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Sample records for dysphagia assessment tool

  1. Suprahyoid Muscle Complex: A Reliable Neural Assessment Tool For Dysphagia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Stubbs, Peter William; Pedersen, Asger Roer

    be a non-invasive reliable neural assessment tool for patients with dysphagia. Objective: To investigate the possibility of using the suprahyoid muscle complex (SMC) using surface electromyography (sEMG) to assess changes to neural pathways by determining the reliability of measurements in healthy...

  2. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in neurodegeneration (CADN): development, validity and reliability of a bedside tool for dysphagia assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P; Rommel, Natalie; Sauer, Carina; Horger, Marius; Krumm, Patrick; Himmelbach, Marc; Synofzik, Matthis

    2017-06-01

    Screening assessments for dysphagia are essential in neurodegenerative disease. Yet there are no purpose-built tools to quantify swallowing deficits at bedside or in clinical trials. A quantifiable, brief, easy to administer assessment that measures the impact of dysphagia and predicts the presence or absence of aspiration is needed. The Clinical Assessment of Dysphagia in Neurodegeneration (CADN) was designed by a multidisciplinary team (neurology, neuropsychology, speech pathology) validated against strict methodological criteria in two neurodegenerative diseases, Parkinson's disease (PD) and degenerative ataxia (DA). CADN comprises two parts, an anamnesis (part one) and consumption (part two). Two-thirds of patients were assessed using reference tests, the SWAL-QOL symptoms subscale (part one) and videofluoroscopic assessment of swallowing (part two). CADN has 11 items and can be administered and scored in an average of 7 min. Test-retest reliability was established using correlation and Bland-Altman plots. 125 patients with a neurodegenerative disease were recruited; 60 PD and 65 DA. Validity was established using ROC graphs and correlations. CADN has sensitivity of 79 and 84% and specificity 71 and 69% for parts one and two, respectively. Significant correlations with disease severity were also observed (p dysphagia symptomatology and risk of aspiration. The CADN is a reliable, valid, brief, quantifiable, and easily deployed assessment of swallowing in neurodegenerative disease. It is thus ideally suited for both clinical bedside assessment and future multicentre clinical trials in neurodegenerative disease.

  3. A visual analogue scale and a Likert scale are simple and responsive tools for assessing dysphagia in eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, C C; Wolf, W A; Cotton, C C; Dellon, E S

    2017-06-01

    While symptom scores have been developed to evaluate dysphagia in eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), their complexity may limit clinical use. To evaluate a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a 10-point Likert scale (LS) for assessment of dysphagia severity before and after EoE treatment. We conducted a prospective cohort study enrolling consecutive adults undergoing out-patient endoscopy. Incident cases of EoE were diagnosed per consensus guidelines. At diagnosis and after 8 weeks of treatment, symptoms were measured using the VAS, LS and the Mayo Dysphagia Questionnaire (MDQ). The percentage change in scores before and after treatment were compared overall, in treatment responders (dysphagia severity in EoE in clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A Visual Analogue Scale and a Likert Scale are Simple and Responsive Tools for Assessing Dysphagia in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Craig C.; Wolf, W. Asher; Cotton, Cary C.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2017-01-01

    Background While symptom scores have been developed to evaluate dysphagia in eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), their complexity may limit clinical use. Aim We aimed to evaluate a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a 10 point Likert scale (LS) for assessment of dysphagia severity before and after EoE treatment. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study enrolling consecutive adults undergoing outpatient endoscopy. Incident cases of EoE were diagnosed per consensus guidelines. At diagnosis and after 8 weeks of treatment, symptoms were measured using the VAS, LS, and the Mayo Dysphagia Questionnaire (MDQ). The percentage change in scores before and after treatment were compared overall, in treatment responders (dysphagia severity in EoE in clinical practice. PMID:28370355

  5. Analysis of dysphagia risk using the modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The elderly are susceptible to dysphagia, and complications can be minimized if high-risk groups are screened in early stages and properly rehabilitated. This study provides basic material for the early detection and prevention of dysphagia by investigating the risks of dysphagia and related factors in community-dwelling elders. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 325 community-dwelling elderly people aged 65 or older. The modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly was used to assess dysphagia risk. [Results] Approximately 52.6% (n=171) of participants belonged to the high-risk group for dysphagia. After adjusting for confounding variables, people aged 75+, who used dentures, and who needed partial help in daily living had a significantly higher risk of dysphagia. [Conclusion] It is necessary to develop guidelines for dysphagia for early detection and rehabilitation.

  6. Analysis of dysphagia risk using the modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The elderly are susceptible to dysphagia, and complications can be minimized if high-risk groups are screened in early stages and properly rehabilitated. This study provides basic material for the early detection and prevention of dysphagia by investigating the risks of dysphagia and related factors in community-dwelling elders. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 325 community-dwelling elderly people aged 65 or older. The modified dysphagia risk assessment for the communit...

  7. Videofluoroscopy versus upper G.I. endoscopy: A comparative study as a diagnostic tool in patients presenting with dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Sharwak Ramlan; Sai Manohar; Gangadhara Somayaji

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Dysphagia is a major symptom in many of the patients coming to the hospital. There can be various causes of dysphagia and its accurate diagnosis shows the way for the necessary treatment. Videofluoroscopy and upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy are the two most commonly employed primary investigating modalities in assessing dysphagia. The objective of the study was to compare videofluoroscopy and upper GI endoscopy and establish a primary diagnostic tool for assess...

  8. Measuring Outcomes for Dysphagia: Validity and Reliability of the European Portuguese Eating Assessment Tool (P-EAT-10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Dália Santos; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes; Reis, Elizabeth Azevedo; Lopes, Inês Sousa

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and the reliability of the European Portuguese version of the EAT-10 (P-EAT-10). This research was conducted in three phases: (i) cultural and linguistic adaptation; (ii) feasibility and reliability test; and (iii) validity tests. The final sample was formed by a cohort of 520 subjects. The P-EAT-10 index was compared for socio-demographic and clinic variables. It was also compared for both dysphagic and non-dysphagic groups as well as for the results of the 3Oz wst. Lastly, the P-EAT-10 scores were correlated with the EuroQol Group Portuguese EQ-5D index. The Cronbach's α obtained for the P-EAT-10 scale was 0.952 and it remained excellent even if any item was deleted. The item-total and the intraclass correlation coefficients were very good. The P-EAT-10 mean of the non-dysphagic cohort was 0.56 and that of the dysphagic cohort was 14.26, the mean comparison between the 3Oz wst groups and the P-EAT-10 scores were significant. A significant higher perception of QoL was also found among the non-dysphagic subjects. P-EAT-10 is a valid and reliable measure that may be used to document dysphagia which makes it useful both for screening in clinical practice and in research.

  9. Sensitivity and specificity of the Eating Assessment Tool and the Volume-Viscosity Swallow Test for clinical evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofes, L; Arreola, V; Mukherjee, R; Clavé, P

    2014-01-01

    Background Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is an underdiagnosed digestive disorder that causes severe nutritional and respiratory complications. Our aim was to determine the accuracy of the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and the Volume-Viscosity Swallow Test (V-VST) for clinical evaluation of OD. Methods We studied 120 patients with swallowing difficulties and 14 healthy subjects. OD was evaluated by the 10-item screening questionnaire EAT-10 and the bedside method V-VST, videofluoroscopy (VFS) being the reference standard. The V-VST is an effort test that uses boluses of different volumes and viscosities to identify clinical signs of impaired efficacy (impaired labial seal, piecemeal deglutition, and residue) and impaired safety of swallow (cough, voice changes, and oxygen desaturation ≥3%). Discriminating ability was assessed by the AUC of the ROC curve and sensitivity and specificity values. Key Results According to VFS, prevalence of OD was 87%, 75.6% with impaired efficacy and 80.9% with impaired safety of swallow including 17.6% aspirations. The EAT-10 showed a ROC AUC of 0.89 for OD with an optimal cut-off at 2 (0.89 sensitivity and 0.82 specificity). The V-VST showed 0.94 sensitivity and 0.88 specificity for OD, 0.79 sensitivity and 0.75 specificity for impaired efficacy, 0.87 sensitivity and 0.81 specificity for impaired safety, and 0.91 sensitivity and 0.28 specificity for aspirations. Conclusions & Inferences Clinical methods for screening (EAT-10) and assessment (V-VST) of OD offer excellent psychometric proprieties that allow adequate management of OD. Their universal application among at-risk populations will improve the identification of patients with OD at risk for malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia. PMID:24909661

  10. Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscles and nerves used for swallowing may cause dysphagia. For example, people with diseases of the nervous system, such as cerebral palsy or Parkinson’s disease, often have problems swallowing. Additionally, stroke or ...

  11. Pitfalls in the assessment of dysphagia by fibreoptic oesophagogastroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    We present a paper to highlight that the investigation of dysphagia by the standard methods of barium swallow and the now routinely used fibreoptic oesophagogastroscope may miss or inadequately assess pharyngeal and hypopharyngeal causes of dysphagia and to remind that if such a cause is suspected then rigid endoscopy is required to assess or exclude the pathology.

  12. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  13. The Mayo Dysphagia Questionnaire-30: documentation of reliability and validity of a tool for interventional trials in adults with esophageal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhiney, Judith; Lohse, Matthew R; Arora, Amindra S; Peloquin, Joanna M; Geno, Debra M; Kuntz, Melissa M; Enders, Felicity B; Fredericksen, Mary; Abdalla, Adil A; Khan, Yulia; Talley, Nicholas J; Diehl, Nancy N; Beebe, Timothy J; Harris, Ann M; Farrugia, Gianrico; Graner, Darlene E; Murray, Joseph A; Locke, G Richard; Grothe, Rayna M; Crowell, Michael D; Francis, Dawn L; Grudell, April M B; Dabade, Tushar; Ramirez, Angelica; Alkhatib, MhdMaan; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Kimber, Jessica; Prasad, Ganapathy; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Romero, Yvonne

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop the Mayo Dysphagia Questionnaire-30 Day (MDQ-30), a tool to measure esophageal dysphagia, by adapting items from validated instruments for use in clinical trials, and assess its feasibility, reproducibility, and concurrent validity. Outpatients referred to endoscopy for dysphagia or seen in a specialty clinic were recruited. Feasibility testing was done to identify problematic items. Reproducibility was measured by test-retest format. Concurrent validity reflects agreement between information gathered in a structured interview versus the patients' written responses. The MDQ-30, a 28-item instrument, took 10 min (range = 5-30 min) to complete. Four hundred thirty-one outpatients [210 (49%) men; mean age = 61 years] participated. Overall, most concurrent validity kappa values for dysphagia were very good to excellent with a median of 0.78 (min 0.28, max 0.95). The majority of reproducibility kappa values for dysphagia were moderate to excellent with a median kappa value of 0.66 (min 0.07, max 1.0). Overall, concurrent validity and reproducibility kappa values for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms were 0.81 (95% CI = 0.72, 0.91) and 0.66 (95% CI = 0.55, 0.77), respectively. Individual item percent agreement was generally very good to excellent. Internal consistency was excellent. We conclude that the MDQ-30 is an easy-to-complete tool to evaluate reliably dysphagia symptoms over the last 30 days.

  14. Dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy: Evaluation of risk factors and assessment of endoscopic intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Nath, Anand; Yewale, Sayali; Tran, Tung; Brebbia, John S; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the risks of medical conditions, evaluate gastric sleeve narrowing, and assess hydrostatic balloon dilatation to treat dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG). METHODS VSG is being performed more frequently worldwide as a treatment for medically-complicated obesity, and dysphagia is common post-operatively. We hypothesize that post-operative dysphagia is related to underlying medical conditions or narrowing of the gastric sleeve. This is a retrospective, single insti...

  15. Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrup, Inga; Warnecke, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    More than 80 % of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop dysphagia during the course of their disease. Swallowing impairment reduces quality of life, complicates medication intake and leads to malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. Although the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood, it has been shown that dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the development of dysphagia in PD. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in PD patients is challenging and often delivers unreliable results. A modified water test assessing maximum swallowing volume is recommended to uncover oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD. PD-specific questionnaires may also be useful to identify patients at risk for swallowing impairment. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and videofluoroscopic swallowing study are both considered to be the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. In addition, high-resolution manometry may be a helpful tool. These instrumental methods allow a reliable detection of aspiration events. Furthermore, typical patterns of impairment during the oral, pharyngeal and/or esophageal swallowing phase of PD patients can be identified. Therapy of dysphagia in PD consists of pharmacological interventions and swallowing treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs). Fluctuating dysphagia with deterioration during the off-state should be treated by optimizing dopaminergic medication. The methods used during swallowing treatment by SLTs shall be selected according to the individual dysphagia pattern of each PD patient. A promising novel method is an intensive training of expiratory muscle strength. Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinical relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. The goal of this review is giving an overview on current stages of epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of PD-associated dysphagia, which might be helpful for neurologists

  16. Dysphagia: Aspects of assessment and management for the Acute Physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A; Stacey, B

    2008-01-01

    The term Dysphagia originates from a Greek word meaning disordered eating. It is defined as difficulty in swallowing. Dysphagia should not be confused with globus senstation, a feeling of having a lump in the throat, which is unrelated to swallowing and occurs without impaired transit (see below). Although odynophagia (painful swallowing) and phagophobia (fear of swallowing) are symptoms that may be associated with dysphagia it is important to distinguish this in the history.

  17. Evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia: which diagnostic tool is superior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmore, Susan E

    2003-12-01

    As flexible endoscopic examinations of swallowing become more widely used to evaluate patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia, it is important to be aware of research regarding the efficacy of this procedure as compared with the videofluoroscopy procedure. A recent evidence-based review of the field threw some long-held findings into question and has stimulated a surge of new research studying the sensitivity of the two instrumental examinations, health outcomes of patients who receive each procedure, and a look at different patient outcomes. Since 1999, one quasi-randomized clinical trial has directly compared outcomes of patients given a fluoroscopy versus a fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) examination. This study showed no significant difference in pneumonia rates between the two groups of patients. A multitude of studies have shown a high level of agreement between the two instrumental examinations, and the use of the term gold standard as applied to fluoroscopy is no longer appropriate. The attempt to standardize each examination has been slow, and inter-judge reliability of results has come under fire. Several new scales for quality of life and functional status are now ready to be applied to research that can measure outcomes other than pneumonia. Research to date has suggested that both instrumental examinations are valuable. It is likely that both will continue to be used and will be seen as complementary rather than competitors.

  18. Dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy: Evaluation of risk factors and assessment of endoscopic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Anand; Yewale, Sayali; Tran, Tung; Brebbia, John S; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2016-12-21

    To evaluate the risks of medical conditions, evaluate gastric sleeve narrowing, and assess hydrostatic balloon dilatation to treat dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG). VSG is being performed more frequently worldwide as a treatment for medically-complicated obesity, and dysphagia is common post-operatively. We hypothesize that post-operative dysphagia is related to underlying medical conditions or narrowing of the gastric sleeve. This is a retrospective, single institution study of consecutive patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy from 2013 to 2015. Patients with previous bariatric procedures were excluded. Narrowing of a gastric sleeve includes: inability to pass a 9.6 mm gastroscope due to stenosis or sharp angulation or spiral hindering its passage. Of 400 consecutive patients, 352 are included; the prevalence of dysphagia is 22.7%; 33 patients (9.3%) have narrowing of the sleeve with 25 (7.1%) having sharp angulation or a spiral while 8 (2.3%) have a stenosis. All 33 patients underwent balloon dilatation of the gastric sleeve and dysphagia resolved in 13 patients (39%); 10 patients (30%) noted resolution of dysphagia after two additional dilatations. In a multivariate model, medical conditions associated with post-operative dysphagia include diabetes mellitus, symptoms of esophageal reflux, a low whole blood thiamine level, hypothyroidism, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and use of opioids. Narrowing of the gastric sleeve and gastric sleeve stenosis are common after VSG. Endoscopic balloon dilatations of the gastric sleeve resolves dysphagia in 69% of patients.

  19. Assessing adherence to the evidence base in the management of poststroke dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Christopher; Pennington, Lindsay; Roddam, Hazel; Russell, Ian; Russell, Daphne; Krawczyk, Karen; Smith, Hilary A

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability and responsiveness to change of an audit tool to assess adherence to evidence of effectiveness in the speech and language therapy (SLT) management of poststroke dysphagia. The tool was used to review SLT practice as part of a randomized study of different education strategies. Medical records were audited before and after delivery of the trial intervention. Seventeen SLT departments in the north-west of England participated in the study. The assessment tool was used to assess the medical records of 753 patients before and 717 patients after delivery of the trial intervention across the 17 departments. A target of 10 records per department per month was sought, using systematic sampling with a random start. Inter- and intra-rater reliability were explored, together with the tool's internal consistency and responsiveness to change. The assessment tool had high face validity, although internal consistency was low (ra = 0.37). Composite scores on the tool were however responsive to differences between SLT departments. Both inter- and intra-rater reliability ranged from 'substantial' to 'near perfect' across all items. The audit tool has high face validity and measurement reliability. The use of a composite adherence score should, however, proceed with caution as internal consistency is low.

  20. High Resolution Manometry - an underappreciated tool for examination of dysphagia in a surgical setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Sanberg

    Introduction Examination of dysphagia in Danish surgical departments, rely primarily on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. When no visible or histological cause can be detected, esophageal motility disorders are important differential diagnosis. In examining these disorders and in evaluating...... gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD), High Resolution Esophageal Manometry (HRM), provide valuable insights. The purpose of this study was to examine referrals and final diagnosis from HRM in a surgical center specializing in esophageal disorders. Methods and Procedures All patients referred to HRM at our.......1% based on 10419 endoscopies. Conclusion HRM is an important diagnostic tool and supplements upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in examination of dysphagia as well as GERD, with significant differences in patterns of motility disorders. Knowledge and availability of HRM increases use at a surgical center...

  1. Diagnostic Assessment and Management of Dysphagia in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardi, Virginia; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Patriti, Alberto; Marano, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    A growing concern in patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) is dysphagia, or swallowing impairment, which leads to malnutrition, dehydration, weight loss, functional decline and fear of eating and drinking, as well as a decrease in the quality of life. Thus the diagnostic assessment of dysphagia in patients with AD is imperative to ensure that they receive effective management, avoiding complications, and reducing comorbidity and mortality in such a growing population. Dysphagia management requires a multidisciplinary approach considering that no single strategy is appropriate for all patients. However, evidence for clinical diagnostic assessment, interventions, and medical management of dysphagia in these patients are still limited: few studies are reporting the evaluation and the management among this group of patients. Here we analyzed the most recent findings in diagnostic assessment and management of swallowing impairment in patients affected by AD.

  2. Dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy: Evaluation of risk factors and assessment of endoscopic intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Anand; Yewale, Sayali; Tran, Tung; Brebbia, John S; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the risks of medical conditions, evaluate gastric sleeve narrowing, and assess hydrostatic balloon dilatation to treat dysphagia after vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG). METHODS VSG is being performed more frequently worldwide as a treatment for medically-complicated obesity, and dysphagia is common post-operatively. We hypothesize that post-operative dysphagia is related to underlying medical conditions or narrowing of the gastric sleeve. This is a retrospective, single institution study of consecutive patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy from 2013 to 2015. Patients with previous bariatric procedures were excluded. Narrowing of a gastric sleeve includes: inability to pass a 9.6 mm gastroscope due to stenosis or sharp angulation or spiral hindering its passage. RESULTS Of 400 consecutive patients, 352 are included; the prevalence of dysphagia is 22.7%; 33 patients (9.3%) have narrowing of the sleeve with 25 (7.1%) having sharp angulation or a spiral while 8 (2.3%) have a stenosis. All 33 patients underwent balloon dilatation of the gastric sleeve and dysphagia resolved in 13 patients (39%); 10 patients (30%) noted resolution of dysphagia after two additional dilatations. In a multivariate model, medical conditions associated with post-operative dysphagia include diabetes mellitus, symptoms of esophageal reflux, a low whole blood thiamine level, hypothyroidism, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and use of opioids. CONCLUSION Narrowing of the gastric sleeve and gastric sleeve stenosis are common after VSG. Endoscopic balloon dilatations of the gastric sleeve resolves dysphagia in 69% of patients. PMID:28058017

  3. Evaluation of a dysphagia screening system based on the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability for use in dependent older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Mariko; Ishida, Ryo; Maki, Yoshinobu; Ohkubo, Mai; Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Sakayori, Takaharu; Sato, Toru

    2017-04-01

    Dysphagia is common in dependent older adults. Thus, a method of evaluating eating and swallowing functions that can be used to diagnose and manage dysphagia in a simple and robust manner is required. In 2002, the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA) was introduced to identify dysphagia in acute-stage stroke patients. As the MASA enables easy screening, it might also be applicable to dependent older adults if appropriate MASA cut-off values and the most useful assessment items could be determined. In the present study, we attempted to determine suitable MASA cut-off values, and the most useful assessment items for predicting aspiration and pharyngeal retention in dependent older adults. Using the MASA, we evaluated the eating and swallowing functions of 50 dependent older adults with dysphagia. All of the patients also underwent videoendoscopic-based swallowing evaluations to detect aspiration and pharyngeal retention. The participants' characteristics and the utility of each assessment item were compared between various groups. Using the patients' videoendoscopic findings as a reference, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was carried out to determine appropriate cut-off values for predicting aspiration and pharyngeal retention in dependent older adults. The optimal MASA cut-off values for predicting aspiration and pharyngeal retention were 122 points and 151 points, respectively. A total of 17 of the 24 clinical items assessed by the MASA were found to be associated with aspiration in dependent older adults. The MASA is a useful screening tool for evaluating eating and swallowing functions in dependent older adults. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 561-567. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  4. [A retrospective study on the assessment of dysphagia after partial laryngectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, T T; Sun, Z F

    2017-11-07

    Objective: To retrospectively investigate the long-term swallowing function of patients with laryngeal carcinoma, who underwent partial laryngectomy, discuss the effectiveness and reliability of Kubota drinking test in the assessment of patients with dysphagia, who underwent partial laryngectomy, and analyze the influence of different ways of operation on swallowing function. Methods: Clinical data were retrospectively analyzed on 83 patients with laryngeal carcinoma, who underwent partial laryngectomy between September 2012 and August 2015. Questionnaire survey, Kubota drinking test and video fluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were conducted for patients during a scheduled interview. Patients were grouped by two ways: the one was whether epiglottis was retained, and the other was whether either arytenoids or both were reserved. The influence of different surgical techniques on swallowing function was analyzed according to the results of Kubota drinking test. The agreement and reliability of Kubota drinking test were statistically analyzed with respect to VFSS treated as the gold standard. SPSS23.0 software was used to analyze the data. Results: Questionnaire results revealed that among 83 patients underwent partial laryngectomy 32.53% suffered from eating disorder, and 43.37% experienced painful swallowing. The incidence of dysphagia was 40.96% according to the results of Kubota drinking test. There was statistical difference between the group with epiglottis remained and that having epiglottis removed in terms of the absence of dysphagia and severity. The statistical values of normal, moderate and severe dysphagia were in the order of 18.160, 7.229, 12.344( P dysphagia as well as that of intermediate severity, and their statistical values were 4.790 and 9.110( P dysphagia post partial laryngectomy.

  5. Presbyphagia and Sarcopenic Dysphagia: Association between Aging, Sarcopenia, and Deglutition Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, H

    2014-01-01

    Presbyphagia refers to age-related changes in the swallowing mechanism in the elderly associated with a frailty in swallowing. Presbyphagia is different from dysphagia. Sarcopenic dysphagia is difficulty swallowing due to sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles. Age-related loss of swallowing muscle mass becomes evident in the geniohyoid muscle and tongue. Elderly subjects with both sarcopenia and dysphagia may have not only disease-related dysphagia but also sarcopenic dysphagia. In cases of aspiration pneumonia, deterioration in activity-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles may develop into sarcopenic dysphagia. Assessment of sarcopenic dysphagia includes evaluation of both dysphagia and sarcopenia. The 10-item Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and a water test combined with pulse oximetry are useful for dysphagia screening. Assessment of the multi-factorial causes of sarcopenia including nutritional review is important, because rehabilitation of sarcopenic dysphagia differs depending on its etiology. Consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenic dysphagia were proposed at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Dysphagia Rehabilitation. Rehabilitation for sarcopenic dysphagia includes treatment of both dysphagia and sarcopenia. The core components of dysphagia rehabilitation are oral health care, rehabilitative techniques, and food modification. The causes of adult malnutrition may also contribute to the etiology of secondary sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia. Therefore, nutrition management is indispensable for sarcopenic dysphagia rehabilitation. In cases of sarcopenia with numerous complicating causes, treatment should include pharmaceutical therapies for age-related sarcopenia and comorbid chronic diseases, resistance training, early ambulation, nutrition management, protein and amino acid supplementation, and non-smoking.

  6. Evaluation of a Clinical Service Model for Dysphagia Assessment via Telerehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Ward

    2013-01-01

    employed to examine the outcomes of a weekly dysphagia assessment clinic conducted via telerehabilitation and examine issues relating to service delivery and user perceptions. Data was collected across a total of 100 patient assessments. Information relating to primary patient outcomes, session statistics, patient perceptions, and clinician perceptions was examined. Results revealed that session durations averaged 45 minutes, there was minimal technical difficulty experienced, and clinical decisions made regarding primary patient outcomes were comparable between the online and face to face clinicians. Patient satisfaction was high and clinicians felt that they developed good rapport, found the system easy to use, and were satisfied with the service in over 90% of the assessments conducted. Key factors relating to screening patient suitability, having good general organization, and skilled staff were identified as facilitators for the service. This trial has highlighted important issues for consideration when planning or implementing a telerehabilitation service for dysphagia management.

  7. An audit of combined multichannel intraluminal impedance manometry in the assessment of dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Nicholas G; Wyeth, John W

    2011-04-01

    Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance (MII) Monitoring is a method of examining oesophageal bolus transit without the need for radiation. In combination with oesophageal manometry it allows correlation of bolus transit with peristaltic activity. The clinical application of impedance manometry is still being refined. This audit looked to examine whether impedance manometry had advantages over standard manometry in assessment of patients with dysphagia. 41 patients with the presenting symptom of dysphagia were assessed by combined MII and oesophageal manometry at a Wellington Hospital between February 2008 and December 2009. Each underwent manometry and MII using standardised techniques. Achalasia was diagnosed in 23 patients (56.1%), Ineffective oesophageal motility (IEM) in 5 patients (12.2%), Diffuse oesophageal Spasm (DES) in 7 patients (17.1%), and Nutcracker oesophagus in 2 patients (4.9%). 4 patients had normal manometry studies (9.8%). All patients with achalasia, IEM, and DES had abnormal bolus transit. All patients with normal manometry had abnormal bolus transit. Both patients with nutcracker oesophagus had normal bolus transit. 4 patients with achalasia had undergone previous Hellers myotomy. Two of these patients (50.0%) now had normal LES relaxation pressures, but all four still had abnormal oesophageal peristalsis and abnormal bolus transit. Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance manometry has advantages over standard manometry in characterising the physiological abnormalities associated with dysphagia. Patients in this study had severe defects including achalasia where bolus transit was invariably poor meaning little further information was gained. Extension of this study to include a wider group of patients with dysphagia may yield different results. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Dutch Risk Assessment tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, A.

    2015-01-01

    The ‘Risico- Inventarisatie- en Evaluatie-instrumenten’ is the name for the Dutch risk assessment (RA) tools. A RA tool can be used to perform a risk assessment including an evaluation of the identified risks. These tools were among the first online risk assessment tools developed in Europe. The

  9. Correlation between the reason for referral, clinical, and objective assessment of the risk for dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancopes, Renata; Gonçalves, Bruna Franciele da Trindade; Costa, Cintia Conceição; Favero, Talita Cristina; Drozdz, Daniela Rejane Constantino; Bilheri, Diego Fernando Dorneles; Schumacher, Stéfani Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    To correlate the reason for referral to speech therapy service at a university hospital with the results of clinical and objective assessment of risk for dysphagia. This is a cross-sectional, observational, retrospective analytical and quantitative study. The data were gathered from the database, and the information used was the reason for referral to speech therapy service, results of clinical assessment of the risk for dysphagia, and also from swallowing videofluoroscopy. There was a mean difference between the variables of the reason for the referral, results of the clinical and objective swallowing assessments, and scale of penetration/aspiration, although the values were not statistically significant. Statistically significant correlation was observed between clinical and objective assessments and the penetration scale, with the largest occurring between the results of objective assessment and penetration scale. There was a correlation between clinical and objective assessments of swallowing and mean difference between the variables of the reason for the referral with their respective assessment. This shows the importance of the association between the data of patient's history and results of clinical evaluation and complementary tests, such as videofluoroscopy, for correct identification of the swallowing disorders, being important to combine the use of severity scales of penetration/aspiration for diagnosis.

  10. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: practical recommendations to guide management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Michel; Davidson, Zoe; Bouvoie, Veronique; Evenepoel, Nathalie; Haan, Jurn; Soudon, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disorder causing weakness of the skeletal, respiratory, cardiac and oropharyngeal muscles with up to one third of young men reporting difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). Recent studies on dysphagia in DMD clarify the pathophysiology of swallowing disorders and offer new tools for its assessment but little guidance is available for its management. This paper aims to provide a step-by-step algorithm to facilitate clinical decisions regarding dysphagia management in this patient population. This algorithm is based on 30 years of clinical experience with DMD in a specialised Centre for Neuromuscular Disorders (Inkendaal Rehabilitation Hospital, Belgium) and is supported by literature where available. Dysphagia can worsen the condition of ageing patients with DMD. Apart from the difficulties of chewing and oral fragmentation of the food bolus, dysphagia is rather a consequence of an impairment in the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. By contrast with central neurologic disorders, dysphagia in DMD accompanies solid rather than liquid intake. Symptoms of dysphagia may not be clinically evident; however laryngeal food penetration, accumulation of food residue in the pharynx and/or true laryngeal food aspiration may occur. The prevalence of these issues in DMD is likely underestimated. There is little guidance available for clinicians to manage dysphagia and improve feeding for young men with DMD. This report aims to provide a clinical algorithm to facilitate the diagnosis of dysphagia, to identify the symptoms and to propose practical recommendations to treat dysphagia in the adult DMD population. Implications for Rehabilitation Little guidance is available for the management of dysphagia in Duchenne dystrophy. Food can penetrate the vestibule, accumulate as residue or cause aspiration. We propose recommendations and an algorithm to guide management of dysphagia. Penetration/residue accumulation

  11. Screening tool for oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke - Part I: evidence of validity based on the content and response processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Tatiana Magalhães de; Cola, Paula Cristina; Pernambuco, Leandro de Araújo; Magalhães, Hipólito Virgílio; Magnoni, Carlos Daniel; Silva, Roberta Gonçalves da

    2017-08-17

    The aim of the present study was to identify the evidence of validity based on the content and response process of the Rastreamento de Disfagia Orofaríngea no Acidente Vascular Encefálico (RADAVE; "Screening Tool for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Stroke"). The criteria used to elaborate the questions were based on a literature review. A group of judges consisting of 19 different health professionals evaluated the relevance and representativeness of the questions, and the results were analyzed using the Content Validity Index. In order to evidence validity based on the response processes, 23 health professionals administered the screening tool and analyzed the questions using a structured scale and cognitive interview. The RADAVE structured to be applied in two stages. The first version consisted of 18 questions in stage I and 11 questions in stage II. Eight questions in stage I and four in stage II did not reach the minimum Content Validity Index, requiring reformulation by the authors. The cognitive interview demonstrated some misconceptions. New adjustments were made and the final version was produced with 12 questions in stage I and six questions in stage II. It was possible to develop a screening tool for dysphagia in stroke with adequate evidence of validity based on content and response processes. Both validity evidences obtained so far allowed to adjust the screening tool in relation to its construct. The next studies will analyze the other evidences of validity and the measures of accuracy.

  12. Radiology of oesophageal dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A.J.; Nolan, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Dysphagia is defined as the sensation of difficulty in swallowing. The causes of dysphagia can be oropharyngeal or oesophageal. Oesophageal dysphagia develops as a result of mechanical obstruction or motility disorders and frequently causes distressing symptoms. Patients who develop oesophageal dysphagia can be easily and rapidly examined by routine barium techniques. The barium swallow remains a safe, accurate and widely available method for showing structural and functional oesophageal lesions, and for identifying those patients who require urgent endoscopic assessment and treatment. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) and endoscopic ultrasonography are available for the preoperative staging of oesophageal neoplasms. This article discusses the radiological appearances of the main oesophageal disorders that cause dysphagia in adults. (author). 15 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab

  13. The Anxiety Level of Caregivers of Neurological Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serel Arslan, Selen; Demir, Numan; Karaduman, A Ayşe

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to investigate anxiety level of caregivers of neurological patients with dysphagia, and the relationship of patient-related factors to anxiety level of dysphagia caregivers. A total of 103 adult neurological patients with dysphagia (study group), 30 without dysphagia (control group), and their primary caregivers were included. Types of feeding, condition of dependency in eating and drinking, dysphagia duration, and history of previous dysphagia treatment were recorded for study group. In study group, the Turkish version of the Eating Assessment Tool-10 (T-EAT-10) was used to determine dysphagia symptom severity. Penetration and aspiration severity was determined with the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS). The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) that has two subscales including state anxiety (S-STAI) and trait anxiety (T-STAI) was used to determine anxiety level of caregivers. There was no difference between groups in terms of age, gender, weight, and height. The mean S-STAI was 42.56 ± 10.10 for the study group and 29.20 ± 6.64 for the control group (p dysphagia treatment (p = 0.01, r = 0.25). No correlation was found between STAI (in terms of both S-STAI and T-STAI) and T-EAT-10, PAS, types of feeding, condition of dependency in eating and drinking, dysphagia duration (p > 0.05). Caregivers of neurological patients with dysphagia have greater anxiety level than caregivers of neurological patients without dysphagia.

  14. The Functional Dysphagia Scale Is a Useful Tool for Predicting Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients With Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Lee, Kyeong Woo; Kim, Sang Beom; Lee, Sook Joung; Chun, Sang Myung; Jung, Sung Moon

    2016-06-01

    To describe the correlation between the functional dysphagia scale and aspiration pneumonia and which characteristics influence the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia in patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease. Fifty-three patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease were prospectively evaluated in this study. Disease severity and functional status were measured by modified Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) staging, Schwab and England activities of daily living (S-E ADL) scale and Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE). Swallowing function was evaluated by the functional dysphagia scale (FDS) and the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) based on a videofluoroscopic swallowing study. The patients were followed up for 3 months and divided into two groups according to the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia. The correlation between the variables and aspiration pneumonia was analyzed. Eight patients of the 53 patients were allocated to the aspiration pneumonia group and 45 patients to the non-aspiration pneumonia group. The patients in the aspiration pneumonia group had significantly higher H&Y staging, and scored lower on S-E ADL scale and K-MMSE. The patients in the aspiration pneumonia group had significantly higher scores on FDS and PAS. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the S-E ADL scale and the FDS were associated with the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia in the patients with Parkinson disease. Given that the FDS can quantitatively assess the functional problems associated with dysphagia, it can be clinically effective in predicting the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia, and the FDS and the S-E ADL scale could be predictive variables for aspiration pneumonia in patients with Parkinson disease.

  15. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  16. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint

  17. Breastfeeding assessment tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizouerne, Cécile; Kerac, Marko; Macgrath, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Breastfeeding plays a major role in reducing the global burden of child mortality and under-nutrition. Whilst many programmes aim to support breastfeeding and prevent feeding problems occurring, interventions are also needed once they have developed. In this situation, accurate assessment of a problem is critical to inform prognosis and enables tailored, appropriate treatment. The presentation will present a review, which aims to identify breastfeeding assessment tools/checklists for use in assessing malnourished infants in poor resource settings. The literature review identified 24 breastfeeding assessment tools, and 41 validation studies. Evidence underpinning most of the tools was mainly low quality, and conducted in high-income countries and hospital settings. The presentation will describe the main findings of the literature review and propose recommendations for improving existing tools in order to appropriately assess malnourished infants and enable early, appropriate intervention and treatment of malnutrition. (author)

  18. Adaptation and Assessment of Reliability and Validity of the Greek Version of the Ohkuma Questionnaire for Dysphagia Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Soultana L.; Exarchakos, Georgios; Christodoulou, Dimitrios; Theodorou, Stavroula; Beris, Alexandre; Ploumis, Avraam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Ohkuma questionnaire is a validated screening tool originally used to detect dysphagia among patients hospitalized in Japanese nursing facilities. Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate the reliability and validity of the adapted Greek version of the Ohkuma questionnaire. Methods Following the steps for cross-cultural adaptation, we delivered the validated Ohkuma questionnaire to 70 patients (53 men, 17 women) who were either suffering from dysphagia or not. All of them completed the questionnaire a second time within a month. For all of them, we performed a bedside and VFSS study of dysphagia and asked participants to undergo a second VFSS screening, with the exception of nine individuals. Statistical analysis included measurement of internal consistency with Cronbach's α coefficient, reliability with Cohen's Kappa, Pearson's correlation coefficient and construct validity with categorical components, and One-Way Anova test. Results According to Cronbach's α coefficient (0.976) for total score, there was high internal consistency for the Ohkuma Dysphagia questionnaire. Test-retest reliability (Cohen's Kappa) ranged from 0.586 to 1.00, exhibiting acceptable stability. We also estimated the Pearson's correlation coefficient for the test-retest total score, which reached high levels (0.952; p = 0.000). The One-Way Anova test in the two measurement times showed statistically significant correlation in both measurements (p = 0.02 and p = 0.016). Conclusion The adapted Greek version of the questionnaire is valid and reliable and can be used for the screening of dysphagia in the Greek-speaking patients. PMID:28050209

  19. First Step in Telehealth Assessment: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Investigate the Effectiveness of an Electronic Case History Form for Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarcigil, Cagla; Malandraki, Georgia A

    2017-08-01

    The need for developing effective telehealth tools for dysphagia management is high not only for people who live in rural areas, but also for individuals with mobility/access limitations. We aimed to develop an electronic case History Tool/form (thereafter, e-HiT) for dysphagia, and compare its effectiveness with its paper-based version (PBV) on completion time, completeness, independence, and patient perceptions/satisfaction. Secondarily, we examined associations between the aforementioned variables and predictor variables, such as age, cognition, and computer/internet use. Forty adults who expressed concerns with eating/swallowing participated. To compare both versions, a randomized, controlled two-period crossover design was used. In Visit 1, Group A completed the e-HiT and Group B completed the PBV. In Visit 2, Group A completed the PBV and Group B completed the e-HiT. A satisfaction survey was completed post visits. There were no statistically significant differences for completion time (p = 0.743), completeness (p = 0.486), and independence (p = 0.738). Patient perception/satisfaction was significantly higher with the e-HiT (p = 0.004). In addition, a significant association was found between completion time and age (p = 0.0063). Our results indicate that completing the e-HiT is as time efficient as completing the PBV and that both forms elicit the same amount of information with no or minimal support. Also, completion of the e-HiT yielded significantly higher satisfaction responses. This is the first study documenting the effectiveness of the e-HiT for outpatients with dysphagia, providing evidence that the first step of a swallowing assessment-case history completion-can be effectively completed via telehealth by individuals with reliable internet connection and basic computer literacy skills.

  20. The nutritional intake of elderly patients with dysphagia admitted to the internal medical department of the emergency hospital was analyzed. The Fujishima dysphagia scale after care and treatment by the Nutrition Support Team was assessed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwano, Mototaka

    2016-01-01

    The Nutrition Support Team (NST) assessed the severity of dysphagia in elderly patients admitted to the internal medical department, and the appropriate nutritional treatment was determined. Patients were treated with either oral nutrition (enteral nutrition, EN) or artificial alimentation (parenteral nutrition, PN). The goal of this study was to analyze whether or not the route of nutrition affected the patient discharge rates. We divided 290 elderly inpatients with dysphagia into 2 groups, the pneumonia group (200 patients) and the non-pneumonia group (90 patients). The NST estimated the swallowing function using the Fujishima dysphagia scale. Monitoring was continued until the NST care and treatment had been finalized. We further divided the pneumonia patients into two subgroups: those with a Fujishima dysphagia scale score ≤3 or ≥4 at the beginning of NST intervention. The changes in the swallowing function were analyzed.The swallowing function in the patients with a score ≥4 was significantly improved compared with that in the patients with a score ≤3. This difference, however, was not observed in the non-pneumonia group. In both the pneumonia and non-pneumonia groups, the ratio of patients discharged on oral nutrition was one-third, and the ratio of death in hospital was one-quarter, the remaining patients required artificial alimentation. Among elderly patients admitted to the internal medical department of the emergency hospital with dysphagia, one-third left the hospital with oral nutritional intake, one-quarter died in hospital, and the remaining required artificial alimentation.

  1. Coach assessment tool

    OpenAIRE

    Härkönen, Niko; Klicznik, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The Coach Assessment Tool was created to assist coaches of all sports for their own development. The starting point to develop the tool is the fact that coaching clinics solely focus on the technical and tactial skills of the sport. The education for coaches is lacking to teach the importance of the coach´s behavior towards their athletes. The question is how to teach properly the task in hand to increase the athlete´s performance considering the coach´s behavior. Nevertheless,...

  2. Oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian J

    2009-09-01

    Although the aging process per se can produce measurable changes in the normal oropharyngeal swallow, these changes alone are rarely sufficient to cause clinically apparent dysphagia. The causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia in the elderly are predominantly neuromyogenic, with the most common cause being stroke. The evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in the elderly involves early exclusion of structural abnormalities, detection of aspiration by videofluoroscopy which might dictate early introduction of nonoral feeding, and exclusion of underlying systemic and neuromyogenic causes that have specific therapies in their own right. Such conditions include Parkinson disease, myositis, myasthenia, and thyrotoxicosis. Management is best delivered by a multidisciplinary team involving physician, speech pathologist, nutritionist and, at times, a surgeon.

  3. Assessment of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Patients With Parkinson Disease: Use of Ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun Hyun; Seo, Jin Seok; Kang, Hyo Jung

    2016-04-01

    To compare tongue thickness, the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation (distance between the hyoid bone and thyroid cartilage), and the time interval between the initiation of tongue movement and the time of the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation, by using ultrasonography in healthy controls and patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Healthy controls and PD patients with dysphagia were compared. Ultrasonography was performed 3 times for the evaluation of tongue thickness, the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation, and the time between the initiation of tongue movement and the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation. A total of 24 healthy controls and 24 PD patients with dysphagia were enrolled. No significant differences were demonstrated between the two groups for the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation (controls, 1.19±0.34 cm; PD patients, 1.37±0.5 cm; p=0.15) and tongue thickness (controls, 4.42±0.46 cm; PD patients, 4.27±0.51 cm; p=0.3). In contrast, the time to the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation was significantly different between the two groups (controls, 1.53±0.87 ms; PD patients, 2.4±1.4 ms, p=0.048). Ultrasonography can be useful in evaluating dysphagia in patients with PD by direct visualization and measurement of the hyoid bone. Moreover, ultrasonography might contribute to a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of dysphagia in PD.

  4. Acoustic analysis of swallowing sounds: a new technique for assessing dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamato, Andrea; Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Russo, Anna; Frisardi, Vincenza; Megna, Marisa; Ranieri, Maurizio; Fiore, Pietro

    2009-07-01

    To perform acoustic analysis of swallowing sounds, using a microphone and a notebook computer system, in healthy subjects and patients with dysphagia affected by neurological diseases, testing the positive/negative predictive value of a pathological pattern of swallowing sounds for penetration/aspiration. Diagnostic test study, prospective, not blinded, with the penetration/aspiration evaluated by fibreoptic endoscopy of swallowing as criterion standard. Data from a previously recorded database of normal swallowing sounds for 60 healthy subjects according to gender, age, and bolus consistency was compared with those of 15 patients with dysphagia from a university hospital referral centre who were affected by various neurological diseases. Mean duration of the swallowing sounds and post-swallowing apnoea were recorded. Penetration/aspiration was verified by fibreoptic endoscopy of swallowing in all patients with dysphagia. The mean duration of swallowing sounds for a liquid bolus of 10 ml water was significantly different between patients with dysphagia and healthy patients. We also described patterns of swallowing sounds and tested the negative/positive predictive values of post-swallowing apnoea for penetration/aspiration verified by fibreoptic endoscopy of swallowing (sensitivity 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.24-0.94); specificity 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.56-1.00)). The proposed technique for recording and measuring swallowing sounds could be incorporated into the bedside evaluation, but it should not replace the use of more diagnostic and valuable measures.

  5. Criticism on Environmental Assessment Tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdalla, G.; Maas, G.J.; Huyghe, J.; Oostra, M.; Saji Baby, xx; Bogdan Zygmunt, xx

    2011-01-01

    Using environmental assessment tools to assess the sustainability of buildings, homes and mixed- use area is increasing. Environmental tools assign scores to projects using some sustainability (sub) aspects according to design and realization documents and evidences. Six European sustainable urban

  6. Assessment of Esophageal High-Resolution Impedance Manometry in Patients with Nonobstructive Dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyu Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. High-resolution impedance manometry (HRIM can calculate the bolus motion parameters and the ratio of complete esophageal transit besides the conventional esophageal dynamic parameters; therefore, we could better manage the patients with nonobstructive dysphagia (NOD clinically. Aim. To analyze the HRIM parameter results of NOD patients and evaluate the characteristics of their esophageal motility and transit function. Methods. In total, 58 NOD patients were assessed and the clinical diagnoses were determined. HRIM was performed, and both conventional high-resolution manometry and esophageal transit parameters were analyzed. Results. In 58 NOD patients, 28 patients had achalasia, 3 esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, and 20 nonspecific esophageal motility disorders, and 7 were normal. Impedance results demonstrated that all the patients with achalasia exhibited incomplete esophageal transit (ICET, three patients with esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction showed ICET, and the average bolus transit time (BTT was 6.6 ± 1.2 sec. In 20 nonspecific esophageal motility disorders, 13 patients with gastroenterologly reflux disease (GERD presented ineffective esophageal motility and fragmented peristalsis, and 65.0% swallows had exhibited ICET. However, 49.1% swallows of 7 nonspecific esophageal motility disorder patients with non-GERD had exhibited ICET. The average BTT in 13 GERD patients was longer than that in the non-GERD patients (8.1 ± 1.1 sec versus 5.5 ± 0.3 sec, P<0.05. And in the seven patients with normal esophagus function, 3.5% swallows showed ICET and BTT was 5.6 ± 0.3 sec. Conclusion. Achalasia was the most common esophageal dysmotility in NOD patients, followed by nonspecific esophageal motility disorders. The clinical diagnoses of NOD were mostly achalasia and GERD. Impedance assessments showed that all achalasia cases exhibited ICET, and other esophageal motility abnormalities that

  7. Spontaneous swallow frequency compared with clinical screening in the identification of dysphagia in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare spontaneous swallow frequency analysis (SFA) with clinical screening protocols for identification of dysphagia in acute stroke. In all, 62 patients with acute stroke were evaluated for spontaneous swallow frequency rates using a validated acoustic analysis technique. Independent of SFA, these same patients received a routine nurse-administered clinical dysphagia screening as part of standard stroke care. Both screening tools were compared against a validated clinical assessment of dysphagia for acute stroke. In addition, psychometric properties of SFA were compared against published, validated clinical screening protocols. Spontaneous SFA differentiates patients with versus without dysphagia after acute stroke. Using a previously identified cut point based on swallows per minute, spontaneous SFA demonstrated superior ability to identify dysphagia cases compared with a nurse-administered clinical screening tool. In addition, spontaneous SFA demonstrated equal or superior psychometric properties to 4 validated, published clinical dysphagia screening tools. Spontaneous SFA has high potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke with psychometric properties equal or superior to clinical screening protocols. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of radiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yuri; Niibe, Yuzuru; Terahara, Atsuro; Shimada, Hideaki; Yajima, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively assess the efficacy of radiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia due to the primary lesion at our institute, by evaluating change of Mellow-Pinkas-dysphagia score and subjective symptom. We confarmed radiotherapy for esophageal cancer help improve dysphagia. Change of Mel-low-Pinkas-dysphagia score throughout radiotherapy did not match with change of subjective dysphagia, which have relevancy to patients' quality of life. New evaluation criterion is required. (author)

  9. Environmental Tools and Radiological Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation details two tools (SADA and FRAMES) available for use in environmental assessments of chemicals that can also be used for radiological assessments of the environment. Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is a Windows freeware program that incorporate...

  10. Development and validation of the brief esophageal dysphagia questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, T H; Riehl, M; Sodikoff, J B; Kahrilas, P J; Keefer, L; Doerfler, B; Pandolfino, J E

    2016-12-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is common in gastroenterology practice and has multiple etiologies. A complication for some patients with dysphagia is food impaction. A valid and reliable questionnaire to rapidly evaluate esophageal dysphagia and impaction symptoms can aid the gastroenterologist in gathering information to inform treatment approach and further evaluation, including endoscopy. 1638 patients participated over two study phases. 744 participants completed the Brief Esophageal Dysphagia Questionnaire (BEDQ) for phase 1; 869 completed the BEDQ, Visceral Sensitivity Index, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for phase 2. Demographic and clinical data were obtained via the electronic medical record. The BEDQ was evaluated for internal consistency, split-half reliability, ceiling and floor effects, and construct validity. The BEDQ demonstrated excellent internal consistency, reliability, and construct validity. The symptom frequency and severity scales scored above the standard acceptable cutoffs for reliability while the impaction subscale yielded poor internal consistency and split-half reliability; thus the impaction items were deemed qualifiers only and removed from the total score. No significant ceiling or floor effects were found with the exception of 1 item, and inter-item correlations fell within accepted ranges. Construct validity was supported by moderate yet significant correlations with other measures. The predictive ability of the BEDQ was small but significant. The BEDQ represents a rapid, reliable, and valid assessment tool for esophageal dysphagia with food impaction for clinical practice that differentiates between patients with major motor dysfunction and mechanical obstruction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Acute Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Faezeh Asadollahpour; Kowsar Baghban; Mojgan Asadi; Ehsan Naderifar; Maryam Dehghani

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of different kinds of swallowing disorder and it’s severity in patients after stroke. Patients and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 91 consecutive stroke patients were screened by the Northwestern Dysphagia Patient Check Sheet (NDPCS) and the Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). Results: Forty seven percent of those assessed demonstrated signs of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Mild dysphagia was seen in (10.98%) pat...

  12. Dysphagia in children with repaired oesophageal atresia

    OpenAIRE

    Coppens, C.H.; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Scharbatke, H.E.; Groot, S.A. de; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in children with repaired oesophageal atresia (OA). Abnormalities in the oropharyngeal and oesophageal phase have hardly been studied. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of dysphagia in children with repaired OA and to identify and differentiate oral and pharyngeal dysphagia based on videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) findings in a limited number of children in this cohort. Medical records of 111 patients, born between January 1996 and July ...

  13. [Transdisciplinary approach for sarcopenia. Sarcopenic Dysphagia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka

    2014-10-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is difficulty swallowing due to sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles. Presbyphagia refers to age-related changes in the swallowing mechanism in the elderly associated with a frailty in swallowing. Presbyphagia is different from dysphagia. The most common cause of dysphagia is stroke. However, sarcopenic dysphagia may be common in the elderly with sarcopenia and dysphagia. Frail elderly with aspiration pneumonia can simultaneously experience activity-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles, resulting in the development of sarcopenic dysphagia. Consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenic dysphagia were proposed at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Dysphagia Rehabilitation. The concept of rehabilitation nutrition as a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management is useful for treatment of sarcopenic dysphagia. Therapy for sarcopenic dysphagia includes dysphagia rehabilitation, nutrition improvement and sarcopenia treatment. The core components of dysphagia rehabilitation are oral health care, rehabilitative techniques, and food modification. Nutrition improvement is important, because malnutrition contributes to the etiology of secondary sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia. Assessment of the multi-factorial causes of primary and secondary sarcopenia is important because rehabilitation nutrition for sarcopenia differs depending on its etiology. Treatment of age-related sarcopenia should include resistance training and dietary supplements of amino acids. Therapy for activity-related sarcopenia includes reduced bed rest time and early mobilization and physical activity. Treatment for disease-related sarcopenia requires therapies for advanced organ failure, inflammatory disease, or malignancy, while therapy for nutrition-related sarcopenia involves appropriate nutrition management to increase muscle mass.

  14. Dysphagia in children with repaired oesophageal atresia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppens, C.H.; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Scharbatke, H.E.; Groot, S.A. de; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in children with repaired oesophageal atresia (OA). Abnormalities in the oropharyngeal and oesophageal phase have hardly been studied. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of dysphagia in children with repaired OA and to identify and differentiate oral

  15. Structural cause of dysphagia detected during videofluoroscopic swallow study

    OpenAIRE

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong; Kabuto, Syu

    2017-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Dysphagia can be caused by many different underlying conditions. The assessment and management of dysphagia depend on each individual patient, often requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Structural cause of dysphagia can be dealt with using endoscopic interventions before the patient's general status deteriorates.

  16. Tools for Microbiological risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassett, john; Nauta, Maarten; Lindqvist, Roland

    can increase the understanding of microbiological risks in foods. It is timely to inform food safety professionals about the availability and utility of MRA tools. Therefore, the focus of this report is to aid the food safety manager by providing a concise summary of the tools available for the MRA......Microbiological Risk Assessment (MRA) has emerged as a comprehensive and systematic approach for addressing the risk of pathogens in specific foods and/or processes. At government level, MRA is increasingly recognised as a structured and objective approach to understand the level of risk in a given...... food/pathogen scenario. Tools developed so far support qualitative and quantitative assessments of the risk that a food pathogen poses to a particular population. Risk can be expressed as absolute numbers or as relative (ranked) risks. The food industry is beginning to appreciate that the tools for MRA...

  17. Assessment of early and late dysphagia using videofluoroscopy and quality of life questionnaires in patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yirmibeşoğlu Erkal, Eda; Canoğlu, Doğu; Kaya, Ahmet; Aksu, Görkem; Sarper, Binnaz; Akansel, Gür; Meydancı, Tülay; Erkal, Haldun Şükrü

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dysphagia in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy using objective and subjective tools simultaneously and to associate the clinical correlates of dysphagia with dosimetric parameters. Twenty patients were included in the study. The primary tumor and the involved lymph nodes (LN) were treated with 66-70 Gy, the uninvolved LN were treated with 46-50 Gy. Six swallowing structures were identified: the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (SPCM), the middle pharyngeal constrictor muscle (MPCM), the inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (IPCM), the base of tongue (BOT), the larynx and the proximal esophageal sphincter (PES). Dysphagia was evaluated using videofluoroscopy and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QoL questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and supplemental EORTC QoL module for HNC (QLQ-H&N35). The evaluations were performed before treatment, at 3 months and at 6 months following treatment. On objective evaluation, the D max for the larynx and the sub-structures of the PCM were correlated with impaired lingual movement, BOT weakness and proximal esophageal stricture at 3 months, whereas the V 65 , the V 70 and the D max for the larynx was correlated with BOT weakness and the V 65 , the V 70 , the D max or the D mean for the sub-structures of the PCM were correlated with impaired lingual movement, BOT weakness, reduced laryngeal elevation, reduced epiglottic inversion and aspiration at 6 months following treatment. On subjective evaluation, the V 60 , the D max and the D mean for SPCM were correlated with QoL scores for HNSO at 3 months, whereas the V 70 for SPCM were correlated with QoL scores for HNPA and the V 60 , the V 65 , the V 70 , the D max and the D mean for SPCM were correlated with QoL scores for HNSO at 6 months following treatment. The use of multiple dysphagia-related endpoints to complement eachother rather than to overlap with

  18. Videofluoroscopic assessment of dysphagia: A questionnaire survey of protocols, roles and responsibilities of radiology and speech and language therapy personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, Maxine; Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Kasthuri, Ram S.; Nicholson, David A.; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2006-01-01

    Videofluoroscopy (VF) is the 'gold standard' assessment for oropharyngeal dysphagia and radiographers are beginning to direct this examination independently, yet little is known about the roles and responsibilities of the core professions of radiology and speech and language therapy and their practice in this examination. Aim: To evaluate VF practice and identify the roles and responsibilities of radiology and speech and language therapy personnel. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was developed and distributed to speech and language therapists (SALT) and radiologists via national special interest networks. Information regarding protocols, test materials, supervision, radiation protection and training was obtained. Results: One hundred and thirteen questionnaires were completed, 83% of respondents had more than 5 years service. Most were carrying out VF on an 'ad hoc' basis with only 32% participating in more than 6 assessments per month. There was no consensus on protocol and 41% chose to thicken barium solutions by adding more barium sulphate powder, potentially predisposing patients to complications. Over 50% of SALTs had received one day post-graduate training in VF, whereas, only one radiologist had specific VF training. Conclusion: Despite its importance in determining the feeding route for patients, VF is carried out infrequently by most clinicians and protocols vary widely. Moreover, intra- and inter-disciplinary training and supervision is minimal. More work is needed to develop standard guidelines, to improve the quality of the examination and its reproducibility

  19. Environmental impact assessment screening tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    An environmental assessment and impact planning software, SCREENER, was tested at a pilot project at the Cameco site (Port Hope). SCREENER was used to screen the impacts of a new construction project in accordance with the process and reporting requirements laid out in the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. The software test concentrated on the activities that are directly involved with the structure construction and site preparation activities. In addition, a two and one half day training course was given to three AECB staff using the test case as a hands on example. The conclusion of this project is that an automated tool such as SCREENER (or Calyx, the new generation of environmental assessment tools from ESSA Software Ltd.), will help the AECB to standardize the approach to environmental assessment, assist in project planning, and save resources in the screening process. The new approach could allow to allocate AECB limited resources to the detailed assessments required for maximum impact activities. 2 figs. 7 refs.

  20. Environmental impact assessment screening tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    An environmental assessment and impact planning software, SCREENER, was tested at a pilot project at the Cameco site (Port Hope). SCREENER was used to screen the impacts of a new construction project in accordance with the process and reporting requirements laid out in the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. The software test concentrated on the activities that are directly involved with the structure construction and site preparation activities. In addition, a two and one half day training course was given to three AECB staff using the test case as a hands on example. The conclusion of this project is that an automated tool such as SCREENER (or Calyx, the new generation of environmental assessment tools from ESSA Software Ltd.), will help the AECB to standardize the approach to environmental assessment, assist in project planning, and save resources in the screening process. The new approach could allow to allocate AECB limited resources to the detailed assessments required for maximum impact activities

  1. Dysphagia following stroke: evaluation with digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Sung Nam; Kang, Heoung Keun; Joo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Chang Il; Park, Soo Min; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Seo, Jeong Jin; Chung, Tae Woong

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of digital radiography in the assessment of dysphagia following stroke. Eighteen stroke patients (8 men, 10 women) referred for dysphagia and ten controls without known pharyngeal swallowing difficulty underwent digital radiography using a 1:1 mixture of barium and water. We evaluated oropharyngeal transit time and the location and severity of dysphagia; transit time was defined as the time from the first movement of the bolus to the return of the epiglottis to its original position. We sought to observe specific patterns of oropharyngeal dysfunction; dysphagia was classified as mild, moderate, or severe. The dynamic image of the pharynx, as seen on a digital radiograph, may be diagnostically useful for defining the location and severity of dysphagia; in order to make feeding recommendations, this information is essential. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs

  2. Dysphagia following stroke: evaluation with digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Sung Nam; Kang, Heoung Keun; Joo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Chang Il; Park, Soo Min; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Seo, Jeong Jin; Chung, Tae Woong [Chonnam Univ., Kwanju (Korea, Republic of). Medical School

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of digital radiography in the assessment of dysphagia following stroke. Eighteen stroke patients (8 men, 10 women) referred for dysphagia and ten controls without known pharyngeal swallowing difficulty underwent digital radiography using a 1:1 mixture of barium and water. We evaluated oropharyngeal transit time and the location and severity of dysphagia; transit time was defined as the time from the first movement of the bolus to the return of the epiglottis to its original position. We sought to observe specific patterns of oropharyngeal dysfunction; dysphagia was classified as mild, moderate, or severe. The dynamic image of the pharynx, as seen on a digital radiograph, may be diagnostically useful for defining the location and severity of dysphagia; in order to make feeding recommendations, this information is essential. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs.

