive a home-made formula of standard ingredients. The commercial formula seemed to help patients to fight the catabolism of concurrent treatment, since, at the 8mo assessment, both Body Mass index and Fat Free Mass had almost recovered to the values at the time of first diagnosis. Neither group on blenderized or home-made formulas exhibited nutritional improvement, but experienced a significant deterioration throughout the study period, with the home-made formula group being the worst. These findings clearly indicate that home-made and blenderized foods do not adequately support the nutritional requirements of patients with HNC scheduled to receive concurrent CRT treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Relief of dysphagia during neoadjuvant treatment for cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, B; Ericson, J; Kumagai, K; Lundell, L; Tsai, J A; Lindblad, M; Rouvelas, I; Friesland, S; Wang, N; Nilsson, M

    2016-07-01

    Dysphagia is the main symptom of cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction and causing nutritional problems and weight loss, often counteracted by insertion of self-expandable metal stents or nutrition via an enteral route. Clinical observations indicate that neoadjuvant therapy may effectively and promptly alleviate dysphagia, making such nutrition supportive interventions redundant before surgical resection. The objective of the current study was to carefully study the effects of induction neoadjuvant therapy on dysphagia and its subsequent course and thereby investigate the actual need for alimentary gateways for nutritional support. Thirty-five consecutive patients scheduled for neoadjuvant therapy were recruited and assessed regarding dysphagia and appetite at baseline, after the first cycle of preoperative treatment with either chemotherapy alone or with chemoradiotherapy and before surgery. Platinum-based therapy in combination with 5-fluorouracil was administered intravenously days 1-5 every 3 weeks and consisted of three treatments. Patients receiving combined chemoradiotherapy started radiotherapy on day one of second chemotherapy cycle. They received fractions of 2 Gy/day each up to a total dose of 40 Gy. Watson and Ogilvie dysphagia scores were used to assess dysphagia, while appetite was assessed by the Edmonton Assessment System Visual analogue scale-appetite questionnaire. Patients were evaluated at regular outpatient clinic visits or by telephone. The histological tumor response in the surgical specimen was assessed using the Chirieac scale. Ten patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 25 patients scheduled for chemoradiotherapy were included in the analysis. There was a significant improvement in dysphagia in both treatment groups, according to both scales, already from baseline to the completion of the first chemotherapy cycle which remained to the end of the neoadjuvant treatment (P dysphagia and the degree of

  13. POSTFUNDOPLICATION DYSPHAGIA CAUSES SIMILAR WATER INGESTION DYNAMICS AS ACHALASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Oliveira DANTAS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background - After surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease dysphagia is a symptom in the majority of patients, with decrease in intensity over time. However, some patients may have persistent dysphagia. Objective - The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the dynamics of water ingestion in patients with postfundoplication dysphagia compared with patients with dysphagia caused by achalasia, idiopathic or consequent to Chagas' disease, and controls. Methods - Thirty-three patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, assessed more than one year after surgery, together with 50 patients with Chagas' disease, 27 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 88 controls were all evaluated by the water swallow test. They drunk, in triplicate, 50 mL of water without breaks while being precisely timed and the number of swallows counted. Also measured was: (a inter-swallows interval - the time to complete the task, divided by the number of swallows during the task; (b swallowing flow - volume drunk divided by the time taken; (c volume of each swallow - volume drunk divided by the number of swallows. Results - Patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia took longer to ingest all the volume, had an increased number of swallows, an increase in interval between swallows, a decrease in swallowing flow and a decrease in water volume of each swallow compared with the controls. There was no difference between the three groups of patients. There was no correlation between postfundoplication time and the results. Conclusion - It was concluded that patients with postfundoplication dysphagia have similar water ingestion dynamics as patients with achalasia.

  14. POSTFUNDOPLICATION DYSPHAGIA CAUSES SIMILAR WATER INGESTION DYNAMICS AS ACHALASIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Roberto Oliveira; Santos, Carla Manfredi; Cassiani, Rachel Aguiar; Alves, Leda Maria Tavares; Nascimento, Weslania Viviane

    2016-01-01

    - After surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease dysphagia is a symptom in the majority of patients, with decrease in intensity over time. However, some patients may have persistent dysphagia. - The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the dynamics of water ingestion in patients with postfundoplication dysphagia compared with patients with dysphagia caused by achalasia, idiopathic or consequent to Chagas' disease, and controls. - Thirty-three patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, assessed more than one year after surgery, together with 50 patients with Chagas' disease, 27 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 88 controls were all evaluated by the water swallow test. They drunk, in triplicate, 50 mL of water without breaks while being precisely timed and the number of swallows counted. Also measured was: (a) inter-swallows interval - the time to complete the task, divided by the number of swallows during the task; (b) swallowing flow - volume drunk divided by the time taken; (c) volume of each swallow - volume drunk divided by the number of swallows. - Patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia took longer to ingest all the volume, had an increased number of swallows, an increase in interval between swallows, a decrease in swallowing flow and a decrease in water volume of each swallow compared with the controls. There was no difference between the three groups of patients. There was no correlation between postfundoplication time and the results. - It was concluded that patients with postfundoplication dysphagia have similar water ingestion dynamics as patients with achalasia.

  15. A young patient with multisystem complications after cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaroopa Pulivarthi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We are describing a case of an 18-year-old male patient with cytomegalovirus (CMV associated guillain-barre syndrome (GBS who presented with an acute onset of generalized weakness and numbness in the extremities, dysphagia, and facial diplegia, followed by respiratory failure, which led to mechanical ventilation. He had positive immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M antibodies against CMV, and CMV polymerase chain reaction was positive with <2000 copies of deoxyribonucleic acid. Human immunodeficiency virus test was negative. He received a course of ganciclovir, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasmapheresis. After improving from acute episode, patient was transferred to a rehabilitation facility for physical and occupational therapy. At the rehabilitation facility, he exhibited signs of acute abdomen with pain in the left upper quadrant secondary to peritonitis from dislodged gastrostomy tube and underwent exploratory laparotomy. During the hospital course he was found to have splenic infarct and colitis on the computed tomography of abdomen. This case showed an immunocompetent young patient with multisystem complications including guillain-barre syndrome (GBS, splenic infarct, hepatitis, and colitis due to CMV.

  16. Therapeutic endoscopy for dysphagia and delayed gastric emptying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirdes, M.M.C.

    2012-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on the endoscopic treatment of benign and malignant dysphagia and delayed gastric emptying. Dysphagia due to a benign anastomotic stricture occurs in 40% of patients after esophagectomy and often requires ongoing endoscopic dilations. We evaluated whether corticosteroid

  17. Gastrostomy feeding tube - pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... button, close the clamp on the feeding set, disconnect the extension set from the button, and close ... Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of ...

  18. Gastrostomy tube placement - slideshow

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    ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright ...

  19. Hiatus Hernia as a Cause of Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Hamish; Sweis, Rami

    2017-08-01

    This review aims to discuss the putative relationship between hiatus hernia and dysphagia. Proposed mechanisms of dysphagia in patients with hiatus hernia are usually difficult to identify, but recent advances in technology (high-resolution manometry with or without concomitant impedance, ambulatory pH with impedance, videofluoroscopy, and the endoluminal functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP)) and methodology (inclusion of swallows of various consistencies and volumes or shifting position during the manometry protocol) can help induce symptoms and identify the underlying disorder. Chronic reflux disease is often associated with hiatus hernia and is the most common underlying etiology. Dysmotility because of impaired contractility and vigor can occur as a consequence of repeated acid exposure from the acid pocket within the hernia, and the resultant poor clearance subsequently worsens this insult. As such, dysphagia appears to be more common with increasing hiatus hernia size. Furthermore, mucosal inflammation can lead to fibrotic stricture formation and in turn obstruction. On the other hand, there appears to be a difference in the pathophysiology of smaller sliding hernias, in that those with dysphagia are more likely to have extrinsic compression at the crural diaphragm as compared to those with reflux symptoms only. Sliding hiatus hernia, especially when small, does not commonly lead to dysmotility and dysphagia; however, in those patients with symptoms, the underlying etiology can be sought with new technologies and, in particular, the reproduction of normal eating and drinking during testing.

  20. Identification of risk factors for postoperative dysphagia after primary anti-reflux surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Lee, Tommy H; Legner, András; Yano, Fumiaki; Dworak, Thomas; Mittal, Sumeet K

    2011-03-01

    Transient postoperative dysphagia is not uncommon after antireflux surgery and usually runs a self-limiting course. However, a subset of patients report long-term dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors for persistent postoperative dysphagia at 1 year after surgery. All patients who underwent antireflux surgery were entered into a prospectively maintained database. After obtaining institutional review board approval, the database was queried to identify patients who underwent primary antireflux surgery and were at least 1 year from surgery. Postoperative severity of dysphagia was evaluated using a standardized questionnaire (scale 0-3). Patients with scores of 2 or 3 were defined as having significant dysphagia. A total of 316 consecutive patients underwent primary antireflux surgery by a single surgeon. Of these, 219 patients had 1 year postoperative symptom data. Significant postoperative dysphagia at 1 year was reported by 19 (9.1%) patients. Thirty-eight patients (18.3%) required postoperative dilation for dysphagia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified preoperative dysphagia (odds ratio (OR), 4.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2-15.5; p = 0.023) and preoperative delayed esophageal transit by barium swallow (OR, 8.2; 95% CI, 1.6-42.2; p = 0.012) as risk factors for postoperative dysphagia. Female gender was a risk factor for requiring dilation during the early postoperative period (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.3-10.2; p = 0.016). No correlations were found with preoperative manometry. There also was no correlation between a need for early dilation and persistent dysphagia at 1 year of follow-up (p = 0.109). Patients with preoperative dysphagia and delayed esophageal transit on preoperative contrast study were significantly more likely to report moderate to severe postoperative dysphagia 1 year after antireflux surgery. This study confirms that the manometric criteria used to define esophageal dysmotility are not reliable

  1. DYSPHAGIA – BEYOND MALIGNANT PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Constantinescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Esophageal dysphagia can be caused by functional or structural abnormalities of the esophagus like esophageal strictures due to acid reflux disease, eosinophilic esophagitis, tumors and extrinsic compression, or by neuromuscular disorders like achalasia and diffuse spasm. The true prevalence of esophageal dysphagia is unknown, although epidemiological studies estimate a prevalence rate of 16% to 22% among individuals over 50 years of age. Case presentation. We present the case of a 55-year-old man, admitted to our hospital with progressive dysphagia for solids and important weight loss over the last two months. The upper endoscopy revealed an extrinsic compression of the middle esophagus. At this point, a thorax and abdomen computed tomography scan was performed, that showed a retrohilar mass of 58/44/38 mm, which compressed the right inferior lobar bronchus at the origin and the thoracic esophagus in the middle part. Endoscopic ultrasound and fine needle aspiration were performed. The anatomopathological examination of the biopsy reveals elements of chronic inflammation with neutrophils and lymphocytes, and granulomas with areas of necrosis, highly suggestive for tuberculosis. Conclusions. Dysphagia is a rare manifestation of tuberculosis, most commonly caused by an extrinsic compression mechanism due to mediastinal adenopathies. The particularity of this case is related to the contradicting imaging studies, that suggested either an esophageal or a pulmonary tumor, with mediastinal adenopathies, and the importance of endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration in determining the benign or malignant nature of injuries that are hardly accessible to non-invasive diagnostic methods.