  3. High nutrition risk is associated with higher risk of dysphagia in advanced age adults newly admitted to hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popman, Amy; Richter, Marilize; Allen, Jacqueline; Wham, Carol

    2018-02-01

    To establish the prevalence of nutrition risk and associated risk factors among adults of advanced age newly admitted to hospital. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in adults aged over 85 years admitted to one of two hospital wards in Auckland within the previous 5 days. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to establish participant's socio-demographic and health characteristics. Markers of body composition and muscle strength were collected. Nutrition risk was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF), dysphagia risk using the 10-Item Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and level of cognition using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. A total of 88 participants with a mean age of 90.0 ± 3.7 years completed the assessments. A third (28.4%) of the participants were categorised by the MNA-SF as malnourished and 43.2% were classified at risk of malnutrition. A third (29.5%) were at risk of dysphagia as assessed by EAT-10. Malnourished participants were more likely to be at risk of dysphagia (P = 0.015). The MNA-SF score was positively correlated with body mass index (r = 0.484, P strength (r = 0.250, P = 0.026) and negatively correlated with risk of dysphagia (r = -0.383, P strength and negatively correlated with dysphagia risk. Findings highlight the importance of screening for dysphagia risk, especially in those identified to be malnourished or at nutrition risk. © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  4. Employability Skills Assessment Tool Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Rauf, Rose Amnah Abd; Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Puvanasvaran, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Research nationally and internationally found that technical graduates are lacking in employability skills. As employability skills are crucial in outcome-based education, the main goal of this research is to develop an Employability Skill Assessment Tool to help students and lecturers produce competent graduates in employability skills needed by…

  5. Development and validation of a new screening questionnaire for dysphagia in early stages of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Janine A; Fietzek, Urban M; Waldmann, Annika; Warnecke, Tobias; Schuster, Tibor; Ceballos-Baumann, Andrés O

    2014-09-01

    Dysphagia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) significantly reduces quality of life and predicted lifetime. Current screening procedures are insufficiently evaluated. We aimed to develop and validate a patient-reported outcome questionnaire for early diagnosis of dysphagia in patients with PD. The two-phased project comprised the questionnaire, diagnostic scales construction (N = 105), and a validation study (N = 82). Data for the project were gathered from PD patients at a German Movement Disorder Center. For validation purposes, a clinical evaluation focusing on swallowing tests, tests of sensory reflexes, and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) was performed that yielded a criteria sum score against which the results of the questionnaire were compared. Specificity and sensitivity were evaluated for the detection of noticeable dysphagia and for the risk of aspiration. The Munich Dysphagia Test - Parkinson's disease (MDT-PD) consists of 26 items that show high internal consistency (α = 0.91). For the validation study, 82 patients, aged 70.9 ± 8.7 (mean ± SD), with a median Hoehn & Yahr stage of 3, were assessed. 73% of patients had dysphagia with noticeable oropharyngeal symptoms (44%) or with penetration/aspiration (29%). The criteria sum score correlated positively with the screening result (r = 0.70, p dysphagia vs. risk of aspiration (noticeable dysphagia) with a sensitivity of 90% (82%) and a specificity of 86% (71%), and yielded similar results in cross-validation, respectively. MDT-PD is a valid screening tool for early diagnosis of swallowing problems and aspiration risk, as well as initial graduation of dysphagia severity in PD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Probabilistic Flood Defence Assessment Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slomp Robert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The WTI2017 project is responsible for the development of flood defence assessment tools for the 3600 km of Dutch primary flood defences, dikes/levees, dunes and hydraulic structures. These tools are necessary, as per January 1st 2017, the new flood risk management policy for the Netherlands will be implemented. Then, the seven decades old design practice (maximum water level methodology of 1958 and two decades old safety standards (and maximum hydraulic load methodology of 1996 will formally be replaced by a more risked based approach for the national policy in flood risk management. The formal flood defence assessment is an important part of this new policy, especially for flood defence managers, since national and regional funding for reinforcement is based on this assessment. This new flood defence policy is based on a maximum allowable probability of flooding. For this, a maximum acceptable individual risk was determined at 1/100 000 per year, this is the probability of life loss of for every protected area in the Netherlands. Safety standards of flood defences were then determined based on this acceptable individual risk. The results were adjusted based on information from cost -benefit analysis, societal risk and large scale societal disruption due to the failure of critical infrastructure e.g. power stations. The resulting riskbased flood defence safety standards range from a 300 to a 100 000 year return period for failure. Two policy studies, WV21 (Safety from floods in the 21st century and VNK-2 (the National Flood Risk in 2010 provided the essential information to determine the new risk based safety standards for flood defences. The WTI2017 project will provide the safety assessment tools based on these new standards and is thus an essential element for the implementation of this policy change. A major issue to be tackled was the development of user-friendly tools, as the new assessment is to be carried out by personnel of the

  7. [Dysphagia rehabilitation in visiting home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohara, Haruka; Iida, Takatoshi; Inoue, Motoharu; Sato, Mitsuyasu; Wada, Satoko; Sanpei, Ryuichi; Okada, Takeshi; Shimano, Takaya; Ebihara, Katsuko; Ueda, Koichiro

    2010-12-01

    Dysphagia can cause aspiration pneumonia. The condition of dysphagia is difficult to evaluate from outside. Therefore, a careful examination is necessary to grasp the state of swallowing of a patient accurately. However, it has been a difficult situation for a patient who cannot come to hospital for some reason to be examined by video fluoroscopy or video endoscopy. In recent years, a usefulness of video endoscopy in visiting home examination for dysphagia has been reported several times. And this video endoscopy examination is a valuable tool to detect a discrepancy between swallowing function and nutritional intake of the patient. Cooperative rehabilitation with such a careful examination is an important issue to be successful in dysphagia rehabilitation.

  8. Cervical osteophyte induced dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.P.; Sage, M.R.; Brophy, B.P.

    1989-01-01

    Although cervical spondylosis is a common disorder, dysphagia induced by osteophyte formation is uncommon. Fewer than one hundred cases of cervical osteophyte induced dysphagia have been reported, with little attention to the diagnosis by barium swallow. The radiological features of two cases treated surgically with good results are described. Both cases complained of dysphagia while one had associated respiratory obstruction on forward flexion of his neck. The features on barium study of cervical osteophytes causing dysphagia include deformity at the level of osteophyte formation, in both AP and lateral projections. Tracheal aspirations due to deformity at the laryngeal inlet and interference with epiglottic retroversion may be present. 8 refs., 3 figs

  9. DYSPHAGIA AND SIALORRHEA:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Hack NICARETTA

    Full Text Available ContextDysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease.ObjectiveThe aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease.MethodTwo Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by the scintigraphic method,ResultsVideofluoroscopic examination of the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing showed that 94% of Parkinson's diseases patients present, structural causes, not related to Parkinson's diseases, able to produce or intensify the observed disphagia. The scintigraphic examination of Parkinson's diseases patients with sialorrhea showed that there is no increase of serous saliva production. Nevertheless, showed a significantly higher velocity of saliva excretion in the Parkinson's diseases patients.ConclusionsDysphagia can be due to the muscular rigidity often present in the Parkinson's diseases patient, or more usually by non Parkinson's disease associated causes. In Parkinson's diseases patients, sialorrhea is produced by saliva retention. Nevertheless, sialorrhea can produce discomfort in swallowing, although without a formal complaint of dysphagia. In this case, subclinical dysphagia must be considered. Sialorrhea is indicative of dysphagia or at least of subclinical dysphagia. As final conclusion, Parkinson's diseases can be an isolated cause of dysphagia and/or sialorrhea, but frequently, a factor unrelated to Parkinson's diseases is the main cause of or at least aggravates the dysphagia.

  10. Full Implementation of Screening for Nutritional Risk and Dysphagia in an Acute Stroke Unit: A Clinical Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampman, Margitta T; Eltoft, Agnethe; Karaliute, Migle; Børvik, Margrethe T; Nilssen, Hugo; Rasmussen, Ida; Johnsen, Stein H

    2015-10-01

    In patients with acute stroke, undernutrition and aspiration pneumonia are associated with increased mortality and length of hospital stay. Formal screening for nutritional risk and dysphagia helps to ensure optimal nutritional management in all patients with stroke and to reduce the risk of aspiration in patients with dysphagia. We developed a national guideline for nutritional and dysphagia screening in acute stroke, which was introduced in our stroke unit on June 1, 2012. The primary objective was to audit adherence to the guideline and to achieve full implementation. Second, we assessed the prevalence of nutritional risk and dysphagia. We performed a chart review to assess performance of screening for nutritional risk and dysphagia in all patients with stroke hospitalized for ≥48 hours between June 1, 2012, and May 31, 2013. Next we applied a "clinical microsystems approach" with rapid improvement cycles and audits over a 6-month period to achieve full implementation. The chart review showed that nutritional risk screening was performed in 65% and swallow testing in 91% of eligible patients (n = 185). Proactive implementation resulted in >95% patients screened (n = 79). The overall prevalence of nutritional risk was 29%, and 23% of the patients failed the initial swallow test. Proactive implementation is required to obtain high screening rates for nutritional risk and swallowing difficulties using validated screening tools. The proportion of patients at nutritional risk and the prevalence of dysphagia at initial swallow test were in the lower range of previous reports.

  11. Dysphagia after Nissen fundoplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breumelhof, R.; Fellinger, H. W.; Vlasblom, V.; Jansen, A.; Smout, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Nissen fundoplication is a commonly used antireflux operation. After this operation symptoms such as dysphagia, inability to belch and vomit, and gas bloating are frequently reported in the literature. In 32 patients who underwent Nissen fundoplication 3.5-18 years ago, postprocedure dysphagia was

  12. The letter knowledge assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cassandra; Lousada, Marisa; Pereira, Rita; Hall, Andreia; Jesus, Luis M T

    2017-10-10

    There is a need to develop letter knowledge assessment tools to characterise the letter knowledge in Portuguese pre-schoolers and to compare it with pre-schoolers from other countries, but there are no tools for this purpose in Portugal. The aim of this paper is to describe the development and validation procedures of the Prova de Avaliação de Competências de Pré-Literacia (PACPL), which assesses letter knowledge. This study includes data that has been gathered in two phases: pilot and main study. In the pilot study, an expert panel of six speech and language pathologists analysed the instrument. Children (n = 216) aged 5;0-7;11 participated in the main study that reports data related to the psychometric characteristics of the PACPL. Content validity, internal consistency, reliability and contributing factors to performance were examined statistically. A modified Bland-Altman method revealed good agreement amongst evaluators. The main study showed that the PACPL has a very good internal consistency and high inter-rater (96.2% of agreement and a Cohen's k value of 0.92) and intra-rater (95.6% of agreement and a Cohen's k value of 0.91) agreement. Construct validity of the PCAPL was also assured (Cronbach's α of 0.982). Significant differences were found between age groups with children increasing their letter knowledge with age. In addition, they were better at identifying than at producing both letter names and letter sounds. The PACPL is a valid and reliable instrument to assess letter knowledge in Portuguese children.

  13. Treatment Effects for Dysphagia in Adults with Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Dalal; Ballard, Kirrie; Bogaardt, Hans

    2016-10-01

    Dysphagia or swallowing difficulties have been reported to be a concern in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). This problem can result in several complications including aspiration pneumonia, reduced quality of life and an increase in mortality rate. No previous systematic reviews on treatment effects for dysphagia in MS have been published. The main objective of this study is to summarise and qualitatively analyse published studies on treatment effects for dysphagia in MS. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were applied to conduct a systematic search of seven databases, using relevant key words, and subsequent analysis of the identified studies. The studies were required to meet all three inclusion criteria of including a statement on intention to treat, or measure the effects of treatment for dysphagia in adults with MS and data on treatment outcomes for at least one adult diagnosed with MS. Retained studies were evaluated by two independent reviewers using a critical appraisal tool. This study has not been registered. A total of 563 studies were identified from the database searches. After screening and assessment of full articles for eligibility, five studies were included in the review. Three examined electrical stimulation and two examined the use of botulinum toxin. One study testing electrical stimulation was a randomised controlled trial, two were well-designed case series and two were case series lacking experimental control. All studies reported some positive effects on dysphagia; however, treatments that involved the use of electrical stimulation showed larger effect sizes. There is a paucity of evidence to guide treatment of dysphagia in MS, with only electrical stimulation and botulinum toxin treatment represented in the literature search conducted here. While both treatments show initial promise for reducing the swallowing impairment, they require further research using well-controlled experimental

  14. Objective Measures of Swallowing Function Applied to the Dysphagia Population: A One Year Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Katherine A; Ellerston, Julia; Heller, Amanda; Houtz, Daniel R; Zhang, Chong; Presson, Angela P

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative, reliable measures of swallowing physiology can be made from an modified barium swallowing study. These quantitative measures have not been previously employed to study large dysphagic patient populations. The present retrospective study of 139 consecutive patients with dysphagia seen in a university tertiary voice and swallowing clinic sought to use objective measures of swallowing physiology to (1) quantify the most prevalent deficits seen in the patient population, (2) identify commonly associated diagnoses and describe the most prevalent swallowing deficits, and (3) determine any correlation between objective deficits and Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) scores and body mass index. Poor pharyngeal constriction (34.5 %) and airway protection deficits (65.5 %) were the most common swallowing abnormalities. Reflux-related dysphagia (36 %), nonspecific pharyngeal dysphagia (24 %), Parkinson disease (16 %), esophageal abnormality (13 %), and brain insult (10 %) were the most common diagnoses. Poor pharyngeal constriction was significantly associated with an esophageal motility abnormality (p dysphagia symptoms as determined by the EAT-10 did not correlate with swallowing function abnormalities. This preliminary study indicates that reflux disease is common in patients with dysphagia and that associated esophageal abnormalities are common in dysphagic populations and may be associated with specific pharyngeal swallowing abnormalities. However, symptom scores from the EAT-10 did not correspond to swallowing pathophysiology.

  15. Validity and Reliability of the Persian Version of the Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahpour, Faezeh; Baghban, Kowsar; Asadi, Mozhgan

    2015-05-01

    The Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI) is one of the instruments used for measuring a dysphagic patient's self-assessment. In some ways, it reflects the patient's quality of life. Although it has been recognized and widely applied in English speaking populations, it has not been used in its present forms in Persian speaking countries. The purpose of this study was to adapt a Persian version of the DHI and to evaluate its validity, consistency, and reliability in the Persian population with oropharyngeal dysphagia. Some stages for cross-cultural adaptation were performed, which consisted in translation, synthesis, back translation, review by an expert committee, and final proof reading. The generated Persian DHI was administered to 85 patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia and 89 control subjects at Zahedan city between May 2013 and August 2013. The patients and control subjects answered the same questionnaire 2 weeks later to verify the test-retest reliability. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were evaluated. The results of the patients and the control group were compared. The Persian DHI showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficients range from 0.82 to 0.94). Also, good test-retest reliability was found for the total scores of the Persian DHI (r=0.89). There was a significant difference between the DHI scores of the control group and those of the oropharyngeal dysphagia group (P‹0.001). The Persian version of the DHI achieved Face and translation validity. This study demonstrated that the Persian DHI is a valid tool for self-assessment of the handicapping effects of dysphagia on the physical, functional, and emotional aspects of patient life and can be a useful tool for screening and treatment planning for the Persian-speaking dysphagic patients, regardless of the cause or the severity of the dysphagia.

  16. Validity and Reliability of the Persian Version of the Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    faezeh asadollahpour

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI is one of the instruments used for measuring a dysphagic patient’s self-assessment. In some ways, it reflects the patient’s quality of life. Although it has been recognized and widely applied in English speaking populations, it has not been used in its present forms in Persian speaking countries. The purpose of this study was to adapt a Persian version of the DHI and to evaluate its validity, consistency, and reliability in the Persian population with oropharyngeal dysphagia.   Materials and Methods: Some stages for cross-cultural adaptation were performed, which consisted in translation, synthesis, back translation, review by an expert committee, and final proof reading. The generated Persian DHI was administered to 85 patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia and 89 control subjects at Zahedan city between May 2013 and August 2013. The patients and control subjects answered the same questionnaire 2 weeks later to verify the test-retest reliability. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were evaluated. The results of the patients and the control group were compared.   Results: The Persian DHI showed good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficients range from 0.82 to 0.94. Also, good test-retest reliability was found for the total scores of the Persian DHI (r=0.89. There was a significant difference between the DHI scores of the control group and those of the oropharyngeal dysphagia group (P‹0.001.   Conclusion:  The Persian version of the DHI achieved Face and translation validity. This study demonstrated that the Persian DHI is a valid tool for self-assessment of the handicapping effects of dysphagia on the physical, functional, and emotional aspects of patient life and can be a useful tool for screening and treatment planning for the Persian-speaking dysphagic patients, regardless of the cause or the severity of the dysphagia.

  17. Utility of Eating Assessment Tool-10 in Predicting Aspiration in Patients with Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Steven A; Ebersole, Barbara; Jamal, Nausheen

    2018-03-01

    Objective Examine the incidence of penetration/aspiration in patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility and investigate the relationship with self-reported perception of dysphagia. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Academic cancer center. Subjects and Methods Adult patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility diagnosed between 2014 and 2016 were reviewed. Patients were stratified into an aspiration group and a nonaspiration group using objective findings on flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, as scored using Rosenbek's Penetration Aspiration Scale. Objective findings were compared to patient perception of dysphagia. Bivariate linear correlation analysis was performed to evaluate correlation between Eating Assessment Tool-10 scores and presence of aspiration. Tests of diagnostic accuracy were calculated to investigate the predictive value of Eating Assessment Tool-10 scores >9 on aspiration risk. Results Of the 35 patients with new-onset unilateral vocal fold immobility were evaluated, 25.7% (9/35) demonstrated tracheal aspiration. Mean ± SD Eating Assessment Tool-10 scores were 19.2 ± 13.7 for aspirators and 7.0 ± 7.8 for nonaspirators ( P = .016). A statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between increasing Eating Assessment Tool-10 scores and Penetration Aspiration Scale scores ( r = 0.511, P = .002). Diagnostic accuracy analysis for aspiration risk in patients with an Eating Assessment Tool-10 score >9 revealed a sensitivity of 77.8% and a specificity of 73.1%. Conclusion Patient perception of swallowing difficulty may have utility in predicting aspiration risk. An EAT-10 of >9 in patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility may portend up to a 5 times greater risk of aspiration. Routine swallow testing to assess for penetration/aspiration may be indicated in patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility.

  18. Challenges in oral drug delivery in patients with esophageal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappelle, Wouter F W; Siersema, Peter D; Bogte, Auke; Vleggaar, Frank P

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is a commonly reported symptom with various benign and malignant causes. Esophageal dysphagia can impede intake of oral medication, which often poses a major challenge for both patients and physicians. The best way to address this challenge depends of the cause of dysphagia. The pathophysiology of esophageal dysphagia is discussed, diagnostic tools to determine its cause are reviewed and recent developments in the treatment of esophageal dysphagia are discussed. Alternative options to administer medication in dysphagia are discussed and the appropriateness of them reviewed. Two ways can be followed to allow medication intake in patients with esophageal dysphagia, i.e. altering medication or resolving dysphagia. The latter is generally preferred, since esophageal dysphagia rarely only impedes medication intake. Esophageal resection is possible in more advanced esophageal cancer stages due to advances in neo-adjuvant therapy. Due to recent improvements in intraluminal radiotherapy, it can be expected that this will be the primary treatment in a palliative setting. Temporary self-expandable metal stent placement is a promising new alternative for bougienage in difficult-to-treat benign strictures.

  19. [Awareness of dysphagia in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés-Rusiñol, Àngels; Forjaz, Maria J; Ayala, Alba; Crespo, M de la Cruz; Prats, Anna; Valles, Esther; Petit, Cristina; Casanovas, Mercè; Garolera-Freixa, Maite

    2011-12-01

    In order to be able to assess the level of awareness of swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD), a specific questionnaire was designed and validated: the Dysphapark questionnaire. A total of 470 persons with PD were asked whether they believe they have problems swallowing or not, and then they filled in a self-administered questionnaire that evaluates the effectiveness and safety of swallowing. The Dysphapark questionnaire was validated by means of Rasch analysis and classical psychometric methods. The safety and effectiveness dimensions of the Dysphapark fit the Rasch model well. The efficacy dimension showed significant differences for gender, length of the illness, awareness of dysphagia and length of meals. Significant differences were also found in the safety dimension for length and severity of illness, awareness of dysphagia, speech therapy and knowledge of thickening agents. Despite the fact that 90% of patients had problems concerning effectiveness and safety in swallowing, 79.45% were not aware that they suffered from dysphagia. The Dysphapark questionnaire is a suitable measure of dysphagia in PD, according to the Rasch analysis. A high proportion of patients with PD have dysphagia, although it has been observed that they have a low level of awareness of the condition, of the consequences it may have and of the possibility of using thickening agents. Given that some of the swallowing disorders in PD are asymptomatic and that the level of awareness of the disorder is low, we recommend including specific questionnaires as well as clinical and instrumental evaluation of dysphagia in clinical practice.

  20. [Dysphagia and swallowing rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Fujishima, Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Dysphagia is a life-threatening disorder caused by many medical conditions such as stroke, neurological disorders, tumors, etc. The symptoms of dysphagia are quite variable and diagnosed by observation or through screening involving instrumental swallowing examinations such as video-fluoroscopy and video-endoscopy, to determine functional severity and treatment-prognosis. Direct- and indirect-therapy is used with and without food, respectively. Swallowing rehabilitation is very effective, and could be used in conjunction with compensatory techniques. Here we present an overview of dysphagia and swallowing rehabilitation.

  1. Dysphagia in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients are inherently predisposed to dysphagia predominately because of comorbid health conditions. With the aging of the population in the United States, along with the increased prevalence of obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease, healthcare providers will increasingly encounter older patients with either oropharyngeal or esophageal disease and complaints of dysphagia. Useful tests to evaluate dysphagia include the videofluoroscopic swallowing study and the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Swallow rehabilitation is useful to help patients compensate for swallowing difficulty and ultimately help strengthen the neuromusculature involved in swallowing. PMID:24772045

  2. Dysphagia (Difficulty Swallowing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some of the causes of esophageal dysphagia include: Achalasia. When your lower esophageal muscle (sphincter) doesn't ... into your esophagus and cause frequent heartburn. Radiation therapy. This cancer treatment can lead to inflammation and ...

  3. Calculational Tool for Skin Contamination Dose Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R L

    2002-01-01

    Spreadsheet calculational tool was developed to automate the calculations preformed for dose assessment of skin contamination. This document reports on the design and testing of the spreadsheet calculational tool.

  4. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11/12/2014 Risk Calculator About the Tool Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors Download SAS and Gauss Code Page ... Rectal Cancer: Prevention, Genetics, Causes Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps Cancer Risk Prediction Resources Update November ...

  5. Diagnostic value of "dysphagia limit" for neurogenic dysphagia: 17 years of experience in 1278 adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Kiylioglu, Nefati; Tarlaci, Sultan; Tanriverdi, Zeynep; Alpaydin, Sezin; Acarer, Ahmet; Baysal, Leyla; Arpaci, Esra; Yuceyar, Nur; Secil, Yaprak; Ozdemirkiran, Tolga; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2015-03-01

    Neurogenic dysphagia (ND) is a prevalent condition that accounts for significant mortality and morbidity worldwide. Screening and follow-up are critical for early diagnosis and management which can mitigate its complications and be cost-saving. The aims of this study are to provide a comprehensive investigation of the dysphagia limit (DL) in a large diverse cohort and to provide a longitudinal assessment of dysphagia in a subset of subjects. We developed a quantitative and noninvasive method for objective assessment of dysphagia by using laryngeal sensor and submental electromyography. DL is the volume at which second or more swallows become necessary to swallow the whole amount of bolus. This study represents 17 years experience with the DL approach in assessing ND in a cohort of 1278 adult subjects consisting of 292 healthy controls, 784 patients with dysphagia, and 202 patients without dysphagia. A total of 192 of all patients were also reevaluated longitudinally over a period of 1-19 months. DL has 92% sensitivity, 91% specificity, 94% positive predictive value, and 88% negative predictive value with an accuracy of 0.92. Patients with ALS, stroke, and movement disorders have the highest sensitivity (85-97%) and positive predictive value (90-99%). The clinical severity of dysphagia has significant negative correlation with DL (r=-0.67, pdysphagia and it can be performed in an EMG laboratory. Our study provides specific quantitative features of DL test that can be readily utilized by the neurologic community and nominates DL as an objective and robust method to evaluate dysphagia in a wide range of neurologic conditions. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Oral muscles are progressively affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy : Implications for dysphagia treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bert de Swart; W. Klein; L. van den Engel-Hoek; S. Pillen; J. Hendriks; Alexander Geurts; I. de Groot; L. Sie; C. Erasmus

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is reported in advanced stages of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The population of DMD is changing due to an increasing survival. We aimed to describe the dysphagia in consecutive stages and to assess the underlying mechanisms of dysphagia in DMD, in order to develop mechanism based

  7. Oral muscles are progressively affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: implications for dysphagia treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Erasmus, C.E.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Klein, W.M.; Pillen, S.; Sie, L.T.L.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia is reported in advanced stages of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The population of DMD is changing due to an increasing survival. We aimed to describe the dysphagia in consecutive stages and to assess the underlying mechanisms of dysphagia in DMD, in order to develop mechanism based

  8. Air Traffic Control Tools Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Noskievič

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Undoubtedly air transport in today’s world wouldn’t be able to exist without any air traffic control service. As the air transport has been coming through major changes and it has been expanding, it is assumed that its volume will be doubled in the next 15 years. Air traffic control uses strictly organised procedures to ensure safe course of air operations. With the skies covered with more airplanes every year, new tools must be introduced to allow the controllers to manage this rising amount of flying aircraft and to keep the air transport safe. This paper provides a comprehensive and organized material, which describes the newest tools and systems used by air traffic control officers. It proposes improvements for further research and development of ATC tools.

  9. The Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation Approach Applied to Patients With Neurogenic Dysphagia: A Case Series Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandraki, Georgia A; Rajappa, Akila; Kantarcigil, Cagla; Wagner, Elise; Ivey, Chandra; Youse, Kathleen

    2016-04-01

    To examine the effects of the Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation approach on physiological and functional swallowing outcomes in adults with neurogenic dysphagia. Intervention study; before-after trial with 4-week follow-up through an online survey. Outpatient university clinics. A consecutive sample of subjects (N=10) recruited from outpatient university clinics. All subjects were diagnosed with adult-onset neurologic injury or disease. Dysphagia diagnosis was confirmed through clinical and endoscopic swallowing evaluations. No subjects withdrew from the study. Participants completed the 4-week Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation protocol, including 2 oropharyngeal exercise regimens, a targeted swallowing routine using salient stimuli, and caregiver participation. Treatment included hourly sessions twice per week and home practice for approximately 45 min/d. Outcome measures assessed pre- and posttreatment included airway safety using an 8-point Penetration Aspiration Scale, lingual isometric pressures, self-reported swallowing-related quality of life (QOL), and level of oral intake. Also, patients were monitored for adverse dysphagia-related effects. QOL and adverse effects were also assessed at the 4-week follow-up (online survey). The Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation approach was effective in improving maximum and mean Penetration Aspiration Scale scores (PDysphagia Rehabilitation approach was safe and improved physiological and some functional swallowing outcomes in our sample; however, further investigation is needed before it can be widely applied. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dysphagia in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: prevalence and clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoppolo, G; Schettino, I; Frasca, V; Giacomelli, E; Prosperini, L; Cambieri, C; Roma, R; Greco, A; Mancini, P; De Vincentiis, M; Silani, V; Inghilleri, M

    2013-12-01

    To characterize swallowing deficits in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); investigate the delay in dysphagia onset; estimate correlations between dysphagia severity and patients' functional status; identify the symptom(s) most likely to predict dysphagia. A group of 49 consecutive patients with ALS, 14 with bulbar onset and 35 with spinal onset, underwent swallowing evaluation including bedside and fiberoptic endoscopic examination to detect dysphagia. Patients with dysphagia were more likely than those without to have bulbar onset ALS (P = 0.02); more severely impaired chewing (P = 0.01); and tongue muscle deficits (P = 0.001). The only variable measured at first examination significantly associated with dysphagia was a more than mild tongue muscle deficit. The only variable useful in predicting dysphagia was a chewing deficit. In 10 of the 49 patients studied, swallowing evaluation disclosed an impaired cough reflex. Dysphagia in patients with ALS correlates significantly with bulbar onset and with oral swallowing impairment. Fiberoptic swallowing evaluation is a useful tool for detecting swallowing deficits and laryngeal sensitivity in patients with ALS. An impaired cough reflex is an unexpected finding in many patients with ALS. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Frailty measurements and dysphagia in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Bridget; Vaezi, Alec; Egloff, Ann Marie; Smith, Libby; Wasserman-Wincko, Tamara; Johnson, Jonas T

    2014-09-01

    Deconditioning and frailty may contribute to dysphagia and aspiration. Early identification of patients at risk of aspiration is important. Aspiration prevention would lead to reduced morbidity and health care costs. We therefore wondered whether objective measurements of frailty could help identify patients at risk for dysphagia and aspiration. Consecutive patients (n = 183) were enrolled. Patient characteristics and objective measures of frailty were recorded prospectively. Variables tested included age, body mass index, grip strength, and 5 meter walk pace. Statistical analysis tested for association between these parameters and dysphagia or aspiration, diagnosed by instrumental swallowing examination. Of variables tested for association with grip strength, only age category (P = .003) and ambulatory status (P dysphagia or aspiration, ambulatory status was significantly associated with dysphagia and aspiration in multivariable model building. Nonambulatory status is a predictor of aspiration and should be included in risk assessments for dysphagia. The relationship between frailty and dysphagia deserves further investigation. Frailty assessments may help identify those at risk for complications of dysphagia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Dysphagia in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlgemuth, M.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Kalf, J.G.; Joosten, F.B.M.; Vliet, A.M. van der; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Dysphagia is not considered a symptom of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In this study, the authors found that dysphagia does occur in patients with advanced FSHD showing mild involvement of the jaw and lingual muscles. Dysphagia is seldom life threatening in these patients. The

  13. Efficiency of cineradiography in the diagnosis of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelerich, M.; Mai, R.; Mueller-Miny, H.; Peters, P.E.

    1995-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom in clinical practice. Due to the broad spectrum of underlying diseases many disciplines are involved in the therapy and diagnosis of dysphagia, where radiology plays a central role. The radiologist is confronted with different diagnostic problems and has to choose the most appropriate type of investigation. In many cases no organic disorder can be demonstrated by clinical examination, endoscopy or conventional radiological techniques. In this setting cineradiography is an outstanding tool for finding functional or structural changes in the swallowing chain. This study underlines the efficiency of cineradiography in the diagnosis of dysphagia. (orig.) [de

  14. [Efficacy of high-frequency cinematography in diagnosis of dysphagia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelerich, M; Mai, R; Müller-Miny, H; Peters, P E

    1995-10-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom in clinical practice. Due to the broad spectrum of underlying diseases many disciplines are involved in the therapy and diagnosis of dysphagia, where radiology plays a central role. The radiologist is confronted with different diagnostic problems and has to choose the most appropriate type of investigation. In many cases no organic disorder can be demonstrated by clinical examination, endoscopy or conventional radiological techniques. In this setting cineradiography is an outstanding tool for finding functional or structural changes in the swallowing chain. This study underlines the efficiency of cineradiography in the diagnosis of dysphagia.

  15. Dysphagia in Multiple Sclerosis: Evaluation and Validation of the DYMUS Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Dalal; Ballard, Kirrie; Vucic, Steve; Bogaardt, Hans

    2018-06-01

    The 10-item Dysphagia in Multiple Sclerosis (DYMUS) questionnaire is a self-administered tool used to identify swallowing problems in adults with MS. The questionnaire was not validated against other existing questionnaires to assess its convergent validity. Moreover, its test-retest reliability was not measured previously. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the factor analysis, internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the DYMUS, as well as its convergent validity against an established and validated questionnaire, the EAT-10. English-speaking adults with MS in New South Wales, Australia who were seen for routine medical check-ups were invited to complete two questionnaires across two phases. One hundred participants completed phase 1, while 55 completed phase 2. Statistical analyses were performed to investigate the psychometric properties of the DYMUS questionnaire. Internal consistency (Cronbach's Alpha) reduced the DYMUS questionnaire from ten to five items. The shortened version of the DYMUS showed high internal consistency (alpha = 0.904). It also showed satisfactory reproducibility, and adequate correlation with the 10-item Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10). Evaluation of the DYMUS resulted in a shortened version of the questionnaire with five questions related to dysphagia. This shortened version is considered an easy and useful tool in identifying patients with MS-related dysphagia.

  16. Dysphagia in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk-van den Berg, Willemien Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with an autosomal, dominant mode of inheritance. Patients with HD suffer from dysphagia which can have serious consequences, such as weight loss, dehydration, and pneumonia leading to death. Many patients with HD die of aspiration

  17. The reliability and validity of cervical auscultation in the diagnosis of dysphagia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, Marloes L J; Kamalski, Digna M A; van den Engel-Hoek, Lenie

    2016-02-01

    To systematically review the available evidence for the reliability and validity of cervical auscultation in diagnosing the several aspects of dysphagia in adults and children suffering from dysphagia. Medline (PubMed), Embase and the Cochrane Library databases. The systematic review was carried out applying the steps of the PRISMA-statement. The methodological quality of the included studies were evaluated using the Dutch 'Cochrane checklist for diagnostic accuracy studies'. A total of 90 articles were identified through the search strategy, and after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, six articles were included in this review. In the six studies, 197 patients were assessed with cervical auscultation. Two of the six articles were considered to be of 'good' quality and three studies were of 'moderate' quality. One article was excluded because of a 'poor' methodological quality. Sensitivity ranges from 23%-94% and specificity ranges from 50%-74%. Inter-rater reliability was 'poor' or 'fair' in all studies. The intra-rater reliability shows a wide variance among speech language therapists. In this systematic review, conflicting evidence is found for the validity of cervical auscultation. The reliability of cervical auscultation is insufficient when used as a stand-alone tool in the diagnosis of dysphagia in adults. There is no available evidence for the validity and reliability of cervical auscultation in children. Cervical auscultation should not be used as a stand-alone instrument to diagnose dysphagia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Systemic Assessment as a New Tool for Assessing Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic Assessment as a New Tool for Assessing Students Learning in Chemistry using SATL Methods: Systemic Matching, Systemic Synthesis, Systemic Analysis, Systemic Synthetic – Analytic, as Systemic Question Types.

  19. Dysphagia in Children with Esophageal Atresia: Current Diagnostic Options

    OpenAIRE

    Rayyan, Maissa; Allegaert, Karel; Omari, Taher; Rommel, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia or swallowing disorder is very common (range, 15-52%) in patients with esophageal atresia. Children present with a wide range of symptoms. The most common diagnostic tools to evaluate esophageal dysphagia, such as upper barium study and manometry, aim to characterize anatomy and function of the esophageal body and the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). Using these technologies, a variety of pathological motor patterns have been identified in children with esophageal atresia. However, t...

  20. Pediatric Eating Assessment Tool-10 as an indicator to predict aspiration in children with esophageal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyer, Tutku; Yalcin, Sule; Arslan, Selen Serel; Demir, Numan; Tanyel, Feridun Cahit

    2017-10-01

    Airway aspiration is a common problem in children with esophageal atresia (EA). Pediatric Eating Assessment Tool-10 (pEAT-10) is a self-administered questionnaire to evaluate dysphagia symptoms in children. A prospective study was performed to evaluate the validity of pEAT-10 to predict aspiration in children with EA. Patients with EA were evaluated for age, sex, type of atresia, presence of associated anomalies, type of esophageal repair, time of definitive treatment, and the beginning of oral feeding. Penetration-aspiration score (PAS) was evaluated with videofluoroscopy (VFS) and parents were surveyed for pEAT-10, dysphagia score (DS) and functional oral intake scale (FOIS). PAS scores greater than 7 were considered as risk of aspiration. EAT-10 values greater than 3 were assessed as abnormal. Higher DS scores shows dysphagia whereas higher FOIS shows better feeding abilities. Forty patients were included. Children with PAS greater than 7 were assessed as PAS+ group, and scores less than 7 were constituted as PAS- group. Demographic features and results of surgical treatments showed no difference between groups (p>0.05). The median values of PAS, pEAT-10 and DS scores were significantly higher in PAS+ group when compared to PAS- group (p<0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of pEAT-10 to predict aspiration were 88% and 77%, and the positive and negative predictive values were 22% and 11%, respectively. Type-C cases had better pEAT-10 and FOIS scores with respect to type-A cases, and both scores were statistically more reliable in primary repair than delayed repair (p<0.05). Among the postoperative complications, only leakage had impact on DS, pEAT-10, PAS and FOIS scores (p<0.05). The pEAT-10 is a valid, simple and reliable tool to predict aspiration in children. Patients with higher pEAT-10 scores should undergo detailed evaluation of deglutitive functions and assessment of risks of aspiration to improve safer feeding strategies. Level II (Development of

  1. Central cholinergic dysfunction could be associated with oropharyngeal dysphagia in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Duck; Koo, Jung Hoi; Song, Sun Hong; Jo, Kwang Deog; Lee, Moon Kyu; Jang, Wooyoung

    2015-11-01

    Dysphagia is an important issue in the prognosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although several studies have reported that oropharyngeal dysphagia may be associated with cognitive dysfunction, the exact relationship between cortical function and swallowing function in PD patients is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between an electrophysiological marker of central cholinergic function, which reflected cognitive function, and swallowing function, as measured by videofluoroscopic studies (VFSS). We enrolled 29 early PD patients. Using the Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire (SDQ), we divided the enrolled patients into two groups: PD with dysphagia and PD without dysphagia. The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) was applied to explore the nature of the dysphagia. To assess central cholinergic dysfunction, short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was evaluated. We analyzed the relationship between central cholinergic dysfunction and oropharyngeal dysphagia and investigated the characteristics of the dysphagia. The SAI values were significantly different between the two groups. The comparison of each VFSS component between the PD with dysphagia group and the PD without dysphagia group showed statistical significance for most of the oral phase components and for a single pharyngeal phase component. The total score on the VDS was higher in the PD with dysphagia group than in the PD without dysphagia group. The Mini-Mental State Examination and SAI values showed significant correlations with the total score of the oral phase components. According to binary logistic regression analysis, SAI value independently contributed to the presence of dysphagia in PD patients. Our findings suggest that cholinergic dysfunction is associated with dysphagia in early PD and that an abnormal SAI value is a good biomarker for predicting the risk of dysphagia in PD patients.

  2. Automated Assessment in a Programming Tools Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Aleman, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Automated assessment systems can be useful for both students and instructors. Ranking and immediate feedback can have a strongly positive effect on student learning. This paper presents an experience using automatic assessment in a programming tools course. The proposal aims at extending the traditional use of an online judging system with a…

  3. Designing Online Assessment Tools for Disengaged Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brader, Andy; Luke, Allan; Klenowski, Val; Connolly, Stephen; Behzadpour, Adib

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the development of online assessment tools for disengaged youth in flexible learning environments. Sociocultural theories of learning and assessment and Bourdieu's sociological concepts of capital and exchange were used to design a purpose-built content management system. This design experiment engaged participants in…

  4. Tools for the Assessment of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2007-01-01

    Assessment tools enable both learning and assessing. They also give library media specialists snapshots of evidence that demonstrates student understanding of the Information Literacy Standards. Over time the evidence provide a more complete picture of learners' ability to gather, evaluate, and use information to solve problems, make decisions,…

  5. Exposure Assessment Tools by Chemical Classes - Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA ExpoBox is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Swallowing Function Between Dysphagia Patients and Healthy Subjects Using High-Resolution Manometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare swallowing function between healthy subjects and patients with pharyngeal dysphagia using high resolution manometry (HRM) and to evaluate the usefulness of HRM for detecting pharyngeal dysphagia. Methods Seventy-five patients with dysphagia and 28 healthy subjects were included in this study. Diagnosis of dysphagia was confirmed by a videofluoroscopy. HRM was performed to measure pressure and timing information at the velopharynx (VP), tongue base (TB), and upper esophageal sphincter (UES). HRM parameters were compared between dysphagia and healthy groups. Optimal threshold values of significant HRM parameters for dysphagia were determined. Results VP maximal pressure, TB maximal pressure, UES relaxation duration, and UES resting pressure were lower in the dysphagia group than those in healthy group. UES minimal pressure was higher in dysphagia group than in the healthy group. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were conducted to validate optimal threshold values for significant HRM parameters to identify patients with pharyngeal dysphagia. With maximal VP pressure at a threshold value of 144.0 mmHg, dysphagia was identified with 96.4% sensitivity and 74.7% specificity. With maximal TB pressure at a threshold value of 158.0 mmHg, dysphagia was identified with 96.4% sensitivity and 77.3% specificity. At a threshold value of 2.0 mmHg for UES minimal pressure, dysphagia was diagnosed at 74.7% sensitivity and 60.7% specificity. Lastly, UES relaxation duration of dysphagia. Conclusion We present evidence that HRM could be a useful evaluation tool for detecting pharyngeal dysphagia. PMID:29201816

  7. An introduction to Item Response Theory and Rasch Analysis of the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Jacob; Brodke, Darrel S; Biber, Joshua; Gross, Paul

    2018-03-01

    Item response theory has its origins in educational measurement and is now commonly applied in health-related measurement of latent traits, such as function and symptoms. This application is due in large part to gains in the precision of measurement attributable to item response theory and corresponding decreases in response burden, study costs, and study duration. The purpose of this paper is twofold: introduce basic concepts of item response theory and demonstrate this analytic approach in a worked example, a Rasch model (1PL) analysis of the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10), a commonly used measure for oropharyngeal dysphagia. The results of the analysis were largely concordant with previous studies of the EAT-10 and illustrate for brain impairment clinicians and researchers how IRT analysis can yield greater precision of measurement.

  8. Dysphagia after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, Peter; Jacobsen, Bo

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency and severity of dysphagia during the first 8 weeks after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. So far, there have been no studies reporting data on day-to-day occurrence of dysphagia after laparoscopic fundoplication...... in a consecutive series of patients. This may explain why the frequency of dysphagia varies greatly in the literature (4-100%). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients, undergoing elective laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication, completed a standard dysphagia registration diary each day during the first 8...... weeks after surgery. Patients who preoperatively had suffered from dysphagia were excluded. Thus, none of the patients had dysphagia in the 2-month period before surgery. Ten patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy served as controls. Data were quantified, and a score value of 4 or more...

  9. Approach to patients with esophageal Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Eubanks, Steve

    2015-06-01

    Patients frequently present to a physician with complaints of difficulty swallowing. The approach to systematically evaluating these problems can be challenging for those who do not manage this type of patient regularly. The potential for life-threatening malignancies is present and makes this evaluation a priority. Numerous excellent tools are available to aid with the determination of the cause of dysphagia and assist with the formulation of a logical treatment algorithm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Monika C.; Leidecker, Henning W.

    2010-01-01

    The Tin Whisker Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool has been designed to evaluate the risk of metal vapor arcing and to help facilitate a decision toward a researched risk disposition. Users can evaluate a system without having to open up the hardware. This process allows for investigating components at risk rather than spending time and money analyzing every component. The tool points to a risk level and provides direction for appropriate action and documentation.

  11. An appraisal of current dysphagia diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaindlstorfer, Adolf; Pointner, Rudolph

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia is a common, serious health problem with a wide variety of etiologies and manifestations. This review gives a general overview of diagnostic and therapeutic options for oropharyngeal as well as esophageal swallowing disorders respecting the considerable progress made over recent years. Diagnosis can be challenging and requires expertise in interpretation of symptoms and patient history. Endoscopy, barium radiography and manometry are still the diagnostic mainstays. Classification of esophageal motor-disorders has been revolutionized with the introduction of high-resolution esophageal pressure topography and a new standardized classification algorithm. Automated integrated impedance manometry is a promising upcoming tool for objective evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia, in non-obstructive esophageal dysphagia and prediction of post fundoplication dysphagia risk. Impedance planimetry provides new diagnostic information on esophageal and LES-distensibility and allows controlled therapeutic dilatation without the need for radiation. Peroral endoscopic myotomy is a promising therapeutic approach for achalasia and spastic motility disorders.

  12. POSTFUNDOPLICATION DYSPHAGIA CAUSES SIMILAR WATER INGESTION DYNAMICS AS ACHALASIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Roberto Oliveira; Santos, Carla Manfredi; Cassiani, Rachel Aguiar; Alves, Leda Maria Tavares; Nascimento, Weslania Viviane

    2016-01-01

    - After surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease dysphagia is a symptom in the majority of patients, with decrease in intensity over time. However, some patients may have persistent dysphagia. - The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the dynamics of water ingestion in patients with postfundoplication dysphagia compared with patients with dysphagia caused by achalasia, idiopathic or consequent to Chagas' disease, and controls. - Thirty-three patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, assessed more than one year after surgery, together with 50 patients with Chagas' disease, 27 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 88 controls were all evaluated by the water swallow test. They drunk, in triplicate, 50 mL of water without breaks while being precisely timed and the number of swallows counted. Also measured was: (a) inter-swallows interval - the time to complete the task, divided by the number of swallows during the task; (b) swallowing flow - volume drunk divided by the time taken; (c) volume of each swallow - volume drunk divided by the number of swallows. - Patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia took longer to ingest all the volume, had an increased number of swallows, an increase in interval between swallows, a decrease in swallowing flow and a decrease in water volume of each swallow compared with the controls. There was no difference between the three groups of patients. There was no correlation between postfundoplication time and the results. - It was concluded that patients with postfundoplication dysphagia have similar water ingestion dynamics as patients with achalasia.

  13. Forest Landscape Assessment Tool (FLAT): rapid assessment for land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa Ciecko; David Kimmett; Jesse Saunders; Rachael Katz; Kathleen L. Wolf; Oliver Bazinet; Jeffrey Richardson; Weston Brinkley; Dale J. Blahna

    2016-01-01

    The Forest Landscape Assessment Tool (FLAT) is a set of procedures and tools used to rapidly determine forest ecological conditions and potential threats. FLAT enables planners and managers to understand baseline conditions, determine and prioritize restoration needs across a landscape system, and conduct ongoing monitoring to achieve land management goals. The rapid...

  14. Software Tools Used for Continuous Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina SBUGHEA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available he present paper addresses the subject of continuous evaluation and of the IT tools that support it. The approach starts from the main concepts and methods used in the teaching process, according to the assessment methodology and, then, it focuses on their implementation in the Wondershare QuizCreator software.

  15. AGWA: The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA, see: www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/agwa or http://www.epa.gov/esd/land-sci/agwa/) is a GIS interface jointly developed by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Arizona...

  16. A Suite of Tools for Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Saden, Povinelli & Rosen, 1989). • This was a significant change in emphasis on the part of NASA, where technology had previously viewed as merely...Cost Analysis Symposium, April 13, 2005. A Suite of Tools for Technology Assessment 24 Bibliography - continued: • Sadin, Stanley T.; Povinelli

  17. Innovative Tools to Assess Systems Thinking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    addition to the six cognitive ability constructs, there are two motivational attributes that are highly relevant to systems thinking performance...roles of the habenular complex, the reward system , and the cingulate motor area revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Journal of...Technical Report 1362 Innovative Tools to Assess Systems Thinking Ability Cory Adis Michelle Wisecarver Chelsey Raber Personnel

  18. Validation of the Australian Midwifery Standards Assessment Tool (AMSAT): A tool to assess midwifery competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Linda; Bazargan, Maryam; McKellar, Lois; Gray, Joanne; Henderson, Amanda

    2018-02-01

    There is no current validated clinical assessment tool to measure the attainment of midwifery student competence in the midwifery practice setting. The lack of a valid assessment tool has led to a proliferation of tools and inconsistency in assessment of, and feedback on student learning. This research aimed to develop and validate a tool to assess competence of midwifery students in practice-based settings. A mixed-methods approach was used and the study implemented in two phases. Phase one involved the development of the AMSAT tool with qualitative feedback from midwifery academics, midwife assessors of students, and midwifery students. In phase two the newly developed AMSAT tool was piloted across a range of midwifery practice settings and ANOVA was used to compare scores across year levels, with feedback being obtained from assessors. Analysis of 150 AMSAT forms indicate the AMSAT as: reliable (Cronbach alpha greater than 0.9); valid-data extraction loaded predominantly onto one factor; and sensitivity scores indicating level of proficiency increased across the three years. Feedback evaluation forms (n=83) suggest acceptance of this tool for the purpose of both assessing and providing feedback on midwifery student's practice performance and competence. The AMSAT is a valid, reliable and acceptable midwifery assessment tool enables consistent assessment of midwifery student competence. This assists benchmarking across midwifery education programs. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Ability of the Eating Assessment Tool-10 to Detect Aspiration in Patients With Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Selen Serel; Demir, Numan; Kılınç, Hasan E; Karaduman, Aynur A

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Dysphagia is common in patients with neurological disorders. There is a need to identify patients at risk early by a useful clinical tool to prevent its serious complications. The study aims to determine the ability of the Turkish version of Eating Assessment Tool-10 (T-EAT-10) to detect aspiration in patients with neurological disorders. Methods Two hundred fifty-nine patients with neurological disorders who had complaints about swallowing difficulty and referred for a swallowing evaluation were included. Oropharyngeal dysphagia was evaluated with the T-EAT-10 and videofluoroscopic swallowing study in the same day. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) was used to document the penetration and aspiration severity. Results The mean age of the patients was 59.72 ± 17.24 years (minimum [min] = 18, maximum [max] = 96), of which 57.1% were male. The mean T-EAT-10 of patients who had aspiration (PAS > 5) was 25.91 ± 10.31 (min = 1, max = 40) and the mean T-EAT-10 of patients who did not have aspiration (PAS < 6) was 15.70 ± 10.54 (min = 0, max = 40) (P < 0.001). Patients with a T-EAT-10 score higher than 15 were 2.4 times more likely to aspirate. A linear correlation was found between T-EAT-10 and PAS scores of the patients (r = 0.416, P < 0.001). The sensitivity of a T-EAT-10 higher than 15 in detecting aspiration was 81.0% and the specificity was 58.0%. A T-EAT-10 score of higher than 15 has a positive predictive value of 72.0% and a negative predictive value of 69.0%. Conclusion The T-EAT-10 can be used to detect unsafe airway protection in neurology clinics to identify and refer dysphagic patients for further evaluation. PMID:28545185

  20. Nutritional Aspects of Dysphagia Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, C; Brito-de la Fuente, E; Clavé, P; Costa, A; Assegehegn, G

    This chapter describes the nutritional aspects of dysphagia management by starting with the definition of these two conditions (dysphagia and malnutrition) that share three main clinical characteristics: (a) their prevalence is very high, (b) they can lead to severe complications, and (c) they are frequently underrecognized and neglected conditions. From an anatomical standpoint, dysphagia can result from oropharyngeal and/or esophageal causes; from a pathophysiological perspective, dysphagia can be caused by organic or structural diseases (either benign or malignant) or diseases causing impaired physiology (mainly motility and/or perception disorders). This chapter gathers up-to-date information on the screening and diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia, the consequences of dysphagia (aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, and dehydration), and on the nutritional management of dysphagic patients. Concerning this last topic, this chapter reviews the rheological aspects of swallowing and dysphagia (including shear and elongational flows) and its influence on the characteristics of the enteral nutrition for dysphagia management (solid/semisolid foods and thickened liquids; ready-to-use oral nutritional supplements and thickening powders), with special focus on the real characteristics of the bolus after mixing with human saliva. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Marine Litter, Eutrophication and Noise Assessment Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, Atanas; Velcheva, Maya; Milkova, Tanya; Slabakova, Violeta; Marinova, Veselka

    2017-04-01

    MARLEN - Marine Litter, Eutrophication and Noise Assessment Tools is a project under the Programme BG02.03: Increased capacity for assessing and predicting environmental status in marine and inland waters, managed by Bulgarian Ministry of environment and waters and co-financed by the Financial Mechanism of the European Economic Area (EEA FM) 2009 - 2014. Project Beneficiary is the Institute of oceanology - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences with two partners: Burgas municipality and Bulgarian Black Sea Basin Directorate. Initial assessment of ecological state of Bulgarian marine waters showed lack of data for some descriptors of MSFD. The main goal of MARLEN is to build up tools for assessment of marine environment by implementing new technologies and best practices for addressing three main areas of interest with lack of marine data in particular: a) Marine litter detection and classification in coastal areas; b) Regular near real time surface water eutrophication monitoring on large aquatory; c) Underwater noise monitoring. Developed tools are an important source of real time, near real time and delay mode marine data for Bulgarian Black Sea waters. The partnership within the project increased capacity for environmental assessments and training of personnel and enhances collaboration between scientific institutes, regional and local authorities. Project results supported implementation of MSFD in Bulgarian marine waters for the benefit of coastal population, marine industry, tourism, marine research and marine spatial planning.

  2. Prevalence and clinical correlation of dysphagia in Parkinson disease: a study on Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, X; Gao, J; Xie, C; Xiong, B; Wu, S; Cen, Z; Lou, Y; Lou, D; Xie, F; Luo, W

    2018-01-01

    Dysphagia is relatively common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and can have a negative impact on their quality of life; therefore, it is imperative that its prevalence in PD patients is studied. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and clinical correlation of dysphagia in Chinese PD patients. We recruited 116 Chinese PD patients. A videofluoroscopic study of swallowing (VFSS) was used to identify dysphagia. Assessments, including water drinking test, relative motor symptoms, non-motor symptoms (NMS) and quality of life, were performed to analyze the risks of dysphagia. The prevalence of dysphagia was 87.1%. The comparison of demographic and clinical features between patients with and without dysphagia included sex, education level, disease course, Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), Question 6, 7 of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS Part II), Hoehn-Yahr stage (H&Y), water drinking test, 39-item Parkinson Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and Non-Motor Symptoms Quest (NMSQ). We found significant correlations between dysphagia and age. Using age, disease course, and H&Y stage as the independent variable in our regression analysis for assessing the risk factors of dysphagia in PD patients, age and H&Y stage displayed a strong correlation as the risk factors. The risk of dysphagia in elderly PD patients is 1.078 times greater than that of younger PD patients. Also, the risk of dysphagia in PD patients of a greater H&Y staging is 3.260 times greater than that of lower staging PD patients. Our results suggest that dysphagia is common in Chinese PD patients. Older patients or those in higher H&Y stages are more likely to experience dysphagia. There is no correlation between dysphagia and PD duration.

  3. An overview of pediatric dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasse, Jane E; Kikano, George E

    2009-04-01

    Difficulty swallowing or dysphagia can be present in children and adults alike. Pediatric dysphagias have long been recognized in the literature. Certain groups of infants with specific developmental and/or medical conditions have been identified as being at high risk for developing dysphagia. Still others may present with a swallowing or feeding problem as their primary symptom. Left untreated, these problems in infants and children can lead to failure to thrive, aspiration pneumonias, gastroesophageal reflux, and/or the inability to establish and maintain proper nutrition and hydration. Awareness of the prevalence of pediatric dysphagia in today's population and the signs and symptoms of this condition aids in its treatment. Early detection of dysphagia in infants and children is important to prevent or minimize complications. This article provides a review of symptoms, etiologies, and resources available regarding management of this condition to help the primary care physician and the families of young children and infants in its management.

  4. Spontaneous swallowing frequency has potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael F

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases, swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute [SPM]) were compared with stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with versus without clinically significant dysphagia. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM, which was compared with a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was used to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis yielded a threshold of SPM≤0.40 that identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5- to 10-minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel.

  5. Spontaneous Swallowing Frequency [Has Potential to] Identify Dysphagia in Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. Methods In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute: SPM) were compared to stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with vs. without clinically significant dysphagia. ROC analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM which was compared to a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was employed to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. Results SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. ROC analysis yielded a threshold of SPM ≤ 0.40 which identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5 to 10 minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Conclusions Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel. PMID:24149008

  6. Dysphagia in Acute Stroke: Incidence, Burden and Impact on Clinical Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeg-Morvay, Anne; Meisterernst, Julia; Schlager, Markus; Mono, Marie-Luise; El-Koussy, Marwan; Kägi, Georg; Jung, Simon; Sarikaya, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Reported frequency of post-stroke dysphagia in the literature is highly variable. In view of progress in stroke management, we aimed to assess the current burden of dysphagia in acute ischemic stroke. Methods We studied 570 consecutive patients treated in a tertiary stroke center. Dysphagia was evaluated by using the Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). We investigated the relationship of dysphagia with pneumonia, length of hospital stay and discharge destination and compared rates of favourable clinical outcome and mortality at 3 months between dysphagic patients and those without dysphagia. Results Dysphagia was diagnosed in 118 of 570 (20.7%) patients and persisted in 60 (50.9%) at hospital discharge. Thirty-six (30.5%) patients needed nasogastric tube because of severe dysphagia. Stroke severity rather than infarct location was associated with dysphagia. Dysphagic patients suffered more frequently from pneumonia (23.1% vs. 1.1%, pdysphagia. At 3 months, dysphagic patients less often had a favourable outcome (35.7% vs. 69.7%; pdysphagia to be an independent predictor of discharge destination and institutionalization at 3 months, while severe dysphagia requiring tube placement was strongly associated with mortality. Conclusion Dysphagia still affects a substantial portion of stroke patients and may have a large impact on clinical outcome, mortality and institutionalization. PMID:26863627

  7. Effect of Vocal Fold Medialization on Dysphagia in Patients with Unilateral Vocal Fold Immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Daniel J; Venkatesan, Naren N; Strong, Brandon; Kuhn, Maggie A; Belafsky, Peter C

    2016-09-01

    The effect of vocal fold medialization (VFM) on vocal improvement in persons with unilateral vocal fold immobility (UVFI) is well established. The effect of VFM on the symptom of dysphagia is uncertain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate dysphagia symptoms in patients with UVFI pre- and post-VFM. Case series with chart review. Academic tertiary care medical center. The charts of 44 persons with UVFI who underwent VFM between June 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014, were abstracted from a prospectively maintained database at the University of California, Davis, Voice and Swallowing Center. Patient demographics, indications, and type of surgical procedure were recorded. Self-reported swallowing impairment was assessed with the validated 10-item Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) before and after surgery. A paired samples t test was used to compare pre- and postmedialization EAT-10 scores. Forty-four patients met criteria and underwent either vocal fold injection (73%) or thyroplasty (27%). Etiologies of vocal fold paralysis were iatrogenic (55%), idiopathic (29%), benign or malignant neoplastic (9%), traumatic (5%), or related to the late effects of radiation (2%). EAT-10 (mean ± SD) scores improved from 12.2 ± 11.1 to 7.7 ± 7.2 after medialization (P dysphagia and report significant improvement in swallowing symptoms following VFM. The symptomatic improvement appears to be durable over time. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of dysphagia using scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seok Gun; Hyun, Jung Keun; Lee, Seong Jae

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate dysphagia objectively and quantitatively, and to clarify the effect of neck position and viscosity changes in patients with aspiration and laryngeal penetration. We studied 35 patients with dysphagia and 21 normal controls using videofluoroscopy and scintigraphy. Videofluoroscopy was performed with barium with three different viscosity, and scintigraphy was done with water, yogurt, and steamed egg mixed with Tc-99m tin colloid. If aspiration was found during videofluoroscopic examination, patient's neck position was changed and study repeated. Videofluoroscopy was analyzed qualitatively. We calculated 7 quantitative parameters from scintigraphy. According to the videofluoroscopic findings, we divided patients into 3 subgroups; aspiration, laryngeal penetration, and no-aspiration group. The result of videofluoroscopy revealed that the most common finding was the delay in triggering pharyngeal swallow. Pharyngeal transit time (PTT) and pharyngeal swallowing efficiency (PSE) in patients with aspiration were significantly different from other groups. After neck position change, aspiration could be reduced in all of 7 patients, and laryngeal penetration reduced by about 82%. PTT and PSE were also improved after position change. Aspiration and laryngeal penetration occurred more frequently in thin liquid swallowing than in thin liquid and solid swallowing. PTT and PSE were useful for the evaluation of dysphagia. Aspiration and laryngeal penetration could by reduced when appropriate position assumed. We could decrease the chance of aspiration by changing the patient diet consistency. Scintigraphy might be useful tool to quantitate and follow up these changes

  9. Quantitative evaluation of dysphagia using scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seok Gun; Hyun, Jung Keun; Lee, Seong Jae [College of Medicine, Dankook Univ., Cheonnon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate dysphagia objectively and quantitatively, and to clarify the effect of neck position and viscosity changes in patients with aspiration and laryngeal penetration. We studied 35 patients with dysphagia and 21 normal controls using videofluoroscopy and scintigraphy. Videofluoroscopy was performed with barium with three different viscosity, and scintigraphy was done with water, yogurt, and steamed egg mixed with Tc-99m tin colloid. If aspiration was found during videofluoroscopic examination, patient's neck position was changed and study repeated. Videofluoroscopy was analyzed qualitatively. We calculated 7 quantitative parameters from scintigraphy. According to the videofluoroscopic findings, we divided patients into 3 subgroups; aspiration, laryngeal penetration, and no-aspiration group. The result of videofluoroscopy revealed that the most common finding was the delay in triggering pharyngeal swallow. Pharyngeal transit time (PTT) and pharyngeal swallowing efficiency (PSE) in patients with aspiration were significantly different from other groups. After neck position change, aspiration could be reduced in all of 7 patients, and laryngeal penetration reduced by about 82%. PTT and PSE were also improved after position change. Aspiration and laryngeal penetration occurred more frequently in thin liquid swallowing than in thin liquid and solid swallowing. PTT and PSE were useful for the evaluation of dysphagia. Aspiration and laryngeal penetration could by reduced when appropriate position assumed. We could decrease the chance of aspiration by changing the patient diet consistency. Scintigraphy might be useful tool to quantitate and follow up these changes.

  10. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia...

  11. A software tool for ecosystem services assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegels, Niels; Klinting, Anders; Butts, Michael; Middelboe, Anne Lise; Mark, Ole

    2017-04-01

    The EU FP7 DESSIN project is developing methods and tools for assessment of ecosystem services (ESS) and associated economic values, with a focus on freshwater ESS in urban settings. Although the ESS approach has gained considerable visibility over the past ten years, operationalizing the approach remains a challenge. Therefore, DESSSIN is also supporting development of a free software tool to support users implementing the DESSIN ESS evaluation framework. The DESSIN ESS evaluation framework is a structured approach to measuring changes in ecosystem services. The main purpose of the framework is to facilitate the application of the ESS approach in the appraisal of projects that have impacts on freshwater ecosystems and their services. The DESSIN framework helps users evaluate changes in ESS by linking biophysical, economic, and sustainability assessments sequentially. It was developed using the Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services (CICES) and the DPSIR (Drivers, Pressures, States, Impacts, Responses) adaptive management cycle. The former is a standardized system for the classification of ESS developed by the European Union to enhance the consistency and comparability of ESS assessments. The latter is a well-known concept to disentangle the biophysical and social aspects of a system under study. As part of its analytical component, the DESSIN framework also integrates elements of the Final Ecosystem Goods and Services-Classification System (FEGS-CS) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). As implemented in the software tool, the DESSIN framework consists of five parts: • In part I of the evaluation, the ecosystem is defined and described and the local stakeholders are identified. In addition, administrative details and objectives of the assessment are defined. • In part II, drivers and pressures are identified. Once these first two elements of the DPSIR scheme have been characterized, the claimed/expected capabilities of a

  12. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  13. Dysphagia due to tardive dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pookala S Bhat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dyskinesia (TD, neuroleptic-induced delayed onset movement disorder, remains an enigmatic phenomenon and a therapeutic challenge. Only a few cases of dysphagia also have been reported in world literature and to the best knowledge of the authors no case of TD manifesting as isolated dysphagia has been reported so far from India. We report a case of TD consequent to prolonged exposure to typical neuroleptics, manifesting as isolated dysphagia who responded well to a combination of Quetiapine, Donepezil and Vit E.