  2. Psychological as well as illness factors influence acceptance of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and gastrostomy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): a prospective population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Naomi H; Landau, Sabine; Janssen, Anna; Lyall, Rebecca; Higginson, Irene; Burman, Rachel; McCrone, Paul; Sakel, Mohammed; Ellis, Catherine M; Shaw, Christopher E; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Leigh, P Nigel; Goldstein, Laura H

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to identify factors associated with acceptance of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and gastrostomy in an exploratory population-based study. Seventy-eight people with ALS at least six months post-diagnosis, and 50 caregivers, were recruited from the South-East ALS Register. Baseline physical, cognitive and psychological measures were obtained. Three-monthly follow-ups monitored whether patients had accepted or refused NIV or gastrostomy. Following an intervention decision, post-decision interviews repeated baseline measures and included further intervention-specific questionnaires. Results showed that 32 people with ALS made at least one intervention decision and of these 10 decided about both NIV and gastrostomy. While illness factors predicted those needing to make an intervention decision, cognitive and education status, and level of executive dysfunction were associated with decision-making and acceptance or refusal of interventions. Patients' understanding of their illness, their early approach to considering interventions and carer-related factors were also associated with treatment decisions. In conclusion, our findings highlight the complexity of decision-making and provide a platform for designing further studies. Cognitive and psychosocial factors may assume a greater role in palliative care decisions for people with ALS than has been explicitly recognized. Future work must clarify how to ensure patients are not inadvertently being denied suitable interventions.

  3. Efficiency of cineradiography in the diagnosis of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelerich, M.; Mai, R.; Mueller-Miny, H.; Peters, P.E.

    1995-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom in clinical practice. Due to the broad spectrum of underlying diseases many disciplines are involved in the therapy and diagnosis of dysphagia, where radiology plays a central role. The radiologist is confronted with different diagnostic problems and has to choose the most appropriate type of investigation. In many cases no organic disorder can be demonstrated by clinical examination, endoscopy or conventional radiological techniques. In this setting cineradiography is an outstanding tool for finding functional or structural changes in the swallowing chain. This study underlines the efficiency of cineradiography in the diagnosis of dysphagia. (orig.) [de

  4. Telehealth Stroke Dysphagia Evaluation Is Safe and Effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Kate; Hyers, Megan; Stuchiner, Tamela; Lucas, Lindsay; Schwartz, Karissa; Mako, Jenniffer; Spinelli, Kateri J; Yanase, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Rapid evaluation of dysphagia poststroke significantly lowers rates of aspiration pneumonia. Logistical barriers often significantly delay in-person dysphagia evaluation by speech language pathologists (SLPs) in remote and rural hospitals. Clinical swallow evaluations delivered via telehealth have been validated in a number of clinical contexts, yet no one has specifically validated a teleswallow evaluation for in-hospital post-stroke dysphagia assessment. A team of 6 SLPs experienced in stroke care and a telestroke neurologist designed, implemented, and tested a teleswallow evaluation for acute stroke patients, in which 100 patients across 2 affiliated, urban certified stroke centers were sequentially evaluated by a bedside and telehealth SLP. Inter-rater reliability was analyzed using percent agreement, Cohen's kappa, Kendall's tau-b, and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests. Logistic regression models accounting for age and gender were used to test the impact of stroke severity and stroke location on agreement. We found excellent agreement for both liquid (91% agreement; kappa = 0.808; Kendall's tau-b = 0.813, p Dysphagia evaluation by a remote SLP via telehealth is safe and effective following stroke. We plan to implement teleswallow across our multistate telestroke network as standard practice for poststroke dysphagia evaluation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Treatment of idiopathic hepatic lipidosis in cats: 11 cases (1986-1987).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, G; Cornelius, L; Allen, S; Greene, C

    1989-09-01

    Idiopathic hepatic lipidosis was diagnosed in 11 cats. Cats were treated by delivery of balanced nutrients supplemented with L-carnitine via a surgically placed gastrostomy tube. Feeding through the gastrostomy tube was initiated in the hospital and was continued at home in all cats. The mean duration of gastrostomy tube feeding was 48 days (range, 22 to 98 days). Vomiting associated with feeding (3 cats) and localized cellulitis at the gastrostomy site (2 cats) were the most frequent complications. Vomiting was controlled by reducing the volume of food administered at each feeding or by administration of metoclopramide. Cellulitis was treated successfully by parenteral administration of antibiotics and local wound cleansing. Seven of 11 cats (65%) survived and have remained clinically healthy for 15 to 29 months (mean, 20 months) since diagnosis. The other 4 cats died of peritonitis (n = 1), pneumonia (n = 1), hepatic encephalopathy (n = 1), or cardiopulmonary arrest (n = 1) between 0 and 10 days after surgery.

  6. Effect of dysphasia and dysphagia on inpatient mortality and hospital length of stay: a database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyomard, Veronique; Fulcher, Robert A; Redmayne, Oliver; Metcalf, Anthony K; Potter, John F; Myint, Phyo K

    2009-11-01

    To examine the effect of dysphasia and dysphagia on stroke outcome. Retrospective database study. Norfolk, United Kingdom. Two thousand nine hundred eighty-three men and women with stroke admitted to the hospital between 1997 and 2001. Inpatient mortality and likelihood of longer length of hospital stay, defined as longer than median length of stay (LOS). Dysphagia was defined as difficulty swallowing any liquid (including saliva) or solid material. Dysphasia was defined as speech disorders in which there was impairment of the power of expression by speech, writing, or signs or impairment of the power of comprehension of spoken or written language. An experienced team assessed dysphagia and dysphasia using explicit criteria. Two thousand nine hundred eighty-three patients (1,330 (44.6%) male), median age 78 (range 17-105), were included, of whom 77.7% had ischemic, 10.5% had hemorrhagic, and 11.8% had undetermined stroke types. Dysphasia was present in 41.2% (1,230) and dysphagia in 50.5% (1,506), and 27.7% (827) had both conditions. Having either or both conditions was associated with greater mortality and longer LOS (P<.001 for all). Using multiple logistic regression models controlling for age, sex, premorbid Rankin score, previous disabling stroke, and stroke type, corresponding odds ratios for death and longer LOS were 2.2 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.8-2.7) and 1.4 (95% CI=1.2-1.6) for dysphasia; 12.5 (95% CI=8.9-17.3) and 3.9 (95% CI=3.3-4.6) for dysphagia, 5.5 (95% CI=3.7-8.2), 1.9 (95% CI=1.6-2.3) for either, and 13.8 (95% CI=9.4-20.4) and 3.7 (95% CI=3.1-4.6) if they had both, versus having no dysphasia, no dysphagia, or none of these conditions, respectively. Patients with dysphagia have worse outcome in terms of inpatient mortality and length of hospital stay than those with dysphasia. When both conditions are present, the presence of dysphagia appears to determine the likelihood of poor outcome. Whether this effect is related just to stroke severity

  7. Swallowing function in pediatric patients with bilateral vocal fold immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jeffrey; Tibbetts, Kathleen M; Wu, Derek; Nassar, Michel; Tan, Melin

    2017-02-01

    Infants with bilateral vocal fold immobility (BVFI) often have poor swallow function in addition to potential airway compromise. While there are several reports on BVFI and its effect on patients' airway status, little is known about long term swallow function. We aim to characterize the swallowing function over time in pediatric patients with bilateral vocal fold immobility. A retrospective review of medical records of infants diagnosed with BVFI at a tertiary care children's hospital between 2005 and 2014 was conducted. Patient demographics, nature and etiology of immobility, laryngoscopy findings, comorbidities, and swallow outcomes at diagnosis and follow-up were recorded. Swallowing outcomes as measured by presence or absence of a gastrostomy tube were compared by etiology, vocal fold status, and normal or developmentally delay using the Fisher's exact test. 110 patients with a diagnosis of vocal fold immobility were identified. Twenty-nine (26%) had BVFI and twenty-three had complete medical records. Etiologies of vocal fold immobility include cardiac related in 13% (3/23), idiopathic in 30% (7/23) prolonged intubation in 26% (6/23) central neurologic in 22% (5/23), trauma in 4% (1/23), and infection in 4% (1/23). Average follow-up time was 44 months (range 5-94 months). Ten patients (56.5%) required a gastrostomy tube at time of diagnosis. Of this cohort who received gastrostomy tubes, three (30%) ultimately transitioned to complete oral feeds. Return of vocal fold mobility did not correlate with swallow function. In those with non-neurologic etiologies, the need for gastrostomy tube at end of follow up was unlikely. There was a statistically significant difference in the percentage of gastrostomy tube-free children at most recent follow up in patients who were normally developed (86%) versus those who were developmentally delayed (33%) (p = 0.02). We characterized the swallowing function of 23 pediatric patients with BVFI. Comorbidities are significant

  8. Acute gastric volvulus treated with laparoscopic reduction and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sang-Ho; Ha, Chang-Youn; Lee, Young-Joon; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Chan; Jung, Eun-Jung; Ju, Young-Tae; Jeong, Chi-Young; Ha, Woo-Song

    2013-07-01

    Acute gastric volvulus requires emergency surgery, and a laparoscopic approach for both acute and chronic gastric volvulus was reported recently to give good results. The case of a 50-year-old patient with acute primary gastric volvulus who was treated by laparoscopic reduction and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is described here. This approach seems to be feasible and safe for not only chronic gastric volvulus, but also acute gastric volvulus.

  9. The value of scintigraphy in the evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia

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    Argon, Murat; Duygun, Uelkem; Kocacelebi, Kenan; Ozkilic, Hayal [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ege University Medical School Hospital, 35100, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Secil, Yaprak; Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Ertekin, Cumhur [Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Ege University Medical School Hospital, Izmir (Turkey)

    2004-01-01

    Healthy adults can swallow boluses of 20 ml water in a single swallow. Individuals with impaired swallowing, however, may be unable to do so, instead requiring two or more swallows; this phenomenon is called ''piecemeal deglutition''. The term ''dysphagia limit'' refers to the volume at which piecemeal deglutition occurs. The aim of our study was to investigate the potential value of scintigraphic evaluation of piecemeal deglutition and dysphagia limit in patients with dysphagia, based on correlation with the results of submental electromyography (SM-EMG) and laryngeal sensor monitoring (LS). The study population comprised 24 patients with dysphagia secondary to neurological disorders and ten normal adults, who formed a control group. In the scintigraphic evaluation, subjects underwent four separate dynamic studies using 5, 10, 15 and 20 ml of water containing 0.5 mCi technetium-99m labelled sulphur colloid, and time-activity curves (TACs) were created for each study. Static thoracic images were also recorded in order to detect airway aspiration Observation of two or more peaks on TACs within the 10-s acquisition period was considered a sign of piecemeal deglutition. If piecemeal deglutition occurred at or below 20 ml, this volume was regarded as the dysphagia limit. Piecemeal deglutition was not found in any normal subjects; by contrast, it was observed in 14 of the 24 (58%) patients on scintigraphy and in 17 (71%) patients on EMG and LS. In three patients, signs of the airway aspiration were observed on static thoracic images. Scintigraphic and electrophysiological findings were in agreement in 19 patients (79%), and the correlation between scintigraphy and the electrophysiological methods for the evaluation of dysphagia was statistically significant (r=0.57, P=0.003). The novel finding of this study is the demonstration of piecemeal deglutition and dysphagia limit on scintigraphic studies in patients with neurogenic

  10. The value of scintigraphy in the evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argon, Murat; Duygun, Uelkem; Kocacelebi, Kenan; Ozkilic, Hayal; Secil, Yaprak; Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2004-01-01

    Healthy adults can swallow boluses of 20 ml water in a single swallow. Individuals with impaired swallowing, however, may be unable to do so, instead requiring two or more swallows; this phenomenon is called ''piecemeal deglutition''. The term ''dysphagia limit'' refers to the volume at which piecemeal deglutition occurs. The aim of our study was to investigate the potential value of scintigraphic evaluation of piecemeal deglutition and dysphagia limit in patients with dysphagia, based on correlation with the results of submental electromyography (SM-EMG) and laryngeal sensor monitoring (LS). The study population comprised 24 patients with dysphagia secondary to neurological disorders and ten normal adults, who formed a control group. In the scintigraphic evaluation, subjects underwent four separate dynamic studies using 5, 10, 15 and 20 ml of water containing 0.5 mCi technetium-99m labelled sulphur colloid, and time-activity curves (TACs) were created for each study. Static thoracic images were also recorded in order to detect airway aspiration Observation of two or more peaks on TACs within the 10-s acquisition period was considered a sign of piecemeal deglutition. If piecemeal deglutition occurred at or below 20 ml, this volume was regarded as the dysphagia limit. Piecemeal deglutition was not found in any normal subjects; by contrast, it was observed in 14 of the 24 (58%) patients on scintigraphy and in 17 (71%) patients on EMG and LS. In three patients, signs of the airway aspiration were observed on static thoracic images. Scintigraphic and electrophysiological findings were in agreement in 19 patients (79%), and the correlation between scintigraphy and the electrophysiological methods for the evaluation of dysphagia was statistically significant (r=0.57, P=0.003). The novel finding of this study is the demonstration of piecemeal deglutition and dysphagia limit on scintigraphic studies in patients with neurogenic dysphagia. Based on this finding we consider

  11. A Systematic Review of the Prevalence of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Stroke, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, and Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Claire; Gemmell, Elizabeth; Kenworthy, James; Speyer, Renée

    2016-06-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a common condition after stroke, Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and can cause serious complications including malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia, and premature mortality. Despite its high prevalence among the elderly and associated serious complications, dysphagia is often overlooked and under-diagnosed in vulnerable patient populations. This systematic review aimed to improve understanding and awareness of the prevalence of dysphagia in susceptible patient populations. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, PROSPERO, and disease-specific websites were systematically searched for studies reporting oropharyngeal dysphagia prevalence or incidence in people with stroke, PD, AD, traumatic brain injury, and community-acquired pneumonia, from the USA, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, Japan, China, and regional studies. The quality of study descriptions were assessed based on STROBE guidelines. A total of 1207 publications were identified and 33 met inclusion criteria: 24 in stroke, six in PD, two in traumatic brain injury, and one in patients with traumatic brain injury. Dysphagia was reported in 8.1-80 % of stroke patients, 11-81 % of PD, 27-30 % of traumatic brain injury patients, and 91.7 % of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. No relevant studies of dysphagia in AD were identified. This review demonstrates that dysphagia is highly prevalent in these populations, and highlights discrepancies between studies, gaps in dysphagia research, and the need for better dysphagia management starting with a reliable, standardized, and validated method for oropharyngeal dysphagia identification.

  12. Validation of the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale in various etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juyong; Oh, Byung-Mo; Kim, Jung Yoon; Lee, Goo Joo; Lee, Seung Ah; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2014-08-01

    The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) was developed as an objective predictor of the prognosis of dysphagia after stroke. We evaluated the clinical validity of the VDS for various diseases. We reviewed the medical records of 1,995 dysphagic patients (1,222 men and 773 women) who underwent videofluoroscopic studies in Seoul National University Hospital from April 2002 through December 2009. Their American Speech–Language–Hearing Association’s National Outcome Measurement System (ASHA NOMS) swallowing scale, clinical dysphagia scale (CDS), and VDS scores were evaluated on the basis of the clinical and/or videofluoroscopic findings by the consensus of two physiatrists. The correlations between the VDS and the other scales were calculated. The VDS displayed significant correlations with the ASHA NOMS swallowing scale and the CDS in every disease group (p dysphagia

  13. Early Dysphagia Screening by Trained Nurses Reduces Pneumonia Rate in Stroke Patients: A Clinical Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palli, Christoph; Fandler, Simon; Doppelhofer, Kathrin; Niederkorn, Kurt; Enzinger, Christian; Vetta, Christian; Trampusch, Esther; Schmidt, Reinhold; Fazekas, Franz; Gattringer, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Dysphagia is a common stroke symptom and leads to serious complications such as aspiration and pneumonia. Early dysphagia screening can reduce these complications. In many hospitals, dysphagia screening is performed by speech-language therapists who are often not available on weekends/holidays, which results in delayed dysphagia assessment. We trained the nurses of our neurological department to perform formal dysphagia screening in every acute stroke patient by using the Gugging Swallowing Screen. The impact of a 24/7 dysphagia screening (intervention) over swallowing assessment by speech-language therapists during regular working hours only was compared in two 5-month periods with time to dysphagia screening, pneumonia rate, and length of hospitalization as outcome variables. Overall, 384 patients (mean age, 72.3±13.7 years; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 3) were included in the study. Both groups (pre-intervention, n=198 versus post-intervention, n=186) were comparable regarding age, sex, and stroke severity. Time to dysphagia screening was significantly reduced in the intervention group (median, 7 hours; range, 1-69 hours) compared with the control group (median, 20 hours; range, 1-183; P =0.001). Patients in the intervention group had a lower rate of pneumonia (3.8% versus 11.6%; P =0.004) and also a reduced length of hospital stay (median, 8 days; range, 2-40 versus median, 9 days; range, 1-61 days; P =0.033). 24/7 dysphagia screening can be effectively performed by nurses and leads to reduced pneumonia rates. Therefore, empowering nurses to do a formal bedside screening for swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients timely after admission is warranted whenever speech-language therapists are not available. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. The physiology of deglutition and the pathophysiology and complications of oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M

    2012-01-01

    The opening session of the 2nd International Conference on Oropharyngeal Dysphagia featured a series of invited talks reviewing the definition of dysphagia, its prevalence and its pathophysiology. The discussion arising from these talks focused heavily on the current underrecognition of dysphagia as a significant concern for older adults, particularly those over 75. The burdens associated with dysphagia in this sector of the population were recognized to be substantial, both in social/psychological terms and in terms of economic consequences for the healthcare system. The importance of developing swallow screening protocols as a routine method for the early identification of dysphagia and aspiration was explored. The idea of launching political initiatives aimed at increasing awareness and the utilization of appropriate dysphagia healthcare codes was also discussed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. A Rare Case of Esophageal Dysphagia in Children: Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery

    OpenAIRE

    Barone, Claudia; Carucci, Nicolina Stefania; Romano, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is an impairment of swallowing that may involve any structures from the mouth to the stomach. Esophageal dysphagia presents with the sensation of food sticking, pain with swallowing, substernal pressure, or chronic heartburn. There are many causes of esophageal dysphagia, such as motility disorders and mechanical and inflammatory diseases. Infrequently dysphagia arises from extrinsic compression of the esophagus from any vascular anomaly of the aortic arch. The most common embryolog...

  16. Use of endoscopy in diagnosis and management of patients with dysphagia in an African setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudawi, H M Y; Mahmoud, A O A; El Tahir, M A; Suliman, S H; Ibrahim, S Z

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to define the utility of esophagogastroduodenoscopy in the diagnosis and management of patients presenting with dysphagia and to determine the relative incidence of the various causes of dysphagia in Sudan. This is a prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive, hospital-based study carried out at the endoscopy unit of Soba University Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan. All patients complaining of dysphagia underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with therapeutic intervention when necessary. A total of 114 patients were enrolled in the study, with a mean age of 47 years SD +/- 19 and a male to female ratio of 1 : 1.04. A benign condition was diagnosed in 56% of the cases; this included esophageal strictures in 21% of the cases and achalasia in 14%. Malignant causes were mainly due to esophageal cancer (40.4%) and cancer of the stomach cardia (3.5%). Therapeutic intervention was attempted in 83% of the cases. Risk factors predictive of a malignant etiology were age over 40 years (P dysphagia lasting between 1 month and 1 year (P endoscopy in our African setting is an accurate and useful investigation in the diagnosis and management of patients presenting with dysphagia. Patients over the age of 40 years presenting with dysphagia and weight loss are more likely to have a neoplastic disease and should be referred for urgent endoscopy.

  17. Dysphagia among adult patients who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh Trudeau, Valérie; Maynard, Stéphanie; Terzic, Tatjana; Soucy, Geneviève; Bouin, Mickeal

    2015-03-01

    Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and⁄or anatomical anomalies. To determine the motor and anatomical causes of dysphagia. A total of 41 adults, followed at the Esophageal Atresia Clinic at Hôpital Saint-Luc (Montreal, Quebec), were approached to particpate in the present prospective study. Evaluation was completed using upper endoscopy, manometry and barium swallow for the participants who consented. The medical charts of respondents were systematically reviewed from the neonatal period to 18 years of age to assess medical and surgical history. All 41 patients followed at the clinic consented and were included in the study. Dysphagia was present in 73% of patients. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in 32 patients: hiatal hernia was present in 62% (n=20); esophageal diverticulum in 13% (n=4); macroscopic Barrett esophagus in 31% (n=10); and esophagitis in 19% (n=6). Histological esophagitis was present in 20% and intestinal metaplasia in 10%. There were no cases of dysplagia or adenocarcinoma. Esophageal manometry was performed on 56% of the patients (n=23). Manometry revealed hypomotility in 100% of patients and included an insufficient number of peristaltic waves in 96%, nonpropagating peristalsis in 78% and low-wave amplitude in 95%. Complete aperistalsis was present in 78%. The lower esophageal sphincter was abnormal in 12 (52%) patients, with incomplete relaxation the most common anomaly. Of the 41 patients, 29 (71%) consented to a barium swallow, which was abnormal in 13 (45%). The anomalies found were short esophageal dilation in 28%, delay in esophageal emptying in 14%, diverticula in 14% and stenosis in 7

  18. Dysphagia in the patient after stroke: consequences and nurse intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Frias

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to check the consequences of poststroke dysphagia and to reflect on the nurse’s intervention in dysphagia rehabilitation. Methodology: it was performed a systematic literature review of the topic in question; research based on international databases EBSCOhost, LILACS, SciELO.We were able to identify some studies publications between 2006 and 2014. We intend to answer the guiding question: What are the consequences of dysphagia in the patient after stroke? » Results vs. Discussion: after a thorough analysis, we have selected 11 articles and found that the most frequent consequences of dysphagia are the pulmonary complications by saliva and/or food suction. The nurse specialist still has a barely visible role, but his/her interventions are critical in these patients rehabilitation. Conclusions: rehabilitation is essential to avoid the consequences of poststroke dysphagia. The rehabilitation process must go through a multidisciplinary team of which nurses are an integral and essential part.

  19. Predictive factors for oropharyngeal dysphagia after prolonged orotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Carolina Martins de; Friche, Amélia Augusta de Lima; Salomão, Marina Silva; Bougo, Graziela Chamarelli; Vicente, Laélia Cristina Caseiro

    2017-09-13

    Lesions in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx due to endotracheal intubation can cause reduction in the local motility and sensitivity, impairing the swallowing process, resulting in oropharyngeal dysphagia. To verify the predictive factors for the development of oropharyngeal dysphagia and the risk of aspiration in patients with prolonged orotracheal intubation admitted to an intensive care unit. This is an observational, analytical, cross-sectional and retrospective data collection study of 181 electronic medical records of patients submitted to prolonged orotracheal intubation. Data on age; gender; underlying disease; associated comorbidities; time and reason for orotracheal intubation; Glasgow scale on the day of the Speech Therapist assessment; comprehension; vocal quality; presence and severity of dysphagia; risk of bronchoaspiration; and the suggested oral route were collected. The data were analyzed through logistic regression. The level of significance was set at 5%, with a 95% Confidence Interval. The prevalence of dysphagia in this study was 35.9% and the risk of aspiration was 24.9%. As the age increased, the altered vocal quality and the degree of voice impairment increased the risk of the presence of dysphagia by 5-; 45.4- and 6.7-fold, respectively, and of aspiration by 6-; 36.4- and 4.8-fold. The increase in the time of orotracheal intubation increased the risk of aspiration by 5.5-fold. Patients submitted to prolonged intubation who have risk factors associated with dysphagia and aspiration should be submitted to an early speech-language/audiology assessment and receive appropriate and timely treatment. The recognition of these predictive factors by the entire multidisciplinary team can minimize the possibility of clinical complications inherent to the risk of dysphagia and aspiration in extubated patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  20. Number of Gastrointestinal Symptoms is a Useful Means of Identifying Patients with Cancer for Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Machi; Manabe, Noriaki; Kamada, Tomoari; Hirai, Toshihiro; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken; Inoue, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia is a symptom suggestive of severe underlying pathology, although its causes include organic and non-organic disorders. The epidemiology of dysphagia is, however, poorly understood. We evaluated the prevalence of dysphagia in outpatients in Japan, measured the proportion ultimately found to have an organic cause, and recorded the nature of their symptoms and the underlying disorder. Of 5362 consecutive outpatients attending the Digestive Center at our hospital between June 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012, 186 patients (3.5 %) had dysphagia with a frequency score of ≥5 out of 6. The most common diagnosis was cancer (34 patients, 18.3 %), followed by gastroesophageal reflux disease (24 patients, 12.9 %). An esophageal motility disorder was diagnosed in 21 patients (11.3 %); the causes in the remaining 107 patients (57.5 %) were miscellaneous. Multivariable analysis identified the following predictors of cancer: age ≥ 54 years, weight loss, being a drinker of alcohol, and ≤2 gastrointestinal symptoms. Our findings can be used to inform the prioritization of referrals from primary care for investigation and treatment for patients with cancer for dysphagia.