  14. Data Center IT Equipment Energy Assessment Tools: Current State of Commercial Tools, Proposal for a Future Set of Assessment Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Ben D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); National Univ., San Diego, CA (United States). School of Engineering

    2012-06-30

    This research project, which was conducted during the Summer and Fall of 2011, investigated some commercially available assessment tools with a focus on IT equipment to see if such tools could round out the DC Pro tool suite. In this research, the assessment capabilities of the various tools were compiled to help make “non-biased” information available to the public. This research should not be considered to be exhaustive on all existing vendor tools although a number of vendors were contacted. Large IT equipment OEM’s like IBM and Dell provide their proprietary internal automated software which does not work on any other IT equipment. However, found two companies with products that showed promise in performing automated assessments for IT equipment from different OEM vendors. This report documents the research and provides a list of software products reviewed, contacts and websites, product details, discussions with specific companies, a set of recommendations, and next steps. As a result of this research, a simple 3-level approach to an IT assessment tool is proposed along with an example of an assessment using a simple IT equipment data collection tool (Level 1, spreadsheet). The tool has been reviewed with the Green Grid and LBNL staff. The initial feedback has been positive although further refinement to the tool will be necessary. Proposed next steps include a field trial of at least two vendors’ software in two different data centers with an objective to prove the concept, ascertain the extent of energy and computational assessment, ease of installation and opportunities for continuous improvement. Based on the discussions, field trials (or case studies) are proposed with two vendors – JouleX (expected to be completed in 2012) and Sentilla.

  15. Dysphagia Post Subcortical and Supratentorial Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ping; Chen, Xuhui; Zhu, Lequn; Xu, Shuangjin; Huang, Li; Li, Xiangcui; Ye, Qing; Ding, Ruiying

    2016-01-01

    Studies have recognized that the damage in the subcortical and supratentorial regions may affect voluntary and involuntary aspects of the swallowing function. The current study attempted to explore the dysphagia characteristics in patients with subcortical and supratentorial stroke. Twelve post first or second subcortical and supratentorial stroke patients were included in the study. The location of the stroke was ascertained by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The characteristics of swallowing disorder were assessed by video fluoroscopic swallowing assessment/fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. The following main parameters were analyzed: oral transit time, pharyngeal delay time, presence of cricopharyngeal muscle achalasia (CMA), distance of laryngeal elevation, the amounts of vallecular residue and pyriform sinus residue (PSR), and the extent of pharyngeal contraction. Eighty-three percent of the 12 patients were found suffering from pharyngeal dysphagia, with 50% having 50%-100% PSRs, 50% having pharyngeal delay, and 41.6% cases demonstrating CMA. Simple regression analysis showed PSRs were most strongly associated with CMA. Pharyngeal delay in the study can be caused by infarcts of basal ganglia/thalamus, infarcts of sensory tract, infarcts of swallowing motor pathways in the centrum semiovale, or a combination of the three. Subcortical and supratentorial stroke may result in pharyngeal dysphagia such as PSR and pharyngeal delay. PSR was mainly caused by CMA. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Systemic Assessment as a new tool for assessing students learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic Assessment [SA] has been shown to be highly effective new tool in raising the level of students academic achievements, improve their ability to learn by enhancing the process of teaching and learning, and converts students from surface to deep learning. It also allow teacher to monitor students learning ...

  17. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Heroes Among Us Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia) Updated:Nov 15,2016 Excerpted and adapted from "Swallowing Disorders After a Stroke," Stroke Connection Magazine July/August ...

  18. Prolonged refractory dysphagia in polymyositis

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Mathew; Mohan Muvvala; G R K Sarma; Raghunandan Nadig

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report a patient with polymyositis (biopsy proved) with dysphagia that did not improve with conventional treatment. An upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy showed esophageal stricture and a biopsy taken from the site revealed evidence of squamous cell carcinoma.

  19. Impact assessment as a design tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Ivar

    Research and development (R&D) programmes constitute a pivotal arena for shaping technologies of the future. In order to make qualified decisions, R&D programmes ought to be subject to impact assessment (IA). It seems, however, that only a few countries have developed a systematic practice. One r...... reason for the limited practice might be that IA of R&D policy is said to be particularly difficult. This paper reports on experiences from a voluntary IA application in Danish with point of departure in the question: How does IA work as a design tool in terms of R&D programmes?...

  20. Content validation of a Danish version of "The McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment" for dysphagia management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Tina; Lambert, Heather C; Faber, Jens

    2011-12-01

    This study addresses the first steps in the cross-cultural adaptation of a Danish version of the McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment (MISA), which quantifies eating and drinking abilities by scoring a meal observation. The original Canadian MISA was translated and adapted into Danish (MISA-DK). For content validation of the MISA-DK, a judgemental quantification process was applied using 13 experts. Thereafter, the MISA-DK was pilot tested by 16 occupational therapists. Finally, the MISA-DK was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Content validity of 43 items was found for 93% in terms of adequacy, 67% in terms of clarity of item description, 86% in terms of clarity of score descriptions, and 93% in terms of relevance. Thirteen of 14 sections of the instruction manual and score sheet were content valid. In light of these results, a revised MISA-DK was produced for the pilot test, which then found content validity for all sections and 98% of the items. The ICF linking resulted in 41 ICF-categories, which may reflect the complexity of eating and drinking as well as a multidimensional structure of the MISA-DK. In conclusion, the MISA-DK is prepared for psychometric testing using classical as well as modern test theory.

  1. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function.

  2. Recovery of Dysphagia in lateral medullary stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function.

  3. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function. PMID:25045555

  4. Oesophageal dysphagia: manifestations and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Frank; Omari, Taher

    2015-06-01

    Oesophageal dysphagia is a common symptom, which might be related to severe oesophageal diseases such as carcinomas. Therefore, an organic process must be ruled out in the first instance by endoscopy in all patients presenting with dysphagia symptoms. The most prevalent obstructive aetiologies are oesophageal cancer, peptic strictures and eosinophilic oesophagitis. Eosinophilic oesophagitis is one of the most common causes of dysphagia in adults and children, thus justifying the need to obtain oesophageal biopsy samples from all patients presenting with unexplained dysphagia. With the advent of standardized high-resolution manometry and specific metrics to characterize oesophageal motility, the Chicago classification has become a gold-standard algorithm for manometric diagnosis of oesophageal motor disorders. In addition, sophisticated investigations and analysis methods that combine pressure and impedance measurement are currently in development. In the future, these techniques might be able to detect subtle pressure abnormalities during bolus transport, which could further explain pathophysiology and symptoms. The degree to which novel approaches will help distinguish dysphagia caused by motor abnormalities from functional dysphagia still needs to be determined.

  5. Prevalence and risk factors for dysphagia: a U.S. community study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, So Yang; Choung, Rok Seon; Saito, Yuri A.; Schleck, Cathy D; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Locke, G. Richard; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysphagia is considered an alarm symptom but detailed population-based data on dysphagia are lacking. We aimed to estimate in a representative US Caucasian population the prevalence of dysphagia and potential risk factors. Methods A modified version of the previously validated Bowel Disease Questionnaire was mailed to a population based cohort (n=7640) of Olmsted County, MN. Dysphagia was measured by one validated question “In the last year, how often have you had difficulty swallowing (a feeling that food sticks in your throat or chest)?” The medical records were reviewed for organic causes of dysphagia. The associations of reported frequency of dysphagia with potential risk factors were assessed using logistic regression models. Results The sex-specific, age-adjusted (US White 2000) prevalence for dysphagia experienced at least weekly was 3.0 % (95% CI: 2.2, 3.7) in females and 3.0 % (95% CI: 2.0, 4.0) in males. Those with frequent heartburn [OR=5.9 (4.0, 8.6)] and acid regurgitation [OR=10.6 (6.8, 16.6)] were significantly more likely to report frequent dysphagia. PPI use was significantly associated with frequent (3.1, 95% CI 2.2, 4.4) and infrequent dysphagia (1.5, 955 CI 1.3, 1.8). GERD was the most common diagnosis in those reporting dysphagia on the medical record; other organic explanations were rare and only found in the frequent dysphagia group. Conclusions Frequent dysphagia is not rare in the community (3%), occurs in both women and men across all adult age groups, and is most likely to indicate underlying GERD. PMID:25376877

  6. Comparison of dysphagia outcomes between rostral and caudal lateral medullary infarct patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Min Ho; Kim, Daeha; Chang, Min Cheol

    2017-11-01

    A detailed knowledge of dysphagia outcomes in lateral medullary infarct (LMI) patients would enable proper establishment of swallowing therapy goals and strategies. However, little is known about the impact of infarct location on dysphagia outcomes in patients with LMI. Twenty patients with rostral LMI (rostral group) and 20 patients with caudal LMI (caudal group) participated in the study. All patients underwent swallowing therapy, which included compensatory treatments and strengthening exercises, for >3 months. Dysphagia evaluation was performed twice (during the subacute stage and six months after stroke onset) using videofluoroscopic swallowing studies. Dysphagia degree was assessed using the functional dysphagia scale (FDS), the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Outcome Measurement System (NOMS) swallowing scale. In the subacute stage, the rostral group had significantly higher FDS and PAS scores and a significantly lower ASHA NOMS score than the caudal group. Patients from both groups showed significant improvement from the initial evaluation to the six-month evaluation. There were no significant differences in these scale scores between the two groups at the six-month evaluation. In the subacute stage, patients in the rostral group had more severe dysphagia than those in the caudal group. Dysphagia improved in both groups after 3-6 months of swallowing therapy. At six months after onset, there were no significant differences in dysphagia severity between the two groups. Recovery from dysphagia after LMI was observed regardless of the infarct location.

  7. Predictive factors for oropharyngeal dysphagia after prolonged orotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Carolina Martins de; Friche, Amélia Augusta de Lima; Salomão, Marina Silva; Bougo, Graziela Chamarelli; Vicente, Laélia Cristina Caseiro

    2017-09-13

    Lesions in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx due to endotracheal intubation can cause reduction in the local motility and sensitivity, impairing the swallowing process, resulting in oropharyngeal dysphagia. To verify the predictive factors for the development of oropharyngeal dysphagia and the risk of aspiration in patients with prolonged orotracheal intubation admitted to an intensive care unit. This is an observational, analytical, cross-sectional and retrospective data collection study of 181 electronic medical records of patients submitted to prolonged orotracheal intubation. Data on age; gender; underlying disease; associated comorbidities; time and reason for orotracheal intubation; Glasgow scale on the day of the Speech Therapist assessment; comprehension; vocal quality; presence and severity of dysphagia; risk of bronchoaspiration; and the suggested oral route were collected. The data were analyzed through logistic regression. The level of significance was set at 5%, with a 95% Confidence Interval. The prevalence of dysphagia in this study was 35.9% and the risk of aspiration was 24.9%. As the age increased, the altered vocal quality and the degree of voice impairment increased the risk of the presence of dysphagia by 5-; 45.4- and 6.7-fold, respectively, and of aspiration by 6-; 36.4- and 4.8-fold. The increase in the time of orotracheal intubation increased the risk of aspiration by 5.5-fold. Patients submitted to prolonged intubation who have risk factors associated with dysphagia and aspiration should be submitted to an early speech-language/audiology assessment and receive appropriate and timely treatment. The recognition of these predictive factors by the entire multidisciplinary team can minimize the possibility of clinical complications inherent to the risk of dysphagia and aspiration in extubated patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  8. Revisão analítica das escalas de disfagia Analytic review of dysphagia scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Antonio Aissar Sallum

    2012-12-01

    orofaringeana (região cervical, ambas focadas em terapia nutricional. Para a avaliação motora baixa, a escala de Zaninotto e Youssef tem aplicação prática, e a DHI parece representar a ferramenta mais promissora na avaliação global da disfagia.INTRODUCTION: An efficient instrument for dysphagia measurement, easily reproducible and statistically consistent, should provide consistent data on the outcomes and follow-up of diseases with dysphagia. Existent proposals do not show a global coverage in the evaluation of this symptom. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the available dysphagia scales determining those that allow a more objective and statistically consistent evaluation, and not only a measurement tool. Also, witch of the them achieve a better quantification of the symptom and useful in the follow-up. METHOD: Searching descriptors in the database Pubmed: "dysphagia", "scale", "index", "score", 10 papers were selected published between 1995 and June 2012 with proposals of dysphagia scales. RESULTS: Most scales do not reach the requirements to be classified as a complete tool in the evaluation of any dysphagia. Many are specific to a single disease and few, which have a global assessment, have no statistical consistency. In oropharyngeal (cervical dysphagia, the FOIS and ASHA scales are the most often cited. In motor dysphagia (cervical, the Zaninotto and Youssef scale have extremely practical applicability, but both require statistical validation. Zaninotto´s seems to be more accurate by including more variables (dysphagia, chest pain and heartburn. The scales which cover the two forms of dysphagia (ASHA and DHI are extremely different regarding the goal of their evaluation. The DHI is a scale of recent publication, which examines the two types of dysphagia and has a well-structured statistical validation. Future important step would be testing this new proposal with a more expressive and representative sample, probably enshrining this new assessment tool. CONCLUSION: The most

  9. [Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrup, I; Warnecke, T

    2016-07-01

    Oropharyngeal and esophageal dysphagia are a frequent, but seldom diagnosed symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). More than 80 % of patients with PD develop dysphagia during the course of their disease leading to a reduced quality of life, complicated medication intake, malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. The underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. Impaired dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms of the cortical swallowing network as well as peripheral neuromuscular involvement have been suggested to contribute to its multifactorial genesis. Diagnostic screening methods include PD-specific questionnaires and a modified water test. Fiber optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS), which complement each other, are the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. For evaluation of esophageal dysphagia, the high-resolution manometry (HRM) may be a helpful tool. In addition to dysphagia-specific treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs), optimized dopaminergic medication is a meaningful therapeutic option. A promising novel method is intensive training of expiratory muscle strength (EMST). Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinically relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Food Culture, Preferences and Ethics in Dysphagia Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Belinda

    2015-11-01

    Adults with dysphagia experience difficulties swallowing food and fluids with potentially harmful health and psychosocial consequences. Speech pathologists who manage patients with dysphagia are frequently required to address ethical issues when patients' food culture and/ or preferences are inconsistent with recommended diets. These issues incorporate complex links between food, identity and social participation. A composite case has been developed to reflect ethical issues identified by practising speech pathologists for the purposes of illustrating ethical concerns in dysphagia management. The case examines a speech pathologist's role in supporting patient autonomy when patients and carers express different goals and values. The case presents a 68-year-old man of Australian/Italian heritage with severe swallowing impairment and strong values attached to food preferences. The case is examined through application of the dysphagia algorithm, a tool for shared decision-making when patients refuse dietary modifications. Case analysis revealed the benefits and challenges of shared decision-making processes in dysphagia management. Four health professional skills and attributes were identified as synonymous with shared decision making: communication, imagination, courage and reflection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Eighty-year-old man with 10 years dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Showkat A Kadla; Nisar Ahmad Shah; Shaheena Parveen; Bilal A Khan; Asif I Shah; Shaheen Nazir Lone; Sandeep Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is a sensation of food being "stuck" up in its passage from the mouth to stomach. It is of two main types, oropharyngeal dysphagia, and esophageal dysphagia. In oropharyngeal dysphagia, there is difficulty in transferring the food from the mouth to upper esophagus. Thus, this dysphagia is also called as transfer dysphagia. It occurs within 1 st 1-2 s of the swallow. We also call this dysphagia as instant dysphagia. It is almost always associated with sinobronchial symptoms. The seco...

  12. Ultrasonography to Measure Swallowing Muscle Mass and Quality in Older Patients With Sarcopenic Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Nami; Mori, Takashi; Fujishima, Ichiro; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Itoda, Masataka; Kunieda, Kenjiro; Shigematsu, Takashi; Nishioka, Shinta; Tohara, Haruka; Yamada, Minoru; Ogawa, Sumito

    2018-06-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is characterized by difficulty swallowing due to a loss of whole-body skeletal and swallowing muscle mass and function. However, no study has reported on swallowing muscle mass and quality in patients with sarcopenic dysphagia. To compare the differences in swallowing muscle mass and quality between sarcopenic and nonsarcopenic dysphagia. A cross-sectional study was performed in 55 older patients, who had been recommended to undergo dysphagia assessment and/or rehabilitation. Sarcopenic dysphagia was diagnosed using a diagnostic algorithm for sarcopenic dysphagia. The thickness and area of tongue muscle and geniohyoid muscle (coronal plane and sagittal plane), and the echo-intensity of the tongue and geniohyoid muscles were examined by ultrasound. The study participants included 31 males and 24 females (mean age of 82 ± 7 years), with 14 having possible sarcopenic dysphagia, 22 probable sarcopenic dysphagia, and 19 without sarcopenic dysphagia. The group with sarcopenic dysphagia had a significantly lower cross-sectional area and area of brightness of the tongue muscle than that observed in the group without sarcopenic dysphagia. The most specific factor for identifying the presence of sarcopenic dysphagia was tongue muscle area (sensitivity, 0.389; specificity, 0.947; cut-off value, 1536.0), while the factor with the highest sensitivity was geniohyoid muscle area brightness in sagittal sections (sensitivity, 0.806; specificity, 0.632; cut-off value, 20.1). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the area of the tongue muscle and its area of brightness were independent risk factors for sarcopenic dysphagia. However, geniohyoid sagittal muscle area and area of brightness showed no significant independent association with sarcopenic dysphagia. Tongue muscle mass in patients with sarcopenic dysphagia was smaller than that in patients without the condition. Sarcopenic dysphagia was also associated with increased intensity of the

  13. Dysphagia risk, low muscle strength and poor cognition predict malnutrition risk in older adults athospital admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatindiara, Idah; Allen, Jacqueline; Popman, Amy; Patel, Darshan; Richter, Marilize; Kruger, Marlena; Wham, Carol

    2018-03-21

    Malnutrition in patients admitted to hospital may have detrimental effects on recovery and healing. Malnutrition is preceded by a state of malnutrition risk, yet malnutrition risk is often not detected during admission. The aim of the current study was to investigate the magnitude and potential predictors of malnutrition risk in older adults, at hospital admission. A cross-sectional was study conducted in 234 older adults (age ≥ 65 or ≥ 55 for Māori or Pacific ethnicity) at admission to hospital in Auckland, New Zealand. Assessment of malnutrition risk status was performed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short-Form (MNA®-SF), dysphagia risk by the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10), muscle strength by hand grip strength and cognitive status by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) tool. Among 234 participants, mean age 83.6 ± 7.6 years, 46.6% were identified as at malnutrition risk and 26.9% malnourished. After adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity, the study identified [prevalence ratio (95% confidence interval)] high dysphagia risk [EAT-10 score: 0.98 (0.97-0.99)], low body mass index [kg/m 2 : 1.02 (1.02-1.03)], low muscle strength [hand grip strength, kg: 1.01 (1.00-1.02)] and decline in cognition [MoCA score: 1.01 (1.00-1.02)] as significant predictors of malnutrition risk in older adults at hospital admission. Among older adults recently admitted to the hospital, almost three-quarters were malnourished or at malnutrition risk. As the majority (88%) of participants were admitted from the community, this illustrates the need for routine nutrition screening both at hospital admission and in community-dwelling older adults. Factors such as dysphagia, unintentional weight loss, decline in muscle strength, and poor cognition may indicate increased risk of malnutrition.

  14. QUAST: quality assessment tool for genome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alexey; Saveliev, Vladislav; Vyahhi, Nikolay; Tesler, Glenn

    2013-04-15

    Limitations of genome sequencing techniques have led to dozens of assembly algorithms, none of which is perfect. A number of methods for comparing assemblers have been developed, but none is yet a recognized benchmark. Further, most existing methods for comparing assemblies are only applicable to new assemblies of finished genomes; the problem of evaluating assemblies of previously unsequenced species has not been adequately considered. Here, we present QUAST-a quality assessment tool for evaluating and comparing genome assemblies. This tool improves on leading assembly comparison software with new ideas and quality metrics. QUAST can evaluate assemblies both with a reference genome, as well as without a reference. QUAST produces many reports, summary tables and plots to help scientists in their research and in their publications. In this study, we used QUAST to compare several genome assemblers on three datasets. QUAST tables and plots for all of them are available in the Supplementary Material, and interactive versions of these reports are on the QUAST website. http://bioinf.spbau.ru/quast . Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. Conceptual assessment tool for advanced undergraduate electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baily, Charles; Ryan, Qing X.; Astolfi, Cecilia; Pollock, Steven J.

    2017-12-01

    As part of ongoing investigations into student learning in advanced undergraduate courses, we have developed a conceptual assessment tool for upper-division electrodynamics (E&M II): the Colorado UppeR-division ElectrodyNamics Test (CURrENT). This is a free response, postinstruction diagnostic with 6 multipart questions, an optional 3-question preinstruction test, and accompanying grading rubrics. The instrument's development was guided by faculty-consensus learning goals and research into common student difficulties. It can be used to gauge the effectiveness of transformed pedagogy, and to gain insights into student thinking in the covered topic areas. We present baseline data representing 500 students across 9 institutions, along with validity, reliability, and discrimination measures of the instrument and scoring rubric.

  16. Conceptual assessment tool for advanced undergraduate electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Baily

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As part of ongoing investigations into student learning in advanced undergraduate courses, we have developed a conceptual assessment tool for upper-division electrodynamics (E&M II: the Colorado UppeR-division ElectrodyNamics Test (CURrENT. This is a free response, postinstruction diagnostic with 6 multipart questions, an optional 3-question preinstruction test, and accompanying grading rubrics. The instrument’s development was guided by faculty-consensus learning goals and research into common student difficulties. It can be used to gauge the effectiveness of transformed pedagogy, and to gain insights into student thinking in the covered topic areas. We present baseline data representing 500 students across 9 institutions, along with validity, reliability, and discrimination measures of the instrument and scoring rubric.

  17. POSTFUNDOPLICATION DYSPHAGIA CAUSES SIMILAR WATER INGESTION DYNAMICS AS ACHALASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Oliveira DANTAS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background - After surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease dysphagia is a symptom in the majority of patients, with decrease in intensity over time. However, some patients may have persistent dysphagia. Objective - The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the dynamics of water ingestion in patients with postfundoplication dysphagia compared with patients with dysphagia caused by achalasia, idiopathic or consequent to Chagas' disease, and controls. Methods - Thirty-three patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, assessed more than one year after surgery, together with 50 patients with Chagas' disease, 27 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 88 controls were all evaluated by the water swallow test. They drunk, in triplicate, 50 mL of water without breaks while being precisely timed and the number of swallows counted. Also measured was: (a inter-swallows interval - the time to complete the task, divided by the number of swallows during the task; (b swallowing flow - volume drunk divided by the time taken; (c volume of each swallow - volume drunk divided by the number of swallows. Results - Patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia took longer to ingest all the volume, had an increased number of swallows, an increase in interval between swallows, a decrease in swallowing flow and a decrease in water volume of each swallow compared with the controls. There was no difference between the three groups of patients. There was no correlation between postfundoplication time and the results. Conclusion - It was concluded that patients with postfundoplication dysphagia have similar water ingestion dynamics as patients with achalasia.

  18. Diagnostic evaluation of dysphagia in multiple sclerosis patients using a Persian version of DYMUS questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajouh, Sahar Danesh; Moradi, Negin; Shaterzadeh Yazdi, Mohammad Jafar; Latifi, Seyed Mahmoud; Mehravar, Mohammad; Majdinasab, Nastaran; Olapour, Ali Reza; Soltani, Majid; Khanchezar, Fatemeh

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurological disease that may cause swallowing disorders. Dysphagia is a common problem, which patients with different levels of disability may encounter, but it is usually underestimated; therefore, effective assessments need to be performed before any serious complications. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency and characteristics of dysphagia in multiple sclerosis patients of Khuzestan MS society, using a Persian version of Dysphagia in Multiple Sclerosis (DYMUS) questionnaire. 105 consecutive MS patients (84 F and 21 M, mean age 33.8 ± 8.5 years, mean disease duration 3.5 ± 3.1 years, mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) 1.8 ± 1.3) participated in the study and the DYMUS questionnaire was administered by a trained speech therapist. The results have shown that 55 MS patients (52.4%) had dysphagia and the dysphagia was significantly associated with the disease course of MS (p = 0.02). However, significant associations between DYMUS values and EDSS, disease duration, age, and gender were not observed. (Respectively, p = 0.4, p = 0.09, p = 0.1, p = 1.0). In the dysphagia group, based on dysphagia severity, 17.1% and 35.2% of patients had mild and alarming dysphagia, respectively. Although, the patients with alarming dysphagia had longer disease duration, higher EDSS score and more with SP, PP and PR disease course than the patients with mild dysphagia, these differences were not significant. The oropharyngeal dysphagia in MS patients is very common even in early stages of the disease; therefore, it is important to assess these patients carefully and to initiate a treatment program if needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Challenge Course Facilitator Technical Skills Assessment Tool Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, William Quinn

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to develop a technical skills assessment tool for the training and development of challenge course facilitators. Researchers accessed two professional on-line listserves to collect a sample size of twenty-seven currently used technical skills assessment tools. The assessment tools were critically analysed by three independent…

  20. Diagnostic yield in the evaluation of dysphagia: experience at a single tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, J; Rajagopal, S; Kushnir, V; Gyawali, C P

    2018-05-24

    Evaluation of dysphagia typically starts with esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD); further testing is pursued if this is negative. When no mucosal, structural, or motor esophageal disorders are identified with persisting symptoms, functional dysphagia is considered. We evaluated outcomes in patients undergoing EGD for dysphagia, and estimated prevalence of functional dysphagia. The endoscopy database at single tertiary care center was interrogated to identify EGDs performed for an indication of 'dysphagia' over a 12-month period (2008-09). Electronic medical records were reviewed over the next 8 years to assess if an etiology was identified. Data were analyzed to assess the diagnostic yield of endoscopy and subsequent tests in the evaluation of dysphagia. Of 5486 EGDs, 822 (15.0%) were performed for dysphagia in 694 patients (58.4 ± 0.6 year, range: 18-95 year, 55.8% female). Of these, 529 (76.2%) had EGD findings that explained dysphagia; another 22 (3.2%) had findings on histopathology. Of the remainder 143 patients (20.6%) with normal index EGD, 38 (26.6%) patients underwent barium esophagram with 15 (39.5%) having abnormal studies. 19 patients (13.3%) underwent esophageal high resolution manometry with 12 (63.2%) being abnormal, and 7 had a mechanism for dysphagia on alternate testing. A repeat EGD was abnormal in 6 patients, while 45 patients were lost to follow-up. 42 patients had complete resolution of symptoms despite normal endoscopy, of which 30 were treated empirically with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Only 16 patients had no findings on evaluation, and had continued dysphagia symptoms, representing true functional dysphagia in 2.3% of all dysphagia patients and 11.2% of patients with normal EGD. Endoscopy remains the test with the highest yield (over 75%) for a diagnosis in patients presenting with dysphagia; secondary tests are useful when endoscopy does not provide a diagnosis. Benign strictures and GERD-related etiologies are leading causes; PPI

  1. Impact of dysphagia on quality of life after treatment of head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Frank, Cheryl; Moltz, Candace C.; Vos, Paul; Smith, Herbert J.; Karlsson, Ulf; Dutta, Suresh; Midyett, Allan; Barloon, Jessica; Sallah, Sabah

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the quality of life (QOL) associated with dysphagia after head-and-neck cancer treatment. Methods and materials: Of a total population of 104, a retrospective analysis of 73 patients who complained of dysphagia after primary radiotherapy (RT), chemoradiotherapy, and postoperative RT for head-and-neck malignancies were evaluated. All patients underwent a modified barium swallow examination to assess the severity of dysphagia, graded on a scale of 1-7. QOL was evaluated by the University of Washington (UW) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression questionnaires. The QOL scores obtained were compared with those from the 31 patients who were free of dysphagia after treatment. The QOL scores were also graded according to the dysphagia severity. Results: The UW and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scores were reduced and elevated, respectively, in the dysphagia group compared with the no dysphagia group (p = 0.0005). The UW scores were also substantially lower among patients with moderate-to-severe (Grade 4-7) compared with no or mild (Grade 2-3) dysphagia (p = 0.0005). The corresponding Hospital Anxiety (p = 0.005) and Depression (p = 0.0001) scores were also greater for the moderate-to-severe group. The UW QOL subscale scores showed a statistically significant decrease for swallowing (p = 0.00005), speech (p = 0.0005), recreation/entertainment (p = 0.0005), disfigurement (p = 0.0006), activity (p = 0.005), eating (p = 0.002), shoulder disability (p = 0.006), and pain (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Dysphagia is a significant morbidity of head-and-neck cancer treatment, and the severity of dysphagia correlated with a compromised QOL, anxiety, and depression. Patients with moderate-to-severe dysphagia require a team approach involving nutritional support, physical therapy, speech rehabilitation, pain management, and psychological counseling

  2. Dysphagia: current reality and scope of the problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavé, Pere; Shaker, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dysphagia is a symptom of swallowing dysfunction that occurs between the mouth and the stomach. Although oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent condition (occurring in up to 50% of elderly people and 50% of patients with neurological conditions) and is associated with aspiration, severe nutritional and respiratory complications and even death, most patients are not diagnosed and do not receive any treatment. By contrast, oesophageal dysphagia is less prevalent and less severe, but with better recognized symptoms caused by diseases affecting the enteric nervous system and/or oesophageal muscular layers. Recognition of the clinical relevance and complications of oesophageal and oropharyngeal dysphagia is growing among health-care professionals in many fields. In addition, the emergence of new methods to screen and assess swallow function at both the oropharynx and oesophagus, and marked advances in understanding the pathophysiology of these conditions, is paving the way for a new era of intensive research and active therapeutic strategies for affected patients. Indeed, a unified field of deglutology is developing, with new professional profiles to cover the needs of all patients with dysphagia in a nonfragmented way.

  3. Telehealth Stroke Dysphagia Evaluation Is Safe and Effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Kate; Hyers, Megan; Stuchiner, Tamela; Lucas, Lindsay; Schwartz, Karissa; Mako, Jenniffer; Spinelli, Kateri J; Yanase, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Rapid evaluation of dysphagia poststroke significantly lowers rates of aspiration pneumonia. Logistical barriers often significantly delay in-person dysphagia evaluation by speech language pathologists (SLPs) in remote and rural hospitals. Clinical swallow evaluations delivered via telehealth have been validated in a number of clinical contexts, yet no one has specifically validated a teleswallow evaluation for in-hospital post-stroke dysphagia assessment. A team of 6 SLPs experienced in stroke care and a telestroke neurologist designed, implemented, and tested a teleswallow evaluation for acute stroke patients, in which 100 patients across 2 affiliated, urban certified stroke centers were sequentially evaluated by a bedside and telehealth SLP. Inter-rater reliability was analyzed using percent agreement, Cohen's kappa, Kendall's tau-b, and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests. Logistic regression models accounting for age and gender were used to test the impact of stroke severity and stroke location on agreement. We found excellent agreement for both liquid (91% agreement; kappa = 0.808; Kendall's tau-b = 0.813, p Dysphagia evaluation by a remote SLP via telehealth is safe and effective following stroke. We plan to implement teleswallow across our multistate telestroke network as standard practice for poststroke dysphagia evaluation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Exploratory Research on Latent Esophageal Motility Disorders in Dysphagia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Shinpei; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Inoue, Yousuke; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Ozaki, Haruhiko; Ota, Kazuhiro; Harada, Satoshi; Edogawa, Shoko; Kojima, Yuichi; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Fukuchi, Takumi; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) has been applied to assess esophageal motility disorders. However, the frequency and types of motility disorders in patients with dysphagia, which are frequently seen in clinical practice, are not clear. We evaluated latent esophageal motility disorders associated with dysphagia. The study included patients without erosive esophageal mucosal damage and with dysphagia symptoms refractory to at least 8 weeks of standard-dose proton pump inhibitors. After enrolment, HRM was used to evaluate for esophageal motility disorder based on the Chicago classification. Esophageal motility disorder was found in 58 of 100 patients and was classified based on the causes: achalasia (13%), esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (16%), distal esophageal spasms (3%), weak peristalsis (14%), frequently failed peristalsis (5%), and hypertensive peristalsis (7%). Primary esophageal motility disorder was found in approximately 50% of cases in dysphagia patients. Therefore, esophageal motility disorder is not an uncommon condition and should be sought for in order to elucidate precisely the cause of dysphagia. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. BASINS and WEPP Climate Assessment Tools (CAT): Case ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This draft report supports application of two recently developed water modeling tools, the BASINS and WEPP climate assessment tools. The report presents a series of short case studies designed to illustrate the capabilities of these tools for conducting scenario based assessments of the potential future effects of climate change on water resources. This report presents a series of short, illustrative case studies using the BASINS and WEPP climate assessment tools.

  6. Dysphagia Aortica: Diagnostic Dilemma and Therapeutic Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivanesan Pitchai

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Dysphagia due to vascular diseases in the thoracic domain is an uncommon clinical entity. Patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm presenting with severe dysphagia deserve open surgical repair to provide optimal symptomatic relief in addition to saving life. The state-of-the-art endovascular stent grafting may be considered in very elderly patient having severe comorbidities presenting with mild dysphagia.

  7. Value of radionuclide oesophageal transit in studies of functional dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llamas-Elvira, J.M.; Martinez-Parades, M.; Velasco-Lajo, T.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide oesophageal transit time was evaluated in 70 individuals, divided into three groups: normal individuals, patients with non-organic dysphagia and patients with primary oesophageal motility disorders treated with per-endoscopic forced pneumatic dilatation. In all of them the oesophageal transit time of a bolus of water with 18.5 MBq (500 μCi) of 99 Tcsup(m) sulphur colloid was assessed, as was the percentage of residual activity of the bolus in the oesophagus. There was a significant difference in these parameters between the control group and the group with non-organic dysphagia, the diagnostic capacity of this test being 93% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value and 90% negative predictive value, which suggests its inclusion in diagnostic protocols of dysphagias. In patients with primary oesophageal motility disorders, a significant decrease in values of residual activity has been observed after treatment with per-endoscopic forced pneumatic dilation. (author)

  8. Delamination Assessment Tool for Spacecraft Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, Pedro; Preller, Fabian; Wittke, Henrik; Sinnema, Gerben; Camanho, Pedro; Turon, Albert

    2012-07-01

    Fortunately only few cases are known where failure of spacecraft structures due to undetected damage has resulted in a loss of spacecraft and launcher mission. However, several problems related to damage tolerance and in particular delamination of composite materials have been encountered during structure development of various ESA projects and qualification testing. To avoid such costly failures during development, launch or service of spacecraft, launcher and reusable launch vehicles structures a comprehensive damage tolerance verification approach is needed. In 2009, the European Space Agency (ESA) initiated an activity called “Delamination Assessment Tool” which is led by the Portuguese company HPS Lda and includes academic and industrial partners. The goal of this study is the development of a comprehensive damage tolerance verification approach for launcher and reusable launch vehicles (RLV) structures, addressing analytical and numerical methodologies, material-, subcomponent- and component testing, as well as non-destructive inspection. The study includes a comprehensive review of current industrial damage tolerance practice resulting from ECSS and NASA standards, the development of new Best Practice Guidelines for analysis, test and inspection methods and the validation of these with a real industrial case study. The paper describes the main findings of this activity so far and presents a first iteration of a Damage Tolerance Verification Approach, which includes the introduction of novel analytical and numerical tools at an industrial level. This new approach is being put to the test using real industrial case studies provided by the industrial partners, MT Aerospace, RUAG Space and INVENT GmbH

  9. A Systematic Review of the Prevalence of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Stroke, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, and Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Claire; Gemmell, Elizabeth; Kenworthy, James; Speyer, Renée

    2016-06-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a common condition after stroke, Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and can cause serious complications including malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia, and premature mortality. Despite its high prevalence among the elderly and associated serious complications, dysphagia is often overlooked and under-diagnosed in vulnerable patient populations. This systematic review aimed to improve understanding and awareness of the prevalence of dysphagia in susceptible patient populations. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, PROSPERO, and disease-specific websites were systematically searched for studies reporting oropharyngeal dysphagia prevalence or incidence in people with stroke, PD, AD, traumatic brain injury, and community-acquired pneumonia, from the USA, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, Japan, China, and regional studies. The quality of study descriptions were assessed based on STROBE guidelines. A total of 1207 publications were identified and 33 met inclusion criteria: 24 in stroke, six in PD, two in traumatic brain injury, and one in patients with traumatic brain injury. Dysphagia was reported in 8.1-80 % of stroke patients, 11-81 % of PD, 27-30 % of traumatic brain injury patients, and 91.7 % of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. No relevant studies of dysphagia in AD were identified. This review demonstrates that dysphagia is highly prevalent in these populations, and highlights discrepancies between studies, gaps in dysphagia research, and the need for better dysphagia management starting with a reliable, standardized, and validated method for oropharyngeal dysphagia identification.

  10. Relation between functional dysphagia and vocal cord palsy after transhiatal oesophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierie, J P; Goedegebuure, S; Schuerman, F A; Leguit, P

    2000-03-01

    To assess the incidence, natural course, and possible pathogenesis of dysphagia that is not caused by anastomotic stricture, after transhiatal oesophagectomy and gastric tube reconstruction. Prospective study. District teaching hospital, The Netherlands. 22 patients who had transhiatal oesophagectomy and gastric tube reconstruction for cancer. Incidence of dysphagia that is not caused by anastomotic stricture one week after operation, and presence of this functional dysphagia and correlation with vocal cord palsy at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postoperatively. The incidence of functional dysphagia was 7 out of 22 (32%); it was self-limiting in 5 out of 7 (71%) of the cases and associated with the incidence of vocal cord palsy (p = 0.0006). Functional dysphagia after transhiatal oesophagectomy occurs frequently, but is self-limiting in most patients. Injury to branches of the recurrent laryngeal nerve is a likely cause.

  11. Poststroke dysphagia rehabilitation by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: a noncontrolled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verin, E; Leroi, A M

    2009-06-01

    Poststroke dysphagia is frequent and significantly increases patient mortality. In two thirds of cases there is a spontaneous improvement in a few weeks, but in the other third, oropharyngeal dysphagia persists. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is known to excite or inhibit cortical neurons, depending on stimulation frequency. The aim of this noncontrolled pilot study was to assess the feasibility and the effects of 1-Hz rTMS, known to have an inhibitory effect, on poststroke dysphagia. Seven patients (3 females, age = 65 +/- 10 years), with poststroke dysphagia due to hemispheric or subhemispheric stroke more than 6 months earlier (56 +/- 50 months) diagnosed by videofluoroscopy, participated in the study. rTMS at 1 Hz was applied for 20 min per day every day for 5 days to the healthy hemisphere to decrease transcallosal inhibition. The evaluation was performed using the dysphagia handicap index and videofluoroscopy. The dysphagia handicap index demonstrated that the patients had mild oropharyngeal dysphagia. Initially, the score was 43 +/- 9 of a possible 120 which decreased to 30 +/- 7 (p study demonstrated that rTMS is feasible in poststroke dysphagia and improves swallowing coordination. Our results now need to be confirmed by a randomized controlled study with a larger patient population.

  12. Late dysphagia after IMRT for head and neck cancer and correlation with dose–volume parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortensen, Hanna R.; Jensen, Kenneth; Aksglæde, Karin; Behrens, Marie; Grau, Cai

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Many head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors experience diminished quality of life due to radiation-induced dysphagia. The aim of this study was to investigate frequency, intensity and dose–volume dependency for late dysphagia in HNC patients treated with curative IMRT. Materials and methods: Candidates for the study were 294 patients treated with primary IMRT from 2006 to 2010; a total of 259 patients accepted to participate by answering the EORTC QLQ-C30 and H and N35 questionnaires. A total of 65 patients were further examined with modified barium swallow (MBS) and saliva collection. Data on patient, tumor and treatment characteristics were prospectively recorded in the DAHANCA database. Dose–volume histograms (DVH) of swallowing-related structures were retrospectively analyzed. Results: QoL data showed low degree of dysphagia (QoL subscales scores of 17 and below) compared to objective measures. The most frequent swallowing dysfunction was retention; penetration and aspiration was less common. In general, objective measurements and observer-assessed late dysphagia correlated with dose to pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM), whereas QoL endpoints correlated with DVH parameters in the glottis/supraglottic larynx. Both xerostomia and dysphagia has been reduced after introduction of IMRT. Conclusions: Radiation-induced dysphagia is still important, with a high degree of retention and penetration. Introduction of parotid-sparing IMRT has reduced the severity of dysphagia, primarily through a major reduction in xerostomia. Dose–response relationships were found for specific dysphagia endpoints

  13. Evaluation of dysphagia risk, nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly patients with Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, Vanessa Fernanda; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela Billig; de Oliveira, Lilian Oliveira; Hack, Jaqueline; Magro, Marcela; Bonini, Juliana Sartori

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the risk of dysphagia and its relationship with the stage of Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the relationship between the risk of dysphagia and nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly people with Alzheimer's disease. Methods the sample consisted of 30 subjects of both genders with probable Alzheimer's disease. The stage of the disease, nutritional status, energy intake, and risk of dysphagia were assessed. Results it was found that increased risk of dysphagia is associated with the advance in the stages of Alzheimer's disease and that even patients in the early stages of disease have a slight risk of developing dysphagia. No association was found between nutritional status and the risk of dysphagia. High levels of inadequate intake of micronutrients were also verified in the patients. Conclusion an association between dysphagia and the development of Alzheimer's disease was found. The results indicate the need to monitor the presence of dysphagia and the micronutrient intake in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26107841

  14. Evaluation of dysphagia risk, nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly patients with Alzheimer's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Fernanda Goes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the risk of dysphagia and its relationship with the stage of Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the relationship between the risk of dysphagia and nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly people with Alzheimer's disease.METHODS: the sample consisted of 30 subjects of both genders with probable Alzheimer's disease. The stage of the disease, nutritional status, energy intake, and risk of dysphagia were assessed.RESULTS: it was found that increased risk of dysphagia is associated with the advance in the stages of Alzheimer's disease and that even patients in the early stages of disease have a slight risk of developing dysphagia. No association was found between nutritional status and the risk of dysphagia. High levels of inadequate intake of micronutrients were also verified in the patients.CONCLUSION: an association between dysphagia and the development of Alzheimer's disease was found. The results indicate the need to monitor the presence of dysphagia and the micronutrient intake in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Vulnerability Assessment Tools for Complex Information Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cassandras, Christos G; Gong, Weibo; Pepyne, David L; Lee, Wenke; Liu, Hong; Ho, Yu-Chi; Pfeffer, Avrom

    2006-01-01

    The specific aims of this research is to develop theories, methodologies, tools, and implementable solutions for modeling, analyzing, designing, and securing information networks against information-based attack...

  16. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Practice Guidelines: Evaluation of Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Cockeram, Alan W

    1998-01-01

    Dysphagia may be defined as difficulty in swallowing. Dysphagia may be classified as oropharyngeal or esophageal; oropharyngeal dysphagia arises from a structural or functional abnormality in the oropharynx, and esophageal dysphagia occurs as a result of structural or functional abnormalities in the esophagus. Esophageal dysphagia may be further subclassified symptomatically as dysphagia for solids alone, which usually suggests a mechanical problem, versus dysphagia for liquids and solids, wh...

  17. Dysphagia lusoria: a late onset presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Alice Louise; Cock, Charles; Heddle, Richard; Morcom, Russell Kym

    2013-04-21

    Dysphagia lusoria is a term used to describe dysphagia secondary to vascular compression of the oesophagus. The various embryologic anomalies of the arterial brachial arch system often remain unrecognised and asymptomatic, but in 30%-40% of cases can result in tracheo-oesophageal symptoms, which in the majority of cases manifest as dysphagia. Diagnosis of dysphagia lusoria is via barium swallow and chest Computed tomography scan. Manometric abnormalities are variable, but age-related manometric changes may contribute to clinically relevant dysphagia lusoria in patients who present later in life. Our report describes a case of late-onset dysphagia secondary to a right aortic arch with an aberrant left subclavian artery, which represents a rare variant of dysphagia lusoria. The patient had proven additional oesophageal dysmotility with solid bolus only and a clinical response to dietary modification.

  18. Dysphagia: Thinking outside the box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Hamish; Garg, Mayur; Tomic, Dunya; Balasubramanian, Smrithya; Sweis, Rami

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom that is important to recognise and appropriately manage, given that causes include life threatening oesophageal neoplasia, oropharyngeal dysfunction, the risk of aspiration, as well as chronic disabling gastroesophageal reflux (GORD). The predominant causes of dysphagia varies between cohorts depending on the interplay between genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors, and is changing with time. Currently in white Caucasian societies adopting a western lifestyle, obesity is common and thus associated gastroesophageal reflux disease is increasingly diagnosed. Similarly, food allergies are increasing in the west, and eosinophilic oesophagitis is increasingly found as a cause. Other regions where cigarette smoking is still prevalent, or where access to medical care and antisecretory agents such as proton pump inhibitors are less available, benign oesophageal peptic strictures, Barrett’s oesophagus, adeno- as well as squamous cell carcinoma are endemic. The evaluation should consider the severity of symptoms, as well as the pre-test probability of a given condition. In young white Caucasian males who are atopic or describe heartburn, eosinophilic esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease will predominate and a proton pump inhibitor could be commenced prior to further investigation. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy remains a valid first line investigation for patients with suspected oesophageal dysphagia. Barium swallow is particularly useful for oropharyngeal dysphagia, and oesophageal manometry mandatory to diagnose motility disorders. PMID:29097867

  19. DYSPHAGIA – BEYOND MALIGNANT PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Constantinescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Esophageal dysphagia can be caused by functional or structural abnormalities of the esophagus like esophageal strictures due to acid reflux disease, eosinophilic esophagitis, tumors and extrinsic compression, or by neuromuscular disorders like achalasia and diffuse spasm. The true prevalence of esophageal dysphagia is unknown, although epidemiological studies estimate a prevalence rate of 16% to 22% among individuals over 50 years of age. Case presentation. We present the case of a 55-year-old man, admitted to our hospital with progressive dysphagia for solids and important weight loss over the last two months. The upper endoscopy revealed an extrinsic compression of the middle esophagus. At this point, a thorax and abdomen computed tomography scan was performed, that showed a retrohilar mass of 58/44/38 mm, which compressed the right inferior lobar bronchus at the origin and the thoracic esophagus in the middle part. Endoscopic ultrasound and fine needle aspiration were performed. The anatomopathological examination of the biopsy reveals elements of chronic inflammation with neutrophils and lymphocytes, and granulomas with areas of necrosis, highly suggestive for tuberculosis. Conclusions. Dysphagia is a rare manifestation of tuberculosis, most commonly caused by an extrinsic compression mechanism due to mediastinal adenopathies. The particularity of this case is related to the contradicting imaging studies, that suggested either an esophageal or a pulmonary tumor, with mediastinal adenopathies, and the importance of endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration in determining the benign or malignant nature of injuries that are hardly accessible to non-invasive diagnostic methods.

  20. Neck Pain and Acute Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, João; Romão, José; Cunha, Anita; Paiva, Sofia; Miguéis, António

    2017-02-01

    The acute tendinitis of the longus colli muscle is an unusual diagnosis in the cases of acute dysphagia with cervical pain. Is a self-limiting condition caused by abnormal calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the prevertebral space and can cause pharyngeal swelling with impaired swallow. It is absolutely critical to make the differential diagnosis with deep cervical infections in order to avoid invasive treatments.

  1. A Descriptive Investigation of Dysphagia in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia has rarely been investigated in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) despite being a serious condition affecting health and quality of life. Method: This study collected information about 101 adults with ID, living in community settings, referred for an assessment of their eating and drinking. Ninety-nine people were…

  2. Impaired bolus transit across the esophagogastric junction in postfundoplication dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, R. C. H.; Samsom, M.; Haverkamp, A.; Oors, J.; Hebbard, G. S.; Gooszen, H. G.

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of fundoplication on liquid and solid bolus transit across the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) in relation to EGJ dynamics and dysphagia. Twelve patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) were studied before and after fundoplication. Concurrent

  3. Dysphagia, a reversible cause not to be forgotten.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, M.; Haigh, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    An 84-year-old man presented with dysphagia two years after the onset of symptoms. Repeated assessments at both ENT and neurology clinics had not recorded any of the more classical signs of Parkinson's disease and these did not become apparent until intercurrent illness had been treated. Once diagnosed, treatment was started and dramatic improvement was seen.

  4. Evaluation of neurogenic dysphagia in Iraqi patients with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Zeki N; Al-Shimmery, Ehsan K; Taha, Mufeed A

    2010-04-01

    To clinically assess neurogenic dysphagia, and to correlate its presence with demographic features, different stroke risk factors, anatomical arterial territorial stroke types, and pathological stroke types. Seventy-two stroke inpatients were studied between July 2007 and February 2008, at the Departments of Medicine and Neurology at Al-Yarmouk Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, and Rizgary Teaching Hospital, Erbil, Iraq. All patients were assessed using the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability score (MASA), Modified Rankin Scale, and the Stroke Risk Scorecard. All patients were reassessed after one month. There were 40 males and 32 females. Sixty-eight patients had ischemic stroke, and 4 had primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). According to the MASA score, 55% of anterior circulation stroke (ACS) cases were associated with dysphasia, and 91% of lateral medullary syndrome cases were associated with dysphagia. Fifty-six percent of ACS dysphagic cases improved within the first month. Forty percent of dysphagic patients died in the one month follow up period, and in most, death was caused by aspiration pneumonia. We observed no significant differences regarding demographic features of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be an indicator of the severity of stroke causing higher mortality and morbidity in affected patients. It was not related to the stroke risk factors and the type of stroke. It is essential from a prognostic point of view to assess swallowing, and to treat its complications early.

  5. Observation the swallowing mechanism in elderly patients with pharyngeal dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ximena Campo-Cañar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Observation of the swallowing dynamics is an issue that demands close attention by the health professionals involved in the diagnosis and management of patients with dysphagia. This article is a review of the literature aimed to enhance the knowledge regarding the speech therapy assessment of pharyngeal dysphagia in elder adults. The disorder of the swallowing is called dysphagia and it is defined as difficulty swallowing. The dysphagia is often caused by affectation of mechanical or neuromuscular components of the swallowing mechanism. This type of disorder is likely to impact the the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of the swallowing. The speech therapist should take into account assessing aspects such as level of consciousness, vital signs, whether or not the patient is ventilator dependent, means of feeding, if intubated what type of cannula, whether or not the patient uses a speaking valve (if a trach tube is present, nutritional status, the patient’s expressive and receptive language, the anatomical and physiological state of the oral motor structures. When assessing swallowing clinicians should also make sure to develop an adequate beside clinical, voice assessment and videofluoroscopy.

  6. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutt, Polly; Love, Jo; Clavé, Pere; Cohen, David; Dziewas, Rainer; Iversen, Helle K.; Ledl, Christian; Ragab, Suzanne; Soda, Hassan; Warusevitane, Anushka; Woisard, Virginie; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials. Methods— We randomly assigned 162 patients with a recent ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and dysphagia, defined as a penetration aspiration score (PAS) of ≥3 on video fluoroscopy, to PES or sham treatment given on 3 consecutive days. The primary outcome was swallowing safety, assessed using the PAS, at 2 weeks. Secondary outcomes included dysphagia severity, function, quality of life, and serious adverse events at 6 and 12 weeks. Results— In randomized patients, the mean age was 74 years, male 58%, ischemic stroke 89%, and PAS 4.8. The mean treatment current was 14.8 (7.9) mA and duration 9.9 (1.2) minutes per session. On the basis of previous data, 45 patients (58.4%) randomized to PES seemed to receive suboptimal stimulation. The PAS at 2 weeks, adjusted for baseline, did not differ between the randomized groups: PES 3.7 (2.0) versus sham 3.6 (1.9), P=0.60. Similarly, the secondary outcomes did not differ, including clinical swallowing and functional outcome. No serious adverse device-related events occurred. Conclusions— In patients with subacute stroke and dysphagia, PES was safe but did not improve dysphagia. Undertreatment of patients receiving PES may have contributed to the neutral result. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN25681641. PMID:27165955

  7. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: sonographic evaluation of dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrini, S; Solazzo, A; Sagnelli, A; Del Vecchio, L; Reginelli, A; Monsorrò, M; Grassi, R

    2010-08-01

    The authors sought to determine the role of video ultrasonography (VUS) in the diagnostic assessment of dysphagia in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Nine patients underwent simultaneous static and dynamic VUS examination and videofluoroscopy (VFS) of swallowing. At the static phase, VUS showed 5/9 patients had lingual atrophy. Abnormal bolus position was observed in 6/9 patients at VUS and 3/9 at VFS. Both techniques identified an inability to keep the bolus in the oral cavity in 4/9 patients. At the dynamic phase, reduced lingual movement was observed in 5/9 patients at VUS and 2/9 at VFS. Disorganised tongue movement was seen in 3/9 patients at VUS and in 2/9 at VFS. Fragmented swallowing was only visualised at VUS. Stagnation of ingested material was never visualised at VUS, whereas it was clearly depicted in 2/9 patients at VFS. VUS can be integrated into the diagnostic protocol for evaluating swallowing in patients with ALS, as it has higher sensitivity than VFS in assessing the dynamic factors that represent the early signs of dysphagia.

  8. Comparative Testing for Corporate Impact Assessment Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farsang, Andrea; Reisch, Lucia A.

    of our study are: poverty, water and sanitation, education, food and agriculture, climate change, and human rights in three industries, namely: footwear, coffee, and paper and pulp. The paper develops a protocol for the selection and quantification of indicators that can be used in selecting...... the appropriate tools for measuring impacts in the selected sectors on SDGs. Background: In the Global Value Project, a long list of indicators was compiled covering the main thematic areas and challenges of sustainability. In a second step, this long list was reduced using predefined criteria as well as other...... criteria, such as the feasibility and scalability of different tools. As a result, a protocol was developed to help compare the different tools that measure corporate impact and to interpret the results in relation to the SDGs. The protocol was pre-tested with a limited number of tools in two case studies...

  9. Human Factors and Habitability Assessment Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The major accomplishment for FY2012 was successful testing of the iPad-based Space Habitability Observation Reporting Tool (iSHORT) during NEEMO 16. iSHORT is an...

  10. The Bristol Radiology Report Assessment Tool (BRRAT): developing a workplace-based assessment tool for radiology reporting skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, A; Edey, A; Prothero, D; McCoubrie, P

    2013-11-01

    To review the development of a workplace-based assessment tool to assess the quality of written radiology reports and assess its reliability, feasibility, and validity. A comprehensive literature review and rigorous Delphi study enabled the development of the Bristol Radiology Report Assessment Tool (BRRAT), which consists of 19 questions and a global assessment score. Three assessors applied the assessment tool to 240 radiology reports provided by 24 radiology trainees. The reliability coefficient for the 19 questions was 0.79 and the equivalent coefficient for the global assessment scores was 0.67. Generalizability coefficients demonstrate that higher numbers of assessors and assessments are needed to reach acceptable levels of reliability for summative assessments due to assessor subjectivity. The study methodology gives good validity and strong foundation in best-practice. The assessment tool developed for radiology reporting is reliable and most suited to formative assessments. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Bristol Radiology Report Assessment Tool (BRRAT): Developing a workplace-based assessment tool for radiology reporting skills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallis, A.; Edey, A.; Prothero, D.; McCoubrie, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To review the development of a workplace-based assessment tool to assess the quality of written radiology reports and assess its reliability, feasibility, and validity. Materials and methods: A comprehensive literature review and rigorous Delphi study enabled the development of the Bristol Radiology Report Assessment Tool (BRRAT), which consists of 19 questions and a global assessment score. Three assessors applied the assessment tool to 240 radiology reports provided by 24 radiology trainees. Results: The reliability coefficient for the 19 questions was 0.79 and the equivalent coefficient for the global assessment scores was 0.67. Generalizability coefficients demonstrate that higher numbers of assessors and assessments are needed to reach acceptable levels of reliability for summative assessments due to assessor subjectivity. Conclusion: The study methodology gives good validity and strong foundation in best-practice. The assessment tool developed for radiology reporting is reliable and most suited to formative assessments

  12. Resiliency Evaluation, Assessment and Contingency Tools, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Resiliency Evaluation, Assessment and Contingency Tools (REACT) Achieving resiliency in any system requires capabilities that are beyond the boundaries of currently...

  13. Dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Nam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, VA North Texas Health Care System, Radiation Oncology Service (140), 4500 S, Lancaster Road, Dallas, TX 72516 (United States)]. E-mail: NamPhong.Nguyen@med.va.gov; Moltz, Candace C. [Audiology and Speech Pathology Service (126), VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Frank, Cheryl [Audiology and Speech Pathology Service (126), VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Karlsson, Ulf [Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Nguyen, Phuc D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, VA North Texas Health Care System, Radiation Oncology Service (140), 4500 S, Lancaster Road, Dallas, TX 72516 (United States); Vos, Paul [Department of Biostatistics, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Smith, Herbert J. [Radiology Service, VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Dutta, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Nguyen, Ly M. [Public Health School, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Lemanski, Claire [Department of Radiation Oncology, Val D' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Chan, Wayne [Radiation Oncology Service, VAMC, Jackson, MS 39216 (United States); Sallah, Sabah [Division of Hematology/Oncology Research, Novo Nordisk, Athens (Greece)

    2006-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to evaluate dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer, and particularly the aspiration risk because of its potential life-threatening consequence. Materials and methods: We reviewed retrospectively the modified barium swallow (MBS) results in 110 patients who complained of dysphagia following chemoradiation (57) and postoperative radiation (53) of their head and neck cancer. Patients were selected if they were cancer free at the time of the swallowing study. Dysphagia severity was graded on a scale of 1-7. Patients were grouped according to the dysphagia severity: mild (grades 2-3), moderate (grades 4-5), and severe (grades 6-7). Results: Mean and median dysphagia grades were 4.84/5 and 4.12/4 for chemoradiation and postoperative radiation respectively. The mean difference between the two groups is statistically significant (p = 0.02). Mild dysphagia occurred in 13 patients (22%) of the chemoradiation group and 17 (32%) of the postoperative group. Corresponding number for the moderate group was 25 (43%) and 25 (48%), respectively. Severe dysphagia was significant in the chemoradiation group (34%) compared to the postoperative group (19%). However, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.29). There was a higher proportion of patients with large tumor (T3-T4) in the chemoradiation group who developed severe dysphagia. Conclusion: Dysphagia remained a significant morbidity of chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer. Dysphagia may be more severe in the chemoradiation group because of the higher proportion of patients with large tumor, the high radiation dose, and a high number of oropharyngeal tumors. Aspiration occurred in both groups. Diagnostic studies such as MBS should be part of future head and neck cancer prospective studies to assess the prevalence of aspiration, as it may be silent.

  14. Dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Moltz, Candace C.; Frank, Cheryl; Karlsson, Ulf; Nguyen, Phuc D.; Vos, Paul; Smith, Herbert J.; Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Ly M.; Lemanski, Claire; Chan, Wayne; Sallah, Sabah

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to evaluate dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer, and particularly the aspiration risk because of its potential life-threatening consequence. Materials and methods: We reviewed retrospectively the modified barium swallow (MBS) results in 110 patients who complained of dysphagia following chemoradiation (57) and postoperative radiation (53) of their head and neck cancer. Patients were selected if they were cancer free at the time of the swallowing study. Dysphagia severity was graded on a scale of 1-7. Patients were grouped according to the dysphagia severity: mild (grades 2-3), moderate (grades 4-5), and severe (grades 6-7). Results: Mean and median dysphagia grades were 4.84/5 and 4.12/4 for chemoradiation and postoperative radiation respectively. The mean difference between the two groups is statistically significant (p = 0.02). Mild dysphagia occurred in 13 patients (22%) of the chemoradiation group and 17 (32%) of the postoperative group. Corresponding number for the moderate group was 25 (43%) and 25 (48%), respectively. Severe dysphagia was significant in the chemoradiation group (34%) compared to the postoperative group (19%). However, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.29). There was a higher proportion of patients with large tumor (T3-T4) in the chemoradiation group who developed severe dysphagia. Conclusion: Dysphagia remained a significant morbidity of chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer. Dysphagia may be more severe in the chemoradiation group because of the higher proportion of patients with large tumor, the high radiation dose, and a high number of oropharyngeal tumors. Aspiration occurred in both groups. Diagnostic studies such as MBS should be part of future head and neck cancer prospective studies to assess the prevalence of aspiration, as it may be silent

  15. Dysphagia in Children with Esophageal Atresia: Current Diagnostic Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayyan, Maissa; Allegaert, Karel; Omari, Taher; Rommel, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    Dysphagia or swallowing disorder is very common (range, 15-52%) in patients with esophageal atresia. Children present with a wide range of symptoms. The most common diagnostic tools to evaluate esophageal dysphagia, such as upper barium study and manometry, aim to characterize anatomy and function of the esophageal body and the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). Using these technologies, a variety of pathological motor patterns have been identified in children with esophageal atresia. However, the most challenging part of diagnosing patients with esophageal dysphagia lies in the fact that these methods fail to link functional symptoms such as dysphagia with the esophageal motor disorders observed. A recent method, called pressure-flow analysis (PFA), uses simultaneously acquired impedance and manometry measurements, and applies an integrated analysis of these recordings to derive quantitative pressure-flow metrics. These pressure-flow metrics allow detection of the interplay between bolus flow, motor patterns, and symptomatology by combining data on bolus transit and bolus flow resistance. Based on a dichotomous categorization, flow resistance at the EGJ and ineffective esophageal bolus transit can be determined. This method has the potential to guide therapeutic decisions for esophageal dysmotility in pediatric patients with esophageal atresia. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Comparative assessment of several dismantling cutting tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilot, G.; Bernard, J.; Lorin, C.; Ravera, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The research work relates to semi-industrial scale testing in air of various relevant cutting tools (plasma torch, arc-air, grinder, alternating saw) for mild steel and stainless steel with thicknesses of 10, 30 and 50 mm. Its originality is a comparison between tools in the same normalized conditions of use in order to determine the performances of the different techniques and to measure all the generated secondary solid wastes. Among the tested tools, the plasma torch is the fastest and the alternating saw the slowest. The arc-air produces the widest kerf and thus the most wastes. The electrode of the arc-air and the wheel of the grinder wear the swiftest. The alternating saw generates the least mass of aerosols. (author). 1 ref., 7 figs

  17. 77 FR 28894 - Maritime Vulnerability Self-Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Maritime Vulnerability Self... maritime vulnerability self- assessment tool. SUMMARY: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) announces that the TSA Maritime Self-Assessment Risk Module (TMSARM), developed to support the United States...