  1. The results of the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion: Analysis of 113 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazım Ekin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the results and experiences of the patients who received percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG. Methods: A total of 113 patients who admitted to the Dicle University Medical Faculty , Department of Gastroenterology between January 2012 and December 2014 and in whom received PEG was performed. The patients were assessed in terms of indications, complications and results. Results: Among these patients, 70 (61.9% were male and 40 (38.1% were female. Though 8 (7% patients had head, neck and esophageal cancer; 105 (93% patients had primer or seconder neurological disorders. After the PEG, any serious complication was seen in patients. Wound infections were encountered in five patients (4.4% and the rate of minor complications was found to be 9.7%. The risk of complications was higher in patients over sixty years and men (p values of 0.049 and 0.022. Conclusion: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, a simple and safe method of enteral nutrition with a low complication rate, should be the first choice when extended period enteral nutrition is required. There is increased risk of complications in elderly males.

  2. Clinical significance of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for patients with severe craniocerebral injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Hanggen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the application of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG to patients with severe craniocerebral injury for the purpose of nutritional support therapy and pulmonary infection prevention. Methods: A total of 43 patients with severe craniocerebral injury admitted to our department from January 2008 to December 2012 received PEG followed by nutritional therapy. There were other 82 patients who were prescribed nasal-feeding nutrition. Nutrition status was evaluated by comparing serum albumin levels, and the incidence of pulmonary infection 1 week before and 2 weeks after operation was identifi ed and compared. Results: Both PEG and nasal-feeding nutrition therapies have significantly levated serum albumin levels (P<0.05. Serum albumin levels before and after nutritional therapies showed no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05. The incidence of pulmonary infection in PEG group was significantly decreased compared with that in nasal-feeding nutrition group (P<0.05. Conclusion: PEG is an effective method for severe craniocerebral injury patients. It can not only provide enteral nutrition but also prevent pulmonary infection induced by esophageal refl ux. Key words: Gastrostomy; Craniocerebral trauma; Enteral nutrition

  3. Gastrostomia endoscópica em pacientes com cardiopatia complicada Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in cardiologic complicated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso CUKIER

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Pacientes cardiopatas complicados com isquemia cerebral e insuficiência cardíaca necessitam terapia nutricional enteral prolongada por se apresentarem em situação de risco nutricional. Complicações advindas do uso prolongado da sonda nasoenteral poderiam ser evitadas com a execução da gastrostomia endoscópica. Esta é alternativa técnica para acesso ao tubo digestivo em nutrição enteral. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o tempo de indicação para gastrostomia endoscópica em pacientes com nutrição enteral com uso de sonda nasoenteral e as principais complicações do procedimento. Doze pacientes foram submetidos a gastrostomia endoscópica, sendo oito do sexo masculino. A idade média foi de 62,42 + 22,10 anos. A indicação principal foi síndrome isquêmica cerebral após parada cardiorespiratória por patologia clínica (sete pacientes ou cirurgia cardiovascular complicada (cinco. O tempo médio para indicação da gastrostomia endoscópica foi de 35,58 + 26,79 dias após introdução da nutrição enteral. Não houve intercorrências com o procedimento e, no período pós-operatório tardio, ocorreu infecção do orifício de inserção da gastrostomia endoscópica em um caso, resolvida com cuidados locais. Em conclusão, a gastrostomia endoscópica é técnica segura, com baixa incidência de complicações. Pode ser realizada em ambulatório, no leito do paciente, ou em centro de terapia intensiva e sua indicação deveria ser mais precoce.Complicated cardiologic patients with brain ischemia and heart failure need long term enteral nutrition. Long term nasoenteral tuibe feeding may cause complications that could be avoided with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the indications for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and its main complications. Twelve patients were submitted to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (eight male with main age of 62,42 ± 22,10 years old. Brain ischemia

  4. Poststroke dysphagia rehabilitation by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: a noncontrolled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verin, E; Leroi, A M

    2009-06-01

    Poststroke dysphagia is frequent and significantly increases patient mortality. In two thirds of cases there is a spontaneous improvement in a few weeks, but in the other third, oropharyngeal dysphagia persists. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is known to excite or inhibit cortical neurons, depending on stimulation frequency. The aim of this noncontrolled pilot study was to assess the feasibility and the effects of 1-Hz rTMS, known to have an inhibitory effect, on poststroke dysphagia. Seven patients (3 females, age = 65 +/- 10 years), with poststroke dysphagia due to hemispheric or subhemispheric stroke more than 6 months earlier (56 +/- 50 months) diagnosed by videofluoroscopy, participated in the study. rTMS at 1 Hz was applied for 20 min per day every day for 5 days to the healthy hemisphere to decrease transcallosal inhibition. The evaluation was performed using the dysphagia handicap index and videofluoroscopy. The dysphagia handicap index demonstrated that the patients had mild oropharyngeal dysphagia. Initially, the score was 43 +/- 9 of a possible 120 which decreased to 30 +/- 7 (p study demonstrated that rTMS is feasible in poststroke dysphagia and improves swallowing coordination. Our results now need to be confirmed by a randomized controlled study with a larger patient population.

  5. A Targeted Swallow Screen for the Detection of Postoperative Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Erica; Lancaster, Elizabeth; Meltzer, Jospeh; Mendelsohn, Abie H; Benharash, Peyman

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative dysphagia leads to aspiration pneumonia, prolonged hospital stay, and is associated with increased mortality. A simple and sensitive screening test to identify patients requiring objective dysphagia evaluation is presently lacking. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of a novel targeted swallow screen evaluation. This was a prospective trial involving all adult patients who underwent elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at our institution over an 8-week period. Within 24 hours of extubation and before the initiation of oral intake, all postsurgical patients were evaluated using the targeted swallow screen. A fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing was requested for failed screenings. During the study, 50 postcardiac surgery patients were screened. Fifteen (30%) failed the targeted swallow screen, and ten of the fifteen (66%) failed the subsequent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing exam and were confirmed to have dysphagia. The screening test had 100 per cent sensitivity for detecting dysphagia in our patient population, and a specificity of 87.5 per cent. The overall incidence of dysphagia was 20 per cent. We have shown that a targeted swallow evaluation can efficiently screen patients during the postcardiac surgery period. Furthermore, we have shown that the true incidence of dysphagia after cardiac surgery is significantly higher than previously recognized in literature.

  6. Severe complications caused by dissolution of latex with consequent self-disintegration of esophageal plastic tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löser, C

    2000-09-01

    A case of decisive material degeneration of an esophageal Celestin tube is described: a 50-year-old man with adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus received a Celestin tube for palliative endoscopic treatment and 8 months later presented with suddenly occurring complete dysphagia. Dissolution of the latex layer in the proximal as well as the distal part of the tube had caused self-disintegration of the Celestin tube and had liberated the monofilament nylon coil which completely obstructed the lumen of the tube. Endoscopic tube removal was only possible by careful attachment of a balloon catheter and peroral extraction after insufflation with contrast medium up to 5 atm. A Medline-based review of the literature revealed different but predominantly severe complications (perforation, hemorrhage, obstruction, and peritonitis) based on material fatigue of the latex layer in esophageal Celestin tubes. At least 6 months after placement of a Celestin tube, regular fluoroscopic controls should be performed to detect early disintegration of the tube. Indication for the placement of Celestin tubes in patients with benign esophageal strictures and longer life expectancy should be assessed very critically.

  7. Age-Related Differences in Clinical Characteristics and Esophageal Motility in Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakato, Rui; Manabe, Noriaki; Kamada, Tomoari; Matsumoto, Hideo; Shiotani, Akiko; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2017-06-01

    Dysphagia in elderly patients has a major effect on nutrition and quality of life (QOL). Although several studies have shown that aging itself is associated with changes in esophageal motility, the impact of these changes on dysphagia symptoms and QOL is unknown. This study assessed the manometric diagnoses of elderly patients with dysphagia compared with diagnoses in younger counterparts. Participants included 116 consecutive patients examined for dysphagia from 2007 to 2014. We divided patients into three groups by age: Group A, 66 years and older (24 men, 23 women); Group B, 45-65 years (18 men, 24 women); and Group C, 44 years and younger (15 men, 12 women). The three groups were compared in regard to symptoms, esophageal motility, and health-related QOL (HRQOL). All patients underwent esophageal manometry examination and completed a self-administered questionnaire concerning their symptoms; HRQOL assessment was based on results of the Short Form-8 General Health Survey. Symptoms rated ≥4 points on the Likert scale were defined as significant. Although all patients had dysphagia as a major symptom, more elderly patients reported globus sensation, whereas more young patients reported heartburn as the primary symptom. Manometric diagnoses were generally similar across the three groups. Ineffective esophageal motility was more prevalent in Groups A and C than in Group B, although the difference was not statistically significant. No significant differences in manometric parameters or HRQOL were detected among the three groups. Despite differences in symptom patterns, broad manometric diagnoses and impairment of HRQOL in elderly patients with dysphagia are similar to those in younger counterparts.

  8. Application of noninvasive brain stimulation for post-stroke dysphagia rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Song, Wei-Qun; Wang, Liang

    2017-02-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS), commonly consisting of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS), as well as paired associative stimulation (PAS), has attracted increased interest and been applied experimentally in the treatment of post-stroke dysphagia (PSD). This review presented a synopsis of the current research for the application of NIBS on PSD. The intention here was to understand the current research progress and limitations in this field and to stimulate potential research questions not yet investigated for the application of NIBS on patients with PSD. Here we successively reviewed advances of repetitive TMS (rTMS), tDCS, and PAS techniques on both healthy participants and PSD patients in three aspects, including scientific researches about dysphagia mechanism, applied studies about stimulation parameters, and clinical trials about their therapeutic effects. The techniques of NIBS, especially rTMS, have been used by the researchers to explore the different mechanisms between swallowing recovery and extremity rehabilitation. The key findings included the important role of intact hemisphere reorganization for PSD recovery, and the use of NIBS on the contra-lesional side as a therapeutic potential for dysphagia rehabilitation. Though significant results were achieved in most studies by using NIBS on swallowing rehabilitation, it is still difficult to draw conclusions for the efficacy of these neurostimulation techniques, considering the great disparities between studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  9. Diagnostic yield in the evaluation of dysphagia: experience at a single tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, J; Rajagopal, S; Kushnir, V; Gyawali, C P

    2018-05-24

    Evaluation of dysphagia typically starts with esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD); further testing is pursued if this is negative. When no mucosal, structural, or motor esophageal disorders are identified with persisting symptoms, functional dysphagia is considered. We evaluated outcomes in patients undergoing EGD for dysphagia, and estimated prevalence of functional dysphagia. The endoscopy database at single tertiary care center was interrogated to identify EGDs performed for an indication of 'dysphagia' over a 12-month period (2008-09). Electronic medical records were reviewed over the next 8 years to assess if an etiology was identified. Data were analyzed to assess the diagnostic yield of endoscopy and subsequent tests in the evaluation of dysphagia. Of 5486 EGDs, 822 (15.0%) were performed for dysphagia in 694 patients (58.4 ± 0.6 year, range: 18-95 year, 55.8% female). Of these, 529 (76.2%) had EGD findings that explained dysphagia; another 22 (3.2%) had findings on histopathology. Of the remainder 143 patients (20.6%) with normal index EGD, 38 (26.6%) patients underwent barium esophagram with 15 (39.5%) having abnormal studies. 19 patients (13.3%) underwent esophageal high resolution manometry with 12 (63.2%) being abnormal, and 7 had a mechanism for dysphagia on alternate testing. A repeat EGD was abnormal in 6 patients, while 45 patients were lost to follow-up. 42 patients had complete resolution of symptoms despite normal endoscopy, of which 30 were treated empirically with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Only 16 patients had no findings on evaluation, and had continued dysphagia symptoms, representing true functional dysphagia in 2.3% of all dysphagia patients and 11.2% of patients with normal EGD. Endoscopy remains the test with the highest yield (over 75%) for a diagnosis in patients presenting with dysphagia; secondary tests are useful when endoscopy does not provide a diagnosis. Benign strictures and GERD-related etiologies are leading causes; PPI

  10. Oral conditions and dysphagia in Japanese, community-dwelling middle- and older- aged adults, independent in daily living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inui A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Akinari Inui,1 Ippei Takahashi,2 Sizuka Kurauchi,2 Yuki Soma,2 Toshiaki Oyama,1 Yoshihiro Tamura,1 Takao Noguchi,1 Kouichi Murashita,3 Shigeyuki Nakaji,2 Wataru Kobayashi1 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2Department of Social Medicine, 3COI Research Initiatives Organization, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori Prefecture, Japan Purpose: Prevention, early detection and effective rehabilitation of dysphagia are important issues to be considered in an aging society. Previous studies have shown conflicting findings regarding the association between dysphagia and its potential risk factors, including age, malnutrition, oral conditions, lifestyle and medical history. Herein, we assessed the prevalence and association of dysphagia with potential risk factors in 50- to 79-year-old adults dwelling in a community in Japan. Patients and methods: In this study, there were 532 participants (185 males and 347 females. Participants who responded positively to the question “Do you sometimes choke on drinks/food such as tea and soup?” or those who presented with abnormal repetitive saliva swallowing test findings were diagnosed with dysphagia. The data collected from these participants included the following: number of teeth, occurrence of oral dryness, age, body mass index, serum albumin concentration, smoking, drinking and exercise habits, presence of diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and questions from the Mini–Mental State Examination. Results: Dysphagia was observed in 33 males (17.8% and 76 females (21.9%. To explore the effect of the potential risk factors on the prevalence of dysphagia, a model was built by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Using the forced entry method, oral dryness (odds ratio [OR] =3.683 and P=0.003 in males; OR =1.797 and P=0.032 in females and the number of teeth (OR =0.946 and P=0.038 in males were found to be significantly related to dysphagia

  11. Dysphagia: Aspects of assessment and management for the Acute Physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A; Stacey, B

    2008-01-01

    The term Dysphagia originates from a Greek word meaning disordered eating. It is defined as difficulty in swallowing. Dysphagia should not be confused with globus senstation, a feeling of having a lump in the throat, which is unrelated to swallowing and occurs without impaired transit (see below). Although odynophagia (painful swallowing) and phagophobia (fear of swallowing) are symptoms that may be associated with dysphagia it is important to distinguish this in the history.

  12. Dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Nam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, VA North Texas Health Care System, Radiation Oncology Service (140), 4500 S, Lancaster Road, Dallas, TX 72516 (United States)]. E-mail: NamPhong.Nguyen@med.va.gov; Moltz, Candace C. [Audiology and Speech Pathology Service (126), VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Frank, Cheryl [Audiology and Speech Pathology Service (126), VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Karlsson, Ulf [Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Nguyen, Phuc D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, VA North Texas Health Care System, Radiation Oncology Service (140), 4500 S, Lancaster Road, Dallas, TX 72516 (United States); Vos, Paul [Department of Biostatistics, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Smith, Herbert J. [Radiology Service, VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Dutta, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Nguyen, Ly M. [Public Health School, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Lemanski, Claire [Department of Radiation Oncology, Val D' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Chan, Wayne [Radiation Oncology Service, VAMC, Jackson, MS 39216 (United States); Sallah, Sabah [Division of Hematology/Oncology Research, Novo Nordisk, Athens (Greece)

    2006-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to evaluate dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer, and particularly the aspiration risk because of its potential life-threatening consequence. Materials and methods: We reviewed retrospectively the modified barium swallow (MBS) results in 110 patients who complained of dysphagia following chemoradiation (57) and postoperative radiation (53) of their head and neck cancer. Patients were selected if they were cancer free at the time of the swallowing study. Dysphagia severity was graded on a scale of 1-7. Patients were grouped according to the dysphagia severity: mild (grades 2-3), moderate (grades 4-5), and severe (grades 6-7). Results: Mean and median dysphagia grades were 4.84/5 and 4.12/4 for chemoradiation and postoperative radiation respectively. The mean difference between the two groups is statistically significant (p = 0.02). Mild dysphagia occurred in 13 patients (22%) of the chemoradiation group and 17 (32%) of the postoperative group. Corresponding number for the moderate group was 25 (43%) and 25 (48%), respectively. Severe dysphagia was significant in the chemoradiation group (34%) compared to the postoperative group (19%). However, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.29). There was a higher proportion of patients with large tumor (T3-T4) in the chemoradiation group who developed severe dysphagia. Conclusion: Dysphagia remained a significant morbidity of chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer. Dysphagia may be more severe in the chemoradiation group because of the higher proportion of patients with large tumor, the high radiation dose, and a high number of oropharyngeal tumors. Aspiration occurred in both groups. Diagnostic studies such as MBS should be part of future head and neck cancer prospective studies to assess the prevalence of aspiration, as it may be silent.

  13. Dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Moltz, Candace C.; Frank, Cheryl; Karlsson, Ulf; Nguyen, Phuc D.; Vos, Paul; Smith, Herbert J.; Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Ly M.; Lemanski, Claire; Chan, Wayne; Sallah, Sabah

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to evaluate dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer, and particularly the aspiration risk because of its potential life-threatening consequence. Materials and methods: We reviewed retrospectively the modified barium swallow (MBS) results in 110 patients who complained of dysphagia following chemoradiation (57) and postoperative radiation (53) of their head and neck cancer. Patients were selected if they were cancer free at the time of the swallowing study. Dysphagia severity was graded on a scale of 1-7. Patients were grouped according to the dysphagia severity: mild (grades 2-3), moderate (grades 4-5), and severe (grades 6-7). Results: Mean and median dysphagia grades were 4.84/5 and 4.12/4 for chemoradiation and postoperative radiation respectively. The mean difference between the two groups is statistically significant (p = 0.02). Mild dysphagia occurred in 13 patients (22%) of the chemoradiation group and 17 (32%) of the postoperative group. Corresponding number for the moderate group was 25 (43%) and 25 (48%), respectively. Severe dysphagia was significant in the chemoradiation group (34%) compared to the postoperative group (19%). However, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.29). There was a higher proportion of patients with large tumor (T3-T4) in the chemoradiation group who developed severe dysphagia. Conclusion: Dysphagia remained a significant morbidity of chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer. Dysphagia may be more severe in the chemoradiation group because of the higher proportion of patients with large tumor, the high radiation dose, and a high number of oropharyngeal tumors. Aspiration occurred in both groups. Diagnostic studies such as MBS should be part of future head and neck cancer prospective studies to assess the prevalence of aspiration, as it may be silent

  14. Neuroprostheses for management of dysphagia resulting from cerebrovascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, D J

    2007-01-01

    Swallowing is a complicated process that involves intricate timing between many different muscles in the mouth and neck. The primary purpose of swallowing is to move food through the mouth and pharynx and into the esophagus for transport to the stomach for digestion. Dysphagia is a general term that refers to a disruption in any part of the process. The consequences of dysphagia include social embarrassment; malnutrition; and aspiration. Of these, aspiration is the most significant as it is associated with a significantly greater risk of pneumonia and death. If patients fail to adequately protect the airways with standard exercise and therapy, they are often disallowed from taking food by mouth and receive nutrition by alternate means. If patients still experience frequent pneumonia, more drastic surgical measures that permanently separate the airway from foodway are required. As an alternative to these surgical procedures, neuroprostheses can dynamically restore airway protection. There are two primary protective mechanisms that neuroprostheses seek to restore. The first is laryngeal elevation and the second is vocal fold closure. The present article is an introductory overview of the swallowing process, the primary muscles and nerves related to swallowing, the effects of dysphagia, the standard treatment options, and the neuroprosthetic options.

  15. Chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and aspiration: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheeren, Betina; Hochhegger, Bruno; Gomes, Erissandra; Alves, Giordano; Marchiori, Edson

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to characterize chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and pulmonary aspiration, identifying the characteristics and the methods used. The studies were selected from among those indexed in the Brazilian Virtual Library of Health, LILACS, Indice Bibliografico Espanol de Ciencias de la Salud, Medline, Cochrane Library, SciELO, and PubMed databases. The search was carried out between June and July of 2016. Five articles were included and reviewed, all of them carried out in the last five years, published in English, and coming from different countries. The sample size in the selected studies ranged from 43 to 56 patients, with a predominance of adult and elderly subjects. The tomographic findings in patients with dysphagia-related aspiration were varied, including bronchiectasis, bronchial wall thickening, pulmonary nodules, consolidations, pleural effusion, ground-glass attenuation, atelectasis, septal thickening, fibrosis, and air trapping. Evidence suggests that chest CT findings in patients with aspiration are diverse. In this review, it was not possible to establish a consensus that could characterize a pattern of pulmonary aspiration in patients with dysphagia, further studies of the topic being needed. (author)

  16. Chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and aspiration: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheeren, Betina; Hochhegger, Bruno, E-mail: betinascheeren@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), RS (Brazil); Gomes, Erissandra [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre (Brazil); Alves, Giordano; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-15

    The objective of this systematic review was to characterize chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and pulmonary aspiration, identifying the characteristics and the methods used. The studies were selected from among those indexed in the Brazilian Virtual Library of Health, LILACS, Indice Bibliografico Espanol de Ciencias de la Salud, Medline, Cochrane Library, SciELO, and PubMed databases. The search was carried out between June and July of 2016. Five articles were included and reviewed, all of them carried out in the last five years, published in English, and coming from different countries. The sample size in the selected studies ranged from 43 to 56 patients, with a predominance of adult and elderly subjects. The tomographic findings in patients with dysphagia-related aspiration were varied, including bronchiectasis, bronchial wall thickening, pulmonary nodules, consolidations, pleural effusion, ground-glass attenuation, atelectasis, septal thickening, fibrosis, and air trapping. Evidence suggests that chest CT findings in patients with aspiration are diverse. In this review, it was not possible to establish a consensus that could characterize a pattern of pulmonary aspiration in patients with dysphagia, further studies of the topic being needed. (author)

  17. A Longitudinal Study of Symptoms of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in an Elderly Community-Dwelling Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmons, Danielle; Michou, Emilia; Jones, Maureen; Pendleton, Neil; Horan, Michael; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia has been estimated to affect around 8-16 % of healthy elderly individuals living in the community. The present study investigated the stability of perceived dysphagia symptoms over a 3-year period and whether such symptoms predicted death outcomes. A population of 800 and 550 elderly community-dwelling individuals were sent the Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ) in 2009 and 2012, respectively, where an arbitrary score of 180 or more was chosen to indicate symptomatic dysphagia. The telephone interview cognitive screen measured cognitive performance and the Geriatric Depression Scale measured depression. Regression models were used to investigate associations with dysphagia symptom scores, cognition, depression, age, gender and a history of stroke; a paired t test was used to examine if individual mean scores had changed. A total of 528 participants were included in the analysis. In 2009, dysphagia was associated with age (P = 0.028, OR 1.07, CI 1.01, 1.13) and stroke (P = 0.046, OR 2.04, CI 1.01, 4.11) but these associations were no longer present in 2012. Those who had symptomatic dysphagia in 2009 (n = 75) showed a shift towards improvement in swallowing (P < 0.001, mean = -174.4, CI -243.6, -105.3), and for those who died from pneumonia, there was no association between the SSQ derived swallowing score and death (P = 0.509, OR 0.10, CI -0.41, -0.20). We conclude that swallowing symptoms are a temporally dynamic process, which increases our knowledge on swallowing in the elderly.