  18. Self-reported dysphagia and its correlates within a prevalent population of people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Richard W; Dunn, Janet R; Gray, William K

    2011-03-01

    Many people with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience dysphagia; however, the prevalence of dysphagia in people with PD is unknown. We studied a prevalent population of PD cases. All of those who consented to participate were assessed for anxiety, depression, cognitive function, and quality of life using standard rating scales. Anyone who answered "yes" to either one of the two questions: Do you have difficulty swallowing food/liquid or tablets? and Do you cough after eating/drinking? was considered to have dysphagia. Question 7 of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was also used to identify dysphagia. Of 106 prevalent PD cases, 75 (38 males) patients consented to examination and assessment. The prevalence of dysphagia was 32.0% (n=24; 11 males). Using the response to UPDRS Question 7 as an indicator of the impact of swallowing problems on the patient, there were significant correlations with cognitive function, anxiety, depression, quality of life, and UPDRS-reported gait disturbance, postural instability and problems with falling. There was no correlation with disease duration, age, or gender. Almost one third of the participants reported dysphagia. There was a strong correlation between dysphagia and gross motor skills; patients reporting such problems should be screened for swallowing problems. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

  19. Dysphagia is a common and serious problem for adults with mental illness: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Kristy J; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2012-03-01

    Adults with mental illness may experience a higher incidence of dysphagia and choking due to factors such as medication side effects and behavioural abnormalities. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of dysphagia and the most effective interventions for this population. Studies published up to August 2010 were sought via a comprehensive electronic database search (CINAHL, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase). Studies reporting dysphagia frequency or dysphagia intervention outcomes in adults with mental illness were included. Two reviewers independently assessed study eligibility and quality, and the results were synthesised descriptively. Ten studies were identified, each describing dysphagia frequency or death due to choking asphyxiation. No studies evaluating intervention effectiveness were identified. Study quality was limited by subjective assessment of outcomes. Six studies presented dysphagia frequencies ranging from 9 to 42% in varying subgroups. Four studies presented the frequency of choking asphyxiation death, including a large survey that concluded that adults with organic mental illness were 43 times more likely to die of this cause than the general population. Dysphagia is a common and significant cause of morbidity and mortality in adults with mental illness and our review found that there is a lack of studies evaluating the effectiveness of intervention techniques.

  20. Dysphagia in Rett Syndrome: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzedimi, Chiara; Livi, Walter; De Felice, Claudio; Cocca, Serena

    2017-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder and the second major cause of mental retardation in females. The aim of this study was to evaluate swallowing problems of RS patients by endoscopic assessment and compile a list of suggestions for managing feeding and preventing complications. The sample consisted of 61 female patients (mean age = 13.6 years, range, 2-33 years) admitted to the Department of Neuropsychiatry, where they had previously been diagnosed with RS. Speech evaluation associated with observation during mealtimes was useful to formulate suggestions for caregivers. Progressive deterioration of feeding was commonly noted by caregivers. Fifty-four patients had a history of recurrent episodes of bronchitis. Oral apraxia, dyskinetic tongue movements, prolonged oral stage, and poor bolus formation were the most common findings in all patients. Dysphagia was primarily limited to oral preparatory phases, while the pharyngeal phase was normal in most patients. The high percentage of dysphagia suggests the need to accurately monitor the feeding capability of RS children. It is critical to correctly inform caregivers about safe swallowing procedures to reduce the incidence of fatal complications.

  1. Teacher Leadership: Teacher Self-Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Institutes for Research, 2017

    2017-01-01

    As interest in teacher leadership has grown, many leading organizations have developed tools and guidance to support schools, districts, and teacher leaders themselves. In collaboration and consultation with the Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Midwest Educator Effectiveness Research Alliance, REL Midwest and the Center on Great Teachers and…

  2. A quality assessment tool for markup-based clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalom, Erez; Shahar, Yuval; Taieb-Maimon, Meirav; Lunenfeld, Eitan

    2008-11-06

    We introduce a tool for quality assessment of procedural and declarative knowledge. We developed this tool for evaluating the specification of mark-up-based clinical GLs. Using this graphical tool, the expert physician and knowledge engineer collaborate to perform scoring, using pre-defined scoring scale, each of the knowledge roles of the mark-ups, comparing it to a gold standard. The tool enables scoring the mark-ups simultaneously at different sites by different users at different locations.

  3. Rapid assessment as an evaluation tool for polio national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid assessment as an evaluation tool for polio national immunisation days in Brong Ahafo region, Ghana. ... TM Akande, M Eshetu, G Bonsu ... Conclusion: Rapid assessment is a valuable tool for evaluation of NIDs; it enables timely intervention in covering missed children and helps in careful interpretation of the usual ...

  4. Advanced REACH tool: A Bayesian model for occupational exposure assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McNally, K.; Warren, N.; Fransman, W.; Entink, R.K.; Schinkel, J.; Van Tongeren, M.; Cherrie, J.W.; Kromhout, H.; Schneider, T.; Tielemans, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a Bayesian model for the assessment of inhalation exposures in an occupational setting; the methodology underpins a freely available web-based application for exposure assessment, the Advanced REACH Tool (ART). The ART is a higher tier exposure tool that combines disparate

  5. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation versus traditional therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease and oropharyngeal dysphagia: effects on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijnen, B J; Speyer, R; Baijens, L W J; Bogaardt, H C A

    2012-09-01

    This study compares the effects of traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment with those of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) as adjunct to therapy on the quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease and oropharyngeal dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients were randomized over three treatment groups. Traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment and traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment combined with NMES at sensor or motor level stimulation were compared. At three times (pretreatment, post-treatment, and 3 months following treatment), two quality-of-life questionnaires (SWAL-QOL and MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory) and a single-item Dysphagia Severity Scale were scored. The Functional Oral Intake Scale was used to assess the dietary intake. After therapy, all groups showed significant improvement on the Dysphagia Severity Scale and restricted positive effects on quality of life. Minimal group differences were found. These effects remained unchanged 3 months following treatment. No significant correlations were found between dietary intake and quality of life. Logopedic dysphagia treatment results in a restricted increased quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease. In this randomized controlled trial, all groups showed significant therapy effects on the Dysphagia Severity Scale and restricted improvements on the SWAL-QOL and the MDADI. However, only slight nonsignificant differences between groups were found.

  6. NREL: International Activities - Assessments and Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afghanistan, Bhutan, India, Pakistan, and Philippines. We have also mapped alternative fueling stations and energy poverty, and solar and wind energy resource assessments. Training Courses NREL training courses

  7. Identification of risk factors for postoperative dysphagia after primary anti-reflux surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Lee, Tommy H; Legner, András; Yano, Fumiaki; Dworak, Thomas; Mittal, Sumeet K

    2011-03-01

    to identify patients at risk for postfundoplication dysphagia, and that there is need for standardization of contrast swallow assessment of esophageal function.

  8. Using Business Simulations as Authentic Assessment Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Pat; Tucker, Jan

    2012-01-01

    New modalities for assessing student learning exist as a result of advances in computer technology. Conventional measurement practices have been transformed into computer based testing. Although current testing replicates assessment processes used in college classrooms, a greater opportunity exists to use computer technology to create authentic…

  9. Early Dysphagia Screening by Trained Nurses Reduces Pneumonia Rate in Stroke Patients: A Clinical Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palli, Christoph; Fandler, Simon; Doppelhofer, Kathrin; Niederkorn, Kurt; Enzinger, Christian; Vetta, Christian; Trampusch, Esther; Schmidt, Reinhold; Fazekas, Franz; Gattringer, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Dysphagia is a common stroke symptom and leads to serious complications such as aspiration and pneumonia. Early dysphagia screening can reduce these complications. In many hospitals, dysphagia screening is performed by speech-language therapists who are often not available on weekends/holidays, which results in delayed dysphagia assessment. We trained the nurses of our neurological department to perform formal dysphagia screening in every acute stroke patient by using the Gugging Swallowing Screen. The impact of a 24/7 dysphagia screening (intervention) over swallowing assessment by speech-language therapists during regular working hours only was compared in two 5-month periods with time to dysphagia screening, pneumonia rate, and length of hospitalization as outcome variables. Overall, 384 patients (mean age, 72.3±13.7 years; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 3) were included in the study. Both groups (pre-intervention, n=198 versus post-intervention, n=186) were comparable regarding age, sex, and stroke severity. Time to dysphagia screening was significantly reduced in the intervention group (median, 7 hours; range, 1-69 hours) compared with the control group (median, 20 hours; range, 1-183; P =0.001). Patients in the intervention group had a lower rate of pneumonia (3.8% versus 11.6%; P =0.004) and also a reduced length of hospital stay (median, 8 days; range, 2-40 versus median, 9 days; range, 1-61 days; P =0.033). 24/7 dysphagia screening can be effectively performed by nurses and leads to reduced pneumonia rates. Therefore, empowering nurses to do a formal bedside screening for swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients timely after admission is warranted whenever speech-language therapists are not available. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Health impact assessment – A survey on quantifying tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehr, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.fehr@uni-bielefeld.de [Fakultaet fuer Gesundheitswissenschaften, Universitaet Bielefeld, Universitaetsstr. 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Mekel, Odile C.L., E-mail: odile.mekel@lzg.nrw.de [Gesundheitsdaten und analysen, Versorgungsstrukturen, Landeszentrum Gesundheit Nordrhein-Westfalen (LZG.NRW), Westerfeldstr. 35-37, 33611 Bielefeld (Germany); Fintan Hurley, J., E-mail: fintan.hurley@iom-world.org [Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), Research Avenue North, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH14 4AP, Scotland (United Kingdom); Mackenbach, Johan P., E-mail: j.mackenbach@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    Integrating human health into prospective impact assessments is known to be challenging. This is true for both approaches: dedicated health impact assessments (HIA) as well as inclusion of health into more general impact assessments. Acknowledging the full range of participatory, qualitative, and quantitative approaches, this study focuses on the latter, especially on computational tools for quantitative health modelling. We conducted a survey among tool developers concerning the status quo of development and availability of such tools; experiences made with model usage in real-life situations; and priorities for further development. Responding toolmaker groups described 17 such tools, most of them being maintained and reported as ready for use and covering a wide range of topics, including risk & protective factors, exposures, policies, and health outcomes. In recent years, existing models have been improved and were applied in new ways, and completely new models emerged. There was high agreement among respondents on the need to further develop methods for assessment of inequalities and uncertainty. The contribution of quantitative modeling to health foresight would benefit from building joint strategies of further tool development, improving the visibility of quantitative tools and methods, and engaging continuously with actual and potential users. - Highlights: • A survey investigated computational tools for health impact quantification. • Formal evaluation of such tools has been rare. • Handling inequalities and uncertainties are priority areas for further development. • Health foresight would benefit from tool developers and users forming a community. • Joint development strategies across computational tools are needed.

  11. Health impact assessment – A survey on quantifying tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehr, Rainer; Mekel, Odile C.L.; Fintan Hurley, J.; Mackenbach, Johan P.

    2016-01-01

    Integrating human health into prospective impact assessments is known to be challenging. This is true for both approaches: dedicated health impact assessments (HIA) as well as inclusion of health into more general impact assessments. Acknowledging the full range of participatory, qualitative, and quantitative approaches, this study focuses on the latter, especially on computational tools for quantitative health modelling. We conducted a survey among tool developers concerning the status quo of development and availability of such tools; experiences made with model usage in real-life situations; and priorities for further development. Responding toolmaker groups described 17 such tools, most of them being maintained and reported as ready for use and covering a wide range of topics, including risk & protective factors, exposures, policies, and health outcomes. In recent years, existing models have been improved and were applied in new ways, and completely new models emerged. There was high agreement among respondents on the need to further develop methods for assessment of inequalities and uncertainty. The contribution of quantitative modeling to health foresight would benefit from building joint strategies of further tool development, improving the visibility of quantitative tools and methods, and engaging continuously with actual and potential users. - Highlights: • A survey investigated computational tools for health impact quantification. • Formal evaluation of such tools has been rare. • Handling inequalities and uncertainties are priority areas for further development. • Health foresight would benefit from tool developers and users forming a community. • Joint development strategies across computational tools are needed.

  12. The lived experience of dysphagia following non-surgical treatment for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence and severity of dysphagia in people treated non-surgically for primary head and neck cancer (HNC) is well documented. However, few studies have looked beyond the physiological impairment to explore the lived experience of dysphagia in the post-treatment period of HNC. The current study adopted a person-centred, qualitative approach to describe the experiences of people living with dysphagia in the months and years following non-surgical treatment for HNC. Using maximum variation sampling, 24 participants who had undergone radiotherapy treatment for HNC were recruited. Individual interviews were conducted to explore the impact of dysphagia on participants' everyday lives. The themes identified included: (1) physical changes related to swallowing; (2) emotions evoked by living with dysphagia; (3) altered perceptions and changes in appreciation of food; and (4) personal and lifestyle impacts. The data revealed the breadth and significance of the impact of dysphagia on the lives of people treated curatively for HNC. Assessment and management in the post-treatment period must be sufficiently holistic to address both the changing physical states and the psychosocial needs of people with dysphagia following HNC. Rehabilitation services which focus only on impairment-based management will fail to fully meet the support needs of this clinical population.

  13. Psychometric Properties of Questionnaires on Functional Health Status in Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speyer, Renée; Cordier, Reinie; Kertscher, Berit; Heijnen, Bas J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Questionnaires on Functional Health Status (FHS) are part of the assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Objective. To conduct a systematic review of the literature on the psychometric properties of English-language FHS questionnaires in adults with oropharyngeal dysphagia. Methods. A systematic search was performed using the electronic databases Pubmed and Embase. The psychometric properties of the questionnaires were determined based on the COSMIN taxonomy of measurement properties and definitions for health-related patient-reported outcomes and the COSMIN checklist using preset psychometric criteria. Results. Three questionnaires were included: the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10), the Swallowing Outcome after Laryngectomy (SOAL), and the Self-report Symptom Inventory. The Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ) proved to be identical to the Modified Self-report Symptom Inventory. All FHS questionnaires obtained poor overall methodological quality scores for most measurement properties. Conclusions. The retrieved FHS questionnaires need psychometric reevaluation; if the overall methodological quality shows satisfactory improvement on most measurement properties, the use of the questionnaires in daily clinic and research can be justified. However, in case of insufficient validity and/or reliability scores, new FHS questionnaires need to be developed using and reporting on preestablished psychometric criteria as recommended in literature. PMID:24877095

  14. Dysphagia in infants after open heart procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sook-Hee; Kim, Sang-Jun; Huh, June; Jun, Tae-Gook; Cheon, Hee Jung; Kwon, Jeong-Yi

    2013-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and the clinical predictors of dysphagia and to determine the characteristics of videofluoroscopic swallowing study findings in infants after open heart procedures. This study is a retrospective review of 146 infants who underwent open heart surgery. The infants with dysphagia were compared with those without dysphagia. The videofluoroscopic swallowing study findings of the infants with dysphagia were also evaluated. Of the 146 infants who underwent open heart surgery, 35 (24.0%) had dysphagia symptoms. The infants with dysphagia had lower body weight at operation, more malformation syndromes, longer operation times, and more complex operations than did the infants without dysphagia. In addition, the infants with dysphagia required more time to achieve full oral feeding and had longer hospital stays. Thirty-three infants underwent videofluoroscopic swallowing study: 32 (97.0%) exhibited at least one abnormal finding among the videofluoroscopic swallowing study parameters and 21 (63.6%) exhibited tracheal aspiration. Given the high rate of aspiration in the infants who underwent open heart procedures, monitoring and prompt recognition of the signs and the risk factors of dysphagia may substantially improve infant care with oral feeding and reduce the duration of hospital stays.

  15. Treatment effects for dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooren, M R A; Baijens, L W J; Voskuilen, S; Oosterloo, M; Kremer, B

    2014-08-01

    Dysphagia remains a common problem in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous systematic reviews on therapy effects for oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD have shown a lack of evidence. In the past 5 years several placebo or sham-controlled trials with varying results have been published. The aim of this systematic literature review is to summarize and qualitatively analyze the published studies on this matter. Studies published up to December 2013 were found via a systematic comprehensive electronic database search using PubMed, Embase, and The Cochrane Library. Two reviewers independently assessed the studies using strict inclusion criteria. Twelve studies were included and qualitatively analyzed using critical appraisal items. The review includes rehabilitative (exercises, electrical stimulation, bolus modification etc.) and pharmacologic treatment. Some well-designed controlled trials were included. However, none of the included studies fulfilled all criteria for external and internal validity. A meta-analysis was not carried out as most of the studies were not of sufficient quality to warrant doing so. Expiratory Muscle Strength Training (EMST) and Video-Assisted Swallowing Therapy (VAST) may be effective dysphagia treatments solely or in addition to dopaminergic therapy for PD. However, these preliminary results warrant further investigation concerning their clinical applicability, and further research should be based on randomized sham-controlled trials to determine the effectiveness and long-term effects of different therapies for dysphagia in PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. GIS Technology: Resource and Habitability Assessment Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are applying Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to new orbital data sets for lunar resource assessment and the identification of past habitable environments on...

  17. Jaw-opening force test to screen for Dysphagia: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Koji; Tohara, Haruka; Wada, Satoko; Iida, Takatoshi; Ueda, Koichiro; Ansai, Toshihiro

    2014-05-01

    To assess the jaw-opening force test (JOFT) for dysphagia screening. Criterion standard. University dental hospital. Patients complaining of dysphagia (N=95) and with symptoms of dysphagia with chronic underlying causes (mean age ± SD, 79.3±9.61y; range, 50-94y; men: n=49; mean age ± SD, 77.03±9.81y; range, 50-94y; women: n=46; mean age ± SD, 75.42±9.73y; range, 51-93y) admitted for treatment between May 2011 and December 2012 were included. None. All patients were administered the JOFT and underwent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). The mean jaw-opening strength was compared with aspiration (ASP) and pharyngeal residue observations of the FEES, which was used as the criterion standard. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed. Forces of ≤3.2kg for men and ≤4kg for women were appropriate cutoff values for predicting ASP with a sensitivity and specificity of .57 and .79 for men and .93 and .52 for women, respectively. Based on the ROC analyses for predicting pharyngeal residue, forces of ≤5.3kg in men and ≤3.9kg in women were appropriate cutoff values, with a sensitivity and specificity of .80 and .88 for men and .83 and .81 for women, respectively. The JOFT could be a useful screening tool for predicting pharyngeal residue and could provide useful information to aid in the referral of patients for further diagnostic imaging testing. However, given its low sensitivity to ASP the JOFT should be paired with other screening tests that predict ASP. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluating an holistic assessment tool for palliative care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlfatrick, Sonja; Hasson, Felicity

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate a holistic assessment tool for palliative care practice. This included identifying patients' needs using the holistic tool and exploring the usability, applicability and barriers and facilitators towards implementation in practice. The delivery of effective holistic palliative care requires a careful assessment of the patients' needs and circumstances. Whilst holistic assessment of palliative care needs is advocated, questions exist around the appropriateness of tools to assist this process. Mixed-method research design. Data collection involved an analysis of piloted holistic assessments undertaken using the tool (n = 132) and two focus groups with healthcare professionals (n = 10). The tool enabled health professionals to identify and gain an understanding of the needs of the patients, specifically in relation to the physical healthcare needs. Differences, however, between the analysis of the tool documentation and focus group responses were identified in particular areas. For example, 59 (68·8%) respondents had discussed preferred priorities of care with the patient; however, focus group comments revealed participants had concerns around this. Similarly, whilst over half of responses (n = 50; 57·5%) had considered a prognostic clinical indicator for the patient as an action, focus group results indicated questions around healthcare professionals' knowledge and perceived usefulness of such indicators. Positive aspects of the tool were that it was easy to understand and captured the needs of individuals. Negative aspects of the tool were that it was repetitive and the experience of assessors required consideration. The tool evaluation identified questions regarding holistic assessment in palliative care practice and the importance of communication. A holistic assessment tool can support patient assessment and identification of patients' needs in the 'real world' of palliative care practice, but the 'tool' is merely an aid to assist professionals to

  19. Assess your competitor collaboration to advance sustainability : an assessment tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DiVito, Lori; Garima, Sharma

    2016-01-01

    If your company is currently collaborating with competitors in order to advance sustainability, this tool will help you think about how to take that collaboration to the next level and achieve better results. If you’re still at the planning stages, this tool can help you reflect on where you would

  20. A critical review of seven selected neighborhood sustainability assessment tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifi, Ayyoob, E-mail: sharifi.ayyoob@a.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Murayama, Akito, E-mail: murayama@corot.nuac.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2013-01-15

    Neighborhood sustainability assessment tools have become widespread since the turn of 21st century and many communities, mainly in the developed world, are utilizing these tools to measure their success in approaching sustainable development goals. In this study, seven tools from Australia, Europe, Japan, and the United States are selected and analyzed with the aim of providing insights into the current situations; highlighting the strengths, weaknesses, successes, and failures; and making recommendations for future improvements. Using a content analysis, the issues of sustainability coverage, pre-requisites, local adaptability, scoring and weighting, participation, reporting, and applicability are discussed in this paper. The results of this study indicate that most of the tools are not doing well regarding the coverage of social, economic, and institutional aspects of sustainability; there are ambiguities and shortcomings in the weighting, scoring, and rating; in most cases, there is no mechanism for local adaptability and participation; and, only those tools which are embedded within the broader planning framework are doing well with regard to applicability. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Seven widely used assessment tools were analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a lack of balanced assessment of sustainability dimensions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tools are not doing well regarding the applicability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refinements are needed to make the tools more effective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment tools must be integrated into the planning process.

  1. A critical review of seven selected neighborhood sustainability assessment tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifi, Ayyoob; Murayama, Akito

    2013-01-01

    Neighborhood sustainability assessment tools have become widespread since the turn of 21st century and many communities, mainly in the developed world, are utilizing these tools to measure their success in approaching sustainable development goals. In this study, seven tools from Australia, Europe, Japan, and the United States are selected and analyzed with the aim of providing insights into the current situations; highlighting the strengths, weaknesses, successes, and failures; and making recommendations for future improvements. Using a content analysis, the issues of sustainability coverage, pre-requisites, local adaptability, scoring and weighting, participation, reporting, and applicability are discussed in this paper. The results of this study indicate that most of the tools are not doing well regarding the coverage of social, economic, and institutional aspects of sustainability; there are ambiguities and shortcomings in the weighting, scoring, and rating; in most cases, there is no mechanism for local adaptability and participation; and, only those tools which are embedded within the broader planning framework are doing well with regard to applicability. - Highlights: ► Seven widely used assessment tools were analyzed. ► There is a lack of balanced assessment of sustainability dimensions. ► Tools are not doing well regarding the applicability. ► Refinements are needed to make the tools more effective. ► Assessment tools must be integrated into the planning process.

  2. Randomized controlled trial comparing esophageal dilation to no dilation among adults with esophageal eosinophilia and dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitt, R T; Ates, F; Slaughter, J C; Higginbotham, T; Shepherd, B D; Sumner, E L; Vaezi, M F

    2016-11-01

    The role of esophageal dilation in patients with esophageal eosinophilia with dysphagia remains unknown. The practice of dilation is currently based on center preferences and expert opinion. The aim of this study is to determine if, and to what extent, dysphagia improves in response to initial esophageal dilation followed by standard medical therapies. We conducted a randomized, blinded, controlled trial evaluating adult patients with dysphagia and newly diagnosed esophageal eosinophilia from 2008 to 2013. Patients were randomized to dilation or no dilation at time of endoscopy and blinded to dilation status. Endoscopic features were graded as major and minor. Subsequent to randomization and endoscopy, all patients received fluticasone and dexlansoprazole for 2 months. The primary study outcome was reduction in overall dysphagia score, assessed at 30 and 60 days post-intervention. Patients with severe strictures (less than 7-mm esophageal diameter) were excluded from the study. Thirty-one patients were randomized and completed the protocol: 17 randomized to dilation and 14 to no dilation. Both groups were similar with regard to gender, age, eosinophil density, endoscopic score, and baseline dysphagia score. The population exhibited moderate to severe dysphagia and moderate esophageal stricturing at baseline. Overall, there was a significant (P dysphagia score at 30 and 60 days post-randomization compared with baseline in both groups. No significant difference in dysphagia scores between treatment groups after 30 (P = 0.93) or 60 (P = 0.21) days post-intervention was observed. Esophageal dilation did not result in additional improvement in dysphagia score compared with treatment with proton pump inhibitor and fluticasone alone. In patients with symptomatic esophageal eosinophilia without severe stricture, dilation does not appear to be a necessary initial treatment strategy. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  3. Current established risk assessment methodologies and tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ionita, Dan; Hartel, Pieter H.; Pieters, Wolter; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    2013-01-01

    The technology behind information systems evolves at an exponential rate, while at the same time becoming more and more ubiquitous. This brings with it an implicit rise in the average complexity of systems as well as the number of external interactions. In order to allow a proper assessment of the

  4. Analysis of Alternatives for Risk Assessment Methodologies and Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtigal, Noel M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). System Analytics; Fruetel, Julia A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Systems Research and Analysis; Gleason, Nathaniel J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Systems Research and Analysis; Helms, Jovana [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Systems Research and Analysis; Imbro, Dennis Raymond [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Systems Research and Analysis; Sumner, Matthew C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Systems Research and Analysis

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a basic overview and understanding of risk assessment methodologies and tools from the literature and to assess the suitability of these methodologies and tools for cyber risk assessment. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) performed this review in support of risk modeling activities performed for the Stakeholder Engagement and Cyber Infrastructure Resilience (SECIR) division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C). The set of methodologies and tools covered in this document is not intended to be exhaustive; instead, it focuses on those that are commonly used in the risk assessment community. The classification of methodologies and tools was performed by a group of analysts with experience in risk analysis and cybersecurity, and the resulting analysis of alternatives has been tailored to address the needs of a cyber risk assessment.

  5. Clinical reasoning in nursing: teaching strategies and assessment tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emília Campos de Carvalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To present the concept and development of teaching strategies and the assessment tools regarding clinical reasoning for accurate practice. Method: This is a theoretical reflection based on scientific studies. Results: Comprehension of the essential concepts of the thought process and its articulation with the different teaching strategies and the assessment tools which has allowed presenting ways to improve the process of diagnostic or therapeutic clinical reasoning. Conclusion: The use of new strategies and assessment tools should be encouraged in order to contribute to the development of skills that lead to safe and effective decision making.

  6. Tools for the assessment of childhood apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubiani, Marileda Barichello; Pagliarin, Karina Carlesso; Keske-Soares, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    This study systematically reviews the literature on the main tools used to evaluate childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). The search strategy includes Scopus, PubMed, and Embase databases. Empirical studies that used tools for assessing CAS were selected. Articles were selected by two independent researchers. The search retrieved 695 articles, out of which 12 were included in the study. Five tools were identified: Verbal Motor Production Assessment for Children, Dynamic Evaluation of Motor Speech Skill, The Orofacial Praxis Test, Kaufman Speech Praxis Test for Children, and Madison Speech Assessment Protocol. There are few instruments available for CAS assessment and most of them are intended to assess praxis and/or orofacial movements, sequences of orofacial movements, articulation of syllables and phonemes, spontaneous speech, and prosody. There are some tests for assessment and diagnosis of CAS. However, few studies on this topic have been conducted at the national level, as well as protocols to assess and assist in an accurate diagnosis.

  7. The development of a post occupancy evaluation tool for primary schools: learner comfort assessment tool (LCAT)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motsatsi, L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available in order to facilitate teaching and learning. The aim of this study was to develop a Post Occupational Evaluation (POE) tool to assess learner comfort in relation to indoor environmental quality in the classroom. The development of POE tool followed a...

  8. Chemical Risk Assessment Screening Tool of a Global Chemical Company

    OpenAIRE

    Evelyn Tjoe-Nij; Christophe Rochin; Nathalie Berne; Alessandro Sassi; Antoine Leplay

    2018-01-01

    Background: This paper describes a simple-to-use and reliable screening tool called Critical Task Exposure Screening (CTES), developed by a chemical company. The tool assesses if the exposure to a chemical for a task is likely to be within acceptable levels. Methods: CTES is a Microsoft Excel tool, where the inhalation risk score is calculated by relating the exposure estimate to the corresponding occupational exposure limit (OEL) or occupational exposure band (OEB). The inhalation exposure i...

  9. Assessment of Available Numerical Tools for Dynamic Mooring Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jonas Bjerg; Eskilsson, Claes; Ferri, Francesco

    This report covers a preliminary assessment of available numerical tools to be used in upcoming full dynamic analysis of the mooring systems assessed in the project _Mooring Solutions for Large Wave Energy Converters_. The assessments tends to cover potential candidate software and subsequently c...

  10. Rubric Authoring Tool Supporting Cognitive Skills Assessment across an Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simper, Natalie

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores a method to support instructors in assessing cognitive skills in their course, designed to enable aggregation of data across an institution. A rubric authoring tool, "BASICS" (Building Assessment Scaffolds for Intellectual Cognitive Skills) was built as part of the Queen's University Learning Outcomes Assessment (LOA)…

  11. Tools for Assessing Readability of Statistics Teaching Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Lawrence; Wagler, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This article provides tools and rationale for instructors in math and science to make their assessment and curriculum materials (more) readable for students. The tools discussed (MSWord, LexTutor, Coh-Metrix TEA) are readily available linguistic analysis applications that are grounded in current linguistic theory, but present output that can…

  12. NTL Data Management Planning "Greenout" Bingo Self Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-11

    This tool is designed to help assess your current data management practices. Pick a dataset or research project, sit down with your data collection team, and discuss each prompt below. This tool can guide DMP improvement by revealing best practices t...

  13. Tools for regulatory assessment of occupational exposure: Development and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielemans, E.; Warren, N.; Schneider, T.; Tischer, M.; Ritchie, P.; Goede, H.; Kromhout, H.; Hemmen, J. van; Cherrie, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of CHemicals) requires improved exposure models that can be incorporated into screening tools and refined assessment tools. These are referred to as tier 1 and 2 models, respectively. There are a number of candidate in tier 1 models that could be

  14. Risk Informed Design Using Integrated Vehicle Rapid Assessment Tools

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A successful proof of concept was performed in FY 2012 integrating the Envision tool for parametric estimates of vehicle mass and the Rapid Response Risk Assessment...

  15. Air Traffic Management Cost Assessment Tool, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Robust Analytics Air Traffic Management Cost Assessment Tool (ACAT) provides the comprehensive capability to analyze the impacts of NASA air traffic management...

  16. Defining and Measuring Dysphagia Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Stephanie K.; Schroeder, Mae Fern; DeGeorge, Pamela C.; Corey, David M.; Foundas, Anne L.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To continue the development of a quantified, standard method to differentiate individuals with stroke and dysphagia from individuals without dysphagia. Method: Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) were completed on a group of participants with acute stroke (n = 42) and healthy age-matched individuals (n = 25). Calibrated liquid…

  17. Teamwork Assessment Tools in Obstetric Emergencies: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwochei, Desire N; Halpern, Stephen; Balki, Mrinalini

    2017-06-01

    Team-based training and simulation can improve patient safety, by improving communication, decision making, and performance of team members. Currently, there is no general consensus on whether or not a specific assessment tool is better adapted to evaluate teamwork in obstetric emergencies. The purpose of this qualitative systematic review was to find the tools available to assess team effectiveness in obstetric emergencies. We searched Embase, Medline, PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar for prospective studies that evaluated nontechnical skills in multidisciplinary teams involving obstetric emergencies. The search included studies from 1944 until January 11, 2016. Data on reliability and validity measures were collected and used for interpretation. A descriptive analysis was performed on the data. Thirteen studies were included in the final qualitative synthesis. All the studies assessed teams in the context of obstetric simulation scenarios, but only six included anesthetists in the simulations. One study evaluated their teamwork tool using just validity measures, five using just reliability measures, and one used both. The most reliable tools identified were the Clinical Teamwork Scale, the Global Assessment of Obstetric Team Performance, and the Global Rating Scale of performance. However, they were still lacking in terms of quality and validity. More work needs to be conducted to establish the validity of teamwork tools for nontechnical skills, and the development of an ideal tool is warranted. Further studies are required to assess how outcomes, such as performance and patient safety, are influenced when using these tools.

  18. IMPLEMENTING A VALUE ASSESSMENT TOOL FOR SERVICE INNOVATION IDEAS

    OpenAIRE

    TOR HELGE AAS

    2010-01-01

    There has not been much discussion of how firms may assess the value of service innovation projects ex-ante in the extant research literature. This paper theoretically derives a value assessment tool for service innovation ideas called QSI (tool for pre-Qualification of Service Innovation projects). Thereafter QSI is implemented in three firms and it is explored to what degree the implementation improved managerial decision making on service innovation projects and investments. The findings i...

  19. A patient self-assessment tool for cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, C; Finnell, M D; Mottla, K A

    1989-01-01

    A patient self-assessment tool was designed, tested, and implemented to promote cardiac-specific data collection, based on Gordon's Functional Health Patterns, to maximize patient/family involvement in determining a plan of care, and to streamline primary nurses' documentation requirements. Retrospective and concurrent chart reviews provided data for quality assurance monitoring. The results of the monitoring demonstrated that the self-assessment tool markedly improved the patient-specific data base.

  20. Update on clinical trials in Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logemann, Jeri A

    2006-04-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are often known as the gold standard in treatment efficacy studies. This article defines the characteristics of RCTs and the factors that investigators must consider in designing clinical trials in dysphagia. Design issues unique to behavioral treatments often used in dysphagia are discussed. Ongoing RCTs in dysphagia are described including studies of (1) the effectiveness of the Shaker exercise versus standardized treatment in patients with severe dysphagia resulting from stroke or treatment for head and neck cancer who have been nonoral for at least three months; (2) the comparative effects of nectar- and honey-thickened liquids versus chin tuck posture and in patients with dementia or Parkinson's disease with or without dementia who aspirate on thin liquids; and (3) the comparative effects of muscle exercise versus sensory postural therapy for dysphagia resulting from treatment for head and neck cancer. Issues in generalizing from the results of clinical trials are also described.

  1. Development of bilingual tools to assess functional health patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krozy, R E; McCarthy, N C

    1999-01-01

    The theory and process of developing bilingual assessment tools based on Gordon's 11 functional health patterns. To facilitate assessing the individual, family, and community in a student clinical practicum in a Spanish-speaking country. Multiple family and community health promotion theories; translation theories, Gordon's Manual of Nursing Diagnosis (1982); translation/back-translation involving Ecuadorian faculty and students; student community assessments; faculty and staff workshops in Ecuador. Bilingual, culturally sensitive health assessment tools facilitate history taking, establish nursing diagnoses and interventions, and promote mutual learning. These outcomes demonstrate potential application to other systems in the international nursing community.

  2. Dysphagia in the Older Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Samia; Tulunay-Ugur, Ozlem E

    2018-05-17

    Dysphagia in older adults is a challenging problem and necessitates a team approach. The key to effective management is recognition. Patients tend to dismiss their symptoms as normal aging; therefore, early diagnosis depends on the diligence of the primary care doctors. No diagnostic technique can replace the benefits of a thorough history, with a detailed understanding of nutritional status and aspiration risk. Although one of the main goals in management is to ensure safe swallowing, the impact of a nonoral diet on the quality of life of patients should not be underestimated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Simulation tools for robotics research and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, MaryAnne; Brewer, Ralph; Edge, Harris L.; Pusey, Jason L.; Weller, Ed; Patel, Dilip G.; DiBerardino, Charles A.

    2016-05-01

    The Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliance (RCTA) program focuses on four overlapping technology areas: Perception, Intelligence, Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), and Dexterous Manipulation and Unique Mobility (DMUM). In addition, the RCTA program has a requirement to assess progress of this research in standalone as well as integrated form. Since the research is evolving and the robotic platforms with unique mobility and dexterous manipulation are in the early development stage and very expensive, an alternate approach is needed for efficient assessment. Simulation of robotic systems, platforms, sensors, and algorithms, is an attractive alternative to expensive field-based testing. Simulation can provide insight during development and debugging unavailable by many other means. This paper explores the maturity of robotic simulation systems for applications to real-world problems in robotic systems research. Open source (such as Gazebo and Moby), commercial (Simulink, Actin, LMS), government (ANVEL/VANE), and the RCTA-developed RIVET simulation environments are examined with respect to their application in the robotic research domains of Perception, Intelligence, HRI, and DMUM. Tradeoffs for applications to representative problems from each domain are presented, along with known deficiencies and disadvantages. In particular, no single robotic simulation environment adequately covers the needs of the robotic researcher in all of the domains. Simulation for DMUM poses unique constraints on the development of physics-based computational models of the robot, the environment and objects within the environment, and the interactions between them. Most current robot simulations focus on quasi-static systems, but dynamic robotic motion places an increased emphasis on the accuracy of the computational models. In order to understand the interaction of dynamic multi-body systems, such as limbed robots, with the environment, it may be necessary to build component

  4. Tools in the assessment of sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C; Fielding, R; Visser, M; van Loon, LJ; Rolland, Y; Orwoll, E; Reid, K; Boonen, S; Dere, W; Epstein, S; Mitlak, B; Tsouderos, Y; Sayer, AA; Rizzoli, R; Reginster, JY; Kanis, JA

    2013-01-01

    Summary This review provides a framework for development of an operational definition of sarcopenia and of the potential endpoints that might be adopted in clinical trials among older adults. Introduction While the clinical relevance of sarcopenia is widely recognized, there is currently no universally accepted definition of the disorder. The development of interventions to alter the natural history of sarcopenia also requires consensus on the most appropriate endpoints for determining outcomes of clinical importance which might be utilised in intervention studies. Methods and results We review current approaches to the definition of sarcopenia, and the methods used for the assessment of various aspects of physical function in older people. The potential endpoints of muscle mass, muscle strength, muscle power and muscle fatigue, as well as the relationships between them, are explored with reference to the availability and practicality of the available methods for measuring these endpoints in clinical trials. Conclusions Based on current evidence, none of the four potential outcomes in question is sufficiently comprehensive to recommend as a uniform single outcome in randomised clinical trials. We propose that sarcopenia may be optimally defined (for the purposes of clinical trial inclusion criteria, as well as epidemiological studies) using a combination of measures of muscle mass and physical performance. The choice of outcome measures for clinical trials in sarcopenia is more difficult; co-primary outcomes, tailored to the specific intervention in question, may be the best way forward in this difficult but clinically important area. PMID:23842964

  5. Temporary tattoos: a novel OSCE assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Gerry; Menary, Allison; Layard, Brooke; Hart, Nigel; McCourt, Collette

    2013-08-01

    There are many issues regarding the use of real patients in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs). In dermatology OSCE stations, standardised patients (SPs) with clinical photographs are often used. Temporary transfer tattoos can potentially simulate skin lesions when applied to an SP. This study aims to appraise the use of temporary malignant melanoma tattoos within an OSCE framework. Within an 11-station OSCE, a temporary malignant melanoma tattoo was developed and applied to SPs in a 'skin lesion' OSCE station. A questionnaire captured the opinions of the candidate, SP and examiners, and the degree of perceived realism of each station was determined. Standard post hoc OSCE analysis determined the psychometric reliability of the stations. The response rates were 95.9 per cent of candidates and 100 per cent of the examiners and SPs. The 'skin lesion' station achieved the highest realism score compared with other stations: 89.0 per cent of candidates felt that the skin lesion appeared realistic; only 28 per cent of candidates had ever seen a melanoma before in training. The psychometric performance of the melanoma station was comparable with, and in many instances better than, other OSCE stations. Transfer tattoo technology facilitates a realistic dermatology OSCE station encounter. Temporary tattoos, alongside trained SPs, provide an authentic, standardised and reliable experience, allowing the assessment of integrated dermatology clinical skills. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Dysphagia: A Systematic Review of Instrument Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dhyanesh A.; Sharda, Rohit; Hovis, Kristen L.; Nichols, Erin E.; Sathe, Nila; Penson, David F.; Feurer, Irene D.; McPheeters, Melissa L.; Vaezi, Michael F.; Francis, David O.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are commonly used to capture patient experience with dysphagia and to evaluate treatment effectiveness. Inappropriate application can lead to distorted results in clinical studies. A systematic review of the literature on dysphagia-related PRO measures was performed to 1) identify all currently available measures and 2) to evaluate each for the presence of important measurement properties that would affect their applicability. Design MEDLINE via the PubMed interface, the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and the Health and Psychosocial Instrument database were searched using relevant vocabulary terms and key terms related to PRO measures and dysphagia. Three independent investigators performed abstract and full text reviews. Each study meeting criteria was evaluated using an 18-item checklist developed a priori that assessed multiple domains: 1) conceptual model, 2) content validity, 3) reliability, 4) construct validity, 6) scoring and interpretation, and 7) burden and presentation. Results Of 4950 abstracts reviewed, a total of 34 dysphagia-related PRO measures (publication year 1987 – 2014) met criteria for extraction and analysis. Several PRO measures were of high quality (MADS for achalasia, SWAL-QOL and SSQ for oropharyngeal dysphagia, PROMIS-GI for general dysphagia, EORTC-QLQ-OG25 for esophageal cancer, ROMP-swallowing for Parkinson’s disease, DSQ-EoE for eosinophilic esophagitis, and SOAL for total laryngectomy-related dysphagia). In all, 17 met at least one criterion per domain. Thematic deficiencies in current measures were evident including: 1) direct patient involvement in content development, 2) empirically justified dimensionality, 3) demonstrable responsiveness to change, 4) plan for interpreting missing responses, and 5) literacy level assessment. Conclusion This is the first comprehensive systematic review assessing developmental properties of all available dysphagia

  7. Patient-reported outcome measures in dysphagia: a systematic review of instrument development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, D A; Sharda, R; Hovis, K L; Nichols, E E; Sathe, N; Penson, D F; Feurer, I D; McPheeters, M L; Vaezi, M F; Francis, David O

    2017-05-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are commonly used to capture patient experience with dysphagia and to evaluate treatment effectiveness. Inappropriate application can lead to distorted results in clinical studies. A systematic review of the literature on dysphagia-related PRO measures was performed to (1) identify all currently available measures and (2) to evaluate each for the presence of important measurement properties that would affect their applicability. MEDLINE via the PubMed interface, the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and the Health and Psychosocial Instrument database were searched using relevant vocabulary terms and key terms related to PRO measures and dysphagia. Three independent investigators performed abstract and full text reviews. Each study meeting criteria was evaluated using an 18-item checklist developed a priori that assessed multiple domains: (1) conceptual model, (2) content validity, (3) reliability, (4) construct validity, (6) scoring and interpretation, and (7) burden and presentation. Of 4950 abstracts reviewed, a total of 34 dysphagia-related PRO measures (publication year 1987-2014) met criteria for extraction and analysis. Several PRO measures were of high quality (MADS for achalasia, SWAL-QOL and SSQ for oropharyngeal dysphagia, PROMIS-GI for general dysphagia, EORTC-QLQ-OG25 for esophageal cancer, ROMP-swallowing for Parkinson's Disease, DSQ-EoE for eosinophilic esophagitis, and SOAL for total laryngectomy-related dysphagia). In all, 17 met at least one criterion per domain. Thematic deficiencies in current measures were evident including: (1) direct patient involvement in content development, (2) empirically justified dimensionality, (3) demonstrable responsiveness to change, (4) plan for interpreting missing responses, and (5) literacy level assessment. This is the first comprehensive systematic review assessing developmental properties of all available dysphagia-related PRO measures. We

  8. High-resolution impedance manometry parameters enhance the esophageal motility evaluation in non-obstructive dysphagia patients without a major Chicago Classification motility disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, DA; Omari, T; Lin, Z; Rommel, N; Starkey, K; Kahrilas, PJ; Tack, J; Pandolfino, JE

    2016-01-01

    Background High-resolution impedance manometry (HRIM) allows evaluation of esophageal bolus retention, flow, and pressurization. We aimed to perform a collaborative analysis of HRIM metrics to evaluate patients with non-obstructive dysphagia. Methods 14 asymptomatic controls (58% female; ages 20 – 50) and 41 patients (63% female; ages 24 – 82), 18 evaluated for dysphagia, 23 for reflux (‘non-dysphagia patients’), with esophageal motility diagnoses of normal motility or ineffective esophageal motility were evaluated with HRIM and a global dysphagia symptom score (Brief Esophageal Dysphagia Questionnaire). HRIM were analyzed to assess Chicago Classification metrics, automated pressure-flow metrics, the esophageal impedance integral (EII) ratio, and the bolus flow time (BFT). Key Results Significant symptom-metric correlations were detected only with basal EGJ pressure, EII ratio, and BFT. The EII ratio, BFT, and impedance ratio differed between controls and dysphagia patients, while the EII ratio in the upright position was the only measure that differentiated dysphagia from non-dysphagia patients. Conclusions & Inferences The EII ratio and BFT appear to offer an improved diagnostic evaluation in patients with non-obstructive dysphagia without a major esophageal motility disorder. Bolus retention as measured with the EII ratio appears to carry the strongest association with dysphagia, and thus may aid in the characterization of symptomatic patients with otherwise normal manometry. PMID:27647522

  9. High-resolution impedance manometry parameters enhance the esophageal motility evaluation in non-obstructive dysphagia patients without a major Chicago Classification motility disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, D A; Omari, T; Lin, Z; Rommel, N; Starkey, K; Kahrilas, P J; Tack, J; Pandolfino, J E

    2017-03-01

    High-resolution impedance manometry (HRIM) allows evaluation of esophageal bolus retention, flow, and pressurization. We aimed to perform a collaborative analysis of HRIM metrics to evaluate patients with non-obstructive dysphagia. Fourteen asymptomatic controls (58% female; ages 20-50) and 41 patients (63% female; ages 24-82), 18 evaluated for dysphagia and 23 for reflux (non-dysphagia patients), with esophageal motility diagnoses of normal motility or ineffective esophageal motility, were evaluated with HRIM and a global dysphagia symptom score (Brief Esophageal Dysphagia Questionnaire). HRIM was analyzed to assess Chicago Classification metrics, automated pressure-flow metrics, the esophageal impedance integral (EII) ratio, and the bolus flow time (BFT). Significant symptom-metric correlations were detected only with basal EGJ pressure, EII ratio, and BFT. The EII ratio, BFT, and impedance ratio differed between controls and dysphagia patients, while the EII ratio in the upright position was the only measure that differentiated dysphagia from non-dysphagia patients. The EII ratio and BFT appear to offer an improved diagnostic evaluation in patients with non-obstructive dysphagia without a major esophageal motility disorder. Bolus retention as measured with the EII ratio appears to carry the strongest association with dysphagia, and thus may aid in the characterization of symptomatic patients with otherwise normal manometry. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Developing and Validating a New Classroom Climate Observation Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Stephen S; Thomas, Duane E; Shapiro, Edward S; Paskewich, Brooke; Wilson, Kim; Necowitz-Hoffman, Beth; Jawad, Abbas F

    2011-01-01

    The climate of school classrooms, shaped by a combination of teacher practices and peer processes, is an important determinant for children's psychosocial functioning and is a primary factor affecting bullying and victimization. Given that there are relatively few theoretically-grounded and validated assessment tools designed to measure the social climate of classrooms, our research team developed an observation tool through participatory action research (PAR). This article details how the assessment tool was designed and preliminarily validated in 18 third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade classrooms in a large urban public school district. The goals of this study are to illustrate the feasibility of a PAR paradigm in measurement development, ascertain the psychometric properties of the assessment tool, and determine associations with different indices of classroom levels of relational and physical aggression.

  11. Levodopa responsiveness of dysphagia in advanced Parkinson's disease and reliability testing of the FEES-Levodopa-test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnecke, Tobias; Suttrup, Inga; Schröder, Jens B; Osada, Nani; Oelenberg, Stephan; Hamacher, Christina; Suntrup, Sonja; Dziewas, Rainer

    2016-07-01

    It is still controversially discussed whether central dopaminergic stimulation improves swallowing ability in Parkinson's disease (PD). We evaluated the effect of oral levodopa application on dysphagia in advanced PD patients with motor fluctuations. In 15 PD patients (mean age 71.93 ± 8.29 years, mean disease duration 14.33 ± 5.94 years) with oropharyngeal dysphagia and motor fluctuations endoscopic swallowing evaluation was performed in the off state and on state condition following a specifically developed protocol (FEES-levodopa-test). The respective dysphagia score covered three salient parameters, i. e. premature spillage, penetration/aspiration events and residues, each tested with liquid as well as semisolid and solid food consistencies. An improvement of >30% in this score indicated levodopa responsiveness of dysphagia. Measures were compared between the off- and on-state condition by using the Wilcoxon Test and marginal homogeneity test. Inter- and intrarater reliability was also investigated. Severity of swallowing dysfunction in the off state varied widely. The lowest dysphagia score was 15 points (dysphagia without any aspiration risk). The highest dysphagia score was 84 points (dysphagia with aspiration of all consistencies). Seven patients showed a marked improvement of dysphagia in the on state condition. Eight PD patients did not respond. Inter- and intrarater reliability was excellent for all three subscales in the off state and on state conditions. A significant proportion of advanced PD patients with motor fluctuations and mild to moderate oropharyngeal dysphagia may demonstrate a clinically relevant improvement of swallowing after levodopa challenge. The FEES-levodopa-test is a reliable and sensitive tool to differentiate these responders from non-responders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Nationwide Study of the Impact of Dysphagia on Hospital Outcomes Among Patients With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranji, Suchitra; Paranji, Neethi; Wright, Scott; Chandra, Shalini

    2017-02-01

    To assess the impact of dysphagia on clinical and operational outcomes in hospitalized patients with dementia. Retrospective cohort study. 2012 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. All patients discharged with a diagnosis of dementia (N = 234,006) from US hospitals in 2012. Univariate and multivariate regression models, adjusting for stroke and patient characteristics, to assess the impact of dysphagia on the prevalence of comorbidities, including pneumonia, sepsis, and malnutrition; complications, including mechanical ventilation and death; and operational outcomes, including length of stay (LOS) and total charges for patients with dementia. Patients having dementia with dysphagia (DWD) had significantly higher odds of having percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement during the admission (odds ratio [OR]: 13.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.53-14.95, P dysphagia. Dysphagia is a significant predictor of worse clinical and operational outcomes including a 38% longer LOS and a 30% increase in charge per case among hospitalized patients with dementia. Although these findings may not be surprising, this new evidence might bring heightened awareness for the need to more thoughtfully support patients with dementia and dysphagia who are hospitalized.

  13. Sarcopenia is an independent risk factor of dysphagia in hospitalized older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keisuke; Akagi, Junji

    2016-04-01

    Sarcopenia can cause varying physical function disorders, including dysphagia. Malnutrition, a potential result of dysphagia, can also cause sarcopenia. However, the association between sarcopenia and dysphagia is not fully understood, despite evidence suggesting correlations between deglutition disorders and degenerative loss of muscle mass. The present study investigated the prevalence of dysphagia among patients with sarcopenia, and the association between the two conditions. We included 224 older adults (mean age 82.5 ± 8.4 years; 37.9% men). Individuals who had a stroke or other diseases that could directly cause dysphagia were excluded. Logistic regression analyses were carried out after adjusting for potential causes of sarcopenia, including malnutrition, a low activity of daily living levels and aging, to investigate the relationship between the skeletal muscle index (SMI), prevalence of sarcopenia diagnosed based on a low SMI and grip strength, and swallowing functions. The Mini-Nutritional Assessment short form was used to assess their nutritional status, and the Barthel Index was used to evaluate their activities of daily living. The prevalences of sarcopenia and dysphagia were 76.8% and 30.0%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that Barthel Index, SMI and presence of sarcopenia were significant independent factors for the prevalence of dysphagia, after adjusting for sex, age and nutritional status. Furthermore, subgroup analysis showed that SMI in males, and both hand-grip strength and SMI in females were lower in dysphagic subjects than in non-dysphagic subjects (P ≤ 0.01). Sarcopenia was an independent risk factor for dysphagia among older individuals. However, further studies are required to define causality. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  14. Self-expanding oesophageal metal stents for the palliation of dysphagia due to extrinsic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, N.K.; Boylan, C.E.; Razzaq, R.; England, R.E.; Mirra, L.; Martin, D.F. [Dept. of Radiology, South Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Withington Hospital (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    The role of self-expanding metallic stents is well established in the palliation of oesophageal stenosis and dysphagia due to primary oesophageal malignancy. However, their role in palliation of dysphagia due to external compressive mediastinal malignancies is not well established. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of self-expanding metallic stents in the palliation of dysphagia due to extrinsic oesophageal compression by mediastinal malignancy. Between January 1995 and January 1998, 21 patients with oesophageal compression due to malignant mediastinal tumours underwent oesophageal stent placement for palliation of dysphagia. Complete data were available in 17 patients (10 men and 7 women). The mean age was 63.5 years (range 46-89 years). A total of 19 stents were placed successfully. The dysphagia grade prior to and after oesophageal stent placement was assessed and the complications documented. Of the 17 patients, 16 reported an improvement in dysphagia. The mean dysphagia score improved from 3.1 prior to treatment to 1.3 after treatment. In 1 patient the stent slipped during placement and another stent was placed satisfactorily. Early complications (within 48 h) in the form of mild to moderate retrosternal chest pain occurred in 5 patients. This was treated symptomatically. Late complications (after 48 h) in the form of bolus impaction occurred in 2 patients. This was successfully treated with oesophagoscopy and removal of bolus. In 2 patients the stent was overgrown by tumour and in one of these an additional stent was placed. In 1 patient incomplete closure of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula was observed. There was no procedure- or stent-related mortality. The mean survival time of this group was 2.1 months. Self-expanding metallic stents can be safely and effectively used in the palliation of dysphagia due to external mediastinal malignancies. (orig.)

  15. Self-expanding oesophageal metal stents for the palliation of dysphagia due to extrinsic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.; Boylan, C.E.; Razzaq, R.; England, R.E.; Mirra, L.; Martin, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    The role of self-expanding metallic stents is well established in the palliation of oesophageal stenosis and dysphagia due to primary oesophageal malignancy. However, their role in palliation of dysphagia due to external compressive mediastinal malignancies is not well established. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of self-expanding metallic stents in the palliation of dysphagia due to extrinsic oesophageal compression by mediastinal malignancy. Between January 1995 and January 1998, 21 patients with oesophageal compression due to malignant mediastinal tumours underwent oesophageal stent placement for palliation of dysphagia. Complete data were available in 17 patients (10 men and 7 women). The mean age was 63.5 years (range 46-89 years). A total of 19 stents were placed successfully. The dysphagia grade prior to and after oesophageal stent placement was assessed and the complications documented. Of the 17 patients, 16 reported an improvement in dysphagia. The mean dysphagia score improved from 3.1 prior to treatment to 1.3 after treatment. In 1 patient the stent slipped during placement and another stent was placed satisfactorily. Early complications (within 48 h) in the form of mild to moderate retrosternal chest pain occurred in 5 patients. This was treated symptomatically. Late complications (after 48 h) in the form of bolus impaction occurred in 2 patients. This was successfully treated with oesophagoscopy and removal of bolus. In 2 patients the stent was overgrown by tumour and in one of these an additional stent was placed. In 1 patient incomplete closure of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula was observed. There was no procedure- or stent-related mortality. The mean survival time of this group was 2.1 months. Self-expanding metallic stents can be safely and effectively used in the palliation of dysphagia due to external mediastinal malignancies. (orig.)

  16. Assessing organisational culture for quality and safety improvement: a national survey of tools and tool use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, R; Konteh, F H; Davies, H T O

    2009-04-01

    There is growing international interest in managing organisational culture as a lever for healthcare improvement. This has prompted a practical need to understand what instruments and tools exist for assessing cultures in healthcare contexts. The present study was undertaken to determine the culture assessment tools being used in the English NHS and assess their fitness for purpose. Postal questionnaire survey of clinical governance leads in 275 English NHS organisations, with a response rate of 77%. A third of the organisations were currently using a culture assessment instrument to support their clinical governance activity. Although we found a high degree of satisfaction with existing instruments, in terms of ease of use and relevance, there is an immediate practical need to develop new and better bespoke culture assessment tools to bridge the gap between the cultural domains covered by extant instruments and the broader range of concerns of clinical governance managers. There is growing interest in understanding and shaping local cultures in healthcare, which is not yet matched by widespread use of available instruments. Even though extant tools cover many of the most important cultural attributes identified by clinical governance managers, the over-riding focus of tools in use is on safety rather than a holistic assessment of the dimensions of healthcare quality and performance.

  17. The cost of dysphagia in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westmark S

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Signe Westmark,1 Dorte Melgaard,1,2 Line O Rethmeier,3 Lars Holger Ehlers3 1Center for Clinical Research, North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring, Denmark; 2Department of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring, Denmark; 3Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Objectives: To estimate the annual cost at the hospital and in the municipality (social care due to dysphagia in geriatric patients.Design: Retrospective cost analysis of geriatric patients with dysphagia versus geriatric patients without dysphagia 1 year before hospitalization.Setting: North Denmark Regional Hospital, Hjørring Municipality, Frederikshavn Municipality, and Brønderslev Municipality.Subjects: A total of 258 hospitalized patients, 60 years or older, acute hospitalized in the geriatric department.Materials and methods: Volume-viscosity swallow test and the Minimal Eating Observation Form-II were conducted for data collection. A Charlson Comorbidity Index score measured comorbidity, and functional status was measured by Barthel-100. To investigate the cost of dysphagia, patient-specific data on health care consumption at the hospital and in the municipality (nursing, home care, and training were collected from medical registers and records 1 year before hospitalization including the hospitalization for screening for dysphagia. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between dysphagia and hospital and municipality costs, respectively, adjusting for age, gender, and comorbidity.Results: Patients with dysphagia were significantly costlier than patients without dysphagia in both hospital (p=0.013 and municipality costs (p=0.028 compared to patients without dysphagia. Adjusted annual hospital costs in patients with dysphagia were 27,347 DKK (3,677 EUR, 4,282 USD higher than patients without dysphagia at the hospital, and annual health care costs in the

  18. Validation of a clinical assessment tool for spinal anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Breen, D

    2011-07-01

    There is a need for a procedure-specific means of assessment of clinical performance in anaesthesia. The aim of this study was to devise a tool for assessing the performance of spinal anaesthesia, which has both content and construct validity.

  19. Exposure Assessment Tools by Lifestages and Populations - General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA ExpoBox is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  20. The comparative risk assessment framework and tools (CRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Research Station. USDA Forest Service

    2010-01-01

    To help address these challenges, the USDA Forest Service’s Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center (EFETAC) and the University of North Carolina Asheville’s National Environmental Modeling and Analysis Center (NEMAC) designed a planning framework, called the Comparative Risk Assessment Framework and Tools (CRAFT). CRAFT is...

  1. Using Rubrics as an Assessment Tool in Your Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Angela

    2005-01-01

    The article deals with the use of rubrics as an assessment tool in the classroom. It is said that teaching elementary music holds many joys but there are serious challenges for new and seasoned teachers including the U.S. No Child Left Behind Act. With limited time to cover music curricula, assessment is often put aside because teachers feel the…

  2. EAST: Developing an Electronic Assessment and Storage Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Katherine I.; Fernandez, Eugenia; Milionis, Tracey M.; Williamson, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the purpose, development, analysis, prototyping, and features of the Electronic Assessment and Storage Tool (EAST). The Web-based system aids curriculum assessment at Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis through the ability to easily store artifacts in electronic form, support…

  3. The Importance of Culturally Safe Assessment Tools for Inuit Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffer, Jasmin

    2017-01-01

    There are still no major assessment and diagnostic tools that educators can use to properly assess our Inuit students' learning. Cultural safety as it is currently defined in New Zealand educational research (Macfarlane et al., 2007) is necessary in creating a classroom community that encourages the appreciation of culture and worldview, and…

  4. Validation of a new assessment tool for qualitative research articles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Lone; Høstrup, Helle; Lyngsø, Elin

    2012-01-01

    schou l., høstrup h., lyngsø e.e., larsen s. & poulsen i. (2011) Validation of a new assessment tool for qualitative research articles. Journal of Advanced Nursing00(0), 000-000. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05898.x ABSTRACT: Aim.  This paper presents the development and validation of a new...... assessment tool for qualitative research articles, which could assess trustworthiness of qualitative research articles as defined by Guba and at the same time aid clinicians in their assessment. Background.  There are more than 100 sets of proposals for quality criteria for qualitative research. However, we...... is the Danish acronym for Appraisal of Qualitative Studies. Phase 1 was to develop the tool based on a literature review and on consultation with qualitative researchers. Phase 2 was an inter-rater reliability test in which 40 health professionals participated. Phase 3 was an inter-rater reliability test among...