  18. An appraisal of current dysphagia diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaindlstorfer, Adolf; Pointner, Rudolph

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia is a common, serious health problem with a wide variety of etiologies and manifestations. This review gives a general overview of diagnostic and therapeutic options for oropharyngeal as well as esophageal swallowing disorders respecting the considerable progress made over recent years. Diagnosis can be challenging and requires expertise in interpretation of symptoms and patient history. Endoscopy, barium radiography and manometry are still the diagnostic mainstays. Classification of esophageal motor-disorders has been revolutionized with the introduction of high-resolution esophageal pressure topography and a new standardized classification algorithm. Automated integrated impedance manometry is a promising upcoming tool for objective evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia, in non-obstructive esophageal dysphagia and prediction of post fundoplication dysphagia risk. Impedance planimetry provides new diagnostic information on esophageal and LES-distensibility and allows controlled therapeutic dilatation without the need for radiation. Peroral endoscopic myotomy is a promising therapeutic approach for achalasia and spastic motility disorders.

  19. Dysarthria and dysphagia are highly prevalent among various types of neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuijt, Simone; Kalf, Johanna G.; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Drost, Gea; Hendricks, Henk T.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with a neuromuscular disease (NMD) can present with dysarthria and/or dysphagia. Literature regarding prevalence rates of dysarthria and dysphagia is scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence rates, severity and co-presence of dysarthria and dysphagia in adult

  20. Dysarthria and dysphagia are highly prevalent among various types of neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuijt, S.; Kalf, J.G.; Swart, B.J. de; Drost, G.; Hendricks, H.T.; Geurts, A.C.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with a neuromuscular disease (NMD) can present with dysarthria and/or dysphagia. Literature regarding prevalence rates of dysarthria and dysphagia is scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence rates, severity and co-presence of dysarthria and dysphagia in adult

  1. Atrophy of Swallowing Muscles Is Associated With Severity of Dysphagia and Age in Patients With Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Peter B; Muhle, Paul; Hanning, Uta; Suntrup-Krueger, Sonja; Schwindt, Wolfram; Eversmann, Julian; Warnecke, Tobias; Wirth, Rainer; Zimmer, Sebastian; Dziewas, Rainer

    2017-07-01

    Sarcopenia has been identified as an independent risk factor for dysphagia. Dysphagia is one of the most important and prognostically relevant complications of acute stroke. The role of muscle atrophy as a contributing factor for the occurrence of poststroke dysphagia is yet unclear. To assess whether there is a correlation between age and muscle volume and whether muscle volume is related to dysphagia in acute stroke patients. This retrospective, single-center study included 73 patients with acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who underwent computed tomography angiography on admission and an objective dysphagia assessment by Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing within 72 hours from admission. With the help of semiautomated muscle segmentation and 3-dimensional reconstruction volumetry of the digastric, temporal, and geniohyoid muscles was performed. For further analysis, participants were first divided into 4 groups according to their age (dysphagia severity using the Fiberoptic Endoscopic Dysphagia Severity Scale (FEDSS) (FEDSS 1 and 2, n = 25; FEDSS 3 and 4, n = 32; FEDSS 5 and 6, n = 16). Correlation of muscle volumes with age and dysphagia severity. Muscle volumes of single muscles (except for geniohyoid and the right digastric muscles) as well as the sum muscle volume were significantly and inversely related to dysphagia severity. We found a significant decline of muscle volume with advancing age for most muscle groups and, in particular, for the total muscle volume. Apart from features being determined by the acute stroke itself (eg, site and size of stroke), also premorbid conditions, in particular age-related muscle atrophy, have an impact on the complex pathophysiology of swallowing disorders poststroke. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Temporal trends in the relative prevalence of dysphagia etiologies from 1999-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, Trilokesh; Toto, Erin; Ho, Nancy; Taft, Tiffany; Hirano, Ikuo

    2012-08-28

    To examine the relative prevalence and temporal variation of dysphagia etiologies in patients undergoing upper endoscopy (EGD) over the past decade. EGDs with the indication of dysphagia at an urban, university medical center in 1999, 2004 and 2009 were retrospectively identified from the electronic medical record. The entire patient chart, including EGD, pathology, manometry, radiographic and clinician reports, was reviewed for demographic and clinical data and to determine the etiology of dysphagia. The number of EGDs in which an esophageal biopsy was performed was also noted. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as a cause of dysphagia independent of peptic stricture was defined by symptoms with erosive esophagitis or symptom response to proton pump inhibition (PPI). Cases of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) were defined by an appropriate clinical history and histological criteria of ≥ 15 eosinophils per high powered field. PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia was not routinely reported prior to 2008. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance to analyze for trends between 1999, 2004 and 2009 and a post-hoc Tukey analysis was performed following a significant main effect. A total of 1371 cases (mean age 54 years, 43% male) met pre-specified inclusion criteria with 191, 504 and 675 cases in 1999, 2004 and 2009, respectively. Patients were older in 2004 compared to 2009 (mean ± SD, 54.0 ± 15.7 years vs 52.3 ± 16.8 years, P = 0.02) and there were more males in 1999 compared to 2004 (57.5% vs 40.8%, P = 0.005). Overall, GERD (27.6%) and EoE (7.7%) were the most common identifiable causes of dysphagia. An unspecified diagnosis accounted for 21% of overall cases. There were no significant differences in the relative prevalence of achalasia or other motility disorders, peptic stricture, Schatzki's ring, esophageal cancer or unspecified diagnoses over the 10-year time period. There was, however, a decrease in the relative prevalence of

  3. [Evaluation and treatment of dysphagia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-11-01

    As both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson's disease (PD) exhibit a variety of patterns of dysphagia, appropriate symptomatic treatment is provided after evaluation of swallowing function through videofluoroscopic examination of swallowing. In ALS, disease progression is rapid, therefore, respiratory function, swallowing function and nutritional status should be evaluated regularly. When the oral or pharyngeal stage of swallowing are affected early in dysphagia, adjusting swallowing volume and varying consistency can be beneficial in ALS. When all stages of swallowing are impaired in ALS, such complications as pneumonia, dehydration and malnutrition, are observed. In such patients, it is necessary to consider an alternative to oral dietary intake. In PD, dysphagia is not necessarily associated with severity of parkinsonism and can appear at any time during the course of the disease. Dysphagia in PD can occur at any stage of swallowing and frequently accompanies multiple abnormalities. In particular, aspiration is an important risk factor for pneumonia in PD. The effect of L-dopa treatment for dysphagia is often insufficient; however, this treatment remains the first choice because dysphagia is exacerbated during off state. Rehabilitation for dysphagia in PD has also some effect.

  4. A rare cause of dysphagia: compression of the esophagus by an anterior cervical osteophyte due to ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Ilknur; Bağcacı, Sinan; Sallı, Ali; Kucuksen, Sami; Uğurlu, Hatice

    2013-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatological disease affecting the axial skeleton with various extra-articular complications. Dysphagia due to a giant anterior osteophyte of the cervical spine in AS is extremely rare. We present a 48-year-old male with AS suffering from progressive dysphagia to soft foods and liquids. Esophagography showed an anterior osteophyte at C5-C6 resulting in esophageal compression. The patient refused surgical resection of the osteophyte and received conservative therapy. However, after 6 months there was no improvement in dysphagia. This case illustrates that a large cervical osteophyte may be the cause of dysphagia in patients with AS and should be included in the diagnostic workup in early stages of the disease.

  5. Evaluation of dysphagia risk, nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly patients with Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, Vanessa Fernanda; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela Billig; de Oliveira, Lilian Oliveira; Hack, Jaqueline; Magro, Marcela; Bonini, Juliana Sartori

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the risk of dysphagia and its relationship with the stage of Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the relationship between the risk of dysphagia and nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly people with Alzheimer's disease. Methods the sample consisted of 30 subjects of both genders with probable Alzheimer's disease. The stage of the disease, nutritional status, energy intake, and risk of dysphagia were assessed. Results it was found that increased risk of dysphagia is associated with the advance in the stages of Alzheimer's disease and that even patients in the early stages of disease have a slight risk of developing dysphagia. No association was found between nutritional status and the risk of dysphagia. High levels of inadequate intake of micronutrients were also verified in the patients. Conclusion an association between dysphagia and the development of Alzheimer's disease was found. The results indicate the need to monitor the presence of dysphagia and the micronutrient intake in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26107841

  6. Evaluation of dysphagia risk, nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly patients with Alzheimer's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Fernanda Goes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the risk of dysphagia and its relationship with the stage of Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the relationship between the risk of dysphagia and nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly people with Alzheimer's disease.METHODS: the sample consisted of 30 subjects of both genders with probable Alzheimer's disease. The stage of the disease, nutritional status, energy intake, and risk of dysphagia were assessed.RESULTS: it was found that increased risk of dysphagia is associated with the advance in the stages of Alzheimer's disease and that even patients in the early stages of disease have a slight risk of developing dysphagia. No association was found between nutritional status and the risk of dysphagia. High levels of inadequate intake of micronutrients were also verified in the patients.CONCLUSION: an association between dysphagia and the development of Alzheimer's disease was found. The results indicate the need to monitor the presence of dysphagia and the micronutrient intake in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Heroes Among Us Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia) Updated:Nov 15,2016 Excerpted and adapted from "Swallowing Disorders After a Stroke," Stroke Connection Magazine July/August ...

  8. [Efficacy of high-frequency cinematography in diagnosis of dysphagia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelerich, M; Mai, R; Müller-Miny, H; Peters, P E

    1995-10-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom in clinical practice. Due to the broad spectrum of underlying diseases many disciplines are involved in the therapy and diagnosis of dysphagia, where radiology plays a central role. The radiologist is confronted with different diagnostic problems and has to choose the most appropriate type of investigation. In many cases no organic disorder can be demonstrated by clinical examination, endoscopy or conventional radiological techniques. In this setting cineradiography is an outstanding tool for finding functional or structural changes in the swallowing chain. This study underlines the efficiency of cineradiography in the diagnosis of dysphagia.

  9. Correlation of High-Resolution Manometric Findings with Symptoms of Dysphagia and Endoscopic Features in Adults with Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Arnim, Ulrike; Kandulski, Arne; Weigt, Jochen; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) presents with dysphagia, but data about motility patterns using high-resolution manometry (HRM) are rare. We aimed at evaluating esophageal motility patterns in EoE and their correlation to endoscopic and dysphagia scores. Twenty-six EoE patients and 23 controls were included after 4 weeks of treatment with proton pump inhibitors. Dysphagia and endoscopic scores were evaluated before performing HRM. EoE patients were classified to have fibrostenotic (FS) or inflammatory (IF) type. HRM analysis was performed according to the Chicago classification (CC) system. According to the CC, the HRM findings in EoE and controls were normal in 11 (42%) and 20 (88.5%), p dysphagia scores in EoE subtypes. HRM findings in EoE are often diagnostic, but they are non-specific and do not correlate with the severity of dysphagia or endoscopic appearance. The clinical impact of HRM in EoE needs further evaluation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia Is Strongly Correlated With Apparent Life-Threatening Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Daniel R; Amirault, Janine; Mitchell, Paul D; Larson, Kara; Rosen, Rachel L

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysfunction with resultant aspiration in patients admitted after apparent life-threatening events (ALTE) and to determine whether historical characteristics could predict this oropharyngeal dysphagia and aspiration risk. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients admitted to Boston Children's Hospital between 2012 and 2015 with a diagnosis of ALTE to determine the frequency of evaluation for oropharyngeal dysphagia using video fluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) and clinical feeding evaluations, to determine the prevalence of swallowing dysfunction in subjects admitted after ALTE and to compare presenting historical characteristics to swallow study results. A total of 188 children were admitted with a diagnosis of ALTE of which 29% (n = 55) had an assessment of swallowing by VFSS. Of those who had a VFSS, 73% (n = 40) had evidence of aspiration or penetration on VFSS. Of all of the diagnostic tests ordered on patients with ALTEs, the VFSS had the highest rate of abnormalities of any test ordered. None of the historical characteristics of ALTE predicted which patients were at risk for aspiration. In patients who had both clinical feeding evaluations and VFSS, observed clinical feedings incorrectly identified 26% of patients as having no oropharyngeal dysphagia when in fact aspiration was present on VFSS. Oropharyngeal dysphagia with aspiration is the most common diagnosis identified in infants presenting with ALTEs. The algorithm for ALTE should be revised to include an assessment of VFSS as clinical feeding evaluations are inadequate to assess for aspiration.

  11. Distribution of Esophageal Motor Disorders in Diabetic Patients With Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Nina S; Rangan, Vikram; Geng, Zhuo; Khan, Freeha; Kichler, Adam; Gabbard, Scott; Ganocy, Stephen; Fass, Ronnie

    Diabetes mellitus can cause various gastrointestinal symptoms. Assessment of esophageal dysmotility in diabetic patients has been scarcely studied. The aim of this study was to determine the esophageal motor characteristics of diabetic versus nondiabetic patients who present with dysphagia. High-resolution esophageal manometries (HREMs) of 83 diabetic patients and 83 age and gender-matched nondiabetic patients with dysphagia from 2 medical centers were included in this study. Demographic information, medical comorbidities, and medication usage were recorded for each patient in a single registry. HREM of each patient was evaluated and the different functional parameters were recorded. Overall, 46% of diabetic patients were found to have an esophageal motor disorder. Diabetic patients with dysphagia were more likely to have failed swallows on HREM (50.6% vs. 33.7%; P=0.03) as compared with nondiabetic patients. Among diabetic patients, those being treated with insulin were more likely to have failed (69.0% vs. 40.7%; P=0.01) and weak (65.5% vs. 33.3%; P=0.005) swallows as compared with diabetic patients not on insulin. Among diabetic patients, those with abnormal manometry were more likely to demonstrate diabetic retinopathy (27.0% vs. 8.7%; P=0.04). There was a trend toward increased incidence of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction in diabetic patients (10.8% vs. 2.4%; P=0.057) as compared with nondiabetic patients. Nearly half of diabetic patients with dysphagia have some type of an esophageal motility disorder. Diabetic retinopathy and the use of insulin are predictive of esophageal motor abnormalities among diabetic patients.

  12. Psychological as well as illness factors influence acceptance of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and gastrostomy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS):A prospective population study

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Naomi H; Landau, Sabine; Janssen, Anna; Lyall, Rebecca; Higginson, Irene; Burman, Rachel; McCrone, Paul; Sakel, Mohammed; Ellis, Catherine M; Shaw, Christopher E; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Leigh, P Nigel; Goldstein, Laura H

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to identify factors associated with acceptance of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and gastrostomy in an exploratory population-based study. Seventy-eight people with ALS at least six months post-diagnosis, and 50 caregivers, were recruited from the South-East ALS Register. Baseline physical, cognitive and psychological measures were obtained. Three-monthly follow-ups monitored whether patients had accepted or refused NIV or gastrostomy. Following an intervention decision, pos...

  13. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  14. Fiber-optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES): predictor of swallowing-related complications in the head and neck cancer population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Michael W; McDonough, Alanna; Dort, Joseph C; Dort, Erika; Nakoneshny, Steve; Matthews, T Wayne

    2013-07-01

    The treatment of head and neck cancer is associated with significant dysphagia and morbidity. Prescribing a safe oral diet in this population is challenging. Data from 116 consecutive patients having 189 fiber-optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) examinations over a 3-year period were analyzed. All patients had been treated for head and neck cancer and subsequently were assessed by FEES. The primary outcome was the incidence of swallowing-related adverse events resulting from the FEES-based dietary recommendations. There were 10 episodes of aspiration pneumonia, 4 episodes of airway obstruction, 3 unanticipated insertions of gastrostomy tubes, and 2 unexplained deaths within the study period. The overall rate of adverse events was 10.1%. The only statistically significant predictor of adverse events was the Rosenbek score (p = .03). Our experience is that FEES guides appropriate and safe diet recommendations in this population. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Clozapine-induced dysphagia with secondary substantial weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Mugtaba; Devadas, Vekneswaran

    2016-08-19

    Dysphagia is listed as a 'rare' side effect following clozapine treatment. In this case report, we describe how significant clozapine-induced dysphagia has led to significant reduction of nutritional intake with subsequent substantial weight loss. An 18-year-old single man with an established diagnosis of treatment-resistant paranoid schizophrenia recovered well on a therapeutic dose of clozapine. However, he was noted to lose weight significantly (up to 20% of his original weight) as the dose was uptitrated. This was brought about by development of dysphagia, likely to be due to clozapine. Addition of nutritional supplementary liquids and initiation of a modified behavioural dietary/swallowing programme, while repeatedly mastering the Mendelsohn manoeuvre technique, alleviated the swallowing difficulties and restored his weight. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Evaluating a novel approach to enhancing dysphagia management: workplace-based, blended e-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilott, Irene; Bennett, Bev; Gerrish, Kate; Pownall, Sue; Jones, Amanda; Garth, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the learning effect and resource use cost of workplace-based, blended e-learning about dysphagia for stroke rehabilitation nurses. Dysphagia is a potentially life-threatening problem that compromises quality of life. In many countries, nurses play a crucial role in supporting the management of patients with swallowing problems, yet the literature reports a need for training. A single-group, pre- and post-study with mixed methods. Each blended e-learning session comprised a needs analysis, e-learning programmes, practical skills about modifying fluids and action planning to transfer learning into practice. Participants were the population of registered nurses (n = 22) and healthcare assistants (n = 10) on a stroke rehabilitation ward in a large, teaching hospital in England between August 2010-March 2011. Data collection comprised observation (34 hours), questionnaires administered at four time points to examine change in attitude, knowledge and practice, and estimating the resource use cost for the service. Nonparametric tests and content analysis were used to analyse the data. All participants achieved a nationally recognised level of competence. The learning effect was evident on the post- and follow-up measures, with some items of dysphagia knowledge and attitude achieving significance at the p ≤ 0·05 level. The most common self-reported changes in practice related to medicines management, thickening fluids and oral hygiene. The resource use cost was estimated at £2688 for 108 hours training. Workplace-based, blended e-learning was an acceptable, cost effective way of delivering essential clinical knowledge and skills about dysphagia. Dysphagia should be viewed as a patient safety issue because of the risks of malnutrition, dehydration and aspiration pneumonia. As such, it is pertinent to many members of the interdisciplinary team. Consideration should be given to including dysphagia management in initial education and continuing professional

  17. Esophageal rupture caused by explosion of an automobile tire tube: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongkang; Ding, Sheng; Zheng, Yifeng; Li, Wei; Yang, Lie; Zheng, Xiushan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Jianqing

    2013-08-23

    There have been no reports in the literature of esophageal rupture in adults resulting from an explosion of an automobile tire. We report the first case of just such an occurrence after an individual bit into a tire, causing it to explode in his mouth. A 47-year-old Han Chinese man presented with massive hemorrhage in his left eye after he accidentally bit an automobile tire tube which burst into his mouth. He was diagnosed with esophageal rupture based on a chest computed tomography scan and barium swallow examination. Drainage of empyema (right chest), removal of thoracic esophagus, exposure of cervical esophagus, cardiac ligation and gastrostomy were performed respectively. After that, esophagogastrostomy was performed. Successful anastomosis was obtained at the neck with no postoperative complications 3 months after the surgery. The patient was discharged with satisfactory outcomes. We present this case report to bring attention to esophageal rupture in adults during the explosion of an automobile tire tube in the mouth.

  18. IMRT for head and neck cancer: reducing xerostomia and dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, XiaoShen; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia and xerostomia are the main sequellae of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and the main factors in reducing long-term patient quality of life. IMRT uses advanced technology to focus the high radiation doses on the targets and avoid irradiation of non-involved tissues. The decisions about sparing organs and tissues whose damage causes xerostomia and dysphagia depends on the evidence for dose–response relationships for the organs causing these sequellae. This paper discusses the evidence for the contribution of radiotherapy to xerostomia via damage of the major salivary glands (parotid and submandibular) and minor salivary glands within the oral cavity, and the contribution of radiotherapy-related effect on important swallowing structures causing dysphagia. Recommendations for dose limits to these organs, based on measurements of xerostomia and dysphagia following radiotherapy, are provided here

  19. A Meta-Analysis of the Incidence of Patient-Reported Dysphagia After Anterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion with the Zero-Profile Implant System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Ma, Litai; Liu, Hao; Xu, MangMang

    2016-04-01

    Dysphagia is a well-known complication following anterior cervical surgery. It has been reported that the Zero-profile Implant System can decrease the incidence of dysphagia following surgery, however, dysphagia after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with the Zero-profile Implant System remains controversial. Previous studies only focus on small sample sizes. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of dysphagia after ACDF with the Zero-profile Implant System. Studies were collected from PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane library and the China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database using the keywords "Zero-profile OR Zero-p) AND (dysphagia OR [swallowing dysfunction]". The software STATA (Version 13.0) was used for statistical analysis. Statistical heterogeneity across the various trials, a test of publication bias and sensitivity analysis was performed. 30 studies with a total of 1062 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The occurrence of post-operative transient dysphagia ranged from 0 to 76 % whilst the pooled incidence was 15.6 % (95 % CI, 12.6, 18.5 %). 23 studies reported no persistent dysphagia whilst seven studies reported persistent dysphagia ranging from 1 to 7 %). In summary, the present study observed a low incidence of both transient and persistent dysphagia after ACDF using the Zero-profile Implant System. Most of the dysphagia was mild and gradually decreased during the following months. Moderate or severe dysphagia was uncommon. Future randomized controlled multi-center studies and those focusing on the mechanisms of dysphagia and methods to reduce its incidence are required.

  20. Incidence and clinical presentation of dysarthria and dysphagia in the acute setting following paediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A T; Mageandran, S-D; Mei, C

    2010-01-01

    A lack of data on dysarthria and dysphagia outcomes for children following traumatic brain injury (TBI) limits our clinical evidence base, and poses daily challenges for the speech language pathologist (SLP) managing this group. The present study aimed to examine dysarthria and dysphagia incidence and the clinical presentation of children with these disorders in the acute phase following TBI. Incidence and characteristics were determined via a comprehensive retrospective medical chart review of children consecutively referred to a tertiary paediatric hospital over an 8-year period. Cases (n= 22 dysarthria, n= 72 dysphagia) and matched controls were compared across ancillary variables (e.g. age, severity of TBI, motor impairment). Incidence across the entire cohort was low [i.e. dysarthria (1.2%, 22/1895), dysphagia (3.8%, 72/1895)], but was markedly higher for the sub-category of children with severe TBI [e.g. dysphagia (76%, 63/83)]. Speech deficits were reported across respiration, phonation, resonance, articulation and prosody. Swallowing deficits included reduced lip closure, delayed swallow initiation, wet voice and coughing. Language and swallowing deficits were often co-morbid with dysarthria. Motor impairment was frequently co-morbid with both dysarthria and dysphagia. Cases had longer periods of hospitalization, ventilation and supplementary feeding compared with controls. Despite the low incidence of dysarthria and dysphagia across the entire TBI cohort, this sub-group may place longer-term burden on SLP services, having prolonged periods of ventilation, extended periods of hospitalization and a complex co-morbid clinical presentation compared with controls. The prevalence of co-morbid communication and swallowing impairments suggests a need for integrated rather than single discipline (i.e. dysphagia stream only) SLP services.

  1. Role of videofluoroscopy in evaluation of neurologic dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugiu, MG

    2007-01-01

    Summary For many years, videofluoroscopy was considered the gold standard for studies on swallowing disorders, and only recently has its role been challenged, due primarily to the widespread use of videoendoscopy in the evaluation of dysphagia. Albeit, videofluoroscopy still maintains its key role in this area and, in particular, in studies on dysphagia of neurological origin, on account not only of the possibility, with this procedure, to achieve complete and dynamic evaluation of all phases of deglutition, but also the high sensitivity and specificity in revealing the presence of inhalation. Aim of the present investigation was to analyse the technical procedure of videofluoroscopy and the principal indications in the study of dysphagia of neurological origin, in the attempt to reveal the advantages and disadvantages occurring in this examination, also with respect to other methods adopted in the evaluation of dyphagia. In conclusion, at present, no instrumental examination can be defined as ideal for the study of swallowing, but it can be seen that, with each of these procedures, the information forthcoming is actually complementary, thus achieving the aim to proceed as correctly and rapidly as possible, with the management of patients with dysphagia. PMID:18320837

  2. Higher risk of complications in odynophagia-associated dysphagia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Fontes Luchesi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective This investigation aimed to identify associated factors with dysphagia severity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Method We performed a cross-sectional study of 49 patients with ALS. All patients underwent fiberoptic endoscopy evaluation of swallowing and answered a verbal questionnaire about swallowing complaints. The patients were divided into groups according to dysphagia severity. Results Among the factors analyzed, only odynophagia was associated with moderate or severe dysphagia. Conclusion Odynophagia was associated with moderate and severe dysphagia in ALS and suggests a high risk of pulmonary and nutritional complications.