  5. Teamwork Assessment Tools in Modern Surgical Practice: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, George; Abboudi, Hamid; Khan, Muhammed Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Deficiencies in teamwork skills have been shown to contribute to the occurrence of adverse events during surgery. Consequently, several teamwork assessment tools have been developed to evaluate trainee nontechnical performance. This paper aims to provide an overview of these instruments and review the validity of each tool. Furthermore, the present paper aims to review the deficiencies surrounding training and propose several recommendations to address these issues. Methods. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify teamwork assessment tools using MEDLINE (1946 to August 2015), EMBASE (1974 to August 2015), and PsycINFO (1806 to August 2015) databases. Results. Eight assessment tools which encompass aspects of teamwork were identified. The Nontechnical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) assessment was found to possess the highest level of validity from a variety of sources; reliability and acceptability have also been established for this tool. Conclusions. Deficits in current surgical training pathways have prompted several recommendations to meet the evolving requirements of surgeons. Recommendations from the current paper include integration of teamwork training and assessment into medical school curricula, standardised formal training of assessors to ensure accurate evaluation of nontechnical skill acquisition, and integration of concurrent technical and nontechnical skills training throughout training. PMID:26425732

  6. ECTA/DaSy Framework Self-Assessment Comparison Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy), 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Self-Assessment Comparison (SAC) Tool is for state Part C and Section 619/Preschool programs to use to assess changes in the implementation of one or more components of the ECTA System Framework and/or subcomponenets of the DaSy Data System Framework. It is a companion to the ECTA/DaSy Framework Self-Assessment. Key features of the SAC are…

  7. Creation and Initial Validation of the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M; Namasivayam-MacDonald, Ashwini M; Guida, Brittany T; Cichero, Julie A; Duivestein, Janice; Hanson, Ben; Lam, Peter; Riquelme, Luis F

    2018-05-01

    To assess consensual validity, interrater reliability, and criterion validity of the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale, a new functional outcome scale intended to capture the severity of oropharyngeal dysphagia, as represented by the degree of diet texture restriction recommended for the patient. Participants assigned International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale scores to 16 clinical cases. Consensual validity was measured against reference scores determined by an author reference panel. Interrater reliability was measured overall and across quartile subsets of the dataset. Criterion validity was evaluated versus Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) scores assigned by survey respondents to the same case scenarios. Feedback was requested regarding ease and likelihood of use. Web-based survey. Respondents (N=170) from 29 countries. Not applicable. Consensual validity (percent agreement and Kendall τ), criterion validity (Spearman rank correlation), and interrater reliability (Kendall concordance and intraclass coefficients). The International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale showed strong consensual validity, criterion validity, and interrater reliability. Scenarios involving liquid-only diets, transition from nonoral feeding, or trial diet advances in therapy showed the poorest consensus, indicating a need for clear instructions on how to score these situations. The International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale showed greater sensitivity than the FOIS to specific changes in diet. Most (>70%) respondents indicated enthusiasm for implementing the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale. This initial validation study suggests that the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale has strong consensual and criterion validity and can be used reliably by clinicians

  8. Requirements for water assessment tools: An automotive industry perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry A. Mueller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water availability is one of the greatest global sustainability challenges. Water is not available in adequate quantity and quality in many areas and water shortfalls are expected to increase. Businesses are facing water-related challenges due to inadequate water availability and poor resource management. Identifying and quantifying impacts is key to enabling companies to make effective management decisions. Several water assessment tools have been developed to help companies understand the complex nature of water challenges; however, there remain significant gaps in the datasets and inconsistencies in measurement and reporting of geographic water shortfalls. There is a need for more complete datasets containing information on water withdrawal and discharge, freshwater availability and depletion (spatially and temporally, water quality monitoring, reuse and recycling. We discuss four of the available water assessment tools (Global Water Tool, India Water Tool, Water Risk Filter and Aqueduct and highlight those elements most critical to water-related business decisions.

  9. Analysis of oropharyngeal dysphagia through fibroendoscopy evaluation of swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Flores, Melissa; Arch-Tirado, Emilio; Villeda-Miranda, Alicia; Rocha-Cacho, Karina Elizabeth; Verduzco-Mendoza, Antonio; Hernández-López, Xochiquetzal

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a high incidence in Mexico and is estimated at approximately 500,000 patients. One of the main clinical manifestations of PD is dysphagia, which is the difficult passage of food from the mouth to the stomach. The aim of this study was to assess oropharyngeal dysphagia through fibroendoscopy evaluation of swallowing in patients with PD. We conducted a census sample of patients with PD: 17 males and 10 females, aged >49 years. Clinical history, physical examination and neurological evaluation of swallowing fibroendoscopy were carried out. Of the symptomatic patients, 16 patients (59.25%) reported dysphagia. Fibroendoscopic evaluation demonstrated swallowing disorders in 25 patients (92.59%). The main findings were poor bolus control in 19 patients (70.37%), deficits in bolus propulsion in 25 patients (92.59%), impaired swallowing in 14 patients (51.85%), fractional swallowing in 11 patients (40.74%), reduced epiglottic tilting in 11 patients (48.14%), food residue in vallecula in 24 patients (88.88%) and piriform sinus in 19 patients (70.37%). There was no correlation between duration of PD and degree of involvement of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with PD is a common symptom and can range from the oral cavity to the upper esophageal sphincter. Early onset of severe dysphagia is exceptional in this disease and should alert the clinician to the diagnostic possibility of parkinsonism.

  10. Effect of anterior cervical osteophyte in poststroke dysphagia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngkook; Park, Geun-Young; Seo, Yu Jung; Im, Sun

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether the concomitant presence of anterior cervical osteophytes can influence the severity and outcome of patients with poststroke dysphagia. Retrospective case-control study. Hospital. A total of 40 participants were identified (N=40). Patients with poststroke dysphagia with anterior cervical osteophytes (n=20) were identified and matched by age, sex, location, and laterality of the stroke lesion to a poststroke dysphagia control group with no anterior cervical osteophytes (n=20). Not applicable. Videofluoroscopic swallowing study, Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS), and Penetration-Aspiration Scale results assessed within the first month of stroke were analyzed. The FOIS at 6 months was recorded, and severity of dysphagia was compared between the 2 groups. The case group had larger degrees of postswallow residues in the valleculae and pyriform sinuses (P=.020 and Pdysphagia (OR=15.375; 95% CI, 3.195-infinity). The presence of anterior cervical osteophytes, which may cause mechanical obstruction and interfere with residue clearance at the valleculae and pyriform sinuses and result in more postswallow aspiration, may influence initial severity and outcome of poststroke dysphagia. The presence of anterior cervical osteophytes may be considered an important clinical condition that may affect poststroke dysphagia rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Visual Impairment Screening Assessment (VISA) tool: pilot validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J; Hepworth, Lauren R; Hanna, Kerry L; Howard, Claire

    2018-03-06

    To report and evaluate a new Vision Impairment Screening Assessment (VISA) tool intended for use by the stroke team to improve identification of visual impairment in stroke survivors. Prospective case cohort comparative study. Stroke units at two secondary care hospitals and one tertiary centre. 116 stroke survivors were screened, 62 by naïve and 54 by non-naïve screeners. Both the VISA screening tool and the comprehensive specialist vision assessment measured case history, visual acuity, eye alignment, eye movements, visual field and visual inattention. Full completion of VISA tool and specialist vision assessment was achieved for 89 stroke survivors. Missing data for one or more sections typically related to patient's inability to complete the assessment. Sensitivity and specificity of the VISA screening tool were 90.24% and 85.29%, respectively; the positive and negative predictive values were 93.67% and 78.36%, respectively. Overall agreement was significant; k=0.736. Lowest agreement was found for screening of eye movement and visual inattention deficits. This early validation of the VISA screening tool shows promise in improving detection accuracy for clinicians involved in stroke care who are not specialists in vision problems and lack formal eye training, with potential to lead to more prompt referral with fewer false positives and negatives. Pilot validation indicates acceptability of the VISA tool for screening of visual impairment in stroke survivors. Sensitivity and specificity were high indicating the potential accuracy of the VISA tool for screening purposes. Results of this study have guided the revision of the VISA screening tool ahead of full clinical validation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Dysphagia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    control via the cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. Once sensory information .... Thyroid diseases. • Vascular abnormalities – aberrant vessels and compressive rings ... and is frequently a terminal event.6,7. Table II. Basic indicators of a ...

  13. SYSTEMIC ASSESSMENT [SA] AS A TOOL TO ASSESS STUDENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    our studies on Systemic Assessment [SA] [5-8] is an ongoing process of .... schema can be considered as a single element in working memory [9]. This is ... our students from surface learning to deep learning of chemical processes in sodium ...

  14. Systemic assessment as a new tool to assess student learning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    students' systemic thinking level developed in organic chemistry is strongly related to a deeper understanding of the relevant chemistry concepts (7) .In this regards we will illustrate five types of SAQ,s in heterocyclic chemistry based on systemics to assess students at synthesis and analysis learning levels. We experiment ...

  15. Randomized trial of transcranial direct current stimulation for poststroke dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntrup-Krueger, Sonja; Ringmaier, Corinna; Muhle, Paul; Wollbrink, Andreas; Kemmling, Andre; Hanning, Uta; Claus, Inga; Warnecke, Tobias; Teismann, Inga; Pantev, Christo; Dziewas, Rainer

    2018-02-01

    We evaluated whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is able to enhance dysphagia rehabilitation following stroke. Besides relating clinical effects with neuroplastic changes in cortical swallowing processing, we aimed to identify factors influencing treatment success. In this double-blind, randomized study, 60 acute dysphagic stroke patients received contralesional anodal (1mA, 20 minutes) or sham tDCS on 4 consecutive days. Swallowing function was thoroughly assessed before and after the intervention using the validated Fiberoptic Endoscopic Dysphagia Severity Scale (FEDSS) and clinical assessment. In 10 patients, swallowing-related brain activation was recorded applying magnetoencephalography before and after the intervention. Voxel-based statistical lesion pattern analysis was also performed. Study groups did not differ according to demographic data, stroke characteristics, or baseline dysphagia severity. Patients treated with tDCS showed greater improvement in FEDSS than the sham group (1.3 vs 0.4 points, mean difference = 0.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.4-1.4, p < 0.0005). Functional recovery was accompanied by a significant increase of activation (p < 0.05) in the contralesional swallowing network after real but not sham tDCS. Regarding predictors of treatment success, for every hour earlier that treatment was initiated, there was greater improvement on the FEDSS (adjusted odds ratio = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.98-1.00, p < 0.05) in multivariate analysis. Stroke location in the right insula and operculum was indicative of worse response to tDCS (p < 0.05). Application of tDCS over the contralesional swallowing motor cortex supports swallowing network reorganization, thereby leading to faster rehabilitation of acute poststroke dysphagia. Early treatment initiation seems beneficial. tDCS may be less effective in right-hemispheric insulo-opercular stroke. Ann Neurol 2018;83:328-340. © 2018 American Neurological

  16. Performance Assessment as a Diagnostic Tool for Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruit, Patricia; Oostdam, Ron; van den Berg, Ed; Schuitema, Jaap

    2018-04-01

    Information on students' development of science skills is essential for teachers to evaluate and improve their own education, as well as to provide adequate support and feedback to the learning process of individual students. The present study explores and discusses the use of performance assessments as a diagnostic tool for formative assessment to inform teachers and guide instruction of science skills in primary education. Three performance assessments were administered to more than 400 students in grades 5 and 6 of primary education. Students performed small experiments using real materials while following the different steps of the empirical cycle. The mutual relationship between the three performance assessments is examined to provide evidence for the value of performance assessments as useful tools for formative evaluation. Differences in response patterns are discussed, and the diagnostic value of performance assessments is illustrated with examples of individual student performances. Findings show that the performance assessments were difficult for grades 5 and 6 students but that much individual variation exists regarding the different steps of the empirical cycle. Evaluation of scores as well as a more substantive analysis of students' responses provided insight into typical errors that students make. It is concluded that performance assessments can be used as a diagnostic tool for monitoring students' skill performance as well as to support teachers in evaluating and improving their science lessons.

  17. Performance Analysis of the Capability Assessment Tool for Sustainable Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enda Crossin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the performance of a novel capability assessment tool, developed to identify capability gaps and associated training and development requirements across the supply chain for environmentally-sustainable manufacturing. The tool was developed to assess 170 capabilities that have been clustered with respect to key areas of concern such as managing energy, water, material resources, carbon emissions and waste as well as environmental management practices for sustainability. Two independent expert teams used the tool to assess a sample group of five first and second tier sports apparel and footwear suppliers within the supply chain of a global sporting goods manufacturer in Asia. The paper addresses the reliability and robustness of the developed assessment method by formulating the expected links between the assessment results. The management practices of the participating suppliers were shown to be closely connected to their performance in managing their resources and emissions. The companies’ initiatives in implementing energy efficiency measures were found to be generally related to their performance in carbon emissions management. The suppliers were also asked to undertake a self-assessment by using a short questionnaire. The large gap between the comprehensive assessment and these in-house self-assessments revealed the suppliers’ misconceptions about their capabilities.

  18. Content Validation and Evaluation of an Endovascular Teamwork Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, L; Bicknell, C; Patel, K; Vyas, R; Van Herzeele, I; Sevdalis, N; Rudarakanchana, N

    2016-07-01

    To modify, content validate, and evaluate a teamwork assessment tool for use in endovascular surgery. A multistage, multimethod study was conducted. Stage 1 included expert review and modification of the existing Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery (OTAS) tool. Stage 2 included identification of additional exemplar behaviours contributing to effective teamwork and enhanced patient safety in endovascular surgery (using real-time observation, focus groups, and semistructured interviews of multidisciplinary teams). Stage 3 included content validation of exemplar behaviours using expert consensus according to established psychometric recommendations and evaluation of structure, content, feasibility, and usability of the Endovascular Observational Teamwork Assessment Tool (Endo-OTAS) by an expert multidisciplinary panel. Stage 4 included final team expert review of exemplars. OTAS core team behaviours were maintained (communication, coordination, cooperation, leadership team monitoring). Of the 114 OTAS behavioural exemplars, 19 were modified, four removed, and 39 additional endovascular-specific behaviours identified. Content validation of these 153 exemplar behaviours showed that 113/153 (73.9%) reached the predetermined Item-Content Validity Index rating for teamwork and/or patient safety. After expert team review, 140/153 (91.5%) exemplars were deemed to warrant inclusion in the tool. More than 90% of the expert panel agreed that Endo-OTAS is an appropriate teamwork assessment tool with observable behaviours. Some concerns were noted about the time required to conduct observations and provide performance feedback. Endo-OTAS is a novel teamwork assessment tool, with evidence for content validity and relevance to endovascular teams. Endo-OTAS enables systematic objective assessment of the quality of team performance during endovascular procedures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. GEOGLAM Crop Monitor Assessment Tool: Developing Monthly Crop Condition Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaughey, K.; Becker Reshef, I.; Barker, B.; Humber, M. L.; Nordling, J.; Justice, C. O.; Deshayes, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) developed the Global Agricultural Monitoring initiative (GEOGLAM) to improve existing agricultural information through a network of international partnerships, data sharing, and operational research. This presentation will discuss the Crop Monitor component of GEOGLAM, which provides the Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS) with an international, multi-source, and transparent consensus assessment of crop growing conditions, status, and agro-climatic conditions likely to impact global production. This activity covers the four primary crop types (wheat, maize, rice, and soybean) within the main agricultural producing regions of the AMIS countries. These assessments have been produced operationally since September 2013 and are published in the AMIS Market Monitor Bulletin. The Crop Monitor reports provide cartographic and textual summaries of crop conditions as of the 28th of each month, according to crop type. This presentation will focus on the building of international networks, data collection, and data dissemination.

  20. Aphonia and dysphagia after gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Satako, Kimura; Mizutari, Kunio; Fujimine, Takekatsu; Fujii, Masato; Syunji, Ikeuchi; Matunaga, Tatsuo; Tsunoda, Koichi

    2005-11-01

    A 67-year-old male was referred to our otolaryngological clinic because of aphonia and dysphagia. His voice was breathy and he could not even swallow saliva following a total gastrectomy for gastric carcinoma performed 2 weeks previously. Laryngeal fiberscopy revealed major glottal incompetence when he tried to phonate. However, both vocal folds abducted over the full range during inhalation. The patient could not swallow saliva because of a huge glottal chink, even during phonation. Based on these findings, he was diagnosed as having bilateral incomplete cricoarytenoid dislocation after intubation. The patient underwent speech therapy; within 1 min his vocal fold movement recovered dramatically and he was able to phonate and swallow. There have been few case reports of bilateral cricoarytenoid dislocation, and no effective rehabilitation has been reported. We believe that our method of vocal rehabilitation serves as a useful reference for physicians and surgeons worldwide.

  1. BASINs 4.0 Climate Assessment Tool (CAT): Supporting ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the report, BASINS 4.0 Climate Assessment Tool (CAT): Supporting Documentation and User's Manual. This report was prepared by the EPA's Global Change Research Program (GCRP), an assessment-oriented program, that sits within the Office of Research and Development, that focuses on assessing how potential changes in climate and other global environmental stressors may impact water quality, air quality, aquatic ecosystems, and human health in the United States. The Program’s focus on water quality is consistent with the Research Strategy of the U.S. Climate Change Research Program—the federal umbrella organization for climate change science in the U.S. government—and is responsive to U.S. EPA’s mission and responsibilities as defined by the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act. A central goal of the EPA GCRP is to provide EPA program offices, Regions, and other stakeholders with tools and information for assessing and responding to any potential future impacts of climate change. In 2007, the EPA Global Change Research Program (GCRP), in partnership with the EPA Office of Water, supported development of a Climate Assessment Tool (CAT) for version 4 of EPA’s BASINS modeling system. This report provides supporting documentation and user support materials for the BASINS CAT tool. The purpose of this report is to provide in a single document a variety of documentation and user support materials supporting the use

  2. Validating Appetite Assessment Tools among Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfino, Alessio; Kaysen, George A.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Doyle, Julie; Delgado, Cynthia; Dwyer, Tjien; Laviano, Alessandro; Fanelli, Filippo Rossi; Johansen, Kirsten L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the performance of appetite assessment tools among patients receiving hemodialysis. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Seven dialysis facilities in Northern California. Subjects 221 patients receiving hemodialysis. Intervention We assessed five appetite assessment tools [self-assessment of appetite, subjective assessment of appetite, visual analogue scale (VAS), Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy (FAACT) score and the Anorexia Questionnaire (AQ)]. Main outcome measures Reported food intake, normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), and change in body weight were used as criterion measures, and we assessed associations among the appetite tools and biomarkers associated with nutrition and inflammation. Patients were asked to report their appetite and the percentage of food eaten (from 0% to 100%) during the last meal compared to usual intake. Results Fifty-eight (26%) patients reported food intake ≤50% (defined as poor appetite). The prevalence of anorexia was 12% by self-assessment of appetite, 6% by subjective assessment of appetite, 24% by VAS, 17% by FAACT score, and 12% by AQ. All tools were significantly associated with food intake ≤50% (pappetite. The FAACT score and the VAS had the strongest association with food intake ≤50% (c-statistic 0.80 and 0.76). Patients with food intake ≤50% reported weight loss more frequently than patients without low intake (36% vs 22%) and weight gain less frequently (19% vs 35%; p=0.03). nPCR was lower among anorexic patients based on the VAS (1.1 ± 0.3 vs 1.2 ± 0.3, p=0.03). Ln IL-6 correlated inversely with food intake (p=0.03), but neither IL-6 nor CRP correlated with any of the appetite tools. Furthermore, only the self-assessment of appetite was significantly associated with serum albumin (p=0.02), prealbumin (p=0.02) and adiponectin concentrations (p=0.03). Conclusions Alternative appetite assessment tools yielded widely different estimates of the prevalence of anorexia in

  3. Dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: a therapeutic challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michou, Emilia; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2010-06-01

    This article focuses on the current status and research directions on swallowing disorders (dysphagia) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Although epidemiological data are scarce, increased incidence of dysphagia in patients with PD leads to increased risk of mortality, secondary to aspiration pneumonia. Although studies show that aspiration pneumonia is a common cause of death in this group of patients, clinical practice lacks an evidence base and there is an increased need for randomized clinical trials. Importantly, the underlying mechanisms accounting for the progression of dysphagia in PD are still unclear. Furthermore, evidence shows that dopaminergic medication does not affect swallowing performance. Future research in the field is urgently needed and may result in improved management of dysphagia in patients with PD.

  4. Dysphagia lusorium in elderly: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarceken, Bulent; Bulbuloglu, Ertan; Yuksel, Murvet; Cetinkaya, Ali

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Late unset of dysphagia due to vascular abnormalities is a rare condition. We aimed to present a case of right subclavian artery abnormalities caused dysphagia in the elderly. METHODS: A 68-year-old female was admitted with dysphagia seven months ago. Upper endoscopic procedures and routine examinations could not demonstrate any etiology. Multislice computed thorax tomography was performed for probable extra- esophagial lesions. RESULTS: Multislice computed thorax tomography showed right subclavian artery abnormality and esophagial compression with this aberrant artery. CONCLUSION: Causes of dysphagia in the elderly are commonly malignancies, strictures and/or motility disorders. If routine examinations and endoscopic procedures fail to show any etiology, rare vascular abnormalities can be considered in such patients. Multislice computed tomography is a usefull choice in such conditions. PMID:15285045

  5. Dysphagia due to Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Ohki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH is usually asymptomatic. However, rarely, it causes dysphagia, hoarseness, dyspnea, snoring, stridor, and laryngeal edema. Herein, we present a patient with DISH causing dysphagia. A 70-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of sore throat, dysphagia, and foreign body sensation. Flexible laryngoscopy revealed a leftward-protruding posterior wall in the hypopharynx. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a bony mass pushing, anteriorly, on the posterior hypopharyngeal wall. Ossification included an osseous bridge involving 5 contiguous vertebral bodies. Dysphagia due to DISH was diagnosed. His symptoms were relieved by conservative therapy using anti-inflammatory drugs. However, if conservative therapy fails and symptoms are severe, surgical treatments must be considered.

  6. Creation of complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leopoldina de Castro Villas Bôas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To create and validate a complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care from a public health service. METHOD A diagnostic accuracy study, with estimates for the tool's validity and reliability. Measurements of sensitivity and specificity were considered when producing validity estimates. The resulting tool was used for testing. Assessment by a specialized team of home care professionals was used as the gold standard. In the tool's reliability study, the authors used the Kappa statistic. The tool's sensitivity and specificity were analyzed using various cut-off points. RESULTS On the best cut-off point-21-with the gold standard, a sensitivity of 75.5% was obtained, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 68.3% and 82.8% and specificity of 53.2%, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 43.8% and 62.7%. CONCLUSION The tool presented evidence of validity and reliability, possibly helping in service organization at patient admission, care type change, or support during the creation of care plans.

  7. Comparison of occupational exposure assessment tools and concepts for nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liguori, Biase; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    The development, production and application of engineered nanomaterials have been growing in different fields. This leads to a consequent increased potential of exposure to nanomaterials in the working environment. However to determine the potential exposure risk is a challenging task for risk...... for Nanomaterials”; “NanoSafer vs. 1.1 – A web-based precautionary risk assessment tool for manufactured nanomaterials using first order modeling” Based on the literature information we have analyzed these tools and discussed elements regarding: the domain of application and whether it accounts for the nanospecific...... factor or nano-relevance; the work exposure scenario, for which types of processes they may be used; are the tools using the source-transmission-receptor approach; the input data requirements; whether the tools included qualitative or semi-quantitative or quantitative evaluations of the exposure; whether...

  8. Distribution of Esophageal Motor Disorders in Diabetic Patients With Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Nina S; Rangan, Vikram; Geng, Zhuo; Khan, Freeha; Kichler, Adam; Gabbard, Scott; Ganocy, Stephen; Fass, Ronnie

    Diabetes mellitus can cause various gastrointestinal symptoms. Assessment of esophageal dysmotility in diabetic patients has been scarcely studied. The aim of this study was to determine the esophageal motor characteristics of diabetic versus nondiabetic patients who present with dysphagia. High-resolution esophageal manometries (HREMs) of 83 diabetic patients and 83 age and gender-matched nondiabetic patients with dysphagia from 2 medical centers were included in this study. Demographic information, medical comorbidities, and medication usage were recorded for each patient in a single registry. HREM of each patient was evaluated and the different functional parameters were recorded. Overall, 46% of diabetic patients were found to have an esophageal motor disorder. Diabetic patients with dysphagia were more likely to have failed swallows on HREM (50.6% vs. 33.7%; P=0.03) as compared with nondiabetic patients. Among diabetic patients, those being treated with insulin were more likely to have failed (69.0% vs. 40.7%; P=0.01) and weak (65.5% vs. 33.3%; P=0.005) swallows as compared with diabetic patients not on insulin. Among diabetic patients, those with abnormal manometry were more likely to demonstrate diabetic retinopathy (27.0% vs. 8.7%; P=0.04). There was a trend toward increased incidence of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction in diabetic patients (10.8% vs. 2.4%; P=0.057) as compared with nondiabetic patients. Nearly half of diabetic patients with dysphagia have some type of an esophageal motility disorder. Diabetic retinopathy and the use of insulin are predictive of esophageal motor abnormalities among diabetic patients.

  9. The Safety Assessment Framework Tool (SAFRAN) - Description, Overview and Applicability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alujevic, Luka

    2014-01-01

    The SAFRAN tool (Safety Assessment Framework) is a user-friendly software application that incorporates the methodologies developed in the SADRWMS (Safety Assessment Driven Radioactive Waste Management Solutions) project. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized the International Project on Safety Assessment Driving Radioactive Waste Management Solutions (SADRWMS) to examine international approaches to safety assessment for predisposal management of all types of radioactive waste, including disused sources, small volumes, legacy and decommissioning waste, operational waste, and large volume naturally occurring radioactive material residues. SAFRAN provides aid in: Describing the predisposal RW management activities in a systematic way, Conducting the SA (safety assessment) with clear documentation of the methodology, assumptions, input data and models, Establishing a traceable and transparent record of the safety basis for decisions on the proposed RW management solutions, Demonstrating clear consideration of and compliance with national and international safety standards and recommendations. The SAFRAN tool allows the user to visibly, systematically and logically address predisposal radioactive waste management and decommissioning challenges in a structured way. It also records the decisions taken in such a way that it constitutes a justifiable safety assessment of the proposed management solutions. The objective of this paper is to describe the SAFRAN architecture and features, properly define the terms safety case and safety assessment, and to predict the future development of the SAFRAN tool and assess its applicability to the construction of a future LILW (Low and Intermediate Level Waste) storage facility and repository in Croatia, taking into account all the capabilities and modelling features of the SAFRAN tool. (author)

  10. Web-based teaching tool incorporating peer assessment and self-assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEvoy, Fintan; McEvoy, Peter M.; Svalastoga, Eiliv L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Our objective was to create an electronic learning tool that incorporates the pedagogic advantages of peer assessment and self-assessment into report-generating skills. CONCLUSION. The tool was created using Web programming software. It was tested with 12 veterinary students and provided...... peer-peer and tutor-student interactions that supported learning. The tool is suited for training any professional concerned with the interpretation of images, particularly resident radiologists....

  11. Employee recruitment: using behavioral assessments as an employee selection tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K

    2007-01-01

    The labor shortage of skilled health care professionals continues to make employee recruitment and retention a challenge for health care managers. Greater accountability is being placed on health care managers to retain their employees. The urgency to retain health care professionals is largely an issue that should be considered during the initial recruitment of potential employees. Health care managers should analyze candidates rigorously to ensure that appropriate hiring decisions are made. Behavioral assessments can be used as a useful employee selection tool to assist managers in the appropriate placement and training of potential new employees. When administered appropriately, these tools can provide managers with a variety of useful information. This information can assist health care managers in demystifying the hiring process. Although there are varying organizational concerns to address when using behavioral assessments as an employee selection tool, the potential return on investment is worth the effort.

  12. Chemical Risk Assessment Screening Tool of a Global Chemical Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Tjoe-Nij

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This paper describes a simple-to-use and reliable screening tool called Critical Task Exposure Screening (CTES, developed by a chemical company. The tool assesses if the exposure to a chemical for a task is likely to be within acceptable levels. Methods: CTES is a Microsoft Excel tool, where the inhalation risk score is calculated by relating the exposure estimate to the corresponding occupational exposure limit (OEL or occupational exposure band (OEB. The inhalation exposure is estimated for tasks by preassigned ART1.5 activity classes and modifying factors. Results: CTES requires few inputs. The toxicological data, including OELs, OEBs, and vapor pressure are read from a database. Once the substance is selected, the user specifies its concentration and then chooses the task description and its duration. CTES has three outputs that may trigger follow-up: (1 inhalation risk score; (2 identification of the skin hazard with the skin warnings for local and systemic adverse effects; and (3 status for carcinogenic, mutagenic, or reprotoxic effects. Conclusion: The tool provides an effective way to rapidly screen low-concern tasks, and quickly identifies certain tasks involving substances that will need further review with, nevertheless, the appropriate conservatism. This tool shows that the higher-tier ART1.5 inhalation exposure assessment model can be included effectively in a screening tool. After 2 years of worldwide extensive use within the company, CTES is well perceived by the users, including the shop floor management, and it fulfills its target of screening tool. Keywords: occupational exposure, risk assessment, risk management

  13. Econometric Assessment of "One Minute" Paper as a Pedagogic Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amaresh

    2010-01-01

    This paper makes an econometric testing of one-minute paper used as a tool to manage and assess instruction in my statistics class. One of our findings is that the one minute paper when I have tested it by using an OLS estimate in a controlled Vs experimental design framework is found to statistically significant and effective in enhancing…

  14. A comparative study assessing a new tool for occluding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0.630, p=0.068 and p=0.047, respectively) (Table 2). A comparative study assessing a new tool for occluding parenchymal blood flow during liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma. S Zhou, X-J Xue, R-R Li, D-F Chen, W-Y Chen, G-X Liu, ...

  15. Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA) Poster Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment tool (AGWA, see: www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/agwa or http://www.epa.gov/esd/land-sci/agwa/) is a GIS interface jointly developed by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Arizona...

  16. Assessing Educational Processes Using Total-Quality-Management Measurement Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, Peter, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of the use of Total Quality Management (TQM) assessment tools in educational settings highlights and gives examples of fishbone diagrams, or cause and effect charts; Pareto diagrams; control charts; histograms and check sheets; scatter diagrams; and flowcharts. Variation and quality are discussed in terms of continuous process…

  17. An Integrative Review of Pediatric Fall Risk Assessment Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGerolamo, Kimberly; Davis, Katherine Finn

    Patient fall prevention begins with accurate risk assessment. However, sustained improvements in prevention and quality of care include use of validated fall risk assessment tools (FRATs). The goal of FRATs is to identify patients at highest risk. Adult FRATs are often borrowed from to create tools for pediatric patients. Though factors associated with pediatric falls in the hospital setting are similar to those in adults, such as mobility, medication use, and cognitive impairment, adult FRATs and the factors associated with them do not adequately assess risk in children. Articles were limited to English language, ages 0-21years, and publish date 2006-2015. The search yielded 22 articles. Ten were excluded as the population was primarily adult or lacked discussion of a FRAT. Critical appraisal and findings were synthesized using the Johns Hopkins Nursing evidence appraisal system. Twelve articles relevant to fall prevention in the pediatric hospital setting that discussed fall risk assessment and use of a FRAT were reviewed. Comparison between and accuracy of FRATs is challenged when different classifications, definitions, risk stratification, and inclusion criteria are used. Though there are several pediatric FRATs published in the literature, none have been found to be reliable and valid across institutions and diverse populations. This integrative review highlights the importance of choosing a FRAT based on an institution's identified risk factors and validating the tool for one's own patient population as well as using the tool in conjunction with nursing clinical judgment to guide interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New evaluation tool now available to assess research quality | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... New evaluation tool now available to assess research quality ... Ratings on a scale defined by rubrics, to indicate the level at which a project ... Report: The value-for-money discourse: risks and opportunities for research for development ... Copyright · Open access policy · Privacy policy · Research ethics ...

  19. Analysis of Online Quizzes as a Teaching and Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Morera, Lorenzo; Arauzo-Azofra, Antonio; García-Hernández, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with the integrated use of online quizzes as a teaching and assessment tool in the general program of the subject Proyectos in the third course of Ingeniero Técnico en Informática de Gestión over five consecutive years. The research undertaken aimed to test quizzes effectiveness on student performance when used, not only as an…

  20. Teaching and Learning: Using Digital Tools for Progressive Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Rita B.; Petersson, Eva; Lewis Brooks, Anthony

    2008-01-01

      Non-biased assessment becomes a reality when Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is implemented as a pedagogical tool to augment teacher practice and student learning. This paper details a study that was undertaken at a secondary school in Lithuania involving four educators and 200...... in education to address future augmented teacher - students' liaisons....

  1. Content Maps: A Teaching and Assessment Tool for Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Phillip; Lehwald, Harry; Lee, Yun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Developing content knowledge in teachers presents a constant challenge for teacher educators. This article introduces a teaching and assessment tool called a "content map," which allows teacher educators, teachers, and coaches to conceptualize the scope, sequence, and relational characteristics of the content being taught. Content maps…

  2. Variability of building environmental assessment tools on evaluating carbon emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, S. Thomas, E-mail: tstng@hkucc.hku.hk; Chen Yuan, E-mail: chenyuan4@gmail.com; Wong, James M.W., E-mail: jmwwong@hku.hk

    2013-01-15

    With an increasing importance of sustainability in construction, more and more clients and designers employ building environmental assessment (BEA) tools to evaluate the environmental friendliness of their building facilities, and one important aspect of evaluation in the BEA models is the assessment of carbon emissions. However, in the absence of any agreed framework for carbon auditing and benchmarking, the results generated by the BEA tools might vary significantly which could lead to confusion or misinterpretation on the carbon performance of a building. This study thus aims to unveil the properties of and the standard imposed by the current BEA models on evaluating the life cycle carbon emissions. The analyses cover the (i) weighting of energy efficiency and emission levels among various environmental performance indicators; (ii) building life cycle stages in which carbon is taken into consideration; (iii) objectiveness of assessment; (iv) baseline set for carbon assessment; (v) mechanism for benchmarking the emission level; and (v) limitations of the carbon assessment approaches. Results indicate that the current BEA schemes focus primarily on operational carbon instead of the emissions generated throughout the entire building life cycle. Besides, the baseline and benchmark for carbon evaluation vary significantly among the BEA tools based on the analytical results of a hypothetical building. The findings point to the needs for a more transparent framework for carbon auditing and benchmarking in BEA modeling. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon emission evaluation in building environmental assessment schemes are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulative carbon emission is modeled for building environmental assessment schemes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon assessments focus primarily on operational stage instead of entire lifecycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baseline and benchmark of carbon assessment vary greatly among BEA

  3. Variability of building environmental assessment tools on evaluating carbon emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, S. Thomas; Chen Yuan; Wong, James M.W.

    2013-01-01

    With an increasing importance of sustainability in construction, more and more clients and designers employ building environmental assessment (BEA) tools to evaluate the environmental friendliness of their building facilities, and one important aspect of evaluation in the BEA models is the assessment of carbon emissions. However, in the absence of any agreed framework for carbon auditing and benchmarking, the results generated by the BEA tools might vary significantly which could lead to confusion or misinterpretation on the carbon performance of a building. This study thus aims to unveil the properties of and the standard imposed by the current BEA models on evaluating the life cycle carbon emissions. The analyses cover the (i) weighting of energy efficiency and emission levels among various environmental performance indicators; (ii) building life cycle stages in which carbon is taken into consideration; (iii) objectiveness of assessment; (iv) baseline set for carbon assessment; (v) mechanism for benchmarking the emission level; and (v) limitations of the carbon assessment approaches. Results indicate that the current BEA schemes focus primarily on operational carbon instead of the emissions generated throughout the entire building life cycle. Besides, the baseline and benchmark for carbon evaluation vary significantly among the BEA tools based on the analytical results of a hypothetical building. The findings point to the needs for a more transparent framework for carbon auditing and benchmarking in BEA modeling. - Highlights: ► Carbon emission evaluation in building environmental assessment schemes are studied. ► Simulative carbon emission is modeled for building environmental assessment schemes. ► Carbon assessments focus primarily on operational stage instead of entire lifecycle. ► Baseline and benchmark of carbon assessment vary greatly among BEA schemes. ► A more transparent and comprehensive framework for carbon assessment is required.

  4. Developing a tool for assessing competency in root cause analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priyanka; Varkey, Prathibha

    2009-01-01

    Root cause analysis (RCA) is a tool for identifying the key cause(s) contributing to a sentinel event or near miss. Although training in RCA is gaining popularity in medical education, there is no published literature on valid or reliable methods for assessing competency in the same. A tool for assessing competency in RCA was pilot tested as part of an eight-station Objective Structured Clinical Examination that was conducted at the completion of a three-week quality improvement (QI) curriculum for the Mayo Clinic Preventive Medicine and Endocrinology fellowship programs. As part of the curriculum, fellows completed a QI project to enhance physician communication of the diagnosis and treatment plan at the end of a patient visit. They had a didactic session on RCA, followed by process mapping of the information flow at the project clinic, after which fellows conducted an actual RCA using the Ishikawa fishbone diagram. For the RCA competency assessment, fellows performed an RCA regarding a scenario describing an adverse medication event and provided possible solutions to prevent such errors in the future. All faculty strongly agreed or agreed that they were able to accurately assess competency in RCA using the tool. Interrater reliability for the global competency rating and checklist scoring were 0.96 and 0.85, respectively. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.76. Six of eight of the fellows found the difficulty level of the test to be optimal. Assessment methods must accompany education programs to ensure that graduates are competent in QI methodologies and are able to apply them effectively in the workplace. The RCA assessment tool was found to be a valid, reliable, feasible, and acceptable method for assessing competency in RCA. Further research is needed to examine its predictive validity and generalizability.

  5. The Shoulder Objective Practical Assessment Tool: Evaluation of a New Tool Assessing Residents Learning in Diagnostic Shoulder Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Christopher L; Holt, Edward M; Gooding, Benjamin W T; Tennent, Thomas D; Foden, Philip

    2015-08-01

    To design and validate an objective practical assessment tool for diagnostic shoulder arthroscopy that would provide residents with a method to evaluate their progression in this field of surgery and to identify specific learning needs. We designed and evaluated the shoulder Objective Practical Assessment Tool (OPAT). The shoulder OPAT was designed by us, and scoring domains were created using a Delphi process. The shoulder OPAT was trialed by members of the British Elbow & Shoulder Society Education Committee for internal consistency and ease of use before being offered to other trainers and residents. Inter-rater reliability and intrarater reliability were calculated. One hundred forty orthopaedic residents, of varying seniority, within 5 training regions in the United Kingdom, were questioned regarding the tool. A pilot study of 6 residents was undertaken. Internal consistency was 0.77 (standardized Cronbach α). Inter-rater reliability was 0.60, and intrarater reliability was 0.82. The Spearman correlation coefficient (r) between the global summary score for the shoulder OPAT and the current assessment tool used in postgraduate training for orthopaedic residents undertaking diagnostic shoulder arthroscopy equaled 0.74. Of the residents, 82% agreed or strongly agreed when asked if the shoulder OPAT would be a useful tool in monitoring progression and 72% agreed or strongly agreed with the introduction of the shoulder OPAT within the orthopaedic domain. This study shows that the shoulder OPAT fulfills several aspects of reliability and validity when tested. Despite the inter-rater reliability being 0.60, we believe that the shoulder OPAT has the potential to play a role alongside the current assessment tool in the training of orthopaedic residents. The shoulder OPAT can be used to assess residents during shoulder arthroscopy and has the potential for use in medical education, as well as arthroscopic skills training in the operating theater. Copyright © 2015

  6. Development and Validation of a Family Meeting Assessment Tool (FMAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Yuya; Healy, Jennifer; Lee, Shuko; Ross, Jeanette; Fischer, Dixie; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra

    2018-01-01

    A cornerstone procedure in Palliative Medicine is to perform family meetings. Learning how to lead a family meeting is an important skill for physicians and others who care for patients with serious illnesses and their families. There is limited evidence on how to assess best practice behaviors during end-of-life family meetings. Our aim was to develop and validate an observational tool to assess trainees' ability to lead a simulated end-of-life family meeting. Building on evidence from published studies and accrediting agency guidelines, an expert panel at our institution developed the Family Meeting Assessment Tool. All fourth-year medical students (MS4) and eight geriatric and palliative medicine fellows (GPFs) were invited to participate in a Family Meeting Objective Structured Clinical Examination, where each trainee assumed the physician role leading a complex family meeting. Two evaluators observed and rated randomly chosen students' performances using the Family Meeting Assessment Tool during the examination. Inter-rater reliability was measured using percent agreement. Internal consistency was measured using Cronbach α. A total of 141 trainees (MS4 = 133 and GPF = 8) and 26 interdisciplinary evaluators participated in the study. Internal reliability (Cronbach α) of the tool was 0.85. Number of trainees rated by two evaluators was 210 (MS4 = 202 and GPF = 8). Rater agreement was 84%. Composite scores, on average, were significantly higher for fellows than for medical students (P < 0.001). Expert-based content, high inter-rater reliability, good internal consistency, and ability to predict educational level provided initial evidence for construct validity for this novel assessment tool. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. All rights reserved.

  7. Relief of dysphagia during neoadjuvant treatment for cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, B; Ericson, J; Kumagai, K; Lundell, L; Tsai, J A; Lindblad, M; Rouvelas, I; Friesland, S; Wang, N; Nilsson, M

    2016-07-01

    Dysphagia is the main symptom of cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction and causing nutritional problems and weight loss, often counteracted by insertion of self-expandable metal stents or nutrition via an enteral route. Clinical observations indicate that neoadjuvant therapy may effectively and promptly alleviate dysphagia, making such nutrition supportive interventions redundant before surgical resection. The objective of the current study was to carefully study the effects of induction neoadjuvant therapy on dysphagia and its subsequent course and thereby investigate the actual need for alimentary gateways for nutritional support. Thirty-five consecutive patients scheduled for neoadjuvant therapy were recruited and assessed regarding dysphagia and appetite at baseline, after the first cycle of preoperative treatment with either chemotherapy alone or with chemoradiotherapy and before surgery. Platinum-based therapy in combination with 5-fluorouracil was administered intravenously days 1-5 every 3 weeks and consisted of three treatments. Patients receiving combined chemoradiotherapy started radiotherapy on day one of second chemotherapy cycle. They received fractions of 2 Gy/day each up to a total dose of 40 Gy. Watson and Ogilvie dysphagia scores were used to assess dysphagia, while appetite was assessed by the Edmonton Assessment System Visual analogue scale-appetite questionnaire. Patients were evaluated at regular outpatient clinic visits or by telephone. The histological tumor response in the surgical specimen was assessed using the Chirieac scale. Ten patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 25 patients scheduled for chemoradiotherapy were included in the analysis. There was a significant improvement in dysphagia in both treatment groups, according to both scales, already from baseline to the completion of the first chemotherapy cycle which remained to the end of the neoadjuvant treatment (P dysphagia and the degree of

  8. Experience Curves: A Tool for Energy Policy Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neij, Lena; Helby, Peter [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Environmental and Energy Systems Studies; Dannemand Andersen, Per; Morthorst, Poul Erik [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark); Durstewitz, Michael; Hoppe-Kilpper, Martin [Inst. fuer Solare Energieversorgungstechnik e.V., Kassel (DE); and others

    2003-07-01

    The objective of the project, Experience curves: a tool for energy policy assessment (EXTOOL), was to analyse the experience curve as a tool for the assessment of energy policy measures. This is of special interest, since the use of experience curves for the assessment of energy policy measures requires the development of the established experience curve methodology. This development raises several questions which have been addressed and analysed in this project. The analysis is based on case studies of wind power, an area with considerable experience in technology development, deployment and policy measures. Therefore, a case study based on wind power provides a good opportunity to study the usefulness of experience curves as a tool for the assessment of energy policy measures. However, the results are discussed in terms of using experience curves for the assessment of any energy technology. The project shows that experience curves can be used to assess the effect of combined policy measures in terms of cost reductions. Moreover, the result of the project show that experience curves could be used to analyse international 'learning systems', i.e. cost reductions brought about by the development of wind power and policy measures used in other countries. Nevertheless, the use of experience curves for the assessment of policy programmes has several limitations. First, the analysis and assessment of policy programmes cannot be achieved unless relevant experience curves based on good data can be developed. The authors are of the opinion that only studies that provide evidence of the validity, reliability and relevance of experience curves should be taken into account in policy making. Second, experience curves provide an aggregated picture of the situation and more detailed analysis of various sources of cost reduction, and cost reductions resulting from individual policy measures, requires additional data and analysis tools. Third, we do not recommend the use of

  9. Atrophy of Swallowing Muscles Is Associated With Severity of Dysphagia and Age in Patients With Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Peter B; Muhle, Paul; Hanning, Uta; Suntrup-Krueger, Sonja; Schwindt, Wolfram; Eversmann, Julian; Warnecke, Tobias; Wirth, Rainer; Zimmer, Sebastian; Dziewas, Rainer

    2017-07-01

    Sarcopenia has been identified as an independent risk factor for dysphagia. Dysphagia is one of the most important and prognostically relevant complications of acute stroke. The role of muscle atrophy as a contributing factor for the occurrence of poststroke dysphagia is yet unclear. To assess whether there is a correlation between age and muscle volume and whether muscle volume is related to dysphagia in acute stroke patients. This retrospective, single-center study included 73 patients with acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who underwent computed tomography angiography on admission and an objective dysphagia assessment by Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing within 72 hours from admission. With the help of semiautomated muscle segmentation and 3-dimensional reconstruction volumetry of the digastric, temporal, and geniohyoid muscles was performed. For further analysis, participants were first divided into 4 groups according to their age (dysphagia severity using the Fiberoptic Endoscopic Dysphagia Severity Scale (FEDSS) (FEDSS 1 and 2, n = 25; FEDSS 3 and 4, n = 32; FEDSS 5 and 6, n = 16). Correlation of muscle volumes with age and dysphagia severity. Muscle volumes of single muscles (except for geniohyoid and the right digastric muscles) as well as the sum muscle volume were significantly and inversely related to dysphagia severity. We found a significant decline of muscle volume with advancing age for most muscle groups and, in particular, for the total muscle volume. Apart from features being determined by the acute stroke itself (eg, site and size of stroke), also premorbid conditions, in particular age-related muscle atrophy, have an impact on the complex pathophysiology of swallowing disorders poststroke. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Qualitative risk assessment as a remediation management tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The technique used to complete this thesis utilizes existing NRC and EPA guidance on health-based risk to qualitatively prioritize preliminary assessments and provide a tool for the direction and management of remediation activities. This method is intended as a decision making tool to aid in prioritizing the remediation effort and manage the remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) process. It is not a replacement for the RI/FS. The methodology for qualitative risk assessment utilizes data gathered in preliminary assessments and calculates the health-based hazards and consequences from contaminants found at each individual location. The health-based qualitative risk indicated that number-sign 6 fuel oil, carbon tetrachloride, depleted uranium, and enriched uranium were the contaminants of major concern, in that order. Plutonium ranked approximately sixth in the contaminant of concern priority. 38 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs

  11. Quality of life in oncological patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia: validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory and the Deglutition Handicap Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speyer, Renée; Heijnen, Bas J; Baijens, Laura W; Vrijenhoef, Femke H; Otters, Elsemieke F; Roodenburg, Nel; Bogaardt, Hans C

    2011-12-01

    Quality of life is an important outcome measurement in objectifying the current health status or therapy effects in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. In this study, the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the Deglutition Handicap Index (DHI) and the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) have been determined for oncological patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. At Maastricht University Medical Center, 76 consecutive patients were selected and asked to fill in three questionnaires on quality of life related to oropharyngeal dysphagia (the SWAL-QOL, the MDADI, and the DHI) as well as a simple one-item visual analog Dysphagia Severity Scale. None of the quality-of-life questionnaires showed any floor or ceiling effect. The test-retest reliability of the MDADI and the Dysphagia Severity Scale proved to be good. The test-retest reliability of the DHI could not be determined because of insufficient data, but the intraclass correlation coefficients were rather high. The internal consistency proved to be good. However, confirmatory factor analysis could not distinguish the underlying constructs as defined by the subscales per questionnaire. When assessing criterion validity, both the MDADI and the DHI showed satisfactory associations with the SWAL-QOL (reference or gold standard) after having removed the less relevant subscales of the SWAL-QOL. In conclusion, when assessing the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the DHI or the MDADI, not all psychometric properties have been adequately met. In general, because of difficulties in the interpretation of study results when using questionnaires lacking sufficient psychometric quality, it is recommended that researchers strive to use questionnaires with the most optimal psychometric properties.

  12. Information security system quality assessment through the intelligent tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapeznikov, E. V.

    2018-04-01

    The technology development has shown the automated system information security comprehensive analysis necessity. The subject area analysis indicates the study relevance. The research objective is to develop the information security system quality assessment methodology based on the intelligent tools. The basis of the methodology is the information security assessment model in the information system through the neural network. The paper presents the security assessment model, its algorithm. The methodology practical implementation results in the form of the software flow diagram are represented. The practical significance of the model being developed is noted in conclusions.

  13. Fish habitat simulation models and integrated assessment tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harby, A.; Alfredsen, K.

    1999-01-01

    Because of human development water use increases in importance, and this worldwide trend is leading to an increasing number of user conflicts with a strong need for assessment tools to measure the impacts both on the ecosystem and the different users and user groups. The quantitative tools must allow a comparison of alternatives, different user groups, etc., and the tools must be integrated while impact assessments includes different disciplines. Fish species, especially young ones, are indicators of the environmental state of a riverine system and monitoring them is a way to follow environmental changes. The direct and indirect impacts on the ecosystem itself are measured, and impacts on user groups is not included. Fish habitat simulation models are concentrated on, and methods and examples are considered from Norway. Some ideas on integrated modelling tools for impact assessment studies are included. One dimensional hydraulic models are rapidly calibrated and do not require any expert knowledge in hydraulics. Two and three dimensional models require a bit more skilled users, especially if the topography is very heterogeneous. The advantages of using two and three dimensional models include: they do not need any calibration, just validation; they are predictive; and they can be more cost effective than traditional habitat hydraulic models when combined with modern data acquisition systems and tailored in a multi-disciplinary study. Suitable modelling model choice should be based on available data and possible data acquisition, available manpower, computer, and software resources, and needed output and accuracy in the output. 58 refs

  14. Bedside screening to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with neurological disorders: an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertscher, Berit; Speyer, Renée; Palmieri, Maria; Plant, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent comorbidity in neurological patients and presents a serious health threat, which may le to outcomes of aspiration pneumonia ranging from hospitalization to death. Therefore, an early identification of risk followed by an accurate diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia is fundamental. This systematic review provides an update of currently available bedside screenings to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia in neurological patients. An electronic search was carried out in the databases PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychInfo (formerly PsychLit), and all hits from 2008 up to December 2012 were included in the review. Only studies with sufficient methodological quality were considered, after which the psychometric characteristics of the screening tools were determined. Two relevant bedside screenings were identified, with a minimum sensitivity and specificity of ≥70 and ≥60 %, respectively.

  15. Oropharyngeal dysphagia: the experience of patients with non-head and neck cancers receiving specialist palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Justin W G; Leslie, Paula; Drinnan, Michael J

    2007-10-01

    Difficulty swallowing is a well-documented symptom in head and neck cancer and oesophageal malignancy. The frequency of oropharyngeal swallowing difficulties in the palliative phase of other malignancies is less reported. 1) To describe the patient experience of swallowing and associated difficulties while receiving specialist palliative care for malignancies other than those affecting the head and neck and 2) to identify the quality of life issues for the participants with dysphagia and compare with normative and dysphagic data provided by SWAL-QOL. Four month prospective pilot study - questionnaire design. Acute teaching hospital. Eleven patients receiving specialist palliative care. Participants were interviewed using a modified version of the SWAL-QOL, a validated quality of life assessment tool for use specifically with people with oropharyngeal dysphagia. Eight quality of life domains were explored as well as fourteen dysphagic symptoms. Seven of the 11 participants had dysphagic symptoms detailed in the SWAL-QOL and a further two patients reported transient dysphagic symptoms since diagnosis of their disease. Nine participants reported an impact on their quality of life and three reported a considerable impact in four or more domains. Eight of the 11 participants had self-selected softer textured foods. A notable group were three patients with lung cancer and one with lung metastases with a history of vocal fold motion impairment, all of who had experienced dysphagic symptoms since diagnosis. Patients with cancers not affecting the head and neck are at risk of developing symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia and subsequently, compromized nutrition, hydration and quality of life. Areas for further research are suggested.

  16. Patient Simulation: A Literary Synthesis of Assessment Tools in Anesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice A. Edler

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available High-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS has been hypothesized as a modality for assessing competency of knowledge and skill in patient simulation, but uniform methods for HFPS performance assessment (PA have not yet been completely achieved. Anesthesiology as a field founded the HFPS discipline and also leads in its PA. This project reviews the types, quality, and designated purpose of HFPS PA tools in anesthesiology. We used the systematic review method and systematically reviewed anesthesiology literature referenced in PubMed to assess the quality and reliability of available PA tools in HFPS. Of 412 articles identified, 50 met our inclusion criteria. Seventy seven percent of studies have been published since 2000; more recent studies demonstrated higher quality. Investigators reported a variety of test construction and validation methods. The most commonly reported test construction methods included “modified Delphi Techniques” for item selection, reliability measurement using inter-rater agreement, and intra-class correlations between test items or subtests. Modern test theory, in particular generalizability theory, was used in nine (18% of studies. Test score validity has been addressed in multiple investigations and shown a significant improvement in reporting accuracy. However the assessment of predicative has been low across the majority of studies. Usability and practicality of testing occasions and tools was only anecdotally reported. To more completely comply with the gold standards for PA design, both shared experience of experts and recognition of test construction standards, including reliability and validity measurements, instrument piloting, rater training, and explicit identification of the purpose and proposed use of the assessment tool, are required.

  17. Evaluation of Phosphorus Site Assessment Tools: Lessons from the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpley, Andrew; Kleinman, Peter; Baffaut, Claire; Beegle, Doug; Bolster, Carl; Collick, Amy; Easton, Zachary; Lory, John; Nelson, Nathan; Osmond, Deanna; Radcliffe, David; Veith, Tamie; Weld, Jennifer

    2017-11-01

    Critical source area identification through phosphorus (P) site assessment is a fundamental part of modern nutrient management planning in the United States, yet there has been only sparse testing of the many versions of the P Index that now exist. Each P site assessment tool was developed to be applicable across a range of field conditions found in a given geographic area, making evaluation extremely difficult. In general, evaluation with in-field monitoring data has been limited, focusing primarily on corroborating manure and fertilizer "source" factors. Thus, a multiregional effort (Chesapeake Bay, Heartland, and Southern States) was undertaken to evaluate P Indices using a combination of limited field data, as well as output from simulation models (i.e., Agricultural Policy Environmental eXtender, Annual P Loss Estimator, Soil and Water Assessment Tool [SWAT], and Texas Best Management Practice Evaluation Tool [TBET]) to compare against P Index ratings. These comparisons show promise for advancing the weighting and formulation of qualitative P Index components but require careful vetting of the simulation models. Differences among regional conclusions highlight model strengths and weaknesses. For example, the Southern States region found that, although models could simulate the effects of nutrient management on P runoff, they often more accurately predicted hydrology than total P loads. Furthermore, SWAT and TBET overpredicted particulate P and underpredicted dissolved P, resulting in correct total P predictions but for the wrong reasons. Experience in the United States supports expanded regional approaches to P site assessment, assuming closely coordinated efforts that engage science, policy, and implementation communities, but limited scientific validity exists for uniform national P site assessment tools at the present time. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Comparative analysis of deterministic and probabilistic fracture mechanical assessment tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckmann, Klaus [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany); Saifi, Qais [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-11-15

    Uncertainties in material properties, manufacturing processes, loading conditions and damage mechanisms complicate the quantification of structural reliability. Probabilistic structure mechanical computing codes serve as tools for assessing leak- and break probabilities of nuclear piping components. Probabilistic fracture mechanical tools were compared in different benchmark activities, usually revealing minor, but systematic discrepancies between results of different codes. In this joint paper, probabilistic fracture mechanical codes are compared. Crack initiation, crack growth and the influence of in-service inspections are analyzed. Example cases for stress corrosion cracking and fatigue in LWR conditions are analyzed. The evolution of annual failure probabilities during simulated operation time is investigated, in order to identify the reasons for differences in the results of different codes. The comparison of the tools is used for further improvements of the codes applied by the partners.

  19. The incidence of dysphagia in patients receiving cerebral reperfusion therapy poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Priscila W; Cola, Paula C; Gatto, Ana R; da Silva, Roberta G; Luvizutto, Gustavo J; Braga, Gabriel P; Schelp, Arthur O; de Arruda Henry, Maria A C; Bazan, Rodrigo

    2014-07-01

    The high prevalence of dysphagia after stroke leads to increased mortality, and cerebral reperfusion therapy has been effective in reducing neurologic deficits. The aim of this study was to investigate the severity and evolution of dysphagia and the occurrence of pneumonia in patients submitted to cerebral reperfusion therapy. Seventy ischemic stroke patients were evaluated. Of these, 35 patients (group 1) were submitted to cerebral reperfusion therapy and 35 (group 2) did not receive thrombolytic treatment. The following were evaluated: severity of dysphagia by means of videofluoroscopy, evolution of oral intake rate by means of the Functional Oral Intake Scale, and the occurrence of pneumonia by international protocol. The relation between the severity of dysphagia and the occurrence of pneumonia with the treatment was evaluated through the chi-square test; the daily oral intake rate and its relation to the treatment were assessed by the Mann-Whitney test and considered significant if P is less than .05. The moderate and severe degrees of dysphagia were more frequent (P=.013) among the patients who were not submitted to cerebral reperfusion therapy. The daily oral intake evolved independently of the treatment type, without statistical significance when compared between the groups, whereas pneumonia occurred more frequently in group 2 (28%) in relation to group 1 (11%) and was associated with the worst degrees of dysphagia (P=.045). We can conclude that there is improvement in the oral intake rate in both groups, with lower severity of dysphagia and occurrence of pneumonia in ischemic stroke patients submitted to cerebral reperfusion therapy. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychometric characteristics of health-related quality-of-life questionnaires in oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Angelique A; Speyer, Renée; Heijnen, Bas J; Klijn-Zwijnenberg, Iris R

    2014-04-01

    Dysphagia can have severe consequences for the patient's health, influencing health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Sound psychometric properties of HRQoL questionnaires are a precondition for assessing the impact of dysphagia, the focus of this study, resulting in recommendations for the appropriate use of these questionnaires in both clinical practice and research contexts. We performed a systematic review starting with a search for and retrieval of all full-text articles on the development of HRQoL questionnaires related to oropharyngeal dysphagia and/or their psychometric validation from the electronic databases PubMed and Embase published up to June 2011. Psychometric properties were judged according to quality criteria proposed for health status questionnaires. Eight questionnaires were included in this study. Four are aimed solely at HRQoL in oropharyngeal dysphagia: the deglutition handicap index (DHI), dysphagia handicap index (DHI'), M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI), and SWAL-QOL, while the EDGQ, EORTC QLQ-STO 22, EORTC QLQ-OG 25 and EORTC QLQ-H&N35 focus on other primary diseases resulting in dysphagia. The psychometric properties of the DHI, DHI', MDADI, and SWAL-QOL were evaluated. For appropriate applicability of HRQoL questionnaires, strong scores on the psychometric criteria face validity, criterion validity, and interpretability are prerequisites. The SWAL-QOL has the strongest ratings for these criteria, while the DHI' is the most easy to apply given its 25 items and the use of a uniform scoring format. For optimal use of HRQoL questionnaires in diverse settings, it is necessary to combine psychometric and utility approaches.

  1. [Relationship between dysphagia and malnutritition in patients over 65 years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán Sánchez-Heredero, María José; Santander Vaquero, Cecilio; Cortázar Sáez, Milagros; de la Morena López, Felipe; Susi García, Rosario; Martínez Rincón, María Del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to understand the relationship between oropharyngeal dysphagia, nutritional risk factors and functional impairment in the elderly (>65y) admitted to a medical-surgical hospital unit. Secondary objectives were to determine the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia, the nutritional status and their functional capacity. A cross-sectional observational study was performed. It included patients over 65 years of age admitted to the Gastroenterology-Urology Department in La Princesa University Hospital (Madrid, Spain) during the months of February and March. The following variables were recorded: age, sex, body mass index, family support, diagnosis, comorbidity, oropharyngeal dysphagia (EAT-10 and volume-viscosity evaluation method), malnutrition (Mininutritional Assessment) and functional capacity (Barthel index). A total of 167 patients were recruited, with 30.8% and 15.4% prevalence of dysphagia and malnutrition, respectively. Prevalence of malnutrition increased to 75% in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. The logistic regression analysis showed how conditions as low score on the Barthel index (OR 0.97 [95% CI, 0.95-0.99]), comorbidity (OR 7.98 [CI 95%, 3.09-20.61]) and dysphagia (OR 4.07 [CI 95%, 1.57-10.52]) were associated with a greater likelihood of suffering malnutrition. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is one of the most underdiagnosed and underestimated conditions among elderly patients and one that has a greater effect on their nutritional status. Accordingly, we suggest using established diagnostic methods with a multidisciplinary team collaboration for its early detection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Orotracheal intubation and dysphagia: comparison of patients with and without brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rodrigues Padovani

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the swallowing and feeding abilities in extubated patients with and without brain injury. Methods: A retrospective study including 44 patients aged 20 to 50 years submitted to prolonged orotracheal intubation (> 48 hours. Two groups were analyzed: Group 1 composed of nontraumatic brain injury patients, and Group 2 composed of patients with traumatic brain injury. Two scales for characterization of functional swallowing and feeding abilities were used to compare both groups; the levels of alertness, awareness and patient collaboration were also assessed. Rresults: The groups were equal in age, number and time of orotracheal intubation and extubation on the date of the assessment. Regarding the speech and language diagnosis, Group 1 presented higher percentage of functional swallowing and mild dysphagia, while Group 2 showed higher rates of moderate to severe dysphagia and severe dysphagia. The Functional Oral Intake Scale average was higher in Group 1. In addition, the injured brain group was sleepier, less collaborative and had less contact in the first evaluation. Cconclusions: In this study, patients who underwent prolonged orotracheal intubation had dysphagia in different degrees, but the patients with brain injury presented more frequent and severe disorder. Thus, this study suggested that orotracheal intubation cannot be considered as the single factor causing dysphagia, especially in neurological patients. Moreover, some cognitive factors may influence the possibility of providing oral feeding.