  3. Progressive dysphagia in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Richard

    2012-02-01

    Dysphagia has not been reported in genetically confirmed limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B). A 40-year-old woman reported exercise-induced calf pain at age 34, followed by progressive lower and upper limb weakness. At age 38, progressive dysphagia for solids, and subsequently liquids, ensued. Endoscopic and videofluoroscopic-radiological findings indicated a myopathic swallowing disorder. Molecular genetic analysis confirmed two dysferlin gene mutations consistent with a compound heterozygote state. Progressive dysphagia should be considered as part of the expanding dysferlinopathy phenotype.

  4. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in neurodegeneration (CADN): development, validity and reliability of a bedside tool for dysphagia assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P; Rommel, Natalie; Sauer, Carina; Horger, Marius; Krumm, Patrick; Himmelbach, Marc; Synofzik, Matthis

    2017-06-01

    Screening assessments for dysphagia are essential in neurodegenerative disease. Yet there are no purpose-built tools to quantify swallowing deficits at bedside or in clinical trials. A quantifiable, brief, easy to administer assessment that measures the impact of dysphagia and predicts the presence or absence of aspiration is needed. The Clinical Assessment of Dysphagia in Neurodegeneration (CADN) was designed by a multidisciplinary team (neurology, neuropsychology, speech pathology) validated against strict methodological criteria in two neurodegenerative diseases, Parkinson's disease (PD) and degenerative ataxia (DA). CADN comprises two parts, an anamnesis (part one) and consumption (part two). Two-thirds of patients were assessed using reference tests, the SWAL-QOL symptoms subscale (part one) and videofluoroscopic assessment of swallowing (part two). CADN has 11 items and can be administered and scored in an average of 7 min. Test-retest reliability was established using correlation and Bland-Altman plots. 125 patients with a neurodegenerative disease were recruited; 60 PD and 65 DA. Validity was established using ROC graphs and correlations. CADN has sensitivity of 79 and 84% and specificity 71 and 69% for parts one and two, respectively. Significant correlations with disease severity were also observed (p dysphagia symptomatology and risk of aspiration. The CADN is a reliable, valid, brief, quantifiable, and easily deployed assessment of swallowing in neurodegenerative disease. It is thus ideally suited for both clinical bedside assessment and future multicentre clinical trials in neurodegenerative disease.

  5. Emerging modalities in dysphagia rehabilitation: neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckabee, Maggie-Lee; Doeltgen, Sebastian

    2007-10-12

    The aim of this review article is to advise the New Zealand medical community about the application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) as a treatment for pharyngeal swallowing impairment (dysphagia). NMES in this field of rehabilitation medicine has quickly emerged as a widely used method overseas but has been accompanied by significant controversy. Basic information is provided about the physiologic background of electrical stimulation. The literature reviewed in this manuscript was derived through a computer-assisted search using the biomedical database Medline to identify all relevant articles published until from the initiation of the databases up to January 2007. The reviewers used the following search strategy: [(deglutition disorders OR dysphagia) AND (neuromuscular electrical stimulation OR NMES)]. In addition, the technique of reference tracing was used and very recently published studies known to the authors but not yet included in the database systems were included. This review elucidates not only the substantive potential benefit of this treatment, but also potential key concerns for patient safety and long term outcome. The discussion within the clinical and research communities, especially around the commercially available VitalStim stimulator, is objectively explained.

  6. Dysphagia in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk-van den Berg, Willemien Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with an autosomal, dominant mode of inheritance. Patients with HD suffer from dysphagia which can have serious consequences, such as weight loss, dehydration, and pneumonia leading to death. Many patients with HD die of aspiration

  7. Dysphagia referrals to a district general hospital gastroenterology unit: hard to swallow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melleney, Elizabeth Mary-Ann; Subhani, Javaid Mohammed; Willoughby, Charles Peter

    2004-01-01

    The aim of our study was to audit dysphagia referrals received by a specialist gastroenterology unit during an entire year. We used a prospective audit carried out over a 12-month period at the District General Hospital gastroenterology unit. The audit included 396 consecutive patients who were referred with swallowing difficulties. We found that 60 referrals (15.2%) were inaccurate and the patients had no swallowing problem. Of the 336 patients with genuine dysphagia, only 29 (8.6%) were new cancer cases. The large majority of subjects had benign disease mostly related to acid reflux. Weight loss was significantly associated with malignancy but also occurred in one third of patients with reflux alone. The temporal pattern of dysphagia was not significantly predictive of cancer. All the cancer patients were above the age of 50 years. Although patients were in general assessed rapidly after hospital referral, the productivity, in terms of early tumor diagnosis, was extremely low. We conclude that there is a substantial rate of inaccurate referrals of dysphagia patients. Most true cases of swallowing difficulty relate to benign disease. Even the devotion of considerable resources to the early diagnosis of esophago gastric malignancy in an attempt to conform with best practice guidelines results in a very low success rate in terms of the detection of potentially curable tumors.

  8. Incidence of Dysphagia and Serial Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study Findings After Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yusun; Kim, Won-Seok; Kang, Sung Shik; Choi, Jin Man; Yeom, Jin S; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2016-05-01

    Prospective study. To prospectively assess the incidence of dysphagia and to present the serial changes of each finding in the videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The reported incidence of dysphagia after ACDF has varied widely, and the serial changes of dysphagia using VFSS have not been clearly determined yet. Data of 47 patients preoperatively and at 1 week and 1 month postoperatively were used for the analyses. The Bazaz dysphagia score and VFSS were checked preoperatively and at 1 week and 1 month postoperatively. The presence of aspiration or penetration, amount of vallecular and pyriform sinus residues, functional dysphagia scale, temporal parameters of oral transit time, pharyngeal transit time, and pharyngeal delay time (PDT) were evaluated from the VFSS data. Incidences of dysphagia measured by the Bazaz dysphagia score were 83.0% at 1 week and 59.6% at 1 month after ACDF. Although the incidence of aspiration was 4.3% and the incidence of penetration was 36.2% at 1 week and 25.5% at 1 month after surgery, none of the patients had aspiration pneumonia. The number of patients with vallecular and pyriform sinus residues significantly increased after ACDF. Further, there were no statistically significant changes at all time points in terms of oral transit time, pharyngeal transit time, and pharyngeal delay time. Dysphagia is common until 1 month after ACDF. Although the incidence of aspiration or penetration in VFSS after ACDF was high, no patient had aspiration pneumonia, which may be because of the intact neurological swallowing mechanism. The typical pattern of dysphagia after ACDF included vallecular and pyriform sinuses filled with postswallow residue, which may result from soft tissue edema and weak constriction of pharyngeal muscles after ACDF.

  9. Pathophysiology of Radiation-Induced Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Suzanne N; Dunlap, Neal E; Tennant, Paul A; Pitts, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Oncologic treatments, such as curative radiotherapy and chemoradiation, for head and neck cancer can cause long-term swallowing impairments (dysphagia) that negatively impact quality of life. Radiation-induced dysphagia comprised a broad spectrum of structural, mechanical, and neurologic deficits. An understanding of the biomolecular effects of radiation on the time course of wound healing and underlying morphological tissue responses that precede radiation damage will improve options available for dysphagia treatment. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of radiation-induced injury and elucidate areas that need further exploration.

  10. Posterior teeth occlusion and dysphagia risk in older nursing home residents: a cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Y; Takeuchi, K; Izumi, M; Furuta, M; Takeshita, T; Shibata, Y; Kageyama, S; Ganaha, S; Yamashita, Y

    2017-02-01

    The total number of natural teeth was related to swallowing function among older adults; however, limited information is available regarding the impact of occluding pairs of teeth on swallowing function. This study aimed to examine the association between posterior teeth occlusion and dysphagia risk in older nursing home residents. This cross-sectional study included 238 residents aged ≥60 years from eight nursing homes in Aso City, Japan. Swallowing function was evaluated using the modified water swallowing test (MWST); the primary outcome was dysphagia risk (MWST score ≤3). Posterior teeth occlusion was assessed using number of functional tooth units (FTUs), determined based on number and location of the remaining natural and artificial teeth on implant-supported, fixed or removable prostheses. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between posterior teeth occlusion and dysphagia risk, adjusted for the covariates of number of natural teeth, demographic characteristics, comorbidities, physical function, body mass index and cognitive function. Of the 238 subjects, 44 (18·5%) were determined to be at risk of dysphagia based on the MWST scores. The odds ratio (OR) of dysphagia risk decreased in subjects with higher total FTUs [OR = 0·92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·87-0·98]. After adjusting for covariates, this association remained significant (OR = 0·90, 95% CI 0·84-0·97). Loss of posterior teeth occlusion was independently associated with dysphagia risk in older nursing home residents. Maintaining and restoring posterior teeth occlusion may be an effective measure to prevent dysphagia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bath, Philip M W; Scutt, Polly; Love, Jo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials. METHODS...

  12. Utility of esophageal gastroduodenoscopy at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scalea Thomas M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The utility of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD performed at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is unclear. We examined whether EGD at time of PEG yielded clinically useful information important in patient care. We also reviewed the outcome and complication rates of EGD-PEG performed by trauma surgeons. Methods Retrospective review of all trauma patients undergoing EGD with PEG at a level I trauma center from 1/01–6/03. Results 210 patients underwent combined EGD with PEG by the trauma team. A total of 37% of patients had unsuspected upper gastrointestinal lesions seen on EGD. Of these, 35% had traumatic brain injury, 10% suffered multisystem injury, and 47% had spinal cord injury. These included 15 esophageal, 61 gastric, and six duodenal lesions, mucosal or hemorrhagic findings on EGD. This finding led to a change in therapy in 90% of patients; either resumption/continuation of H2 -blockers or conversion to proton-pump inhibitors. One patient suffered an upper gastrointestinal bleed while on H2-blocker. It was treated endoscopically. Complication rates were low. There were no iatrogenic visceral perforations seen. Three PEGs were inadvertently removed by the patient (1.5%; one was replaced with a Foley, one replaced endoscopically, and one patient underwent gastric repair and open jejunostomy tube. One PEG leak was repaired during exploration for unrelated hemorrhage. Six patients had significant site infections (3%; four treated with local drainage and antibiotics, one requiring operative debridement and later closure, and one with antibiotics alone. Conclusion EGD at the time of PEG may add clinically useful data in the management of trauma patients. Only one patient treated with acid suppression therapy for EGD diagnosed lesions suffered delayed gastrointestinal bleeding. Trauma surgeons can perform EGD and PEG with acceptable outcomes and complication rates.

  13. DYSPHAGIA AND SIALORRHEA: the relationship to Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Hack NICARETTA; Ana Lucia ROSSO; James Pitagoras de MATTOS; Carmelindo MALISKA; Milton M. B. COSTA

    2013-01-01

    Context Dysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease. Objective The aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Method Two Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by th...

  14. Mesothelioma - A rare cause of dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanathan Swati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 81-year-old elderly Caucasian male presented with progressive dysphagia and unintentional weight loss over four months. His history was significant for asbestos exposure; however there was no history of asbestos related lung disease. Barium swallow showed achalasia and a subsequent CT chest showed a posterior mediastinal mass 11.8×9.1×5.8cm, compressing the distal oesophagus. Laparoscopic biopsy of the mass showed an epitheloid mesothelioma. Mass was deemed unresectable and patient was started on chemotherapy with Cisplatin/Pemetrexed. Localised mesothelioma is extremely rare, and dysphagia can be uncommon presenting feature. 7.4 per cent of cases of Pseudoachalasia are attributed to mesothelioma