  3. Duration and extent of dysphagia following pediatric airway reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Claire Kane; Linck, Jessica; Willging, Jay Paul

    2009-04-01

    Patients who undergo open airway reconstruction procedures are likely to experience some degree of post-operative dysphagia. This retrospective review describes the duration of post-operative dysphagia and the use of compensatory strategies in a group of 30 pediatric patients. A retrospective chart review of pediatric patients referred for post-operative swallowing assessment following airway reconstruction during a six-month period was completed. Age, sex, surgical procedure, stent type, co-morbid factors, duration of dysphagia, and use of compensatory dietary modifications and swallowing strategies was summarized and compared. Dysphagia was generally of short duration (1-5 days) in patients undergoing single stage procedures with anterior or anterior/posterior grafts. Duration of swallowing difficulty was increased in patients undergoing posterior grafts in combination with T tubes (10-14 days). The longest duration of difficulty (>2 weeks) occurred in patients who had anterior and posterior grafting with T tubes, combined with additional procedures such as vocal fold lateralization, epiglottic petiole repositioning, and/or arytenoidectomy. There was a greater likelihood of oral feeding difficulty post-operatively in patients presenting with pre-operative feeding issues such as oral aversion or specific texture refusal, and the pre-morbid need for supplemental tube feeding to supplement oral intake. Compensatory swallowing strategies were effective in decreasing aspiration associated with swallowing in oral feeders post-operatively, and in facilitating return to baseline swallowing skills. The duration of dysphagia overall was increased in patients undergoing anterior/posterior grafts in conjunction with in-dwelling T tubes, especially when combined with additional procedures. Compensatory strategies to assist with swallowing were found to be effective in the post-operative phase and included the use of a modified supraglottic swallowing sequence to assist with

  4. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Saito, Naoko [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Qureshi, Muhammad M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Ozonoff, Al [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Romesser, Paul B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

  5. Incidence of Dysphagia and Serial Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study Findings After Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yusun; Kim, Won-Seok; Kang, Sung Shik; Choi, Jin Man; Yeom, Jin S; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2016-05-01

    Prospective study. To prospectively assess the incidence of dysphagia and to present the serial changes of each finding in the videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The reported incidence of dysphagia after ACDF has varied widely, and the serial changes of dysphagia using VFSS have not been clearly determined yet. Data of 47 patients preoperatively and at 1 week and 1 month postoperatively were used for the analyses. The Bazaz dysphagia score and VFSS were checked preoperatively and at 1 week and 1 month postoperatively. The presence of aspiration or penetration, amount of vallecular and pyriform sinus residues, functional dysphagia scale, temporal parameters of oral transit time, pharyngeal transit time, and pharyngeal delay time (PDT) were evaluated from the VFSS data. Incidences of dysphagia measured by the Bazaz dysphagia score were 83.0% at 1 week and 59.6% at 1 month after ACDF. Although the incidence of aspiration was 4.3% and the incidence of penetration was 36.2% at 1 week and 25.5% at 1 month after surgery, none of the patients had aspiration pneumonia. The number of patients with vallecular and pyriform sinus residues significantly increased after ACDF. Further, there were no statistically significant changes at all time points in terms of oral transit time, pharyngeal transit time, and pharyngeal delay time. Dysphagia is common until 1 month after ACDF. Although the incidence of aspiration or penetration in VFSS after ACDF was high, no patient had aspiration pneumonia, which may be because of the intact neurological swallowing mechanism. The typical pattern of dysphagia after ACDF included vallecular and pyriform sinuses filled with postswallow residue, which may result from soft tissue edema and weak constriction of pharyngeal muscles after ACDF.

  6. Recovery from Dysphagia Symptoms after Oral Endotracheal Intubation in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Survivors. A 5-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Martin B; Huang, Minxuan; Shanholtz, Carl; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Palmer, Jeffrey B; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Needham, Dale M

    2017-03-01

    Nearly 60% of patients who are intubated in intensive care units (ICUs) experience dysphagia after extubation, and approximately 50% of them aspirate. Little is known about dysphagia recovery time after patients are discharged from the hospital. To determine factors associated with recovery from dysphagia symptoms after hospital discharge for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) survivors who received oral intubation with mechanical ventilation. This is a prospective, 5-year longitudinal cohort study involving 13 ICUs at four teaching hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland. The Sydney Swallowing Questionnaire (SSQ), a 17-item visual analog scale (range, 0-1,700), was used to quantify patient-perceived dysphagia symptoms at hospital discharge, and at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months after ARDS. An SSQ score greater than or equal to 200 was used to indicate clinically important dysphagia symptoms at the time of hospital discharge. Recovery was defined as an SSQ score less than 200, with a decrease from hospital discharge greater than or equal to 119, the reliable change index for SSQ score. Fine and Gray proportional subdistribution hazards regression analysis was used to evaluate patient and ICU variables associated with time to recovery accounting for the competing risk of death. Thirty-seven (32%) of 115 patients had an SSQ score greater than or equal to 200 at hospital discharge; 3 died before recovery. All 34 remaining survivors recovered from dysphagia symptoms by 5-year follow-up, 7 (23%) after 6 months. ICU length of stay was independently associated with time to recovery, with a hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.96 (0.93-1.00) per day. One-third of orally intubated ARDS survivors have dysphagia symptoms that persist beyond hospital discharge. Patients with a longer ICU length of stay have slower recovery from dysphagia symptoms and should be carefully considered for swallowing assessment to help prevent complications related to dysphagia.

  7. Oral conditions and dysphagia in Japanese, community-dwelling middle- and older- aged adults, independent in daily living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Akinari; Takahashi, Ippei; Kurauchi, Sizuka; Soma, Yuki; Oyama, Toshiaki; Tamura, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Takao; Murashita, Kouichi; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Prevention, early detection and effective rehabilitation of dysphagia are important issues to be considered in an aging society. Previous studies have shown conflicting findings regarding the association between dysphagia and its potential risk factors, including age, malnutrition, oral conditions, lifestyle and medical history. Herein, we assessed the prevalence and association of dysphagia with potential risk factors in 50- to 79-year-old adults dwelling in a community in Japan. Patients and methods In this study, there were 532 participants (185 males and 347 females). Participants who responded positively to the question “Do you sometimes choke on drinks/food such as tea and soup?” or those who presented with abnormal repetitive saliva swallowing test findings were diagnosed with dysphagia. The data collected from these participants included the following: number of teeth, occurrence of oral dryness, age, body mass index, serum albumin concentration, smoking, drinking and exercise habits, presence of diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and questions from the Mini–Mental State Examination. Results Dysphagia was observed in 33 males (17.8%) and 76 females (21.9%). To explore the effect of the potential risk factors on the prevalence of dysphagia, a model was built by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Using the forced entry method, oral dryness (odds ratio [OR] =3.683 and P=0.003 in males; OR =1.797 and P=0.032 in females) and the number of teeth (OR =0.946 and P=0.038 in males) were found to be significantly related to dysphagia. Conclusion This cross-sectional study demonstrated associations between oral conditions and dysphagia. Factors such as oral dryness and number of teeth may contribute to dysphagia more so than aging, lifestyle and comorbidity in community-dwelling adults over the age of 50. PMID:28352164

  8. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, Minh Tam; Lee, Richard; Saito, Naoko; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Ozonoff, Al; Romesser, Paul B.; Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6–44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0–2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0–2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

  9. International physical protection self-assessment tool for chemical facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewell, Craig R.; Burdick, Brent A.; Stiles, Linda L.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2010-09-01

    This report is the final report for Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project No.130746, International Physical Protection Self-Assessment Tool for Chemical Facilities. The goal of the project was to develop an exportable, low-cost, computer-based risk assessment tool for small to medium size chemical facilities. The tool would assist facilities in improving their physical protection posture, while protecting their proprietary information. In FY2009, the project team proposed a comprehensive evaluation of safety and security regulations in the target geographical area, Southeast Asia. This approach was later modified and the team worked instead on developing a methodology for identifying potential targets at chemical facilities. Milestones proposed for FY2010 included characterizing the international/regional regulatory framework, finalizing the target identification and consequence analysis methodology, and developing, reviewing, and piloting the software tool. The project team accomplished the initial goal of developing potential target categories for chemical facilities; however, the additional milestones proposed for FY2010 were not pursued and the LDRD funding therefore was redirected.

  10. An equity tool for health impact assessments: Reflections from Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, Jeremy; Wagler, Meghan; Lkhagvasuren, Oyun; Laing, Lory; Davison, Colleen; Janes, Craig

    2012-01-01

    A health impact assessment (HIA) is a tool for assessing the potential effects of a project or policy on a population's health. In this paper, we discuss a tool for successfully integrating equity concerns into HIAs. This discussion is the product of collaboration by Mongolian and Canadian experts, and it incorporates comments and suggestions of participants of a workshop on equity focused HIAs that took place in Mongolia in October, 2010. Our motivation for discussing this tool is based on the observation that existing HIAs tend either to fail to define equity or use problematic accounts of this concept. In this paper we give an overview of socio-demographic and health indicators in Mongolia and briefly discuss its mining industry. We then review three accounts of equity and argue for the importance of developing a consensus understanding of this concept when integrating considerations of equity into an HIA. Finally, we present findings from the workshop in Mongolia and outline a tool, derived from lessons from this workshop, for critically considering and integrating the concept of equity into an HIA.

  11. Development of the Central Dogma Concept Inventory (CDCI) Assessment Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Dina L.; Snyder, Christopher W.; Fisk, J. Nick; Wright, L. Kate

    2016-01-01

    Scientific teaching requires scientifically constructed, field-tested instruments to accurately evaluate student thinking and gauge teacher effectiveness. We have developed a 23-question, multiple select?format assessment of student understanding of the essential concepts of the central dogma of molecular biology that is appropriate for all levels of undergraduate biology. Questions for the Central Dogma Concept Inventory (CDCI) tool were developed and iteratively revised based on student lan...

  12. Developing and implementing an oral care policy and assessment tool.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stout, Michelle

    2012-01-09

    Oral hygiene is an essential aspect of nursing care. Poor oral care results in patients experiencing pain and discomfort, puts individuals at risk of nutritional deficiency and infection, and has an adverse effect on quality of life. This article describes how an oral care policy and assessment tool were updated to ensure the implementation of evidence-based practice at one hospital in the Republic of Ireland.

  13. Translating and validating a Training Needs Assessment tool into Greek

    OpenAIRE

    Markaki, Adelais; Antonakis, Nikos; Hicks, Carolyn M; Lionis, Christos

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The translation and cultural adaptation of widely accepted, psychometrically tested tools is regarded as an essential component of effective human resource management in the primary care arena. The Training Needs Assessment (TNA) is a widely used, valid instrument, designed to measure professional development needs of health care professionals, especially in primary health care. This study aims to describe the translation, adaptation and validation of the TNA questionnaire...

  14. Clinical assessment tools identify functional deficits in fragility fracture patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ames TD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tyler D Ames,1 Corinne E Wee,1 Khoi M Le,1 Tiffany L Wang,1 Julie Y Bishop,2 Laura S Phieffer,2 Carmen E Quatman2 1The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 2Department of Orthopaedics, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA Purpose: To identify inexpensive, noninvasive, portable, clinical assessment tools that can be used to assess functional performance measures that may put older patients at risk for falls such as balance, handgrip strength, and lumbopelvic control.Patients and methods: Twenty fragility fracture patients and 21 healthy control subjects were evaluated using clinical assessment tools (Nintendo Wii Balance Board [WBB], a handheld dynamometer, and an application for the Apple iPod Touch, the Level Belt that measure functional performance during activity of daily living tasks. The main outcome measurements were balance (WBB, handgrip strength (handheld dynamometer, and lumbopelvic control (iPod Touch Level Belt, which were compared between fragility fracture patients and healthy controls.Results: Fragility fracture patients had lower scores on the vertical component of the WBB Torso Twist task (P=0.042 and greater medial–lateral lumbopelvic sway during a 40 m walk (P=0.026 when compared to healthy controls. Unexpectedly, the fracture patients had significantly higher scores on the left leg (P=0.020 and total components (P=0.010 of the WBB Single Leg Stand task as well as less faults during the left Single Leg Stand task (P=0.003.Conclusion: The clinical assessment tools utilized in this study are relatively inexpensive and portable tools of performance measures capable of detecting differences in postural sway between fragility fracture patients and controls. Keywords: fall risk, geriatric fracture, Nintendo Wii Balance Board, Level Belt, fragility fracture

  15. Hiatus Hernia as a Cause of Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Hamish; Sweis, Rami

    2017-08-01

    This review aims to discuss the putative relationship between hiatus hernia and dysphagia. Proposed mechanisms of dysphagia in patients with hiatus hernia are usually difficult to identify, but recent advances in technology (high-resolution manometry with or without concomitant impedance, ambulatory pH with impedance, videofluoroscopy, and the endoluminal functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP)) and methodology (inclusion of swallows of various consistencies and volumes or shifting position during the manometry protocol) can help induce symptoms and identify the underlying disorder. Chronic reflux disease is often associated with hiatus hernia and is the most common underlying etiology. Dysmotility because of impaired contractility and vigor can occur as a consequence of repeated acid exposure from the acid pocket within the hernia, and the resultant poor clearance subsequently worsens this insult. As such, dysphagia appears to be more common with increasing hiatus hernia size. Furthermore, mucosal inflammation can lead to fibrotic stricture formation and in turn obstruction. On the other hand, there appears to be a difference in the pathophysiology of smaller sliding hernias, in that those with dysphagia are more likely to have extrinsic compression at the crural diaphragm as compared to those with reflux symptoms only. Sliding hiatus hernia, especially when small, does not commonly lead to dysmotility and dysphagia; however, in those patients with symptoms, the underlying etiology can be sought with new technologies and, in particular, the reproduction of normal eating and drinking during testing.

  16. Software Tools to Support the Assessment of System Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of three software tools that were developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center to support the assessment of system health: the Propulsion Diagnostic Method Evaluation Strategy (ProDIMES), the Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy (S4), and the Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) tool. Originally developed to support specific NASA projects in aeronautics and space, these software tools are currently available to U.S. citizens through the NASA Glenn Software Catalog. The ProDiMES software tool was developed to support a uniform comparison of propulsion gas path diagnostic methods. Methods published in the open literature are typically applied to dissimilar platforms with different levels of complexity. They often address different diagnostic problems and use inconsistent metrics for evaluating performance. As a result, it is difficult to perform a one ]to ]one comparison of the various diagnostic methods. ProDIMES solves this problem by serving as a theme problem to aid in propulsion gas path diagnostic technology development and evaluation. The overall goal is to provide a tool that will serve as an industry standard, and will truly facilitate the development and evaluation of significant Engine Health Management (EHM) capabilities. ProDiMES has been developed under a collaborative project of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) based on feedback provided by individuals within the aircraft engine health management community. The S4 software tool provides a framework that supports the optimal selection of sensors for health management assessments. S4 is structured to accommodate user ]defined applications, diagnostic systems, search techniques, and system requirements/constraints. One or more sensor suites that maximize this performance while meeting other user ]defined system requirements that are presumed to exist. S4 provides a systematic approach for evaluating combinations of sensors to determine the set or sets of

  17. Thyrotoxic Dysphagia in an 82-Year-Old Male

    OpenAIRE

    Parperis, Konstantinos; Dadu, Ramona; Hoq, Sheikh; Argento, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in elderly patients and a rare manifestation of Graves' disease. We report a case of an 82-year-old male who presented with a 4-week history of dysphagia and weight loss. Workup for his dysphagia with upper endoscopy, MRI brain, electromyography, acetyl-cholinesterase receptor antibodies, and voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. Modified Barium swallow test showed oropharyngeal dysphagia. Thyroid function tests that revealed hyperthyroidism and...

  18. Reduction of inequalities in health: assessing evidence-based tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shea Beverley

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reduction of health inequalities is a focus of many national and international health organisations. The need for pragmatic evidence-based approaches has led to the development of a number of evidence-based equity initiatives. This paper describes a new program that focuses upon evidence- based tools, which are useful for policy initiatives that reduce inequities. Methods This paper is based on a presentation that was given at the "Regional Consultation on Policy Tools: Equity in Population Health Reports," held in Toronto, Canada in June 2002. Results Five assessment tools were presented. 1. A database of systematic reviews on the effects of educational, legal, social, and health interventions to reduce unfair inequalities is being established through the Cochrane and Campbell Collaborations. 2 Decision aids and shared decision making can be facilitated in disadvantaged groups by 'health coaches' to help people become better decision makers, negotiators, and navigators of the health system; a pilot study in Chile has provided proof of this concept. 3. The CIET Cycle: Combining adapted cluster survey techniques with qualitative methods, CIET's population based applications support evidence-based decision making at local and national levels. The CIET map generates maps directly from survey or routine institutional data, to be used as evidence-based decisions aids. Complex data can be displayed attractively, providing an important tool for studying and comparing health indicators among and between different populations. 4. The Ottawa Equity Gauge is applying the Global Equity Gauge Alliance framework to an industrialised country setting. 5 The Needs-Based Health Assessment Toolkit, established to assemble information on which clinical and health policy decisions can be based, is being expanded to ensure a focus on distribution and average health indicators. Conclusion Evidence-based planning tools have much to offer the

  19. A web-based endodontic case difficulty assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, P K; Chong, B S

    2018-01-25

    To develop a web-based tool to facilitate identification, evaluation and management of teeth requiring endodontic treatment. Following a literature search and thorough analysis of existing case difficulty assessment forms, the web-based tool was developed using an online survey builder (Qualtrics, Qualtrics Lab, UT, USA). Following feedback from a pilot study, it was refined and improved. A study was performed, using the updated version (EndoApp) on a cohort (n = 53) of dental professionals and dental students. The participants were e-mailed instructions detailing the assessment of five test cases using EndoApp, followed by completion of a structured feedback form. Analysis of the EndoApp responses was used to evaluate usage times, whereas the results of the feedback forms were used to assess user experience and relevance, other potential applications and comments on further improvement/s. The average usage time was 2 min 7 s; the average times needed for the last three (Cases 3-5) were significantly less than the preceding two (Cases 1 & 2) test cases. An overwhelming majority of participants expressed favourable views on user experience and relevance of the web-based case difficulty assessment tool. Only two participants (4%) were unlikely or very unlikely to use EndoApp again. The potential application of EndoApp as an 'educational tool' and for 'primary care triage' was deemed the most popular features and of greater importance than the secondary options of 'fee setting' and as a 'dento-legal justification tool'. Within the study limitations, owing to its ability to quantify the level of difficulty and provide guidance, EndoApp was considered user-friendly and helped facilitate endodontic case difficulty assessment. From the feedback, further improvements and the development of a Smartphone App version are in progress. EndoApp may facilitate treatment planning, improve treatment cost-effectiveness and reduce frequency of procedural errors by providing

  20. Strategic Risk Assessment: A Decision Tool for Complex Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, Simon; Duarte-Davidson, Raquel; Yearsley, Roger [Environment Agency, London (United Kingdom). National Centre for Risk Analysis and Options Appraisal; Kemp, Ray; Crawford, Mark [Galson Sciences Limited, Oakham (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    Reporting on the state of the environment often requires policy makers and regulators to prioritise a range of diverse environmental issues for the purpose of directing future action on environmental protection and improvement. Information on environmental issues to inform this type of analysis can be disparate, it may be too voluminous or even absent. Data on a range of issues are rarely presented in a common format that allows easy comparison. Nevertheless, strategic judgements are required on the significance of impacts from various environmental pressures and on the inherent uncertainties. Prioritising issues forces a discussion among stakeholders of the relative significance of 'environmental harm' from pressures acting on various receptors in the environment. Discussions of this sort rapidly evolve into a discourse on risks and values. In an attempt to help systematise these discussions and provide practical tools for the analysis of environmental risks at a strategic level, the Environment Agency of England and Wales has initiated developmental research on strategic risk assessment. The tools developed under this research use the concept of 'environmental harm' as a common currency, viewed from technical, social and economic perspectives, to analyse impacts from a range of environmental pressures. Critical to an informed debate is an understanding and analysis both of the various characteristics of harm (spatial and temporal extent, reversibility, latency, etc.) and of the social response to the actual or potential environmental harm. Recent developments in this approach allow a presentation of the analysis in a structured fashion so as to better inform risk management decisions. Here, we present recent developments in the strategic risk assessment research tool, as tested by case studies from state of the environment reporting and the analysis of a regional environmental plan. We discuss its relative advantages and limitations and its

  1. Strategic Risk Assessment: A Decision Tool for Complex Decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, Simon; Duarte-Davidson, Raquel; Yearsley, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Reporting on the state of the environment often requires policy makers and regulators to prioritise a range of diverse environmental issues for the purpose of directing future action on environmental protection and improvement. Information on environmental issues to inform this type of analysis can be disparate, it may be too voluminous or even absent. Data on a range of issues are rarely presented in a common format that allows easy comparison. Nevertheless, strategic judgements are required on the significance of impacts from various environmental pressures and on the inherent uncertainties. Prioritising issues forces a discussion among stakeholders of the relative significance of 'environmental harm' from pressures acting on various receptors in the environment. Discussions of this sort rapidly evolve into a discourse on risks and values. In an attempt to help systematise these discussions and provide practical tools for the analysis of environmental risks at a strategic level, the Environment Agency of England and Wales has initiated developmental research on strategic risk assessment. The tools developed under this research use the concept of 'environmental harm' as a common currency, viewed from technical, social and economic perspectives, to analyse impacts from a range of environmental pressures. Critical to an informed debate is an understanding and analysis both of the various characteristics of harm (spatial and temporal extent, reversibility, latency, etc.) and of the social response to the actual or potential environmental harm. Recent developments in this approach allow a presentation of the analysis in a structured fashion so as to better inform risk management decisions. Here, we present recent developments in the strategic risk assessment research tool, as tested by case studies from state of the environment reporting and the analysis of a regional environmental plan. We discuss its relative advantages and limitations and its wider potential role

  2. Esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms before and after oral IQoro(R) training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita; Franzén, Thomas

    2015-06-28

    To examine whether muscle training with an oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) improves esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms. A total of 43 adult patients (21 women and 22 men) were consecutively referred to a swallowing center for the treatment and investigation of long-lasting nonstenotic esophageal dysphagia. Hiatal hernia was confirmed by radiologic examination in 21 patients before enrollment in the study (group A; median age 52 years, range: 19-85 years). No hiatal hernia was detected by radiologic examination in the remaining 22 patients (group B; median age 57 years, range: 22-85 years). Before and after training with an oral IQS for 6-8 mo, the patients were evaluated using a symptom questionnaire (esophageal dysphagia and acid chest symptoms; score 0-3), visual analogue scale (ability to swallow food: score 0-100), lip force test (≥ 15 N), velopharyngeal closure test (≥ 10 s), orofacial motor tests, and an oral sensory test. Another twelve patients (median age 53 years, range: 22-68 years) with hiatal hernia were evaluated using oral IQS traction maneuvers with pressure recordings of the upper esophageal sphincter and hiatus canal as assessed by high-resolution manometry. Esophageal dysphagia was present in all 43 patients at entry, and 98% of patients showed improvement after IQS training [mean score (range): 2.5 (1-3) vs 0.9 (0-2), P dysphagia and reflux symptoms in adults, likely due to improved hiatal competence.

  3. Dysphagia and cerebrovascular accident: relationship between severity degree and level of neurological impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itaquy, Roberta Baldino; Favero, Samara Regina; Ribeiro, Marlise de Castro; Barea, Liselotte Menke; Almeida, Sheila Tamanini de; Mancopes, Renata

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this case study was to verify the occurrence of dysphagia in acute ischemic stroke within 48 hours after the onset of the first symptoms, in order to establish a possible relationship between the level of neurologic impairment and the severity degree of dysphagia. After emergency hospital admission, three patients underwent neurological clinical evaluation (general physical examination, neurological examination, and application of the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale - NIHSS), and clinical assessment of swallowing using the Protocolo Fonoaudiológico de Avaliação do Risco para Disfagia (PARD--Speech-Language Pathology Protocol for Risk Evaluation for Dysphagia). One of the patients presented functional swallowing (NIHSS score 11), while the other two had mild and moderate oropharyngeal dysphagia (NIHSS scores 15 and 19, respectively). The service flow and the delay on the patients' search for medical care determined the small sample. The findings corroborate literature data regarding the severity of the neurological condition and the manifestation of dysphagia.

  4. The Challenges of Dysphagia Management and Rehabilitation in Two Complex Cases Post Chemical Ingestion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbach, Anna F; Cremer, Rebecca; Chatwood, Astra; Fink, Sari; Haider, Sadaf; Yee, Michelle

    2016-11-01

    Dysphagia is common sequelae of chemical ingestion injury, resulting from damage to critical swallowing structures. From a speech-language pathology perspective, this study outlines the physiological deficits in 2 individuals with severe injury (1 woman, acid; 1 man, alkali) and the pattern of dysphagia rehabilitation and recovery. A retrospective chart review of clinical and instrumental assessments was conducted to examine swallow characteristics and speech-language pathology management (compensatory and rehabilitation strategies) at multiple time points. Chemical ingestion injury resulted in severe pharyngeal dysphagia for both participants, warranting speech-language pathology management. Dysphagia was characterized by poor base of tongue mobility and reduced laryngeal excursion. Decreased airway patency and protection, secondary to mucosal sloughing, widespread edema, and structural deficits necessitated tracheostomy. Recovery was complicated by physical alterations of pharyngeal and laryngeal structures (e.g., interarytenoid adhesions) and esophageal strictures. Participant 1 was discharged (Day 135) consuming a texture-modified diet; Participant 2 remained nil by mouth (Day 329). Dysphagia recovery subsequent to chemical ingestion is protracted and complex. Clinical outcomes may be improved through individualized and intensive rehabilitation by speech-language pathologists.

  5. Development of risk assessment tool for foundry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, G Madhan; Prasad, P S S; Mokkapati, Anil Kumar; Venkataraman, G

    2008-01-01

    Occupational ill-health and work-related disorders are predominant in manufacturing industries due to the inevitable presence of manual work even after several waves of industrial automation and technological advancements. Ergonomic risk factors and musculoskeletal disorders like low-back symptoms have been noted amongst foundry workers. The purpose of this study was to formulate and develop a Physical Effort Index to assess risk factor. The questionnaire tool applicable to foundry environment has been designed and validated. The data recorded through survey across the foundries has been subjected to regression analysis to correlate between proposed physical effort index and the standard Borg's Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE) scale. The physical efforts of sixty seven workers in various foundry shop floors were assessed subjectively. The 'Job factors' and 'Work environment' were the two major parameters considered in assessing the worker discomfort level at workplace. A relation between Borg's RPE scale and the above two parameters were arrived at, through regression analysis. The study demonstrates the prevalence of risk factors amongst foundry workers and the effectiveness of the proposed index in estimating the risk factor levels. RELEVANCE TO THE INDUSTRY: The proposed tool will assist foundry supervisors and managers to assess the risk factors and helps in better understanding of the workplace to avoid work-related disorders, ensuring better output.

  6. Systematic Sustainability Assessment (SSA) Tool for Hydroelectric Project in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Faiz Mohd; Johan, Kartina

    2017-08-01

    Sustainably developed and managed hydropower has enormous potential to contribute to global sustainability goals. It is known that hydroelectricity contributing small amounts to greenhouse gas emissions and other atmospheric pollutants. However, developing the remaining hydroelectric potential offers many challenges, and public pressure and expectations on the environmental and social performance of hydroelectric tend to increase over time. This paper aims to develop Systematic Sustainability Assessment (SSA) Tool that promotes and guides more sustainable hydroelectric projects in the context of Malaysia. The proposed SSA tool which not only provide a quality and quantitative report of sustainability performance but also act as Self-Assessment Report (SAR) to provide roadmap to achieve greater level of sustainability in project management for continuous improvement. It is expected to provide a common language that allow government, civil society, financial institutions and the hydroelectric sector to talk about and evaluate sustainability issues. The advantage of SSA tool is it can be used at any stage of hydroelectric development, from the earliest planning stages right through to operation.

  7. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ORAU' s Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

    2011-04-14

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

  8. Dysphagia screening after acute stroke: a quality improvement project using criteria-based clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivertsen, Jorun; Graverholt, Birgitte; Espehaug, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is common after stroke and represents a major risk factor for developing aspiration pneumonia. Early detection can reduce the risk of pulmonary complications and death. Despite the fact that evidence-based guidelines recommend screening for swallowing deficit using a standardized screening tool, national audits has identified a gap between practice and this recommendation. The aim was to determine the level of adherence to an evidence-based recommendation on swallow assessment and to take actions to improve practice if necessary. We carried out a criteria-based clinical audit (CBCA) in a small stroke unit at a Norwegian hospital. Patients with hemorrhagic stroke, ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack were included. A power calculation informed the number of included patients at baseline ( n  = 80) and at re-audit ( n  = 35). We compared the baseline result with the evidence-based criteria and gave feedback to management and staff. A brainstorming session, a root-cause analysis and implementation science were used to inform the quality improvement actions which consisted of workshops, use of local opinion leaders, manual paper reminders and feedback. We completed a re-audit after implementation. Percentages and median are reported with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Among 88 cases at baseline, documentation of swallow screening was complete for 6% (95% CI 2-11). In the re-audit ( n  = 51) 61% (95% CI 45-74) had a complete screening. A CBCA involving management and staff, and using multiple tailored intervention targeting barriers, led to greater adherence with the recommendation for screening stroke patients for dysphagia.

  9. Phagophobia: a form of psychogenic dysphagia. A new entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, J; Franko, D L; Gagne, A

    1997-04-01

    There is a group of patients presenting with either acute or chronic dysphagia secondary to fear of swallowing. We have termed this entity phagophobia. It is characterized by various significant swallowing complaints in the face of normal findings on head and neck examination, oropharyngeal swallowing videofluoroscopy, and standard barium swallow study. Ten patients who received diagnoses of phagophobia after a full evaluation at our swallowing disorders center are presented. Each patient was then evaluated by a psychologist, and an attempt at therapy was undertaken. We discuss the specific clinical features, assessment, and treatment of this frequently misdiagnosed disorder.

  10. A comparison of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and traditional therapy, versus traditional therapy in patients with longstanding dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jo; Robinson, H Fiona; Hibberd, Judi

    2018-06-01

    Dysphagia in adults arises from a range of causes including acquired neurological disorders and some cancers. Previous research has suggested that treatment using neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) when used in conjunction with conventional therapy is effective. This review describes the recent literature and a small prospective case series carried out in the United Kingdom. This study contributed to support National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidance for clinicians who wish to include NMES in a rehabilitation programme for dysphagic patients, specifically with reference to safety and the impact on swallowing function of this intervention. In 2014, the UK NICE issued guidelines enabling UK therapists to trial the use of NMES, but the guidelines also sought additional evidence on the impact on swallowing function of NMES and the incidence of side effects. This small prospective case series investigated both of these aspects with a group of patients with dysphagia of neurological origin who had not achieved adequate swallowing function with traditional therapy alone. This study recruited 10 adult patients with dysphagia of neurological origin. All had previously received traditional swallowing therapy for at least 6 months but only achieved a Functional Oral Intake Scale of 4 or less (a scale for amounts and types of oral intake). The total study period was 10 weeks for each subject comprising 5 weeks of traditional therapy delivered three times a week followed by 5 weeks of NMES concurrent with traditional therapy (NMES + traditional therapy) delivered three times a week using the VitalStim stimulator (VitalStim Therapy, UK). In addition, the Quality of Life in Swallowing and Eating Assessment Tool 10 (quality of life scales) were determined to allow comparison between studies. Nine subjects achieved an improvement in swallowing function after NMES + traditional therapy was measured using the Functional Oral Intake Scale, giving a

  11. Effect of dysphasia and dysphagia on inpatient mortality and hospital length of stay: a database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyomard, Veronique; Fulcher, Robert A; Redmayne, Oliver; Metcalf, Anthony K; Potter, John F; Myint, Phyo K

    2009-11-01

    To examine the effect of dysphasia and dysphagia on stroke outcome. Retrospective database study. Norfolk, United Kingdom. Two thousand nine hundred eighty-three men and women with stroke admitted to the hospital between 1997 and 2001. Inpatient mortality and likelihood of longer length of hospital stay, defined as longer than median length of stay (LOS). Dysphagia was defined as difficulty swallowing any liquid (including saliva) or solid material. Dysphasia was defined as speech disorders in which there was impairment of the power of expression by speech, writing, or signs or impairment of the power of comprehension of spoken or written language. An experienced team assessed dysphagia and dysphasia using explicit criteria. Two thousand nine hundred eighty-three patients (1,330 (44.6%) male), median age 78 (range 17-105), were included, of whom 77.7% had ischemic, 10.5% had hemorrhagic, and 11.8% had undetermined stroke types. Dysphasia was present in 41.2% (1,230) and dysphagia in 50.5% (1,506), and 27.7% (827) had both conditions. Having either or both conditions was associated with greater mortality and longer LOS (P<.001 for all). Using multiple logistic regression models controlling for age, sex, premorbid Rankin score, previous disabling stroke, and stroke type, corresponding odds ratios for death and longer LOS were 2.2 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.8-2.7) and 1.4 (95% CI=1.2-1.6) for dysphasia; 12.5 (95% CI=8.9-17.3) and 3.9 (95% CI=3.3-4.6) for dysphagia, 5.5 (95% CI=3.7-8.2), 1.9 (95% CI=1.6-2.3) for either, and 13.8 (95% CI=9.4-20.4) and 3.7 (95% CI=3.1-4.6) if they had both, versus having no dysphasia, no dysphagia, or none of these conditions, respectively. Patients with dysphagia have worse outcome in terms of inpatient mortality and length of hospital stay than those with dysphasia. When both conditions are present, the presence of dysphagia appears to determine the likelihood of poor outcome. Whether this effect is related just to stroke severity

  12. Occupational Exposure Assessment of Nanomaterials using Control Banding Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liguori, Biase

    , are relatively advanced, and they are good foundations for an advanced exposure assessment. Considering the tiered approach for workplace assessment proposed by the OECD, these two tools could be situated, between Tier 1 (Information gathering) and Tier 2 (Basic exposure assessment). Moreover, the thesis......Nanotechnology can be termed as the “new industrial revolution”. A broad range of potential benefits in various applications for the environment and everyday life of humans can be related to the use of nanotechnology. Nanomaterials are used in a large variety of products already in the market......, and because of their novel physical and chemical characteristics, the application of nanomaterials is projected to increase further. This will inevitably increase the production of nanomaterials with potential increase of exposure for the workers which are the first in line expected to become exposed...

  13. Demonstration of vascular abnormalities compressing esophagus by MDCT: Special focus on dysphagia lusoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alper, Fatih; Akgun, Metin; Kantarci, Mecit; Eroglu, Atilla; Ceyhan, Elvan; Onbas, Omer; Duran, Cihan; Okur, Adnan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia lusoria (DL) is described in the literature as difficulty in swallowing caused by vascular abnormalities. The most common cause is an aberrant right subclavian artery (SCA) which passes behind the esophagus and is also called arteria lusoria (AL). Our aim was to demonstrate the use of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the diagnosis of AL, as there is no comprehensive study investigating the role of MDCT in such cases. Material and methods: A total of 38 consecutive patients, comprising of 23 females (61%) and 15 males (39%), who had extrinsic compression were included in the study. These patients are selected from the cases who were admitted due to their gastrointestinal symptoms, such as dysphagia, epigastric pain, chronic nausea, vomiting, etc. The mean age of patients was 40 ± 25 years (range 15-65). Following barium esophagogram and then endoscopy performed, MDCT angiography was carried out on the same or the following few days. MDCT sections were examined to determine the following: presence of vascular abnormality; the diameter and angle of that vascular structure; and the compressed area of esophagus. Radiological findings and dysphagia scores were also compared. Results: In each of 15 cases, there was a compression due to vascular abnormality which were all located between the esophagus and the spine. There was an esophageal compression in each of 12 cases, due to right aberrant SCA, in one case due to right superior aortic arch and in two cases due to both right aortic arch and left SCA with Kommerell's diverticulum. The mean diameter and the angle of AL were 16.4 mm and 48.8 o , respectively, and the mean area of pressured esophagus was 194.7 mm 2 . Dysphagia scores of the cases was 1 in thirteen cases and 2 in two cases. However, dysphagia scores were not correlated with these parameters. Conclusions: MDCT angiography is a useful diagnostic tool for evaluation of patients with dysphagia, especially caused by a vascular

  14. Dysphagia as initial presentation of primary amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis involves all parts of the gastrointestinal tract including the esophagus. The esophageal involvement in amyloidosis has been reported to vary from 13% in a radiology study to 22% in an autopsy series; however, such patients have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. Dysphagia is an uncommon presentation of amyloidosis. We report a 64-year-old patient who presented with progressive dysphagia of 4 months duration which was confirmed to be due to primary amyloidosis with multiple myeloma. The esophageal involvement by amyloidosis was confirmed by esophageal mucosal biopsies, and 22-channel high-resolution manometry.

  15. The Pooling-score (P-score): inter- and intra-rater reliability in endoscopic assessment of the severity of dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farneti, D; Fattori, B; Nacci, A; Mancini, V; Simonelli, M; Ruoppolo, G; Genovese, E

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluated the intra- and inter-rater reliability of the Pooling score (P-score) in clinical endoscopic evaluation of severity of swallowing disorder, considering excess residue in the pharynx and larynx. The score (minimum 4 - maximum 11) is obtained by the sum of the scores given to the site of the bolus, the amount and ability to control residue/bolus pooling, the latter assessed on the basis of cough, raclage, number of dry voluntary or reflex swallowing acts ( 5). Four judges evaluated 30 short films of pharyngeal transit of 10 solid (1/4 of a cracker), 11 creamy (1 tablespoon of jam) and 9 liquid (1 tablespoon of 5 cc of water coloured with methlyene blue, 1 ml in 100 ml) boluses in 23 subjects (10 M/13 F, age from 31 to 76 yrs, mean age 58.56±11.76 years) with different pathologies. The films were randomly distributed on two CDs, which differed in terms of the sequence of the films, and were given to judges (after an explanatory session) at time 0, 24 hours later (time 1) and after 7 days (time 2). The inter- and intra-rater reliability of the P-score was calculated using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC; 3,k). The possibility that consistency of boluses could affect the scoring of the films was considered. The ICC for site, amount, management and the P-score total was found to be, respectively, 0.999, 0.997, 1.00 and 0.999. Clinical evaluation of a criterion of severity of a swallowing disorder remains a crucial point in the management of patients with pathologies that predispose to complications. The P-score, derived from static and dynamic parameters, yielded a very high correlation among the scores attributed by the four judges during observations carried out at different times. Bolus consistencies did not affect the outcome of the test: the analysis of variance, performed to verify if the scores attributed by the four judges to the parameters selected, might be influenced by the different consistencies of the boluses, was not

  16. Benefits Assessment for Tactical Runway Configuration Management Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa; Phojanamongkolkij, Nipa; Lohr, Gary; Fenbert, James W.

    2013-01-01

    The Tactical Runway Configuration Management (TRCM) software tool was developed to provide air traffic flow managers and supervisors with recommendations for airport configuration changes and runway usage. The objective for this study is to conduct a benefits assessment at Memphis (MEM), Dallas Fort-Worth (DFW) and New York's John F. Kennedy (JFK) airports using the TRCM tool. Results from simulations using the TRCM-generated runway configuration schedule are compared with results using historical schedules. For the 12 days of data used in this analysis, the transit time (arrival fix to spot on airport movement area for arrivals, or spot to departure fix for departures) for MEM departures is greater (7%) than for arrivals (3%); for JFK, there is a benefit for arrivals (9%) but not for departures (-2%); for DFW, arrivals show a slight benefit (1%), but this is offset by departures (-2%). Departure queue length benefits show fewer aircraft in queue for JFK (29%) and MEM (11%), but not for DFW (-13%). Fuel savings for surface operations at MEM are seen for both arrivals and departures. At JFK there are fuel savings for arrivals, but these are offset by increased fuel use for departures. In this study, no surface fuel benefits resulted for DFW. Results suggest that the TRCM algorithm requires modifications for complex surface traffic operations that can cause taxi delays. For all three airports, the average number of changes in flow direction (runway configuration) recommended by TRCM was many times greater than the historical data; TRCM would need to be adapted to a particular airport's needs, to limit the number of changes to acceptable levels. The results from this analysis indicate the TRCM tool can provide benefits at some high-capacity airports. The magnitude of these benefits depends on many airport-specific factors and would require adaptation of the TRCM tool; a detailed assessment is needed prior to determining suitability for a particular airport.

  17. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HCTT-CHE

    2011-04-14

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

  18. The impact of oropharynegeal dysphagia on quality of life in individuals with age over 50 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, S.; Iqblal, A.; Ayaz, S.B.; Khan, A.A.; Matee, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the demographics of individuals presented with oropharyngeal dysphagia, correlation of different demographic factors with the quality of life (QOL) after validation of the Urdu translation of Swallowing Quality of Life (SWAL-QOL) questionnaire. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey, carried out at the speech and language therapy department of Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rawalpindi from July 2013 to January 2014 enrolling patients > 50 years of age with oropharyngeal dysphagia and scoring them on Urdu translation of SWAL-QOL questionnaire. The reliability of the tool was measured through Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Results: Of 40 patients, majority (60%) were males, married (62.5 %), illiterate (80%) and settling in age group of 51- 61 years. Most of them were from Punjab (30%) and Sindh (30%). The most common primary pathology was stroke (47.5%).The mean SWAL-QOL score was 147±13 (Range: 124 - 176). Most domains of questionnaire had Cronbach's alpha coefficient = 0.7. No variable was found to be significantly affecting SWAL-QOL score. Conclusion: The Urdu-translated version of SWAL-QOL is a valid tool. QOL in Pakistani patients of age > 50 years with oropharyngeal dysphagia is adversely affected, however, it does not depend on age, gender, marital status, education, ethnicity based on provinces or primary pathology for dysphagia. (author)

  19. A generic rabies risk assessment tool to support surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael P; Hernández-Jover, Marta

    2015-06-01

    The continued spread of rabies in Indonesia poses a risk to human and animal populations in the remaining free islands, as well as the neighbouring rabies-free countries of Timor Leste, Papua New Guinea and Australia. Here we describe the development of a generic risk assessment tool which can be used to rapidly determine the vulnerability of rabies-free islands, so that scarce resources can be targeted to surveillance activities and the sensitivity of surveillance systems increased. The tool was developed by integrating information on the historical spread of rabies, anthropological studies, and the opinions of local animal health experts. The resulting tool is based on eight critical parameters that can be estimated from the literature, expert opinion, observational studies and information generated from routine surveillance. In the case study presented, results generated by this tool were most sensitive to the probability that dogs are present on private and fishing boats and it was predicted that rabies-infection (one infected case) might occur in a rabies-free island (upper 95% prediction interval) with a volume of 1000 boats movements. With 25,000 boat movements, the median of the probability distribution would be equal to one infected case, with an upper 95% prediction interval of six infected cases. This tool could also be used at the national-level to guide control and eradication plans. An initial recommendation from this study is to develop a surveillance programme to determine the likelihood that boats transport dogs, for example by port surveillance or regularly conducted surveys of fisherman and passenger ferries. However, the illegal nature of dog transportation from rabies-infected to rabies-free islands is a challenge for developing such surveillance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Description of Ethical Bio-Technology Assessment Tools for Agriculture and Food Production. Interim Report Ethical Bio-TA Tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, V.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of 'Ethical Bio-TA Tools' project is to develop and improve tools for the ethical assessment of new technologies in agriculture and food production in general and modern biotechnologies in particular. The developed tools need to be designed for various purposes and contexts. They

  1. Reliability of the Hazelbaker Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Jennifer P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 3% of infants are born with a tongue-tie which may lead to breastfeeding problems such as ineffective latch, painful attachment or poor weight gain. The Hazelbaker Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function (HATLFF has been developed to give a quantitative assessment of the tongue-tie and recommendation about frenotomy (release of the frenulum. The aim of this study was to assess the inter-rater reliability of the HATLFF. Methods Fifty-eight infants referred to the Breastfeeding Education and Support Services (BESS at The Royal Women's Hospital for assessment of tongue-tie and 25 control infants were assessed by two clinicians independently. Results The Appearance items received kappas between about 0.4 to 0.6, which represents "moderate" reliability. The first three Function items (lateralization, lift and extension of tongue had kappa values over 0.65 which indicates "substantial" agreement. The four Function items relating to infant sucking (spread, cupping, peristalsis and snapback received low kappa values with insignificant p values. There was 96% agreement between the two assessors on the recommendation for frenotomy (kappa 0.92, excellent agreement. The study found that the Function Score can be more simply assessed using only the first three function items (ie not scoring the sucking items, with a cut-off of ≤4 for recommendation of frenotomy. Conclusion We found that the HATLFF has a high reliability in a study of infants with tongue-tie and control infants

  2. Developing an Assessment (Tool) for Touch Screen Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial-Saad, Alexandra; Chiari, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Touch screen devices have become prevalent in our lives. Assistive technology experts working with people with disabilities face difficulty in understanding and assessing the problems experienced by individuals with disabilities in operating touch screen devices. This paper presents the processes of collecting and creating the required knowledge needed for assessing the user's skills for operating various touch screen devices, in order to develop an application for assessing the user's abilities and limitations. A six step procedure was used to collect and validate the required knowledge for the assessment from a multidisciplinary team. To determine the agreement levels between the experts, content validity was calculated. To test correlation between the experts from the different disciplines, a comparison was made between the discipline groups and their choice of specific skills/measurements. The final number of domains and skills/measurements was 15 domains and 50 skills/measurements. The result of Cronbach's α test for the final assessment questionnaire (50 skills/measurements) was 0.94, which indicates a high degree of reliability. The results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed the lack of any significant difference between agreements of the clinicians and the technicians groups, but significant differences were found between the educators and the clinicians groups. Each of the skills appearing in the final questionnaire was illustrated in a flowchart in preparation for developing the assessment (tool) for using touch screen devices.

  3. Grading Dysphagia as a Toxicity of Head and Neck Cancer: Differences in Severity Classification Based on MBS DIGEST and Clinical CTCAE Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goepfert, Ryan P; Lewin, Jan S; Barrow, Martha P; Warneke, Carla L; Fuller, Clifton D; Lai, Stephen Y; Weber, Randal S; Hutcheson, Katherine A

    2018-04-01

    Clinician-reported toxicity grading through common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) stages dysphagia based on symptoms, diet, and tube dependence. The new dynamic imaging grade of swallowing toxicity (DIGEST) tool offers a similarly scaled five-point ordinal summary grade of pharyngeal swallowing as determined through results of a modified barium swallow (MBS) study. This study aims to inform clinicians on the similarities and differences between dysphagia severity according to clinical CTCAE and MBS-derived DIGEST grading. A cross-sectional sample of 95 MBS studies was randomly selected from a prospectively-acquired MBS database among patients treated with organ preservation strategies for head and neck cancer. MBS DIGEST and clinical CTCAE dysphagia grades were compared. DIGEST and CTCAE dysphagia grades had "fair" agreement per weighted κ of 0.358 (95% CI .231-.485). Using a threshold of DIGEST ≥ 3 as reference, CTCAE had an overall sensitivity of 0.50, specificity of 0.84, and area under the curve (AUC) of 0.67 to identify severe MBS-detected dysphagia. At less than 6 months, sensitivity was 0.72, specificity was 0.76, and AUC was 0.75 while at greater than 6 months, sensitivity was 0.22, specificity was 0.90, and AUC was 0.56 for CTCAE to detect dysphagia as determined by DIGEST. Classification of pharyngeal dysphagia on MBS using DIGEST augments our understanding of dysphagia severity according to the clinically-derived CTCAE while maintaining the simplicity of an ordinal scale. DIGEST likely complements CTCAE toxicity grading through improved specificity for physiologic dysphagia in the acute phase and improved sensitivity for dysphagia in the late-phase.

  4. New graduates’ perceptions of preparedness to provide speech-language therapy services in general and dysphagia services in particular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shajila Singh

    2015-06-01

    Methods: New graduates of six South African universities were recruited to participate in a survey by completing an electronic questionnaire exploring their perceptions of the dysphagia curricula and their preparedness to practise across the scope of the profession of speechlanguage therapy. Results: Eighty graduates participated in the study yielding a response rate of 63.49%. Participants perceived themselves to be well prepared in some areas (e.g. child language: 100%; articulation and phonology: 97.26%, but less prepared in other areas (e.g. adult dysphagia: 50.70%; paediatric dysarthria: 46.58%; paediatric dysphagia: 38.36% and most unprepared to provide services requiring sign language (23.61% and African languages (20.55%. There was a significant relationship between perceptions of adequate theory and clinical learning opportunities with assessment and management of dysphagia and perceptions of preparedness to provide dysphagia services. Conclusion: There is a need for review of existing curricula and consideration of developing a standard speech-language therapy curriculum across universities, particularly in service provision to a multilingual population, and in both the theory and clinical learning of the assessment and management of adult and paediatric dysphagia, to better equip graduates for practice.

  5. Identification of dysphagia using the Toronto Bedside Swallowing Screening Test (TOR-BSST©): are 10 teaspoons of water necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Rosemary; Maki, Ellen; Diamant, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    Dysphagia screening often includes administration of water. This study assessed the accuracy in identifying dysphagia with each additional teaspoon of water. The original research of the TOR-BSST(©) permitted this assessment. Trained nurses from acute and rehabilitation facilities prospectively administered the TOR-BSST(©) to 311 eligible stroke inpatients. A sensitivity analysis was conducted for the water item using 10 teaspoons plus a sip as the standard. The proportion of positive screenings was 59.2% in acute and 38.5% in rehabilitation. Of all four items that form the TOR-BSST(©), the water swallow item contributed to the identification of dysphagia in 42.7% in acute and 29.0% in rehabilitation patients. Across all patients, dysphagia accuracy was that five teaspoons resulted in a sensitivity of 79% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 70-86), eight a sensitivity of 92% (95% CI = 85-96) and 10 a sensitivity of 96% (95% CI = 90-99). Although a primary contributor, the water swallow item alone does not identify all patients with dysphagia. For a water swallow to accurately identify dysphagia, it is critical to administer 10 teaspoons. The TOR-BSST(©) water swallow item contributes largely to the total TOR-BSST(©)'s screening score and in making the test highly accurate and reliable.

  6. New graduates’ perceptions of preparedness to provide speech-language therapy services in general and dysphagia services in particular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Alannah; Choto, Fadziso; Gotlieb, Jessica; Robertson, Rebecca; Morris, Gabriella; Stockley, Nicola; Mauff, Katya

    2015-01-01

    Background Upon graduation, newly qualified speech-language therapists are expected to provide services independently. This study describes new graduates’ perceptions of their preparedness to provide services across the scope of the profession and explores associations between perceptions of dysphagia theory and clinical learning curricula with preparedness for adult and paediatric dysphagia service delivery. Methods New graduates of six South African universities were recruited to participate in a survey by completing an electronic questionnaire exploring their perceptions of the dysphagia curricula and their preparedness to practise across the scope of the profession of speech-language therapy. Results Eighty graduates participated in the study yielding a response rate of 63.49%. Participants perceived themselves to be well prepared in some areas (e.g. child language: 100%; articulation and phonology: 97.26%), but less prepared in other areas (e.g. adult dysphagia: 50.70%; paediatric dysarthria: 46.58%; paediatric dysphagia: 38.36%) and most unprepared to provide services requiring sign language (23.61%) and African languages (20.55%). There was a significant relationship between perceptions of adequate theory and clinical learning opportunities with assessment and management of dysphagia and perceptions of preparedness to provide dysphagia services. Conclusion There is a need for review of existing curricula and consideration of developing a standard speech-language therapy curriculum across universities, particularly in service provision to a multilingual population, and in both the theory and clinical learning of the assessment and management of adult and paediatric dysphagia, to better equip graduates for practice. PMID:26304217

  7. MOVEMENT SKILL ASSESSMENT OF TYPICALLY DEVELOPING PRESCHOOL CHILDREN: A REVIEW OF SEVEN MOVEMENT SKILL ASSESSMENT TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Cools

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of movement is often overlooked because it is such a natural part of human life. It is, however, crucial for a child's physical, cognitive and social development. In addition, experiences support learning and development of fundamental movement skills. The foundations of those skills are laid in early childhood and essential to encourage a physically active lifestyle. Fundamental movement skill performance can be examined with several assessment tools. The choice of a test will depend on the context in which the assessment is planned. This article compares seven assessment tools which are often referred to in European or international context. It discusses the tools' usefulness for the assessment of movement skill development in general population samples. After a brief description of each assessment tool the article focuses on contents, reliability, validity and normative data. A conclusion outline of strengths and weaknesses of all reviewed assessment tools focusing on their use in educational research settings is provided and stresses the importance of regular data collection of fundamental movement skill development among preschool children.

  8. Age-Related Differences in Clinical Characteristics and Esophageal Motility in Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakato, Rui; Manabe, Noriaki; Kamada, Tomoari; Matsumoto, Hideo; Shiotani, Akiko; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2017-06-01

    Dysphagia in elderly patients has a major effect on nutrition and quality of life (QOL). Although several studies have shown that aging itself is associated with changes in esophageal motility, the impact of these changes on dysphagia symptoms and QOL is unknown. This study assessed the manometric diagnoses of elderly patients with dysphagia compared with diagnoses in younger counterparts. Participants included 116 consecutive patients examined for dysphagia from 2007 to 2014. We divided patients into three groups by age: Group A, 66 years and older (24 men, 23 women); Group B, 45-65 years (18 men, 24 women); and Group C, 44 years and younger (15 men, 12 women). The three groups were compared in regard to symptoms, esophageal motility, and health-related QOL (HRQOL). All patients underwent esophageal manometry examination and completed a self-administered questionnaire concerning their symptoms; HRQOL assessment was based on results of the Short Form-8 General Health Survey. Symptoms rated ≥4 points on the Likert scale were defined as significant. Although all patients had dysphagia as a major symptom, more elderly patients reported globus sensation, whereas more young patients reported heartburn as the primary symptom. Manometric diagnoses were generally similar across the three groups. Ineffective esophageal motility was more prevalent in Groups A and C than in Group B, although the difference was not statistically significant. No significant differences in manometric parameters or HRQOL were detected among the three groups. Despite differences in symptom patterns, broad manometric diagnoses and impairment of HRQOL in elderly patients with dysphagia are similar to those in younger counterparts.

  9. Evaluating and Reporting Dysphagia in Trials of Chemoirradiation for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluck, Iris; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Reporting long-term toxicities in trials of chemoirradiation (CRT) of head-and-neck cancer (HNC) has mostly been limited to observer-rated maximal Grades ≥3. We evaluated this reporting approach for dysphagia by assessing patient-reported dysphagia (PRD) and objective swallowing dysfunction through videofluoroscopy (VF) in patients with various grades of maximal observer-reported dysphagia (ORD). Methods and Materials: A total of 62 HNC patients completed quality-of-life questionnaires periodically through 12 months post-CRT. Five PRD items were selected: three dysphagia-specific questions, an Eating-Domain, and 'Overall Bother.' They underwent VF at 3 and 12 months, and ORD (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) scoring every 2 months. We classified patients into four groups (0-3) according to maximal ORD scores documented 3-12 months post-CRT, and assessed PRD and VF summary scores in each group. Results: Differences in ORD scores among the groups were considerable throughout the observation period. In contrast, PRD scores were similar between Groups 2 and 3, and variable in Group 1. VF scores were worse in Group 3 compared with 2 at 3 months but similar at 12 months. In Group 1, PRD and VF scores from 3 through 12 months were close to Groups 2 and 3 if ORD score 1 persisted, but were similar to Group 0 in patients whose ORD scores improved by 12 months. Conclusions: Patients with lower maximal ORD grades, especially if persistent, had similar rates of PRD and objective dysphagia as patients with highest grades. Lower ORD grades should therefore be reported. These findings may have implications for reporting additional toxicities besides dysphagia.

  10. Exposure Assessment Tools by Tiers and Types - Deterministic and Probabilistic Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA ExpoBox is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases

  11. A novel tool for assessing and summarizing the built environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background A growing corpus of research focuses on assessing the quality of the local built environment and also examining the relationship between the built environment and health outcomes and indicators in communities. However, there is a lack of research presenting a highly resolved, systematic, and comprehensive spatial approach to assessing the built environment over a large geographic extent. In this paper, we contribute to the built environment literature by describing a tool used to assess the residential built environment at the tax parcel-level, as well as a methodology for summarizing the data into meaningful indices for linkages with health data. Methods A database containing residential built environment variables was constructed using the existing body of literature, as well as input from local community partners. During the summer of 2008, a team of trained assessors conducted an on-foot, curb-side assessment of approximately 17,000 tax parcels in Durham, North Carolina, evaluating the built environment on over 80 variables using handheld Global Positioning System (GPS) devices. The exercise was repeated again in the summer of 2011 over a larger geographic area that included roughly 30,700 tax parcels; summary data presented here are from the 2008 assessment. Results Built environment data were combined with Durham crime data and tax assessor data in order to construct seven built environment indices. These indices were aggregated to US Census blocks, as well as to primary adjacency communities (PACs) and secondary adjacency communities (SACs) which better described the larger neighborhood context experienced by local residents. Results were disseminated to community members, public health professionals, and government officials. Conclusions The assessment tool described is both easily-replicable and comprehensive in design. Furthermore, our construction of PACs and SACs introduces a novel concept to approximate varying scales of community and

  12. A novel tool for assessing and summarizing the built environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroeger Gretchen L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing corpus of research focuses on assessing the quality of the local built environment and also examining the relationship between the built environment and health outcomes and indicators in communities. However, there is a lack of research presenting a highly resolved, systematic, and comprehensive spatial approach to assessing the built environment over a large geographic extent. In this paper, we contribute to the built environment literature by describing a tool used to assess the residential built environment at the tax parcel-level, as well as a methodology for summarizing the data into meaningful indices for linkages with health data. Methods A database containing residential built environment variables was constructed using the existing body of literature, as well as input from local community partners. During the summer of 2008, a team of trained assessors conducted an on-foot, curb-side assessment of approximately 17,000 tax parcels in Durham, North Carolina, evaluating the built environment on over 80 variables using handheld Global Positioning System (GPS devices. The exercise was repeated again in the summer of 2011 over a larger geographic area that included roughly 30,700 tax parcels; summary data presented here are from the 2008 assessment. Results Built environment data were combined with Durham crime data and tax assessor data in order to construct seven built environment indices. These indices were aggregated to US Census blocks, as well as to primary adjacency communities (PACs and secondary adjacency communities (SACs which better described the larger neighborhood context experienced by local residents. Results were disseminated to community members, public health professionals, and government officials. Conclusions The assessment tool described is both easily-replicable and comprehensive in design. Furthermore, our construction of PACs and SACs introduces a novel concept to approximate varying

  13. Judging the Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Assessment Tools to Guide Future Tool Development: The use of Clinimetrics as Opposed to Psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Philip M; Gomez-Pomar, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    In the face of the current Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) epidemic, there is considerable variability in the assessment and management of infants with NAS. In this manuscript, we particularly focus on NAS assessment, with special attention given to the popular Finnegan Neonatal Abstinence Score (FNAS). A major instigator of the problem of variable practices is that multiple modified versions of the FNAS exist and continue to be proposed, including shortened versions. Furthermore, the validity of such assessment tools has been questioned, and as a result, the need for better tools has been suggested. The ultimate purpose of this manuscript, therefore, is to increase researchers' and clinicians' understanding on how to judge the usefulness of NAS assessment tools in order to guide future tool development and to reduce variable practices. In short, we suggest that judgment of NAS assessment tools should be made on a clinimetrics viewpoint as opposed to psychometrically. We provide examples, address multiple issues that must be considered, and discuss future tool development. Furthermore, we urge researchers and clinicians to come together, utilizing their knowledge and experience, to assess the utility and practicality of existing assessment tools and to determine if one or more new or modified tools are needed with the goal of increased agreement on the assessment of NAS in practice.

  14. Judging the Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Assessment Tools to Guide Future Tool Development: The use of Clinimetrics as Opposed to Psychometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Westgate

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the face of the current Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS epidemic, there is considerable variability in the assessment and management of infants with NAS. In this manuscript, we particularly focus on NAS assessment, with special attention given to the popular Finnegan Neonatal Abstinence Score (FNAS. A major instigator of the problem of variable practices is that multiple modified versions of the FNAS exist and continue to be proposed, including shortened versions. Furthermore, the validity of such assessment tools has been questioned, and as a result, the need for better tools has been suggested. The ultimate purpose of this manuscript, therefore, is to increase researchers’ and clinicians’ understanding on how to judge the usefulness of NAS assessment tools in order to guide future tool development and to reduce variable practices. In short, we suggest that judgment of NAS assessment tools should be made on a clinimetrics viewpoint as opposed to psychometrically. We provide examples, address multiple issues that must be considered, and discuss future tool development. Furthermore, we urge researchers and clinicians to come together, utilizing their knowledge and experience, to assess the utility and practicality of existing assessment tools and to determine if one or more new or modified tools are needed with the goal of increased agreement on the assessment of NAS in practice.

  15. Field Assessment of Energy Audit Tools for Retrofit Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J.; Bohac, D.; Nelson, C.; Smith, I.

    2013-07-01

    This project focused on the use of home energy ratings as a tool to promote energy retrofits in existing homes. A home energy rating provides a quantitative appraisal of a home's asset performance, usually compared to a benchmark such as the average energy use of similar homes in the same region. Home rating systems can help motivate homeowners in several ways. Ratings can clearly communicate a home's achievable energy efficiency potential, provide a quantitative assessment of energy savings after retrofits are completed, and show homeowners how they rate compared to their neighbors, thus creating an incentive to conform to a social standard. An important consideration is how rating tools for the retrofit market will integrate with existing home energy service programs. For residential programs that target energy savings only, home visits should be focused on key efficiency measures for that home. In order to gain wide adoption, a rating tool must be easily integrated into the field process, demonstrate consistency and reasonable accuracy to earn the trust of home energy technicians, and have a low monetary cost and time hurdle for homeowners. Along with the Home Energy Score, this project also evaluated the energy modeling performance of SIMPLE and REM/Rate.

  16. Development of tools and models for computational fracture assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talja, H.; Santaoja, K.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this paper has been to develop and test new computational tools and theoretically more sound methods for fracture mechanical analysis. The applicability of the engineering integrity assessment system MASI for evaluation of piping components has been extended. The most important motivation for the theoretical development have been the well-known fundamental limitations in the validity of J-integral, which limits its applicability in many important practical safety assessment cases. Examples are extensive plastic deformation, multimaterial structures and ascending loading paths (especially warm prestress, WPS). Further, the micromechanical Gurson model has been applied to several reactor pressure vessel materials. Special attention is paid to the transferability of Gurson model parameters from tensile test results to prediction of ductile failure behaviour of cracked structures. (author)

  17. Field Assessment of Energy Audit Tools for Retrofit Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Bohac, D. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Nelson, C. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Smith, I. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This project focused on the use of home energy ratings as a tool to promote energy retrofits in existing homes. A home energy rating provides a quantitative appraisal of a home’s energy performance, usually compared to a benchmark such as the average energy use of similar homes in the same region. Rating systems based on energy performance models, the focus of this report, can establish a home’s achievable energy efficiency potential and provide a quantitative assessment of energy savings after retrofits are completed, although their accuracy needs to be verified by actual measurement or billing data. Ratings can also show homeowners where they stand compared to their neighbors, thus creating social pressure to conform to or surpass others. This project field-tested three different building performance models of varying complexity, in order to assess their value as rating systems in the context of a residential retrofit program: Home Energy Score, SIMPLE, and REM/Rate.

  18. Creating a Social Media Assessment Tool for Family Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risling, Tracie; Risling, Derek; Holtslander, Lorraine

    2017-02-01

    The use of social media (SM) is contributing to an unprecedented state of global connectivity and occupying an increasingly prominent position in the lives of individuals and families. The more integrated these media become into society the more likely they are to play a role in overall health and family functioning, be it positively or negatively. Family systems theory provides an ideal lens through which to examine the effects of SM in today's family life. This article introduces a new SM assessment tool aligned with the principles of this foundational theory. Family nurses can use the proposed Social Media Assessment Package (SMAP) to gain an initial picture of usage patterns within a family as well as identify and support positive future SM choices. Practitioners may also use the SMAP in a personal evaluation of their practice as a means to maximize SM use in ongoing professional development.

  19. Translating and validating a Training Needs Assessment tool into Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Carolyn M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The translation and cultural adaptation of widely accepted, psychometrically tested tools is regarded as an essential component of effective human resource management in the primary care arena. The Training Needs Assessment (TNA is a widely used, valid instrument, designed to measure professional development needs of health care professionals, especially in primary health care. This study aims to describe the translation, adaptation and validation of the TNA questionnaire into Greek language and discuss possibilities of its use in primary care settings. Methods A modified version of the English self-administered questionnaire consisting of 30 items was used. Internationally recommended methodology, mandating forward translation, backward translation, reconciliation and pretesting steps, was followed. Tool validation included assessing item internal consistency, using the alpha coefficient of Cronbach. Reproducibility (test – retest reliability was measured by the kappa correlation coefficient. Criterion validity was calculated for selected parts of the questionnaire by correlating respondents' research experience with relevant research item scores. An exploratory factor analysis highlighted how the items group together, using a Varimax (oblique rotation and subsequent Cronbach's alpha assessment. Results The psychometric properties of the Greek version of the TNA questionnaire for nursing staff employed in primary care were good. Internal consistency of the instrument was very good, Cronbach's alpha was found to be 0.985 (p 1.0, KMO (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy = 0.680 and Bartlett's test of sphericity, p Conclusion The translated and adapted Greek version is comparable with the original English instrument in terms of validity and reliability and it is suitable to assess professional development needs of nursing staff in Greek primary care settings.

  20. Translating and validating a Training Needs Assessment tool into Greek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markaki, Adelais; Antonakis, Nikos; Hicks, Carolyn M; Lionis, Christos

    2007-01-01

    Background The translation and cultural adaptation of widely accepted, psychometrically tested tools is regarded as an essential component of effective human resource management in the primary care arena. The Training Needs Assessment (TNA) is a widely used, valid instrument, designed to measure professional development needs of health care professionals, especially in primary health care. This study aims to describe the translation, adaptation and validation of the TNA questionnaire into Greek language and discuss possibilities of its use in primary care settings. Methods A modified version of the English self-administered questionnaire consisting of 30 items was used. Internationally recommended methodology, mandating forward translation, backward translation, reconciliation and pretesting steps, was followed. Tool validation included assessing item internal consistency, using the alpha coefficient of Cronbach. Reproducibility (test – retest reliability) was measured by the kappa correlation coefficient. Criterion validity was calculated for selected parts of the questionnaire by correlating respondents' research experience with relevant research item scores. An exploratory factor analysis highlighted how the items group together, using a Varimax (oblique) rotation and subsequent Cronbach's alpha assessment. Results The psychometric properties of the Greek version of the TNA questionnaire for nursing staff employed in primary care were good. Internal consistency of the instrument was very good, Cronbach's alpha was found to be 0.985 (p 1.0, KMO (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin) measure of sampling adequacy = 0.680 and Bartlett's test of sphericity, p < 0.001. Conclusion The translated and adapted Greek version is comparable with the original English instrument in terms of validity and reliability and it is suitable to assess professional development needs of nursing staff in Greek primary care settings. PMID:17474989

  1. The Neurobiology of Swallowing and Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Arthur J.

    2008-01-01

    The neurobiological study of swallowing and its dysfunction, defined as dysphagia, has evolved over two centuries beginning with electrical stimulation applied directly to the central nervous system, and then followed by systematic investigations that have used lesioning, transmagnetic stimulation, magnetoencephalography, and functional magnetic…

  2. Palliation of Dysphagia from Esophageal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.Y.V. Homs (Marjolein)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe prognosis of esophageal cancer is poor with a 5-year survival of 10-15%. In addition, over 50% of patients with esophageal cancer already have an inoperable disease at presentation. The majority of these patients require palliative treatment to relieve progressive dysphagia. Metal

  3. Indicators of Dysphagia in Aged Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Dai; Murry, Thomas; Wong, May C. M.; Yiu, Edwin M. L.; Chan, Karen M. K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The current cross-sectional study aimed to investigate risk factors for dysphagia in elderly individuals in aged care facilities. Method: A total of 878 individuals from 42 aged care facilities were recruited for this study. The dependent outcome was speech therapist-determined swallowing function. Independent factors were Eating…

  4. Dysphagia due to diffuseidiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) or Forestier's disease isa form of degenerative arthritiswith unique spinal and extra spinal manifestations. Dysphagia due to DISH is uncommon but when present DISH should be suspected. Surgical decompression can relieve some of the symptoms. We report a case of a 60 ...

  5. The Utility of Pitch Elevation in the Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; Hind, Jacqueline A.; Gangnon, Ronald; Logemann, Jeri A.; Robbins, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a pitch elevation task in the assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Method: This study was a pilot prospective cohort study including 40 consecutive patients (16 male and 24 female) who were referred by their physician for a swallowing evaluation. Patients were evaluated with a noninstrumental clinical…

  6. Environmental Comfort Indicators for School Buildings in Sustainability Assessment Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Santos Saraiva

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Decades ago, the only requirement to construct a building was to give men the right conditions for the execution of their work or leisure activities. With the development of knowledge about the internal and external environments of buildings, other requirements have been added such as the issue of user comfort. New construction techniques have been incorporated and new products have been created to improve internal environment comfort. This research addressed the importance of using indicators related to environmental comfort in sustainability assessment tools applied to school buildings. It also considered the importance of environmental issues for the good performance of human beings, and the harmonious coexistence of the comfort indicators indoor air quality, thermal comfort, visual comfort, acoustic comfort and ergonomic comfort based on data gathered in research carried out with users of high schools (only students. This research was carried out in two different cities of different countries, Guimarães (Portugal and Juiz de Fora (Brazil, that have similar characteristics of teaching standards and climate conditions (temperature and air humidity. In this study, interviews were made through questionnaires and, later, the information collected was analyzed. This study demonstrates the need to include an ergonomic indicator for school buildings in sustainability assessment tools.

  7. A tool for assessing cultural competence training in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyfield, Lavern J; Miller, Barbara H

    2013-08-01

    Policies exist to promote fairness and equal access to opportunities and services that address basic human needs of all U.S. citizens. Nonetheless, health disparities continue to persist among certain subpopulations, including those of racial, ethnic, geographic, socioeconomic, and other cultural identity groups. The Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) has added standards to address this concern. According to the most recent standards, adopted in 2010 for implementation in July 2013, CODA stipulates that "students should learn about factors and practices associated with disparities in health." Thus, it is imperative that dental schools develop strategies to comply with this addition. One key strategy for compliance is the inclusion of cultural competence training in the dental curriculum. A survey, the Dental Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training (D-TACCT), based on the Association of American Medical Colleges' Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training (TACCT), was sent to the academic deans at seventy-one U.S. and Canadian dental schools to determine best practices for cultural competence training. The survey was completed by thirty-seven individuals, for a 52 percent response rate. This article describes the use of this survey as a guide for developing culturally competent strategies and enhancing cultural competence training in dental schools.

  8. Factors predicting dysphagia after anterior cervical surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Ma, Lei; Yang, Da-Long; Wang, Hui; Bai, Zhi-Long; Zhang, Li-Jun; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A multicenter retrospective study. The purpose of this study was to explore risk factors of dysphagia after anterior cervical surgery and factors affecting rehabilitation of dysphagia 2 years after surgery. Patients who underwent anterior cervical surgery at 3 centers from January 2010 to January 2013 were included. The possible factors included 3 aspects: demographic variables—age, sex, body mass index (BMI): hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, smoking, alcohol use, diagnose (cervical spondylotic myelopathy or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament), preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA), surgical-related variables—surgical option (ACDF, ACCF, ACCDF, or Zero profile), operation time, blood loss, operative level, superior fusion segment, incision length, angle of C2 to C7, height of C2 to C7, cervical circumference, cervical circumference/height of C2 to C7. The results of our study indicated that the rate of dysphagia at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery was 20%, 5.4%, 2.4%, 1.1%, and 0.4%, respectively. Our results showed that age (58.8 years old), BMI (27.3 kg/m2), course of disease (11.6 months), operation time (103.2 min), blood loss (151.6 mL), incision length (9.1 cm), cervical circumference (46.8 cm), angle of C2 to C7 (15.3°), cervical circumference/height of C2 to C7 (4.8), preoperative VAS (7.5), and ODI (0.6) in dysphagia group were significantly higher than those (52.0, 24.6, 8.6, 88.2, 121.6, 8.6, 42.3, 12.6, 3.7, 5.6, and 0.4, respectively) in nondysphagia group; however, height of C2 to C7 (9.9 vs 11.7 cm) and preoperative JOA (8.3 vs 10.7) had opposite trend between 2 groups. We could also infer that female, smoking, diabetes, ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, ACCDF, multilevel surgery, and superior fusion segment including C2 to C3 or C6 to C7 were the risk factors for dysphagia after surgery immediately. However

  9. Decreased tongue pressure is associated with sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keisuke; Akagi, Junji

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the association between tongue pressure and factors related to sarcopenia such as aging, activities of daily living, nutritional state, and dysphagia. One-hundred-and-four patients without a history of treatment of stroke and without a diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease (36 men and 68 women), with a mean age of 84.1 ± 5.6 years, hospitalized from May 2013 to June 2013 were included in this study. Maximum voluntary tongue pressure against the palate (MTP) was measured by a device consisting of a disposable oral balloon probe. Nutritional and anthropometric parameters such as serum albumin concentration, Mini-Nutritional Assessment short form (MNA-SF), body mass index, arm muscle area (AMA), and others and presence of sarcopenia and dysphagia were analyzed to evaluate their relationships. Correlation analysis and univariate or multivariate analysis were performed. Simple correlation analysis showed that MTP correlated with Barthel index (BI), MNA-SF, serum albumin concentration, body mass index, and AMA. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that sarcopenia, BI, MNA-SF, and age were the independent explanatory factors for decreased MTP, and the propensity score for dysphagia, including causes of primary or secondary sarcopenia, and the presence of sarcopenia were significantly associated with the presence of dysphagia. Decreased MTP and dysphagia were related to sarcopenia or the causes of sarcopenia in the studied population. Furthermore, the clinical condition of sarcopenic dysphagia may be partially interpreted as the presence of sarcopenia and causal factors for sarcopenia.

  10. Effects of Bilateral Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Post-Stroke Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunhee; Kim, Min Su; Chang, Won Hyuk; Oh, Su Mi; Kim, Yun Kwan; Lee, Ahee; Kim, Yun-Hee

    Optimal protocol of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on post-stroke dysphagia remains uncertain with regard to its clinical efficacy. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of high-frequency rTMS at the bilateral motor cortices over the cortical representation of the mylohyoid muscles in the patients with post-stroke dysphagia. This study was a single-blind, randomized controlled study with a blinded observer. Thirty-five stroke patients were randomly divided into three intervention groups: the bilateral stimulation group, the unilateral stimulation group, and the sham stimulation group. For the bilateral stimulation group, 500 pulses of 10 Hz rTMS over the ipsilesional and 500 pulses of 10 Hz rTMS over the contralesional motor cortices over the cortical areas that project to the mylohyoid muscles were administered daily for 2 consecutive weeks. For the unilateral stimulation group, 500 pulses of 10 Hz rTMS over the ipsilesional motor cortex over the cortical representation of the mylohyoid muscle and the same amount of sham rTMS over the contralesional hemisphere were applied. For the sham stimulation group, sham rTMS was applied at the bilateral motor cortices. Clinical swallowing function and videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were assessed before the intervention (T0), immediately after the intervention (T1) and 3 weeks after the intervention (T2) using Clinical Dysphagia Scale (CDS), Dysphagia Outcome and Severity Scale (DOSS), Penetration Aspiration Scale (PAS), and Videofluoroscopic Dysphagia Scale (VDS). There were significant time and intervention interaction effects in the CDS, DOSS, PAS, and VDS scores (p dysphagia therapies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Dysphonia and dysphagia after anterior cervical decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervonen, Hanna; Niemelä, Mika; Lauri, Eija-Riitta; Back, Leif; Juvas, Anja; Räsänen, Pirjo; Roine, Risto P; Sintonen, Harri; Salmi, Tapani; Vilkman, S Erkki; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the effects of anterior cervical decompression (ACD) on swallowing and vocal function. The study comprised 114 patients who underwent ACD. The early group (50 patients) was examined immediately pre- and postoperatively, and the late group (64 patients) was examined at only 3 to 9 months postoperatively. Fifty age- and sex-matched patients from the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery who had not been intubated in the previous 5 years were used as a control group. All patients in the early and control groups were examined by a laryngologist; patients in the late group were examined by a laryngologist and a neurosurgeon. Videolaryngostroboscopy was performed in all members of the patient and control groups, and the function of the ninth through 12th cranial nerves were clinically evaluated. Data were collected concerning swallowing, voice quality, surgery results, and health-related quality of life. Patients with persistent dysphonia were referred for phoniatric evaluation and laryngeal electromyography (EMG). Those with persistent dysphagia underwent transoral endoscopic evaluation of swallowing function and videofluorography. Sixty percent of patients in the early group reported dysphonia and 69% reported dysphagia at the immediate postoperative visit. Unilateral vocal fold paresis occurred in 12%. The prevalence of both dysphonia and dysphagia decreased in both groups 3 to 9 months postoperatively. All six patients with vocal fold paresis in the early group recovered, and in the late group there were two cases of vocal fold paresis. The results of laryngeal EMG were abnormal in 14 of 16 patients with persistent dysphonia. Neither intraoperative factors nor age or sex had any effect on the occurrence of dysphonia, dysphagia, or vocal fold paresis. Most patients were satisfied with the surgical outcome. Dysphonia, dysphagia, and vocal fold paresis are common but usually transient complications of ACD

  12. Validation of screening tools to assess appetite among geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisah, R; Suzana, S; Lee, F S

    2012-07-01

    Poor appetite is one of the main contributing factors of poor nutritional status among elderly individuals. Recognizing the importance of assessment of appetite, a cross sectional study was conducted to determine the validity of appetite screening tools namely, the Council on Nutrition Appetite questionnaire (CNAQ) and the simplified nutritional appetite questionnaire (SNAQ) against the appetite, hunger and sensory perception questionnaire (AHSPQ), measures of nutritional status and food intake among geriatric patients at the main general hospital in Malaysia. Nutritional status was assessed using the subjective global assessment (SGA) while food intake was measured using the dietary history questionnaire (DHQ). Anthropometric parameters included weight, height, body mass index (BMI), calf circumference (CC) and mid upper arm circumference (MUAC). A total of 145 subjects aged 60 to 86 years (68.3 ± 5.8 years) with 31.7% men and 68.3% women were recruited from outpatients (35 subjects) and inpatients (110 subjects) of Kuala Lumpur Hospital of Malaysia. As assessed by SGA, most subjects were classified as mild to moderately malnourished (50.4%), followed by normal (38.6%) and severely malnourished (11.0%). A total of 79.3% and 57.2% subjects were classified as having poor appetite according to CNAQ and SNAQ, respectively. CNAQ (80.9%) had a higher sensitivity than SNAQ (69.7%) when validated against nutritional status as assessed using SGA. However, the specificity of SNAQ (62.5%) was higher than CNAQ (23.2%). Positive predictive value for CNAQ and SNAQ were 62.6% and 74.7%, respectively. Cronbach's alpha for CNAQ and SNAQ were 0.546 and 0.578, respectively. History of weight loss over the past one year (Adjusted odds ratio 2.49) (p risk factors for poor appetite among subjects. In conclusion, malnutrition and poor appetite were prevalent among the geriatric outpatients and inpatients. SNAQ was more reliable and valid as an appetite screening tool among this special

  13. Developing an integration tool for soil contamination assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Romero, Maria; Zingg, Felix; Pérez-Álvarez, José Miguel; Madejón, Paula; Kotb Abd-Elmabod, Sameh

    2015-04-01

    In the last decades, huge soil areas have been negatively influenced or altered in multiples forms. Soils and, consequently, underground water, have been contaminated by accumulation of contaminants from agricultural activities (fertilizers and pesticides) industrial activities (harmful material dumping, sludge, flying ashes) and urban activities (hydrocarbon, metals from vehicle traffic, urban waste dumping). In the framework of the RECARE project, local partners across Europe are focusing on a wide range of soil threats, as soil contamination, and aiming to develop effective prevention, remediation and restoration measures by designing and applying targeted land management strategies (van Lynden et al., 2013). In this context, the Guadiamar Green Corridor (Southern Spain) was used as a case study, aiming to obtain soil data and new information in order to assess soil contamination. The main threat in the Guadiamar valley is soil contamination after a mine spill occurred on April 1998. About four hm3 of acid waters and two hm3 of mud, rich in heavy metals, were released into the Agrio and Guadiamar rivers affecting more than 4,600 ha of agricultural and pasture land. Main trace elements contaminating soil and water were As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Tl and Zn. The objective of the present research is to develop informatics tools that integrate soil database, models and interactive platforms for soil contamination assessment. Preliminary results were obtained related to the compilation of harmonized databases including geographical, hydro-meteorological, soil and socio-economic variables based on spatial analysis and stakeholder's consultation. Further research will be modellization and upscaling at the European level, in order to obtain a scientifically-technical predictive tool for the assessment of soil contamination.

  14. Aqueduct: an interactive tool to empower global water risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig, Paul; Gassert, Francis

    2013-04-01

    The Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas (Aqueduct) is a publicly available, global database and interactive tool that maps indicators of water related risks for decision makers worldwide. Aqueduct makes use of the latest geo-statistical modeling techniques to compute a composite index and translate the most recently available hydrological data into practical information on water related risks for companies, investors, and governments alike. Twelve global indicators are grouped into a Water Risk Framework designed in response to the growing concerns from private sector actors around water scarcity, water quality, climate change, and increasing demand for freshwater. The Aqueduct framework includes indicators of water stress, variability in supply, storage, flood, drought, groundwater, water quality and social conflict, addressing both spatial and temporal variation in water hazards. It organizes indicators into three categories of risk that bring together multiple dimensions of water related risk into comprehensive aggregated scores, which allow for dynamic weighting to capture users' unique exposure to water hazards. All information is compiled into an online, open access platform, from which decision-makers can view indicators, scores, and maps, conduct global risk assessments, and export data and shape files for further analysis. Companies can use this tool to evaluate their exposure to water risks across operations and supply chains, investors to assess water-related risks in their portfolio, and public-sector actors to better understand water security. Additionally, the open nature of the data and maps allow other organizations to build off of this effort with new research, for example in the areas of water-energy or water-food relationships. This presentation will showcase the Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas online tool and the features and functionalities it offers, as well as explain how it can be used for both private and public sector applications. The session will

  15. Assessment of COTS IR image simulation tools for ATR development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Heiko; Stahl, Christoph; Bjerkeli, Frode; Skaaren-Fystro, Paal

    2005-05-01

    recommendation. The synthetic image data that are used for the investigation are generated using the recommended tool. Within the scope of this study, ATR performance on IR imagery using classifiers trained on real, synthetic and mixed image sets was evaluated. The performance of the adapted classifiers is assessed using recorded IR imagery with known ground-truth and recommendations are given for the use of COTS IR image simulation tools for ATR development.

  16. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia Is Strongly Correlated With Apparent Life-Threatening Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Daniel R; Amirault, Janine; Mitchell, Paul D; Larson, Kara; Rosen, Rachel L

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysfunction with resultant aspiration in patients admitted after apparent life-threatening events (ALTE) and to determine whether historical characteristics could predict this oropharyngeal dysphagia and aspiration risk. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients admitted to Boston Children's Hospital between 2012 and 2015 with a diagnosis of ALTE to determine the frequency of evaluation for oropharyngeal dysphagia using video fluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) and clinical feeding evaluations, to determine the prevalence of swallowing dysfunction in subjects admitted after ALTE and to compare presenting historical characteristics to swallow study results. A total of 188 children were admitted with a diagnosis of ALTE of which 29% (n = 55) had an assessment of swallowing by VFSS. Of those who had a VFSS, 73% (n = 40) had evidence of aspiration or penetration on VFSS. Of all of the diagnostic tests ordered on patients with ALTEs, the VFSS had the highest rate of abnormalities of any test ordered. None of the historical characteristics of ALTE predicted which patients were at risk for aspiration. In patients who had both clinical feeding evaluations and VFSS, observed clinical feedings incorrectly identified 26% of patients as having no oropharyngeal dysphagia when in fact aspiration was present on VFSS. Oropharyngeal dysphagia with aspiration is the most common diagnosis identified in infants presenting with ALTEs. The algorithm for ALTE should be revised to include an assessment of VFSS as clinical feeding evaluations are inadequate to assess for aspiration.

  17. BASINs and WEPP Climate Assessment Tools (CAT): Case Study Guide to Potential Applications (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final report, BASINs and WEPP Climate Assessment Tools (CAT): Case Study Guide to Potential Applications. This report supports application of two recently developed water modeling tools, the Better Assessment Science Integrating point & ...

  18. MODERN METHODOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR STUDENTS’ LANGUAGE SKILLS SELF-ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Astanina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nowadays, the problem of standardization of foreign language training at the higher school is becoming currently topical. With regard to the processes of globalization, the international educational projects and students exchange programs gain greater international recognition. Such international programmes involve foreign language knowledge graded as not only high certified academic levels but also as basic language skills. The lack of foreign language competence becomes the obstacle for successful training, depriving a future graduate of a part of chances to become the competitive and popular expert in the chosen profession. The success of a foreign language course completion among students depends on many factors; the most important factor is motivation which can affect self-assessment of training results. The aim of the study is to describe possibilities of the CanDos tools implementation for the organization of students self-consciousness and self-assessment of own achievements in order to influence the motivation for mastering a foreign language.Methodology and research methods. The research is based on competencybased approach. The methods involve comparative analysis, synthesis, and generalization.Results and scientific novelty. The questionnaire developed for the experiment helped to collect the data concerning the effectiveness of the CanDos software implementation for self-assessment of students’ foreign language skills. The corresponding self-assessment helps students to carry out a self-reflection of own knowledge and abilities, and to find “weak points” in language proficiency which need additional practice and improvement. By regularly using CanDos software as self-assessment tools, students learn to identify the correspondence of their language competence to the external requirements and standards of education. Orientation to training results will help future experts to create self-motivation that positively

  19. Using urban forest assessment tools to model bird habitat potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Susannah B.; Nislow, Keith H.; Nowak, David J.; DeStefano, Stephen; King, David I.; Jones-Farrand, D. Todd

    2014-01-01

    The alteration of forest cover and the replacement of native vegetation with buildings, roads, exotic vegetation, and other urban features pose one of the greatest threats to global biodiversity. As more land becomes slated for urban development, identifying effective urban forest wildlife management tools becomes paramount to ensure the urban forest provides habitat to sustain bird and other wildlife populations. The primary goal of this study was to integrate wildlife suitability indices to an existing national urban forest assessment tool, i-Tree. We quantified available habitat characteristics of urban forests for ten northeastern U.S. cities, and summarized bird habitat relationships from the literature in terms of variables that were represented in the i-Tree datasets. With these data, we generated habitat suitability equations for nine bird species representing a range of life history traits and conservation status that predicts the habitat suitability based on i-Tree data. We applied these equations to the urban forest datasets to calculate the overall habitat suitability for each city and the habitat suitability for different types of land-use (e.g., residential, commercial, parkland) for each bird species. The proposed habitat models will help guide wildlife managers, urban planners, and landscape designers who require specific information such as desirable habitat conditions within an urban management project to help improve the suitability of urban forests for birds.

  20. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT (LCA AS A TOOL FOR BUSINESS STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Salvador

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing concern about the development of sustainable production systems leads organizations to seek the support of management tools for decision-making. Considering the whole life cycle of the product, the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA has an important role in this scenario. The objective of this paper is to present, through the theoretical discussion, the role of LCA in strategic planning of the organization. It showed the enormous potential for decision making on the environmental aspect, but also the critical factor in the development shares in the competitive context. The use of LCA can reduce the environmental impacts of the system under study (primary purpose and guide the range of advantages in the fields of marketing, legislation and environmental labeling, competitive strategies, efficiency use of resources and others.

  1. Tools for peer assessment in an e-learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Nordseth

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Our exploration of peer assessment in the formative feedback of themes within ITL111 Digital Competence for teachers (15 ECTS and GEO102 Physical Geography (15 ECTS is based on support from tools within the LMS, sets of learning based outcomes, rubrics and Six Thinking Hats. The overall effect is improved quality of the student assignments and deeper learning. The best results were registered with the use of rubrics where the students were presented with clearly defined criteria for expected performance on a sample of different themes within the course. In order to perform the peer review, the students had to acquire the basic knowledge of the various themes. In addition, seeing how others solved the assignment provided the student with reflections on the themes that would improve the student's own final portfolio.

  2. From Clinical-Developmental Theory to Assessment: The Holistic Student Assessment Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Noam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A description and test of the Holistic Student Assessment Tool (HSA, an assessment tool to measure children’s and adolescents’ resiliencies in relation to externalizing and internalizing problem behaviors. The HSA is based on the authors’ research-based clinical-developmental Clover Leaf Model of resilience and psychopathology, and is one of the first attempts at closing the gap between risk and resilience approaches in developmental assessment. The HSA was tested in a cross-sectional sample of 423 children and adolescents.The results lend support to the HSA as a valid measure of children’s and adolescents’ resiliencies. Furthermore, the resilience scales mostly exhibited the theoretically expected convergent and divergent relationships with the psychopathology scales. In addition, we show how the resilience scales predict adolescents’ externalizing and internalizing symptoms. We contend that evidence-based intervention to address youth aggression needs to be based on sounddevelopmental assessment.

  3. [Clinical Trials for Treatment of Stroke Patients with Dysphagia by Vitalstim Electroacupuncture Combined with Swallowing Rehabilitation Training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng-Yu; Liu, Shao-Bing; Wu, Wei; Chen, Yi-Min; Liao, Kang-Lin; Xiang, Yong; Pan, Dun

    2017-04-25

    To observe the clinical effect of vitalstim electroacupuncture (EA) combined with swallowing rehabilitation training in the treatment of stroke patients with dysphagia. A total of 80 stroke patients with dysphagia were randomized into treatment and control groups ( n =40 in each group). Patients of the control group were treated by regular medication for anti-platelet aggregation and anti-coagulation, lipid-lowering, neuroprotection, blood glucose control and blood pressure control, etc. and swallowing function rehabilitation training, and those of the treatment group treated by EA stimulation of Fengchi (GB 20), Jinjin (EX-HN 12) and Yuye (EX-HN 13) with a Vitalstim Electrostimulator and manual acupuncture stimulation of Lianquan (CV 23), Tiantu (CV 22) in combination with regular medication plus swallowing function training as those mentioned in the control group. The EA and manual acupuncture stimulation treatment was conducted once daily, 6 times a week and 4 weeks altogether. The therapeutic effect was assessed by using Kubota swallowing ability test (6 levels), dysphagia subscale (0-6 scores) of the neurological deficit degrees, videofluorography (VFG) assessment (markedly effective, effective and invalid, for evaluating the function and symmetry state of the swallowing movements), and the MOS Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36, 8 minor items of two major aspects in physiological function, mental health, emotional function, social function and overall health) for assessing the patients' daily-life quality. After the treatment, the dysphagia score of the treatment group was signi-ficantly lower than that of the control group ( P dysphagia (showed by dysphagia score and VFG outcomes) and life quality. EA treatment combined with swallowing function rehabilitation training is effective in improving swallowing ability and daily-life quality in stroke patients with dysphagia.

  4. An ensemble model of QSAR tools for regulatory risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, Prachi; Povinelli, Richard J; White, Shannon; Merrill, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs) are theoretical models that relate a quantitative measure of chemical structure to a physical property or a biological effect. QSAR predictions can be used for chemical risk assessment for protection of human and environmental health, which makes them interesting to regulators, especially in the absence of experimental data. For compatibility with regulatory use, QSAR models should be transparent, reproducible and optimized to minimize the number of false negatives. In silico QSAR tools are gaining wide acceptance as a faster alternative to otherwise time-consuming clinical and animal testing methods. However, different QSAR tools often make conflicting predictions for a given chemical and may also vary in their predictive performance across different chemical datasets. In a regulatory context, conflicting predictions raise interpretation, validation and adequacy concerns. To address these concerns, ensemble learning techniques in the machine learning paradigm can be used to integrate predictions from multiple tools. By leveraging various underlying QSAR algorithms and training datasets, the resulting consensus prediction should yield better overall predictive ability. We present a novel ensemble QSAR model using Bayesian classification. The model allows for varying a cut-off parameter that allows for a selection in the desirable trade-off between model sensitivity and specificity. The predictive performance of the ensemble model is compared with four in silico tools (Toxtree, Lazar, OECD Toolbox, and Danish QSAR) to predict carcinogenicity for a dataset of air toxins (332 chemicals) and a subset of the gold carcinogenic potency database (480 chemicals). Leave-one-out cross validation results show that the ensemble model achieves the best trade-off between sensitivity and specificity (accuracy: 83.8 % and 80.4 %, and balanced accuracy: 80.6 % and 80.8 %) and highest inter-rater agreement [kappa ( κ ): 0

  5. Cognitive and Motor Aspects of Parkinson's Disease Associated with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Sun; Youn, Jinyoung; Suh, Mee Kyung; Kim, Tae-Eun; Chin, Juhee; Park, Suyeon; Cho, Jin Whan

    2015-11-01

    Dysphagia is a common symptom and an important prognostic factor in Parkinson's disease (PD). Although cognitive and motor dysfunctions may contribute to dysphagia in patients with PD, any specific association between such problems and swallowing functions is unclear. Here, we examined the potential relationship between cognitive/motor components and swallowing functions in PD. We evaluated the contributions of cognition and motor function to the components of swallowing via video fluoroscopic swallowing (VFS) experiments. We prospectively enrolled 56 patients without dementia having PD. Parkinson's disease severity was assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). All participants received neuropsychological tests covering general mental status, visuospatial function, attention, language, learning and memory, and frontal executive function. The well-validated "modified barium swallow impairment profile" scoring system was applied during VFS studies to quantify swallowing impairments. Finally, correlations between neuropsychological or motor functions and impairment in swallowing components were calculated. The most significant correlations were found between the frontal/executive or learning/memory domains and the oral phase of swallowing, though a minor component of the pharyngeal phase correlated with frontal function as well. Bradykinesia and the UPDRS total score were associated with both the pharyngeal and oral phases. Our findings suggest that cognitive dysfunctions are associated with the oral phase of swallowing in patients with early stage PD while the severity of motor symptoms may be associated with overall swallowing function.

  6. Dysphagia and laryngeal pathology in post-surgical cardiothoracic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Anna; McLellan, Naomi; Machan, Rochelle; Vokes, David; Hunting, Alexandra; McFarlane, Mary; Holmes, Jennifer; Lynn, Kelly

    2018-02-09

    Cardiothoracic surgery is known to result in dysphagia and laryngeal injury. While prevalence has been explored, extent, trajectory and longevity of symptoms are poorly understood. This retrospective, observational study explored dysphagia and laryngeal injury in patients following cardiothoracic surgery referred for instrumental swallowing assessment. Clinical notes and endoscopic recordings of 106 patients (age range 18-87yrs; mean 63yrs; SD 15yrs) (including 190 endoscopes) at one large tertiary centre were reviewed by two speech-language pathologists and a laryngologist. Standardized measures of laryngeal anatomy and physiology, New Zealand Secretion Scale, Penetration-Aspiration scale and Yale Residue Scale were rated. Prevalence of abnormality included 39% silent aspiration, 65% laryngeal edema and 61% vocal paralysis. The incidence of pneumonia was 36% with a post-operative stroke rate of 14%. Forty percent of patients were receiving a standard diet by discharge from acute care; while, 24% continued to require enteral feeding and 8% received laryngeal surgery within twelve months of discharge. Vocal fold motion impairment was significantly associated with ventilation time and tracheostomy tube duration (pdysphagia and laryngeal injury in patients following cardiothoracic surgery may allow early management and prevention of secondary complications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cybersecurity Assessment Parameter Profile (CAPP). A Tool for Making Sense of Cybersecurity Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-28

    statistical, mathematical , or computational techniques. Utility and limitations: The primary strength of qualitative analysis is the ability to...cybersecurity as “the prevention of damage to, protection of, and restoration of computers , electronic communications systems, electronic...lower. Modeled/Simulated assessment settings use tools like computer models or other stand-ins for live settings, and evaluate how that simulated

  8. Movement Skill Assessment of Typically Developing Preschool Children: A Review of Seven Movement Skill Assessment Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, Wouter; Martelaer, Kristine De; Samaey, Christiane; Andries, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    The importance of movement is often overlooked because it is such a natural part of human life. It is, however, crucial for a child’s physical, cognitive and social development. In addition, experiences support learning and development of fundamental movement skills. The foundations of those skills are laid in early childhood and essential to encourage a physically active lifestyle. Fundamental movement skill performance can be examined with several assessment tools. The choice of a test will depend on the context in which the assessment is planned. This article compares seven assessment tools which are often referred to in European or international context. It discusses the tools’ usefulness for the assessment of movement skill development in general population samples. After a brief description of each assessment tool the article focuses on contents, reliability, validity and normative data. A conclusion outline of strengths and weaknesses of all reviewed assessment tools focusing on their use in educational research settings is provided and stresses the importance of regular data collection of fundamental movement skill development among preschool children. Key pointsThis review discusses seven movement skill assessment tool’s test content, reliability, validity and normative samples.The seven assessment tools all showed to be of great value. Strengths and weaknesses indicate that test choice will depend on specific purpose of test use.Further data collection should also include larger data samples of able bodied preschool children.Admitting PE specialists in assessment of fundamental movement skill performance among preschool children is recommended.The assessment tool’s normative data samples would benefit from frequent movement skill performance follow-up of today’s children. Abbreviations MOT 4-6: Motoriktest fur vier- bis sechsjährige Kinder, M-ABC: Movement Assessment Battery for Children, PDMS: Peabody Development Scales, KTK: K

  9. Moss Biomonitoring as a Tool for Radiological Exposure Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barisic, D.; Vekic, B.; Kusan, V.; Spiric, Z.; Frontasyeva, M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an insight into the Atmospheric Deposition of Airborne Radionuclides in Croatia by using the Moss Biomonitoring Technique. Moss samples were collected during the summer of 2010, from 161 locations in Croatia evenly distributed across the entire country. Sampling was performed in accordance with the LRTAP Convention - ICP Vegetation protocol and sampling strategy of the European Programme on Biomonitoring of Heavy Metal Atmospheric Deposition. In addition to the comprehensive qualitative and quantitative chemical analyses of all samples collected determined by NAA, ICP-AES and AAS, 22 out of 161 moss samples were subjected to gamma-spectrometric analyses for assessing activity of the naturally occurring radionuclides. The activities of 40K, 232Th, 137Cs, 226Ra and 238U were determined by using a low background HPGe detector system coupled with an 8192-channel CANBERRA analyzer. The detector system was calibrated using gamma mixed standards supplied by Eckert and Ziegler (Analytics USA). Preliminary research results on the Atmospheric Deposition of Airborne Radionuclides in Croatia by using the Moss Biomonitoring Technique confirm that it may serve as a valuable tool for Radiological Exposure Assessment. This research has the potential for simple, accurate, reliable and affordable environmental radiation control.(author)

  10. In Vitro Exposure Systems and Dosimetry Assessment Tools ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2009, the passing of The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act facilitated the establishment of the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) and gave it regulatory authority over the marketing, manufacture and distribution of tobacco products, including those termed “modified risk”. On 4-6 April 2016, the Institute for In Vitro Sciences, Inc. (IIVS) convened a workshop conference titled “In Vitro Exposure Systems and Dosimetry Assessment Tools for Inhaled Tobacco Products” to bring together stakeholders representing regulatory agencies, academia, and industry to address the research priorities articulated by the FDA CTP. Specific topics were covered to assess the status of current in vitro smoke and aerosol/vapor exposure systems, as well as the various approaches and challenges to quantifying the complex exposures, in in vitro pulmonary models developed for evaluating adverse pulmonary events resulting from tobacco product exposures. The four core topics covered were, 1) Tobacco Smoke And E-Cigarette Aerosols, 2) Air-Liquid Interface-In Vitro Exposure Systems, 3) Dosimetry Approaches For Particles And Vapors; In Vitro Dosimetry Determinations and 4) Exposure Microenvironment/Physiology Of Cells. The two and a half day workshop included presentations from 20 expert speakers, poster sessions, networking discussions, and breakout sessions which identified key findings and provided recommendations to advance these technologies. Here, we will re

  11. Electrical stimulation therapy for dysphagia: a follow-up survey of USA dysphagia practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barikroo, Ali; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare current application, practice patterns, clinical outcomes, and professional attitudes of dysphagia practitioners regarding electrical stimulation (e-stim) therapy with similar data obtained in 2005. A web-based survey was posted on the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Special Interest Group 13 webpage for 1 month. A total of 271 survey responses were analyzed and descriptively compared with the archived responses from the 2005 survey. Results suggested that e-stim application increased by 47% among dysphagia practitioners over the last 10 years. The frequency of weekly e-stim therapy sessions decreased while the reported total number of treatment sessions increased between the two surveys. Advancement in oral diet was the most commonly reported improvement in both surveys. Overall, reported satisfaction levels of clinicians and patients regarding e-stim therapy decreased. Still, the majority of e-stim practitioners continue to recommend this treatment modality to other dysphagia practitioners. Results from the novel items in the current survey suggested that motor level e-stim (e.g. higher amplitude) is most commonly used during dysphagia therapy with no preferred electrode placement. Furthermore, the majority of clinicians reported high levels of self-confidence regarding their ability to perform e-stim. The results of this survey highlight ongoing changes in application, practice patterns, clinical outcomes, and professional attitudes associated with e-stim therapy among dysphagia practitioners.

  12. The development of a practical tool for risk assessment of manual work – the HAT-tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraker, H. de; Douwes, M.

    2008-01-01

    For the Dutch Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment we developed a tool to assess the risks of developing complaints of the arm, neck or shoulders during manual work. The tool was developed for every type of organization and is easy to use, does not require measurements other than time and can

  13. Development and assessment of the Alberta Context Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrooks, Carole A; Squires, Janet E; Cummings, Greta G; Birdsell, Judy M; Norton, Peter G

    2009-12-15

    The context of healthcare organizations such as hospitals is increasingly accepted as having the potential to influence the use of new knowledge. However, the mechanisms by which the organizational context influences evidence-based practices are not well understood. Current measures of organizational context lack a theory-informed approach, lack construct clarity and generally have modest psychometric properties. This paper presents the development and initial psychometric validation of the Alberta Context Tool (ACT), an eight dimension measure of organizational context for healthcare settings. Three principles guided the development of the ACT: substantive theory, brevity, and modifiability. The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARiHS) framework and related literature were used to guide selection of items in the ACT. The ACT was required to be brief enough to be tolerated in busy and resource stretched work settings and to assess concepts of organizational context that were potentially modifiable. The English version of the ACT was completed by 764 nurses (752 valid responses) working in seven Canadian pediatric care hospitals as part of its initial validation. Cronbach's alpha, exploratory factor analysis, analysis of variance, and tests of association were used to assess instrument reliability and validity. Factor analysis indicated a 13-factor solution (accounting for 59.26% of the variance in 'organizational context'). The composition of the factors was similar to those originally conceptualized. Cronbach's alpha for the 13 factors ranged from .54 to .91 with 4 factors performing below the commonly accepted alpha cut off of .70. Bivariate associations between instrumental research utilization levels (which the ACT was developed to predict) and the ACT's 13 factors were statistically significant at the 5% level for 12 of the 13 factors. Each factor also showed a trend of increasing mean score ranging from the lowest level to the

  14. Development and assessment of the Alberta Context Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birdsell Judy M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The context of healthcare organizations such as hospitals is increasingly accepted as having the potential to influence the use of new knowledge. However, the mechanisms by which the organizational context influences evidence-based practices are not well understood. Current measures of organizational context lack a theory-informed approach, lack construct clarity and generally have modest psychometric properties. This paper presents the development and initial psychometric validation of the Alberta Context Tool (ACT, an eight dimension measure of organizational context for healthcare settings. Methods Three principles guided the development of the ACT: substantive theory, brevity, and modifiability. The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARiHS framework and related literature were used to guide selection of items in the ACT. The ACT was required to be brief enough to be tolerated in busy and resource stretched work settings and to assess concepts of organizational context that were potentially modifiable. The English version of the ACT was completed by 764 nurses (752 valid responses working in seven Canadian pediatric care hospitals as part of its initial validation. Cronbach's alpha, exploratory factor analysis, analysis of variance, and tests of association were used to assess instrument reliability and validity. Results Factor analysis indicated a 13-factor solution (accounting for 59.26% of the variance in 'organizational context'. The composition of the factors was similar to those originally conceptualized. Cronbach's alpha for the 13 factors ranged from .54 to .91 with 4 factors performing below the commonly accepted alpha cut off of .70. Bivariate associations between instrumental research utilization levels (which the ACT was developed to predict and the ACT's 13 factors were statistically significant at the 5% level for 12 of the 13 factors. Each factor also showed a trend of

  15. Performance Assessment Tools for Distance Learning and Simulation: Knowledge, Models and Tools to Improve the Effectiveness of Naval Distance Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baker, Eva L; Munro, Allen; Pizzini, Quentin A; Brill, David G; Michiuye, Joanne K

    2006-01-01

    ... by (a) extending CRESST's knowledge mapping tool's authoring and scoring functionality and (b) providing the capability to embed a knowledge mapping assessment in simulation-based training developed by BTL...

  16. Dysphagia associated with cervical spine and postural disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Soultana; Exarchakos, Georgios; Beris, Alexander; Ploumis, Avraam

    2013-12-01

    Difficulties with swallowing may be both persistent and life threatening for the majority of those who experience it irrespective of age, gender, and race. The purpose of this review is to define oropharyngeal dysphagia and describe its relationship to cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances due to either congenital or acquired disorders. The etiology and diagnosis of dysphagia are analyzed, focusing on cervical spine pathology associated with dysphagia as severe cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances largely have been held accountable for deglutition disorders. Scoliosis, kyphosis–lordosis, and osteophytes are the primary focus of this review in an attempt to elucidate the link between cervical spine disorders and dysphagia. It is important for physicians to be knowledgeable about what triggers oropharyngeal dysphagia in cases of cervical spine and postural disorders. Moreover, the optimum treatment for dysphagia, including the use of therapeutic maneuvers during deglutition, neck exercises, and surgical treatment, is discussed.

  17. Effects of therapy for dysphagia in Parkinson's disease: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baijens, Laura W J; Speyer, Renée

    2009-03-01

    This systematic review explores the effects of dysphagia treatment for Parkinson's disease. The review includes rehabilitative, surgical, pharmacologic, and other treatments. Only oropharyngeal dysphagia is selected for this literature search, excluding dysphagia due to esophageal or gastric disorders. The effects of deep brain stimulation on dysphagia are not included. In general, the literature concerning dysphagia treatment in Parkinson's disease is rather limited. Most effect studies show diverse methodologic problems. Multiple case studies and trials are identified by searching biomedical literature databases PubMed and Embase, and by hand-searching reference lists. The conclusions of most studies cannot be compared with one another because of heterogeneous therapy methods and outcome measures. Further research based on randomized controlled trials to determine the effectiveness of different therapies for dysphagia in Parkinson's disease is required.

  18. Thyrotoxic Dysphagia in an 82-Year-Old Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Parperis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is a common problem in elderly patients and a rare manifestation of Graves' disease. We report a case of an 82-year-old male who presented with a 4-week history of dysphagia and weight loss. Workup for his dysphagia with upper endoscopy, MRI brain, electromyography, acetyl-cholinesterase receptor antibodies, and voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. Modified Barium swallow test showed oropharyngeal dysphagia. Thyroid function tests that revealed hyperthyroidism and antibodies to TSH-receptor were positive. Based on the above findings, we considered Graves' disease as the most likely diagnosis. Patient was treated with methimazole and beta-blockers and subsequently his dysphagia resolved. This paper highlights the importance to clinicians of considering thyrotoxicosis as possible diagnosis in an elderly patient presenting with unexplained dysphagia.

  19. Aspiration in children and adolescents with neurogenic dysphagia: comparison of clinical judgment and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Sabrina; Hartlieb, Till; Müller, Arnd; Granel, Michael; Staudt, Martin

    2014-12-01

    A total of 30 children and adolescents with dysphagia due to various chronic neurological disorders were assessed for their risk of aspiration. This assessment was performed clinically by experienced speech and swallowing therapists, and verified thereafter by fiberoptic endoscopy. We found the clinical judgment to be correct in only 70% (for aspiration of saliva), 55% (of puree), and 67% (of thin liquids). We conclude that, because of this unacceptably high error rate of clinical assessment, a fiberoptic evaluation of swallowing is a necessary diagnostic step both for the planning of therapy and for the development of feeding strategies in children and adolescents with neurogenic dysphagia. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Mesothelioma - A rare cause of dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanathan Swati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 81-year-old elderly Caucasian male presented with progressive dysphagia and unintentional weight loss over four months. His history was significant for asbestos exposure; however there was no history of asbestos related lung disease. Barium swallow showed achalasia and a subsequent CT chest showed a posterior mediastinal mass 11.8×9.1×5.8cm, compressing the distal oesophagus. Laparoscopic biopsy of the mass showed an epitheloid mesothelioma. Mass was deemed unresectable and patient was started on chemotherapy with Cisplatin/Pemetrexed. Localised mesothelioma is extremely rare, and dysphagia can be uncommon presenting feature. 7.4 per cent of cases of Pseudoachalasia are attributed to mesothelioma

  1. Using the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool to Assess and Plan for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainor, Avia; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Maier, Ryan C.; Brossart, Laura; Luke, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing and growing a public health program that benefits society takes considerable time and effort. To ensure that positive outcomes are maintained over time, program managers and stakeholders should plan and implement activities to build sustainability capacity within their programs. We describe a 3-part sustainability planning process that programs can follow to build their sustainability capacity. First, program staff and stakeholders take the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool to measure their program’s sustainability across 8 domains. Next, managers and stakeholders use results from the assessment to inform and prioritize sustainability action planning. Lastly, staff members implement the plan and keep track of progress toward their sustainability goals. Through this process, staff can more holistically address the internal and external challenges and pressures associated with sustaining a program. We include a case example of a chronic disease program that completed the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool and engaged in program sustainability planning. PMID:24456644

  2. Palliation of Dysphagia in Carcinoma Esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala; Malage, Somanath; Sreenath, G.S.; Kotlapati, Sudhakar; Cyriac, Sunu

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma has a special place in gastrointestinal carcinomas because it contains two main types, namely, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Carcinoma esophagus patients require some form of palliation because of locally advanced stage or distant metastasis, where it cannot be subjected to curable treatment with surgery and chemoradiation. Many modalities of palliation of dysphagia are available, but the procedure with least morbidity, mortality, and long-term palliation of...

  3. Oropharyngeal dysphagia, an underestimated disorder in pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Vaquero-Sosa, Esther; Francisco-González, Laura; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Urbasos-Garzón, Cristina; Ruiz-de-León-San-Juan, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a rather frequent clinical entity in patients with neurological problems that can lead to serious complications such as aspiration pneumonia and other disorders like dehydration or malnutrition due to feeding difficulties. It should be suspected in children with splitting of food intake or prolonged feeding, coughing or choking during feeding, continuous drooling or repeated respiratory symptoms. For the diagnosis, apart from the examination of swallowing, additiona...

  4. Laryngopharyngeal abnormalities in hospitalized patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Gregory N; McGuirt, W Frederick; Butler, Susan G; Rees, Catherine J; Crandall, Heather L; Tansavatdi, Kristina

    2007-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of laryngopharyngeal (LP) abnormalities in hospitalized patients with dysphagia referred for flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). Retrospective, blinded review by two otolaryngologists of 100 consecutive FEES studies performed and video-recorded by a speech-language pathologist (SLP). Two otolaryngologists reviewed videos of 100 consecutive FEES studies on hospitalized patients with dysphagia for the presence of abnormal LP findings. Sixty-one male and 38 female patients comprised the hospital dysphagia cohort. The mean age was 62. One subject could not be evaluated because of the severity of the retained secretions, leaving 99 subjects in the cohort. Seventy-six percent had been previously intubated, with a mean intubation duration of 13 days. The overall prevalence of abnormal LP findings was 79%. Forty-five percent of the patients presented with two or more findings, which included arytenoid edema (33%), granuloma (31%), vocal fold paresis (24%), mucosal lesions (17%), vocal fold bowing (14%), diffuse edema (11%), airway stenosis (3%), and ulcer (6%). There was a significant difference in LP findings between those individuals who had or had not been intubated. Hospitalized patients with dysphagia are at high risk for LP abnormalities, particularly if they have been intubated, and may benefit from either 1) an initial joint examination by the SLP and otolaryngologist or 2) an otolaryngologist's review of the recorded examination conducted by the SLP. Such otolaryngology involvement could identify airway stenosis patients at an earlier stage, initiate granuloma treatment sooner, enable earlier biopsy of unexpected lesions, and allow follow-up of mucosal and neuromuscular findings that do not respond to medical management.

  5. The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Hale, Andrew T; Zalneraitis, Brian H; Zuckerman, Scott L; Sills, Allen K; Solomon, Gary S

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Over the last 2 decades, sport-related concussion (SRC) has garnered significant attention. Even with increased awareness and athlete education, sideline recognition and real-time diagnosis remain crucial. The need for an objective and standardized assessment of concussion led to the eventual development of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) during the Second International Conference on Concussion in Sport in 2004, which is now in its third iteration (SCAT3). In an effort to update our understanding of the most well-known sideline concussion assessment, the authors conducted a systematic review of the SCAT and the evidence supporting its use to date. METHODS English-language titles and abstracts published between 1995 and October 2015 were searched systematically across 4 electronic databases and a review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines adapted for the review of a heterogeneous collection of study designs. Peer-reviewed journal articles were included if they reported quantitative data on any iteration of the SCAT, Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC), or modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS) data at baseline or following concussion in an exclusively athlete population with any portion older than 13 years of age. Studies that included nonathletes, only children less than 13 years old, exclusively BESS data, exclusively symptom scale data, or a non-SCAT-related assessment were excluded. RESULTS The database search process yielded 549 abstracts, and 105 full-text articles were reviewed with 36 meeting criteria for inclusion. Nineteen studies were associated with the SAC, 1 was associated with the mBESS exclusively, and 16 studies were associated with a full iteration of the SCAT. The majority of these studies (56%) were prospective cohort studies. Male football players were the most common athletes studied. An analysis of the studies focused on

  6. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cumhur Ertekin

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic, neurodegenerative movement disorder that typically affects elderly patients. Swallowing disorders are highly prevalent in PD and can have grave consequences, including pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration and mortality. Neurogenic dysphagia in PD can manifest with both overt clinical symptoms or silent dysphagia. Regardless, early diagnosis and objective follow-up of dysphagia in PD is crucial for timely and appropriate care for these patients. In this r...

  7. The benefits of a 5-day dysphagia intensive placement

    OpenAIRE

    Cocks, N.; Harding, C.; Pritchard, M.

    2014-01-01

    Finding practical dysphagia opportunities for students pre-qualification is challenging. Discussions with clinicians led to the development of a new placement model. The placement was just five days and had an accompanying workbook. The current study aimed to evaluate the benefits of the placement. Data were analysed from 40 students who attended an adult dysphagia placement and 13 who attended a paediatric dysphagia placement. Measures included a pre and post self-rating questionnaire, quali...

  8. Transcultural adaptation of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Maria Carmen; Iwamoto, Viviane Ernesto; Latorre, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira; Noronha, Adriana Moreira; Oliveira, Ana Paula de Sousa; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Alves; Marques, Ifigenia Augusta Braga; Vendramim, Patrícia; Lopes, Paula Cristina; Sant'Ana, Thais Helena Saes de

    2016-08-29

    to perform the transcultural adaptation and content validity analysis of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool to assess both fall risk and fall-related injury risk for hospitalized elderly in Brazil. the transcultural adaptation consisted of translating the scale to Portuguese (Brazil), back-translating it into its language of origin, establishing a consensus version, and having an expert committee verify its transcultural equivalence. Content assessment was conducted by a committee of judges, ending with the calculation of the items and scales' content validity index. Nurses tested the tool. the scale's translated version went through two evaluation rounds by the judges, based on which, the items with unsatisfactory performance were changed. The content validity index for the items was ≥80.0% and the global index 97.1%. The experimental application showed the scale is user-friendly. the scale presents valid content for the assessment of fall risk and risk of fall-related injuries and is easy to use, with the potential to contribute to the proper identification of risks and the establishment of care actions. realizar a adaptação transcultural para uso no Brasil e a avaliação da validade de conteúdo da Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool para avaliação de risco de quedas e de danos por quedas em pacientes adultos hospitalizados. adaptação transcultural consistiu na tradução da escala para a língua portuguesa (Brasil), retrotradução para a língua de origem, versão de consenso e análise da equivalência transcultural por um comitê de especialistas. A avaliação do conteúdo foi realizada por meio de um comitê de juízes, finalizando com o cálculo do índice de validade de conteúdo dos itens e da escala. Foi realizada a aplicação experimental do instrumento por enfermeiros. a versão traduzida da escala passou por duas rodadas de avaliação pelos juízes, a partir das quais os itens com desempenho insatisfatório foram modificados

  9. Improvements in tongue strength and pressure-generation precision following a tongue-pressure training protocol in older individuals with dysphagia: three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Erin M; Molfenter, Sonja M; Steele, Catriona M

    2008-01-01

    Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, often occurs secondary to conditions such as stroke, head injury or progressive disease, many of which increase in frequency with advancing age. Sarcopenia, the gradual loss of muscle bulk and strength, can place older individuals at greater risk for dysphagia. Data are reported for three older participants in a pilot trial of a tongue-pressure training therapy. During the experimental therapy protocol, participants performed isometric strength exercises for the tongue as well as tongue pressure accuracy tasks. Biofeedback was provided using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI), an instrument that measures tongue pressure. Treatment outcome measures show increased isometric tongue strength, improved tongue pressure generation accuracy, improved bolus control on videofluoroscopy, and improved functional dietary intake by mouth. These preliminary results indicate that, for these three adults with dysphagia, tongue-pressure training was beneficial for improving both instrumental and functional aspects of swallowing. The experimental treatment protocol holds promise as a rehabilitative tool for various dysphagia populations.

  10. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in older persons – from pathophysiology to adequate intervention: a review and summary of an international expert meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Rainer; Dziewas, Rainer; Beck, Anne Marie; Clavé, Pere; Hamdy, Shaheen; Heppner, Hans Juergen; Langmore, Susan; Leischker, Andreas Herbert; Martino, Rosemary; Pluschinski, Petra; Rösler, Alexander; Shaker, Reza; Warnecke, Tobias; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Volkert, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a highly prevalent and growing condition in the older population. Although OD may cause very severe complications, it is often not detected, explored, and treated. Older patients are frequently unaware of their swallowing dysfunction which is one of the reasons why the consequences of OD, ie, aspiration, dehydration, and malnutrition, are regularly not attributed to dysphagia. Older patients are particularly vulnerable to dysphagia because multiple age-related changes increase the risk of dysphagia. Physicians in charge of older patients should be aware that malnutrition, dehydration, and pneumonia are frequently caused by (unrecognized) dysphagia. The diagnosis is particularly difficult in the case of silent aspiration. In addition to numerous screening tools, videofluoroscopy was the traditional gold standard of diagnosing OD. Recently, the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is increasingly utilized because it has several advantages. Besides making a diagnosis, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is applied to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic maneuvers and texture modification of food and liquids. In addition to swallowing training and nutritional interventions, newer rehabilitation approaches of stimulation techniques are showing promise and may significantly impact future treatment strategies. PMID:26966356

  11. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in older persons - from pathophysiology to adequate intervention: a review and summary of an international expert meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Rainer; Dziewas, Rainer; Beck, Anne Marie; Clavé, Pere; Hamdy, Shaheen; Heppner, Hans Juergen; Langmore, Susan; Leischker, Andreas Herbert; Martino, Rosemary; Pluschinski, Petra; Rösler, Alexander; Shaker, Reza; Warnecke, Tobias; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Volkert, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a highly prevalent and growing condition in the older population. Although OD may cause very severe complications, it is often not detected, explored, and treated. Older patients are frequently unaware of their swallowing dysfunction which is one of the reasons why the consequences of OD, ie, aspiration, dehydration, and malnutrition, are regularly not attributed to dysphagia. Older patients are particularly vulnerable to dysphagia because multiple age-related changes increase the risk of dysphagia. Physicians in charge of older patients should be aware that malnutrition, dehydration, and pneumonia are frequently caused by (unrecognized) dysphagia. The diagnosis is particularly difficult in the case of silent aspiration. In addition to numerous screening tools, videofluoroscopy was the traditional gold standard of diagnosing OD. Recently, the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is increasingly utilized because it has several advantages. Besides making a diagnosis, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is applied to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic maneuvers and texture modification of food and liquids. In addition to swallowing training and nutritional interventions, newer rehabilitation approaches of stimulation techniques are showing promise and may significantly impact future treatment strategies.

  12. Application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to people with dysphagia following non-surgical head and neck cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nund, Rebecca L; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Ward, Elizabeth C; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-12-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) is an internationally recognized framework which allows its user to describe the consequences of a health condition on an individual in the context of their environment. With growing recognition that dysphagia can have broad ranging physical and psychosocial impacts, the aim of this paper was to identify the ICF domains and categories that describe the full functional impact of dysphagia following non-surgical head and neck cancer (HNC) management, from the perspective of the person with dysphagia. A secondary analysis was conducted on previously published qualitative study data which explored the lived experiences of dysphagia of 24 individuals with self-reported swallowing difficulties following HNC management. Categories and sub-categories identified by the qualitative analysis were subsequently mapped to the ICF using the established linking rules to develop a set of ICF codes relevant to the impact of dysphagia following HNC management. The 69 categories and sub-categories that had emerged from the qualitative analysis were successfully linked to 52 ICF codes. The distribution of these codes across the ICF framework revealed that the components of Body Functions, Activities and Participation, and Environmental Factors were almost equally represented. The findings confirm that the ICF is a valuable framework for representing the complexity and multifaceted impact of dysphagia following HNC. This list of ICF codes, which reflect the diverse impact of dysphagia associated with HNC on the individual, can be used to guide more holistic assessment and management for this population.

  13. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Practice Guidelines: Evaluation of Dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W Cockeram

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia may be defined as difficulty in swallowing. Dysphagia may be classified as oropharyngeal or esophageal; oropharyngeal dysphagia arises from a structural or functional abnormality in the oropharynx, and esophageal dysphagia occurs as a result of structural or functional abnormalities in the esophagus. Esophageal dysphagia may be further subclassified symptomatically as dysphagia for solids alone, which usually suggests a mechanical problem, versus dysphagia for liquids and solids, which is more suggestive of a neuromuscular problem. Dysphagia may be described by the patient as a sensation of food 'sticking' or as a sensation of food passing slowly through the esophagus. True dysphagia always indicates organic disease and always warrants investigation and consultation if no cause is found in initial studies. These symptoms should be distinguished from those of a persistent foreign body-type sensation or a sensation of a lump, which is more typical of globus sensation. Odynophagia, defined as pain with swallowing, may occur in association with esophageal dysmotility or as a result of mucosal disease in the esophagus.

  14. Dysphagia and sialorrhea: the relationship to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaretta, Denise Hack; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Mattos, James Pitágoras de; Maliska, Carmelindo; Costa, Milton M B

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease. The aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Two Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by the scintigraphic method, Videofluoroscopic examination of the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing showed that 94% of Parkinson's diseases patients present, structural causes, not related to Parkinson's diseases, able to produce or intensify the observed disphagia. The scintigraphic examination of Parkinson's diseases patients with sialorrhea showed that there is no increase of serous saliva production. Nevertheless, showed a significantly higher velocity of saliva excretion in the Parkinson's diseases patients. Dysphagia can be due to the muscular rigidity often present in the Parkinson's diseases patient, or more usually by non Parkinson's disease associated causes. In Parkinson's diseases patients, sialorrhea is produced by saliva retention. Nevertheless, sialorrhea can produce discomfort in swallowing, although without a formal complaint of dysphagia. In this case, subclinical dysphagia must be considered. Sialorrhea is indicative of dysphagia or at least of subclinical dysphagia. As final conclusion, Parkinson's diseases can be an isolated cause of dysphagia and/or sialorrhea, but frequently, a factor unrelated to Parkinson's diseases is the main cause of or at least aggravates the dysphagia.

  15. [Oropharyngeal dysphagia associated with Chiari I malformation and syringomyelia J].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Medina, Julio César; Cárdenas-Lara, Armando; Guerrero-Rascón, Carlos Alberto; Rodríguez-Bautista, Heber

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia associated with neurological disease is an important clinical manifestation in the diagnosis of injury that justifies the compression of the brainstem and lower cranial nerves. To emphasize the study of dysphagia in a patient with Chiari I malformation associated with syringomyelia in the absence of primary gastroenterological symptoms. We describe the case of a 62 year-old woman with oropharyngeal dysphagia of six years of evolution, cervicobrachialgia, ptosis and facial diplexia. Magnetic resonance imaging is an essential element for establishing the etiologic diagnosis of neurogenic dysphagia.

  16. Relationship between dysphagia and depressive states in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Meng; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Nonaka, Michio; Yamauchi, Rika; Hozuki, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Takashi; Saitoh, Masaki; Hisahara, Shin; Imai, Tomihiro; Shimohama, Shun; Mori, Mitsuru

    2011-07-01

    Aspiration pneumonia related to dysphagia is known to be the leading cause of death in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the relationship between depressive states and dysphagia in patients with PD. A hundred and twenty-seven PD patients gave their informed consent and were enrolled in this study. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) questionnaire to determine the participants' depressive states, and also used a questionnaire to assess participants' state of dysphagia. Participants were divided into four groups according to their BDI score. We compared the PD patients with Swallowing Disturbances Questionnaire (SDQ) scores of more than or equal to 11 with the SDQ scores of less than 11 regarding depressive categories. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) adjusting for age, sex, disease duration, wearing-off phenomenon and severity of movement disorder. OR (95%CI) of depressive categories, in which the trivial class was set as a reference group, were 3.28 (0.93-11.55), 13.44 (3.10-58.16), 30.35 (5.65-162.97) in the mild class, the moderate class and the severe class, respectively. This study suggests that there may be a strong relationship between depressive states and dysphagia in patients with PD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Frequency and Predictors of Dysphagia in Patients With Recent Small Subcortical Infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandler, Simon; Gattringer, Thomas; Eppinger, Sebastian; Doppelhofer, Kathrin; Pinter, Daniela; Niederkorn, Kurt; Enzinger, Christian; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Fazekas, Franz

    2017-01-01

    Detailed data on the occurrence of swallowing dysfunction in patients with recent small subcortical infarcts (RSSI) in the context of cerebral small vessel disease are lacking. This prompted us to assess the frequency of and risk factors for dysphagia in RSSI patients. We identified all inpatients with magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed RSSI between January 2008 and February 2013. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from our stroke database, and magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed for morphological changes. Dysphagia was determined according to the Gugging Swallowing Screen. We identified 332 patients with RSSI (mean age, 67.7±11.9 years; 64.5% male). Overall, 83 patients (25%) had dysphagia, which was mild in 46 (55.4%), moderate in 26 (31.3%), and severe in 11 patients (13.3%). The rate of dysphagia in patients with supratentorial RSSI was 20%. Multivariate analysis identified a higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (PDysphagia is present in a quarter of patients with RSSI and has to be expected especially in those with higher stroke severity, pontine infarction, and severe white matter hyperintensities. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Dysphagia referrals to a district general hospital gastroenterology unit: hard to swallow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melleney, Elizabeth Mary-Ann; Subhani, Javaid Mohammed; Willoughby, Charles Peter

    2004-01-01

    The aim of our study was to audit dysphagia referrals received by a specialist gastroenterology unit during an entire year. We used a prospective audit carried out over a 12-month period at the District General Hospital gastroenterology unit. The audit included 396 consecutive patients who were referred with swallowing difficulties. We found that 60 referrals (15.2%) were inaccurate and the patients had no swallowing problem. Of the 336 patients with genuine dysphagia, only 29 (8.6%) were new cancer cases. The large majority of subjects had benign disease mostly related to acid reflux. Weight loss was significantly associated with malignancy but also occurred in one third of patients with reflux alone. The temporal pattern of dysphagia was not significantly predictive of cancer. All the cancer patients were above the age of 50 years. Although patients were in general assessed rapidly after hospital referral, the productivity, in terms of early tumor diagnosis, was extremely low. We conclude that there is a substantial rate of inaccurate referrals of dysphagia patients. Most true cases of swallowing difficulty relate to benign disease. Even the devotion of considerable resources to the early diagnosis of esophago gastric malignancy in an attempt to conform with best practice guidelines results in a very low success rate in terms of the detection of potentially curable tumors.

  19. A Systematic Review of Isometric Lingual Strength-Training Programs in Adults With and Without Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Victoria S; Zhang, Bin; Haines, Morgan B; Kelchner, Lisa N

    2017-05-17

    This systematic review summarizes the effects of isometric lingual strength training on lingual strength and swallow function in adult populations. Furthermore, it evaluates the designs of the reviewed studies and identifies areas of future research in isometric lingual strength training for dysphagia remediation. A comprehensive literature search of 3 databases and additional backward citation search identified 10 studies for inclusion in the review. The review reports and discusses the isometric-exercise intervention protocols, pre- and postintervention lingual-pressure data (maximum peak pressures and lingual-palatal pressures during swallowing), and oropharyngeal swallowing measures such as penetration-aspiration scales, oropharyngeal residue and duration, lingual volumes, and quality-of-life assessments. Studies reported gains in maximum peak lingual pressures following isometric lingual strength training for both healthy adults and select groups of individuals with dysphagia. However, due to the variability in study designs, it remains unclear whether strength gains generalize to swallow function. Although isometric lingual strength training is a promising intervention for oropharyngeal dysphagia, the current literature is too variable to confidently report specific therapeutic benefits. Future investigations should target homogenous patient populations and use randomized controlled trials to determine the efficacy of this treatment for individuals with dysphagia.

  20. Nonaneurysmatic Dysphagia Aortica in the Elderly: Three Case Reports and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Hsueh Chan; Chien-Yuan Hung; Tze-Yu Shieh; Horng-Yuan Wang; Ching-Wei Chang; Shou-Chuan Shih; Ming-Jen Chen

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is a remarkably prevalent disorder in the elderly. Both age-related changes in swallowing physiology and age-related diseases are predisposing factors for dysphagia in the elderly. Dysphagia aortica is a rare etiology of dysphagia resulting from extrinsic compression of the esophagus by an aneurysm or by a tortuous and elongated thoracic aorta. Clinical findings of dysphagia aortica resemble those of esophageal malignancy or esophageal motility disorders. Dysphagia aortica not relat...

  1. Health impact assessment in planning: Development of the design for health HIA tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, Ann; Slotterback, Carissa Schively; Krizek, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    How can planners more systematically incorporate health concerns into practical planning processes? This paper describes a suite of health impact assessment tools (HIAs) developed specifically for planning practice. Taking an evidence-based approach the tools are designed to fit into existing planning activities. The tools include: a short audit tool, the Preliminary Checklist; a structured participatory workshop, the Rapid HIA; an intermediate health impact assessment, the Threshold Analysis; and a set of Plan Review Checklists. This description provides a basis for future work including assessing tool validity, refining specific tools, and creating alternatives.

  2. ELER software - a new tool for urban earthquake loss assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancilar, U.; Tuzun, C.; Yenidogan, C.; Erdik, M.

    2010-12-01

    ATC-55 (Yang, 2005). An urban loss assessment exercise for a scenario earthquake for the city of Istanbul is conducted and physical and social losses are presented. Damage to the urban environment is compared to the results obtained from similar software, i.e. KOERILoss (KOERI, 2002) and DBELA (Crowley et al., 2004). The European rapid loss estimation tool is expected to help enable effective emergency response, on both local and global level, as well as public information.

  3. Doloplus-2, a valid tool for behavioural pain assessment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loge Jon H

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Doloplus-2 is used for behavioural pain assessment in cognitively impaired patients. Little data exists on the psychometric properties of the Doloplus-2. Our objectives were to test the criterion validity and inter-rater reliability of the Doloplus-2, and to explore a design for validations of behavioural pain assessment tools. Methods Fifty-one nursing home patients and 22 patients admitted to a geriatric hospital ward were included. All were cognitively impaired and unable to self-report pain. Each patient was examined by an expert in pain evaluation and treatment, who rated the pain on a numerical rating scale. The ratings were based on information from the medical record, reports from nurses and patients (if possible about pain during the past 24 hours, and a clinical examination. These ratings were used as pain criterion. The Doloplus-2 was administered by the attending nurse. Regression analyses were used to estimate the ability of the Doloplus-2 to explain the expert's ratings. The inter-rater reliability of the Doloplus-2 was evaluated in 16 patients by comparing the ratings of two nurses administrating the Doloplus-2. Results There was no association between the Doloplus-2 and the expert's pain ratings (R2 = 0.02. There was an association (R2 = 0.54 between the expert's ratings and the Doloplus-2 scores in a subgroup of 16 patients assessed by a geriatric expert nurse (the most experienced Doloplus-2 administrator. The inter-rater reliability between the Doloplus-2 administrators assessed by the intra-class coefficient was 0.77. The pain expert's ratings were compared with ratings of two independent geriatricians in a sub sample of 15, and were found satisfactory (intra-class correlation 0.74. Conclusion It was challenging to conduct such a study in patients with cognitive impairment and the study has several limitations. The results do not support the validity of the Doloplus-2 in its present version and they

  4. Biomechanics, diagnosis, and treatment outcome in inflammatory myopathy presenting as oropharyngeal dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R B; Grehan, M J; Hersch, M; Andre, J; Cook, I J

    2003-01-01

    Aims: In patients with inflammatory myopathy and dysphagia, our aims were to determine: (1) the diagnostic utility of clinical and laboratory indicators; (2) the biomechanical properties of the pharyngo-oesophageal segment; (3) the usefulness of pharyngeal videomanometry in distinguishing neuropathic from myopathic dysphagia; and (4) clinical outcome. Methods: Clinical, laboratory, and videomanometric assessment was performed in 13 patients with myositis and dysphagia, in 17 disease controls with dysphagia (due to proven CNS disease), and in 22 healthy age matched controls. The diagnostic accuracy of creatine kinase (CPK), erythrocyte sedimentation rate, antinuclear antibody, and electromyography (EMG) were compared with the gold standard muscle biopsy. The biomechanical properties of the pharyngo-oesophageal segment were assessed by videomanometry. Results: Mean time from dysphagia onset to the diagnosis of myositis was 55 months (range 1–180). One third had no extrapharyngeal muscle weakness; 25% had normal CPK, and EMG was unhelpful in 28%. Compared with neurogenic controls, myositis patients had more prevalent cricopharyngeal restrictive disorders (69% v 14%; p=0.0003), reduced upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening (p=0.01), and elevated hypopharyngeal intrabolus pressures (p=0.001). Videomanometric features favouring a myopathic over a neuropathic aetiology were: preserved pharyngeal swallow response, complete UOS relaxation, and normal swallow coordination. The 12 month mortality was 31%. Conclusions: The notable lack of supportive clinical signs and significant false negative rates for laboratory tests contribute to the marked delay in diagnosis. The myopathic process is strongly associated with restricted sphincter opening suggesting that cricopharyngeal disruption is a useful adjunct to immunosuppressive therapy. The condition has a poor prognosis. PMID:12631653

  5. Developing Anticipatory Life Cycle Assessment Tools to Support Responsible Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wender, Benjamin

    Several prominent research strategy organizations recommend applying life cycle assessment (LCA) early in the development of emerging technologies. For example, the US Environmental Protection Agency, the National Research Council, the Department of Energy, and the National Nanotechnology Initiative identify the potential for LCA to inform research and development (R&D) of photovoltaics and products containing engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). In this capacity, application of LCA to emerging technologies may contribute to the growing movement for responsible research and innovation (RRI). However, existing LCA practices are largely retrospective and ill-suited to support the objectives of RRI. For example, barriers related to data availability, rapid technology change, and isolation of environmental from technical research inhibit application of LCA to developing technologies. This dissertation focuses on development of anticipatory LCA tools that incorporate elements of technology forecasting, provide robust explorations of uncertainty, and engage diverse innovation actors in overcoming retrospective approaches to environmental assessment and improvement of emerging technologies. Chapter one contextualizes current LCA practices within the growing literature articulating RRI and identifies the optimal place in the stage gate innovation model to apply LCA. Chapter one concludes with a call to develop anticipatory LCA---building on the theory of anticipatory governance---as a series of methodological improvements that seek to align LCA practices with the objectives of RRI. Chapter two provides a framework for anticipatory LCA, identifies where research from multiple disciplines informs LCA practice, and builds off the recommendations presented in the preceding chapter. Chapter two focuses on crystalline and thin film photovoltaics (PV) to illustrate the novel framework, in part because PV is an environmentally motivated technology undergoing extensive R&D efforts and

  6. Assess the flood resilience tools integration in the landuse projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, E.; Deroubaix, J.-F.

    2012-04-01

    Despite a severe regulation concerning the building in flooding areas, 80% of these areas are already built in the Greater Paris (Paris, Val-de-Marne, Hauts-de-Seine and Seine-Saint-Denis). The land use in flooding area is presented as one of the main solutions to solve the ongoing real estate pressure. For instance some of the industrial wastelands located along the river are currently in redevelopment and residential buildings are planned. So the landuse in the flooding areas is currently a key issue in the development of the Greater Paris area. To deal with floods there are some resilience tools, whether structural (such as perimeter barriers or building aperture barriers, etc) or non structural (such as warning systems, etc.). The technical solutions are available and most of the time efficient1. Still, we notice that these tools are not much implemented. The people; stakeholders and inhabitants, literally seems to be not interested. This papers focus on the integration of resilience tools in urban projects. Indeed one of the blockages in the implementation of an efficient flood risk prevention policy is the lack of concern of the landuse stakeholders and the inhabitants for the risk2. We conducted an important number of interviews with stakeholders involved in various urban projects and we assess, in this communication, to what extent the improvement of the resilience to floods is considered as a main issue in the execution of an urban project? How this concern is maintained or could be maintained throughout the project. Is there a dilution of this concern? In order to develop this topic we rely on a case study. The "Ardoines" is a project aiming at redeveloping an industrial site (South-East Paris), into a project including residential and office buildings and other amenities. In order to elaborate the master plan, the urban planning authority brought together some flood risk experts. According to the comments of the experts, the architect in charge of the

  7. The spiritual distress assessment tool: an instrument to assess spiritual distress in hospitalised elderly persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Estelle

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although spirituality is usually considered a positive resource for coping with illness, spiritual distress may have a negative influence on health outcomes. Tools are needed to identify spiritual distress in clinical practice and subsequently address identified needs. This study describes the first steps in the development of a clinically acceptable instrument to assess spiritual distress in hospitalized elderly patients. Methods A three-step process was used to develop the Spiritual Distress Assessment Tool (SDAT: 1 Conceptualisation by a multidisciplinary group of a model (Spiritual Needs Model to define the different dimensions characterizing a patient's spirituality and their corresponding needs; 2 Operationalisation of the Spiritual Needs Model within geriatric hospital care leading to a set of questions (SDAT investigating needs related to each of the defined dimensions; 3 Qualitative assessment of the instrument's acceptability and face validity in hospital chaplains. Results Four dimensions of spirituality (Meaning, Transcendence, Values, and Psychosocial Identity and their corresponding needs were defined. A formalised assessment procedure to both identify and subsequently score unmet spiritual needs and spiritual distress was developed. Face validity and acceptability in clinical practice were confirmed by chaplains involved in the focus groups. Conclusions The SDAT appears to be a clinically acceptable instrument to assess spiritual distress in elderly hospitalised persons. Studies are ongoing to investigate the psychometric properties of the instrument and to assess its potential to serve as a basis for integrating the spiritual dimension in the patient's plan of care.

  8. Association of positive screening for dysphagia with nutritional status and long-term mortality in hospitalized elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañas-Martínez, Ana B; Bucar-Barjud, Marina; Campos-Fernández, Julia; Gimeno-Orna, José Antonio; Pérez-Calvo, Juan; Ocón-Bretón, Julia

    2018-04-24

    To assess the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) using the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and its association with malnutrition and long-term mortality. A retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to the general internal medicine ward. In the first 48hours after hospital admission, OD was assessed using the EAT-10, and presence of malnutrition with the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF). Association of OD to malnutrition and long-term mortality was analyzed. Ninety patients with a mean age of 83 (SD: 11.8) years were enrolled. Of these, 56.7% were at risk of OD according to EAT-10. This group of patients had greater prevalence rates of malnutrition (88.2% vs. 48.7%; P=.001) and mortality (70% vs 35.9%; P=.001). During follow-up for 872.71 (SD: 642.89) days, risk of DO according to EAT-10 was an independent predictor of mortality factor in a multivariate analysis (HR: 2.8; 95%CI: 1.49-5.28; P=.001). The EAT-10 is a useful tool for screening OD. Adequate screening for OD is important because of its associated risks of malnutrition and long-term mortality. Copyright © 2018 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. BASINS and WEPP Climate Assessment Tools (CAT): Case Study Guide to Potential Applications (External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This draft report supports application of two recently developed water modeling tools, the BASINS and WEPP climate assessment tools. The report presents a series of short case studies designed to illustrate the capabilities of these tools for conducting scenario based assessments...

  10. Acute and long-term dysphagia in critically ill patients with severe sepsis: results of a prospective controlled observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielske, Joerg; Bohne, Silvia; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Axer, Hubertus; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-11-01

    Dysphagia is a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs). Structured otorhinolaryngological data on dysphagia in ICU survivors with severe sepsis are missing. In a prospective study, 30 ICU patients with severe sepsis and thirty without sepsis as control group were examined using bedside fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing after 14 days in the ICU (T1) and 4 months after onset of critical illness (T2). Swallowing dysfunction was assessed using the Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS). The Functional Oral Intake Scale was applied to evaluate the diet needed. Primary endpoint was the burden of dysphagia defined as PAS score >5. At T1, 19 of 30 severe sepsis patients showed aspiration with a PAS score >5, compared to 7 of 30 in critically ill patients without severe sepsis (p = 0.002). Severe sepsis and tracheostomy were independent risk factors for severe dysphagia with aspiration (PAS > 5) at T1 (p = 0.042 and 0.006, respectively). 4-month mortality (T2) was 57 % in severe sepsis patients compared to 20 % in patients without severe sepsis (p = 0.006). At T2, more severe sepsis survivors were tracheostomy-dependent and needed more often tube or parenteral feeding (p = 0.014 and p = 0.040, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed tracheostomy at T1 as independent risk factor for severe dysphagia at T2 (p = 0.030). Severe sepsis appears to be a relevant risk factor for long-term dysphagia. An otorhinolaryngological evaluation of dysphagia at ICU discharge is mandatory for survivors of severe critical illness to plan specific swallowing rehabilitation programs.

  11. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a risk factor for readmission for pneumonia in the very elderly persons: observational prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabré, Mateu; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Force, Ll; Almirall, Jordi; Palomera, Elisabet; Clavé, Pere

    2014-03-01

    To determine whether oropharyngeal dysphagia is a risk factor for readmission for pneumonia in elderly persons discharged from an acute geriatric unit. Observational prospective cohort study with data collection based on clinical databases and electronic clinical notes. All elderly individuals discharged from an acute geriatric unit from June 2002 to December 2009 were recruited and followed until death or December 31, 2010. All individuals were initially classified according to the presence of oropharyngeal dysphagia assessed by bedside clinical examination. Main outcome measure was readmission for pneumonia. Clinical notes were reviewed by an expert clinician to verify diagnosis and classify pneumonia as aspiration or nonaspiration pneumonia. A total of 2,359 patients (61.9% women, mean age 84.9 y) were recruited and followed for a mean of 24 months. Dysphagia was diagnosed in 47.5% of cases. Overall, 7.9% of individuals were readmitted for pneumonia during follow-up, 24.2% of these had aspiration pneumonia. The incidence rate of hospital readmission for pneumonia was 3.67 readmissions per 100 person-years (95% CI 3.0-4.4) in individuals without dysphagia and 6.7 (5.5-7.8) in those with dysphagia, with an attributable risk of 3.02 readmissions per 100 person-years (1.66-4.38) and a rate ratio of 1.82 (1.41-2.36). Multivariate Cox regression showed an independent effect of oropharyngeal dysphagia, with a hazard ratio of 1.6 (1.15-2.2) for hospitalization for pneumonia, 4.48 (2.01-10.0) for aspiration pneumonia, and 1.44 (1.02-2.03) for nonaspiration pneumonia. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a very prevalent and relevant risk factor associated with hospital readmission for both aspiration and nonaspiration pneumonia in the very elderly persons.

  12. Posterior teeth occlusion and dysphagia risk in older nursing home residents: a cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Y; Takeuchi, K; Izumi, M; Furuta, M; Takeshita, T; Shibata, Y; Kageyama, S; Ganaha, S; Yamashita, Y

    2017-02-01

    The total number of natural teeth was related to swallowing function among older adults; however, limited information is available regarding the impact of occluding pairs of teeth on swallowing function. This study aimed to examine the association between posterior teeth occlusion and dysphagia risk in older nursing home residents. This cross-sectional study included 238 residents aged ≥60 years from eight nursing homes in Aso City, Japan. Swallowing function was evaluated using the modified water swallowing test (MWST); the primary outcome was dysphagia risk (MWST score ≤3). Posterior teeth occlusion was assessed using number of functional tooth units (FTUs), determined based on number and location of the remaining natural and artificial teeth on implant-supported, fixed or removable prostheses. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between posterior teeth occlusion and dysphagia risk, adjusted for the covariates of number of natural teeth, demographic characteristics, comorbidities, physical function, body mass index and cognitive function. Of the 238 subjects, 44 (18·5%) were determined to be at risk of dysphagia based on the MWST scores. The odds ratio (OR) of dysphagia risk decreased in subjects with higher total FTUs [OR = 0·92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·87-0·98]. After adjusting for covariates, this association remained significant (OR = 0·90, 95% CI 0·84-0·97). Loss of posterior teeth occlusion was independently associated with dysphagia risk in older nursing home residents. Maintaining and restoring posterior teeth occlusion may be an effective measure to prevent dysphagia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Chemo-IMRT of Oropharyngeal Cancer Aiming to Reduce Dysphagia: Swallowing Organs Late Complication Probabilities and Dosimetric Correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Feng, Mary; Worden, Frank P.; Bradford, Carol R.; Prince, Mark E.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Assess dosimetric correlates of long-term dysphagia after chemo-intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) sparing parts of the swallowing organs. Patients and Methods: Prospective longitudinal study: weekly chemotherapy concurrent with IMRT for Stages III/IV OPC, aiming to reduce dysphagia by sparing noninvolved parts of swallowing-related organs: pharyngeal constrictors (PC), glottic and supraglottic larynx (GSL), and esophagus, as well as oral cavity and major salivary glands. Dysphagia outcomes included patient-reported Swallowing and Eating Domain scores, Observer-based (CTCAEv.2) dysphagia, and videofluoroscopy (VF), before and periodically after therapy through 2 years. Relationships between dosimetric factors and worsening (from baseline) of dysphagia through 2 years were assessed by linear mixed-effects model. Results: Seventy-three patients participated. Observer-based dysphagia was not modeled because at >6 months there were only four Grade ≥2 cases (one of whom was feeding-tube dependent). PC, GSL, and esophagus mean doses, as well as their partial volume doses (V D s), were each significantly correlated with all dysphagia outcomes. However, the V D s for each organ intercorrelated and also highly correlated with the mean doses, leaving only mean doses significant. Mean doses to each of the parts of the PCs (superior, middle, and inferior) were also significantly correlated with all dysphagia measures, with superior PCs demonstrating highest correlations. For VF-based strictures, most significant predictor was esophageal mean doses (48±17 Gy in patients with, vs 27±12 in patients without strictures, p = 0.004). Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) increased moderately with mean doses without any threshold. For increased VF-based aspirations or worsened VF summary scores, toxic doses (TDs) 50 and TD 25 were 63 Gy and 56 Gy for PC, and 56 Gy and 39 Gy for GSL, respectively. For both PC and GSL, patient

  14. The Mental Disability Military Assessment Tool : A Reliable Tool for Determining Disability in Veterans with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens, Andrea S.; Groothoff, Johan W.; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; Popping, Roel; Stewart, Roy E.; van de Ven, Lex; Brouwer, Sandra; Tuinstra, Jolanda

    Purpose An assessment tool was developed to assess disability in veterans who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to a military mission. The objective of this study was to determine the reliability, intra-rater and inter-rater variation of the Mental Disability Military (MDM)

  15. The Mental Disability Military Assessment Tool : A reliable tool for determining disability in veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens, A.S.; Groothoff, J.W.; van der Klink, J.J.L.; Popping, R.; Stewart, S.E.; van de Ven, L.; Brouwer, S.; Tuinstra, J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose An assessment tool was developed to assess disability in veterans who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to a military mission. The objective of this study was to determine the reliability, intra-rater and inter-rater variation of the Mental Disability Military (MDM)

  16. The fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX® score in subclinical hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovina Snežana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX® score is the 10-year estimated risk calculation tool for bone fracture that includes clinical data and hip bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to elucidate the ability of the FRAX® score in discriminating between bone fracture positive and negative pre- and post-menopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism. Methods. The bone mineral density (by DXA, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH level, free thyroxine (fT4 level, thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb titre, osteocalcin and beta-cross-laps were measured in 27 pre- and post-menopausal women with newly discovered subclinical hyperthyroidism [age 58.85 ± 7.83 years, body mass index (BMI 27.89 ± 3.46 kg/m2, menopause onset in 46.88 ± 10.21 years] and 51 matched euthyroid controls (age 59.69 ± 5.72 years, BMI 27.68 ± 4.66 kg/m2, menopause onset in 48.53 ± 4.58 years. The etiology of subclinical hyperthyroisims was autoimmune thyroid disease or toxic goiter. FRAX® score calculation was performed in both groups. Results. In the group with subclinical hyperthyroidism the main FRAX® score was significantly higher than in the controls (6.50 ± 1.58 vs 4.35 ± 1.56 respectively; p = 0.015. The FRAX® score for hip was also higher in the evaluated group than in the controls (1.33 ± 3.92 vs 0.50 ± 0.46 respectively; p = 0.022. There was no correlations between low TSH and fracture risk (p > 0.05. The ability of the FRAX® score in discriminating between bone fracture positive and negative pre- and postmenopausal female subjects (p < 0.001 is presented by the area under the curve (AUC plotted via ROC analysis. The determined FRAX score cut-off value by this analysis was 6%, with estimated sensitivity and specificity of 95% and 75.9%, respectively. Conclusion. Pre- and postmenopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism have higher FRAX® scores and thus

  17. Interventions for oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with neurological impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Angela T; Dodrill, Pamela; Ward, Elizabeth C

    2012-10-17

    authors obtained the full-text article and independently evaluated each paper for inclusion. The data were categorised for comparisons depending on the nature of the control group (for example, oral sensorimotor treatment versus no treatment). Effectiveness of the oropharyngeal dysphagia intervention was assessed by considering primary outcomes of physiological functions of the oropharyngeal mechanism for swallowing (for example, lip seal maintenance), the presence of chest infection and pneumonia, and diet consistency a child is able to consume. Secondary outcomes were changes in growth, child's level of participation in the mealtime routine and the level of parent or carer stress associated with feeding. Three studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. Two studies were based on oral sensorimotor interventions for participants with cerebral palsy compared to standard care and a third study trialled lip strengthening exercises for children with myotonic dystrophy type 1 compared to no treatment (Sjogreen 2010). A meta-analysis combining results across the three studies was not possible because one of the studies had participants with a different condition, and the remaining two, although using oral sensorimotor treatments, used vastly different approaches with different intensities and durations. The decision not to combine these was in line with our protocol. In this review, we present the results from individual studies for four outcomes: physiological functions of the oropharyngeal mechanism for swallowing, the presence of chest infection and pneumonia, diet consistency, and changes in growth. However, it is not possible to reach definitive conclusions on the effectiveness of particular interventions for oropharyngeal dysphagia based on these studies. One study had a high risk of attrition bias owing to missing data, had statistically significant differences (in weight) across experimental and control groups at baseline, and did not describe other aspects of

  18. Efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy as a palliative treatment in stage IVB esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Eiji; Kojima, Takashi; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively assess the efficacy and safety of palliative chemoradiotherapy in Stage IVB esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia due to the primary lesion. Forty patients with dysphagia caused by metastatic esophageal cancer, which had been treated between January 2004 and June 2009, were retrospectively investigated. The treatment consisted of two courses of chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) and concurrent irradiation of 40 Gy in 20 fractions to the esophageal primary tumor. The grade of dysphagia was evaluated; nutrition-support-free survival was evaluated using the status of nutritional support of patients. Response to treatment, overall survival, progression-free survival and toxicities were also evaluated. Dysphagia score improved in 75% of the patients. Seventeen of the 20 patients (85%) who had required nutritional support at baseline improved their oral intake to no longer need the support, in a median time of 43 days. The median nutrition-support-free survival was 301 days in the 20 patients who had had adequate oral intake before the treatment. Disease control rate of the primary lesion was 95%, including 12 patients (30%) who achieved a complete response. The overall response rate was 55%. The median survival was 308 days, and the 1-year-survival rate was 45.0%. The median progression-free survival was 139 days. Toxicities were generally well tolerated. Major toxicities (Grade 3 or 4) involved hemoglobin (23%), leukocytes (15%), neutrophils (20%), anorexia (10%), nausea (3%), esophageal perforation (5%) and febrile neutropenia (3%). Two patients (5%) died within 30 days of terminating radiotherapy. Palliative chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil plus cisplatin combined with concurrent 40 Gy irradiation effectively improved the symptom of dysphagia in Stage IVB esophageal cancer with acceptable toxicity and favorable survival. (author)

  19. Risk factors associated with refractoriness to esophageal dilatation for benign dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Pinto, Eduardo; Pereira, Pedro; Ribeiro, Armando; Lopes, Susana; Moutinho-Ribeiro, Pedro; Silva, Marco; Peixoto, Armando; Gaspar, Rui; Macedo, Guilherme

    2016-06-01

    Benign esophageal strictures need repeated dilatations to relieve dysphagia. Literature is scarce on the risk factors for refractoriness of these strictures. This study aimed to assess the risk factors associated with refractory strictures. This is a retrospective study of patients with benign esophageal strictures who were referred for esophageal dilatation over a period of 3 years. A total of 327 esophageal dilatations were performed in 103 patients; 53% of the patients reported dysphagia for liquids. Clinical success was achieved in 77% of the patients. There was a need for further dilatations in 54% of patients, being more frequent in patients with dysphagia for liquids [78 vs. 64%, P=0.008, odds ratio (OR) 1.930], in those with caustic strictures (89 vs. 70%, P=0.007, OR 3.487), and in those with complex strictures (83 vs. 70%, P=0.047, OR 2.132). Caustic strictures, peptic strictures, and complex strictures showed statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Time until subsequent dilatations was less in patients with dysphagia for liquids (49 vs. 182 days, Pdysphagia for liquids [hazard ratio (HR) 1.506, P=0.004], in those with peptic strictures (HR 1.644, P=0.002), in those with caustic strictures (HR 1.581, P=0.016), and in patients with complex strictures (HR 1.408, P=0.046). Caustic, peptic, and complex strictures were associated with a greater need for subsequent dilatations. Time until subsequent dilatations was less in patients with dysphagia for liquids and in those with caustic, peptic, and complex strictures.

  20. Relationships between dysphagia and tongue pressure during swallowing in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagi, Y; Ono, T; Hori, K; Fujiwara, S; Tokuda, Y; Murakami, K; Maeda, Y; Sakoda, S; Yokoe, M; Mihara, M; Mochizuki, H

    2018-03-25

    Although dysphagia is a life-threatening problem in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the pathophysiology of oropharyngeal dysphagia is yet to be understood. This study investigated the tongue motor function during swallowing in relation to dysphagia and the severity of PD. Thirty patients with PD (14 males and 16 females; average age, 69.4 years), Hoehn and Yahr stage II-IV, in Osaka University Hospital are participated in this study. During swallowing 5 ml of water, tongue pressure on the hard palate was measured using a sensor sheet with 5 measuring points. The maximal tongue pressure at each measuring point during swallowing was compared between patients with PD and healthy controls. Subjective assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia was performed using Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire-Japanese. The maximal tongue pressure at each measuring point was significantly lower in patients with PD than in healthy controls (8 males and 12 females; average age, 71.6 years). Furthermore, the maximal tongue pressure was significantly lower in dysphagic PD patients than non-dysphagic PD patients. Loss of tongue pressure production at the anterior part of the hard palate was strongly related to dysphagia in the oral phase as well as in the pharyngeal phase. An abnormal pattern of tongue pressure production was more frequently observed in dysphagic PD patients than in non-dysphagic PD patients. The results suggest that tongue pressure measurement might be useful for early and quantitative detection of tongue motor disability during swallowing in patients with PD. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Psychometric Evaluation of the Brachial Assessment Tool Part 1: Reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Bridget; Williams, Gavin; Olver, John; Ferris, Scott; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate reproducibility (reliability and agreement) of the Brachial Assessment Tool (BrAT), a new patient-reported outcome measure for adults with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI). Prospective repeated-measure design. Outpatient clinics. Adults with confirmed traumatic BPI (N=43; age range, 19-82y). People with BPI completed the 31-item 4-response BrAT twice, 2 weeks apart. Results for the 3 subscales and summed score were compared at time 1 and time 2 to determine reliability, including systematic differences using paired t tests, test retest using intraclass correlation coefficient model 1,1 (ICC 1,1 ), and internal consistency using Cronbach α. Agreement parameters included standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change, and limits of agreement. BrAT. Test-retest reliability was excellent (ICC 1,1 =.90-.97). Internal consistency was high (Cronbach α=.90-.98). Measurement error was relatively low (standard error of measurement range, 3.1-8.8). A change of >4 for subscale 1, >6 for subscale 2, >4 for subscale 3, and >10 for the summed score is indicative of change over and above measurement error. Limits of agreement ranged from ±4.4 (subscale 3) to 11.61 (summed score). These findings support the use of the BrAT as a reproducible patient-reported outcome measure for adults with traumatic BPI with evidence of appropriate reliability and agreement for both individual and group comparisons. Further psychometric testing is required to establish the construct validity and responsiveness of the BrAT. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Lisiane De Rosa; Gomes, Erissandra; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the occurrence of clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis, to compare the respiratory parameters during deglutition, and to ensure the intra- and inter- examiners agreement, as well as to accomplish intra and interexaminators concordance of the clinical evaluation of the deglutition. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 42 infants aged 0-12 months. The clinical evaluation was accompanied by measurements of respiratory rate and pulse oximetry. A score of swallowing disorders was designed to establish associations with other studied variables and to ensure the intra- and interrater agreement of clinical feeding assessments. Caregivers also completed a questionnaire about feeding difficulties. Significance was set at pdysphagia. PMID:25479843

  3. Dysphagia in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke: Early Dysphagia Screening May Reduce Stroke-Related Pneumonia and Improve Stroke Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaled, Mohamed; Matthis, Christine; Binder, Andreas; Mudter, Jonas; Schattschneider, Joern; Pulkowski, Ulrich; Strohmaier, Tim; Niehoff, Torsten; Zybur, Roland; Eggers, Juergen; Valdueza, Jose M; Royl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is associated with poor outcome in stroke patients. Studies investigating the association of dysphagia and early dysphagia screening (EDS) with outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) are rare. The aims of our study are to investigate the association of dysphagia and EDS within 24 h with stroke-related pneumonia and outcomes. Over a 4.5-year period (starting November 2007), all consecutive AIS patients from 15 hospitals in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, were prospectively evaluated. The primary outcomes were stroke-related pneumonia during hospitalization, mortality, and disability measured on the modified Rankin Scale ≥2-5, in which 2 indicates an independence/slight disability to 5 severe disability. Of 12,276 patients (mean age 73 ± 13; 49% women), 9,164 patients (74%) underwent dysphagia screening; of these patients, 55, 39, 4.7, and 1.5% of patients had been screened for dysphagia within 3, 3 to 72 h following admission. Patients who underwent dysphagia screening were likely to be older, more affected on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and to have higher rates of neurological symptoms and risk factors than patients who were not screened. A total of 3,083 patients (25.1%; 95% CI 24.4-25.8) had dysphagia. The frequency of dysphagia was higher in patients who had undergone dysphagia screening than in those who had not (30 vs. 11.1%; p dysphagia had a higher rate of pneumonia than those without dysphagia (29.7 vs. 3.7%; p dysphagia was associated with increased risk of stroke-related pneumonia (OR 3.4; 95% CI 2.8-4.2; p dysphagia was independently correlated with an increase in mortality (OR 3.2; 95% CI 2.4-4.2; p Dysphagia exposes stroke patients to a higher risk of pneumonia, disability, and death, whereas an EDS seems to be associated with reduced risk of stroke-related pneumonia and disability. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Family Involvement in School-Based Dysphagia Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Maureen E.; Bailey, Rita L.; Nicholson, Joanna K.; Stoner, Julia B.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a practitioner-friendly synthesis of existing literature on family involvement in the management of dysphagia for school-age. Research reviewed includes family perspectives on programs, therapists, and characteristics that comprise effective family involvement in school-based dysphagia management programs. Also included are…

  5. Therapeutic endoscopy for dysphagia and delayed gastric emptying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirdes, M.M.C.

    2012-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on the endoscopic treatment of benign and malignant dysphagia and delayed gastric emptying. Dysphagia due to a benign anastomotic stricture occurs in 40% of patients after esophagectomy and often requires ongoing endoscopic dilations. We evaluated whether corticosteroid

  6. Botulinum toxin alleviates dysphagia of patients with inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Aleksi; Airas, Laura; Jokela, Manu; Pulkkinen, Jaakko

    2017-09-15

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a disabling and undertreated symptom that often occurs in patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). In this study, we examined the effect of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) injections to the cricopharyngeus muscle (CPM) of patients with s-IBM and dysphagia. A single-center retrospective study involving 40 biopsy-proven s-IBM-patients treated in the District of Southwest Finland from 2000 to 2013. The incidence of dysphagia, rate of aspirations, rate of aspiration pneumonias and treatment results of dysphagia were analyzed. Patients treated for dysphagia were evaluated before and after surgery by video-fluoroscopy and/or using a questionnaire. Twenty-five of the 40 s-IBM patients (62.5%) experienced dysphagia. BoNT-A was injected a median of 2 times (range 1-7) in 12 patients with dysphagia. Before the injections 7 patients reported aspiration, none afterwards. The corresponding figures for aspiration pneumonia were 3 and 0. All of these patients had normal swallowing function 12months (median, range 2-60) after the last injection. BoNT-A injections to the CPM alleviate the dysphagia of s-IBM patients reversibly and appear to reduce the rate of aspiration effectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis and surgical treatment of persistent dysphagia after Nissen fundoplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, J. E.; Wijnhoven, B. P.; Masclee, A. A.; Smout, A. J.; Gooszen, H. G.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After Nissen fundoplication, troublesome dysphagia develops in 5-10 per cent of patients. The mechanism of dysphagia has not been fully resolved, in spite of a number of studies focusing on oesophageal motility and lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) dynamics. Tightness and length of the

  8. Dysphagia screening and intensified oral hygiene reduce pneumonia after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Terp; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Overgaard, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia occurs in approximately 51%-78% of patients with acute stroke. The incidence of pneumonia caused by aspiration in dysphagic patients increases both mortality and the need for hospitalization. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the incidence of aspiration pneumonia could...... be reduced in such patients by an early screening for dysphagia and intensified oral hygiene....

  9. High dose rate brachytherapy for the palliation of malignant dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homs, Marjolein Y.V.; Eijkenboom, Wilhelmina M.H.; Coen, Veronique L.M.A.; Haringsma, Jelle; Blankenstein, Mark van; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a commonly used palliative treatment for esophageal carcinoma. We evaluated the outcome of HDR brachytherapy in patients with malignant dysphagia. Material and methods: A retrospective analysis over a 10-year period was performed of 149 patients treated with HDR brachytherapy, administered in one or two sessions, at a median dose of 15 Gy. Patients were evaluated for functional outcome, complications, recurrent dysphagia, and survival. Results: At 6 weeks after HDR brachytherapy, dysphagia scores had improved from a median of 3 to 2 (n=104; P<0.001), however, dysphagia had not improved in 51 (49%) patients. Procedure-related complications occurred in seven (5%) patients. Late complications, including fistula formation or bleeding, occurred in 11 (7%) patients. Twelve (8%) patients experienced minor retrosternal pain. Median survival of the patients was 160 days with a 1-year survival rate of 15%. Procedure-related mortality was 2%. At follow-up, 55 (37%) patients experienced recurrent dysphagia. In 34 (23%) patients a metal stent was placed to relieve persistent or recurrent dysphagia. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy is a moderately effective treatment for the palliation of malignant dysphagia. The incidence of early major complications is low, however, persistent and recurrent dysphagia occur frequently, and require often additional treatment

  10. Challenges in oral drug delivery in patients with esophageal dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappelle, W.F.; Siersema, P.D.; Bogte, A.; Vleggaar, F.P.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Esophageal dysphagia is a commonly reported symptom with various benign and malignant causes. Esophageal dysphagia can impede intake of oral medication, which often poses a major challenge for both patients and physicians. The best way to address this challenge depends of the cause of

  11. Recovery from severe dysphagia in systemic sclerosis - myositis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dysphagia is common in inflammatory myopathies and usually responds to corticosteroids. Severe dysphagia requiring feeding by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is associated with significant morbidity and high mortality. Clinical case: A 56-year old African Black woman initially presented with systemic ...

  12. Risks associated with suspected dysphagia in infants admitted to a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The prevalence of neonatal dysphagia is increasing, as medical advances contribute to the survival of critically ill and preterm infants. Additional factors such as low birth weight (LBW), gastro-oesoephageal reflux disorder, failure-to-thrive (FTT), and HIV may increase the complexity of dysphagia symptoms.

  13. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bath, Philip M W; Scutt, Polly; Love, Jo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials. METHODS...

  14. Correlation between dose to the pharyngeal constrictors and patient quality of life and late dysphagia following chemo-IMRT for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhide, Shreerang A., E-mail: sabhide@yahoo.co [Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Gulliford, Sarah [Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Kazi, Rehan; El-Hariry, Iman; Newbold, Kate [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin J [Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Nutting, Christopher M [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Aim of this study was to correlate dose to pharyngeal constrictors (PC) with subjective and observer-based assessments of swallowing in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing concomitant chemo-IMRT. Materials and methods: Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for superior constrictor (SC), middle constrictor (MC) and inferior constrictor (IC) were generated for 37 patients. Mean doses to SC, MC and IC were correlated to objective dysphagia grade (1 year, RTOG scoring) and global, total physical (TP) and most relevant components of the physical section (P6, P8) of the MD Anderson dysphagia inventory (MDADI) which was evaluated post-treatment. Odds ratios of dysphagia (>grade 0), poor global (<3), TP (<32), P6 (<3) and P8 (<3) for patients with mean dose > 60 Gy to SC and IC were calculated. Results: There was no significant correlation between mean dose to PC and any of the analysed MDADI parameters and observer-assessed dysphagia grade. Odds ratio of dysphagia (>grade 0), poor global (<3), TP (<32), P6 (<3) and P8 (<3) for patients with mean dose > 60 Gy to IC and SC were not significantly higher than those for patients receiving <60 Gy. Conclusion: This study did not find a statistically significant correlation between radiation dose to the PC and observer-assessed dysphagia grade or patient-reported MDADI questionnaire at 1 year.

  15. Correlation between dose to the pharyngeal constrictors and patient quality of life and late dysphagia following chemo-IMRT for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhide, Shreerang A.; Gulliford, Sarah; Kazi, Rehan; El-Hariry, Iman; Newbold, Kate; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Aim of this study was to correlate dose to pharyngeal constrictors (PC) with subjective and observer-based assessments of swallowing in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing concomitant chemo-IMRT. Materials and methods: Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for superior constrictor (SC), middle constrictor (MC) and inferior constrictor (IC) were generated for 37 patients. Mean doses to SC, MC and IC were correlated to objective dysphagia grade (1 year, RTOG scoring) and global, total physical (TP) and most relevant components of the physical section (P6, P8) of the MD Anderson dysphagia inventory (MDADI) which was evaluated post-treatment. Odds ratios of dysphagia (>grade 0), poor global ( 60 Gy to SC and IC were calculated. Results: There was no significant correlation between mean dose to PC and any of the analysed MDADI parameters and observer-assessed dysphagia grade. Odds ratio of dysphagia (>grade 0), poor global ( 60 Gy to IC and SC were not significantly higher than those for patients receiving <60 Gy. Conclusion: This study did not find a statistically significant correlation between radiation dose to the PC and observer-assessed dysphagia grade or patient-reported MDADI questionnaire at 1 year.

  16. An online formative assessment tool to prepare students for summative assessment in physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Kerr

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. The didactic approach to teaching physiology in our university has traditionally included the delivery of lectures to large groups, illustrating concepts and referencing recommended textbooks. Importantly, at undergraduate level, our assessments demand a level of application of physiological mechanisms to recognised pathophysiological conditions. Objective. To bridge the gap between lectured material and the application of physiological concepts to pathophysiological conditions, we developed a technological tool approach that augments traditional teaching. Methods. Our e-learning initiative, eQuip, is a custom-built e-learning platform specifically created to align question types included in the program to be similar to those used in current assessments. We describe our formative e-learning system and present preliminary results after the first year of introduction, reporting on the performances and perceptions of 2nd-year physiology students. Results. Students who made use of eQuip for at least three of the teaching blocks achieved significantly better results than those who did not use the program (p=0.0032. Questionnaire feedback was positive with regard to the administration processes and usefulness of eQuip. Students reported particularly liking the ease of access to information; however, <60% of them felt that eQuip motivated them to learn. Conclusion. These results are consistent with the literature, which shows that students who made use of an online formative assessment tool performed better in summative assessment tasks. Despite the improved performance of students, the questionnaire results showed that student motives for using online learning tools indicated that they lack self-directed learning skills and seek easy access to information.

  17. Can patients determine the level of their dysphagia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Hafiz Hamad; Palmer, Joanne; Dalton, Harry Richard; Waters, Carolyn; Luff, Thomas; Strugnell, Madeline; Murray, Iain Alexander

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine if patients can localise dysphagia level determined endoscopically or radiologically and association of gender, age, level and pathology. METHODS Retrospective review of consecutive patients presenting to dysphagia hotline between March 2004 and March 2015 was carried out. Demographics, clinical history and investigation findings were recorded including patient perception of obstruction level (pharyngeal, mid sternal or low sternal) was documented and the actual level of obstruction found on endoscopic or radiological examination (if any) was noted. All patients with evidence of obstruction including oesophageal carcinoma, peptic stricture, Schatzki ring, oesophageal pouch and cricopharyngeal hypertrophy were included in the study who had given a perceived level of dysphagia. The upper GI endoscopy reports (barium study where upper GI endoscopy was not performed) were reviewed to confirm the distance of obstructing lesion from central incisors. A previously described anatomical classification of oesophagus was used to define the level of obstruction to be upper, middle or lower oesophagus and this was compared with patient perceived level. RESULTS Three thousand six hundred and sixty-eight patients were included, 42.0% of who were female, mean age 70.7 ± 12.8 years old. Of those with obstructing lesions, 726 gave a perceived level of dysphagia: 37.2% had oesophageal cancer, 36.0% peptic stricture, 13.1% pharyngeal pouches, 10.3% Schatzki rings and 3.3% achalasia. Twenty-seven point five percent of patients reported pharyngeal level (upper) dysphagia, 36.9% mid sternal dysphagia and 25.9% lower sternal dysphagia (9.5% reported multiple levels). The level of obstructing lesion seen on diagnostic testing was upper (17.2%), mid (19.4%) or lower (62.9%) or combined (0.3%). When patients localised their level of dysphagia to a single level, the kappa statistic was 0.245 (P dysphagia were accurate in localising the obstructing pathology. With respect to

  18. Can patients determine the level of their dysphagia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Hafiz Hamad; Palmer, Joanne; Dalton, Harry Richard; Waters, Carolyn; Luff, Thomas; Strugnell, Madeline; Murray, Iain Alexander

    2017-02-14

    To determine if patients can localise dysphagia level determined endoscopically or radiologically and association of gender, age, level and pathology. Retrospective review of consecutive patients presenting to dysphagia hotline between March 2004 and March 2015 was carried out. Demographics, clinical history and investigation findings were recorded including patient perception of obstruction level (pharyngeal, mid sternal or low sternal) was documented and the actual level of obstruction found on endoscopic or radiological examination (if any) was noted. All patients with evidence of obstruction including oesophageal carcinoma, peptic stricture, Schatzki ring, oesophageal pouch and cricopharyngeal hypertrophy were included in the study who had given a perceived level of dysphagia. The upper GI endoscopy reports (barium study where upper GI endoscopy was not performed) were reviewed to confirm the distance of obstructing lesion from central incisors. A previously described anatomical classification of oesophagus was used to define the level of obstruction to be upper, middle or lower oesophagus and this was compared with patient perceived level. Three thousand six hundred and sixty-eight patients were included, 42.0% of who were female, mean age 70.7 ± 12.8 years old. Of those with obstructing lesions, 726 gave a perceived level of dysphagia: 37.2% had oesophageal cancer, 36.0% peptic stricture, 13.1% pharyngeal pouches, 10.3% Schatzki rings and 3.3% achalasia. Twenty-seven point five percent of patients reported pharyngeal level (upper) dysphagia, 36.9% mid sternal dysphagia and 25.9% lower sternal dysphagia (9.5% reported multiple levels). The level of obstructing lesion seen on diagnostic testing was upper (17.2%), mid (19.4%) or lower (62.9%) or combined (0.3%). When patients localised their level of dysphagia to a single level, the kappa statistic was 0.245 ( P dysphagia were accurate in localising the obstructing pathology. With respect to pathology, patients

  19. A Valid and Reliable Tool to Assess Nursing Students` Clinical Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrnoosh Pazargadi; Tahereh Ashktorab; Sharareh Khosravi; Hamid Alavi majd

    2013-01-01

    Background: The necessity of a valid and reliable assessment tool is one of the most repeated issues in nursing students` clinical evaluation. But it is believed that present tools are not mostly valid and can not assess students` performance properly.Objectives: This study was conducted to design a valid and reliable assessment tool for evaluating nursing students` performance in clinical education.Methods: In this methodological study considering nursing students` performance definition; th...

  20. Dysphagia in the patient after stroke: consequences and nurse intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Frias

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to check the consequences of poststroke dysphagia and to reflect on the nurse’s intervention in dysphagia rehabilitation. Methodology: it was performed a systematic literature review of the topic in question; research based on international databases EBSCOhost, LILACS, SciELO.We were able to identify some studies publications between 2006 and 2014. We intend to answer the guiding question: What are the consequences of dysphagia in the patient after stroke? » Results vs. Discussion: after a thorough analysis, we have selected 11 articles and found that the most frequent consequences of dysphagia are the pulmonary complications by saliva and/or food suction. The nurse specialist still has a barely visible role, but his/her interventions are critical in these patients rehabilitation. Conclusions: rehabilitation is essential to avoid the consequences of poststroke dysphagia. The rehabilitation process must go through a multidisciplinary team of which nurses are an integral and essential part.

  1. New Tools and Methods for Assessing Risk-Management Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vendlinski, Terry P; Munro, Allen; Chung, Gregory K; De la Cruz, Girlie C; Pizzini, Quentin A; Bewley, William L; Stuart, Gale; Baker, Eva L

    2004-01-01

    .... The Decision Analysis Tool (DAT) allowed subjects to use Expected Value and Multi-attribute Utility Theories to evaluate the risks and benefits of various acquisition alternatives, and allowed us to monitor the process subjects used...

  2. Hamartoma of pyriform sinus presenting as dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Arunkumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A hamartoma is a benign, focal malformation that resembles a neoplasm in the tissue of its origin. This is not a malignant tumor, and it grows at the same rate as the surrounding tissues. We report a case of a 27-year-old male patient who presented with mild dysphagia and foreign body sensation in the throat of 1-year duration. On examination, there was a mucosal fold on the medial wall of pyriform sinus lateral to aryepiglottic fold that was acting like a sump where food particles used to get collected. Patient underwent microlaryngeal excision of the mucosal fold, and histopathological examination revealed features of hamartoma.

  3. Oral conditions and dysphagia in Japanese, community-dwelling middle- and older- aged adults, independent in daily living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inui A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Akinari Inui,1 Ippei Takahashi,2 Sizuka Kurauchi,2 Yuki Soma,2 Toshiaki Oyama,1 Yoshihiro Tamura,1 Takao Noguchi,1 Kouichi Murashita,3 Shigeyuki Nakaji,2 Wataru Kobayashi1 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2Department of Social Medicine, 3COI Research Initiatives Organization, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori Prefecture, Japan Purpose: Prevention, early detection and effective rehabilitation of dysphagia are important issues to be considered in an aging society. Previous studies have shown conflicting findings regarding the association between dysphagia and its potential risk factors, including age, malnutrition, oral conditions, lifestyle and medical history. Herein, we assessed the prevalence and association of dysphagia with potential risk factors in 50- to 79-year-old adults dwelling in a community in Japan. Patients and methods: In this study, there were 532 participants (185 males and 347 females. Participants who responded positively to the question “Do you sometimes choke on drinks/food such as tea and soup?” or those who presented with abnormal repetitive saliva swallowing test findings were diagnosed with dysphagia. The data collected from these participants included the following: number of teeth, occurrence of oral dryness, age, body mass index, serum albumin concentration, smoking, drinking and exercise habits, presence of diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and questions from the Mini–Mental State Examination. Results: Dysphagia was observed in 33 males (17.8% and 76 females (21.9%. To explore the effect of the potential risk factors on the prevalence of dysphagia, a model was built by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Using the forced entry method, oral dryness (odds ratio [OR] =3.683 and P=0.003 in males; OR =1.797 and P=0.032 in females and the number of teeth (OR =0.946 and P=0.038 in males were found to be significantly related to dysphagia

  4. Assessing the assessments: U.K. dermatology trainees' views of the workplace assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S N; Farrant, P B J; Taibjee, S M

    2009-07-01

    The workplace assessments, direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS), mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) and multisource feedback (MSF, formerly known as 360 degrees appraisal), are now mandatory during dermatology specialist training in the U.K. The opinions of those undergoing such assessments in any medical specialty have rarely been sought. To collate the experience and views of U.K. dermatology trainees on the three workplace assessments. A questionnaire was circulated in autumn 2006 to all U.K. dermatology specialist registrars (SpRs) registered as members of the British Association of Dermatologists (n = 269). A total of 138 responses were received (51%). Seventeen SpRs had not experienced any of the assessments; 92 had undergone MSF, 95 DOPS and 54 mini-CEX. The total experience of the respondents amounted to a minimum of 251 DOPS, 122 MSF and 142 mini-CEX. Trainees appreciated the formative aspects of the assessments, especially feedback and training opportunities, although not all trainees reported receiving useful feedback. MSF was praised for the insights that it provides. All of the assessments were found to be time-consuming and difficult to organize. DOPS and mini-CEX carried a degree of stress and artificiality. Concerns were raised over the possibility of victimization by MSF raters. Discussion of performance in the assessments was rarely prominent in trainees' annual summative reviews. Trainees appreciate the formative benefits which derive from the assessments, namely feedback, reassurance of satisfactory performance and, in the case of DOPS and mini-CEX, additional one-to-one training from consultants. Some problems came to light. The issues raised will not be unique to dermatology and other specialties should take note.

  5. Progression of Dysphagia in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isono, Chiharu; Hirano, Makito; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Ueno, Shuichi; Kusunoki, Susumu; Nakamura, Yusaku

    2017-06-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant triplet repeat disease, predominantly affects the cerebellum with a late onset and generally good prognosis. Dysphagia is commonly associated with the outcomes of neurodegenerative diseases such as SCA6. Although the characteristics of dysphagia have been rarely reported in SCA6, our previous study indicated that dysphagia is generally milder in SCA6 than in SCA3, another inherited ataxia with multisystem involvement. However, abnormalities in the pharyngeal phase in SCA6 were indistinguishable from those in SCA3, with no explainable reason. To determine the reason, we repeatedly performed videofluoroscopic examinations (VF) in 14 patients with SCA6. The results showed that the gross progression of dysphagia was apparently slow, but four patients had progressive dysphagia at an early disease stage; dysphagia began within 10 years from the onset of ataxia and rapidly progressed. A common clinical feature of the four patients was a significantly older age at the onset of ataxia (74.0 vs. 60.3 years), associated with significantly shorter triplet repeats. This finding surprisingly indicated that patients who had shorter repeats and thereby later onset and potentially better prognoses were at risk for dysphagia-associated problems. Ischemic changes, homozygous mutation, and diabetes mellitus as well as aging might have contributed to the observed progressive dysphagia. We found that conventionally monitored somatosensory evoked potentials at least partly reflected progressive dysphagia. Despite the small study group, our findings suggest that clinicians should carefully monitor dysphagia in patients with SCA6 who are older at disease onset (>60 years).

  6. Transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation (VitalStim) curative therapy for severe dysphagia: myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Gary Y; Sechtem, Phillip R; Searl, Jeff; Keller, Kristina; Rawi, Taib A; Dowdy, Emily

    2007-01-01

    VitalStim therapy was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2001 for the treatment of dysphagia through the application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation to cervical swallowing muscles. This approval was based upon submission of data on more than 800 patients who received this therapy collected by the principal developer and patent-holder of the device. The therapy is marketed as successful in restoring long-term swallowing function in 97.5% of dysphagic patients past the point of requiring a feeding tube and as significantly better than existing therapies. More than 2,500 speech-language pathologists have taken the certification course, and thousands of devices have been sold. To date, however, aside from the developer's own studies, there are no peer-reviewed publications supporting these claims. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of VitalStim therapy in a heterogeneous group of dysphagic patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of 18 patients who received this therapy at an urban tertiary referral center. All patients underwent pretherapy evaluation by speech-language pathologists, including modified barium swallow and/or functional endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and clinical evaluation of swallowing that included assessment of laryngeal elevation, diet tolerance, and swallowing delay, and were then assigned an overall dysphagia severity score. After therapy, all patients underwent the same assessments. Twelve of the 18 also underwent a functional swallowing telephone survey months (range, 1 to 21 months) after their therapy to assess whether the improvement was worthwhile and sustained. Eleven of the 18 patients (61%) demonstrated some improvement in their swallowing. Six of the 18 patients (33%) were improved enough to no longer require a feeding tube. However, of the 5 patients categorized as having "severe dysphagia" before therapy, only 2 showed any improvement, and these patients still required a feeding tube for

  7. Characteristics of Dysphagia in Infants with Microcephaly Caused by Congenital Zika Virus Infection, Brazil, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Vanessa; Bezerra, Thiago P.; de Valois, Luciana; Borges, Adriana C.G.; Antunes, Margarida M.C.; Brandt, Kátia G.; Moura, Catharina X.; Rodrigues, Laura C.; Ximenes, Coeli R.

    2017-01-01

    We summarize the characteristics of dysphagia in 9 infants in Brazil with microcephaly caused by congenital Zika virus infection. The Schedule for Oral Motor Assessment, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, and the videofluoroscopic swallowing study were used as noninstrumental and instrumental assessments. All infants had a degree of neurologic damage and showed abnormalities in the oral phase. Of the 9 infants, 8 lacked oral and upper respiratory tract sensitivity, leading to delays in initiation of the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. Those delays, combined with marked oral dysfunction, increased the risk for aspiration of food, particularly liquid foods. Dysphagia resulting from congenital Zika virus syndrome microcephaly can develop in infants >3 months of age and is severe. PMID:28604336

  8. Characteristics of Dysphagia in Infants with Microcephaly Caused by Congenital Zika Virus Infection, Brazil, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Mariana C; van der Linden, Vanessa; Bezerra, Thiago P; de Valois, Luciana; Borges, Adriana C G; Antunes, Margarida M C; Brandt, Kátia G; Moura, Catharina X; Rodrigues, Laura C; Ximenes, Coeli R

    2017-08-01

    We summarize the characteristics of dysphagia in 9 infants in Brazil with microcephaly caused by congenital Zika virus infection. The Schedule for Oral Motor Assessment, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, and the videofluoroscopic swallowing study were used as noninstrumental and instrumental assessments. All infants had a degree of neurologic damage and showed abnormalities in the oral phase. Of the 9 infants, 8 lacked oral and upper respiratory tract sensitivity, leading to delays in initiation of the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. Those delays, combined with marked oral dysfunction, increased the risk for aspiration of food, particularly liquid foods. Dysphagia resulting from congenital Zika virus syndrome microcephaly can develop in infants >3 months of age and is severe.

  9. Improving Major Depressive Episode Assessment: A New Tool Developed by Formal Psychological Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Francesca; Spoto, Andrea; Ghisi, Marta; Vidotto, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Major depressive episode (MDE) can manifest with different features. Discriminating between different types of MDEs is crucial for proper treatment. The aim of this study is to propose a new tool for MDE assessment in bipolar disorder (BD) or major depressive disorder (MDD) to overcome some limitations of current rating scales. The proposed tool investigates all of the clinical features of different MDEs and gives qualitative information, differentiating patients with the same score but different symptoms and psychopathology severity. To achieve this purpose authors used a new methodology called Formal Psychological Assessment (FPA). FPA allows creating relations between the items of an assessment tool, and the set of diagnostic criteria of a given clinical disorder. In the application at hand, given the capability to analyze all clinical features, FPA appears a useful way to highlight and differenti